00030 How to Bareboat Charter Your Yacht - Maritime Law Center

00030 How to Bareboat Charter Your Yacht - Maritime Law Center

Volume V Maritime Handbook Series Michael E. Vaughn Copyright 2014 HOW TO BARE BOAT CHARTER YOUR YACHT TABLE OF CONTENTS CHARTERING YOUR YACHT ...

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Volume V Maritime Handbook Series Michael E. Vaughn Copyright 2014

HOW TO BARE BOAT CHARTER YOUR YACHT TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHARTERING YOUR YACHT ................................................................................................ 1 BAREBOAT OR DEMISED CHARTERS.......................................................................... 1 TIME OR VOYAGE CHARTERS ................................................................................... 2 UNINSPECTED PASSENGER VESSELS - 6-PAC CHARTERS .......................................... 3 INSPECTED VESSELS ............................................................................................... 4 THE BUSINESS OF BARE BOAT CHARTERS ........................................................................ 4 IMPORTANT ISSUES TO CONSIDER .......................................................................... 4 INSURANCE ............................................................................................................ 5 SEAWORTHINESS.................................................................................................... 5 TO WHOM DO YOU CHARTER? ................................................................................ 6 LIMITATIONS OF OPERATION.................................................................................. 7 PREPARING YOUR VESSEL FOR CHARTER ................................................................ 9 THE CHARTER AGREEMENT ..................................................................................... 9 DETERMINING CHARTER RATE .............................................................................. 10 CONCLUSIONS ............................................................................................................... 12

Form - Demise Charter Agreement (Bare Boat Charter) – 5 pages

HOW TO BARE BOAT CHARTER YOUR YACHT CHARTERING YOUR YACHT The investment in a private yacht and the costs of maintenance, insurance, taxes and slip fees may be offset by chartering the vessel. This can be a profitable and rewarding experience if properly done. The use of boats and ships to carry passengers is very heavily regulated by the Passenger Vessel Act and the Jones Act. Unless you comply with all of the rules and regulations, you may be charged with a violation of law and be subject to fines and seizure of your vessel. Vessel charters are a very commonplace method of vessel management and operation. There are two basic types of charters: (1) Bareboat or Demised, and (2) Time and Voyage.

BAREBOAT OR DEMISED CHARTERS A bareboat or demised charter is one in which the Charterer (the person chartering the vessel) takes over full operation and management of the vessel for the period of the charter. Under the terms of a typical bareboat charter, the Charterer must maintain the vessel, choose and pay crew, pay for all expenses of the ship including fuel, food and insurance. The deciding issue in the determination of whether a charter is bareboat or not is the question: Did the owner relinquish possession, command and navigation of the vessel? The importance of the bareboat charter is essential to foreign-built yachts or non-licensed U.S. yachts. The Coast Guard considers true bareboat charters as non-commercial use. This means that a yacht or foreign vessel under a bareboat charter in U.S. waters cannot carry passengers for hire or engage in coastwise trade. Be aware that the Coast Guard has even ruled that an organization that bareboat charters a vessel for its members and then charges its members individually for the trip are in fact engaged in a “passenger for hire” operation and are in violation of the statute If the owner skippers the ship or selects the skipper, it is not a true bareboat charter but a “passenger for hire” operation. Any violation may subject the vessel to forfeiture and seizure. In the commercial operation, the bareboat charter is a very common and practical way to lease a vessel that is properly documented and licensed.

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A bareboat charter agreement must accomplish a number of important things. Even though there is no requirement that the agreement be in writing, good business practice requires it. Although oral agreements are enforceable, the legal problem that arises is the difficulty in proving exactly what the terms of the agreement were. A written document, whether drafted by an attorney or handwritten by the parties, is evidence of what was agreed to by the parties to the charter. A charter needs to cover basic points. There are standard agreements for major shipping bareboat charters; the difficulty arises in smaller ships doing non-standard jobs. The charter should identify the parties and the vessel. Usually, it is important to limit the area or navigable limits, the time for delivery and return and location. The amount of the charter and how it is to be paid is very important. Under the terms of a bareboat charter, the Charterer is responsible for the care and maintenance of the vessel, so it is very important to have the vessel surveyed prior to acceptance by the Charterer and then to re-survey at the end of the charter. This will determine if the vessel has been maintained, less ordinary wear and tear. Ordinarily, the owner will want to control the crewing and types of operation. There is no limit to the terms as long as the parties agree. The owner may set certain standards of experience or license but the selection of the captain and crew must be at the option of the Charterer. It is important to have a provision asserting that the Charterer is a U.S. Citizen and that he will maintain his citizenship during the course of the charter. A U.S. flag cannot be chartered by a non-citizen.1

TIME OR VOYAGE CHARTERS Time or Voyage charters differ from bareboat charters in the sense that the use of the vessel is leased and not the vessel itself. A good example is the difference between renting a car from Avis or Hertz Auto Rentals which would be comparable to a bareboat charter and taking a taxi—a time charter would be if you hired a cab for the day; and a voyage charter would be if you took the taxi from one location to another. Under either of these types of charters, the owners maintain control and responsibility for the vessel’s operation. The Charterer remains responsible for loading and discharging cargo. Unless otherwise agreed, a time Charterer has no responsibility for the vessel, no control over it or its crew, and is not liable for the negligence of the crew’s operation or the unseaworthiness of the vessel. 146 USC

Sec.808

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If a time charter or voyage charter extends beyond the time set forth in the charter contracts, the parties usually agree upon a daily rate for the vessel. This is called demurrage. This may become a very expensive part of the charter if problems arise that delay cargo arrival, handling or discharge.

UNINSPECTED PASSENGER VESSELS - 6-PAC CHARTERS A vessel that carries fewer than 6 passengers and is under 100 tons does not need to be inspected and licensed by the U.S. Coast Guard as a passenger for hire vessel. A vessel more than 100 tons and less than 300 tons and carrying 12 or fewer passengers does not need to be inspected and licensed by the U.S. Coast Guard. However the vessel operator must have an OPUV (6-pac) or (12 pac) operator’s license, issued by the United States Coast Guard. The requirements for this license are as follows: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Age 18 or over 360 days underway experience 90 of those days in the last 3 years Physical, drug test and eye exam Valid CPR First Aid card Completion of USCG Exam or USCG approved course

The vessel must be equipped with the following: 1. 2. 3. 4.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Personal Flotation Devices for each person on board One throwable IV device Whistle and bell Fire Extinguishers  At least two approved B-I or at least one approved B-II type up to 12M  At least three approved B-I type or at least one approved B-I type plus one approved B-II type to 20M Visual Distress Signals for both daytime and nighttime use. 3x for day & 3x for night Proper ventilation for ventilating closed compartment containing gasoline engine Back-Fire flame arrestor for gasoline engine Navigation Lights Copy Navigation Rules Pollution Discharge Placard Marine Sanitation Devices Type I, II, or III. All undocumented vessels must be registered in the State of principal use.

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The critical element in the 6-pac charter is that no more than 6 passengers are permitted. Violation of that rule may result in substantial penalties. It is important to note that under recent court rulings, the vessel may be subject to OSHA rules and regulations, which may be more difficult to comply with than Coast Guard.

INSPECTED VESSELS All other vessels must undergo substantial Coast Guard inspection as to construction, manning and operation to obtain a Certificate of Inspection that permits the carrying of passengers up to a number specified by Coast Guard. In addition the vessel must comply with the Jones Act requirement of being built in the United States, owned by a U.S. citizen and having never been owned or flagged by a foreign owner.

THE BUSINESS OF BARE BOAT CHARTERS Once you have decided to charter your vessel there are a number of things you must do to insure that it is ready for charter:

IMPORTANT ISSUES TO CONSIDER FIRST determine the tonnage of your vessel and how you will fit into the scheme of inspection for whether you may operate outside of the inspection requirements. 1.

Where was the boat built? Both foreign and U.S.-built recreational boats may be bareboat chartered. A recreational boat is one manufactured or operated primarily for pleasure or chartered to another for the latter’s pleasure.

2.

What is the tonnage of the boat? Your certificate of documentation will show the Gross Tonnage of the vessel. Your boat must be at least 5 net tons to be documented by the US Coast Guard.

3.

Why is tonnage so important? If your tonnage is less than 100 tons, you are limited to six (6) passengers. However if your boat is more than 100 tons, you are limited to twelve (12) passengers.

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4.

How do you determine who is a passenger? Everyone on board is a passenger except: a.

The Charterer or the Charterer’s representative. Regardless of how many people charter the boat, only one is counted as a “non-passenger”.

b.

The Captain or Master;

c.

A member of the crew engaged in the operation of the vessel whom is paid for his on-board services.

d.

THE OWNER MAY NOT BE ON BOARD DURING THE CHARTER!

INSURANCE Most if not all Yacht Insurance Policies become void if you charter your vessel. You must obtain insurance that protects you from damage or loss of the vessel and liability from suit. The risks a Charterer is exposed to range from the sinking or destroying of the boat to injuring himself or his guests or other parties. Maritime Law has been very consistent that once a seaworthy vessel is under charter, the Charterer will be responsible for all damage and injury that he may cause. This does not mean that you will not be sued or that the vessel itself may not become subject of a lawsuit. Under Admiralty Law an “In Rem” action (meaning against the vessel itself) may be maintained to enforce payment of a claim. It is essential that you have sufficient insurance coverage that protects both you and the Charterer against claims.

SEAWORTHINESS Prior to the first charter the vessel should be inventoried and surveyed by a licensed surveyor. This survey report will set a base line for the condition of the vessel at the start of the charter. The vessel should be equipped with a minimum of the following safety equipment: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Personal Flotation Devices for each person on board One throwable IV device Whistle and bell Fire Extinguishers

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5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

At least two approved B-I or at least one approved B-II type up to 12M  At least three approved B-I type or at least one approved B-I type plus one approved B-II type to 20M Visual Distress Signals for both daytime and nighttime use. 3x for day & 3x for night Proper ventilation for ventilating closed compartment containing gasoline engine. Back-Fire flame arrestor for gasoline engine Navigation Lights Copy Navigation Rules Pollution Discharge Placard Marine Sanitation Devices Type I, II, or III. VHF Radio Radar (if the vessel is to be operated at night or in foggy conditions) Coastal EPIRB Adequate anchor and ground tackle Current Charters of the voyaging area.

You and your surveyor should perform and record a sea trial of the vessel, demonstrating the good working condition of all the equipment on the vessel.

TO WHOM DO YOU CHARTER There are two basic ways to charter your boat. First, you may contract with a local charter broker who will advertise your vessel and seek clients for you, or you may do all of it yourself. A charter broker will inspect your boat and make recommendations as to things you may do to improve the value of it as a charter boat. The broker will also have certain guidelines as to experience and knowledge that he will require of the prospective Charterer. As a condition of the charter, you may require that the Charterer retain a licensed captain to run the boat. This is highly recommended to insure that the vessel is safely operated. You may require a captain, but the captain must be of the Charterer’s choosing. If you require that he hire a captain that you recommend or approve, you no longer have a true Bareboat charter and may be in violation of the law. Ordinarily, a charter broker maintains a list of potential captains in whom he has confidence. He will recommend a list to the Charterer and allow him to make an independent choice. The Charterer cannot be required to choose from a list you or the broker present. If you choose not to use a broker or charter service, you may advertise your vessel charter directly to the public. It is very important to scrutinize the Charterer and determine if he has the ability and skill to operate your boat.

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You may review and scrutinize his choice of captain. You are not required to charter the vessel to an unqualified captain. You should also decide, based on the size and value of the vessel, if a licensed captain is required or does the Charterer just need basic boating knowledge and experience. The Charterer may provide his own insurance or you may require that he obtain insurance from a company of which you approve. Either way, the policy must be in affect and you, as the owner, should be named as an additionally insured party. Be certain that it is a vessel marine policy that protects the vessel from loss or damage and protects you and the vessel from liability.

LIMITATIONS OF OPERATION You have a right and interest in limiting the scope of the charter. Legally the Charterer must have the right to operate the vessel, but as a contractual condition you want to limit the following issues: 1.

Navigational Limitation. The vessel should only be operated in U.S. waters or near coastal not more than 20 miles off shore. You may set whatever reasonable limits you and the charterer may agree on.

2.

No Passengers for Hire. Be explicit that the Charterer may not charge other people to go on the vessel. This issue arises when a group or club charters a boat for use of the members and then charges the members individually. This becomes a “passenger for hire” operation and could result in fines and penalties to you. Following the enactment of the Passenger Vessel Safety Act, the Coast Guard issued Navigation and Vessel Inspection Circular No. 7-94 (NVIC 7-94), a document intended to interpret the legislation and provide an overview of Coast Guard policy regarding the new law (the document is available online at uscg.mil/hq/cg5/nvic/pdf/1994/n7-94.pdf). NVIC 7-94 explains that, even where no crew is provided by the owner, any vessel that carries more than 12 passengers is now subject to Coast Guard inspection and all of the other regulations that govern a vessel that carries passengers for hire. Speed Limitations. If your vessel is a particularly powerful vessel, you may want to limit the speeds at which the vessel can be safely operated.

3.

4.

Number of Persons on Board. Be certain to set a limit of the number of people that can safely be aboard the vessel. A life jacket should be available to each person on board the vessel at all times.

5.

Miscellaneous Issues: Do not leave anything to question. If you have any restrictions that reasonably should apply, put it in writing before the charter starts.

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Once the Charterer takes possession of the vessel you will not be able to make any changes to your agreement. Do not leave anything to doubt. If you think no one is stupid enough to do something, discuss it with your Charterer. He may be that one person.

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PREPARING YOUR VESSEL FOR CHARTER Prior to chartering your boat, make sure it is in good working order. Service the main engines if a power boat. Make sure the generators are fully operational and recently serviced. There is not greater headache on a trip than not to have electricity or propulsion. If it is a sailboat, inspect all of the sails and rigging to make sure they are ready to go. Check and service all heads and holding tanks. Make sure all pumps are working for sewage disposal and fresh water. Be certain there is an inventory of equipment, spare parts and toys on the boat indicating where they are located. Keep all service manuals and repair and replacement information in a file accessible to the captain or the Charterer. Check the radios and navigation equipment to insure they are in good working order. Generally, the Charterer will pay for all fuel used during the charter. You should fill all of the fuel tanks and demonstrate that they are full to the Charterer. He will be charged to refill the tank on return. Fill freshwater tanks and service any water maker on board. Be certain that the boat is clean and decks clear of any tripping hazard. Also make sure any head-banging hazards are cushioned in some way and the Charterer is warned. Enter all of the maintenance in the ship log, along with an indication that the vessel is seaworthy and ready for charter. Do this before each charter.

THE CHARTER AGREEMENT The charter agreement is the document that will control all of the rights, liabilities and duties between you as the vessel owner and the Charterer. It is important that the document covers all aspects of the agreement. The example attached as Form 1 is a basic charter document. There are many, many variables that may arise. Principally, are you chartering for one day, one weekend or one year? This issue alone may change how you adjust the expenses for maintenance and repairs and hours used on the engines. After you have reviewed the information contained in this booklet and the forms attached, you should discuss it with your attorney or accountant. There are a number of legal terms, which may appear in this form and other charter agreements that you should understand.

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1.

Charter – Means the lease, rental or use of a vessel.

2.

Charterer – Is the person chartering the vessel.

3.

Charter Party – Is a maritime term for the written charter agreement. I prefer the terms charter agreement.

4.

Charter Hire – Is another maritime term referring to the amount or rate paid to charter the vessel. I use the term charter payment or rental payment.

5.

Demise Charter – This term is interchangeable with Bare Boat Charter. It means that the Charterer takes over full control of the vessel.

Regardless of which form you use, the Charter Agreement must cover these issues: 1.

The legal vessel owner and Charterer must be fully identified. If either is a corporation, the person signing on behalf of the corporation must be authorized by the corporation to execute the document. If the Charterer is a corporation, you should satisfy yourself that the corporation is either properly insured or has assets sufficient to protect you from any loss.

2.

The vessel should be described by name, documentation or registration number, as well as length, draft and beam.

3.

Navigation limits should be determined.

4.

The date that the charter starts and ends must be explicit. Also, you should determine at which port and dock it will start and end. Redelivery can be anywhere you agree. Also, if you provide for renewal of the charter, you must set the time and place for renewal to be given.

5.

Charter Rate must be explicit. The rate may be hourly, daily, weekly, monthly or yearly.

DETERMINING CHARTER RATE There is no hard and fast rule about the value of a vessel in charter. It will always be determined by the market in which the vessel operates. To determine a fair charter rate, find out the rates charged by other vessels doing similar charters in the area. Adjust those rates if your vessel is newer or older, faster or slower, larger or smaller.

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You should also consider what you paid for the boat and monthly slip, insurance and maintenance costs. If you paid $200,000 for your boat at 9% interest, your monthly payment will be about $2500.00 per month. Maintenance, insurance and slip fees will run about $3,000.00 per month, which will place the daily bare costs of the boat at approximately $200.00 per day. If you take your annual costs of approximately $60,000.00 and divide it by the number of charter days you expect, you will have a rough idea of what the rate should be. If you can charter the vessel for 40 days per year at $1,500.00 per day, you will break even. The alternative may be if you charter 2 days per week for 50 weeks a year, you need only charge $600.00 per day to break even. Make a realistic determination of how many charter days you can reasonably expect to sell. Decide if your rate and the work involved are worth the time. In the charter agreement you will set a rate that will be binding on you and the Charterer. 1.

Type of Charter. You must be explicit in the charter that this is a demise, bare boat charter and that the Charterer has full and exclusive use of the vessel.

2.

Surveys. Depending on the type of charter, it is customary to have an “On hire and Off hire” survey. This allows an independent surveyor to determine the condition of the vessel when the Charterer takes it and when he returns it. The Charterer is ordinarily responsible for any damage to the vessel, less ordinary wear and tear.

3.

Warranties. As an owner, you generally want to disclaim any warranty of seaworthiness and the Charterer takes the vessel as is.

4.

Crew & Manning. Under the terms of a demise charter, the owner may not specify a particular captain or crew. You may put requirements on their qualifications and abilities.

5.

Maintenance. On short-term charters, maintenance is not generally a problem. However, if the vessel is to be operated for many months, the owner may specify which maintenance he will have done and which the Charterer must do.

6.

Insurance. As discussed previously, insurance is very important. Specify exactly the type of insurance required for the Charterer to maintain and be certain that you are named as an additionally insured on the policy.

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7.

Mechanical Breakdown. Generally, the owner will be expected to provide a fully operational vessel. Except in long term charters where the Charterer is responsible for repairs and maintenance, you will have to repair mechanical equipment that fails during the charter. You should also determine what compensation is given to the Charterer for the repair period when the vessel is out of use.

8.

Substitution. If you charter several boats, it is a good idea to provide for the right to substitute a comparable vessel in case of a mechanical failure.

9.

Citizenship. Because a U.S. Documented vessel may not be chartered to a non-citizen, you want an affirmative statement from the Charterer that he is in fact a citizen.

10.

Miscellaneous. Additional provision should provide for the right of the owner to recover the vessel in case of default by the Charterer or violation of the terms of the charter. It is also important to choose a jurisdiction to arbitrate any dispute and for payment of attorney fees for the prevailing party.

CONCLUSIONS Before starting your charter business, talk to other people who have experience in chartering in your area. They can be a good source of advice on the opportunities available as well as some of the problems. Best of luck and happy chartering.

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DEMISE CHARTER AGREEMENT Bare Boat Charter This Charter Agreement entered into on this, the _____ day of _____________, 20_____, between ________________________________ hereinafter referred to as the Owner and ____________________________ or their assignees hereinafter referred to as the Charterer. WITNESSETH: Whereas the Owner is the registered owner of a vessel described as: Vessel Name: GRT/NRT: Class: Horsepower: Capacity: Design speed: Proposed route: Period of Hire: Port of Delivery: Vessel Limitations:

Persons on board are limited by the tonnage of this vessel. No more than 12 passengers may be guests on board while underway or moored, excluding the Charterer, the Master and crew members.

And Whereas the Charterer wishes to charter said vessel; NOW, THEREFORE, in consideration of the premises and covenants herein contained, the parties hereto mutually agree as follows: 1.

The charter shall begin at 12:01 A.M. on ___________________ and terminate at 11:59 P.M. on _____________________.

2.

The charter shall be for a total period of _____________ months.

3.

The vessel shall be delivered to Charterer in the same condition as when inspected and accepted by Charterer. Owner reserves the right to have vessel surveyed as to equipment and condition and Charterer reserves the right to have vessel surveyed upon termination and redelivery to Owner at the conclusion of said charter. Said vessel shall be delivered to Charterer at the port of __________________ and redelivered to Owner at the port of _________________________ in the same condition as when chartered excepting ordinary wear and tear.

DEMISE CHARTER AGREEMENT

PAGE 1 of 5

4.

The compensation for said charter shall be as follows: CHARTER RATE: The charter rate shall be __________________________ per day, quoted in the lawful currency of the United States of America. SECURITY DEPOSIT: ______________________________. DATE OF LAST CHARTER PAYMENT: ________________. Said compensation shall be paid as follows: Payment shall be in cash, certified check or electronic bank wire transfer to _____________________________________________________.

5.

This is a demised charter and Charterer reserves to operate said vessel lawfully and in a safe and seaworthy manner. Charterer shall conform to all laws and regulations. Charterer agrees to indemnify, protect, defend and hold harmless the Owner, the vessel, its registered owner, its master and crew, and their respective underwriters from and against the results of any breach by chartered of the obligations or any other obligations imposed by law upon the Charterer. Charterer shall maintain the vessel in good repair and maintain all classification, certificates or certificates of inspection in full force and effect during the entire course of the charter. a)

During the course of the charter, Charterer shall maintain in full force and effect insurance in the amount of $_________________ USD naming the Owner as loss payee protecting the vessel for loss or damage for hull and machinery. In addition Charterer shall maintain a policy or policies of insurance providing for pollution, liability, crew and employee injury. Each policy shall name the Owner as an additional insured.

6.

Charterer shall provide and pay for the master and crew of the vessel. The Charterer shall select and direct said master and crew. The duties of the crew shall be directed and controlled solely by the Charterer. The master of the vessel shall serve at the discretion of the Charterer. Charterer shall review and evaluate each licensed officer as to his ability and skill in the position employed, and assure Owner as to the qualifications of the chief engineering staff.

7.

Neither the Owner, its officers, directors, employees, the vessel, her owner, operators, nor the underwriters of any of the foregoing shall have any responsibility or liability for any claim involving damage to or loss of any cargo or equipment carried by the vessel; or for any injury, illness, disease or death of employees of Charterer, its subcontractors, or their employees or agents; and Charterer shall defend indemnify and hold harmless Owner its officers, directors, employees, the vessel, its owner, operators, master, and crew and the underwriters of each of the foregoing from and against any such claim, whether groundless or not, and whether caused in whole or in part by the negligence or faults of indemnities or by unseaworthiness of the vessel or equipment of Owner, Owner's property and Owner's sub-contractors' property.

8.

Neither Owner nor Charterer shall be responsible hereunder for prospective profits or for special, indirect or consequential damages.

DEMISE CHARTER AGREEMENT

PAGE 2 of 5

9.

Neither the Owner nor the Charterer shall not create, incur, or permit any liens to be imposed upon any vessel chartered under this agreement.

10.

Charterer may not assign this agreement without notice to the Owner and without his written agreement.

11.

Charterer shall keep the Owner advised of the usual berth for the vessel or on voyage of the itinerary of the vessel. Failure to keep the Owner informed of the location of the vessel shall be considered to be a breach of Charterer's agreement. Notices to the Owner shall be sent to: ______________________________________________________________ Notices to the Charterer shall be sent to: ______________________________________________________________ Notices so sent shall be deemed received three (3) days after mailing.

12.

This agreement shall be construed in accordance with the admiralty and maritime laws of the United States of America and the State of ______________________.

13.

Navigational Limitations.

DEFAULT 14.

The Charterer may be declared in default of this charter agreement is any one of the following events occurs: a)

Failure to make charter payments upon the date due.

b)

Having failed to make time payment and upon notice by the Owner having failed to correct the default within fifteen (15) days.

c)

Failing to permit inspection of the vessel by Owner or Owner’s representative and upon written notice by Owner allowing or permitting said failure to permit inspection to continue for more than five (5) days.

d)

Failing to maintain continuous insurance coverage of the vessel in the amount agreed upon and naming Owner as loss payee.

e)

Operating the vessel contrary to the criminal law of any nation or state in which the vessel operates.

f)

Failing to maintain the vessel and its equipment in a seaworthy and seaman like condition. Said determination of maintenance shall be determined by annual survey. Charterer will have 30 days from the completion of the annual survey to make any repairs so designated by the surveyor.

DEMISE CHARTER AGREEMENT

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g)

15.

Commission of any act of bankruptcy or approval by any court of a petition or request for reorganization, arrangement, extension or other relief under any bankruptcy law; or by appointment of a receiver.

Then in case of said default, Owner may: a)

Declare the charter terminated.

b)

Recover judgment for and collect out of any property Charterer may own any amount due and collect all earned charter hire and freight moneys relating to services performed by the vessel.

16.

The Charterer shall have the right to make improvements to the vessel as per Owner’s prior agreement and approval that shall not unreasonably be withheld. The Charterer shall pay for all such improvements.

17.

The purchase option provided for in paragraph 14 shall be governed by the terms and conditions contained in the Agreement to Purchase attached here to as Exhibit 1 and incorporated herein by reference as if fully set forth.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties have caused this agreement to be executed by their duly authorized representative, in duplicate originals, on the day and year first written above.

Dated: ______________________

Dated:______________________

By: _____________________________

By: _____________________________

DEMISE CHARTER AGREEMENT

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CORPORATE RESOLUTION It is hereby resolved by the officers and board of directors of the undersigned corporation, the meeting having been duly called and all objections to notice and place having been waived, that ____________________________, acting as President of _________________________ is hereby authorized to sell, convey and deliver all rights, title or interest, whatsoever, that this corporation has, claims or may in the future acquire to the persons or corporation appearing on the attached Bill of Sale. ____________________________ is hereby authorized to execute the Bill of Sale and any other documents necessary for said transaction on behalf of the corporation with our full consent and authority.

Dated this, the _______ day of _____________________, 20_____.

President

Chairman of the Board of Directors

CORPORATE RESOLUTION It is hereby resolved by the officers and board of directors of the undersigned corporation, the meeting having been duly called and all objections to notice and place having been waived, that ______________________________, acting as President of ________________________, Inc., is hereby authorized to sell, convey and deliver all rights, title or interest, whatsoever, that this corporation has, claims or may in the future acquire to the persons or corporation appearing on the attached Bill of Sale. ___________________________ is hereby authorized to execute the Bill of Sale and any other documents necessary for said transaction on behalf of the corporation with our full consent and authority.

Dated this, the ______day of _____________________, 20______.

President

DEMISE CHARTER AGREEMENT

Chairman of the Board of Directors

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