11099 CarActFile - body - Oklahoma Career Tech

11099 CarActFile - body - Oklahoma Career Tech

Career Activity File K-12 School-Based Enterprise Acknowledgments Special thanks to: • Washington Elementary School, Ponca City School District, fo...

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Acknowledgments

Special thanks to: • Washington Elementary School, Ponca City School District, for sharing the “Greeting Card Manufacturing Company.” • Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education, Marketing Education Division, for sharing “School-Based Enterprises: How to Manage and Operate Your School Store” Grade Level 11-12 — DE 1020. Contact: ODCTE Customer Service at 800-654-4502. • ERIC Clearinghouse, Adult, Career, and Vocational Education, “Entrepreneurship Success Stories: Implications for Teaching and Learning.” (http://ericacve.org/ docgen.asp?tbl=pab&ID=93). • Tony Goetz Elementary, Muskogee, school staff and principal, Pam Bradley, for sharing the elementary JEPES program.

“We cannot always build the future for our youth, but we can build our youth for the future.” Franklin D. Roosevelt i

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Table of Contents Introduction Letter .................................................................................Inside Front Cover Acknowledgments ................................................................................................................. i School-Based Enterprise (SBE): Introduction................................................................... 1 Integration ............................................................................................................. 2-4 Ideas for SBE ............................................................................................................ 5 All Aspects of Industry ............................................................................................. 6 Resource Center and Bibliography of SBE ........................................................... 7-8 Board and Internet Games .................................................................................. 9-10 Teacher Resources, Internet Sites, and Business Plan Competitions ............ 11-14 Career Poster and Poetry Contest ............................................................................... 15-16 Career Development Month Activities Career Awareness – Elementary Best Practices ..................................................................................................... 17-10 Entrepreneurship . . . It’s Elementary ................................................................... 20 Literature List ........................................................................................................ 21 JEPES: Job Experience Program for Elementary Students .......................... 22-36 Cupcake Sale Lesson Plan...................................................................................... 37 Promoting An Activity Lesson Plan .................................................................. 38-40 Marketing Survey Lesson Plan ......................................................................... 41-42 Career Exploration – Middle Grades Best Practices ..................................................................................................... 43-45 Greeting Card Manufacturing Company .......................................................... 46-51 Let’s Make Money Lesson Plan ......................................................................... 52-53 Basic Business Plans .......................................................................................... 54 Marketing Plans .................................................................................................. 55 Logo Logic Lesson Plan .......................................................................................... 56 Career Preparation – High School Best Practices ..................................................................................................... 57-61 Business Plan Internet Sites and Lessons ............................................................ 62 After the Business Plan Sample Activities ....................................................... 63-69 Ad Sense Lesson Plan ............................................................................................. 70 Customer Complaints Lesson Plan ........................................................................ 71 Bulletin Board Ideas.......................................................................................................... 72 Career Development Products ..................................................................................... 73-75

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

School-Based Enterprise Introduction School-Based Enterprise (hereafter referred to as SBE) is defined as a classrelated activity that engages students in producing goods or services for sale or use to people other than the participating students themselves that is directly linked to the curriculum.

School-Based Enterprises or SBEs provide work-based learning opportunities to students in communities lacking business and industry involvement. SBEs promote discovery learning and student responsibility in the learning process. They expose students to creative thinking, problem solving, planning and organizational skills, and teamwork. SBEs help young people become business creators rather than job seekers.

• Make classrooms student-centered. • Integrate content and context. • Become a coach and mentor. • Require collaboration and teamwork. • Require students to achieve high intellectual standards. • Engage students in exploration, inquiry, problem solving, and reflection. These techniques offer new ways of teaching and learning that are appropriate for entrepreneurship.

In a 1994 Gallup poll, 7 out of 10 American high school students said they wanted to start their own business. However, the dilemma is that these students aren’t getting the kind of education they need to do so. Approximately 85 percent of them indicated they believe it is important to receive entrepreneurship education.

The following characteristics are commonly attributed to entrepreneurs. • Perceptive

• Confident

• Innovative

• Collaborative

• Creative

• Persevering

• Self-directed

Following are several strategies that teachers can use to foster entrepreneurship education in their classrooms:

• Action-Oriented/Risk Taker • Decisive/Problem Solver

• Situate learning in the context of its real-world application. • Require in-depth understanding of a concept or issue. • Provide learning activities that enable students to engage in their preferred styles of learning. 1

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Integration Integration blends content and best instructional practices with another discipline or subject area. The resulting curriculum provides a meaningful learning context, reduces redundancy in the learning experience, and enhances student interest and learning. SBEs involve many subject areas. The high school business plan is a major research and writing project that involves English, math, social studies, science, and computer technology.

charge of the various jobs on the island. Hold elections. Identify how products will be created and exchanged by the inhabitants. • Envision an early American dry goods store in the West. In small groups, have students decide on marketing, goods available, location, etc. • Establish a mini-store in class and allow students to make products to sell. • Ask students to write their “adult” resumés. Offer job applications for students to apply for the jobs of cashier, marketer, accountant, manufacturer, warehouse manager, business consultant, teacher, etc.

Starting with their own fields of expertise, teachers working with SBEs can make integration a reality. The following suggestions for student activities were contributed by teachers in a brainstorming activity at the New Jersey School-to-Work Coordinators’ Meeting.

• Research the necessary legal steps to open a new business. Science and Entrepreneurship

Social Studies and Entrepreneurship

• Choose an important nutritional concept. Develop an advertising plan to sell the idea. Develop a product line of nutritional snacks and decide how to sell them. Establish and name a company that will market the nutritional snacks. Organize the company. Identify positions and possible careers.

• In a unit on “Workplace Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow,” talk to parents and/or grandparents and note changes in technology, communications, transportation, and skills needed. Identify the cost of products in 1900 versus cost of products in 2000. Explain how wages are also part of the price. Discuss a business that reflects products from times past that are still able to be sold and how to market such products.

• Ask students to locate food ads in a magazine, mount them on index cards, and evaluate their nutritional content. Make a bulletin board display. Discuss the role of advertising in promoting nutrition.

• Map out a voyage. The ship is destroyed by a storm, but all passengers survive on an island. What are the needs and possible results? Set up a government on the island and put together a plan for obtaining food, clothing, etc. Decide who will be in www.okcareertech.org/guidance

• Do bacterial tests around school. Collect data and generate a report. Sell antibacterial soap or wipes for students to use before lunch, etc.

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School-Based Enterprise

• Study crystal formation by making rock candy. Discuss how a new product might be created from crystal formations.

• Create school postcards — students photograph various school scenes/ activities, and then market the postcards within school and community.

• Experiment with emulsions. Make salad dressing with and without emulsifier. Describe results, taste, etc. Conduct research on what emulsifiers are and how they are used in products.

• Start a “Birthday Party” entertainers unit. Students will develop entertainment activities to sell to busy mothers for children’s birthday parties. Market the idea on the Internet by designing an interesting Web page on birthday party ideas.

• Collect flowers and plants to study. Press them and make book marks to be sold at school book fair.

• Create a series of posters, representing each department elective, to be used in recruitment of students for next year. Think of how businesses recruit, and apply the techniques.

• Plan a student-run service of water sampling. • Start a recycling project. Collect cans and sell to a local recycle center. Analyze costs and income per pound. Structure a business format for the recycle project. Identify roles of individual class members.

• Develop a package design and marketing materials for a product to sell. Develop a TV commercial for your product. Create a TV or radio ad for your business using role playing, audio, and videotaping.

Arts/Performing Arts and Entrepreneurship

• Music classes work with history and art classes to promote a product.

• Identify entrepreneurial skills for individuals who choose the arts, such as musicians, writers, artists, etc.

Math and Entrepreneurship

• Create a business selling/marketing “Practice Partners” for students proficient in some musical instrument who will serve as practice partners, giving guidance and assistance for students who are preparing for music lessons.

• Analyze pros and cons of a business location. Chart/graph traffic flow and interpret it. • Develop a survey of the market to sell a product. • Use spread sheets (Excel) to project operating costs of a business.

• Ask students to create a “jingle” for an art show for use in a TV or radio advertisement.

• Examine business space requirements according to equipment and inventory needs, and draw up a plan.

• Create attractive flyers, posters, logos, or Web pages for promotional activities.

• Reconcile a checking account balance for a business. • Analyze recurrent expenditures and forecast annual costs. 3

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

• Discuss how competition may affect the price of goods.

• Select a local business and determine what language skills are needed by the owner. List qualities necessary to be an entrepreneur.

• Calculate costs of taking business into global markets.

• Assign students oral presentations on famous entrepreneurs and successful businesses. (See www.entre-ed.org/ cases.htm)

• Project future profits after receiving expansion data. • Track stock market for six months. Project profits over next two months. (Percents plus dollar amounts.)

• Contact an employer who has set up his/her own business and interview the person. Report results to the class. Find out about success and failures.

Language Arts and Entrepreneurship

• Write an employee handbook.

• Plan selling and marketing of a given book. Discuss what should be included in the book to make it marketable. Analyze the effects of supply, demand, profit, and competition on small business. Visit local book stores to observe and analyze their marketing techniques. Develop a plan to sell the book. Write ads to promote the book.

• Explore customer relations and problem solving as they relate to particular industries or businesses of student interest. • Form student groups to write a curriculum for younger students to gain skills in creating a business. Older students will identify what is essential and serve as mentors to the younger students.

• Write a business plan. • Have students survey the student body on topics of interest for a book club (survey on hobbies/interests). Then open the book club, selling books on topics of the most interest. Develop a Powerpoint presentation to sell your business to potential stockholders. • Have each student write a career plan with values and goals. How does that plan lead to becoming an entrepreneur? Job shadow a person in your field of interest. • Discuss how to sell an ad, create and design a logo, and prepare a mock radio program. • Have students research a business or industry and write an informational news release for the school newspaper. Use the research for a term paper. www.okcareertech.org/guidance

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School-Based Enterprise

Ideas for School-Based Enterprises Products

Services

Personalized Stationery Refrigerator Magnet Spirit Buttons T-Shirts School Store Photography Studio Newspaper CD Resale Shop

Business Cards Gift Wrapping Welcome Packets (for new students) Locker Decorating Car Wash Computer Repair Copying Center Recycling

Crafts Plants Donut Shop Floral Shop

Bank Word Processing Center Post Office Bicycle Repair Web Page Design Computer Help Services

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School-Based Enterprise

School-Based Enterprises Provide All Aspects of Industry Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act of 1998 All Aspects of the Industry designates the components to strengthen a successful entry into a career path. These components should enable the student to achieve experience in and an understanding of the nine aspects of the industry that they are preparing to enter.

Planning

Principles of Technology

• goals, objectives, planning, assessment of needs • type of ownership • relationship of organization to economic, political, and social contacts • strategic planning

• technological systems used in workplace • contributions to the product or service of the organization • technology for the workplace • continued professional training

Labor Issues Management

• • • • •

• structure and process for effectively accomplishing the goals and operations of the organization using facilities, staff, resources, equipment, and materials • organizational structure/corporate culture

rights of employees and related issues wage, benefits, and working conditions job descriptions employees’ rights and responsibilities role of labor organizations

Community Issues Finance

• impact of the company on the community • impact of the community on the organization • organization’s involvement in the community

• accounting and financial decision-making process • method of acquiring capital to operate • management of financial operations including payroll • financial operations/capital acquisitions

Health, Safety, and Environment

Technical and Production Skills

• practices and laws affecting the employee • the surrounding community, and the environment • regulatory issues/workplace safety

• basic skills in math, communication, computer, and time management • specific skills for production • interpersonal skills within the organization • basic academic skills/specific production skills • team-player skills

www.okcareertech.org/guidance

Personal Work Habits • nontechnical skills and characteristics expected in the workplace • positive attitude • personal fitness and appearance • readiness to work

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Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education (ODCTE)

Resource Center www.okcareertech.org/resrc/default.htm 1500 West Seventh Avenue, Stillwater, OK 74074-4364 Phone 405-743-5163 • Fax 405-743-6809 • E-mail [email protected]

vacations (summer hours are 7:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m.). Materials may be requested by e-mail, fax, phone, written request, or walk in.

The Resource Center at the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education offers a library of materials (print and non-print) for checkout to Oklahoma educators.

We offer subject bibliographies as tools for selecting items to borrow. Several are listed below. Bibliographies on other subjects are available on request.

Circulation Materials may be checked out for one month and renewed if no one else is waiting for them.

Bibliographies of Career Resources are: • Career Program Development • Career Awareness K-8 • Career Exploration and Preparation (secondary – adult) • Job Search/Resumé Writing/ Interviewing • Scholarships/College Guides

There is no fee for borrowing the items, but the borrower is responsible for return postage. Access The Resource Center is open Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and is closed on state-designated holidays. Please note the Resource Center is open during school

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School-Based Enterprise

Bibliography for Entrepreneurship Topics Source: ODCTE Resource Center 658.022 FAU Faught, Suzanne G. Curriculum guide for small business development (entrepreneurship). The University of Texas at Austin, Educational Resources, Extension Instruction and Materials Center, Division of Continuing Education. Austin, Texas: Texas Education Agency, 1993. 371.01 REI Gerstner, Louis V. Reinventing education: entrepreneurship in America’s public schools. New York: Dutton, c1994. 630.68 HAM Hamilton, William Henry, 1919– Agribusiness: an entrepreneurial approach. Albany, N.Y.: Delmar Publishers, c1992. 658.1 / 141 HAR Harper, Stephen C. The McGraw-Hill guide to starting your own business: a step-by-step blueprint for the first-time entrepreneur. New York: McGraw-Hill, c1991. 374.013 HER Hernaandez-Gantes, Victor M. ^ Fostering entrepreneurship through business incubation: the role and prospects of postsecondary vocational-technical education. Berkeley, California: NCRVE, 1996. 371.425 CAR Oklahoma State Department of Vocational and Technical Education. Career awareness for marketing activities and entrepreneur unit (elementary). Stillwater, Oklahoma: Oklahoma Department of Vocational and Technical Education, 1995. 658.022 SUT Sutton, Diane. Perspectives on entrepreneurship: an Arkansas entrepreneurial project designed for secondary home economics programs. Arkansas: Department of Education, 198-?. 338.04 WOO Woodard, Michael D. Black entrepreneurs in America: stories of struggle and success. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, c1997. www.okcareertech.org/guidance

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Board and Internet Games Band Promoter (Grades 5-8) Be your own band promoter. Go on a concert tour and see how much money you can make in 10 weeks. www.headbone.com/cgi-bin/wtvrags.cgi

Gazillionaire (Grades 8-12) Teenagers run a virtual trading company to learn supply and demand concepts and business strategies. www.lavamind.com/download.html

Lemonade Stand (Grades 5-8) Students own a lemonade stand. They receive weather forecasts and financial reports to help them predict how many cups of lemonade they can sell. www.littlejason.com/lemonade/index.html

Hot Company (12 years to Adult) Anyone who has ever dreamed of “being the boss” can experience the thrill of running a company and finding solutions that will lead to success in this exciting new board game. Up to four people or four teams can play. Each is the “owner” of a hot new company. Roll the die, pick a card, and you’re in business! The object of the game is to get your company to turn a profit and have a great time. “Hot Company” develops skills that work in the real world as well. www.anincomeofherown.com/store/ index.htm

Windfall (Grades 5-8) (You will need to sign up your school to receive a password.) Students can manage your own pretend business. Reading the Hexania Herald will give hints about supply and demand. www.headbone.com/fleet/ Business Start-Up Simulation (Grades 8-12) Students are divided into three teams — management, marketing, and finance — for several business firms. This activity gives students real experience in starting a business while they are learning the skills and planning their own business. www.entre-ed.org/simulatn.htm

Product in a Box™ Activity Kit (8 years to Adult) Designed for groups of three to eight to experience the creative thrill of imagining and inventing a new product and business. www.anincomeofherown.com/store/ index.htm

Biz World (Grades 3-8) The Biz World game puts you in charge of your own on-line greeting card company. Log in by first name only. www.bizworldgame.com

Biz Buzz™ Activity Card Set (13 years to Adult) Biz Buzz introduces the principles, language, and key concepts of business through participation and imagination. This new series of eight activities will help you create a fun and effective learning experience. www.anincomeofherown.com/store/ index.html

JATITAN (Grades 7-12) This business simulation game allows the player to serve as the CEO of a fictional company. (Provide e-mail address and ZIP code to play.) www.JATITAN.lycos.com

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Games (continued) “Economics: An Exciting Entrepreneur Experience”

You’re the Boss (High School to Adult) Players learn that reliability, responsibility, and integrity impact job success. Each player is a boss who sets sales and profit goals over a five-year period, but actions of their employees determine whether goals are met. Reinforces good employee behavior, and introduces common business terms. www.cfkr.com 1-800-770-0433

(Grades 2-5) Elementary students review economic terms and design a plan for creating their own business. www.richmond.edu/~ed344/webquests/ economics/outline.html “Simplified Tax and Wage Reporting System” (Grades 2-5) Students go through the process of starting a business, paying taxes, and filing reports. They learn information in a fun and easy-to-follow format using a lemonade stand, lawn mowing service, or band business. www.tax.gov/kids/home.htm

You’re the Boss (Middle School) Same objective as above: to teach the importance of responsibility, reliability, and integrity in the work setting. In this version, players set sales goals only. www.cfkr.com 1-800-770-0433 You Can’t Fire the Customer (13 years to Adult) Players have fun giving employees advice on how to give excellent customer service as well as how to deal with difficult and abusive customers. This game teaches 10 vital customer service skills, including focus on the customer, always show respect, keep your word, be a good listener, and show empathy. www.cfkr.com 1-800-770-0433

“Front Yard Fortunes” (Grades 2-5) Using this site, children can start an athome business or a company at school. They list the amount of money they want to earn and what they will spend it on. They choose from: • Rock decorating • Beaded key chains • Greeting card stand • Bake sale • Car/Bike wash The site also has the children: • List expenses they will have. • Figure price per item. • Name the company. • Choose a location to sell the product. www.fleetkids.com/fleet/ff/business.b.html

“Econopolis” (Elementary) This site was designed to teach children about economics. It covers the following areas with a worksheet for each topic: • History of Money and Trade • Free Enterprise • Goods and Services • Producer vs. Consumer • Opportunity Cost • Supply and Demand At the end of each lesson, there is either a pop quiz or game. http://tqjunior.thinkquest.org/ 3901/index.htm www.okcareertech.org/guidance

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School-Based Enterprise

Internet Sites Who’s Minding the Store? This is a guide for educators working with school-based enterprises. Learn the dayto-day functions of operating a business along with business strategies, budgets, and other skills. This guide also provides a meaningful experience for students in an SBE that is already up and running. http://ncrve.berkeley.edu/allinone/ MDS-1254.html

The Consortium for Entrepreneurship Education 1601 West Fifth Avenue, PMB 199 Columbus, OH 43212 Phone: 614-486-6538 [email protected] www.entre-ed.org (conferences and educational materials) Youth Venture - Washington, D.C. Contact: Scott Lepre 1700 North Moore Street Suite 2000 Arlington, VA 22209 Phone: 703-527-4126 Fax: 703-527-8383 [email protected] or [email protected] www.youthventure.org

Small Business Administration This site offers comprehensive information on business plans. http://www.sbaonline.sba.gov/starting/ indexbusplans.html Rural Entrepreneurship Through Action Learning (REAL) REAL enterprises offer two-day SBE training based on “Who’s Minding the Store?” REAL also provides training for elementary, middle school, and high school instructors who wish to offer entrepreneurship courses. REAL curriculum materials include activities, simulations, and student workbooks. The Mini-REAL and Middle-REAL Resource Manuals for Grades K-8 are step-by-step teaching guides. For more information, e-mail [email protected] or www.realenterprises.org/index.html

The Patent Cafe is a useful Web site for young inventors seeking information on inventing, inventions, and patents. www.itsabout.com www.patentcafe.com/kids_cafe/index.html Institute for Entrepreneurship Phone: 518-443-5606 Fax: 518-443-5610 www.nyie.org/programs/biztech1.html The Coleman Foundation* 575 West Madison Street, Suite 4605 Chicago, IL 60661 Phone: 312-902-7120 Fax: 312-902-7124 [email protected] www.colemanfoundation.org

The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation* 4801 Rockhill Road Kansas City, MO 64110 www.emkf.org www.entreworld.com

*Have grants available. 11

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Internet Sites (continued) DECA 1500 West Seventh Avenue Stillwater, OK 74074-4364 Phone: 405-743-5473 Fax: 405-743-5142 http://www.okcareertech.org/mkted/ deca.htm

Kidsway, Inc. (Ages 8-18) 5589 Peachtree Road Chamblee, GA 30341 Phone: 888-543-7929 e-mail: www.kidsway.com Provides products, magazine subscription, business plan competition, and training.

Locate more sites by logging on to www.education-world.com/ Search for entrepreneurs. The Internet changes often and many of these notes and addresses, while functional at time of publication, may not remain current. If the address changes, a forwarding address is usually provided.

Teacher Resources “BizTech”* (Grades 8-12) BizTech is an on-line learning system that teaches entrepreneurship while reinforcing math, reading, technology, and critical thinking skills. BizTech includes: • an on-line curriculum • creation of a business plan • interviews with entrepreneurs • interactive content to enhance experience • a parallel teacher’s site with tools http://www.nyie.org/programs/ biztech1.html Phone: 1-877-275-6943 or 518-443-5606

www.okcareertech.org/guidance

“PACE”* – Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship These 21 self-contained student modules cover three learning levels. Center on Education and Training for Employment - 800-848-4815. www.entre-ed.org/curricul.htm “Eighth-Grade Assignments” Includes instructions for creating company flyers, checks, gift certificates, business cards, letterheads, memos, and fax cover sheets. These imaginary companies also generate graphs from spreadsheet reports. www.crews.org/media_tech/compsci/ 8thgrade/index.html

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Teacher Resources (continued) Be All That You Can Dream — The Mall Students work in small groups to compete with each other in designing their stores for the mall. The teacher’s guide includes: What Business Am I In, Your Target Market, Pricing, Customer Service Policies, Personnel, Employee Manual, Store Front and Layout, and Advertising. For more information, phone 614-486-6538 or [email protected]

UT-Kauffman Entrepreneur Internship Program for College Students Today 83 colleges offer entrepreneur intern programs. The programs provide the opportunity for a select group of students to extend their classroom learning by working in entrepreneurial organizations, including venture capital firms, portfolio companies, start-ups, and social service agencies with an economic development mission. The program requires that students complete a fulltime (40 hours per week) paid internship during the summer. http://www.bus.utexas.edu/~schwartz/

You Can Own the Place! (Grades 7-12) This teacher’s manual includes 15 detailed units, each of which outlines objectives, the lesson plan, materials needed, vocabulary, exercises, and student handouts. http://way.opens.org/owntheplace/ Start Your Own Business (Grades 7-12) Take the Entrepreneur Quiz to see if you have the personality to succeed. Then take the Business Success Quiz to find out if you have the basic business start-up knowledge to succeed. Business Ownership will help you decide which business is best for you. www.themint.org/index.html The Bank at School This program introduces students to basic monetary concepts, including the origin of money, importance of savings, and principles of credit. It includes a curriculum guide for Grades 1-6 with lessons that integrate math, social studies, and language arts. The bank partner provides a money bag filled with literature, play money, stamps, and more. For more information, contact Dr. Sacra Nicholas, SDE, 405-522-3525. 13

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Business Plan Competitions Young Entrepreneur Business Plan Competition

National Business Plan Competition

This competition is open to K-12 students across the country. The winners in each category receive a trophy and a check for $2,000. The sponsoring teachers also receive $2,000, while the schools receive a trophy. Finalists are named in each category. The finalists and their teachers receive $500 each. All winners and finalists receive scholarships to attend a KidsWay summer entrepreneurship camp. Entry forms and rules are posted online at: www.kidsway.com or call 888-543-7929, ext. 818.

Each year Independent Means invites women, ages 13 to 21, to put their dreams on paper and submit a business plan to the National Business Plan Competition. The 2000 competition will run from Sept. 1, 2000, to June 30, 2001. Five winners will receive: • $2,500 cash award • all-expense paid trip to the National Awards Ceremony • tuition scholarship to Camp $tart-Up and more • Babson College scholarship opportunity Entry forms are posted online at http://www.anincomeof herown.com/ bizplan/index.html

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Career Poster Contest CAREER DEVELOPMENT OVER THE LIFE SPAN Sponsored by the Oklahoma Counselors Association and the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education Eligibility: There are five divisions: Primary (grades K-2), Intermediate (grades 3-5), Middle Grades (grades 6-8), Senior (grades 9-12), and Adult (postsecondary). Theme: The poster should reflect the 2000 theme: “Career Development Over the Life Span.” Possible subthemes are Celebrating Diversity in the Workplace, Meeting the Challenges of Change, and Demonstrating Qualities and Skills of a Successful Employee. Slogans may be used. Judging Criteria: Judging will be based on originality/creativity and development of the theme. Attention will be focused on basic art principles and appropriate use of media and lettering. Only posters judged as first-, second-, and third-place school winners should be sent for judging in the state contest. Lettering: Simple, bold lettering is preferred. Captions may be used to convey the message, attract attention, and achieve goals of clarity, vigor, and originality. All letters will be considered part of the design. Size: Minimum size is 22 by 22 inches. Maximum size is 22 by 28 inches. Display: Posters are to be displayed in the student’s school during National Career Development Month in November. Winning posters must be sent to the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education by November 30 of each calendar year. Entry Form: Copy and place the completed entry form below on a 3- by 5-inch card and attach to the back of each entry. Mail Posters Chosen as School Winners to: Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education, Guidance Division • 1500 West Seventh Avenue • Stillwater, OK 74074-4364. Student Name

Grade First

MI

Last

Address City

State

ZIP

City

State

ZIP

School Name School Address School Phone

Fax

Contact Person

All entries become the property of ODCTE/OCA and will not be returned.

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Career Poetry Contest CAREER DEVELOPMENT OVER THE LIFE SPAN Sponsored by the Oklahoma Counselors Association and the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education Eligibility: There are five divisions: Primary (grades K-2), Intermediate (grades 3-5), Middle Grades (grades 6-8), Senior (grades 9-12), and Adult (postsecondary). Theme: The poem should reflect the theme: “Career Development Over the Life Span.” Possible subthemes are Celebrating Diversity in the Workplace, Meeting the Challenges of Change, and Demonstrating Qualities and Skills of a Successful Employee. Each poem’s topic must relate to the theme or subthemes. Judging Criteria: Judging will be based on originality/creativity and development of the theme, appropriate form and execution, and spelling and grammar. Only poems judged as first-, second-, and third-place winners in the school contests should be sent for judging in the state contest. Poetic Form: Poems may be written in any poetic form, i.e., cinquain, diamante, free verse, haiku, limerick, metered, rhyming, blank verse, etc. Size: Each poem should be typed or printed on a sheet of paper 8 1/2 by 11 inches. Display: Poems are to be displayed/read in the student’s school during National Career Development Month in November. Winning poems must be sent to the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education by November 30 of each calendar year. Entry Form: Copy and place the completed entry form below on a 3- by 5-inch card and attach to the back of each entry. Mail Poems Chosen as School Winners to: Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education, Guidance Division • 1500 West Seventh Avenue • Stillwater, OK 74074-4364.

Student Name

Grade First

MI

Last

Address City

State

ZIP

City

State

ZIP

School Name School Address School Phone

Fax

Contact Person

All entries become the property of ODCTE/OCA and will not be returned. www.okcareertech.org/guidance

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Career Awareness – Elementary Best Practices School-Based Enterprises

School-Based Enterprises

Brown Paper Products Company

Mini Mall

Target Grade Grades 2-5

Target Grade Grades K-5

School Name/City Blackwell Elementary School Blackwell, Okla.

School Name/City Richmond Elementary Stillwater, Okla.

Core Subject Relation Art, Math, English

Core Subject Relation All

Contact Kim Shoffner High School Counselor

Contact Lois Stern Fourth-Grade Instructor

Description This is an assembly-line activity that allowed every student to take part in the process of seeking work, interviewing for a job, and actually working as part of a company team. Students completed a job application and a sample employment test that consisted of math problems, spelling, and essay questions. Students were paid with a check that had “cookie value” instead of cash. Students traced a template and then stuffed and decorated rabbits and rocking horses. Students applied for some of these occupations: • floor managers • stampers • cutters • secretaries • assistant managers • custodians • gluers • inspectors • accountant

Description This is a hands-on approach to instructing children to start and run their own business. Students individually, or in pairs, plan a product or service to be sold during the mini mall. Students name their country and design their own money. Resources YESS!/Mini-Society: Experiencing the Real World in the Classroom. (K-5) curriculum For information on curriculum and workshops, contact: Jean Caldwell University of Central Oklahoma 405-341-2980

Resource Bright Ideas — 816-637-2482 17

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Best Practices: Elementary (continued) School-Based Enterprises

Wee Deliver Program — K-6: http://4teachers.org/feature/foster/ lesson_plan

School Store, Friendship Club (mission is to perform acts of kindness), Tutors, Teacher Assistants, Post Office Wee Deliver Program, Conflict Managers, and Service Club (Flag, Playground Equipment, Attendance Slips, Day Care Helper)

To order, call: 1-888-332-0317 Resources “Good Ideas to Help Young People Develop Good Character,” Character Counts – 800-711-2670

Target Grade Grades 3-5

“Child’s Work, Child’s Play” 1-800-962-1141 www.childswork.com/

School Name/City Fifth- and Sixth-Grade Center Skiatook, Okla.

“Mediations for Kids” – 3-5 1-800-749-8838 www.peaceeducation.com/

Core Subject Relation All

“Secret Agent,” Marco Products, 1-800-448-2197 (used by the Friendship Club)

Contact Shari Hull Counselor Description Students apply and are interviewed for the many positions available. The postal workers take a written test, and the school store patrons have math questions. Students sign in and wear their buttons when they report for duty. Checks are given every two weeks if students have not missed more than two duties or meetings. A raise of 10 cents is given every two weeks if all the rules are followed, a good attitude is shown, and all six pillars of character are exhibited. Students can use their money at the school store. An evaluation on each student is completed every nine weeks. They are evaluated on the six pillars in Character Counts.

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Best Practices: Elementary (continued) School-Based Enterprises

School-Based Enterprises

Market Day

Plant Sale

Target Grade Grades 1-5

Target Grade Elementary

School Name/City Roosevelt Elementary Miami Public Schools Miami, Okla.

School Name/City Western Heights High School Oklahoma City, Okla. Core Subject Relation Science, Math, Art

Core Subject Relation Math, English, Art

Contact Nancy Gripe Family and Consumer Sciences Education Instructor

Contact Janet Beggerly Elementary Teacher Description Market day involves the whole school. Within each class, teachers instruct students on entrepreneurship/ economics. Each class forms a company and sells their product at Market Day. Throughout the year, students earn Roosevelt Rubles for good citizenship. These are used as a form of payment to purchase items at the market. This year students will place their rubles in the student-run bank, and they will also have an advertisement agency. The Market Day is scheduled at the end of the school year, which helps with discipline. Examples of stores: • Bookmarkers • Potted Plants • Candles • Photo Shop (used digital camera; students signed up for a time) • Flower Arrangements

Description Students soaked clay pots in water before painting a design of their choice on the pots. A parent with training in horticulture explained to elementary students how to plant flowers. Each pot had a tag with the child’s name and the occupation the child wanted to pursue for a career. The plants were sold at local businesses. The profits were used to purchase calculators. Students learned about careers related to horticulture.

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Entrepreneurship . . . It’s Elementary! Note: Thanks are expressed to Ronni Cohen, Claymont Elementary School in Delaware, for this group of activities that she uses with elementary students. http://www.entre-ed.org/elem-ed.htm Language Arts

Use the yellow pages for this activity. Have students look for businesses with interesting names. Have a business “scavenger hunt.” Use categories for student research such as business names . . .

Adapt a few basic questions from a business plan, and have students answer these questions for writing activities and projects. Ask each student to think of a product that others might be interested in buying:

• • • • •

• • • •

Describe your product. Who will be your audience? Who will look at this product? How will you make (or produce) your product? • What do you need to make this product a success? • With what other products will your product compete?

• • •

This is a particularly useful language arts as well as venture creation skill. Collect common and unusual objects and keep them handy. Each day, take out an object. For example, take out a film container. Hold it in your hand for everyone to see and say, “I hold in my hand . . .” and give an unusual response. Then pass the object around for each child to give a response. For example, the film container could be a pill holder, a biscuit cutter, a holder for lunch money, etc. Children learn to see possibilities and look at common items in a new way.



Thinking Skills Teach your students a basic evaluation tool . . . PMI. P = POSITIVE. What is positive or strong about your work? M = MINUS. What is a minus or weak about your work? What needs to be changed? What needs to be stronger? I

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with colorful adjectives with superlative forms of adjectives that are made up or are nonsense that are foreign words that tell what the business produces or sells that have alliteration (repeated beginning sounds) that are geographic terms that have nothing to do with the business’s function that are named after people

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= INTERESTING. What makes you say “Ah . . . I wish I had thought of that!”

Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Literature List Any of the following books can be used to teach “entrepreneurship” and “related skills” using ideas presented in the activities listed on page 20.

• Alexander, Lloyd. The Fortune Tellers. Dutton, 1992 (Self-Fulfillment)

• Dooley, Norah. Everybody Cooks Rice. First Avenue Editions: 1991 (Creative Problem Solving)

• Anderson, Hans Christian. The Emperor’s New Clothes. Scholastic: 1977 (Ethics)

• Dunrea, Oliver. The Painter Who Loved Chickens. FSG: 1995 (Invention, Innovation, Entrepreneurship, Niche, Demand)

• Barbour, Karen. Little Nino’s Pizzeria. Harcourt Brace: 1978 (Growing a Business, Scarcity, Opportunity Cost, Business Plan, Business Structures, Location, Demand, Niche, Service)

• Schwartz, Ellen. Mr. Belinsky’s Bagels. Talewinds: 1997 (Entrepreneur, Productive Resources, Demand, Supply, Competition, Economic Profit, Natural Talents, Niche, Unique Selling Point, Naming a Business)

• Carle, Eric. Walter the Baker. Simon and Schuster: 1995 (Problem Solving, Word of Mouth Advertising and Reputation, Quality)

• Seibold, Jotto. Monkey Business. Viking: 1995 (Demand, Capital Goods, Promoting a Product, Barter)

• Charlip, Remy. Fortunately. MacMillan: 1987 (Overcoming Obstacles)

• Seuss, Dr. Daisy-Head Mayzie. Random House: 1994 (Marketing, Values)

• Cohen, Ronni. Inventor’s Portfolio. E.E. Cats, 1996 (Entrepreneurship and Economics) • dePaola, Topmie. Tony’s Bread. Paper Star Books, 1989 (Finding a Niche, Competition, Unique Selling Point)

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

JEPES: Job Experience Program for Elementary Students Tony Goetz Elementary, Muskogee School District

Description of the Learning Unit

Actual JEPES Implementation Steps

JEPES is a Career Awareness Unit that integrates all the National Career Development Guidelines and School-toWork Components with the Oklahoma State Department of Education P.A.S.S. objectives. A project designed to “employ” all students in Grades 4-5, it not only is a unit in social studies but also promotes school pride and student responsibility, lowers discipline problems, and helps students explore school-created jobs as possible career options. It provides students real job experiences, including the application and resume process, the interview, actual hiring, completion of time cards, and an actual paycheck. It also promotes positive social interaction between students and the business world, thus fostering a better relationship between school and the community.

1. Share your vision for a student job program at a staff meeting to get fellow teachers to participate and buy into the concept. Be enthusiastic and eager! 2. Poll staff to determine what schoolcreated jobs should be offered, what teacher will supervise each, and when students will work (our students work two to three times a week during recess). Also get input to determine if and how you will do payroll, as well as how the students can spend their earnings. 3. Create necessary forms: job descriptions, applications, resumés, interview sign up sheet and appointment cards, cover letter to parents (including parent signature for student to participate), time cards, payroll checks and/or mock cash, JEPES evaluation forms, and student evaluation forms. 4. Determine the grade level of students who will participate, how many participants, and what criteria will determine potential employees. 5. Set up a mini Career Fair, allowing students to browse the booths, visit with potential employers, sign up for interviews (we allow students to sign up for top two choices), and leave applications and resumés. This generally lasts 50 minutes for each grade level.

Time Line for Activities Preparation for the job fair requires approximately five class periods with fifth-grade students serving as the job fair presenters. Actual job time for students may vary from nine weeks to one semester. Job time may be served during recess two to three days a week.

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

JEPES: Job Experience Program for Elementary Students (continued)

6. Have supervisors set up interviews with potential employees after reviewing paperwork. You may use the appointment cards as passes for students to leave class for an interview. (Our interviews generally consist of five questions.) 7. Have supervisors turn in a list of their selected employees, and then cross-reference those lists to be sure that there is no conflict in jobs and that all students have jobs. (If some openings still exist, and/or some students did not receive a job, students sign up and we go through Step 6 again.) 8. After all students have been “hired,” post the positions with starting dates and supervisors listed, and have students report the first day or two for job training. Supervisors should explain and demonstrate job duties, responsibilities, and expectations. They should also explain how often students will be working, and how and when students should complete and turn in time cards. • Obtain time card from _________ ____________. • Obtain signature from supervisor at end of week. • Turn in completed time card to ______________ each Friday.

9. Determine who will do the payroll (we have this as a student job), how often paychecks will be passed out, and how paychecks may be spent. (We have a school store.) 10. At the end of the “employment period,” have students complete an evaluation of JEPES. Have supervisors complete and go over with the students their evaluation forms of their job performance.

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Tony Goetz Elementary 2412 Haskell Blvd. Muskogee, OK 74403 (918) 684-3810 Fax: 684-3811 January 8, 2001

Dear Parents: On Monday, January 15, we will host the fourth- and fifth-grade Tiger Job Fair. We will meet in the library from 8:45 to 9:45 a.m. for fourth-grade students and from 9:45 to 10:45 a.m. for fifth-grade students. Students will learn about the various school jobs available; the expectations, requirements, and duties of these jobs; the “pay” for these jobs; and the actual employment process (completing job applications, scheduling interviews, interviewing, and the posting of job positions). Afterwards those students wishing to “apply for jobs” will complete the application and a resumé, sign up for an interview, and take the application form home to be signed by parents. All students who return a signed application and resumé by Friday, January 19, will be scheduled for an interview on the following Monday. Students will also be able to interview on Tuesday. On Tuesday afternoon, teachers/supervisors will turn in student recommendations to me for the job positions they will supervise. Students will begin their new “jobs” on Monday, January 29, during their recess (12:45 to 1:05 p.m.) unless designated otherwise. Supervisors will train the students, share expectations with them, and monitor their work. I’ll send a monthly evaluation for teachers to complete on the students’ job performance. Students who violate rules or continually perform poorly may be relieved of duties once every effort has been made to resolve the challenges. Thanks so much for contributing your time, effort, and expertise to benefit our students. You are helping our motto come true . . . Tony Goetz: Working for a brighter future! Attached is the list of school jobs, job application form, and resumé. If you’d like for your child to participate in this activity, please sign and return the form by Friday. I will help students complete the items on the form during our Job Fair. Sincerely,

Principal Tony Goetz Elementary www.okcareertech.org/guidance

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Job

Supervisor

Description

Office Practice

Rampley & White

Answering phone, Xeroxing, delivery, etc.

Hall/Restroom Monitors

Parnell & Olmstead Scroggins & Fulton

Checking for litter, fill-ups, sweeping, etc.

Ground Patrol

Chaffin & Hull

Checking playground and yards for litter, etc.

Broadcasting/ Announcers

Underwood

Gather school news and make announcements

Recycler

P. White

Pick up and dump paper containers; move bins one time each week

Activities Set Up/ Take Down

Bradley & Fulton

Set up/take down chairs/ equipment, speakers, mike, etc.

Post Office

Cary & Bradley

Collect/deliver student mail to classrooms; provide stamps, etc.

Preschool Assistant

Netherton

Assist in preschool classroom, read to children, etc.

Library Assistant

Hanley

File, put books away, etc.

Career Center/ Medical Alert

Fields

File, set up materials, fill recess bag, check First Aid supplies in office

Greeter

Fields

Greet guests, welcome students in morning, etc.

Tiger Store Clerk

Sell items, make change, inventory products

C.O.P.S.

Use conflict resolution

Tiger Payroll

Use math skills, write checks, keep track of time cards.

Kitchen Patrol

Sweep floor and wipe tables.

Computer Tech Assistant

Turn on computers, load software, and assist where needed. 25

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Tony Goetz Elementary School Application for the JEPES* Program *(Job Experience Program for Elementary Students) This application is intended to provide information for evaluating your suitability for available positions. These positions are school-created jobs to provide you with the opportunity to experience on-the-job training, to understand the relevance of school and the link to the business world, and to help instill a sense of school ownership and school pride. Please print all information neatly: Student Name _______________________

Grade _____

Teacher ________________________

Parents/Guardian __________________________________ Day Phone ____________________ Please number up to four positions for which you would like to apply (with one being the first choice): ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___

C.O.P.S. (Children Observing Peers at School) Computer Tech Assistant Preschool Teacher Assistant Tiger Store Clerk Kitchen Patrol (Cafeteria Assistant) Recycler Greeter Career Center/Medical Alert

____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____

Broadcasters Activity Setup Crew Office Practice Tiger Payroll Library Assistant Ground Patrol Post Office

List any skills/experience/qualifications you may have relating to the position(s) you are seeking: _________________________________________________________________________________ You and a parent MUST read and sign in order to be considered for the JEPES Program: As a student, I promise that if I’m selected to be a part of the JEPES Program: • I will do my very best on the job. • I will be reliable, punctual, and have good attendance. • I will behave in a positive and respectful manner. • I will follow the directions of my supervisor. • I will keep up with my school work. • I will work well with my peers. • I will learn as many positive things as possible from this experience. Student Signature _______________________________________ Date _______________________ As the parent/guardian of the above-named student, I agree to allow my child to serve in this capacity and I will encourage and support the efforts of the school as well as my child. Parent Signature ________________________________________ Date _______________________ (Place in Career Portfolio) www.okcareertech.org/guidance

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Tony Goetz Elementary School Student Resumé for the JEPES* Program *(Job Experience Program for Elementary Students)

Personal Name __________________________________________________________________________ Address ________________________________________________________________________ Phone __________________

Grade _________ Teacher _____________________________

Clubs/Affiliations/Honors/Awards ________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________

Job Objective _______________________________________________________________________________ (Your goal/ambition)

Experience _______________________________________________________________________________

Education/Special Training _______________________________________________________________________________

References Name _____________________________

Title __________________ Phone ____________

Name _____________________________

Title __________________ Phone ____________

(Place in Career Portfolio)

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Interview Sign-In Sheet for ______________________________________________________ Interviews will be ______________ , ________ ______ , ______ , from ______ to _______ . day of week

month

day

year

Please sign your name on one of the time slots to be interviewed. If you are signing up to be interviewed for more than one job, be sure that your interview times do not conflict. Make sure you are punctual to your interview. Good luck and have fun! Time

Name

____________

_________________________________________________

____________

_________________________________________________

____________

_________________________________________________

____________

_________________________________________________

____________

_________________________________________________

____________

_________________________________________________

____________

_________________________________________________

____________

_________________________________________________

____________

_________________________________________________

____________

_________________________________________________

____________

_________________________________________________

____________

_________________________________________________

____________

_________________________________________________

____________

_________________________________________________

____________

_________________________________________________

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Tony Goetz Tiger Job Fair

Tony Goetz Tiger Job Fair

Name _______________________________

Name _______________________________

Appointment Date ___________________

Appointment Date ___________________

Time ________________________________

Time ________________________________

With ________________________________

With ________________________________

Room No. ___________________________

Room No. ___________________________

For Job Position _____________________

For Job Position _____________________

Use as reminders for interview appointment.

Job Experience Program for Elementary Students

Student Time Card Name _____________________________________

Date ______________________________

Job _______________________________________ Working Week ______________________ Dates Worked (Mo/Day/Yr)

Time Worked (in minutes) *5 minutes = 1 Tiger Buck

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Total Time Worked _______________________

Total Tiger Bucks Due ______________

Supervisor’s Signature _________________________________

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Date __________________

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Tony Goetz Student Job Postings Job Position __________________________________________________________________ Report to _________________________________ On _______________________________ Name

Crew No.

Work Days

_______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Tony Goetz School-to-Work Job Descriptions Title: Tiger Payroll Clerk Qualifications: Must be punctual, reliable, and responsible. Must be able to add, subtract, record information, file, and follow directions. Reports to: Office/Pam Bradley Job Goals: To maintain time cards and records for student pay (Tiger Bucks) in the student Job Program. Performance Responsibilities: To maintain, record, add, and file student time sheets and their payroll (Tiger Bucks) each week. Computer usage necessary. Terms of Position: Semester job contingent upon performance. Evaluation: Semester evaluation by supervisor.

Title: Greeter/Presenter Qualifications: Must enjoy meeting and greeting new people. Must be polite, cordial, and able to communicate well with others. Reports to: Kittie Fields and Pam Bradley Job Goals: To instill a sense of confidence and promote social skills while working to build positive relations with our community. Performance Responsibilities: To meet and welcome guests to our building, lead school tour, and serve refreshments. Terms of Position: Semester position contingent upon performance. Evaluation: Monthly evaluations based on social and presentation skills, reliability, and communication skills.

Title: Announcers Qualifications: Must be able to communicate/enunciate clearly, speak over the intercom, read well, and make guests/visitors feel comfortable at Tony Goetz Elementary. Reports to: Pam Bradley Job Goals: To keep students and faculty informed/updated of the activities, important events, and ongoing events in the Tony Goetz Elementary School community as well as greet all Tony Goetz visitors/guests in a polite and respectful manner. Performance Responsibilities: Make daily announcements over intercom at end of day; speak in a respectful, pleasant manner over the intercom; check with faculty to gather information; greet and welcome guests and visitors to our site as well as provide a tour of our site. Must be organized, punctual, friendly, and knowledgeable of school site. Terms of Position: Semester job-rotating position with continuation contingent upon performance. Evaluation: Weekly evaluations based upon communication and organization skills, punctuality, and reliability.

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Tony Goetz School-to-Work Job Descriptions Title Qualifications

Reports to Job Goals

Performance Responsibilities

Terms of Position

Evaluation

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Tiger Payroll Checks and Tiger Bucks created by: Matt Wallace, Fourth-Grade Student at Tony Goetz

Check No. __________

Tony Goetz Elementary School-to-Work Program Muskogee, OK 74403

Check No. _______ Date ____________

Date _______________ To __________________ Amount ____________

Pay to the Order of ___________________________ $ _________ _________________________________________________ Dollars Tiger Bank Muskogee, OK 74403

____________________________

For _________________

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Tony Goetz Student Job Evaluation Name ____________________________________________ Grade ____________________ Job __________________________________ Supervisor ____________________________ Teacher ___________________________ Year _____ Semester: Fall ____ Spring ____ Performance Duties

Excellent

Satisfactory

Improvement Needed

Understands and Follows Directions Attendance, Punctuality, and Efficiency Requires Minimum Supervision Assumes Responsibility for Safe Working Conditions Displays Positive Human Relations Skills Adheres to Job Description and Program Guidelines for Position

Do you recommend this student for continued employment? (Circle one)

YES

NO

Student Employee Signature ____________________________________ Date ___________________ Supervisor’s Signature _________________________________________ Date ___________________ Principal’s Signature ___________________________________________ Date ___________________ (Completed each month)

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Tony Goetz Student Evaluation of Job Program

Supervisor _______________________________________ Date ______________________ Job ___________________________________ Fall ________ Spring ______ Year ______ My Supervisor:

Excellent

Satisfactory

Improvement Needed

Explained Job Duties/ Directions (gave directions on what should be done each day on the job)

Provided Sufficient Supervision Assumed Responsibility for Safe Working Conditions (explained how to work equipment, etc., and told me what and how to perform job duties in a safe way)

Displayed Positive Human Relations Skills (friendly, provided praise and positive direction, and modeled proper behavior on the job)

Adhered to Job Description and Program Guidelines for My Position (gave me directions and daily tasks which related to my job)

Do you think other students would enjoy this job? (Circle one)

YES

NO

What did you like most about this job? ____________________________________________________ What did you dislike most about this job? _________________________________________________ Do you feel this experience will help you be a better student? (Circle one)

YES

NO

Why? __________________________________________________________________________________ Do you feel this experience will help you make better decisions in the future regarding your career choices? (Circle one) YES NO Why? __________________________________________________________________________________ What did you learn from this program? ___________________________________________________ 35

Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

2000 Spring JEPES Evaluation Results 1. Out of 91 fourth- and fifth-graders this spring at Tony Goetz, 83 (91 percent) chose to participate in the JEPES Program. Of those participating, 90 percent received good evaluations and 90 percent were recommended to be rehired.

• It taught me that though people may not look it, they can be nice. • It taught me to be a team worker, to be responsible, and how this can be fun. 5. Things students learned from the JEPES experience: • How to be more polite, kinder, and help others. • How to talk correctly and speak to others. • It taught me how to work with others, to be responsible, and to make decisions. • It taught me that it’s good for people to learn. • This will help me know how to work and how to be a school teacher. • This taught me that I will need to know about money.

2. Percentage of students who felt the JEPES Program experience helped them to be a better student: 92% 3. Percentage of students who felt the JEPES Program experience would help them make better decisions regarding future career choices: 89% 4. Reasons students felt the JEPES Program experience would help them make better decisions in the future regarding career choices: • I learned that I’d like to be a cop, a reporter, or banker — writing checks. • I learned that it’s fun to teach and work with kids. • It helped me be a better student, taught me how to think easier, and showed me that I can stand proud with people watching me. • It showed me how real work is. • It taught me to be kinder, to not be embarrassed in front of people, and to improve my speech so that I know how to speak in front of others. • It taught me office skills, sharpened my math skills, and taught me that I want to work with computers. • It showed me how to do my best and do different job skills. www.okcareertech.org/guidance

6. Staff/Student suggestions to improve JEPES: • To better organize the Tiger Store; post opening dates and get the word out when it IS open. • Open the Tiger Store the day or week after payroll checks have been given. • Schedule payroll to be done only one time per month rather than every two weeks. • Allow students who work at small, odd jobs to apply for more than one position. • Allow those students who choose to work more than one day to do so.

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Activity Cupcake Sale

Related Activity — Lemonade Stand One student is the owner who pours the drink and tells the cost (set by the student). Another student buys and counts out the play money to purchase the drink. The person who bought now becomes the owner and another student comes up to buy a drink. The activity continues until all students have been owner and customer.

Related Subject Math National Career Development Guidelines: VII Awareness of the importance of personal responsibility and good work habits.

Closure/Evaluation The students will participate in discussion, plan a poster, correctly make change, and see the need for cooperation and accuracy in the classroom as applied to the adult workplace.

Suggested Oklahoma P.A.S.S. Grades 1-5 Academic Concept The students will make correct change with money. Activities • The students will plan, organize, advertise, and conduct a cupcake sale, accurately advertising the event and correctly making change. • The teacher will send a letter to parents explaining the cupcake sale and requesting cupcakes. • The students will design a poster advertising the cupcake sale, giving date, location, and the price. • The class will discuss the importance of cooperation between people and relate the ideas developed to their cupcake sale. Relate those same ideas to the workplace. • Students will conduct cupcake sale with emphasis on making change correctly. • After the cupcake sale is over, determine amount of profit by using the four basic operations.

Materials/Supplies Paper, markers, cupcakes, money, tape. Resources Career Development Activities, elementary level. CS1100 Order by calling ODCTE Customer Service at 1-800-654-4502.

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Activity Promoting an Activity

– newspaper (advertising or press release for school newspaper or local newspaper) • Teacher assigns or draws from a hat the form of media to be used by each group. • Teacher hands each group a form to help plan their promotional campaign. Students make their own decisions, following the outline of the form to complete their finished product.

Related Subjects Language Arts, Visual Arts, Reading National Career Development Guidelines: II Skills to interact with others. VIII Awareness of how work relates to the needs and functions of society. Suggested Oklahoma P.A.S.S. Grades 3-5

Closure/Evaluation Final product presented to class and then posted around school or presented to school classrooms. Students self-evaluate their promotional campaign.

Academic Concept Communicate orally and through written forms. Activities • Teacher chooses an activity to promote such as book fair, student store, lunch room, yearbook, visiting author, special assemblies, book genies, etc. • Divide class into five or six groups according to classroom size (three to four students in a group, depending on abilities). • Teacher discusses the six forms of media to use. – television (live action commercial - skit) – radio (morning announcements over P.A. system) – direct mail (flyers for weekly take-home packet) – billboards (posters and bulletin boards) – specialty advertising (buttons, bookmarks, table tents)

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Materials/Supplies Teacher Supplies Forms to promote group activity. Student Supplies (May vary for each form of advertising) Poster board, Kraft bulletin board paper, construction paper, markers, pencils, crayons, paints, colored Xerox paper, cassette tapes, cassette recorder, VCR tapes, video camera, props, tag board, newsprint Resources Career Awareness for Marketing Activities and Entrepreneur Unit DE1300 Order by calling ODCTE Customer Service at 1-800-654-4502.

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Group Name _________________________________________________________________ Group Members ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________

Promotion 1. Promotional Item/Activity _______________________________________________ 2. Target Audience (describe) _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ Age Level ______________________________________________________________ Interests _______________________________________________________________ 3. Dates of Promotion ______________________________________________________ 4. Slogan _________________________________________________________________ 5. Form of Media __________________________________________________________ 6. Location (classrooms, hallways, bulletin boards, restrooms, doors) ___________ _______________________________________________________________________ 7. Script/Sketch (format on back) ___________________________________________ 8. Teacher’s signature approving format _______________________________________________________________________ 9. Completion Date ________________________________________________________ 10. Presentation of Activity

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Script Television — Write a script for up to a two-minute skit. Radio — Write a script for a 30-second commercial. Script (use additional paper if needed):

Props (radio — include sound effects, voice inflection):

Sketch Direct Mail, Billboards, Specialty Advertising, Newspaper

Materials Needed:

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Activity Marketing Survey

Resources Career Awareness for Marketing Activities and Entrepreneur Unit DE1300

Related Subject Language Arts

Order by calling ODCTE Customer Service at 1-800-654-4502.

National Career Development Guidelines: IX Understanding how to make decisions. Suggested Oklahoma P.A.S.S. Grades 3-5 Academic Concept Interpret a survey. Activities • Class will determine which products would sell best individually and which products would sell best in packages. • Teacher presents lesson on pricing and profit margins, adding in cost of advertising and other costs such as shoplifting, packages, setting up store, etc. • Conduct market survey of potential supply and demand. • Tally items students will most likely buy. Closure/Evaluation Surveys are complete and ready for use. Venn Diagrams will also be helpful. Materials/Supplies Oriental Trading Company Catalog Market Surveys

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Sample Marketing Survey for Students Our class is conducting a project to learn more about marketing and entrepreneurship. We need your advice. Please answer the following questions honestly. Thank you for your help. 1.

Which of the following products would you purchase? Please select only one. Product A ______

Product C ______

Product B ______

Product D ______

*Note to Teacher: Have potential products displayed for students to view. 2.

3.

How much would you be willing to pay for the product you selected above? ______ (0 - $.25)

______ ($.51 - $.75)

______ ($.26 - $.50)

______ ($.76 - $1.25)

Which of the following store names do you prefer? ______ XYX

4.

5.

______ ($1.26 and up)

______ ABC

What is your favorite color? ______ Red

______ Pink

______ Other

______ Blue

______ Green

Are you ______ male or ______ female?

*Teachers: This is a sample marketing survey to get you started. Have students brainstorm and then add questions to the survey. Select questions that the students believe will provide useful answers. The students should then tally results, convert the answers to percentages, and make their presentation to the class. The survey could be broken down so that each question is tabulated by two or more students.

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Career Exploration – Middle Grades Best Practices School-Based Enterprises

Resources Getting Down to Business, Math Scape 6-8, Curriculum, Grade 7 Units 312-540-4600 www.creativepublications.com

T-Shirt Business Target Grade Grades 6-7 School Name/City Stillwater Middle School Stillwater, Okla.

Hot Dog Stand: The Works, Students practice math, problem-solving, and communication skills in a business simulation. Sunburst software. 1-800-321-7511

Core Subject Relation All Subjects Contact Becky Szlichta Math Instructor

MicrosoftWorks

Description Middle school students visited small business owners in the downtown area and gave oral presentations at school on how the business got started and what skills learned in school were helpful. Students learned about the power of advertising and participated in a “Design an Ad” contest (Newspaper in Education) in their language arts class. They studied good and poor employment skills and employee/employer characteristics in science class. Spread sheets and P=I-E were covered in their math class. This preliminary information prepared students for the T-shirt business. Each class played an active role in the business — science class was responsible for survey and design, language arts class handled advertising, history class took presales and orders, and math class did accounts and delivery. Students took a field trip to watch silk screeners. The profits of the business were used to provide Christmas gifts to Payne County Youth Shelter.

School-Based Enterprises School Store Target Grade Grade 6 School Name/City Custer Elementary Thomas-Fay-Custer Unified School District Custer, Okla. Core Subject Relation All Subjects Contact Tracy Hajny Instructor Description Sixth-grade students visited banks to learn how to obtain a loan to start a school store business. Students decide what is needed in the store, wait on customers, make change, and are involved in a variety of positions. The store is open 20 minutes every day during the noon hour. 43

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School-Based Enterprise

Best Practices: Middle Grades (continued) School-Based Enterprises

School-Based Enterprises

See Below

Summit Mall (crafts, food, and raffle)

Target Grade Middle School – High School

Target Grade Grade 6

School Name/City Barstable, UK

School Name/City Summit Middle School Edmond, Okla.

Core Subject Relation All Subjects

Core Subject Relation All Subjects

Contact www.barstable.essex.sck.uk/DandT/ courses/menu.html

Contacts Molly Goen and Vance Crampton Social Studies Instructors (They provided in-service at the Create Conference.)

Description This site provides suggestions of course content by week for the following projects: • Promotional Sunglasses • Toothbrush Holder • Disco Badge • Mirror Project • Mechanical Toy • Night Light • Opening Bridge

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Description A two-week integrated lesson to expose students to the real world of business. Each sixth-grade teacher plays an active role in the Summit Mall. Math – percent, loans, profit, loss Science – natural resources Foreign Language – money, currency exchange rates Social Studies – supply/demand, economics, wants/needs English – writing commercial The mall is open two hours one day prior to Christmas vacation. Students are limited to five dollars to purchase supplies for the company. Each student pays a fee for booth space, business license, loan application, and advertisements. On the day of the mall, parents are invited and given $100 to spend at the mall. The amount of money students receive to spend at the store is determined by what they score on their economics test. 44

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Best Practices: Middle Grades (continued) School-Based Enterprises

School-Based Enterprises

T-Shirt Printers, Recycling Center/ School Supply Store, Bicycle Repair Shop, Bistro

Donut Shop Target Grade Grades 6-8

Target Grade Middle School

School Name/City Grove Middle School Grove, Okla.

School Name/City Morris Schott Middle School Mattowa, Wash.

Core Subject Relation English, Math, Science

Core Subject Relation All Subjects

Contacts Jerry Mathews Career Instructor

Contact Andre Stritmatter Special Education Director

Description Donuts are delivered to Grove Middle School each morning, Tuesday through Friday, for students to sell before school starts. Mr. Mathews has four career classes — each is in charge of selling the donuts one morning per week.

Description Students with disabilities created and ran business ventures. They were doing so well that general education students wanted to be a part of the companies. Some of the profits go toward college scholarships for graduating high school seniors. The graduates have to apply to the particular business sponsoring the scholarship.

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Greeting Card Manufacturing Company Entrepreneur Project This project was developed to help integrate business and industry within the classroom to give students hands-on awareness of the relationship between school and work. Students apply their knowledge of math, language arts, reading, social studies, and writing while working cooperatively in the real world of work to produce greeting cards. The outline is a snapshot view of how to start a company. It is important for the teacher to visit each site to become aware of all the facets in starting a company. Information from the visits help in preparing lesson plans and activities. After speakers come to the school or students visit the site to learn the skills, students finalize the articles of incorporation and sale of stock. Students can begin producing the greeting cards by January and sell them for Valentine’s Day.

I. Career Awareness

C. Attorney visits class. An attorney works with the class in writing articles of incorporation, establishing bylaws, and selling stock certificates. Customers who purchase stock will not receive dividends on their investment; any profit made by the company will be used to purchase additional equipment for this project. 1. Teacher awareness – on site 2. Student awareness – classroom speaker 3. Skill and training requirements for law career 4. Types of law careers 5. Discussion of legal aspects of setting up a corporation

A. Human Resource person visits. The class learns to apply appropriate dress, grooming, and social skills when they visit the sites or have a guest speaker. 1. Teacher awareness – phone call 2. Student awareness – classroom speaker 3. Discussion of appropriate skills 4. Skills and training for Human Resources Specialist B. Students visit a bank. Students are divided into small groups to shadow workers in each department. Students watch for math, communication, and cooperative skills used on the job. 1. Teacher awareness – on site 2. Student awareness – on site 3. Departmental functions within bank 4. Employee skills and training

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D. Students visit newspaper manufacturing plant. Students observe the printing and advertising process. Students write ads for the newspaper as a writing assignment. 1. Teacher awareness - on site 2. Student awareness - on site

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Greeting Card Manufacturing Company (continued) 3. Departmental functions within newspaper plant 4. Employee skills and training

D. Attorney will help prepare facsimile of Articles of Incorporation (lesson plan included).

E. Car salesperson visits. A salesperson speaks to class about cooperation in the workplace, salesmanship, and marketing. He/ she relates these topics to selling any product. 1. Teacher awareness – on site 2. Student awareness – classroom speaker 3. Departmental functions within car lot 4. Types of careers

E. Prepare stock certificates. F. Sell stocks (10 cents per share). G. Attorney will act as an advisor and work with officers of the corporation. H. Job applications and selections: 1. Administrative Assistant 2. Personnel Department 3. Accounting Department 4. Sales Staff 5. Marketing Department 6. Warehouse/Inventory 7. Safety and Health Department 8. Production Department

F. Small business management coordinator from a technology center visits class. A small business management coordinator can assist in developing a business plan. Students conduct market surveys and cost analysis. 1. Teacher awareness – on site 2. Student awareness – classroom speaker 3. Types of careers

I. Prepare business cards — can be computer generated. J. Proposal is submitted to principal and superintendent for business license. K. This process will begin first of November.

G. Site and speaker visits are completed in September.

III. Financing II. Corporation Development

A. Second visit to bank: 1. Officers of corporation make application. 2. Officers apply to bank for commercial loan — business capital.

A. Decide on corporate name and logo (lesson plan included). B. Elect officers of corporation: 1. President 2. Vice President of Personnel 3. Vice President of Finance 4. Vice President of Sales 5. Vice President of Marketing 6. Vice President of Inventory 7. Vice President of Health Control 8. Vice President of Production

B. Bank will act as financial advisor and work with vice president of finance during course of project.

C. Weekly board meetings begin once production starts.

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Greeting Card Manufacturing Company (continued)

IV. Manufacturing A. Class purchases supplies: computer paper, color copy paper, paper for packaging, price tags, sales slips/receipts, poster board, magic markers, two videotapes, string or ribbon for packaging, cost of making copies, cash drawer. B. Class produces cards using computer, printer, and copier. C. Students package product. D. Price of product is determined by figuring cost and profit margin (lesson plan included). E. Students maintain inventory. F. Students advertise product (lesson plan included). G. Class sells product (lesson plan included). H. Manufacturing representative will work as advisor with the vice presidents of Sales, Inventory, and Production during course of project. I. Production will last from January through May. V. Culmination of Project A. Corporate officers return to bank to pay off commercial loan. B. Profits are used to purchase item for school (to be decided on by officers and employees of the class corporation). C. Celebration is held.

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Activity Figuring Cost of Greeting Cards (Bank)

Mathematics Content Skills 6th Grade — II, III, and VI

• Based on the total cost of supplies, the class will estimate the amount of capital necessary to borrow from the bank. • With the assistance of the bank, students will determine repayment figure of the loan based on the interest rate set by the bank. • The class will determine the cost of producing each card, based on cost of supplies and repayment of loan. • Based on the cost of production (above), the class will determine the sales price of each card in order to show a profit. • The class will compute the percent of profit per card based on several sales prices. • Class will determine best sales price based on data.

Information Skills – Proficient Level II, III, IX

(Note: Class will work closely with a representative from the bank.)

Related Subject Math National Career Development Guidelines: VIII Understanding how work relates to the needs and functions of the economy and society. Suggested Oklahoma P.A.S.S. Mathematics Process Standards 6th Grade Meets All Process Standards

Academic Concept Number Sense and Number Theory.

Closure/Evaluation Each group will have a set of bids to present to the class. The students will be able to compute a total cost for supplies and secure a loan for the purchase of supplies at the agreed upon price. Cards will sell at the agreed upon sales price, and a profit will be made.

Activities • The class will prepare a list of the necessary supplies needed to produce the greeting cards. • The class will be divided into groups of four to solicit bids for various supplies and to be assigned suppliers to contact. • The groups will determine appropriate means for soliciting bids, i.e., phone, mail, or personal visit. • The groups will secure bids. • Each group will present their bids to the class. • The class will compute the total cost of supplies based on most costeffective bids. 49

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Activity Preparing Articles of Incorporation (Attorney)

• The class will write a final draft of the Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws.

Related Subjects Language Arts, Information Skills

Closure/Evaluation The attorney approves the final draft of the Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws.

National Career Development Guidelines: VIII Understanding how work relates to the needs and functions of the economy and society. Suggested Oklahoma P.A.S.S. Middle School – Junior High Language Arts – Writing A and B Listening/Speaking A and E Information Skills – Proficient Level II, III, IX Activities • The attorney will speak to the class regarding requirements for forming a corporation. • The class will review various forms, provided by the speaker, that are required when setting up a corporation. • The class will discuss and list the necessary components to be included in our class Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws based on actual forms provided by the speaker. • The class will write a rough draft of Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws. • The speaker will review the rough draft and assist in making any revisions and/or suggestions. www.okcareertech.org/guidance

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Activity Promoting the Product (Newspaper Plant)

• The class will be divided into groups of four. • Each group will prepare an advertisement promoting our greeting cards. They may choose from one of the following forms: – Video (live action commercial skit) – Audio (audio tape or school PA system) – Direct Mail (flyers for take home folders) – Billboards (posters/bulletin boards) – Newspaper (advertising or press release for local newspaper and weekly parents’ bulletin)

Related Subject Language Arts National Career Development Guidelines: V Understanding the relationship between work and learning. Suggested Oklahoma P.A.S.S. Middle School – Junior High Language Arts – Reading Responding to Text II — H, I, K, O, P Information and Research III — D, E, I, K

Closure/Evaluation The products will be presented before the class for peer evaluation. Final products will then be distributed to appropriate areas for promotion of greeting cards.

Writing A and B Listening and Speaking A, E, J Visual Literacy A, B, E Grammar/Usage and Mechanics A Activities • The class will visit a newspaper. • The class will discuss the purpose of advertising and various types of media used in advertising. • The teacher will model various types of persuasive materials including newspaper ads and letters to the editor. • The class will discuss and list the characteristics of a good persuasive piece. 51

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Activity Let’s Make Money

• Once they have completed their business plans, have the teams use the handout on page 55, “Marketing Plans,” to develop a detailed plan on how they will market their team’s product. • Have each team make a presentation to the class on their proposed business. Teams should include information gathered from their research, business plan, and marketing plan. • After listening to the presentation, ask the class to determine which of the proposed businesses they feel could be successful. If they believe any of them would not be successful, ask them to tell the class why.

Related Subjects Social Studies, Instructional Technology National Career Development Guidelines: VIII Understanding how work relates to the needs and functions of the economy and society. Suggested Oklahoma P.A.S.S. Middle School – Junior High Academic Concept Information and Research Writing Listening/Speaking

Option: Select the enterprise that shows the most potential and set the business up as a class project. Allow the students to determine how the money they earn will be spent.

Activities • Lead a brainstorming session to identify types of school-based enterprises the class might pursue. • Divide the class into teams of four to six students and let each team choose an enterprise to research. Research should include gathering information from the student body to determine if the team’s enterprise would be a welcome addition to the school and students. • Ask each team to research its enterprise and develop an outline of what would be involved in starting up the enterprise. • Have the teams develop a business plan for their enterprises. “The Basic Business Plans” handout on page 54 outlines what should be included in their plans.

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Closure/Evaluation Students will be evaluated on their research, business and marketing plans, class presentation, and team participation. Materials/Supplies Computer with Internet access (if possible), library or other sources for research, “Basic Business Plans” handout, “Marketing Plans” handout, paper, pen/pencil

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Let’s Make Money Activity (continued) Resources Career Development Activities, Middle School/Junior High CS1101 Order by calling ODCTE Customer Service at 800-654-4502 The National Center for Research in Vocational Education site has an online publication entitled Who’s Minding The Store? A Guide for Educators Working With School-Based Enterprises. It can be found at http:// ncrve.berkeley.edu/ abstracts/MDS-1254/ For more information related to starting a new business, students might visit the following Web sites: The Small Business Knowledge Base, found at http://www.bizmove.com/ Business Owner’s Toolkit, found at http://www.toolkit.cch.com/

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Basic Business Plans If you don’t know where you’re going, how will you know when you get there?

Financial Analysis – This section outlines the projected costs, and hopefully, profits for your business. • Initial costs – equipment, supplies, etc. • Operating expenses • Cost of your product/service • Selling price of your product/ service • Break-even point

Business plans form a framework or road map for businesses just starting out. A good plan will help you analyze the business climate, competition, financing, and strategies. For this activity, you will be creating a simplified business plan. The basic elements in a simplified business plan include:

For more comprehensive information on business plans, you can visit the Small Business Administration’s Web site at:

A Business Summary – This is an overview or description of your business, and it includes many details about your business such as: • Name of business • Type of business and product/ service you plan to sell • Vision/Mission statements • Your goals/objectives for the business • Location of business • What makes your business unique? Why is this a good idea?

http://www.sba.gov/starting/ indexbusplans.html.

Organizational Management – How will your business be managed? • How many employees will you have? • What will be their positions/roles? Marketing Plan – This section includes your marketing strategies. • Who do you see as your customers? • How are you going to “sell” your business? (PR) • How are you going to “sell” your product/service? (Advertising)

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Marketing Plans You’ve started a business. You have plans for producing a product. You’ve done the research that says this is a product people need. Now how do you decide who will want your product? How will you let them know it is available? How much will you charge? You need a marketing plan! As with business plans, marketing plans help you determine where you want to go and how to get there. Of course, you want to make a profit, but how do you decide what to charge? How will you advertise to reach your potential customers? How do you know who your potential customers are?

Pricing — How do you determine the selling price for your product? Consider such things as your cost, how much profit you want to make, how much the competition is selling your product for, etc. Remember, you want to charge enough to make a profit but not so much the customers won’t buy it. Promotion — How will you let people know you have a product for sale? Consider different types of advertising and good public relations. Some forms of advertising include print ads, television commercials, signs and billboards, radio spots, and word-of-mouth. Remember your target audience when planning your advertising, and use the type of ads that will best reach them!

The first thing you need to do to develop a marketing plan is to determine your potential customers or your “target market.” Consider such factors as: • Age • Gender • Income level • Where they live • What they do

Budget — How much can you afford to spend on marketing and advertising? If the sky’s the limit, you can probably do it all. If your budget is limited or nonexistent, your imagination and some creativity can go a long way — like making your own signs or posters, getting a story in the local and/or school newspaper, or making announcements over the school intercom.

Once you have determined who your customers are, you can plan how to reach them and sell to them. You will need to consider such things as: Competition — Who is your competition? Hopefully, when you decided to start a business or sell a product, you considered who else was doing the same thing. If not, do so now — this information will help you in many ways.

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Activity Logo Logic

• Have the students use the guidelines to create a logo for their business. Each student on the team should create his/her own logo. It can be done on the computer or by hand. • Ask the team to select one logo they feel best portrays their business or product. Have them write a justification for their selection. • Display all the logos in the classroom.

Related Subjects Art, Instructional Technology National Career Development Guidelines: V Understanding the relationship between work and learning. Suggested Oklahoma P.A.S.S. Middle School – Junior High Academic Concept Visual Literacy Creation of Art Media

Closure/Evaluation Students will be evaluated on their logos, logo guidelines, justification, and team participation.

Activities • Lead a class discussion about logos. Discuss which logos the students like best, why they remember them easily, and what they think makes a good logo, etc. • Divide the class into teams of three to four students and ask each team to create or select a business or product. The team will then create an appropriate logo for their business or product. • Have the teams research logos. They can use traditional graphic design literature, search the Internet, or interview a graphic designer. If they use the Internet, About.com’s graphic design section has links to several articles on logos. Its logo design links page can be found at . See the Additional Resources section for additional Web sites. • Ask the teams to write down the basic guidelines they find.

Materials/Supplies Computer with Internet access, paper, pen/pencil, markers/art supplies

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Resources Career Development Activities, Middle School/Junior High CS1101 Order by calling ODCTE Customer Service at 800-654-4502 Additional Resources Here is a list of Web sites that might be helpful for this activity. Dimension 47 Studio is a commercial site for the design firm, but it offers information on basic logo design. It is found at http://dimension47.com/ design.htm For some sample logos, visit the Logo Wizard site at http://www.thelogo wizard.com/content/samples.htm

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Career Preparation – High School Best Practices School-Based Enterprises

School-Based Enterprises

The Cage

Bulldog Designs

Target Grade Grades 11-12

Target Grade Grades 10-12

School Name/City Broken Arrow High School Broken Arrow, Okla.

School Name/City Empire High School Empire, Okla.

Core Subject Relation Marketing and Business Management, Math, English, Social Studies, Computer Technology

Core Subject Relation Business and Computer Technology, Science, Math, English Contact Dee Griggs Computer Technology Coordinator and Business and Technology Instructor

Contact Susan Krebsbach Business Management Instructor DECA Sponsor and The Cage Advisor

Description Bulldog Designs was established six years ago and has been a major contributing factor in the growth of the Business and Computer Technology program at Empire High School. This school-based enterprise allows students in the areas of Advanced Computer Technology, Desktop Publishing, Multimedia, Web Page Design, and Information Services to work on individual projects as well as working as a member of a team to complete major projects. The students have been able to build an impressive portfolio of their work, and the bids the Bulldog Design teams have been awarded have contributed to the purchase of more hardware and software for the computer labs.

Debbie M. Davis Marketing Education Instructor DECA Sponsor and The Cage Advisor Description The students in the Marketing Education program at Broken Arrow High School opened a school-based enterprise named The Cage in May of 1997. The Cage has been highlighted as a premier school-based enterprise through the Marketing Education program in Oklahoma. The store is run entirely by 180 Marketing Education students and four student managers. The students do everything from designing and ordering the products to inventory control. The Cage serves as a hands-on learning lab for the students of the Marketing Education program. The lab also provides occupational students who are not enrolled in work study the opportunity to experience a retail setting.

(continued)

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Best Practices: High School (continued) Description The students in the Agricultural Education program at Norman High School opened a school-based enterprise named “The Orange Thumb.” The Orange Thumb provides floral products, fresh plants, plant and artificial arrangement rentals, and landscaping. Agricultural Education and Marketing Education students who have won at both state and national contests for their marketing plan and business applications operate the store.

Examples of the projects include: • multimedia shows for area schools and businesses • desktop publishing projects such as the Career Activity File for the Guidance Division of the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education that won the Governor’s Award for effective partnerships • T-shirt designs, logo designs, etc.

School-Based Enterprises Orange Thumb

School-Based Enterprises

Target Grade Grades 9-12

School Store Target Grade Grades 9-12

School Name/City Norman High School Norman, Okla.

School Name/City Round Rock High School Round Rock, Texas

Core Subject Relation Agricultural Education, Science, Math, English, Marketing Education

Core Subject Relation Math, English, Computer Technology

Contact Jona Kay Squires Agricultural Education Instructor (Agriscience, Agricultural Communications, Horticulture I and Horticulture II). Implemented and maintains school-based business and oversees numerous students in job placement opportunities.

Contact Carol Clark Special Education Instructor School Store Advisor Description Students with disabilities run the school’s store, which provides life skills that help them in the real world. The store is a stepping stone to community-based learning. By giving them experience on campus, teachers are able to prepare these students for part-time jobs and expose them to a variety of careers. Students learn advertising and handle all promotions for the store.

Ida Fryhover Marketing Education Instructor (Marketing, Advertising, Selling, Job Placement or Cooperative Marketing Education). Instrumental in maintaining school-based business.

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Best Practices: High School (continued) School-Based Enterprises

Contact Athena Frank Business Education Instructor, FBLA Advisor

High-Tech Customer Service Target Grade Grades 9-12

Description Future Business Leaders of America at Ripley High School took orders for personalized poems. Poems were written for Mother’s Day, graduation, and baby showers. Customers could order a poem, a poem with frame, and a poem with frame and mat. Money raised helped students attend nationals.

School Name/City Pike County Central High School Pikeville, Kentucky Core Subject Relation Computer Technology, Business Skills, Communication Contact Bill Heise Network Manager

School-Based Enterprises

Description Pike County Central High School’s help desk teaches students how to analyze data, receive marketable skills, work with customers, and receive a grade. Students work in 90minute shifts fielding computer questions from the district’s 7 high schools, 2 middle schools, 20 elementary schools, and the district office.

T-Shirt Business Target Grade Grades 9-12 School Name/City Oilton High School Oilton, Okla. Core Subject Relation English, Math, Art, Computer Technology Contact Dwayne Noble History Instructor

School-Based Enterprises Personalized Poetry

Description Students are walked through a business plan with the assistance of a local business person and Junior Achievement. They cover all aspects of a business to produce a quality product for the customer.

Target Grade Grades 9-12 School Name/City Ripley Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) Ripley, Okla. Core Subject Relation English, Math, Art

Contact this Internet site to locate your closest Junior Achievement organization: www.ja.org 59

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Career Activity File K-12

School-Based Enterprise

Best Practices: High School (continued) School-Based Enterprises

School-Based Enterprises

Cookie Sales and Cards

Student Bank

Target Grade Grades 9-12

Target Grade Grades 11-12

School Name/City MacArthur High School Lawton, Okla.

School Name/City Herrin High School Herrin, Ill.

Core Subject Relation Math, Social Studies

Core Subject Relation English, Math

Contact Susie Hart Autistic Program

Contact Dr. Brenda Ferguson Description The First Tiger Trust of Herrin is the first student-run bank in the state of Illinois. All employees of the bank — from the president to the tellers — are students. Students train in banking operations for six to eight weeks. Limited to juniors and seniors, the Banking/Finance class accepts students who have one year of accounting instruction and approval from the bank advisor. Students are selected not only on their accounting grade but also on attendance and qualities such as honesty and responsibility. This class offers many opportunities for the students enrolled. They learn the meaning of teamwork, getting along with the public, and math skills. For instance, at the end of each month, interest is manually calculated and verified by the students before it is posted to the account cards. Ledgers are then posted to the journals. The depositing bank audits the work at the end of each month. The bank serves only students, faculty, and staff at Herrin High School. It is open three days a week during the school’s two lunch hours.

Mary Martha Multihandicapped Description Students in the autistic program make cookies from scratch on Tuesday and bake them on Wednesday. They are sold during the lunch hour. Students in the multihandicapped program take recycled paper and make cards. They use switches to work the shredder and blender. Students and faculty can purchase these at the school store. Monies from these fund-raisers are used to help pay the Special Olympics fee and expenses for eating lunch in a restaurant.

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Best Practices: High School (continued) School-Based Enterprises

Language Arts classes for assignments completed during the operation of B.O.S.S. Enterprises. Business activities also teach mathematics through accounting, record keeping, inventory, counting change, and completing time cards.

B.O.S.S. Enterprises Target Grade Grades 9-12 School Name/City River Valley High School Mohave Valley, Arizona Core Subject Relation English, Math

School-Based Enterprises School Store

Contact Blake Leber

Target Grade Grades 9-12

Description In the Colorado River Union High School District, high school special education students participate in B.O.S.S. Enterprises (Business Our Students Study). Students create and run entrepreneurial activities that fit their abilities, such as a custom card business, a beef jerky business, specialty product advertisements, importation and sale of Mexican coffee and products, and a retail store located in the Laughlin/Bullhead International Airport. During the summer months, students market and distribute “Cool Snakes,” a personal necktie evaporative cooler. Students run every aspect of all B.O.S.S. Enterprises, including accounting, manufacturing, distribution, sales and management. Students learn both academic and business skills while running the school business. Students write detailed business plans and business letters, speak publicly, and create advertisements and memos. Students may receive credit in their

School Name/City R2J School District Loveland, Colo. Core Subject Relation English, Math, Social Studies, Computer Technology Contact Nan Barron Speech/Language Pathologist Description Before starting the school store, students surveyed the student body and staff. In operating the school store, students work with vendors, keep the checkbook in Quicken, do the weekly inventory on the computer, and use a digital camera to update the Web site. The art class designed a T-shirt, which is one of the items sold through the store.

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Business Plan Internet Sites Rental Car Company http://www.jian.com/html/r_splan.asp

A business plan is a written summary of what you hope to accomplish and how to organize resources to meet your goals. It is a road map for operating and measuring progress of your company. Log on to the following sites for business plans and samples.

Depending on the size of the group, it may be advisable to assign teams of students particular sections of the business plan.

Business Plans SBA – Small Business Answer A tutorial and self-paced activity. http://www.sbaonline.sba.gov/starting/ indexstartup.html

Entrepreneurship Lessons on the Internet TrackStar is a free service provided by the South Central Regional Technology in Education Consortium (SCR*TEC) that allows you to create on-line laps, or “tracks,” to guide students through existing Web pages. This site has hundreds of TrackStar lessons already created for your use. http://trackstar.scrtec.org/

Three Business Templates — Elegant, Contemporary Style, Professional Style http://bus.colorado.edu/faculty/ lawrence/documents/templates.htm BizPlus – Info Resource Each topic links to more information • Pick a Name • Trademark Your Name or Product • Incorporate • Develop a Business Plan http://www.bizplus.com/

Track ID: 2213 Track Description: Entrepreneurship Project. Entrepreneurship is the process of starting and operating your own business. Before starting your business, you must decide on the legal form: sole proprietorship, partnership, or corporation. Then select a service business and develop a business plan. Your business plan should list each relevant part and briefly describe what will be included under each section.

“Who’s Minding the Store? A Guide for Educators Working With SchoolBased Enterprises” This guide provides tools and strategies to help teachers establish and operate an SBE. http://ncrve.berkeley.edu/allinone/ MDS-1254.html

Track ID: 5542 Track Description: Students investigate aspects of Business Plans. They view existing plans, research basic components of entrepreneurial success, and learn about financing options.

Sample Business Plans Fitness Center http://153.91.1.141/sbdc/centsbdc/ BUSPLAN.htm

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After the Business Plan Training • Schedule to train employees. • Serve as team leader — facilitate weekly meetings.

Once the business plan is completed, ask students to start hiring personnel to run the business. A sample list may include: • Store/Personnel Manager • Assistant Manager • Merchandise Manager • Market Researcher • Advertising Manager • Accountant • Inventory Manager • Ordering Manager

Schedules • Develop work schedules. • Assign weekly chores. • Rotate students among different functional areas.

Modify the “Sample Job Descriptions” to fit your business.

Performance Rating • Assessment of on-the-job skills. • Assessment of content knowledge demonstrated.

Interview • Use the attached “Resumé and Position Application Form.” • Conduct interviews and fill all positions.

Employee Health and Safety • Report accidents. • Prevent accidents.

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Sample

Merchandise Pricing Procedures Consult your school store sales manager and establish procedures, or use the following sample procedures for pricing merchandise and/or adjusting prices when necessary.

Sample Procedures for Pricing Merchandise 4. All items should be priced with the appropriate type of price ticket or sticker indicating stock number, size (if applicable) and price. A requisition form should be completed to gain approval for purchasing a label gun and pricing stickers necessary for the type of merchandise carried by the school store.

1. In most instances, use the retail price suggested by the vendor as the selling price. Often the retail price is the cost times two. For example, an item costing 50 cents would have a retail price of $1 plus tax. 2. Final pricing decisions should not be made until after comparison shopping for competitive prices and customer service is analyzed. The school store enjoys the competitive advantage of location and convenience. It is at a disadvantage in offering quantity discounts and a variety of type, color, and sizes in many products.

5. When an item price adjustment must be made for a sale, markdown, discount, etc., a price adjustment form must be completed to maintain proper inventory control and accounting levels.

3. Take into consideration the cost of product, income level of your market, product waste, student error, supplies, and desired profit.

School-Based Enterprises: “How to Manage and Operate Your School Store” Contact: ODCTE, Customer Service, 800-654-4502

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Sample

School Store Merchandise Ordering Procedure Consult your school store accounting/purchasing manager and establish procedures, or use the following sample procedures for ordering merchandise.

Procedures for Ordering Merchandise 1. Complete school store merchandise order form supplied by vendor.

3. Once purchase has been approved, a school purchase order and a purchase order number will be issued.

2. Attach vendor order form to a completed school requisition form to be given to the accounting department and/or appropriate designee (advisor) for purchase approval.

Sample

School Store Merchandise Receiving/Delivery Procedure Consult your school store sales manager and establish procedures, or use the following sample procedures for receiving merchandise.

Procedures for Receiving Merchandise 1. Obtain vendor packing slip from carton and check off merchandise against packing slip.

3. Notify store manager of any merchandise substitutes, shortages, or damage.

2. Obtain a copy of invoice from accounting/purchasing department for comparison to packing slip. The invoice is sent from the vendor to the school store to request payment of merchandise.

4. Record the delivery on the receiving form or log. Include appropriate stock number, item description, unit cost, quantities, retail price (as suggested by vendor), date, and vendor name on the receiving form for input into inventory control.

School-Based Enterprises: “How to Manage and Operate Your School Store” Contact: ODCTE, Customer Service, 800-654-4502 65

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Sample

Job Description Student Name __________________________________________________________________ Department

Personnel

Position

Store Manager/Personnel Manager

Reports to ______________________________________________________________________ Function List of Duties and Tasks: 1. Develop job descriptions for store personnel. 2. Develop or locate a job application form for store personnel. 3. Coordinate employee interviews for any remaining management positions in school store and all sales personnel (all class members). 4. Devise an employee handbook.

5. Develop an employee training plan. 6. Coordinate employee training sessions. 7. Develop an employee schedule. 8. Manage employee grievances. 9. Handle employee evaluations. 10. Conduct interviews. 11. Manage employee benefits.

Sample

Job Description Student Name __________________________________________________________________ Department

Marketing Research/Merchandising

Position

Merchandise Manager

Reports to ______________________________________________________________________ Function

Supervises all merchandising activities.

List of Duties and Tasks: 1. Establish a procedure for ordering merchandise. 2. Purchase stock equipment. 3. Establish procedures for receiving merchandise.

4. Establish procedures for pricing merchandise. 5. Maintain inventory control.

School-Based Enterprises: “How to Manage and Operate Your School Store” Contact: ODCTE, Customer Service, 800-654-4502 www.okcareertech.org/guidance

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Sample

Job Description Student Name __________________________________________________________________ Department

Market Research/Merchandising

Position

Market Researcher

Reports to ______________________________________________________________________ Function

Performs research and analysis of customer wants and needs.

List of Duties and Tasks: 1. Develop and distribute a survey instrument to determine customer wants and needs. 2. Tabulate survey results and develop conclusions and recommendations concerning product selection.

3. Develop a survey instrument to determine consumer behavior. 4. Tabulate survey results and develop conclusions and recommendations concerning store house, customer service, and product lines.

Sample

Job Description Student Name __________________________________________________________________ Department

Advertising

Position

Advertising/Public Relations Manager

Reports to ______________________________________________________________________ Function List of Duties and Tasks: 1. Establish a six-month advertising calendar. 2. Coordinate advertising campaigns (promotional mixes) and advertising budgets with the advertising team. 3. Manage special events, publicity, and promotional aids for each advertising campaign.

4. Budget advertising cost and authorize payment on promotional resources. 5. Assure appreciation is shown for sponsors who donate promotional resources.

School-Based Enterprises: “How to Manage and Operate Your School Store” Contact: ODCTE, Customer Service, 800-654-4502 67

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Resumé and Position

Application Form Name __________________________________________________________________________________ Address ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ Phone _______________ Grade ______ Class Hour ______ Position Sought _________________ Relevant Subjects Studied at School: School Activities _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ Hobbies, Interests _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ Special Honors and Awards _______________________________________________________________________________________ Work Experience Employer’s Name _______________________________________________________________________ Address ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ Telephone ____________________ Dates of Employment — From ___________ To _____________ Duties _________________________________________________________________________________ Employer’s Name _______________________________________________________________________ Address ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ Telephone ____________________ Dates of Employment — From ___________ To _____________ Duties _________________________________________________________________________________ References Name __________________________________________________________________________________ Address ________________________________________________________________________________ Telephone ______________________________________________________________________________ Name __________________________________________________________________________________ Address ________________________________________________________________________________ Telephone ______________________________________________________________________________

School-Based Enterprises: “How to Manage and Operate Your School Store” Contact: ODCTE, Customer Service, 800-654-4502 www.okcareertech.org/guidance

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Sample

School Store Employee Appraisal Form Employee Development Performance Appraisals School store employee performance will be evaluated every _________________________ The following evaluation sheet will be used: Student Name _______________________________________ Date _____________________ School Store Position ____________________________________________________________

Rating Scale 5 - Skilled 4 - Moderately Skilled 3 - Limited Skilled 2 - Unsatisfactory 1 - Not Applicable

Skill _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________

5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Recommended Action _______________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________ Signature

_________________________ Date

School-Based Enterprises: “How to Manage and Operate Your School Store” Contact: ODCTE, Customer Service, 800-654-4502 69

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To sell a product or a service, you need to let people know what you are selling. One of the best ways to do this is to advertise. This activity will allow the students to develop ads for a product or service of their choosing.

their ads. Ads may be written ads for radio, print ads with artwork for newspaper, banner ads for Web pages, storyboards for television ads, etc. • Ask students to make an oral presentation about their product/ service and their choice of advertising. They should explain why they selected their form of advertising and how they created their ad. • Display the students’ ads in the classroom.

Activity Ad Sense Related Subjects Art, Language Arts, Instructional Technology National Career Development Guidelines: V Understanding the relationship between work and learning.

Closure/Evaluation Students will be evaluated on their research, ad, and oral presentation.

Suggested Oklahoma P.A.S.S. Grades 9 - 12

Materials/Supplies Paper, pen/pencil, poster board, markers/art supplies, computer with Internet access (if possible), access to the library or other research materials

Academic Concept Communication Skills Visual Literacy

Resources Web sites dealing with advertising include the following:

Activities • Lead a class discussion on the importance of advertising. • Have the students research the purpose of advertising and list and describe five types of advertising. A possible source of information is MM Design’s on-line newsletter section found at . • Ask the students to select or create a product or service to advertise and determine the best type of advertising for the product/service. • Have the students create advertising for their product/ service. Encourage the students to be creative and innovative with www.okcareertech.org/guidance

The Ad Council, specializing in public service announcements and ads, found at http://www.adcouncil.org/ Excite’s section for small business; promotion, advertising, and PR information, found at http://quicken. excite.com/small_business/cch/text/ ?article=P03_7000 Poznak Law Firm’s information on false advertising, found at http:// www.poznaklaw.com/articles/ falsead.htm

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We have all probably had a defective product or poor service at some time. We may or may not have handled it well. But, how often do we think about what it is like to be on the other side of the complaint? This activity will have the students role play both sides of a customer complaint to give them a better understanding of how complaints should be presented and handled.

• Have each team present their role play for the class. • After each role play, ask the class to critique the activity, noting what was handled properly and what was handled improperly. Closure/Evaluation Students will be evaluated on their role play activity and class participation.

Activity Customer Complaints

Materials/Supplies Computer with Internet access (optional)

Related Subjects Social Studies, Careers

Resources Ideas for complaints include a defective CD being returned to the store, a shirt that shrunk after washing, a car repair that wasn’t done, being charged too much for an item at a store, etc.

National Career Development Guidelines: II Skills to interact positively with others. Suggested Oklahoma P.A.S.S. Grades 9 - 12

Here are some Web sites with information on customer service.

Academic Concept Problem Solving Communication

The Right Answer.com offers tips on soothing the savage customer at http://www.therightanswer.com// angry.html

Activities • Begin a class discussion by asking the students to tell about a time they (or a family member) got a defective product or poor service. Ask them to describe the situation and how it was resolved. Ask them what good customer service means to them. • Divide the class into teams of two. • Assign each team a complaint and ask them to develop a role play dealing with the problem. • Select several teams and ask them to handle the complaint improperly.

Biz Port’s Web site includes an article on providing good customer service at http://www.bizport.com/learn/ custserv.html

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Bulletin Board Ideas

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Career Development Products Occupational Outlook Handbook 2000-2001 Order Number: CS1108 Cost: $13 10th Grade - Adult This handbook describes over 250 jobs — jobs held by over 85 percent of the American workforce. It gives details on nature of work, related occupations, earnings, sources of additional information, training advancement, future employment outlook, and employment opportunities.

our schools. The guide provides examples of lesson plans, activities, policies, and procedures from local school districts as well as a number of resources educators can use to help build effective and inclusive diversity programs. The guide is accompanied by a video showcasing three model sites from Oklahoma. Teachers as Advisors Order Number: SW1020 Cost: $16 High School This toolbox gives implementation suggestions for providing teachers-asadvisors at your school. It contains content materials, monthly activities, check sheets, forms, and teacher training materials to help your school provide education and career planning for all students.

Creating Connections: Integrated Activities for Middle Grades Order Number: CS1303 Cost: $5 Grades 5-8 This collection includes 25 integrated, project-based learning activities for middle-grade students created by teachers from various disciplines. These practical, real-world application activities are designed to integrate academic skills with career exploration in a manner that appeals to middle-grade students. These activities provide a framework for teachers to generate new ideas and serve as a starting point for creating even more project-oriented, integrated activities for the classroom.

Career Classes and Resource Centers Order Number: CS1021 Cost: $22 Grades 6-12 This toolbox provides tools and resources to plan, prepare, and organize instruction for a career class as well as organize and operate a career resource center. Included in the Career Class section are career class contracts, lessons, and suggested career class schedule. The Career Resource Center contains tools, day-to-day operations, and support services available. The Appendix consists of Internet sites, references and resources, games, activities, and bulletin board ideas.

Implementing an Inclusive Diversity Program Order Number: CS1305 Cost: $10 This toolbox highlights some of Oklahoma’s own effective practices for recognizing and celebrating diversity in

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Career Development Products (cont.) Work-Based Learning — Internship and Job Shadowing Order Number: SW1016 Cost: $26 6th Grade - Adult This toolbox consists of student, teacher, business, and parent forms located on 31/2-inch disks to establish and organize Student/Teacher Shadowing and Internships with local school officials and businesses.

and strengths are good clues to possible occupations that they might want to explore. Career Gallery helps them identify what those attributes are and how to relate them to certain occupational groups. Elementary Career Awareness Software Order Number: CS1012 Cost: Request Price Grades 1-7 Interactive multimedia CD-ROM program for career exploration.

Expand Your Child’s Horizon Order Number: CS1304 Cost: One set @ $2 or package of 20 sets @ $25 Grades 5-8 Target Level - 8th Grade Expand Your Child’s Horizon provides educators and parents with information to assist students in making good career decisions. The guide covers educational options, career activities and experiences, identifying and investigating interests, constructing a tentative education/career plan. Its companion piece, “Pathways to Success,” features 13 working adults from a variety of educational paths. They explain how their education and leadership training helped them advance to where they are today. These guides can be used for parent meetings such as teachers as advisors.

Dreams Can Be Reality Order Number: CS9040 Cost: $8 a set Middle School - High School Bright-colored posters list occupations by classroom subject. The occupations on each poster are classified by educational levels of high school/high school with career and technology education, junior/ community college, postsecondary technical, and four-year degree programs or more. Set of eight posters includes science, language arts, social studies, instructional technology, arts, math, foreign language, and skills employers want. To order more: “Skills Employers Want” Poster Order Number: CS9041 Cost: Minimum order of five, each $1

Career Gallery Order Number: CS9000 Cost: $20 package of 30 Grades 6-7 This comic-style booklet is designed to help students realize they are in charge of their future. Students’ interests, abilities,

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Career Stuff Catalog Update (cont.) New Contact

New and Revised Career Development Activities

Oklahoma Wage Survey Report Cost: No Charge Please contact the new number for this valuable resource for employers, guidance counselors, educators, and individuals seeking jobs. The Oklahoma Employment Security Commission develops this report. Over 7,000 employers participated in a survey covering more than 580 different occupations, representing 192,000 wage earners in Oklahoma. Locate information at http:// www.oesc.state.ok.us/lmi/default.htm or call 405-557-5342. This is a change from page 3 in the Career Stuff catalog.

Career infusion is even easier with the following Career Development Activities books. Each activity has been written to meet one of the 12 National Career Development Guidelines. Many activities integrate the Internet. Career Development Activities – Elementary Level Order Number: CS1100 Grades K-5 Career Development Activities – Middle School/Junior High Order Number: CS1101 Grades 6-8

New Product Coming Soon!

Career Development Activities – Mid-High - High School Order Number: CS1102 Grades 9-12

Teachers as Advisors for Middle Grades

Prepared by Career Information Guidance Division Order by calling 1-800-654-4502 Shipping: add 10 percent within the United States. Minimum shipping: $4.50. www.okcareertech.org/cimc To receive a CIMC Catalog, call 1-800-522-5810, extension 831. As products are reprinted, prices will increase.

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Call a friend to tell them about Career Activity File on the Internet. http://www.okcareertech.org/guidance/