12 - There are a few of

12 - There are a few of

RARITAN The Beacon TOWNSHIP Every Reader of the Beacon should keep In mini that the advertisements carry aa much "punch" as the news articles. Ever...

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RARITAN

The Beacon

TOWNSHIP

Every Reader of the Beacon should keep In mini that the advertisements carry aa much "punch" as the news articles. Every advertiser has a meosage for the readers and uses this medium "because he knows the readers desire to keep abreast of every advantage aa well as know what's going on.

Invites new* articles and erpress/onff of opinions on timely subjects from our readers. We welcome all such contributions and will publish them as far as possible. But, It is very important that all correspondence be signed by the writer. Fords Office: 465 New Brunswick Ave.

RAMBLING REPORTER Say s

=

Joseph Dambach, Jr., as sisted by a capable committee, has completed plans for the second annual memorial services of the combined units of the Fords, Keasbey and Hopelawn fire companies. It is slated for Our Lady of Peace church in Fords, Sunday night and promises to be most impressive. 0-0-0 Now that Henry H. Troger, Jr., Raritan Township Commissioner and director of public affairs, has been elected head of that township's Republican organization, plenty of action can be expected. This fella Troger has a way with him that assures big doings in Raritan for the coming presidential election in November. Best of luck to you, Henry. 0-0-0

Governor Harold G. Hoffman will positively attend the Stadium Shows in Woodbridge. A Governor's night has been arranged at which time all the big wigs of the township, county and state will be on hand to help put the shows across with the proverbial bang. 0-0-0

Another important date to be remembered is the annual chief's dinner conducted by the Keasbey Protection Fire Co. The affair is scheduled for June 27 and is in honor of William Dambach, outgoing: chief of the organization. The g-oings-on will take place in the Keasbey school auditorium. 0-0-0

And lest we forget, the Class of 1929 of Woodbridge high school is set to go to town at the Hotel Pines tomorrow night. It is the annual reunion dinner-dance of the members and Dr. Ralph Deutsch, of Fords, who is chairman of the get-together, promises that a swellegent time will be .had by all. He's telling me? 0-0-0

The first of a series of shows planned by the Fords fire company was held at the Fords Playhouse Tuesday night and resulted in a complete success. In addition to the screen feature, local talent headed by Jack Egan, Miss Elaine Jensen, Bob Levine and Katharine Jago entertained the large audience in professional manner. It was a real evening of fun and hilarity. o-o-o Those who ventured to take a spin in the chairplane, thrill-ride at Varady's Amusement Grove, Fords, are still talking about the sensation. When operated at a low speed, the ride is designed for the kiddies, but when it is opened up for the rrown-ups—it's a different story. 0-0-0 The Republican Convention at Cleveland this week was the topic of discussion in Woodbridge and Raritan Townships. A goodly num. ber of ears, belonging to Republicans and Democrats alike, are still drooping from that "key-note" speech Tuesday night. O-O-O

Woo dbrid ge Township's Stadium Queen contest is nearing the finish line. The present candidates, especially the leaders, are opening up and going to town at a great rate of speed. Right now, it's anybody's title. However, a Fords girl is in the lead. Why? Because organizations of this place are assisting. How about local units stepping to the bat now to help out the other Fords and Keasbey candidates. What say ? It's not too late yet. Let's get going! o-o-o Raritan Township's (Continued on page 8)

(and Woodbridge Journal)

The Voice

of the Raritan

Bay

District"

Raritan Township Office: Cor. Main St. & Route 26

FORDS AND RARITAN TOWNSHIP FRIDAY MORNING, JUNE 12, 1936.

VOL. VI. — NO. 14.

The

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STADIUM QUEEN ANNOUNCE DATE YOUTHFUL EXECS CONTEST CLOSES FOR GRADUATION "RUN" TOWNSHIP IN 8 MORE DAYS EXERCISES HERE ION 'SAFETY DAY' ALL VOTES WILL BE RE- CLARA BARTON SCHOOL TO BUT REAL COMMISSIONERS CHECKED AT MIDNIGHT STAND BY TO H-ANDLE BE OPEN TO PUBLIC ON OF JUNE 20 BIG BUSINESS JUNE 18TH FORDS, N. J. — Only eight days more and some young lady is going to be chosen Stadium Queen. The contest will officially close at midnight, June 20 and arrangements are being made for an unattached tally committee to recheck and count every vote. Candidates will be invited to be present. If the closing hour is considered too late by those interested, the committee will be glad to comply with requests for an earlier closing time. All candidates are advised to watch the papers during the coming week for there are numerous offers being made to the "Queen" from permanent waves to gowns. The committee wishes to notify all candidates that returns for any and all books of coupons, credited to candidates and their workers, must be made on or before noon on Friday, June 19 or all votes unaccounted for will be deducted from their total count. This is in fairness to all concerned.

RARITAN TOWNSHIP.—Aided and abeted by the "big shots" themselves, Raritan Township's youthful commissioners, who ruled all municipal affairs for one d a y Tuesday—sold $9,000 of refunding bonds to Kenneth Spear, 24 Commerce street, Newark. The sale is a part of the new $842,000 bond issue which will be sold to refinance township obligations at a low er rate of interest than is being paid at the present. Although the junior executives, picked members of the township'^ safety patrol, stood at the helm, it was really the township officials themselves who actually transacted the evening's business. The student executives and the plficiaJs they represented are us follows: Margaret Bartha, Clara Barton school, Mayor Walter C. Christensen; Justin £izes, Clara Barton school, Commissioner Henry H. Troger, Jr.,; Robert Krog, Oak Tree school, Commissioner Victor C. Pedersen; Louis Marchitto, Piscatawaytown school, Commissioner James C. Porgione; Grace Kenlos, Piscatawaytown school, Commissioner Julius C. Engel. MISS IRENE TOBIAS LEADS Elsie Chille, Clara Barton school FIELD WITH 11,050 Township Engineer Raymond P. VOTES Wilson; Janet Powell, Clara Barton school, Township Attorney FORDS, N. J. — Miss Irene Thomas L. Hanson; John Powell, Tobias, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Oak Tree school, Township Clerk A. J. Tobias, of Fords, is leading Wilfred R. Woodward, and Robert in the Stadium Queen Contest Matthews, Piscatawaytown school, with 11,050 votes according to the iTownship Treasurer Clifford Gillcount made last night by the committee in charge. Miss Tobias is a graduate of the Woodbridge High TO TAKE PART IN ! School and is employed as private STADIUM FESTIVAL; secretary at the Holbrook Hat Co., : of Perth Amboy. Miss Mary Bellanca, who led the field last week, is second with 8,810 votes. The standing to date is as follows: Irene Tobias 11,050 Mary Bellanca 8,810 Bertha Foldhazy, 7,860 Sylvia Dunham 6,556 Mary Charonko 6,087 Mary Guszaly 4,016 Madeline Hackett 3,713 Rosalind Kaufman 1,800 Lorraine Maier 1,188 Peggy Ann Raup 760 Lillian Minsky 610 Eiline Quadt 550 Adaline De Angelo 490 Peggy Concannon 417 Julia Boka 414 Edna Lauritzen 360 Eva Friis 330 Evelyn Barrett 330 Elsie Thompson 310 Anna Dalton, 280 Elizabeth Dunigan 260 RARITAN TOWNSHIP. — According to a report issued by District Clerk John Anderson, of the Board of Education, the following are the dates of the graduation exercises to be held 'by Raritan Township schools: Friday night, June 19—Eighth grade, Oak Tree school in the Clara Barton school auditorium. Monday night, June 22—Eighth grade, Piscatawaytown school in the school auditorium. Tuesday night, June 23—Eighth grade, Clara Barton school in the school auditorium. Wednesday night, June 24— Ninth grade, Clara Barton school in the school auditorium. On Thursday, June 18, the Clara Barton School will be open to the public's inspection.

STADIUM QUEEN STANDING LEAD VETS^lONDS TO AGAIN CHANGES REACH HERE ON MONDAY, JUNE 15

WOODBRIDGE.-A 1 adjusted service bonds for veterans will require the personaLsignature of the veteran, before cashing, according to a communication sent to this paper by James J. Dun.ne, the postmaster. All bonds are expected to reach the local office on the morning of Monday June 15. In the event that the veteran cannot be contacted at his home he may call at the post office which will remain open until 10 P. M., on Monday, Jung 15; Tuesday, June 16; and Wednesday, June 17. "I submit herewith the following information regarding the Adjusted Service Bonds for veterans which are expected to reach this office on the morning of the 15th. "These bonds will be received in registered letters which will require the PERSONAL SIGNATURE of the veteran. Every effort will be made to deliver them to the home of the veteran and secure his signature there. Ln the event he can not be contacted at his home he may call at the post office which will remain open until 10 P. M., on Monday the 15th, Tuesday the 16th and Wednesday, the 17th. "Veterans are not compelled tc have their bonds certified unless they desire to obtain cash for them. The bonds are 3% interest bearing and should be held if the veteran has no immediate need for money. However, if he wishes to receive payment for tjie bands he should bring them to the post office for certification by the Postmaster or any of the following employees who are known to him; Miss Margaret Kelly, William N. Eyerkuss, Russell Lorch, Leroy Litts or Clemens Stancik. "Bonds must be signed IN THE PRESENCE OF the certifying officer who will witness the signature on each bond and issue a receipt for them. "If the veteran is unknown to the certifying officer he must bring two witnesses who are known and who will sign as witnesses to the signature. This procedure must be followed in the case of veterans who are unable to sign their name due to infirmities, etc. "Every effort will be made to handle this extra burden with as little delay as possible.

Three Townshipites Receive Degrees In Education At Rutgers NEW BRUNSWICK. — Harold Goetschius, of Fords and Joseph Ruggieri and Georgianna Cronce, of Woodbridge, were among those upon whom degrees were conferred yesterday afternoon at the annual commencement of the School of Education of Rutgers University. Goetschius and Ruggieri both re ceived degrees of Master of Educa tion, while Miss Cronce received the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education.

BEST SALESMEN IN GUESSING CONTEST TO BE OUTFITTED FORDS, N. J. — Arrangements have been made between the Stadium Commission and Christensen's Department store whereby the boy or man selling the largest number of guesses in the clock contest over five complete cards can enter the store and select any suit, hat shirt and tie and pair of shoes absolutely free. The girl or woman who sells the most guesses over five complete cards can select any two dresses, two hats, two pairs of shoes and purse absolutely free. Those selling the largest number of guesses under five complete cards will receive a Bulova wrist watch and the one selling the next largest amount will be awarded a gold signet ring. Parade Plans Arrangements are also being made for the parade to be held on June 27. All organizations are invited to participate and they are requested to communicate with Thomas Kath, Raymond Moore or the Stadium headquarters. The Mayor has declared his intention of issuing a Stadium Week proclamation for the event. PUBLIC TO JUDGE WOODBRIDGE.—The public will act as the judge in the flag pole contest sponsored by the Stadium Commission it was announced last night. The sketches, which were drawn by high school students, will be placed in the window of the Stadium headquarters on Main street, and the public will be invited to come in and cast ballots for their choice.

Gov. Harold G. Hoffman WOODBRIDGE. — In a communication from Cleveland, Ohio, where he is attending the aNtional Republican Convention, Governor Harold G. Hoffman made known that he will attend the Stadium Shows Week on Friday night, July 3. In connection with the Governor's visit, the Stadium Commission has decided to call the "Night before the Fourth" Governor's Night. Special athletic events and contests together with many free attractions will be offej?ed. The Governor is also scheduled to make an address to the people of Woodbridge.

Where To Get The Beacon The Raritan Township and Fords Beacon, with offices at 465 New Brunswick avenue, Fords, is on sale at the following newsstands: Ferbel's Confectionary, 530 New Brunswick, avenue, Fords. Kovacs' Grocery, Amboy aveM. S. Arway Grocery, 810 Amboy avenue, Raritan Township, J. Toth, Grocery, Woodbridge avenue & Main street, Bonhamtown. J. J. Bacskay Confectionary, 315 New Brunswick ave. Hopelawn. T. Mezo grocery, 501 Crows Mill Road, Fords. V. Madiaz Grocery, Smith street Keasbey. Fee's Confectionary, Smith street and Crows Mill road, Keasbey. Bagdis Market, 50 May street, Hopelawn. And by carrier boys covering the entire Raritan Township, Fords Keasbey, Hopelawn and Metuchen. nue, Raritan Township.

Safety Council Contest Prize Winners Named «-—-— RARITAN TOWNSHIP. — Victor C. Pedersen, commissioner and director of public safety of Raritan Township ,this week annonuced the names of the winners of the contest to sell tickets for the recent minstrel show sponsored by the Safety Council. For selling the largest number of tickets—29 in all—Fred Schaffhauser of the Clara Barton school was awarded $5 for selling the most in the township and $2 for doing likewise in his school. Other §2 prize winners were: Arlene Lund, Piscatawaytown; An na Yuhas and Catherine Wohr, Bonhamtown; Eleanor Porter, Stelton; James Forgione, Oak Tree and Robert McCoy, Sand Hills.

LOCAL WOMAN'S SUIT TO COLLECT $40,000JHOST JURY RETURNS VERDICT OF 'NO CAUSE FOR ACTION' NEW BRUNSWICK,—After deliberating for less than half an hour, a jury sitting in Court of Common Pleas, Wednesday morning returned a verdict of no cause for action in the trial of a suit of $40,000 for the death of Joseph Simak, of Raritan Township, following an automobile accident which took place on the super-highway, Raritan Township, January 10, of this year. The suit was instituted by Mary E. Kapolko, of Raritan Township, administratrix of the Simak estate. The plaintiff claimed the Simak, was in severe pain from the time of the accident until his death which occurred on February 23, and asked $25,000 for his death and an additional $15,000 to cover expenses. William A. Mount of Jamesburg and Ray W. D. Dilatush, of DayIon were the defendants. They were represented by George L. Burton of South River. According to the defense, Mourn was driving a car owned by Dilatush, at the time Simak was struck by the machine. The deceased was crossing the super-highway near Middlesex avenue, and the defense stressed the point, that Simak was at fault in his manner of crossing the road and that Mount was not driving his machine, as charged by the plaintiff. The plaintiff's story was, that Si mak had crossed the highway at a time when not a car was in sight, and that Mount driving at an excessive rate of speed, struck the man and severly injured him, which later caused his death.

DOG CATCHER TO BEGIN DUTY ON MONDAY TO REDEEM DOG FROM WARDEN, OWNER MUST PAY THREE DOLLARS WOODBRIDGE. — If you want to keep your dog and he hasn't the necessary license, we suggest that you get the tags at once from Township Clerk B. J. Dunigan, for the dog catcher comes to town on Monday. August Kurtz, of Perth Amboy, who was officially named dog warden in a resolution passed by the Township committee Monday night, says that he will be right on the job and will pick up dogs who do not wear license tags on their collars. Sergeant Ben Parsons will check the dogs nabbed by the catcher each day and i.n order to redeem your dog within 48 hours you will have to pay three dollars, two of which goes to the dog catcher and one to the Township qf Woodbridge for the purchase of a license.

Many Local People Are On Jury Panels NEW BRUNSWICK. — In the two petit juries drawn by UnderSheriff Thomas Lyons Monday, the following residents of this section were selected to serve in the June 15 to July 4 and July 4 to September 15 semi-terms. June 15 to July 4 Robert Fullerton, Keasbey; Arth ur Lund, Fords; John McGraw, Keasbey; William J. Ryder, Raritan Township , Marie Thompson, Raritan Township and Patrick Tro iano, Raritan Township. July 4 to September 15 Warren Broun, Raritan Township; William F. Erwin, Raritan Township; William Kruedle, Anders Overgaard and John Salaki, of Fords.

PRICE THREE CENTS

PrnincipaFs FIRE UNITS WILL Supervising Contract Is Now Signed TOWNSHIP BOARD --* OF EDUCATION IN HOLD MEMORIAL LENGTHY CONFAB SERVICE. SUNDAY

RARITAN TOWNSHIP.—Frederick A. Talbot, supervising principal of schools in Paulsboro, will j assume his duties in a like capa- j city in Raritan Township July 1. HEARS MANY ROUTINE CASSERVICES WILL BE HELD Talbot's contract was signed by ES AT REGULAR MEETthe local board of education and AT LADY OF PEACE ING a copy delivered to him. CHURCH. FORDS According to a communication from the newly appointed superRARITAN TOWNSHIP. — RouFORDS. — The second annual vising principal, he will visit the memorial service of the combined local school before they close for tine business found the Raritan Township Board of Education units of United Exempt Firemen of the summer vacation. handling a number of cases at its Fords, Keasbey and Hopelawn, will be held at Our Lady of Peace regular meeting Monday night. church on New Brunswick avenue The resignation of Miss Vera E. Sunday night. The committee in Sherwood, English and French incharge have made elaborate plans structor in the ninth grade at the in order that this function shall be Clara Barton school, was received successful. and accepted by the board. Max Bronstein's request to trans The three firemen's units will as for his daughter from Metuchen semble at the Hopelawn fire house high school to the Franklin Junior at 6:45 P. M., and will start the parade from that point at 7 o'high school in Highland Park was clock. The praders will march to RARITAN TOWNSHIP BOARD granted. The Eronsteins reside m Our Lady of Peace church, where OF EDUCATION CONTACTS Vineyard road and the Park the services are scheduled to begin school would be more convenient GOVERNMENT at 7:30 o'clock. The Hopelawn to attend. group will be in charge of the serA recommendation to erect a RARITAN TOWNSHIP. — Ac- fence around the grounds of the vices. cusing township officials for fail- Sand Hills school to protect the ing to take advantage of available children from running out into the government funds, Thomas Hen- highway was made by Miss Ida derson of.Oak Tree, once againh e a d teacher of that brought the dire need of a high j FORDS.—A bit of good school here to the attention of the the building and grounds commitnews reached the Township township board of education Mon- tee. this week when it was an- day night. Pete's Taxi Service, operators of The question of erecting a Rar- one of the school buses, was again nuonccd that a new hat £a.tfitan Township high school has placed under fire. William R. Reed ory will open within the next few weeks, here. The site been on the fire off and on, but chairman of the transportation chosen is the former clubeach time it was smothered by committee, told the board he saw house on Grace street this the "no money" opposition. a passenger get on a school bus place. This week, Henderson pointed and pay a fare. Reed stated thai out that funds could be obtained The factory, which will emthis practice is in violation of the ploy approximately 80 Town- for such a project from the feder- contract. ship girls, in the manufacture al government. He also went to of ladies 'hats, is being started great length citing the immediate by Henry Harbitter, of New need for a local high school. York City. He was urged to However, Henderson was inform locate in the Township largely ed by George Thompson, president through the efforts of William of the school board, that steps had Cohen, a Woodbridge business already been taken by the board WOODBRIDGE. — Gill Robb man, and Building Inspector to obtain a Federal loan a,nd grant. Wilson, director of the department William Allgaier. Thompson also stated that Aylin of aviation of the State of New Necessary repairs have al- Pierson, Perth Amboy architect, Jersey, is seeking suitable sites for ready been started and it is has also been making the neces- air markings in Woodbridge Town sary Washington contact in order estimated that the factory will be ready for operation to assure Raritan Township the ship. According to Wilson, the matter within a month or six weeks. funds. oi securing air markings is the most practicable of safety measures. New Jersey is the most heav ily travelled airway in the world and aids to aerial navigation are extremely important because of this condition. A roof suitable for a marking should be approximately 100 feet or more in length, 30 feet in depth preferably with tar paper, slate or shingle base, or any other m WOODBRIDGE.—Exactly one hundred and eighty- terial suitable for painting. Buildsuch as manufacturing plants, nine students will receive their diplomas next Thursday ings schools, large barns, warehouses, night at the State Theatre, where the Woodbridge High municipal buildings, large garSchool will con-duct the 1936 commencement exercises. ages, water or gas tanks are ideal. The class will be the largest ever to graduate from the lo- The marking consists of the name of the town followed by the letcal high school. ters, "N. J." The paint to be apCommercial Course: Joseph plied and the work to be done is The program will be opened by the Woodbridge High School band. Francis Allgaier, Katherine Ander the responsibility of the DepartRev. Robert Irwin MacBride, past- son, Elmer Anderson, John Rich- ment of Aviation. There is no cost or the Avenel Presbyterian church, ard Anderson, John Andrew Angel to the owner who volunteers his is scheduled to give the invocation. Theodore Carl Aurich, Stella Ma- space. Miss Marcia Lifshitz will give the rie, Paul Bachowsky, John Bacaddress of welcome while the fare- skay, Helen Barney, Joseph Char- But 10 Relief Clients well address will be given by Miss les Bartha, Louis Michael Bartha, Expect Veterans' Bonus Lillian Witovsky. The class song Audrey Mildred Benz, Dorothy this year .has been written by Peg- Lydia Conrad, Margaret Doris gy Anne Raup while the compos- Danko, Marjorie Jean De Satnyik, WOODBRIDGE.—There will be er of the music is Valentine Arthur Robert Deter, Helen S. El- very few cases of persons put off ek, John L. Elias, Charles Thom- relief rolls of the Township due to Schmidt. as Farr, Elizabeth Teresa Fitz- receiving a Veteran's bonus, acA symposium on "Our Pan- patrick, Eva Mario,n Friis, Eugene cording to John T. Ome.nh.iser, muAmerican Policy" will be offered August Gery, Rose Evelyn Gill, nicipal director of relief, due to ss follows: "The Monroe Doctrine" Julius A. Huber, Richard Janni, the fact that most of the veterans Donald Henry Aaroe; "Develop- Anthony Joseph Jeglinski, Mar- are on WPA jobs. At the present ment of Pan-Americanism," Betty garet Elena Kalman. time," said Omenhiser, "there are Rose Crozier; "Recent Trends—An Also: Stephen Francis Katelvero only six positive cases of veterans All-American League," Robert C. ouis Katko, Julius Katrausky, Jo- who will receive a bonus and who Anderson. hanna Marie Kosic, Mary Kovacs, are on relief and. four doubtful The official list of the graduat- John S. Kozma, Carrie Palmer cases which are being investigating class released this week is as Krebs, Steven Rudolph Lazar, Em- ed." follows: ily Helen Lee, Margaret Lee, Ag- During this week alone, OmenAcademic Course: Fred M. Ad- nes Louise Lund, Audrey ^ Gloria hiser stated that sixteen cases have ams, Florence Marie Albertson, Maier, Jennie Mikkeline Masucci, been closed, eight old cases were Margaret Bachoka, Alexander J. Grace Arlene Mathiasen, William reopened due to WPA lay-offs and Bothwell, Robert Wilson Braith- Joseph Mee, Joseph Albert Moll, only one new case has been openwaite, Dorothy Louise Brown, ed. (Continued on page 2) Ruth Margaret Brown, Hildegard E. Brueggeman, Nazareth John Cacciola, Alma eBatrice Cavallito, Michael Sebastian Decibus, Helen Elizabeth DeLisle, Jeanette Elsie Dunfee, Virginia Dunham, Maurice Peter Dunigan, Jr., Violet Ann The Junior Auxiliary of the ma Smith, Mrs. Minnie Zarkovieh. Gloskey, Nancy Claire Grace, Mrs. Laura Hanson and Mrs. ElDorothy Elizabeth Gurka, Alyce Harry Hanson Post No. 163 will len Christianson. Frances Hassey, Rose Hodes, hold a bunco party at Legion hall, * * • * Genevieve R. Hoffman, Stephen; Friday night, June 26. The pro- The Auxiliary is also proud to Louis Hruska, Jr., oJseph H. Hut- ceeds from the affair will be used announce that it wjJl have a litemann, John S. Karnas, Helen toward the purchasing of caps and brary soon for members of the Frances Kluj, Marie Victoria Ko- capes for the members. They will Post, Auxiliary, Juniors and Sons valsky, Genevieve Krause, Pauline receive the National and Auxiliary of the Legion. The members artMary Lance, Edna Ruth Lauritzen, colors and a gavel from the Auxil- working hard at present on thi.-; Evelyn Lawyer, Julius A. Limoli, iary. project and further announceCharlotte Eugenia Logan, Joseph • • • • ments in this connection will bo James Lucas, Mary Magyar, Jo- The regular meeting of the Jun- made later. seph James Martino, Evelyn Leona ior Auxiliary will be held this * * * * McLeod, Gertrude Marie Melder, afternoon at Legion hall. ArrangeA flag code will be displayed at ments will be made for the local Eleanor Mikkelsen, Theodore Roosevelt Nahass, Irene Virginia members to attend the county ral- the home of Mrs. Elizabeth DeNebel, Michael Alexander Nemes, ly. A prize will be awarded to the Matteo, of New Brunswick avenue Victoria Eleanor Pesce, Anna Ma- member, who has the best attend- All neighbors are asked to display the National colors on Sunday, rie Pricz, Madeline Racz, Olive ance for the year. June 14 and this code will aid in Bridget Rielly, Alice Regina Ryan, • • * • Arnold Peter Schmidt, Valentine The Ladies' Auxiliary held its the proper method to display the Schmidt, Walter Steven Skarzen- regular meeting Tuesday evening. flag. The Auxiliary is anxious to ski, Harold Francis Skay, Olive A committee was appointed to have all flags hung properly. Jean Spencer, Lester J. Tobrow- nominate the officers for the com* * * • sky, Joseph Edward Valocsik, Hel- ing year. The committee consists A Flag Day program will be held] en Frida Wetzel, Lillian Witov- of Mrs. DeMatteo, Mrs. Eva Lar- at the next meeting under the disen, Mrs. Emma Baker, Mrs. Em- rection of Mrs. Elizabeth DeMatteo sky, Lillie Evora Young. the Americanization officer. • •

- #

DRIVE IS OPENED TO ACQUIRE OWN HI SCHOOL HERE

NEW HAT FACTORY TO OPEN IN FORDS

STATE HEAD SEEKS SITES IN TOWNSHIP FOR AIR MARKINGS

LARGEST GRADUATING GLASS FROM WOODBRIDGE HIGH SCHOOL TO GET DIPLOMAS NEXT THURSDAY NIGHT

FORDS LEGION BRIEFS

rORDS PERSONALITIES

r

BY MRS. C. ALBERT LARSON

^ ^

MISS CATHERINE REBECK MARRIES GEO. DUDIK HERE

Dortmunder Actien-Beer At Sam's Bar and Grill

WOODBRIDGE HIGH SCHOOL

FORDS.—The famous DortSalutatorian munder Actien-Beer, brewed only jin Dortmund by the largest Ger18 Summit Avenue TeL P. A, jman brewery, is now being served THE WOMAN'S CLUB OF Fords MRS. DANIEL PATEMAN OF ! in Fords at Sam's Bar & Grill, 464 held its annual men's dinner |New Brunswick avenue. Trenton, spent the past weekWednesday at School No, 14. end with her grand-daughter, WEDDING TAKES PLACE AT j The choices hops and the finest Mrs. Willard Dunham of Hornsmalt together with the pure and Mrs. Andrew L. Balint. On WedOUR LADY OF PEACE by street was general chairman. famous Dortmunder water are nesday, they motored to CaldCHURCH, FORDS used to create the delicate and • • * • distinguished Dortmunder beer THE JUNIOR AUXILIARY OF well, where they visited friends. FORDS.—Our Lady of Peace flavor whose prestige has been w w m * the Harry Hanson Post No. 163 American Legion will attend the A SON, MARTIN DUFFY, JR., church was the scene of a beauti- carried the world over, often imcounty rally being held at Lin- was born to Mr. and Mrs. Martin ful June wedding, recently, when itated but never achieved. wood Grove on Tuesday, June Duffy, recently. Mrs. Duffy is Miss Catherine Rebeck, daughter Those who have already visited the former Anne Balint of Fords. of Mr. and Mrs. John Rebeck, of Sam Hodes' establishment and 23, * * • • New Brunswick avenue, became have tasted the Dortmunder Aetien THE WOMAN'S MISSIONARY MISS HENRIETTA DANBACK, Beer are heralding its fine and Society of the Fords Paiish held of Maxwell avenue was among the bride of George Dudik, son of unique flavor. Mr. and Mrs. Michael Dudiuk, of a strawberry festival last night the students of the senior class in the parish house on King of N. J. C. Teachers' College at Ryan street. The marriage cereNewark, who attended the sen- mony was performed by the Rev. George's road. ior tea, Sunday, at the home of John E. Larkin, pastor of the THE PARENT TEACHERS' AS- Dr. M. Ernest Townsend, presi- church. (Continued from page 15 dent of the college, at Glen The bride's wedding gown was sociation of School No. 14 held Frederick Moscarelli, Anna: a card party yesterday after- Ridge, N. J. of white satin and Spanish lace Muller, Albert Nahass, Edna Mary; noon at the school auditorium. * * * * with a full court train of satin ovA DINNER WAS GIVEN BY THEer which fell a veil o fsh^eer tulle Oberlies, Stephen Orosz, Mary MRS. C. COLEMAN, OF FAIR- mothers of the Parent-Teach- from a tiara of orange blossoms. Joan Pa.nconi, Ella Petersen, Anna field avenue .entertained Mr. ers' association of Fords to the She carried an old-fashioned bou- Grace Pierce, Marian E. RasRita Olivia Rively, Anne Mrs. A. Simonsen, of Woodteachers of Fords school No. 7. quet of white sweet peas and lilies- mussen, Berly Rowley, Emma Irene Samu, bridge and Miss Ethel and Emil Those present were, Mr. and of-the-valley. Helen Schlesinger, MadPajak, of Perth Amboy, Sunday Miss Anna Rebeck, cousin of the Nathalie Mrs. Howard Sharp, Mrs. G, eline Louise Schnebbe, Dominick evening. bridge, was the maid of honor and Crounce, Mrs. Repkie, Miss H. * * V * Joseph Scutti, Arthur Seng, Mary MRS. G. GLICK, and sons, Harry Lorch, Miss E. Nolan, Miss M. only attendant. Her gown of blue Serak, Anthony Peter Simionc, Le and Donald, of Maxwell avenue, Dcy, Miss Slattery, Mrs. Jaffee, lace made on princess lines had Roy Richard Simonsen, Charles visited Mr. and Mrs. R. Pierscn, Mrs. Turk, Miss M. Mullen, Miss matching accessories, and she car- Jacob Trautwein, Elsie Margaret Rose Nash, school nurse and Miss ried an attractive bouquet of blue Varany, LillianVivian Weimer, of South Amboy, recently. sweet peas and lace flowers. Jack Emma Peterson, clerk. • • • • Weiner, Ruth Williams, Rebeck, brother of the bride, was Sidney A BIRTHDAY PARTY WAS held Williams, Wilbert Le Roy Wilson, the best man. Sunday for Barry Balint. The Mabel Young. The wedding reception took guests were Mrs. C. Coleman, place at the home of the bride's Richard Coleman, Mrs. R. Kraus Scientific Course: Donald Henparents for the immediate familMrs. J. Dudick, Richard and ry Aaroe, Leonard Anderson, Meries and friends. After a short wedRoberta Krous, Nancy and Jean ding trip the couple will reside in rill Newton Anderson, Robert Dudick, Mrs. S. Balint, Claire Christian Anderson, Michael AndFords. Balint, Mrs. W. Warren, Jr.|, Parahovich, Robert Stanley Arthur, tricia Warren, Miss Catherine J.Milton V. Ashley, Jr. John BccJago, Mrs. D. Pateman, Mrs. J. be spread over the dumps, the su, Ann Edyth Barnekov, Walter Rebovich, Germaine Looser and Township will have to do it. Batiuk, John Graham Bell, Louis Donald Balint. SOIL WILL HAVE TO BE "Langan," he said, "has an ir- Behi, John J. Boyle, Joseph Anrevocable agreement to dump gar- thony Brodniak, Robert All ChrisSPREAD AT EXPENSE bage on the Mutton Hollow Fire tie, Anthony Ralph Ciuffreda, LinOF TOWNSHIP Brick property and he doesn't .have coin Derick, John Hollis DockstadWOODBRIDGE. — What to do to change the site unless he wants er, Chester Frank Elliot, Robert NEW ANTARCTIC TRIP with the garbage dumps? That IS to because it was approved by the Gilbert Henry, Albert Hruska, MaInspector. I do not think thias V. Janson, Frank Michael New York. — According to a rea question. Complaints are still Health that we can ask him to spread soil pouring in and nothing much has over each day's collection because Kantor, Victor G. Katen, Andrew cent announcement, Harold I. drew a Grave Kath, Charles John been done about the obnoxious there is no such stipulation in his Klob, Joseph Barron Levi, Gino June, chief pilot of Rear Admiral odors emanating from the vicinity contract. Although I do not agree Anthony Simoli, Milton Smith, Richard E. Byrd's last trip to the that this is just a first ward mat- Lund, Jack" Edward Manton, Wil- Antarctica, is planning an expediof Burxn's lane. Mr. Bergen and I will go ovtion which expects to spend two At the last meeting of the ter, er the matter thoroughly and try liam Paul Mauer, Richard M. Mit-years at the South pole. Board of Health Monday night. to hhell, Alex Francis Montecalvo, find a remedy." Health Officer Harold J. Bailey reDonald John Murchie, Edward M. OLD CUSTOM FATAL ported that the District Health OfOlbrick, Fred Lewis Olsen, James Chungking, China. — Because ficer, Dr. Louis Sosen'berg had inJoseph O'Toole, Sidney Arthur NOTICE vestigated the condition of the Take notice that Harry Meyers, in- Pinkham, Leon Anthony Plichta, her feet were bound in the old to apply to the Commttteemen of dumps used by Nicholas Langan, tends the Township of Woodbrldge (or a John Edward Rowe, Malcolm Jay Chinese fashion, an elderly woman the collector, and recommended plenary retail consumption license lor Rutan, Stephen Sabo, Thomas Ed- lest her life when her bound feet situated at Smith Street, that fresh soil be spread over the premises Keasbey, Township of Woodbrldge, ward Saxon, Robert Charles Al- prevented her from scrambling out top of each daily collection of gar- New Jersey. fred Schilling, Gordon Wallace So- of the path of an airplane which bage. Mr. Bailey, however, was of Objections, If any, should be made | field, Max Robert Stevens, Ziga A. was taking off from the air port. in writing to B. J. Dunlthe opinion that it would be an immediately Township Cleric, ot the Township Tobak, Robert Toft, George A. undue hardship to the garbage col ga.n. of Woodbridge, New Jer»ey, Varrelman, Jerome Vogel, Frank RUMINATE HABRY MEYERS, lector inasmuch as that stipulation (Signed) Smith Street, Joseph Zilai. was not placed in his contract, Keasbey, N. J. Classical Course: PatriciaCecelia even though it is part of the Byrne, Dorothy Anne Co.ncannon, NOTICE health code. The health officer re- Tnke notice that M. E. M. Holdcommended that the Township ing- Co.. Miehae! the Yanovsky, Pres.. Jane Carolie Cox, Betty Rose intends to apply to the Commltteemen Crozier, Andrew E. Fodor, Barcover the dumps with dirt taken of the Township of Woodbridge (or a ' bara Mary Grow, Lois Jane Jerfrom WPA jobs. Mayor August F. plenary retail consumtion license for WORRIES Orrok Robert Johnson, premises situated at 747 King George's ' nee, Greiner, felt that it was a first Worry over bills often Road, Fords, ward matter and turned the entire New Jersey. Township of Woodbrldge, • Michael Charles Kurucza, Marcia amounts lo almost a disease. case over to the first ward com- Objections, if any, should be made j Lifshitz, Grace Moffett, Peggy AnWecaIlit"Bill-ius." If jou're mitteemen, Fred Spencer and immediately in writing to B. J. Dunl- ne Raup, Barbara Lee Rush. constantly upset with this segan, Township Clerk, o( the Township John Bergen. rious problem of money of Woodbridge, New Jersey. NOTICE

HIGH SCHOOL •

GARBAGE DUMPS CAUSE DEBATES: CONDITION^ SAME

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(Signed) M. E. M. HOLDING CO., MICHAEL YANOVSKY, Pres, hast night, Spencer said foe was 747 King George's Road, of the opinion that if any soil is to Fords, N. J.

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Take notice that Samuel Hodea, intends to apply to the Commltteemen of the Township of Woodbridge for a plenary retail consumption license for premises situated at 464 New Brunswick avenue, Fords, Township of Woodbridge, New Jersey. Objections, if any, should be made immediately in writing to B. J. Dunigan. Township Clerk, of the Township of Woodbridge, New Jersey. (Signed) SAMUEL HODES, 464 New Brunswfck Avenue, Fords, N. J.

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RECEIVES SPECIAL GRANT OF $3,120 FROM FORMER AGENCY

WOODBRIDGE. — Woodbridge Township has paid all its outstanding indebtedness due to the Emergency Relief Administration to the tune of $7,357.50 and as a re suit, received a special grant of $3,120. When the ERA went out of existence, it had a large sum on hand which it was allocating to various municipalities. Woodbridge was .notified if it paid its debt to the ERA it would receive its share. The statement of the amount paid to the ERA released by Town ship Treasurer O. J. Morgenson is as follows: September 1935 $1905.00 October 1905.00 November 1905.00 December 1905.00 March 1936 1905.00 April 952.50

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PRISONER "CLEARED" TOO Empire Exhibition at JohannesGuelph, Ont. — Annoyed be- burg, which opens September 15 cause he thought the courtroom and continues until January 15, too crowded, the judge ordered it 1937. cleared of spectators. When the NOTICE itrial was ready to proceed, it was Take notice that John Cstk, Jr. Village Barn, intends to apply to the Comrmt•found that the prisoner, Angelo teemen ot the Township of Woodbridge iVeleriote, had been "cleared" with for a plenary retail consumption license for premises situated at Corner the spectators. The trial had Charles & Juliette Street. Hopelawn, to be postponed until the defend- Township of Woodbridge, New Jersey. Objections, if any. should be made i FRIENDS HONOR HER AP- ant could be found. immediately in writing to B. J. Dumgan, Township Clerk, of the Township PROACHING MARRIAGE of Woodbridge, New Jersey. 31 DROWN IN RIVER (Signed) JOHN CSIK, JR., TO GEORGE GALYA Auspitz, Czechoslovakia. — A Corner Charles & Juliette Sts. ferry boat, filled with laughling, Hopelawn, N. J. FORDS. — In honor of her ap- 'waving children bound for a picNOTICE „„ . proaching marriage to George Gal- i nic, capsized in the Thaya River Take notice that Hana K. Knudaen intends to apply to the Oommltteemen ya, of Wildwood avenue, this place when the children crowded to one the Township of Woodbrldg-e for a Miss Mary Kovacs was tendered a side of its deck. Thirty children of plenary retail consumption license for shower at the Fords Casino, re- and one man were drowned and premises situated at 499 New Brunswick Avenue, Fords, Township ol cently. Miss Helen Galya and Miss only nine were saved. Woodbrid&e, New Jersey. Ann Kovacs arranged the affair. Objections, if any. should be maw immediately in writing to B. J. DuniJohnny Polagyi's orchestra furn- 1 ondon. — A prize of 10,000 gan. Township Cleric, of the Township ished the music for dancing. pounds has been offered by a of Woodbrldge, New Jersey. (Signed) HANS K. KNUD3EN, wealthy South African for the The guests were: •199 New Brunswick Avenue. Fords, N. J. Mr. and Mrs. J. K. Kasmer, Mr. proposed air race from England to and Mrs. J. Kovaly, Mr. and Mrs.South Africa during the British NOTICE , J Take notice that Louis Varady inF, Kovacs, Mr. and Mrs. P. Kovacs | YOU CAN'T AFFOROZ tends to apply to the Commltteemen or Mr. and Mrs. G. Galya, Mrs. J. t*ie Township of Woodbridge for » to go without reading the weekly plenary retail consumption license lor Lesko, Sr., Mrs. J. Lesko, Jr., Mrs.I remarks of "The Rambling Report- premises situated at 955 Ford Avenue, Yakubick, Mrs. Farkas, Mary Bor- er" or the "Cross Road Chatter." Fords, Township of Woodbrldge, New . kess, Mrs. E. Young, Mrs. Fader, These columns appear only in the Jersey. Objections, if any, should be made Mrs. Waco, Mrs. Borri, Mrs. Fodor BEACON. Head the real, low-down immediately In writing: to B. J. DimlMrs. A. Horvath, Jr., Mrs. A. comments on Inside information giui Township Clerk, of the Township Woodbrid&e, New Jerwy. Nagy, Mrs. Kantor, Mrs. Kopper- prepared, for BEACON subscribers. of (Signed) LOUIS VARADY, watts ,Mrs. Borkess, Mrs. Paku, You'll like "The Rambltn* Report955 Fords Avenue, er" and "Croit Road Chatter." Fords, N. J. Mary Payer, Mary Kasmer. Misses Anna Renner, Ethel Kovacs .Helen Kovacs, Very Hydro Helen Salva, Helen Kovacs, Elaine Kovacs, Mary and Anna Payko, Mr. E. Velchick, Mrs. E. Dondics, Betty Dondics, Emily Wolan, Helen Wolan, Helen Dudash, Helen Salada, Mrs. Kara, Helen Kara, Mr. and Mrs. J. Toth, Miss Helen Toth, all of Fords; Mr. J. Galya, Mrs. A. Kovacs, Mrs. A. Smalliga, Miss Mary Smalliga, Mrs. Mayti, Mrs. A. Dudics, Miss Anna Dudics, Phyllis Checki, Mary Zisgre from IRaritan Township. Mrs. and Mrs. F. Payti, Mr. and Mrs. A. Payti, Mr. and Mrs. S. Pay ti, Mr. and Mrs. Z. Papp, Mrs. Gubich, Misses Anna Payti, Mary Payti, Anna Booth, Mary Booth, illian Papp, from Keasbey; Misses Tessie Slivinsky, Stella Slivinsky, Edna Slivinsky, Kay EHvinsky, T. Slivincky, Mrs. J. Elko, Elizabeth Elko, Anna Elko, Bertha Elko, Mary Elko, Margie Serenska, YOUR LAST OPPORTUNITY Mary Nagy, Margie Hornak, Mrs. A. Patrick, A. Patrick, Anna UnTO WIN der,

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PAGE THREB

Social Briefs of Fords, Keasbey, Hopelawn, Raritan Township & Metuchen BUNCO PARTY IS MISS JUNE LINO ORDER OF STAR JOSEPH SZILAGYI n Weekk. Patt&uwu HELD BY LOCAL GIVEN SURPRISE WILL HOLD CARD TENDERED PARTY KITCHEN CLUB DEMOCRAT UNIT PARTY AT HOME PARTY, MONDAY ON ANNIVERSARY » • CUSS OF 7 9 HAS DANCE TOMORROW •

FORDS.—The Class of 1929, "Woodbridge high school, will hold its annual re-union dance tomorrow night at the Hotel Pines, in And Now; The MenI Metuchen. Dr. Ralph A. Deutsch. a Club Member*: local dentist, and member of that EASTERN STAR TO GIVE TENTH WEDDINC ANNIVERS- Dear I T ' S interesting, how many man SECOND WARD CLUB HAS class, is chairman of the committee MISS ELLEN THOMSEN AND ARY PARTY IS HELD AT * think they can cook these days. AFFAIR AT THOMMRS ARTHUR LIND Some of my men friends are vainer SUCESSFUL AFFAIR LAST in charge of arrangements. VILLAGE INN SEN'S HAL ARE HOSTESSES A popular orchestra has been about their scalloped eggs and NIGHT engaged and it is expected that cheese souffles FORDS.—Mrs. Arthur Lind and FORDS.—A successful bunco this year's affair will exceed last FORDS.—The Fords members FORDS.—On occasion of their than about their Miss Ellen Thomsen tendered a party was held by the Second year's successful dance. of the Raritan Chapter No. 58, tenth wedding anniversary, Mr. golf scores. surprise birthday party to Mrs. Order of the Eastern Star will hold and Mrs. Joseph Szilagyi, Jr., of B u t that's Ward Democratic Association at a card party at Thomsen's Hall 430 Fords were tendered a party at the Lind's daughter, Miss June Lind at only another in- Fords School No. 7 last night. Redication that the New Brunswick avenue, Monday Village Inn, recently by a group her home on William street, remale half of the freshments were enjoyed after the evening. Games will start prompt- ol friends. Music was furnished by cently, in honor of her fifteenth human race is games. ly at 8 o'clock. birthday. Games were played and really beginning Szebenyi's orchestra. The committee was in charge of to appreciate us refreshments were served. Many beautiful prizes will be The guests who attended the afpoor women. AH Charles J. A. Alexander and his Those who attended were: awarded the winners of the vari- fair were: Mr. and Mrs. John Lut h e : e genassistants were: Howard Fletcher, ous games and refreshments will das, Helen, John and Louis LuThe Misses Margaret Hedges, erations we've Anthony Aquila, H. Eurlock, Edbe served .Mrs. Anton Lund is gen das, Peter Kurucz, Mr. and Mrs.been concocting appetite-teasing Lois Anderson, Ellen Thomsen, ward Seiler, Mrs. M. Van Decker, eral chairman and will be assisted Louis Farkas, Mr. and Mrs. George dishes, and abont all we got for it Gladys Liddle, June Lind, Messrs. by the following. Kurucz, Mrs. Gyenes, Mrs. Roman, was a grunt of satisfaction; occa- Albert Anderson, Roy Elliott, WAS ACTIVE MEMBER OF N. Kenneth Schuster, William Seel, Frank Gregory, Albert Levine, Mrs. Ellen Bailey, Mrs. Signa Mr. and Mrs. Frank Miukusi, Mr. sionally an exclamation of "That's Melvin Anacker. Mr. and Mrs. C. J. C. WOMEN STUDENT Mrs. M. Skazinski, Al Schicker, Greisen, Miss Magdaline Peterson, and Mrs. Puskas, Mrs. Alex Kar- great; gimme some more!" Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Matson, Ray Haberkorn, William Grub, R. BODY Now that men are really beginMrs. Ben Jensen, Mrs. Louis Peter dos, Frank Iski, Miss Helen Barta, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Lind, of ning to do some cooking, maybe Reilley, Mrs. G. Ebner, Roy Harnsen, Mrs. Marie Jenkins, Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Kantor, Mr. andthey'll find out it's an art, after all. Thomas Olson, Mrs. Hazel Segar, Mrs. Louis Vigy, Mr. and Mrs.There will be more careful tasting ed, Harold Lake, Harry Berger, FORDS.—An active member ol Fords; Miss Gertrude Lundquist, Mrs. Marius Hanson, Miss Olivia Frank Varga, Mrs. Gozora, Mag- of fine dishes; more appreciation Jean Bonalski, Marie O'Brien, Hel the student body at New Jersey of Staten Island and Arnold KolPeterson, Mrs. William Nelson, dolna Gozora, Ann Grezner, Mrs. for a good sauce, a well-turned en Charonko, Mrs. C. Kutcher, College for Women, Miss Agnita born, of Perth Amboy. Mrs. Frank Dunham, Mrs. Carl Grezner, Mr. and Mrs. Stephen roast, a vegetable salad with just Mrs. J. Drennan, Mrs. Robert Greisen, daughter of Mrs. Signa Mrs. Albert Schicker, the right combination of taste- Reilley, Lund, Mrs. Mads Madson, Miss An Ocsvari, Mrs. Kalko, Mr. and Mrs. pleasure and eye-pleasure. joyed a fishing trip to Lang liu Holt, Mrs. Matilda Holt, Mrs. Stephen Perduk, Mr. and Mrs. Do you know there is actually Mrs. Mary Smith, Daniel Zboyah, Greisen, of 25 Jefferson avenue, Branch, recently. Meta Gloff, Mrs. Frieda Fredmore Peter Kertesz, Mrs. Kukta, Mr. an organization of men who like to Leon Jeglinski, Michael Palko, was honored Saturday by receivand Mrs. William Heppa. and Mrs. Alex Bukocsik, Mrs. cook? There is, though. It's theFoster Fimiani and Joseph Elko... ing the bachelor of arts degree from the New Brunswick institu- MISS KATHRYN TOTH, OF MELouis Kira. American Association of Giyrmettuchen, spent Sunday with Mr. tion. and it had a meeting recently RARITAN TOWNSHIP Mr. and Mrs. George Andricsak, Fords Woman's Club As a student, she majored in so- and Mrs. Joseph Wagonhoffer in Del Monte, California. Ont Mrs. Buda, Mr. and Mrs. John out the items on the program was to THE FINAL MEETING OF THE ciology and was chairman of the of Crows Mill road. To Have Lawn Party Bacso, Kalman Hegedus, Miss Heg ofselect a prize-winning recipe. Parent - Teachers' Association lectures of the Social Service Club. edus, Mrs. Julius Szucs, Mary FarThe winner was Samuel G was held Tuesday night at theShe acted as advisor to the fresh- THE LADIES' AUXILIARY OF FORDS.—The Fords Woman's kas, Frank Kiss, Mary Ludas, Mrs. Blythe. the writer. And Mr. Dlythr Clara Barton school. Following men, was president of the non- the Keasbey Protection fire Club has completed its plans lor Burton Szucs, Mrs. Gyanoszki, and fixes sweetbreads. I thought th^ company, held a special meeting the covered dish supper, a social resident students and was one of a lawn party to be held, Monday daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Club members would like to try Tuesday at the firehouse. the twenty eight seniors, who were hour was held. them the prize-winning way, so at the home of Mrs. Bernice Klem, Farkas, John Farkas, George LuBlythe's recipe: honored in the traditional Christ* * • • on Main street. dash, Mary Yuhasz, Mr. and Mrs. here's Mr. MR. AND MRS. GEORGE PADO Sauled Sweetbreads The affair will commence at 2:30 Nicholas Vertes, Mr. and Mrs. Soak sweetbreads in salted water MR. AND MRS. MICHAEL Reiz mas ceremony as the most dis- were recent New Brunswick tinguished of her class. and Mr. and Mrs. Einer Jensen o'clock in the afternoon and mem- John Csik, Mrs. Grezner, Mr. and for half an hour, t!ien place them in visitors. and son, and Carla Reitenfoack, bers are privileged to bring guests Mrs. John Yuhasz, Mrs. C. Bulecz, a saucepan and just cover with • * • • of Amboy avenue, spent the KEASBEY water to which has been added a with them. Facilities for card! Joseph and Elsie Szilagyi, John MR. AND MRS. EDWARD Jacobs weekend at Mr. Reiz' summer tablespoon of vinegar. Let them playing and lawn croquet will be Farkas, of Fords. for twenty minutes. Dip home at Shelter Cove, on Barne- MISS ELIZABETH TOTH, OF and daughter Joyce and Miss available. It is also expected that Joseph Szilagyi, Sr., Helen, Jul- simmer immediately in cold water. Season Smith street had as her Sunday Mary Wonski, of Peterson aveattending will take advant- ia, Rose and Irene Szilagyi, Mr. with salt and pepper. Dtp in egg gat Bay. guest, nue, motored to Asbury Park inspecting the spacious and and Mrs. John K. Szilagyi, Mr. and white and roll in finely ground ANREW E. JACOBS OF HENRY ville. Miss Erma Szuch, of Man recently. Jful gardens surrounding the Mrs. George Kovacs, Mrs. Nicholas black walnuts. Saute slowly in street is vacationing in Maine. covered pan. Serve at once when -ae. Szilagyi, Miss Irena Szilagyi, Mrs. well sauted. MRS. JOHN KOCSIS, OF Newark ANSWERS TO" OUR Meszaros, Mr. and Mrs. Vendel THE EXECUTIVE BOARD OF visited Mr. and Mrs. John ChorPUZZLE CORNER SPEEDWAYS MEET I tried it last night and believe Both, Mary Both, Mrs. Ernest the Clara Barton Woman's Club onko, of Highland avenue, MonDOTS: Donkey. FORDS. — The New Jersey Dugasz, Julia Butary, Mr. andme, it is good! held a meeting Monday night at day. PETEY'S PROBLEM: Baseball Speedway Club of Fords met Mrs. Matyas Fekete, Mrs. Stephen the home of Mrs. Grace EckertJ • • • • averages. '•. Tuesday night at Mike's Tavern on Fcrencsik, Mr. and Mrs. J. Pasztor, on Albourne street. VICTOR TURKELSON, OF Rari- ERRORS: Wrong brim on hat,1 | King George's road. Several lead- Mrs. and Mrs. Nicholas Fekete, tan Township, was a Sunday in shirt, vest with coat-' ing drivers of the Garden State Mrs. Louis Ssapyak, Mr. and Mrs. MR. AND MRS. RAYMOND guest of Mr. and Mrs. Emil sleeves tails, ladder not leaning on build-' ISELIN Racing Association' were present Stephen Csapyak, Mr. and Mrs. Wilck and children of Carleton Waldman, of Highland avenue. ing, man not on rung, "white" on, and spoke to. the club members. • street were Asbury Park visitors Stephen Casapyak, Mr. and Mrs. paint can, bricks in wooden GUS HUTTEMAN WAS THE recently. THE BOARD OF FIRE COMMIS- black J. Szilagyi. walls, and white shoes, fauPittsburgh, Pa.—So intently was Mr. and Mrs. Paul Gregus, Ethweekend guest of friends at sioners of Keasbey met Tuesday cet in black smokestack, cow in tree, Robert Keeler, 60, listening to a el Pasztor, Anna, Mary, Helen, Lake Watchung. MISS NORMA ANDERSON OF night at the firehouse. one cuff on trousers. safety program being broadcast Theresa and George Kovacs, Vera • • * • Auburn street, spent the week• • • • '•O" OBJECTS: Orator, oranges, from a police "safety car," he and Eleanor Szilagyi, of Perth ARTHUR DUBE AND CARL Janend with her grandparents, Mr. MR. AND MRS. VANDEL Matisz, onlooker, officer, ornament, office, crashed into the side of the of- Amboy; Laszlo Hrubi, Ernest Burk ke were the guest of friends in and Mrs. Struz, of Metuchen. of Smith street had as their reobelisk, owl, ocean, oceanside, orficer's automobile. He got a ti- darth, of Long Island, N. Y. New York over the weekend. cent guests, Mr. and Mrs. Martin "oit. cket for "reckless driving." They were also guests at a theadancing was held and entertin- Winkler, of Perth Amboy. tre party. ELECTROCUTED TRYING ment was enjoyed by all . SUBSCRIBE TO THI MR. AND MRS. HAROLD Prang, * * • • TO RELEASE KITE • * • • of town and Mr. and Mrs. MatTHE PARISHIONERS OF ST CERuritmi Township and Fordi Beacon Wilkes, aBrre, Pa. — While at- celia's church turned out en ARTHUR AND WILLIAM GILL, thew Balint of Perth Amboy enCoal, Wood, Ice, Charcoal tempting to release a kite from a masse Tuesday night to do hon- were the guests of relatives in •high tension line carrying 13,000 or to the new curate, Rev. Jos- Long Island Sunday. and Kerosene ID • • • • volts, Hartley Gilley, 24, was elec- eph Donnelly. A banquet was Courteous Service trocuted. His brother, Roy, 36, held and an elaborate menu was MR. AND MRS. THOMAS Me was critically injured. The bro- served. The young girls of the Dermott visited in Rahway SunPrompt Deliveries thers attached a stone to a piece parish acted as waitresses. Rev. day. TELEPHONE of battery wire and threw the Donnelly gave a very interest• • • * stone at a kite~which a little 5-year ing talk. Among those present Perth Amboy 4—0180 THE LADY FORESTERS OF ISEold boy was flying. The wire car- were: Mayor August F. Greiner, New Brunswick Avenue ried the electricity to the ground. Committeeman Charles J. Alex- lin held their regular meeting Cor. Ford Ave. Thursday night at the Green • ander and Tax Collector Michstreet firehouse. After the busiFORDS, N. J. ael J. Trainer. After the banquet ness session a social hour was held. Read the BEACON (Formerly the Store

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FRIDAY MORNING, JUNE 12, 1936

PAGE FOUR

FORDS AND RARITAN TOWNSHIP BEACON

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Should Not Be Forgotten Collection by the state of $15,620,792.45 from the executors of the $115,000,000 estate of the late Dr. John T. Dorrance, president of the Campbell Soup Company, should stand as a warning to future legislators and state officials against proposing compromises in efforts to effect speedy collection of unusually large tax assessments of any kind. It will be recalled that at .numerous times during the five-year-litigation over the Dorrance taxes, in which the courts were called upon to decide whether or not Dr. Dorrance was a legal resident of this state, proposals were made to seek a compromise with the estate's executors in order to obtain the revenue more rapidly. In 1934, the Legislature even went so far as to authorize a compromise of the payment, but fortunately the legislation was later repealed. Now that the full amount of the levy against the Dorrance estate, together with all penalties and interest, have been collected by New Jersey, it is plainly apparent that the state would have made a costly error if a compromise had been effected at an earlier date. Not only would such a compromise have meant the loss of millions of dollars of revenue to the state, but it would have furthered a policy for which there is no sound justification. Had the Dorrance estate been the average size, instead of the huge $115,000,000 amount, it is obvious there would have been no talk of compromise in collection o£ inheritance taxes. Yet, there is certainly no logic or honesty in the contention that a compromise may justly be effected in the collection of a large inheritance tax any more than with a small sum. In matters of this kind there is only one question to be decided and that is Whether or not the state is entitled to the collection of such a tax. If is entitled to the collection of any amount at all, it is most assuredly entitled to the collection in full as prescribed by law and to follow any other course is inequitable, inefficient and dishonest. The history of the Dorrance litigation should not be soon forgotten, but should be kept in mind by legislators and officials in case any similar situation should arise in the future.

DELTSVILLE, Md.—Near this ^ little town, which lies close to the national capital, the United States government operates Beltsville Research Center, a 16,000-acre project, largest experimental (arm in the world. In this great outdoor laboratory, nine Department of Agriculture bureaus at present are conducting experiments. These agencies include the bureaus of animal, plant, and dairy Industry; those of agricultural economics, agricultural engineering, entomology and plant quarantine, chemistry and soils; besides the biological survey and food and drug administration of the Forest Service. Other departments of the gov-, ernment also carry on some activities at the center, and still others are to be moved there soon. The Beltsville acreage was rich tobacco country before the Revolutionary War; later, much of it went back into forest Since the Civil War, it had been practically deserted. The government has been acquiring the land since 1933 for Us program U eliminate "rural slums." • * • ' p H E work ranges from studies •*• in animal husbandry and beef and dual-purpose cattle investigations to demonstrations in wild life conservation and restoration More than 450 men, including some of the best-known scientists in the United States, start the farm's stock buildings and laboratories. There are mot' than 50 of these buildings

It is all right to work by a schedule if you keep up with the schedule. *

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If New Jersey legislators continue to take the view that the emergency relief situation is settled in this state, merely because of numerous reports of reduced case loads and expenditures which have resulted from local administration, the experience of many municipalities, including this Township, before the end of the year may prove most unfortunate to their taxpayers. The fact that case loads and costs have dropped un der the local administration of relief is indeed encouraging and bears out the contention previously held by many legislators and officials that such savings could be effected. It does not, however, by any stretch of the imagination completely solve the relief problem or indicate that local governments are able to continue to carry the entire burden without substantial state assistance. As in the case of Woodbridge Township, many municipalities have already been forced to issue bonds to meet their relief costs, since the state ERA stopped functioning on April 16, The City of Newark alone has already issued $1,000,000 to care for its needy, and is now preparing another $400,000 issue to carry it through the balance of this month. ,At a recent discussion, officials of Paterson, Passaic and Cliftan agreed that those three cities cannot continue to finance relief on their own resources beyoind July 1. Other cities, particularly industrial centeis, are having similar experiences. If the Legislature adjourns this month without providing substantial state aid for relief, as is now being rumored in Trenton as its present plans, the result may well be lasting damage to municipal credit, unreasonable increases in property taxes in many sections, and even actual human suffering. Municipal officials should not relax in their efforts to impress the solons with the fact that the relief problem has by no means been adequately settled yet. ****** You can't please everybody unless you have more money than you think you have. *



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A Comet In July Before sunrise during the latter part of July the first comet visible to the naked eye since 1927 will awing within the gaz e of the American people. Discovered near the North Star by an amateur astronomer in Ohio it is now 120,000,000 miles from the earth and will come within 20,000,000 miles before it swings away in its wide sweep through the limitless spaces, to return again probably several hundred years from now. * * * * * What many of those on relief would like to have is a wovkless job with collectible pay. * * * * *

PXPER1MENTS in breeding ol animals not generally founu

Democrats Grab Early Lead ?rrrr:v. with (Oh-For-a-Button' Boys BY SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT TFfASHINGTON.—The regular Neighbor L e a g u e," actively " election year attempt of headed by Stanley High, former both parties to snare voters into dry leader and editor of various supporting their candidates by religious publications, and supgetting them to join some league ported by a group of social or club for this or that is going workers, educators, church leadfull blast in both camps. ers, and philanthropists. Co-chairmen with Mr. High Organizations set up by the national committees to bag the are George Foster Peabody, repious vote, the labor vote, the tired banker and trustee of the independent or the progressive Warm Springs, Ga., Foundation, vote, are preparing to send out and Lilian Wald, founder of the their bales of literature, buttons, famous Henry Street Settlement in New York and a pioneer in and medals. public health nursing and social The volume and variety of • * * such appeals to the great Amer- work. ican instinct to join something T H E third organization to and wear its insignia can be ex"*• promote Mr. Roosevelt's canpected to rise steadily as the didacy is the recently created campaign gets hotter. "Committee of One"—the name The Democrats apparently are taken from a phrase in the presileading in formation of such or- dent's Jackson Day speech, ft ganizations thus far, chiefly be- has a rather surprising list of cause they have known all along organizers. One is Senator Benwho their candidate would be. nett Champ Clark of Missouri, Three "non-partisan" affiliates to who time and again, has opposed lend efforts to re-elect Franklin New Deal measures in the SenD. Roosevelt have already been ate. organized, and a fourth is conAnother Is Herbert Bavard templated. Swope, former New York newsThe labor vote, which many paperman, a frequent Al Smith observers feel will be largely for supporter, and an intimate friend Roosevelt anyway, will be sewed of Bernard M. Baruch. Swope up by the Labor Non-Partisan formerly was regarded as a bitLeague, sponsored by Major ter anti-Roosevelt man. George Berry, of the late NRA Mrs. Caspar Whitney, weafthy and president of the Printing social leader in New York. BosPressmen's U n i o n ; President ton, and Philadelphia, is another John L. Lewis, of the United of its organizers. A million Mine Workers Union; and Sid- members are to be asked to ioin ney Hillman, head of the Amal- —no dues or contributions- Thev gamated Clothing Workers. will constitute themselves "com• • * mittees of one" to defend the HPHE organization will make an Roosevelt policies and doubtless •*• active campaign in every to wear the club's button state, but will concentrate on The Republicans have not vei such pivotal states as Pennsyl- organized a n y s u c h fancv vania, New York, Illinois, and leagues, but <=oon you may exOhio, where the labor movement pect to be asked to join an inis strong. It has been hinted dependent Democrats Club to< that this organization might be the Republican candidate, a continued after the election and League for Economy in Governlead to the formation of an inment, a Support the Constitution dependent labor party in 1940 Society, or whatever else the A bid for tne church vote is candidate's managers can think being made through the "Good up to attract voters.

CHURCH NEWS

WOODBRIDGE M. E. CHURCH Rev. Carl C. E. Mellberg, Fh. D. BIBLE THOUGHT FOR TODAY Minister Beloved, let us love one another: for love is of God; George E. Ruddy, Organist. and every one that loveth is born of God and knoweth God. Sunday—There will be no eveHe that loveth not, knoweth not God; for Cod is love. ning service as the congregation In this was manifested the love of God toward us, be- and pastor have been invited to cause that God sent his only begotten Son into the world, participate in the Baccalaureate that we might live through him. Services to be held in the High Herein is love, not that we loved God, but that he School auditorium. loved us, and sent his Son to be the propitiation for our sins. Monday—7:30 P. M. Troop 32 at Beloved, if God so loved us, we ought also to love one P. S. 11, A. G. R. Quelch, scout-

another.—I. John;; Chapter 4; 7-11.

To expedite work of the start members, the farm has been divided into a 2000-acre wild life preserve, a 2000-acre forest, and a soil conservation demonstration area. The Soil Conservation Service now is experimenting for the government's s u b s t i t u t e foi AAA. Availability of the Beltsville Center was a big factor in enabling the Department of Agriculture to Launch the program this year, according to department officials. Most of the experimentation on the acreage set aside for the wild life preserve has been done by the Biological Survey. Game management has been the big Interest of this body.

In the United States also have been conducted. One of the most successful of these was with Karakul lambs, the experimental flock having shown remarkable development, both in quality of fur and conformation. The Forest Service is another agency that has been particularly active in experiments at the center. Largest single building on the project is the three-story animal husbandry laboratory. It provides approximately 1,000,000 square feet of floor space, and houses a group of laboratorie.dealing with animal nutrition genetics, meat and wool investigations, and scientific studies in volving many types of animals The majority of the investigations of the dairy experimen1 station are planned to continue for years. Most important o' those completed was the stud" made in calf feeding. Many more Department cr Agriculture surveys and investi gations are slated for the Maryland project. When they are established, the Beltsville statior will be far ahead of any projef of its type in number and scop of activities, as well as in actu physical size.

master.

8:00 P. M. The Excelsior chapter of the Methodist Brotherhood will meet in the chapel. Plans will be completed for the observance of Father's Day, June 21 at 11 A. M. Tuesday— 7:30 P.. M. Troop 34 in the chapel, J. W. Hilbert, scoutmaster. 8:00 P. M. The Epworth League will hold its monthly business and social meeting at the home of Miss

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Peoria, 111. — Arrested for zigzagging his automobile through heavy traffic, Lewis Tucker, 27, explained that his little girl had the hiccoughs and he was trying to "scare" them out of her.

Adventurers' Club

STAY-AT-HOME DIES Black Moutnain, N. C. — W. R. Goodson, 75, who died here recently had never been farther than 150 yards from the place of his birth, a local farm. Cambridge, Mass.—When police learned that little Joe Brown, 8, was about to lose his dog, Brownie, because his mother could not afford to buy a license for the dog, they all chipped in and Joe was able to lead his beloved Brownie home on a brand new leash, with anew license safely tucked away in his pocket. SUBSCRIBE TO THE BBAOON

•WASHINGTON LETTEB-

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It Is Not Settled Yet



The top picture shows the bull exerciser at Beltsville Research Center. Directly above are the dairy building's. The scientist at left is working In the Beltsville laboratory of the zoological division of the Bureau of Animal Husbandry.

Sunlight or Moonlight Now Come Into Living Room At Flick of Switch By Jean Prentice

"Over the Edge" By FLOYD GIBBONS Famous Headline Hunter.

M

EET Joseph F. April, of Stoughton, N. Y., who has come to tell us about his big adventure and lake his place in the Adventurers' club as a distinguished member. Joe had the biggest thrill of his life when he was only a kid of nine, living in North Easlon, and it sort of cured him of ever trying to win the ten bucks I'm shooting along to him, and maybe if he thought he was going to he wouldn't have sent his yam in at all. • Joe has gotten the Idea that It's bad luck to com© out ahead of the rest of the world In any sort of competition. Look what happened to him the last time he won a gamel It happened to Joe one February afternoon In 1927. A bunch of the kitls from North Enstnn had gone down to Picker pond to skate, and Joe was with them. One of the kids started a game, and that was Joe's undoing. He entered Into it—and won It. But victory came BO near to costing him tils life that he hasn't had uny hankering to win anything since.

Playing on Thin Ice Is a Dangerous Game. The game was a pretty dangerous one, right from the start. The pond tliey were playing on wasn't wholly frozen over. There was a channel of water right through the center, and the big Idea was to see how close you could skate to the edge of the ice. The first lad tried It and came pretty close to the edge. A second kid followed him, and a third skated even closer than did the other two. Then enme Joe's turn. Joe didn't have hia skates on that day. He wa» down there with his sled. That didn't stop hfm, though. The sled made th» stunt more dangerous, for It wasn't as easily handled »• a boy could handle himself on skates. And besides that, the weight of the sled, added to Joe's own weight, presented an extra hazard on the thin, brittle ice. But Joe didn't pay any attention to th« dangers. AM he wanted to do was show tho«e other kldo that h« had just as much nerve as they had. Joe pulled his sled bacfc about u hundred feet and yelled to the other^ kids to get out of the way. lie took a good run, flopped on the Bled, and hofinn to const straight for the edge of the Ice.

Joe's Sled Catapults Him Into Icy Water. Nearer and nearer lie came to the channel of black water that ran through the middle of the pond. His scheme was to turn Just before Ue reached that water and coast along the edge of the Ice. He planned on giving the other kids a big scare, and he succeeded far beyond his greatest expectations. For all too suddenly the hungry water lotmed up before him, and when he yanked and twisted at the steering apparatus he realized, too late, that It wouldn't work—that he couldn't turn the corner sharply enough to save himself from going in, "I closed my eyes," says .Toe, "and tried to full off the sled. I heard one of the other kids scream, and then I felt the chilling water close over me. The sled rope tangled about my body, and down I went."

Sled Rope Anchors Joe Down in Water. A fresh note of modernism is injected into this Chinese Chippendale living room through the installation of a concealed lighting unit recessed behind the curtains. The effect produced is that of warm sunlight streaming through the windows. rpHERE seems to be simply no limit •*• to the ingenuity of these lighting people nowadays. A press of a button, and they give you daylight, sunlight, or moonlight at any hour of the day or evening—right in your nun living room. And it's almost laughably simple! Lighting panels built into hidden places produce the effect. They are often used over the latest kitchen sinks, although in such cases, ordinary colorless bulbs are employed. Recently this type of lighting has become quite popular in living rooms, particularly where there is a bay window. Easily Installed The lighting unit itself consists of a metal box, approximately thirty inches long, six inches wide, and seven inches high. It contains three 40- or 60-watt bulbs, depending upon whether you have light or dark shades. The amount and color of light desired also determines the number of bulbs. Flashed opal glass is used at the bottom of the unit to diffuse and soiten the light.

Toledo. — It was a costly misstep which Thomas Wells made recently. Instead of stepping on Edna Lauritzen, of Fifth and Secthe brakes, his foot pressed the end streets, Fords. Saturday—Annual Church picaccelerator and Wells had to pay $150 damages when the automobile nic at Roosevelt Park. Cars will crashed into a display window. leave promptly from the church at

There are two ways of installing such a unit, which is a regulation fixture, obtainable at many electrical stores. When built into a new house, it is recessed into a ceiling, adjacent to the window. In a house that has been already built, two polished metal reflectors containing 60-watt lamps can be mounted between the over-draperies and the glass curtains. These reflectors are also standard equipment, easily installed by your electrical contractor. Choice of Colors Where there is no space between the draperies and curtains, a row of small 10-watt bulbs or several lumiline lamps may be mounted behind the valance or curtain cornice. The wiring can be so arranged that a choice of colored light is simply a matter of which switch is pressed. In these modern times, there's no need to permit the original architectural limitations of a rcom to stand in the way of modernity. And you'll find that the modest investment yielda ample dividends in the added enjoyment you derive from your home. 9 A. M. to provide transportation to the children of the church school. Parents and friends are requested to supply own transportation.

The channel through the middle of the pond led to a mill race at the far end. The current was swift, and Joe expected to be dragged along with it. But, strangely, he wasn't. lie came up, chilled to the bone, In practically the same spot at which lie had fallen In, It took him a couple of seconds to realize (hat It was the sled, jammed In the Ice somewhere below, and the sled rope tightly wound around his body, that were holding him where he was. hut he had no sooner discovered that than the suction set up by the current began to drag him down again. Says Joe: "I was going down slowly—surely, J believed my end had come, and I shudder to this day at the thought that went through my mind then. Was it all up with me? 1 felt a blinding shock at the top of my head, and then I stopped sinking, but my mouth and nose remained under water. I felt someone grab at my hafr, but whoever it was, lost his grip again.

"The icy coid seemed to be eating riglit Into my bones. I began to struggle, and started to rise—slowly—an Inch at a time. It seemed ages that I drifted gently up through the water—centuries before I hit the air again and was able to get another breath Into my lungs. Two of u>y young friends grabbed my arms, but they couldn't pull me Up onto the let?. My heavy mackiuaw emit wn.s waterlogged and the current pulled iue down almost as hard as they were [Hilling in the other direction.''

Saved! But It Was a Close Shave at That. Then, all of a sudden, Joe felt something brush against his legs. It • was the sled- The current had whirled It around, and now it was standIng up straight, wedged In the ice at the bottom of the pond. Joe found that by putting his feet on the top he could keep himself from sinking. He couldn't get out of the water, though, and that was his big worry Nobody can stay In freezing water long without losing consciousness and falling back to drown. But meanwhile the cries of the other kids had brought help. A man came running out of a house near the pond. He had evidently been shaving, for he was in his shirt sleeves and the lather was still on his face. Joe gets a laugh now out of the way that fellow looked, but then it was a different matter. He pulled Joe out^and the sled along with him, and the other kids rushed him home to get those wet clothes off and put him to bed. Joe got over that one and lived to tell the tale. But what's worrying htm la that next time he might not be so lucky.

&y:--f-

PAGE FIVE

FRIDAY MORNING, JUNE 12, 1936

FORDS AND RARITAN TOWNSHIP BKACON

At the Movies

AT LIBERTY

NOW PLAYING AT REGENT

AT THE RAHWAY

SHIRLEY TEMPLEir^CAPTAIN JANUARY" ATRAHWAY THEATRE FORDS PLAYHOUSE FEATURES 'LOVE BEFORE BREAKFAST', PRESENTS A RACE NIGHT ALSO 'STRIKE ME PINK' AND DISH NITE AT STATE THEATRE 'DRACULAS DAUGHTER' AND ,PANIC ON THE AIR' COMPRISE DOUBLE FEATURE AT LIBERTY

REGENT THEATRE FEATURES SEASON'S HEADUNERS

QTAGE ^ AND SCREEN

the Damned" (AlianceFox) with Claire Trevor and "Abdul Columbia) with Fritz Kortney Brian Donlevy. Asther and Adrienne AmDealing with a couple of rival Niles es. newspaper reporters—Claire Tre• • • • vor and Brian Conlevy—who beA notably produced Britishcome entangled with a gang of alien smugglers, this picture is a made picture, of the reign of Abfair action melodrama. There is dul Hamid II, the despot of Turksome good comedy. The romance ey. Its appeal, however, is almost is worked out logically and pleas- entirely to high-class audiences as antly and some of the situations the theme is a psychological study of the Turkish ruler and the actian prove rattier exciting. is too slow. Good for adults. • • * • • * • * MATCH DESTROYS NEST "Forgotten Faces" (Paramount) with Herbert Marshall and GerPeoria, 111. — Using a match trude Michael. Based on an unpleasant theme— among the sticks gathered for their the unfaithfulness of a wife and nest proved the undoing of a pair the murder of her lover by the husband, who is sentenced to of sparrows recently. In some spend his life in prison—this pic- way, the match ignited the nest, ture begins and ends on a tragic which had been tucked into the note. The role portrayed by Miss eaves of a local residence, and it Michael as the wife ,is despicable, in turn, set fire to the roof of the devoid of any decent traits. The only pleasant spot is the romance house. Although little damage between her daughter and the son was done to the house, the nest was completely destroyed. of a wealthy man.

Bette Davis and George Brent in "Golden Arrow", to be featured at Rahway Theatre, Sunday and Mon"Sons O' Guns" (Warner Bros.) day. with Joe E. Brown and Joan Gloria Hold&n, vampire in "Dracula's Daughter,"

FORDS THEATRE. Fords. Ethel Merman, Sally Eilers, ParkWm. Powell and Jean Arthur in a scene from "The Ex- Blondell. Once again the Fords Playhouse yakarkus and a host of others.1 This is a decidedly not up to the A good Joe E. Brown farce, in standard set for Grace Moore piccomes to the front this week with Then there's "For the Service' Mrs. Bradford, now playing at the Regent Theatre. which he goes through all his well tures—the story is thin and not a bang-up menu of screen plays. with Buck Jones, and news and For tonight and tomorrow, the cartoon. Don't miss this hogh-pow happy lovers, stars of the theatre DREAMLAND PARK, Newark. laughter. The scenes that show particularly exciting and the part given Miss Moore is not suited to Playhouse offers a double-bill at- ered show. Sunday and Monday, in London, Herbert Marshall and him bringing back half the Ger- her talents. The manner in which The playground of New Jersey, the State offers Robert Montgomtraction that is sure to click in a man army as his prisoners, thro- the music is injected into the plot his Viennese sweetheart, Gertrude big way. Carole Lombard and ery and Myrna Loy in "Petticoat Michael, whose wedding plans are Dreamland Park, is still attracting ugh no actual effort on his part, is bad, tending to retard the acPreston Foster are costarred in Fever" also "Tough Guys" featur- wrecked by the declaration of war.thousands of people daily to itsare very amusing. The romantic in tion and not fitting into the story. "Love Before Breakfast," while ing Jackie Cooper, Joseph Calleia Marshall as a loyal Englishman, midway, swimming pool and skat- terest is gay ,but not to be taken There is good comedy, however, and the romance is developed in Melvin Douglas and Gail Patrick and Rin Tin Tin, Jr., plus comedy, joins his colors, and Miss Michael, ing rink. The swimming pool be- seriously. Suitable for all. a fairly amusing way. are featured in the co-feature, news and cartoon. Chester Morris, who unknown to her sweetheart, cause of its tremendous size and * • • • Suitable for all . "The Lone Wolf Returns." To top Lewis Stone and Irene Harvey are is a member of the German Secret safety features is becoming inoff the program, "Race Night" is starred in "3 Godfathers" at the Service, places herself under the creasingly popular. The sand "The King: Steps Out" (Columbia) with Grace Moore, Franchot the dessert. Sunday, for one day State Tuesday and Wednesday. In orders of her commanding officer. beach with its wading pool for "Human Cargo" (20th CenturyTone and Walter Connelly. only, "Barbary Coast" is the stel- addition there are comedies, news children is an attraction not to be lar attraction with Edward G. Rob and cartoons, and of course DISH overlooked. The large skating rink LIBERTY THEATRE, Elizabeth inson and Miriam Hopkins. Here's NIGHT for the ladies. is open every evening and is a pop Otto Kruger, noted actor, anti- ular rendezvous for young coupa film you can't afford to miss. cipated sound movies by several les who enjoy skating over the The added feature is "Times REGENT THEATRE, Elizabeth. Jesting with a gun thrust in hisyears and incidently changed his smooth floor of the large hall. The Square Playboy" with Warren William. The greatest Hungarian ribs, romancing and playing entire career. He told the storyto attractions on the midway are musical picture, "Nem Lehetek Mu pranks in the midst of dangerous n interviewer while he was play- many and all proving very popuzsikaszo Nelkul" (I Can't Live murder investigations—these ara ing the lead in "Dracula's Daugh- lar as are the rides and the glides Without Music) starring Paul Ja- specialties of William Powell! of which there are many. TJiere is In "The Ex-Mrs. Bradford," the ter," the Universal drama that no admission charge to the park vor, comes to the Playhouse Monday and Tuesday. Wednesday and RKO Radio mystery comedy now opens at the Liberty theatre. and parking is free. "One day," recalled Kruger, "I Thursday finds Ann Harding and at the egent, in which he and Jean Herbert Marshal in "The Lady Arthur are co-starred, every op- was sitting in a Toledo picture "Speed" (MGM with James StewTHURSDAY — FRIDAY — SATURDAY Consents" and Robert McWade portunity is afforded him to shi w theatre, way back in the era of the wart, Wendy Barrie and Ted Healy. and Ray Walker in "Cappy Ricks to best effect those qualities which silent movies. I began to think Taken at an automobile factory, Returns" at the local theatre. And, carried him to peak popularity as that it would be a marvelous impicture deals with the autoof course DISH NIGHT for the la- a screen sleuth in "T,he Thin Man" provement if screen actors could this mobile industry, the testing and and "Star Of Midnight," former be heard speaking their dialogue. racing dies. of automobiles and, thereLew Ayres, featured with Flor- fore, will probably appeal more to detective adventures. ence Rice in Columbia's "Panic on men than women. However ,it Powell portrays a physician who RAHWAY THEATRE, Rahway. She's seven years young an ingenious trap to end the Air" coming to the Liberty should prove interesting. The com Hummable new tunes, tantaliz- contrives Theatre, is one of the few men in edy, injected by Ted Healy and the the reign of a killer who, slaying today . . . and her gift ing new dances, and Shirley Temafar, leaves only a dab of Hollywood who holds a contract romantic interest, are both good. ple in her most lovable, believable from Suitable for all. to you is this glorious on his victims' bodies to both as actor and director. role! Those are the entertainment gelatin Ayres, who crashed into fame betray the fact that death was ,not pictureljg/St-) delights that 20th Century's "Cap- from a natural cause. his performance in "All tain January" brings to the Rah- The heartaches of lovers, torn With Quiet on the Western Front," and way Theatre. apart by their devotion to their who is making his first picture for George Brent is a firm advocate lespective countries, are dramatic- Columbia Studios, also holds a con of stock as a training school for ally brought to the screen in "Till tract to direct for the same emyoung actors. TEL. P. A. 4-0348 We Meet Again," which opens at ployer. "Where else can one learn so the Regent Theatre. The Tkeatre Worthy ©f Your much of dramatics in so short a Patronage "Till We Meet Again" shows two period of time?" he asks. "In FRIDAY & SATURDAY stock one portrays a different char AT RAHWAY acter in a different play each CAROLE LOMBARD and week, forty or more weeks a CO-FEATURE PRESTON FOSTER in year." WOODBRIDGE RICHARD Brent, who plays the role of a "Love Before Breakfast" stuttering reporter opposite Bette FRI. SAT. JUNE 12-13 DIX —and— Davis in the First National picture in "The Lone Wolf Returns" Double Feature "The Golden Arrow," now showa FOX pic I vie with with MELVIN DOUGLAS ing at the Rahway theatre, deEDDIE CANTOR IN clares he wouldn't trade his stock and GAIL PATRICK "STRIKE ME PINK" experience for anything you could —also— • J J U N E ' L A N ' G ; • BUDDY |B,$EN —also— give him. "RACE NIGHT" BUCK JONES in Cary Grant is nursing a batterSUN. - M O N . SUNDAY—ONE DAY ONLY ed head, Joan Bennett has a sprain "For T h e Service" ed wrist, and Raoul Walsh is con"THE ACTRESS-OF-THE-YEAR; "BARBARY COAST" News — Cartoon gratulating them both! with EDWARD G. ROBINSON by official vote of the Motion, Picture Miss Bennett, playing a manuAcademy, now in her first picture since and MIRIAM HOPKINSj SUN. MON. JUNE 14 - 15 curist in the early sequences of the winning the world - heralded award! —plus— Walter Wanger production "Big Double Feature "Times Square Playboy" Brown Eyes," coming to the RailROBERT MONTGOMERY with WARREN WILLIAM way Theatre, was supposed to and MYRNA LOY in crown her screen sweetheart, MONDAY & TUESDAY "PETTICOAT FEVER" Grant, with a box full of tools. —also— rhe greatest Hungarian MusiSTATE THEATRE, Woodbridge. Jackie Cooper, Joseph Calleia cal Picture ever presented I:IM;KNE PALLKTTE#DI.CK FOKAN Two million dollars worth of fun and Rin Tin Tin, Jr., in CAItOI. IIU<;ilKS * CATHKKINE "NEM ELHETEK MUZand beauty comes to the State DUDCKT • CHAM; l i K V M H D S "TOUGH GUYS" SIKASZO NELKUL' Theatre tonight and tomorrow when Eddie Cantor holds the Comedy - News - Cartoon (I Can't Live Without Music) screen in one of the greatest picStarring ALSO HIT NO. 2 TUES. WED. JUNE 16-17 ADDED tures of the season "Strike Me PAUL JAVOR VITAGRAPH Pink." Co-starred with Eddie are ATTRACTION D I S H N I T E WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY CARTOON THELMA Chester Morris - Lewis Stone TODD ANN HARDING and —in— —and— HERBERT MARSHAL in "3 GODFATHERS" PATSY 'THE LADY CONSENTS' SHIRLEY TEMPLE'S twinkling METRO Comedies - News - Cartoons KELLY and PETER B. KYNE'S toes are dancing to tinkling tunes NEWS —in— Thurs. June 18—One Day Only "Cappy Ricks Returns" 1 again as the dimpled starlet appears with ROBERT McWADE and 'Slightly in "Captain January," her new Fox and RAY WALKER TWO Woodbridge High School CREW A Piece of the Continental Blue SMASH picture. Static' Graduation Exercises RACING Set FREE to the LADIES HITS

AND

Ckairplane Games Swings Novelty Stands

Dining Dancing Bowling Refreshments

ALL AT YOUR DOOR-STEP -- AT THE --

Playh ouse

BIGGER AND BETTER

'SPECIAL INVESTIGATOR'

GUY KIBBEE • SUM SUMMERVILLE

TOMORROW

SAN

Wf LL HAVE TIM MARRY I

Amusement Grove FORD AVENUE FORDS, N. J. NEAR THE SUPERHIGHWAY

DANCING EVERY WED, NIGHT MUSIC BY SI KIYAK, AND HIS GEORGIA CAPERS

IF YOU'RE LOOKING~FOR A THRILL YOU'LL GET IT IN THE

Chairplane Ride

GEORGE'.BREJNT-

VISIT VARADY'S GROVE, AND REALLY ENJOY YOURSELF

F R A N C I S C O

SYNOPSIS— Tn.S.m Francisco, 1905, BLACKIE NORTON is running for Alderman -.o en.c.rce: lire; filiations. His enemy is JACK BURLEY, powerful Coast landlord. MAR\ BLAKE, B ackie's Paradise cafe, one nf L, simrer singer in Blackie's of NIP the tmnrhMt toughest

us, WON'T WE,BLACKIE ?))

VARADY'S

BETTE DAVIS The Golden Arrow

'Blow-Out'

MIDNITE SHOW — All Seats After 10.30 -

Why Go to the Shore.. ? Avoid Traffic Jams! YOU CAN HAVE YOUR AMUSEMENTS ENTERTAINMENT T HERE IN THE COUNTY...

FORDS

State

&£]

• •**.*,••v

cates on the Barbary Coast, loves him, but leaves for an operatic career. Blackie, who has a contract with her, arrives on opening night to stop the perf performance.

bVT I LOVE HIM, FATHER.

WHAT t>0 YOU THINK JT WILL BE", CAPTAIN ?

PROBABLY Five TtfOt/SAND FINHOR A YEAR/N

JAIL.

GALA OPENING NIGHT* MAY 29th Enttrtainmeht sand Dancing Modefn fireproof structure, elevitor service, on a beaun ful 50 acre esme, 1000 feet ftbove sea-level n o p the Watchung Mountains. Enjoy out J70.000 pool wuri Turkish and Russian Baihi, tennis. handbaJI jnd all spotts. Glonous unobstructed views of junounding country from tl) guest rooms. Completely furnished with Simmons newest fireproof furnifuit and BeiutyResi Mantessej

OTTO KRUGER

GLORIA HOIDEN

BMOMtt D/HIGHTER SHE

GIVES YOU THAT W f l R D

FEEMNGI

— 2 BIG HITS — 2

AMERICAN PLAN WMh-and (2 tut) dayii—from SI0. psr person Dally from $6.—Weekly from $30 Ftau Mkhtill 6 HM la IIINTIIIMU iftf

BELMONT HOTEL a n d COUNTRY CLUB flHt

BROOK

NEW j t R S E T

W ninaUs hon limn S^UHI—UH (wti Ho E

Ptnonul fuptri'iiion

). E. 3ALTZM AN

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LEW AYRES FLORENCE RICE Mldnite Show Saturday All Seats 20c

Blackie watches Mary's entire performance and falls more in love with her than ever. Then he notices that the impatient process server has goa§ backstage. Following him, Blaukie calmly knocks the man out, then proceeds to Mary's dressing room. Mary's heart is troubled for she has just refused Burley's offer of marriage. Then suddenly, Blackie has her in his embrace and is asking her to marry him. Father Tim, his boyhood friend, comes in. Radiantly happy, they tell him the good news

Hypnotized by her love for Blackie, Mary agrees to return to the rowdy Paradise. On the night she is to appear in her gaudy costume, Tim rushes in and tries to prevent her from going on Blackie, infuriated, pulls Mary away and tells Tim to leave' When the latter refuses, Blackie strikes him down. The shock of Blackie's brutality brings Mary to her senses. She breaks her engagement to him and quickly departs from the Paradise with Tim.

Mary now returns to grand opera, throwing herself into hard work. Burley renews his attentions and one day takes her to visit his mother who begs Mary to marry her son. Won over by her sweetness, Mary consents. But, unknown to her, Burley has been persecuting Blackie relentlessly. Trying to forget Mary, Blackie has recklessly plunged into debt but hopes to win the huge prize awarded annually at the Chickens Ball, for the best cafe show. On the night before the ball, however, Burley has the Paradise raided. All the performers are arrested and taken to the police station. Talking to the police Captain, Blackie realizes that he is faced with ruin. Will Mary come to his aid? See the next exciting episode of "San Francisco."

FORDS AND RARITAN TOWNSHIP BEACON

FRIDAY MORNING, JUNE 12, 1936

PAGE SIX

DETECTIVE RILEY

OUR PUZZLE CORNER

By Richard Lee R U S H THE" PlNSWEF? TO AS SOO^ flS

VLX. i-OOK INTO YOUR STORY- IK YOU ARE TELLING THE TRUTH vou'Li. HAVE YOUR

-AND YOU ARE SURE ABOUT THE LOCATION OF THE

GET

SEATTLE HEAD0UASTE-RS RECEIVES Rli-EV'S

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FREEDOM WHEN WE /

HOUSEBOAT P

JFMIN6 SAV FALSEHOOD YOU PUTEE

WING IN , H00SEGi.OW/

pyright I33S, Lmcoin Nta-»pap*[ Fttturtt, In

By Dean Carr

DASH DIXON HERBS POi.tr/CtiL "O OBJECTS

"S P> 7(.i

DASH,

UNAWARE OF ANV QANGER, 10 GIANTS WATCH DOT, TMEY POWER THEIR FATE/ , AND THE DOCTOR A S OUR ONLY CHANCE 1 THEY L00\<~ OVER THE WRECKED NOW IS T O FIND H SPACE SHIP AFTER THE CRASH DAUGHTER.' WE'LL TAK ON THE. ALONG OUR RAV GUNS AND ENOUGH FOOD TO LAST A COUPLE OF MONTHS'

GIANTS//

/ $ . • •

Answers to the above puzzles will be found on Page 3

YOUR HEALTH COMES FIRST!!!

VKtflLL THEY BE ABLE TD ESCAPE THESE

GIANT MOON MEN ??

O U N BATHING IMPROVES T H E -APPETITE, SLEEP AND GENERAL NUTRITION.

LITTLE BUDDY

By Bnic? Stuart

MUST'A GOT1.1.

RECITE GHOST STORIES OR OTHER FEAR COMPELLING- TALES...

&&U.I STAMMERING TUTTERING REMEDIED

THE

TEACHING

ACCENT

GOOFUS FAMILY

By H. T. Elmo

WP»Y -TH«T BRUTES

AT M E . HE'S

OF THE v. THIS »s

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WHAT ^ R E YOU SCAREO

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TOGETHER

LAUGHS FROM THE DAY'S NEWS! GOT

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The Great American Home

Credit's Still Tight, Mac.

by Munch SAY, MISTEROL-EA&Y-WUAT WOULD YOU DO IF X WAO A SODA 'N THE^ GOULDMV

VJHEH GRAN'PA HAS BEEN J p S OVEP-TOSEEHU^NEW ^ S ^ SWEETIE'—• — SHE fe YOU

STiC< "TO

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VIEWS and REVIEWS What they fl»y whether rlfkt or

M. J. Lavelle, Catholic Vicar-General. "We have the best government the world has ever known." • • • * Georgre Laoisbury, British Labor leader: "Today men fight because they are unable to distribute the enormous produce that they bring into being.' '

A BEAUTY PABL°R, j

FOR I'M TOST )

OR ELSE

^es

YOij KNOW/

William E. Grady, Associate Superintendent of New York Schools: "I don't think that the educational pattern we have set up meets the .needs of the situation today." EXPLOSION KILLS TWO Columbia, Tenn. — An explosion of alcohol durin a biology experiment at a local high school fatally burned Miss Scottie Hardison, the teacher, and Miss Ruth Alderson, 14, a pupil.

CHILDCEH f

\

CHARMING-/

^

I'D DO J U J T NNHAT YOU'D EXPECT ME TO D O *

Socialist Platform: by the poor will not raise their '•The New Deal, like the Old economic level is an attempt to Deal, has utterly failed." refute simple rules of arithmetic.1' George H. Tinkham, Member of Congress, Massachusetts: "The country is facing as great a crisis as it faced in the Civil War." * * • • Johnny Drummy, hotel bellboy for 33 years: "The greater they (the guests) are, the less they demand, the kinder they are and the more they appreciate what's done for them." • * * • Eric M. Matsner, Medical Director, Birth Control League: "To argue that family limitation

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3.

THATiP VJHATI WUZ.

!?WNSHIP

RARITAN

SPORTS

FRIDAY MORNING, JUNE 12, 1936

RED GHOSTS HAND SOUTH RIVER ITS FIRST SETBACK TOEND 1936 CAMPAIGN BY WINDSOR J. LAKIS

In defeating South River High at the local diamond, Friday afternoon, Nick Prisco's cohorts finally established themselves in their true form, a form that should have been put into use throughout their past baseball campaign. Had the former Central Jersey Champs played during the season as they did against South River and Carteret, last year's championship title would have stay ed right at home. • • • • In my estimation, the high spots of the South River game came when Fitz sent in the great Soroka to relieve Blaska in the box, and that worthy gentlemen, on whose shoulders this yelar's championship depends, was a sick looking individual after the local combine had finished blasting his hooks. •







E&rl Smith has the makings of a top-noicn flinger, but to date, he's only been able to do five or six innings without blowing up. It seemed as if, he and Joe Allgaier were pulling a brother act. "Smitty" pegs them in for five innings, and then Joey finishes off the game. And, regardless of the pitching capabilities of both these lads, I still maintain that "Percy" Wukovets was the greatest twirler the Red and Black has ever had, especially after comparing this season with last. • * • •. Season statistics show that Smith led the high school pitchers with an average of .600, while A1Igaier, Petro, Ellis and Szewczyk followed in the order named. The brunt of the mound work was left to the first three boys with the latter two only working on the mound for a couple of turnings. Joey Barcellona, the little lad who surprised everyone last year by steping into a baseball suit and making the team, was top man in the batting records with a season's average of .348. The other regulars finished in the following onder: Smith, Leahy, Captain Scutti, Simonsen, Mike Karnas, John Karnas, Jeglinski, Pocklembo, Melder, Petro and Allgaier. The team's average batting record stood at .235, which, experts will tell you is nice hitting for a scholastic club. Trough the pne co-operation of Sam Gioe, Bob Humphries, Herb Williams and the remainder of the WPA recreation league staff, the athletic events to be held during the Stadium Shows Week should be an outstanding success. The committee ap preciktes their help.

:

Sunday, being one of my off days, I took a stroll up to the clay tennis courts on upper Green street and gave them an inspection with a fine tooth comb. My report to you, is that these courts, when completed, will rival the Perth Amboy tennis grounds for both firmness and smoothness. I understand that they will be under supervision of a WPA attend ant at all times, whose job it will be to see that they are kept in perfect condition.

TOPSY NUT CLUB L. COSKY PACES BEATS ROMEOS FORDS ROYALS 9 IN SOUTH AMBOY TO 8 - 2 VICTORY SOUTH AMBOY.—The Romeo All Stars of this place, were given a severe setback here Sunday, at the hands of a superior Topsy Nut Club combine, of Port Reading. The final score showed the Nut Clubbers on top, 6 to 2. F. Kukula, who toed the mound for the winners, pitched a superb brand of ball in allowing his opponents only five hits and by striking out 14 batters. The visitors took an early inning lead and held their advantage throughout the game. Out of the total 17 hits collected by the Nut Club, batting honcrs were divided between. J. Kollar, T. Simeone and A. Simeone, who collected three apiece. Topsy Nut Club (6) ab r h B. Kollar, ss 5 1 1 J. Kollar, 3b 5 1 3 T. Simeone, lb 5 2 3 E. Kollar, c 5 13 A. Simeone, If 4 0 3 F. Covino, 2b 4 0 1 A. Kukulya, cf 5 0 2 S. Covino, rf 3 0 1 F. Kukulya, p 3 10 Totals 39 Romeo All Stars (2) ab Charlenno, lb 4 Post, 2b 4 Jankowski, cf 4

6 17 r 0 0 0

h 0 0 0

CARTERET.—The Fords Royals, with Cosky pitching shut-out ball until the eighth frame, scored a decisive 8 to 2 victory over the Carteret Aces, of this place, here Sunday afternoon. The Fords twirler had an almost perfect game, but three hits and a pair of runs in the final two innings deprived him of that honor. Never once where the Royals threatened and as the game grew older, their scoring ability became stronger. Cekacz, Carteret hurler, was touched for eight hits. Besides doing an excellent job on the mound, Cosky earned a tie in batting honors with J. Whitney, with each collecting a trio of bingles. Cosky had the edge in this case however, by virtue of having his hits count in an equal number of trips to the plate. Fords Royals (8) ab r h F. Whitney, cf 4 1 1 W. Fischer, 3b 5 1 1 L. Wissing, rf 5 11 B. Matusz, ss 3 11 J. Whitney, c 5 2 3 M. Pastor, lb 5 0 2 L. Blanchard, 2b 2 0 0 J. Buchko, 2b ..... 3 0 1 Kalina, If 3 1 0 L. Cosky, p 3 13 Totals

M 8 13

Carteret Aces( 2) ab J. Donovan, 3b 4 Cekacz, p 3 Colgan, c 4 A. Jackson, 2b 4 D. Donovan, lb 3 3 33 2 5 Diedrick, ss 3 003 100 101—6 Van Deventer, cf 2 000 000 020—2 Nesterwitz, If Magyar, rf 3 B. Jackson, If 2 Games

Katz, c

3 0 0

Stader, If O. Piola, p Kurzava, rf Yeager, 3b Mortenson, ss

3 4 4 3 4

Totals Topsy N. C Romeo's

0 0 0 1 1

0 0 1 1 3

Three More Won By White Owls m

WOODBRIDGE. — The White Owls A. C. added three more wins to its successful baseball campaign by defeating the Perth Amboy Con very Stars, 5-2; the Perth Amboy Royals, 7-4 and the. Sewaresi Elue Birds, 10-7 in recent contests. Petro was the winning pitcher against the Convery Stars and the Royals, while Genovese won over the Blue Birds. The Owls are now completely outfitted in new blue and gray uniforms. White Owls (10) ab r h Lomonico, If 2 4 1 Molnar, ss 2 11 Ferraro, c 5 0 3 Genovese, p 5 12 Ur, 3b 4 1 1 Roshal, 2b 3 2 1 Petro, lb 4 12 Geis, cf 4 0, 2 Sipos, rf 3 0 1 Totals 33 10 14 Blue Birds (7) ab r h McDermott, 3b 4 0 0 Simonsen, cf 4 12 Karnas, ss 4 2 3 Pocklembo, c „ 3 10 Tappen, If 4 0 2 Simonsen, p 2 0 0 Derick, rf 3 1 1 Simonsen, lb 4 11 Karnas, 2b 4 1 2 Totals

32 7 11

LEAPS FROM TRUCK ••

» •



'

Deadwood, S. D. — Realizing that the brakes of his truck, which was loaded with 6,000 dynamite caps, were slipping, Lloyd Trucano leaped from the cab and crouched fearfully. A few minutes later, he looked up and saw the truck standing still beside two broken telephone poles and two trees. Its highly explosive contents were undamaged.

ed duck pin scores of 33, 55, 42 and 80 at the Parkwlay Recreation alleys, recently. Shhh—1 might as well admit it was I, before the wolves, who saw me in action spread it around.

The drastic reductions in ticket prices for their 80-lap program of automobile race thrills and the uniform excellence of the two shows already staged this year, should swell Sunday's crowd at the Wodbridge Speedway to record proportions. There are plenty of auto race fans, who enjoy this sport, if they were able to afford the formWho is the lad who roll- er prices.

Totals

r h 0 1 1 0 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

31 2 3

ENTRIES COMING IN FOR STADIUM SPORTS •EVENTS

WOODBRIDGE.—Fourteen individual and four team entries for the athletic events to be held in conjunction with Stadium Shows; Week, June 27 to July 5, are now in the hands of the committee and it is expected that more than 100 entry blanks will be filed by the early part of next week. The committee, consisting of Nicholas Prisco, Maurice Donahue and Windsor J. Lakis, has been augmented by Sam Gioe and his able staff of assistants at the, WPA recreation center. An elaborate list of trophies and prizes have been ordered by the committee and will be on display next week. The following have already entered the events: Junior Division John Mihalko, Cyclones, broad jump and half-mile run; Herbert Saaks, Cyclones, 100 yard dash, 220 yard dash and broad jump; Herman Fredericks, Green Raiders, 100 yard dash and broad jump; B. Fishinger, Comets, 100 and 220 yard dashes; J. Ur, White Owls, broad jump; Douglas Zenobia, Blue Jays, 100 yard dash and greased pig event; E. Carstensen, Blue Jays, 100 yard dash and high jump; J. Dubay, Blue Jays, 100 and 220 yard dashes. Senior Division Eugene Eullivan, Blue Jays, 100 and 220 yard dashes and high jump; Joseph Brodniak, Blue Jays half-mile run; Al BothweU, Black Hawks, 100 yard dash and shotput; J. Gyenes, Cyclones, shot-put; J. Elek, Green Raiders half-mile and one-mile run; T. Barcellona, Green Raiders, 100 yard dash. An entry blank may be found in ihis paper and those interested in participating in the athletic events should fill out a blank and mail or deliver to Windsor J, Lakis, in care of this paper or to Sam Gioe at the WPA recreation center, on Rahway avenue, Woodbridge.

PRICES SLASHED AT WOODBRIDGE SPEEDWAY • _OVAL

| " T H A T L I T T L E CAME"i»to-»«fart«,..o.,s.T-By B. Link You've HAD

SorJ OF SEA SIMP, -

ALL EVENING," LOOK

You MOST I-WISH SOMEFOUR-FLUSH

ANI> FILL.

HOLBROOK HATS TAKE EASY WIN OVER CHEMICALS PERTH AMBOY.—Playing before a capacity crowd at City Stadium, Saturday afternoon, the Heyden Chemical baseball aggregation were handed a 9 to 3 setback by the strong Holbrook Hatters. The game was fairly even until the fourth frame, when the Hatters went to town and grabbed five runs, which gave them a decided advantage to work on. The losing combine was superior in the hitting column, having collected 13 safeties from the combined offerings ol Kubiak and Chasan. The Hatters gathered eight bingles off N. Kopperwats and J. Kopperwats. Bandison starred at bat for Heyden, with three clouts out of four trips to the platter, while Barcellona, Schultz and Levinson were best with the willow for the victors, with a pair of hits apiece. Heyden Chemical (3) ab r h Raypak, cf 5 0 2 Jaglowski, ss 5 11 Check, lb 4 1 2 Bondics, If 4 0 3 N. Kopperwats, 2b 3 12 Elko, 3b 3 0 0 Krauss, rf 3 0 0 Warren, c 4 0 1 J. Kopperwats, 2fb, p 4 0 2 Merker, rf 10 0 Totals

36 3 13

Holbrook Hat Co. (9) ab r Bodnar, ss 4 1 Barcellona, If 3 2 Levinson, rf 4 2 Ivan, lb 4 0 Dedrick, 3b 4 0 Delaney, cf 3 1 Schultz, 2b 3 2 Wynkoop, c 3 0 Kubiak, p 3 0 Chasan, p^ I l

h 0 2 2 0 1 0 2 0 0 l

Totals : 32 9 8 Heyden 010 002 000—3 Holbrook 200 500 02x—9 Home runs, Levinson, Chasan. Three base hits, Levinson, Check. Two base hits, Dedrick, Barcellona Bondics, 2, N. Kopperwats, J. Kop perwats. Speedway to record proportions. Garden State Racing Association officials are confident that their decision to slash admission rates in half—to 55 and 35 cents—will attract hundreds of fans whom the higher tariffs may have kept from the high-voltaged carnivals of speed and daring wih which the independent gas jockeys have inaugurated their fifth season. Acceptance of entries from the ARA has been sharply reflected in the results as the established stars, in the league of New Jersey dare-devils have been forced to keep the heat on their racing wagons every foot of the way to fight the determined threat of the newcomers. New cars, new names and new faces have helped in producing two outstanding successful meets and the new ticket prices should build up an even larger audience for the Garden Staters, who already have won a faithful following of racing devotees from these

WOODBRIDGE. — Drastic reductions in ticket prices for their 80-lap program of automobile race thrills and the uniform excellence of the two shows already staged this year should swell Sun- States. day's crowd at the Woodbridge

ONE IA/OULT> -TELL

THAT

CAPTAIN SCUTTI IS BATTING STAR IN EXCITING 8-7 WIN, BARCELLONA TOPS SEASON'S BATTING RECORDS By Lyman Peck, Jr. WOODBRIDGE.—The Woodbridge High School Red Ghosts unleashed all their power, which had been held in. check most of the season, and scored three impressive victories in the last two weeks, to end the 1936 season in a blaze of glory. They defeated New Brunswick and then showed the fans it wasn't a fluke, by snapping Carteret's twelve-game winning streak. Breaking winning streaks seemed to be their specialty, for they followed through by handing South River its first setback of the season. The locals really showed they had championship stuff in them, when they came from behind to olast South River. They started oil like a meteor, scoring two runs in the first Joining and three in the third. South River started creeping up, by scoring one in the lourtn, one in the tifth and two in ine sixth. In the Maroons half ol the seventh, they took the lead for the first time. Fritz, lef fielder for the Bricktowners, clouted a home run with two men on, to give South River a 7-5 lead. Allgaier was called in to replace Smith and set them down with one hit lor the remainder of the game. Soroka replaced Blaska, lor South River, and the Barrons fell on him with vengeance. Barcellona singled, Scutti followed suit and Smith doubled to score Barcellojia. The throw in was wide ot the third sack, scoring Scutti and Smith took third. John Karnas hit a fly to center field and Smith scored after the catch. Soroka covered the plate on the throw in and was knocked practically out by Smith. Scutti took batting honors with three bingles, while Barcellona and Smith had two each. Fritz and Hrydzusko starred for the Maroons with two hits each.

Clara Barton School Field Day Is Success

RED DEVILS RALLY TO WIN, 19 TO 11

RARITAN TOWNSHIP. — A large group of enthusiastic students witnessed the annual Clara Barton school field day, held at the school field, here recently. Following are the results of the various events: Room 100, Mrs. John Smith, Sec o,nd Grade—'Going to Town' race; first, Jean Kelly; second Steve Nagy; third, Edward Nelson. Room 105, Boys 50-yard dash, First, Stephen Nograde; second, Richard Bandies. Girls' three-legged race: First, Grace Kaminsky; second, Helen Gulya. High jump: Ninth grade, William Mineeberg, 5 feet, 3 inches; eighth grade, Fred Rui'h and Victor Schuster, 5 feet, 2 inches; seventh grade, Steven Adamatz, 5 feet 1 inch. Girls' high jump: Ninth grade, Ruth Moore, 4 feet, 8 inches; eighth grade, Elinor Rolfe, 4 feet, 7 inches.

RARITAN TOWNSHIP.— Staging a rally in the )ast three innings the Red Devils scored 14 runs, to win over the Panthers, 19 to 11, in the opening game in the second h«If of the Piscatawaytown Softball League. The following is the schedule of the second half league games: June 10, Firemen vs. Democrats; 12, Teachers vs. Cubs; 15, Panthers vs. Firemen; 17, Cubs vs. Red Devils; 19, Democrats vs. Teachers; 22, Firemen vs. Cubs; 24, Dem ocrats vs. Panthers; 26, Teachers vs. Red Devils. July 1, Democrats vs. Red Devils; 3, Teachers vs. Firemen; 6 Democrats vs. Cubs; 8, Firemen vs. Red Devils; 1, Teachers vs. Panthers.

FORDS JUNIOR LEAGUE

r h

0 1 2 3 2 0 0 0 0 0

0 l 2 3 2 0 0 1 0 0

Kara, Woodbridge 2 2 1.000 J. Karnas, Sewaren .... 3 3 1.000 1 1 1.000 The Grammar School League of Cole, Woodbridge Nemeth, Sewaren 1 1 1.000 Woodbridge Township, conducted by the recreation department of Hustin, Woodbridge .... 1 1 1.000 5 4 .800 the WPA, drew to a successful Mantecalvo, Wood Chevernak, Wood 5 4 .800 close at the Parish house field, on June 8 with Port Reading taking Kenna, Woodbridge .... 4 3 .750 the measure of Keasbey in the fin- Fraind, Woodbridge .... 4 3 .750 3 2 .666 al and deciding game, by the score Greco, Avenel Finn, Woodbridge 6 4 .606 of 6-5. Evan, Sewaren 8 5 .625 10 6 .600 The game, one of best yet play- Butte, Keasbey 12 7 .583 ed in this league, was closely con- A. Vahaly, Pt. Read 7 4 .571 tested throughout and was finally Quinn, Sewaren 12 decided in the sixth frame, when Dunda, Ave,nel 533 E. Zullo singled, stole second and Smear, Woodbridge .... 2 .500 8 third and reached home on a pass- Nemeth, Keasbey .500 2 ed ball. In the seventh, Nemelh McCann, Colonia .500 2 opened for Keasbey with a single, Kunz, Iselin .500 8 Androcosky fanned, Bilko was out E. Zullo, Pt. Read .500 2 by an infield assist, while Nemeth Wiston, Colonia .500 2 reached third safely, then Nagy, Sedlak, Avenel .500 2 who batted for Toth, was called Semiak, Avenel .500 4 out on strikes, quelling the Keas- | Mega, Iselin .500 13 6 .461 by suprising and giving the game Florio, Avenel, 13 6 .461 and championship to Port Read- Balog, Avenel ing. Butte, the pitcher for Keasby, J. Thompson, Avenel .... 7 3 .428 5 2 .400 hit a home run in the first frame, Coppolla, Pt. Read 10 4 .400 while Andrew Vahaly, led the Port Cilo, Avenel Reading team with a perfect day Aquila, Iselin 6 2 .333 at bat by getting three for three. Argonoizzo, Iselin 6 2 .333 The final standing of the league Waterson, Iselin 3 1 .333 and each team's individual batting Hizer, Avenel 12 4 .333 records follow: B. Thompson, Avenel 12 4 .333 Final Standing Burlia, Avenel 6 2 .333 W L Pet. Baumly, Hopelawn 7 2 .285 Port Reading 4 0 1.000 'Cheslak, Sewaren 7 2 .285 Keasby 3 1 .750 i Barcellona, Wood 4 1 ,250 Avenel 2 2 .500 'Beckwood, Sewaren .... 4 1 .250 Woodbridge l l .500 ; Paris, Hopelawn 8 2 .250 Sewaren 1 1 .500 Sazi, Hopelawn 4 1 .250 Hopelawn 1 1 .500 Hartone, Colonia 4 1 .250 Fords 0 2 .000 Leading: Pitchers Colonia 0 3 .000 Iselin 0 2 .000 W L Pet. E. Zullo Pt. Read 4 0 1.000 • • • « GRAMMAR SCHOOL LEAGUE A. Quinn, Sewaren ... 2* 0 1.000 Montecalvo, Wood 1 0 1.000 Batting Averages Butte, Keasbey 2 1 .666 Ab H Pet. Dunda, Avenel 2 1 .666 Ferraro, Woodbridge . . 3 3 1.000 Sazi, Hopelawn 1 1 .500 Drost, Fords 3 2 1.000 The Woodbridge Tow.nship Doll, Colonia 1 1 1.000 grammar school baseball league of Buryld, Avenel 2 2 1.000 the WPA recreation department, Sieber, Sewaren 1 l 1,000 used 89 players among the 9 teams.



VALENTINE TEAM TAKES TRIMMING FROM NATIONALS WOODBRIDGE. — Showing a complete reversal of early season form, the Valentine Brick Co., team took its second pasting of the week, when it stacked up against the National Lead combine, Saturday afternoon at the Grove street diamond. The final score showed Bill Applegate's team on the losing end, 12 to 7. All told, the locals sent four pitchers on the mound, to try and curb the heavy hitting barrage of the visitors, who kept clouting the ball until 20 hits had been amassed. Wukovets, J. Sabine, P. Sabine and Pickens all took turns on the hill for the Valentines. Mizerak starred at bat for the home club with four hits out of five tries. Nemeth was best for the Nationals with four clouts in five trips to the rubber. National Lead Co. (13) ab r h Nemeth, 3b 5 2 4 Pruss, p 4 2 2 Albany, c 5 12 Zawlinski, cf 5 2 3 Schank, If 5 0 2 Stumpf, lb 4 0 1 G. Urbanski, rf 2 11 Youngcofski, rf 2 0 1 Sappid, rf 10 1 S. Urbanski, 2b 5 2 1

e 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 Ratajack, sa

Wildcats, 8; Boys' Club, 9 Totals 33 8 9 2 Winning pitcher, Grundmar; los South River (7) ing pitcher, Rielly. Leading batters ab r h e Wildcats—Hunz and Ellis; Boys' Fritz, If 4 3 2 1 Club—Orwsky and S. Cipo. McCarthy, 2b 5 1 1 0 Richards, lfo 4 0 1 0 Soroka, 3b, p 4 0 1 0 Rondesko, cf 4 0 0 0 Slatowic, c 3 1 1 1 Hrydzusko, rf 4 1 2 1 Warnowich, ss 4 0 0 0 Blaska, p, 3b 3 1 0 0

WPA RECREATION LEAGUES GRAMMAR LEAGUE

Woodbrid?e (8) ab Simonsen, If 4 Leahy, rf 3 Barcellona, 3b 5 Scutti, c 4 Smith, p, lb 4 J. Karnas, cf 3 Jeglinski, ss 4 M. Karnas, 2b 3 Melder, lb 2 Allgaier, p 0



4 2 2

Totals 42 12 20 Valentine Brick Co. (7) ab r h Grobiznac, c 4 11 Mizerak, ss 5 2 4 Wukovets, cf p ., 5 10 Rybcck, If 4 12 Kerley, lb 4. 0 I Timinski, 3b 4 12 J. Sabine, p 3 0 0 P. Sabine, p 10 0 Lisgar, 2b 4 12 Pickens, rf, p 4 0 0

Totals 38 7 12 35 7 8 3 Valentine 002 010 040— 7 South River 000 112 300—7 National Lead .... 220 111 05x—12 base hits, Nemeth, ZawlinWoodbridge 203 000 30x—8 ski,Two 2, Stumph, G. Urbanik, Mizerak, Kerley. Home runs, G. UrbanBatting Averages ski, Rybeck, Timinski. Double Joe Barcellona, third sacker for plays, Lisgor to Mizerak to Kerley, the Priscomen, took batting hon- Nemeth to Stumpf, Picken to Kerors for the season with a .348 aver- ley, Ratajack to Urbanski to age. Earl Smith, first baseman and Stumpf (2). pitcher, was second with an average of .325 and Leahy, right fielder, was third with, an average o£ FIELDING RECORD .309 for the season. *C. p.o. A. E. Ave. Scutti, Barcellona and Simonsen Simonsen, If .. 52 25 3 4 .875 were tied for the most hits, each Barcellona, 3b 47 13 23 11 .765getting fifteen. Simonsen and Scutti, c, cf .... I l l 96 10 5 .955 Leahy each had one home run to J. Karnas, cf c 32 25 3 4 .875 their credit, while Smith, Simon- Jeglinski, ss 66 25 29 12 .818 sen and Leahy each had two trip- M. Karnas, 2b 66 30 29 7 .893 les among their hits. Melder, lb 52 45 2 5 .903 Smith led the field with the most Leahy, rf 19 17 0 2 .894 runs batted in. He had 13 to his Pocklembo, cf 4 2 1 1 .750 credit, while Leahy had nine and Allgaier, p 6 1 4 1 .833 Scutti eight. Smith, p, lb 81 72 5 4 .950 Earl Smith and Joe Allgaier Petro, p 11 2 7 2 .818 were the star pitchers for the club. Ellis, p 1 0 0 1 .000 Earl won 3 and lost 2, with Joe *C, chances; PO, put outs; A, close behind showing 4 victories assists; E, errors, Ave., fielding and 3 losses. average. Totals

INDIVIDUAL BATTING RECORDS *gp ab r h d t hr ave w so rtoi sac Barcellona 3b 14 43 12 15 1 0 0 .348 7 1 6 4 Smith, p, lb 12 40 6 13 2 2 0 .325 3 12 13 2 Leahy, rf 12 42 7 13 3 2 1 .309 3 11 9 1 Scutti, (C) c, cf .... 14 51 14 15 7 0 0 .294 7 6 - 8 0 Simonsen, If 14 54 9 15 2 2 1 .278 7 9 7 0 M. Karnas, 2b .... 14 52 10 13 3 0 0 .250 2 6 7 1 J. Karnas, cf, c .... 14 45 8 10 2 1 0 .222 7 3 7 1 Jeglinski, ss 14 50 14 11 3 0 0 .220 6 7 3 i Pocklembo, rf 55 11 2 2 0 1 0 .182 2 5 3 1 Melder, lb 8 24 3 4 2 0 0 .166 0 7 4 0 Petro, p 8 13 0 1 0 0 0 .076 0 10 1 0 Allgaier, p 9 14 4 1 1 0 0 .071 3 7 2 0 Korzowski, ph, .... 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000 0 2 0 0 Bartha, 3b 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 .500 1 1 0 0 Totals 447 90 115 26 8 2 .253 48 87 71 11 *—G.P., games played; A. B. times at bat; R, runs scored; H, number of hits made; D, doubles; T, triples; H.R, home runs; Ave., batting average; W, base on balls; S. O., strike-outs; R. B. I., runs batted in; Sac. sacrifice hits. PITCHING RECORDS Pitcher Innings hits runs walks outs won lost ave. Smith, 37 1-3 24 21 14 32 3 2 .600 Allgaier 401-3 38 20 14 28 4 3 .571 Petro 30 1-3 29 15 9 23 1 1 .500 Ellis 3 3 3 1 3 0 0 .000 Szewczyk 1 2 2 1 2 0 0 .000 Totals 112 96 61 39 88 8 6 .571

PAGE EIGHT

FORDS AND RARITAN TOWNSHIP BEACON

FRIDAY MORNING, JUNE 12, 1936

ISELIN

NEWS

by ELIZABETH HEYBOUWJB

LOCAL BOYS TO ATTEND JULY CAMP SESSIONS

TROOPER PICKS UP TRUCK DRIVER FOR CARRYING ALCOHOL

SHOWER IS HELD Classified Ads. FOR FORDS GIRL BY HER JOTHER HELP WANTED MEN—With chain store or bakery route experience preferred for immediate employment. Local positions, steady income; should have drivers' license. For interview write, C. L. Burlew, 186 Decker Place, Woodbridge, N. J.

WOODBRIDGE.-Jack Delaney, 27, of McCloud Drive, Fort Lee, truck driver for John Cottilo, of 690 Broadway, West New York, THE FIREMEN OF THE HARD- pervisor has been appointed to was held under a $2,000 bail for ing avenue firehouse held their take charge of activities. AT THE KIDDIE KEEP WELL the grand jury by Judge Brown, MISS HELEN BODNAR TO • • » • regular meeting Tuesday night. MARRY STEPHEN KERMonday morning, charged with CAME IN ROOSEVELT Plans were made for a carnival. THE UNION OF SOCIAL JUStransporting alleged denatured alPARK FOR SALE tice will sponsor a benefit perMONDY SOON At the behest of Sergeant lieve that a most difficult cohol without a permit. HOME;—6 rooms, 2 sunparlors, tile A VERY INTERESTING MEET- formance on June 21 and 22 at George Balint, Police Com- time was encountered in PERTH AMBOY.—Fifteen boy? Delaney was picked up on the FORDS.—Miss Helen Bodnar of bath and large plot of ground. ing was held by the Women's the local theatre. The feature missioner James F. Schaf- trying to find a house for picture will be "The Country fiom Woodbridge Township will super-highway by Trooper Dan Dietz street was tendered a mis-Located on First Ave., Near PleasRepublican club Monday afternoon at its headquarters on Oak Doctor." All those holding tic- frick had his first ride in an rent at a reasonable begin on July 1 their free month's Barclay, of the Avenel barracks. cellaneous shower at her home re- ant Ave., Raritan Twsp. This build truck was loaded with 18 cently, in honor of her approach- ing is in need of repairs which In race airplane. The big event in amount? Tree road. After the business kets may participate vacation at the Kiddie Keep Well The drums of alcohol each drum con- ing marriage to Stephen Kermonnight. There will be no advance the Commissioner's life took session, refreshments were serv• • • • Camp, county camp for undemouv taining approximately 53 gallons. dy, of Metuchen avenue, Wood- would cost about $800. The owners in prices which are purchased. place at Westfield Airport. of this property-are not willing to ed and card games were held. Then we understand that ished children, in Roosevelt Park, J. Mundy and J. Arts, of the al-bridge. The affair was arranged spend this sum at present on refrom the group members. And, Jim won't forget it for according to an announcement tocoholic Beverage Commission test- by the bride-to-be's mother, Mrs. pairs but prefer to dispose of this there are many requests • * • * THE UNION OF SOCIAL JUSday by Senator John E. Toolan, the alcohol, found it to be de-Mary Bodnar. property at a reasonable price. For tice met Friday night at the THERE A NUMBER OF HONOR some time to come. Howev- made to our Town Fathers president of the camp's board of ed natured, but pressed charges The guests who attended were: further information as to price and er, he said it was "swell." pupils in the high school and from concerns looking for headquarters in the Green street against the driver because he fail- Tessie Torok, Mary Labbarz, other particulars see. w * • • firehouse. An executive board eighth grade from Iselin this large space for manufactur- directors. to obtain permission to trans- Mrs. Melder, Mrs. James Check, MARGARETTEN & CO., Inc. One thing certain was ing purposes, especially the Senator Toolan announced to- ed session was held Monday night year, they are: Hilda Bruggeport drums, Delaney was also', Mrs. N. Bulhower, Mary Komisky, 276 Hobart St., Perth Amboy, N. J. man, Lillian Witovsky, Valenday the quotas for Middlesex held the at the home of Frank Kocheck. that Schaffrick was in dress goods industry for driving without a license. Mrs. Frank Rock, Mrs. Angelcei. tine Smith, Anna Phillips, NetPhone 4-0900 County municipalities, and stated This organization has grown tie Tupick, Virginia Flessner, good hands all through that tentative plans are for having According to the authorities, it Anna Brzychcy, Miss Cizkanich, very rapidly. FOR RENT Doris Rush, Conrad Flessner, his experience. For, Balint With real estate on the the camp's complete number ol is a trick of "bootleg" concerns to Mrs. Csattos, Mrs. V. Szabo, Mrs. • * • • denatured alcohol and V. Bodnar of this place; Mrs. Eliz- Three room apartment with upward trend, it shouldn't 150 children out at camp on July purchase THE PLAY, GIVEN BY THE Ruth Janke, Florence Harned, was quite an aviator at purify it when it reaches its desti- abeth Vigh, Mrs. Theresa Kish, of heiat and hot water. $20 per Young People's Christian asso- Wallace Mathersan and Chris- one time. If you recall, the be lo.ng before our real 1. nation. tian Hehr, Colonia; Mrs. Helen Petro, Linden. month. Located on Cooper Final preparations for the camps Sergeant was heavily in- estate promoters get on ciation of the First Church of Catherine Hansen, Hopelawn; • * • • opening will be made at a direcIselin, Friday night was a big terested in the Pacer Air- the job in this vicinity and tors meeting next week. FIGHTS FOR TREE Mrs. Abhazi, Jennie and Irene Ab- Avenue, Iselin. Inquire at MR. AND MRS F. SCHEIN (the success. Maine, N. Y. — Assured by start building new homes former Miss Martha Andersen, craft Corporation in Fords Almost all the campers have al- scientists that his 200-year-old ahizai Mrs. John Bodnar, Keasbey Grouse Coal and Supply Co., • • * • in wholesale lots. It's be- ready been selected, it was an-maple tree could live another 150 Mrs. M. Kermondy, Julia Kermon- Woodbridge Avenue, Fords, THE COMPANIONS OF THE of Iselin) are on a wedding trip several years ago. Grace Bodnar, Mrs. Mary Dein Florida. • • ** ing done in Woodbridge nounced. Selection is made on theyears, if unmolested, C. V, McGre- dy, Foresters of America, Iselin cirak, Mrs. J. Kearin, Margaret Semb&sis of the child's need for a BUY AND SAVE AT cle, will hold a card party tcThose high-powered jobs and Colonia. gor put up such a fight with high- ko, Helen Zambor, Mrs. E. Fishing Japanese Beetle Control health vacation and his family's night at 8:15 o'clock at the Ise- WOODBRIDGE.—Now that it is —called the Pacer—are still way officials for the tree that financial condition. Among the plans for a ,new highway, which er, Mary Hegcdus, Mrs. Helen Tu» * *• lin Free Public Library. Tickets almost time for the Japanese the topic of conversation in Johnny Jago, who holds agencies referring children to thehad doomed the tree, were re- chalsky, Woodbridge; Mrs. Mrs. may toe purchased at the door. beetle to appear, the department Julia Remais, Mrs. Julia Hofkzon, FURNITURE CO. Many beautiful prizes will be of agriculture announced that in- avifation circles. Coleman forth at Mike's Tavern in Kiddie Camp's Medical Committee drawn and the tree saved. Madeline Ethel, Avenel. awarded for high scores. Refresh formation on the beetle control Bariney and Frank Seesock Fords as master of ceremon- are the county department of pubSUBSTANTIAL Anna Mroczkowska, Mrs. Stelic welfare, the emergency relief ments will be served. may be obtained by writing or were the designers, while ies every Friday and Satur- bureaus, phanie Wersilewsky, Wanda and school nurses, the Salvagetting everything in preparation SAVINGS FOR YOU • * * • Calling Orley G. Bowen, County Balint and your own "Steve" Sabot, Jeanette De Marco, THE CHILDREN OF ST. CECEL- Agricultural Agent, County Re- Vecsey were two of the day night, is getting quits a tion Army, and municipal boards for the youngsters. Grounds have Stacia reputation for himself. His of health and overseers of thebeen put into shape and buildings Mrs. Julia Vargo, Mrs. Mae Bur- Anything* In Furniture, Bedding ia's church will present a Kid-cord Building, New Brunswick, and Floor Coverings cleaned and painted. As the num-dash, Mrs. Michael Yusko, Elsie vocals, which usually con- poor. die's show this afternoon and (telephone New Brunswick 1437). backers. While there has been no build- ber of youngsters to be accepted Bainton, Marjorie Gatzas, Perth • * ** tonight. The children have been Printed recommendations, prepar286 HOBART ST. tain some reference to those Amboy; Mrs. Julia Toth, Anna Signs of better times in in attendance, are always ing program at the camp this year, remains unchanged from last year, Kross, practicing for some time. Danc- ed by specialists at the New JerPHONE P. A. 4-4750 Carteret; Mrs. Bertha Keisas has taken place in the past two present facilities are expected ing was supervised by the Lei-sey Agricultural Experiment Sta- Woodbrklge township are well received. huma, Matawan. years, much work has been done be ample. Art YoungPeter Fimiani sure Time unit. After the play tion and in the State Department many. Recently a family a sport dance will be held. of Agriculture, will be furnished in Fords had to move beGET BIG FEE free of charge. cause of change of ownerTHE FIREMEN OF THE GREEN Winston-Salem, N. C. The street firehouse will conduct ship of the house they oc- three attorneys who represented FISH COSTS LIFE their annual carnival on June cupied. And would you be- the infant son of Libby Holman 25, 26 and 27. The stands will Cumberland, Wis. — Joe Hecht, Reynolds in the litigation over the offer many beautiful prizes. 28, became so excited when he settlement of the $28,000,000 eshooked a large bass that his feel Naval Reserve To Hold Dancing has been planned for tate of his father. Z. Smith Reybecame entangled in his fishing all three nights. nolds, have been allowed a fee of Military Ball Tomorrow line. Falling overboard he was fifteen per cent, of the settlement THE GIRLS OF ISELIN ARE unable to extricate himself and PERTH AMBOY.—The officers allowed the child, which will drowned 'before he could be resurged to join the Leisure Time of the eighth battalion, U. S. Naval amount to over $1,000,000. cluto on Thursday night. A su-cued. Reserve, will conduct a military ball, tomorrow night in the Naval Read the BEACON Militia Armory, Front and Gordon THE FINEST IMPORTED streets, this place. The ball will be Imported a reunion of all the former naval officers connected with the batta"INTERWOVEN" SPECIAL lion and their friends. ON TAP AT Many Woodbridge men belong to REG. $5.00 ANKLETS the outfit. One Minute

Hillcrest Ave.,

Iselin, N. J.

Cotter...

ART • PECK

Christensen's

Graduation Specials

• "• -

BEER SAM'S

DAB

Dortmunder Actien - Beer

BAR AND GRILL 464 New Brunswick Ave., Fords, N. J. Brewed Only in Dortmund by the largest German Brewery. Contains the Choicest Hops and the Finest Malt.

RamblingReporter

Quality Meats-Lowest Prices.'

PRIME RIB ROAST FANCY FRANKFURTERS SLICED BACON CHUCK ROAST BREAST VEAL

»

For Week Beginning SATURDAY JUNE 13th And Continuing Until FRIDAY EVENING JUNE 19th

24c LB 21c /lLB 19c LB 19c

Board of Education is con sidering possibilities of erecting a high school of its own. This is a noble step. But, unless the Federal Government dishes out the funds for the local project, the township is in no position to go through with building plans.

4

An ideal graduation gift from the parents, uncles aunts or oihers closely related—Mary's "One Minute Permanent Wave" — No electricity, self setting, harmless to hair and scalp the longest lasting permanent yet created.

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We all agree that it's about time the township had a high school ol its own. This business of sending students to high schools in Metuchen, Woodbridge and other institutions is expensive.

MARY'S BEAUTY SALON

S6 HOY AVENUE FORDS, N. J. Tel. Perth Ant boy 4-2505-W

In This Column You Will Find Our Weekly

3 pair for $1.00

Permanent Wave

(Continued from page one)

Week-End Specials! LB

••

GRADUATION

1-1-lTIIIIHm-^TTT-

If

'

"KEY VALUES"

50c

SPORT

BELTS

50c

SPORT

SUSPENDERS

1.00

MEN'S

PAJAMAS Special Value

.1.00

BOY'S LINEN

KNICKERS....

Zipper

2.95

BUSY BEE MARKET

87 MAIN STREET WOODBRIDGE, N. J. TEL. 8—0739 — FREE DELIVERY

Two-tone Sport

OXFORDS

white, DRESS

SHOES

Educational feature picture on the vital problem of safety

tfuh. Hew

3.00

MONTHLY PAYMENT PAINTING PLAN

AND

Home Pauduify tcuy,! Features of Our New Plan 1 No KMJ tape % No down payment 3 Your signature !• the only Becurity needed 4 Low monthly payments 5 Two Years to pay 6 You may include other i>ome iva prove menu with your pointing

Now you can give your home new beauty and complete paint protection with pretested du Pont paints and pay from income for as tittle as $6.8S a month. Red tape, down payments and dealings with strange banks have been eliminated. Your own signature is the only security required. Let us help you plan your home painting NOW—when painting is needed most. You can pay for the entire coat in easy convenient monthly payments. See UJ now for complete detail*

Service Hardware Co. 81 MAIN ST. WOODBRIDGE

showing what Oldsmobile is doing in the interests of safer motoring

A MOVIE DEPICTING t H | H I S J O R V OF THE A U T O M O T I V Ei * J N Dll S T R Yf

HERITAGE

UNUSUAL



INTERESTING

2.00

BOY'S

VARNISHES

2.00

$1.9 5

Key Value No. 6.

YOUNG MEN'S SPORT COATS

94c $6.85

Young Men's lKaynee'

SHIRTS Key Value No. 10.

MEATS SLACKS (Neat Stripes and Checks)

and the time whejn every woman should have plenty of our famous—

$3.95 $1.19 94c Exceptionally at

Men's Pure Irish Linen HANDKERCHIEFS, Box of 3

FANCY HOSE

is the Month of Roses

ROSE PETAL CREPE SLIPS

Key Value No. 7.

Student's White FLANNEL TROUSERS

JUNE

For wear and appearance they will match any $2.00 garment made.

$1.04 $1.14

WE CARRY THE FAMOUS

ABC

CORSETS

ALSO A FULL LINE OF

Handbags — Handkerchiefs Jewelry, etc. SUITABLE FOR GIFTS

INFORMATIVE

WOODBRIDGE AUTO SALES 475 RAHWAY AVENUE

Ladies Silk Rayon PAJAMAS & GOWNS

Key Value No. 9.

COMPLETE STOCK OF Wing Collars land Dress Bows

—as at present. We have scoured the country —east,and as far west ,as Minneapolis and assembled the cream of the Market—So that right here in Woodbridge you may procure the very choicest garments at the exceptional low price of—

Key Value No. 5.

MEN'S

^

ENAMELS DUCO

94c

Key Value No. 8.

etc for Graduates. •

94c

(Blue and Sheppard Checks)

white & pastel shades

ADMISSION FREE in the showrooms of

PAINTS

4.00

WHITE OXFORDS AND SPORT SANDALS

WHITE OXFORDS

Key Value No. 3.

(Sizes 1 to 16).

Growing Girl's

produced by Oldsmobile under the supervision of Hollywood directors

74c

GIRL'S WASH DRESSES

"Polly Preston" all

NOW YOU CAM GIVE YOUR HOME COMPLETE PAINT PROTECTION AND PAY FROM INCOME

"Gotham" & "Quaker" SILK HOSE

Key Value No. 4.

Men's All-white alnd

DRESSES

Key Value No. 2.

(Sizes 1 to 10.)

BATHING SUIT

Never Before Have We Shown Such Beautiful—

74c SUMMER

'Kaynee' BLOUSES

BOY'S WASH SUITS

Princeton All-Wool

LB

Key Value No. 1.

Ladies! Take Notice!!

WOODBRIDGE, N. J.

^

i

Christensen's Department Store 97 MAIN ST.

"A Safe Place To Buy"

WOODBRIDGE, N. J