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B e r g e n C o u n t y ’s T r ic e n t e n n ia l Pages 1-A To 20-A Commercial "Keahcr and SOUTH BERGEN REVIEW VOL. (1 NO. 47 Edwina K• Lee Makes O...

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B e r g e n C o u n t y ’s T r ic e n t e n n ia l Pages 1-A To 20-A

Commercial "Keahcr and SOUTH BERGEN REVIEW VOL. (1 NO. 47

Edwina K• Lee Makes Outstanding H.S. Record By A m y Divine Edwina K. Lee is one of the outstanding students in the 1963 graduating class at Lyndhurst High School She is listed with the six students attaining highest academic ran k and gar­ nered the highest number of a w a r d s for her academic and extracur­ ricular work a t the school. On the honor roll every marking period, Edwina received aw ards for lead­ ership and scholarship, ex­ cellence in history, service to the school for which she received fhe Pearl L for over 75 points, the Penick Co. $500 aw ard and the Em blem C lub $1000 schol­ arship for a student pursu­ ing a m ed ical career. She also won a New Jersey State tuition scholarship. In h e r j u n i o r y e a r Edwina was elected to the National Honor Society and was a m em ber of the folk-singing group in addi­ tion to serving as business director of the High School Nutrition C lub, acting as manager of the basketball team, and participating in volleyball and trade. As a m em b er of Girl Scout Troop No. 967 the

THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 1983

Edwina K . Lee med studies She i m not yet decided at whic. medi­ cal school she will com­ plete these studies. E dw ina, 18, came to Lyndhurst from Queens three years ago with her parents. W«* Ling and her Sophomore year at Lyndhurst H igh, enrolling in t h e C o l l e g e P r e p Course. Shy and modest, Edwina became im m ediately pop­ ular with faculty and stu­ dents alike because of her willingness to help wher­ ever needed. Before taking up her studies at Douglass Edwina will spend part of the Sum­ mer as counselor at a “ Y ” c a m p n e a r H a r r im a n , N.Y. E d w in a ’s mother works in the radiology depart­

ment at New York In­ firm a ry Beekman-Downtown Hospital. Her father is restaurant manager at Lee’s H aw aiian Islander, Lyndhurst, but is no rela­ tion to the owner. Her brother, John , 15, has com

Carlucci adm itted she danced in the nude but de­ nied m aking the gestures described by the detec­ tives The case is also being reviewed by the ABC.

Last week Carlucci’s at­ torney, Anthony DiLella, asked that the charge of fredlfftlft yeai1 1 W UWpJj&i and at Lyndhurst High School ^ lhe com plaint of lewd ness be considered by E dw ina s ambition to be­ Breslin come a pediatrician no The judge acceded to doubt results from her in­ this request and found the terest in science and her defendant guilty of lewd­ love of children. She looks ness in the light of testi­ forward to achieving her mony by the detectives am bition, though it will and by the girl, who had take 10 years of study and testified that "the more hard work, four of college, she took off the higher the four of m ed ical school and tips she received.” Breslin tw o y e a r s of t r a in in g imposed a fine of $250 and beyond that, but all who costs of court of $25 and an know her are certain she additional $25 contribution will accept the challenge to the New Jersey Violent a n d b e c o m e t he fi ne Crimes Bureau pediatrician she aims to be. DiLella said he would file an appeal of the ver­ dict Breslin reminded the attorney he has ten days in Again, through Lt. Settem­ which to do so. brino and our Municipal B r e s l i n t o ld G e o rg e Court Clerk Alex Paluzzi's efforts, the impossible was Fonseca of Passaic and his accomplished again, one ex-wife Haydee of Lyn­ week later. But they did it dhurst that they should because they cared to help a friend in distress.

A Letter O f Thanks To: M ayor Ja m e s Guida, Lyndhurst, Ronald Bogle, Comm, of Police, C h ie f W i l l i a m J a r v i s , Chief Lyndhurst P.D. I owe a great big debt of gratitude to m any wonderful employees of this great town of Lyndhurst, when a dire emergency arose for m e. M y tw o g r a n d ­ daughters were in a ter­ rible auto accident on The M e a d o w la n d C o m p le x Property where they are both employees. Injuries were severe, c o n c u s s io n , etc. My notification via telephone was that they were taken to a hospital for emer­ gency treatm ent, no other i n f o r m a t i o n a v a ila b le . Date of accident. May 27, 4:45 P.M ., start of Memo­ rial D ay Holiday long weekend, compounded by the fact our Governor Kean was due to arrive in Lyndhurst m om entarily as a guest for The J im Jensen CBS News A ll Star Bergen County Softball Game. I arrived at Lyndhurst Po­ lice Desk frantically ask­ ing for their help for hospi­ tal nam e where m y loved ones were taken. In spite of the fact that their switchbord was lit up tike a Christm as tree.

m a n y e m e r g e n c y c a lls coming in, trying to calm irate citizens with blocked driveways, citizens arriv­ ing to sign complaints, Lt. Jam es Settembrino and t*tl. Gerald Onnembo were superb under impossible conditions! With a lot of "stick-toitiveness" on their part, four calls to police depts. and am bulance squads, Lt Settembrino had me on my way to Riverside Hospital, Secaucus to join my loved ones in the emergency room. Several days later, we needed necessary informtion in regards to the incident w hich I was tdld was unable to be obtained

consult their attorneys to settle the case of visitation rights of the father to his children H a y d e e a c c u s e d her former m ate of coming to pick up the children while he waas under the in­ fluence of alcohol and that she feared to let them go with their father. She said that on May 1 she felt her former hus­ band had been drinking before he c am e to get the youngsters and refused to permit them to. go with him George left her house and then called her she s a id “ s ix t im e s " and "threatened to report her sister to the authorities” after which she called po­ lice and accused Fonseca of harassment. Breslin told the man, who testified he had called only four tim es, that this time he would find him not guilty of the charge but insisted that if the divorce court judge set visiting times for the father at nine to five every day in the week he should consult his attorney about enforcing the permission He told M rs Fonseca, "You can’t use the police deparment as supervisor of your ex-husband’s visit­ ing rights." S t e v e J a c k s o n , 113 Kearny Avenue, Keamy, a c c u s e d by h is wi f e. Suzanne, Sum m it Avenue, Lyndhurst, of assault, not a p p e a r in g , B re s lin o t dered a war ant for his ar rest issued with bail set at $150. Suzanne told the judge the Kearny police had refused to arrest her husband and Breslin re­ plied, " It is up to the Kearny police to arrest h im .” Two com plaints filed by Jackson against his wife were dismissed because of lack of prosecution Mr and Mrs George Friedrich, 754 New York Avenue, prom ised lo see that their daughter gets to school every possible day until school closes, since charges were brought by attendance officer that the

True thanks just cari't be put into words, because something is lost in trans­ lation, but we hope you know the feeling is one of g r e a t a p p r e c i a t i o n to many others who were w illin g to h e lp C,hief Jarvis also.

little girl, a first-grader at Columbus School, missed 75 days of school last year Mrs. F riedrichs testified her daughter had a strep throat and an ear infection and ran high fevers many days which caused her to be kept at home A t t e n d a n c e Officer Pauline Szymczak told the judge that m any of the child's absences were not explained by a doctor s certificate as should be done John J Wagner. 123 Il­ ford Avenue, North Arl­ ington, pleading guilty to the charge of criminal trespass on property on F r e e m a n S tr e e t, L y n ­ dhurst as charged by Ptl Louis Bihs on May 18, was fined $150, assessed $25 costs of court and a $25 contribution to the Violent Crimes Bureau, as this was the youth's second of­ fense Ray W ilson. 160 Forest Avenue, was ordered to clean up a lot on which heavy equipm ent is stored since building inspector Frank Robi nson com ­ plained of unsightly vehi­ cles on the Droperty. Judge Breslin reserved decision in a case which lasted from 3 P.M . until | 35 P M w hich involved a Lyndhurst youth and his sister accused of various offenses including assault on a Lyndhurst youth in R u t h e r f o r d , assault on Rutherford police officers and driving while on the revoked list, for the youth A total of 11 persons or businesses paid fines in Court Clerk Alex Paluzzi's office on various motor vi olation com plaints Total collected is $670

Second Class postage paid at Rutherford NJ Subscription J8 00 Published Weekly

Mary Ann Favjan. daughter of M r and Mrs George Fa j van of Liv­ ingston Avenue, Lyndhurst - recently graduated from Y a le U n i v e r s i t y , New Haven, with a Masters Degree in Forest Science Miss F a v jan is a 1977 g r a d u a te of L y ndhurst High School and a 1981 graduate of Cook College, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, with a B S Degree in Natural Re- , source Managem ent

The Lyndhurst Senior Citizen Friendship Club held a Hot Hog Meeting serving 247 members Ann La Vecchia, along with her committee, are now mak ing plans for an Indoor Picnic to be held at the Sacred Heart Recreation Center on J u ly 21 Tickets now available Pomona for August 30 -- please sign u d

It’s T im e To Say Goodbye Kenneth Kopacz

Kopacz W ins Scholarship The Polish University Club of New Jersey Schol­ a r s h ip C o m m it t e e a n ­ n o u n c e d th e C lu b ha s awarded 12 scholarships for 1983 The presentations were made June 5th at the Polish Heritage Festival at the Garden State Arts Cen­ ter

K e n n e th K o p a c z , 551 Forest Avenue, Lyndhurst, a senior and Biochemistry major at Princeton Uni­ versity received $750.00. An outstanding basket­ ball player and honor stu­ dent at Lyndhurst High School, Kopacz is on the P r i n c e t o n b a s k e t b a ll team

Donna M. Rubinetti

F o r d h a m D onna M Rubinetti, daughter of M r and Mrs Roger Rubinetti of Summit Avenue, graduated Magna Cum Laude from Fordham University in New York City Donna attended the Lyn­ dhurst elem entary schools and graduated from Lyn-

dhurst High School She majored in m edia sciences and received high honors for excel 1ence in Media Studies and Journalism She worked for an ad­ vertising agency and at various TV stations as part of h e r t r a i n i n g at Fordham

------ I n d e x

40 P a g e s A Trieentennial Celebration 1A-20A 6 Editorials 6 Cable 3 Guide Sportswire 11 Vagabonding 20 13 Medical Directory 14 Fine Dining 15 Obits 2 Wedding Guide Promo 8. 9 Beauty Hints

Linda Rush Beenstock

G ra d u a te s M rs Linda Rush B eenstock, d a u g h te r of Mr and Mrs Warren Rash of Lyndhurst. graduated Magna C um Laude from Adelphi "University. Gar

T h e

W ith

H o n o rs

dfii City. N Y with the class of 198:5 Mrs Beenstoc k earned a Bachelor decree in l ’s> t'holo^\ and plans to con tinur studies in this field

T r ic e n t e n n ia l Is s u e

T h e le a d e rs of South Bergen who. in the e a rly d a y s of th is nation w e re am ong the leading N ew Je r s e y fig u re s, a re d e scrib e d in d etail in to d a y ’s le a d e r N e w sp ap e rs’ T ric e n ten n ial is s u e On P a g e s 1A to 20A w ill be found the fa s c in a tin g h isto rie s of Bergen C o u n ty ’s f ir s t fa m ilie s , a ll of whom settled in the ric h m e ad o w lan d a re a and began to p la y im p o rta n t ro les in it s developm ent One of A m e ric a ’s most fam ou s an d le a st known h e ro e s, P e te r S ch u y le r, who had one of the new c o u n tr y ’s great estates on the b a n k s of the P a s s a ic R iv e r How he w a s ca p tu re d by the F re n c h , g iv e n his te m p o ra ry fre e d o m and then, a s a g entlem an of h is w o rd , tra v e le d to C a n ad a to com p lete h is prison te rm , is told. R o b e rt M cF a d y e n . the w e ll kno w n h is ­ to ria n , p en s the sto ry of P e te r S c h u y le r and o thers a s w e ll M a n y w il l find the p ictu re s of g re a t in te re st — and th e e a r ly m a rria g e s in the a re a a lso of deep in te re s t Y o u w ill see w hy m an y w ill c o n sid e r the issu e a c o lle c t o r ’s item

I t ’s H is D a y - G iv e D a d A B r e a k ! \

G ra d u a te

Lyndhurst W om an Is Yale Graduate

Hot Dogs!

Sincerely, A G ratefal Grandmother D o ro th y W Hughes Lyndhurst Resident

T h e c h ild re n in M iss V e n d o la ’s k in ­ d e rg a rte n c la s s at R o o se ve lt School in L y n ­ d hu rst ju s t received a fa re w e ll pp ster from th e ir pen p a l cla ss at St. N ich o la s School in E v a n s to n , Illin o is. It co n clu d e s a y e a r long correspon den ce w h ich in v o lv e d le tte r w ritin g , exch an g in g a rt p ro je c ts , language a r ts a c tiv it ie s , and tape reco rd e d co n ve rsa tio n s of the c h ild re n . T h e W ritin g P a ls p ro g ra m , w h ic h is spon­ sored b y th e editors of W e e kly R e a d e r, b uild s frie n d s h ip s acro ss the m ile s It te ach e s c h il­ d ren ab o u t oth er p a rts of the c o u n try and gets them to e n jo y w ritin g .

i . P ushed at 251 Ridge Rd Lyndhurst

D ancer Fined $300 Muncipal Court Judge Jam es A. Breslin handed down his delayed verdict in the case of Cynthia Carlucci, 436 Lake Avenue on Thursday afternoon. The girl was accused by Lyndhurst detectives of lewdness and obscenity after they witnesssed a p e rfo r m a n c e at A ld o ’s, Marin Avenue, in which the girl danced in the nude Detectives James Mileski and Richard O ’Donnell testified they witnessed the act on Jan u ­ ary 26 after which they filed charges of lewdness and obscenity as the girl danced, in front of the bar at which liquor was being sold " a t higher prices than usual because of the per­ form ance,” according to testimony. They also said Carlucci m ade gestures they considered indecent i t was disgusting,” said Mileski at the state's pres­ entation of the case before Breslin on A pril 28

Lee and began ing her m erit badges. At LHS Edw ina's favor­ ite subjects were science and m ath and her hobbies include attendance at soc­ cer and softball games. Edwina s great ambition is to become a pediatrician and it was her essay on her desires in this area in addi­ tion to her record of achievement and service at school w hich earned her the E m b le m Club's medi­ cal scholarship Edwina has been ac­ cepted at Douglass College where she w ill pursue pre-

§

Page 2— T H U R S D A Y . JU N E 16, 1983

Job Reveals $385,000 Lyndhurst Grant .

.

.

.

..

Joe Jo b , form er Bergen County Sheriff and the Re­ publican candidate for the New Jersey Senate in Dis­ trict 36, today announced that, after discussions with D e p u ty C o m m is s io n e r Gerome R . White, Jr. of the D epartm ent of Com­ munity A ffairs, he was op­ timistic that Lyndhurst wo u l d be a w a r d e d a $385,000 State grant spread out over the course of the next four years. The grant, from the Neighborhood P re s e r v a tio n P ro g ra m , would go tow ard improve­

r >I I n k t f j e t t a b l y , \ \ r ? u s u

Tw o Fo r T h e R oad •*>£{?

J o b stressed that Lyndhurst would be the first Bergen County com­ munity in several years considered for the decadeold p rogra m which has helped com m unities t h r o u g h o u t t h e S ta te spruce u p their neighbor­ hoods. J o b stated, "Lyn­ dhurst has never before been the recipient of State or Federal funding for any type of c o m m u n ity preser-

M .I.T. G ra d u a te degrees

from

..

The project area will be concentrated in the area bounded by Valley Brook Avenue, G ra n t Avenue and S tu y v e s a n t A v enue . A neighborhood preservation program is designed to generate both the public and the priv ate investment needed to keep a neighbor­ hood healthy and well maintained. It includes ac­ tivities such as housing re­ habilitation, public facility improvenments and effec­

;:r -

John Morrison, son of Mr. and Mrs. Angus A. Morrison of 144 Irving Place, Rutherford, was among those who received

......

vation p ro g ra m . With the assistance of progressive State officials like Deputy C o m m i s s i o n e r W h ite , Lyndhurst’s Board of Com­ m i s s i o n e r s , in a f a r ­ sighted m ove, can partici­ pate in the State funded N e ig hborhood Preserva­ tion P ro g ra m .”

ments in the Valley Brook Avenue section of Lyn­ dhurst.

Massachu­

setts Institute of Technolo­ gy at com m encem ent ex­

a: _______ L

I ' ______ • ____

tive public services.

Job noted that the Lyn­ dh u rst a p p lic a t io n g a r­ nered favorable opinion in

Trenton because it met the two key elements neces­ sary for a successful pro­ gram : the active invertvement and support of area residents and the coordi­ nated application by local officials to sources of pub­ lic and private funds, i n this era of shrinking gov­ ernment spending, greater self-reliance is the key to a successful program. Lyndhurst ’s Board of Com­ missioners has shown its d e d ic a tio n by pursuin g funding from the Bergen County Federal Communi­ ty Development funds and by gaining the commit­ ment of local lending in­

cstitutions,'' t it i it " stated c t o t a r l the th fi P Q can­ didate. ' The mark of a successful neighborhood preservation program is a stable neighborhood where people want to live and in­ vest. This neighborhood has excellent potential for p r e s e r v a t io n g iv e n the com m itm ent of the Board of Commissioners and the state to it. This is the kind of project we will have more of in Bergen Coun­ ty,” Jo b concluded.

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T H U R S D A Y , JU N E 16, 1983—Page 3

Free C ar Wash At Tip Top A s s o c i a t io n - N a t i o n a l Carwash Council - for one day only - are giving away a free car wash to all who drive in as their way of celebrting the upcoming Fourth of July

Tip Top C ar Wash, 485 R id g e R d . . N o rth A rl in g to n , wi l l p a rtic ip a te June 30 in a free car wash to celebrate the July 4th holiday Ira Feinberg, president of Tip Top, said other merchants m ight join in the move to give out pres­ ents to mark "th e greatest holiday in our national his­ tory."

“HELLO LYNDHURST” / “HELLO LYNDHURST”

The c e le b r a t io n was originated last year na­ tionally with great suc­ cess. the car wash opera­ tors are saying ‘celebrate your good luck in being an American - America, the Land of the Free." And they'll help your car be free from road grime, free to run longer, free to bene­ fit from a higher trade-in value

Members of the Intematio n a l C arw ash

C h a r it ie s

B ra n c h M an ag e r

The N o r t h A rlin g to n W om an’s Club met Tues­ day evening Mrs William Swellick, newly elected president, presided The state project of the year will continue to be the St John of God School for re­ tarded children and adults The club also will continue local charities throughout the summ er

B ran ch M an ag e r N IC H O LA S O IA C C H E V ic e President Ridge O ffice: Ridge Rd & V a lle y Brook Ave (201) 845-1322

MORRIS J . SETTEMBRINO A ssistant V ic e President Stuyvesant O ffice: Stuyvesant ft Park Aves (2 0 1) 845-1374

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LOCAL ,

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A SEM INAR ABOUT M ic r o c o m p u t e r s j

Debbie Butkiewicz of No r t h A r l i n g t o n Hi gh School was the student chosen this year top attend Douglas College as part of the G irls' Citizenship In­ stitute sponsored by the S t a t e F e d e r a t i o n of Women's Clubs All win­ ners of the house entry for the Keep A m erica Beau­ t i f u l p r o g r a m were awarded certificates of merit for their work Th e Keep America Beautiful program is an on-going program This Club is participating in the Passaic R iver Restoration FYoject and with the Jun ­ ior W oman's Club have contributed funds toward prize money for the logo to be written by grade school children

N a t io n a l C o m m u n it y B a n k

S T A R T S FR ID A Y

This is a plain-language seminar that explains the different types of microcomputers, teaches you how they fun ction and provides you with guidelines for selecting a system that will meet your home, office or small business needs

June 23 and June 29 Holiday Inn State Highways Nos. 3 and 17 Lyndhurst. N J 07070

10:00 AM -12:39 P.M. or 6:30 PM -9:00 PM Each Day

Seminar Fee: $40 ,

includes material

To Register Call

COTTER CONSULTING SERVICES (201)460-9065

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Page 4— T H U R SD A Y , J U N E 16, 1983

By Joseph Abate J r . At the North Jersey Craftsmen F air, held May 17. 18 and 19. at Paramus Park. 54 projects from Lyndhurst H igh School stu­ dents were entered in com­ petition. 24 were award winners. In a ll. there were five third place winners, four second place winners, ten first place winners, fiv e o u ts ta n d in g aw ard winners, and a grand prize was awarded for ‘‘Best In Show" to the group project for their work on a table, four chairs, and matching tea cart The Industrial Arts Association awarded a plaque and ribbon to Lyndhurst High School for O u t s t a n d i n g C r a f t s m a n s h i p at t he awards dinner The following list con­ tains the names, places and project area category. First Place Award Win­ n e rs : A n n e M a r ie DiGravina - Glass Etching, Debbie Iverson - Printmaking I; Mike Fata Sheet M etal; Pat Maholick - Machine Shop 1; Frank L i p i n s k i - Me c h a n i c a l Drawing I , Andrew Sauser Sheet Metal Develop­ ment. Thom as Yoo -Sheet Metal D raw ing. K im Lillis - G arm ent Construction. Nihal Akar - Garment Con­ struction; Peter Mathus Architectural Drawing. Outstanding Award Win­ ners: Debbie Iverson Scratch B oard Drawing. Martin K am inski. George Wolf. Pat M aholick - M a­ chine Shop. Kevin Moore Flectrical Design ($500 award from C P I ). Mike Fata - Mechanical Draw­ ing. Dan Stack, Pat Ferrie, Mike DiNardo. Dave M a l a n i a k . M i k e D unn. Mike Minogue. Steve Piccininm W ork on table, chairs and tea cart S ec o n d P la c e Aw ard Winners: Cathy Kranich P rin tm a k in g . Mike King Electronic Drafting ($250 award from C .P .I.); Vin­ cent Rogers - Mechanical Drawing. George Minogue - Machine Shop I Third Place Award Winners: Mike Fata Sculpture. Joe DeFranco Electronic D rafting. Rich­ ard Mine - Mechanical D r a w i n g C o n s tr u c tio n . George W olf - Ring and J ewe l r y Construction. Nick Coviello Ring and Jewelry Construction Reader O f The Month The second grade of Co­ lumbus School had a new "R eader of the Month" for May Jen n ifer Carlucci came in first place reading a total of 25 books! Je n ­ nifer B rechtbill came in

PUBLIC NOTICE SBF25423 S H E R IF F 'S S A L E S U P E R IO R CO URT OF N EW J E R S E Y C H A N C ER Y D IVISIO N B E R G E N PASSAIC D O C KET F 7075-00 Wherein F r a n k Cam panaro I* P la in tiff and Alexander JKup sita et als are Defendant*. C ivil Action Execution RO SPO ND. RO SPO ND AND C O N T E , P A. By virtue of the above stated W rit to m e di r e e le d and d e liv ­ ered. I shall expose for sale bv public vendue and sell »o the highest bidder o n Wednesday the 13th day of Ju ly . 19»3 at two o'clock in the afternoon p revail­ ing lim e , a t th e S h e r if f 's O ffic e . situated In the Bergen Countv Ja il Building. Court Street. H ack­ ensack that Is to s a v All that tract or parcel of la n d an d p r e m is e s , hereinafter p a rtic u larly de­ scribed. situate, lying and being in the Township of Lyndhurst in the County of Bergen and State of New Je r ­ sey; KNOWN and designated as Lot 5 on map entitled "Wap of Propertv of John C Van Evfc * f Lvnd hursf. Bergen County, New Jersey, dated March 1928" and filed Mav 74. 1928 as Map #2416. having a frontage ot 15 feet and lo­ cated on the northeasterly side of Maole Avenue, dis­ tant 145 87 teet southeasterly from W eart Avenue as shown on said map ALSO being known as Lot 31 in Block 143 on the Assess­ ment Map of the Township of Lyndhurst. New Jersey. Commonly Known as 343 Maple Ave. Together with the hereiditam en ts and a p p u rte n a n c e s thereunto belonging Approxi­ mate amount due on this execu­ tion Is $23,644 00 Plus sh eriff's fees. 10% of the purchase price in the form of Certified Check or Cash is required at time of sale. The propertv shall be sold sub­ ject to a ll liens and encum­ brances of record and the Sheriff makes no representations ex­ pressed or implied, as to the e xis­ tence amount or validity of any liens and encumbrances on the property which Is the subiect matter of this sa l*. Th is notice is further subiect to Conditions of Sale as set forth bv th* Sheriff of Berg«n County. Th * Sheriff re s *rv * s th * right to ad­ journ this sale from tlm * to tlm * as provided bv law . _ , W IL L IA M D . M cD O W C LL Sheriff

& x z x 'a * r 7m‘

second place The third place w inner was Deanna Dempsey.

Casey At The Bat The F r a n k l i n School sixth grade class, under the direction of teacher Ceil Cerrito, presented an assembly program for ail classes and parents The entire class took part in an action drama of “Casey at the Bat," with Anthony Rotella playing the title role In addition, there was a piano solo by A n th o n y B r i t o a n d i n ­ strumental solos by Cyn­ t h i a P r i n s s e n , R o b e rt Fata, and Jennifer

Gonzalez.

Sold On Safety June 6 ended a ten day Safety Product Sale for Co­ lumbus School PTA. First A id K i t s w i t h m o u t h breathers, Fire E x t ­ in g u is h e r s , R o a d F la re Packs, and Safety Cone Kits, were sold by our chil­ dren. In conjunction with this sale, volunteer First Aid S q u a d m e m b e r , M rs. Terry Muldoon, visited the school to talk with the chil­ dren about Accident Pre­ vention, Baasic First Aid Techniques, and First Aid Assistance.

Students Coached On Safety The safety program de­ signed for children in grades one thru four has been given in every public and parochial school in the township, reports Juvenile Officer R obert Sibilio of the Lyndhurst Police De­ partment as he gave the program, assisted by (me­ chanical) K-9 at Jefferson School to 120 youngsters Friday afternoon Wash­ ington School saw the pro­ gram that morning after Sibilio and K-9 broadcast on Channel 3 TV The children enjoyed the humor and particiption in M

e m

b e r s h i p

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the program as K-9 asked questions and invited stu­ dents who indicated they knew the answers to come up and tell the others the answers to questions on child safety.

New Officers For Roosevelt

School M usical Is Praised

E ducation Update

By Richard DiLascio Bd. of Ed. Liaison

sic was provided by the t a l e n t e d p i a n i s t (a n d teacher) Mrs. Picciano. Now for a rundown of the cast: Dorothy, Jen­ nifer Walsh; Auntie E m Jennifer Lok; Uncle Hen ry ; M a t t h e w M a re tte Wizard, P hilip Falcone Scarecrow: Nicky Frey Tin M an: Stephanie Lit terio; Lion, Brian Wiese T oto: E r ic a S ch em pp Munchkin Mayor: Philip Knell; G linda. Carla Zic Wicked W itch: Alison Scot ti; E m erald City Girls M a r jo R iz z o lo , Jo a n n e Tirrito-Saccone; Emerald C it y G u a r d s : R o n n i e S m i t h . J e f f Do h e r t y ; W itch’s Guards: Jam es Doherty, Danny Preziosi, Im ad Hawa. Joseph Zdep, M ichael Marette; Munchkin Ladies.

I f y o u w e r e n ’ t at L y n d h u rs t’s W ashington School on May 19 between 7-8 P.M . then you missed it! The Washington School Theatre G roup’s 2nd, 4th and 6th grade division pre­ sented a magnificent per­ formance of “The Wizard of O z." The overflowing crowd was entertained by talented actors, actresses and singers, astounded by the professional quality scenery and costumes and amazed by the imaginative special efects. This m usical ex ­ travaganza was directed by 4th grade teacher Mrs Giordano with assistant di­ rector 2nd grade teacher Mrs Sparta and 6th grade teacher Miss DiTonto. Mu­

Mary Ann Fogu, Brenda Frey, M i c h e l e Irwi n, Jessica Korologos, Ryan L o l lg e n , C h r is t o p h e r Lynch, Charles Malaniak, B la in e M a r tin o , S heila Morici, M ario Preziosi, Troy Roenisch, Kimberly

Danielle Zinn, Michelle In­ dorato, Carolyn Genovese. Beth-Ellen Sinnett, Nich­ ole Luongo, Joann Barresi; Munchkin Children: K e v i n A d d a s , Helen C ie rz o , K r is tin a Colon, R o b e rt D e k k e r , Ja m e s Doherty, Susan Dunn, Lisa Grouzalis. John Indorato, Jennifer Kerney. Joelle K ozlow ski, Kerri Lutomski, Daniel Lynch. Diane Marette, Andrew M it c h e ll. J e n n if e r R o ­ m a n o , P a m e l a S c o tti. Jeanine Tonachio Back-up v o c a ls were provided by the chorus w hose m e m b e r s were: J a n e Ander son. Jerry Beke, A nnm arie Borelli, Jennifer Kekker, Michael DiNardo. Debra Dougher­ ty, Dana Egbert, Deana Egbert, C arla Figiolina,

Tumia Last, but by no means le a s t , th e s ta g e h a n d without whom the pro­ gram would never have been run so professionally The stage hands were John Rubinetti, Scott Rubinetti, Cheri Dove, Michael Indo­ rato, Kevin Breslin and Robert Goula. My daughter Tracey and I had a wonderful time that night and we are look­ ing forward to the next Washington School Theatre production

The Roosevelt School PTA announces the new of­ ficers for the 1963-1964 sc h o o l y e a r : M a ry a n n McSweeney - President, Lucille Colacurcio - 1 st V ic e P r e s id e n t , C la ir e Francese - 2nd Vice Presi­ dent, Debbie Tricoli - Cor­ r e s p o n d in g S e c r e ta r y , Carol Franchina - Record­ ing Secretary, Barbara Ruvere - Treasurer, Lou­ ise Lilore - Historian. The membership recently held its Installation Dinner at M a s c h io ’s w h e r e th e ir duties were formally ex­ changed. A bomb threat was re­ corded at G iants Stadium at 3 49 p.m . T he b u i l d i n g w as checked, no bom b found

Jerry Hudert of the J u ­ venile Aid Bureau helped Sibilio and K-9 and ex­ pressed their thanks to the many local businessmen who contributed to K-9 and to his predecessors. Of­ ficer Phil a sweet little car and K-2. the Robot The children enjoyed the respite from classrooms as they sat in a circle on th e s c h o o lg r o u n d s and learned about safety in not talking to strangers, identifying license plates of cars whose drivers try to . . entice them , not playing ... , , a with matches and crossing streets at the crosswalks.

e - o r g a n i z e . .. The r e o r g a n i z a t i o n , meeting of the W omans 6 Club of Lyndhurst Evening M embership Dept will be held Thursday. June 16th at Lyndhurst United Pres­ byterian Church, 511 Ridge Road The meeting will be­ gin with a social hour at 7:30 followed by the busi­ ness session 8:15. By John Maske M rs F r a n P u r p u r a , P r e s i d e n t Chester General Fund Chairman G u tk o w s k i op e n e d the will finalize plans for a flea June 8th Business meeting market at Lyndhurst Town with the pledge to our flag Hall Park. Sunday, July and a prayer Reports 10, rain date Ju ly 17 The were given by treasurer flea m arket is open to per­ Alice Gutkowski. Marie sons interested in renting a Janowski, secretary, and t a b l e c o n t a c t Mr s. by m em bership and health Purpura Funds from this chairmen June Birthdays event will be used to sup­ and Anniversaries were port the club budget which acknowledged with songs in c lu d e d s o c ia l service Congratulations were ac­ work, nursing scholarship, corded to Laura and Frank girls soft ball team and M u s ia l w ho c e le b ra te d ^.•pport for the New Jersey th e ir 50th a n n iv e rsary . State Federated Womans They were presented with Club Evening Membership a crem e cake compliments Dept project 1983-34. Chil­ of the club Thanks to Hen­ drens Specialized Hospi­ rietta Polonski and Jean ta l. M o u n ta in s id e , N. J. P a k u l i e w i c z f or t hei r Evening Membership home-baked crullers, most Dept Clubs throughout the delicious and enjoyed by state will work to raise all The president was $50,000.00 to equip an audio gratified by the large turn­ center for Childrens Spe­ out for the annual mass c i a l i z e d H o s p i t a l for said on M ^y 25th at St. h e a rin g - a n d speech-im ­ Michaels Church for the paired children living and deceased m em ­ bers of the club The Rev PUBLIC NOTICE P a s to r E d w M a je w s k i N O TICE was the celebrant and TO WHOM IT M AY CONCERN In compliance with the Zon Homilist.

St. Michaels Leisure Citizens Club

ing Act o f the S ta te o f New Jersev adopted April 3, 1928. as amended and supplemented, no­ tice is hereby served upon you to the effect that I. Marco Col armto. do nerebv propose to Lvndhurst Board of Adjust ment for a .variance to build a one family home on a sub­ standard lot and to subdivide the lot known a s Block I ?2, L o t 8 more commonly known as 129 Forest Avenue. Lvndhust. N .J. In view of the fact that the Building Inspector of the Town snip of Lvndhurst has refused to issue a permit tor the above erection of said premises, bv reason of its being a violation of the Zoning Ordinance, I nave made a p p lic a t ion to th e B o a rd of Adjustment for a variance in tne terms of the Zoning Ordinance to permit the conditions outlined above Any person or persons af­ fected bv said appeal will be given an opportunity to be heard at the public hearing on the application to be held on June 22, J9R3, at 8.00 P .M . in , the Town Hall, Lyndhurst. New Jersey Very truly yours, M arco Calamito residing at 129 Forest Avenue Lyndhurst, N .J 07071 P u b lish e d Ju n e 16. 1983 F e e Si 1.22

PUBLIC NOTICE T O WHOM I T M A Y CON CERN

in compliance with the Zon­ ing Act of the State of New Jersey, adopted Ap ril 3, 1928 as amended and supplemented, rxx tice is herebv served upon you to tne effect that I. Edw ard P Reid do herebv propose to: erect a structure consisting of one fire resistive room and an enclosed stairwell extending closer than 3 feet to the North side property line in order to provide a second floor of the existing building located at 107 Stuyvesant Ave­ nue, Lvndhurst, N .J. and owned by Edward P Reid. In view of the fact that the Building Inspector of the Town snip of Lvndhurst has refused to issue a permit tor the above erection on M id premises, by reason of its being a violation of the Zoning Ordinance, I have made application to the Board of Adjustment for a variation in the terms of th* Zoning Ordinance to permit the conditions outlined above. Anv person or persons at tected bv said appeal will be olven an opportunity to be heard a t l h * public hearing on th* application to be held on June 22, WW f t 1:00 P.m . in th* Town

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At our last meeting we had as guest speaker Rob­ ert Tarantino, D C who lectured on the benefits of chiropractics. It was a very interesting and in­ formative talk. Our picnic is scheduled later this month at the County P ark, Riverside Avenue, Lyndhurst There will be plenty of food and beverages, also dance mu­ sic Activities chairmen John Szymanski and John Kolokowsky reported that all is set for the Grossingers vacation, check de­ parture tim e and other in­ formation from either one Payments for the Wild­ wood vacation are also being accepted. There are three show performances at the Garden State Arts Center for this month 1. 1983 Talent Expo, 6 p.m Bus leaves from Grant Av­ enue: 2. Singing and Swingin, 1 p.m : 3. Let’s Go To The Movies. 1 p.m. Check with any officer for more info, pertaining to these performances A day at L a k e T o m a h a w k . Sparta, N .J. is all booked The last two excusions to Atlantic C ity were so en­ joyable that more are in the offing.

Meetings will be held as usual during the summer months, there will be no postponements. After adJourmtnt bingo was played as usual

W ith th e d o g d a y s o f s u m m e r c o m e s r e g u l a r T V 's a n n u a l p a r a d e o f t i r e d r e r u n s . B u t C a b le T V s p r in g s in t o

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o n y o u r in s t a lla t io n

f r e s h , n e w p r o g r a m m i n g a ll s u m m e r . Y o u 'l l n e v e r h a v e t o s e t t le f o r r e r u n s a g a in . Y o u c a n c h o o s e fr o m a w id e s e le c tio n o f n e w w ith

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T H U R S D A Y , JU N E 16, 1883—P age 5

-Need Hosts For StudentsYou can extend the hand ai friendship around the world as an American host fam ily for a sum m er for­ e ig n e x c h a n g e student These homestays are often the beginning of lifelong friendships

Bendall E du ca ti o n a l Travel I n t e r n a t i o n a l , which works exclusively th friendship, culture and e d u c a t i o n a l e x ­ changes. Students will come for four, five or eight weeks during the sum m er. Most will arrive in early July.

The students are spon­ sored in this country by

They range in age from 13 to 18. All w ill speak some English although a good sense of hum or may be needed d u r i n g c o m ­ munication for the first few days. Students live as fully participating members of the fam ily, not as guests in

For more information about hosting a student contact the local program representative at (201) 4862958

L E V I ’S A C

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the home. It is an op­ portunity for American fam ilies to ^hare their home and life with some­ one from a different cul­ ture and learn something of the language and cus­ toms of the homeland of t h e i r n e w “ s o n ’ ’ or "daughter"

S L A C K S .

Perhaps the most comfortable slacks a man can wear.

T hirteen F rom Area G raduated At St. Peters Thirteen South Bergen residents graduated from St Peter's College during c o m m e n c e m e n t ceremo­ nies June 4 at the Brendan Byrne A r e n a , East Rutherford N o r th A rlin g to n re si­ dents include Anthony J D e lG a u d io , Je n ise DiSalvo, K im Ann Tiedemann, and M argaret Burns who received an associate of arts degree Lyndhurst residents are G a r y St ev en s, J oann B r o g n a , and James Mulroy. who graduated sunmia cum 1nude M u l r o y re c e iv e d the S m i t h M e d a l fo r t he highest general average for the N atural Science C urriculum Those graduating from Rutherford were Andrew B a c z y n s k y j, Marcia M erlini, c u m laude. and Moira Solleder Diana Cor­ coran of E ast Rutherford graduated c um laude

MENS SHOP

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Valleyhrook I Stvymant » w t , LyntfMirst OPEN FRIDAYTIL830

C arlstadt residents are J o s e p h M a s te b e th a n d John Suarez.

BERLIN'S w o r k c lo t h e s s p o rts w e a r

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B u y

t h e

T eaneck- C om m encement ceremonies for 64 Saturday College gradu­ ates were held on Sunday, June 12, at 2 p.m . Dr Wallace! Arthur, dean of the College of Science and E n g i n e e r i n g , gav e the commencement address Dean Kenneth Vehrkens preside over the ceremo­ nies. E ach of the following students w ill be awarded an A s s o c i a t e in Ar t s degree: Carlstadt - Davina M Maluda (with honors) East Rutherford - Har­ riet E Maphet Kearny - Patricia Ann Bender Rutherford Patricia Pavlik (with honors) W a l l i n g t o n - E lis s a Powell.

W

l

F lo r e n c e N h m , p r e s id e n t o f M A D D (Mothers Against Drunk Drivers) presents plaque to Lt. Bob Herb of Bergen County Police for his efforts in the campaign to curb drunken driving. W

i l l i a m

D A Y

Completes Basic T raining Airm an Scott V Walker, son of Iris L Vickers and s te p s o n o f W a l t e r E Vickers of Rutherford, has completed A ir Force basic training at Lackland Air Force Base. Texas Airm an Walker, who is rem aining at lackland for specialized training in the security police field, stud­ ied the Air Force mission, organization and customs and received special in­ struction in hum an rela-

e n t e r

N

a m

Following a receptiorf and dinner catered by the Poet's Cafe II. the trustees passed a resolution of thanks to the Friends of the W illiam s Center for the support g i.e n to the Center by t h a t o r g a n i z a t i o n Karen H e r m e y and Carolyn Smallwood. Cochairpersons represented the Friends of the Wil

• T o p

B ra n d s

a t

. S P E C IA L T Y

In the Ju n e 9th edition of the paper the name of Elaine R om ano , who re­ ceived the P hi Kappa Phi award, (a national honor society,) from Montclair Slate College, was in a d v e r t e n tly misspelled

aSCEN T

M •

E N ’S

F re e •

The W i l l i a m s Center Summer Festival will be­ gin on F riday. July 1st, with an evening of jazz, fo llo w e d by an Americans Salute' on Saturday, July 2nd featur ing the music of George M Cohan and George and Ira Gershwin

19

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Dr M urray Elters, J r , Charles Ahrens and Paul Wentworth were elected first, second and third Vice Presidents, respectively Professor John Dollar was na me d S e c r e t a r y and Herbert Cutter. Treasurer Al s o e l e c t e d to the

1 9

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Dr North Barry Dancy was re-elected President of the Board of Trustees of the W illiam Carlos Wil­ liams Center for the Per­ forming Arts at the annual meeting

Lisa West of North Arl­ ington, G ay Petrillo of Carlstadt. Susan Greila and E laine Rom ano of L y n d h u r s t, a n d Jo a n n e M a r ia n o of R u th e rfo rd were am ong the area stu­ dents inducted recently into the M ontclair State College Chapter of Phi Kappa Phi. a national hon­ or society

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SOUTH K H U N REVIEW

THURSDAY, JUNE I t A.M. 8:00 “Meadowlands ‘13." This long running show which cele brates its third birth day July 4, brings before the cameras an interesting series of guests over 2.000 since it began in 1980. There are doctors, nurses, musi cians, historians, educators, singers, dancers you name them and John Sanders, the host, has had them as guests. There is a sparkling news summary by the highly gifted Jack O'Shea, the weather by pretty Theresa DeStaso and a sports update by Carmine Bilotti, the man with 1.000 stories.

and THE K M C M SUNDAV LEADER

Official Newspaper of Lyndhurst Sine* 1921 251 RIDGE ROAO LYNOHURST, N J. 07071 Tol. 438-8700 - 0701 -8702

North Arlington's Official Newspaper 157 RIDGE ROAD, NORTH ARUNGTON. N J. 991-1839 * 998-3306

AMY DIVINE, N am Editor IE U .«

Published every Thursday by the North Arlington Leader, 157 Ridge Road, North Arlington. Second class postage paid a t Kearny. N .J. Postmaster: Send address changes to North Arlington Leader, 167 Ridge R d., North Arlington, N .J. 07032. All ad­ vertising published in the North Arlington Leader is subject to the applicable rate card, copies of which are available a t the North Arlington Leader. 157 Ridge Road, North Arlington, N .J. 07032.

K V E R IV MIHVHY, M anaftal Edtof

Rutherford • Carlstadt

H e r- J c e e 3 frr& s 1

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- Official Newspaper Of East Rutherford and Carlstadt Publication Offices 121 HUMBOLDT STtECT, EAST RUTHERFORD CAROL ROMEO. News Editor

ftn g to tt IC r a im P ublication Offices RIOGE ROAD, LYNDHURST, N.J. Tei. 438-8700

(FljrNpuifi C r a t o r • of Rutherford • Offical Newspaper Of Rutherford 38 AMES AVENUE RUTHERFORD, N J .07070 Tel. 438-5100 A M E S LUKE. OINca Maaacar

Guy Savino, President John Savino, Editor & Publisher

M ergen’s T ricentennial L e a d e r N e w s p a p e rs ’ com ttv e is su e , in c lu d e d in e d itio n s , p a y s w e ll det r ib u t e to the r la n d s I t w a s t h e m e a d o w la n d s a r e a t h a t b r o u g h t N e w J e r s e y ’s f ir s t h i n e n c e t h r o u g h th e d is c o v e r y o p p e r in N o r th A r lin g t o n . It s in th e L y n d h u r s t te.eadowlands that Bergen

f

t t y ’s f i r s t ^w n p a k ‘A n d H ands,

la r g e e m p lo y e r , th e R a ilr o a d , b u il t its it is to d a y th e t h r o u g h t h e s p o r ts

, s. t h e ra te 'c e n te r s ,

b u r g e o n in g c o r p o ­ th e t h r i v i n g c o m ­

m e r c ia l o f f ic e and w are h o u se s t r u c t u r e s in C a r ls t a d t , E a s t h e r f o r d , R u th e r fo r d , Lyn'st a n d S e c a u c u s w h ic h h a s N e w J e r s e y 's e c o n o m y th e i o f m u c h n e e d e d v it a lit y . ric h fertility of the • n d s so il h a s p r o d u c e d D ic k in s o n U n iv e r s it y , o n ly its fo r tie t h y e a r y e t dy internationally recog­ n iz e d ; t h e p o e t W i l l i a m C a r lo s W i l l i a m s a n d th e p a in t e r , J o h n N fa rin , a n d th e in c o m p le t e b u t n i s in g W illia m C a r lo s WilC e n t e r fo r th e P e r f o r m i n g

^ t h e d a y in 1668 C a p t . W ilV o r d s te p p e d a s h o r e to 't o th e 20,000 a c r e s o f n t e d h is u n c le , N a t h a n ie l ___ ^ _____ d, t h e p r o m is e o f t h e a r e a a lw a y s h a s b e e n g r e a t H o w e v e r , it to o k th e c r e a t io n o f fe P o rt A u t h o r it y o f N e w Y o r k f N e w J e r s e y a n d its n o v e l u s e r e v e n u e b o n d s to f in a n c e t h e o f f a c ilit ie s t h a t h a v e g ( it t h e p r o m i s e o f t h e p la n d s to its fr u it io n . T h e . T u n n e l is p r o b a b ly t h e , I I p o r t a n t e le m e n t in th e f o f t h e m e a d o w la n d s .

B ut

fth e r P o r t A u t h o r it y in v e s t ­ m e n t s in t h e m id t o w n b u s t e r m i ­

nal, “

H o b o k e n W a te r fr o n t , N e w a r k ‘ ‘ r t , P o r t N e w a r k a n d its E lizi a n c i l l a r y , P A T H , t h e W o r ld ,2 C e n t e r a n d th e G e o r g e . h i n g t o n B r id g e a ll h a v e been y id e n t i a l fo r t h e m e a d o w l a n d

cause

o f t h e ir t o n ic to its

it io n a n d jo b a d v a n t a g e of

th e

H ackensack

M e a d o w la n d s D e v e lo p m e n t C o m ­ m is s io n in 1968 h a s b e e n a m ix e d b le s s in g B r i n g i n g o r d e r o u t o f th e c h a o t ic c o n s tr u c t io n h a b its in to w h ic h t h e a r e a h a d fa lle n h a s b e e n a m a j o r a c c o m p lis h m e n t F o r th is B e r g e n a n d H u e d s o n C o u n tie s b o th c a n be th a n k fu l. F o r th e good p u b ­ lic v is io n o f th e m e a d o w s t h a t t h e ir e ffo rts has a c h ie v e d is a n o th e r p lu s fo r th e c o m m is s io n . W h e re th e c o m m is s io n has fa ile d h a s c o m e f r o m t h e le g is la ­ t io n w h ic h g a v e it th e a lm o s t ins o lu a b le r e s p o n s b ilit y o f f in d in g a w a y o f d is p o s in g o f th e g a r b a g e fro m over 100 m u n ic ip a lit ie s , m a n y o f t h e m n ot e v e n in B e r g e n o r H u d s o n C o u n tie s . So fa r

th e

net

r e s u lt

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th e

H M D C a c c o m m o d a t io n o f th e g a r ­ b a g e p r o b le m h a s b e e n t h e c o n ­ s t r u c tio n o f t h e N o r th A r lin g t o n b a le r w h i c h c o m p r e s s e s b u t d o e s n o t d is p o s e o f th e g a r b a g e , th e e v e r- ris in g m o u n t a in s o f g a r b a g e t h a t h a v e t a k e n o v e r t h e lu s h onceg re e n m e a d o w s a n d e s c a la t in g c o sts to t h e t a x p a y e r s fo r t h e ir g a rb a g e .

9.00 “Drop In." This is the closing program of the day. For an hour such moderators as Carmine Savino. Kathleen Donovan, Ken Davie and others in probing interviews discuss the leading issues of the day, local, county, state and national. Their guests are usually the top figures of busi ness, politics, govern ment. education and finance. 10:00 “Bingo." This cash prize game with John Sanders and Donna Tracy as hosts enter , tains and profits many viewers ev ery day.

E s s e x a n d B e r g e n p la n s a r e u n d e r w a y fo r r e s o u r c e r e c o v e r y p la n t s t h a t w i ll c o n v e r t th e w a s te in to b e n e fits . T h is s h o u ld le a v e p le n t y o f t i m e f o r t h e H M D C to w o r k o n th e u l t i m a t e im p r o v e m e n ts r e ­ q u ir e d in t h e m e a d o w la n d s , s u c h a s e x t e n s io n o f P A T H , t h e e x ­ of

R o u te

17 t h r o u g h

th e

m e a d o w l a n d s a n d th e lo n g d e ­ la y e d d e v e lo p m e n t o f th e K e a r n y m e a d o w s . M u c h w o rk m u s t be d o n e to c o s m e t iz e th e u g ly g a r ­ b a g e m o u n t a i n s u n t il s u c h t im e a s th e y h a v e s e tt le d s u f fic ie n t ly to be

A ll in a ll t h e h o p e t h a t in s p ir e d N a t h a n ie l K i n g s la n d to o b t a in th e la n d g r a n t f r o m th e B r it is h C r o w n to d a y is b e in g r e a liz e d T h e c o p p e r m in e s b r o u g h t f ir s t in t e r n a t io n a l p r o m in e n c e to t h e a r e a . T h e s p o r ts c o m p le x h a s ta k e n u p w h e r e t h e c o p p e r m i n e s le ft off.

We re c o m m e n d Bob McFadyen’s biographies of the families w hich shaped the course of the e a rly days. It is fine reading and great history.

e need for this great of representatives and for ity of their terms? people agree that reel re­

form is needed. There should be fewer congressmen and the con­ gress should have longer terms. A four-year te rm would be more de­ sirable. Others, at more drastic minds would have congress serve six years and be denied further terms. Of a ll the proposals the idea of a single six-year term seems most feasible. Such a term would g ive a congressman three tim es the length of the te rm he now holds.' It would mean that the congressman would have more tim e to get the feel of his office and after a ye a r or two would have four o r five productive years left to him. Congress now operates in a frenzy caused by the knowledge that he’s got to raise money fo r his re-election bid in a h u rry. This is h ard ly conducive to good govern­ ment although the lobbyists who are a lw ays ready to extend a help­ ing hand to ‘w o rth y’ congressmen find it most helpful.

FRIDAY, JUNE 17 A.M. 8:00 “Meadowlands ‘83.” 9:00 ‘‘Dri»p In." 10:00 “Binge.” ll:00 ‘‘0ining witli...” P.M. 12:00 “Meadowlands 13.” 1:00 "DAYTIME." 5:00 “Meadowlands ‘83.” 6:00-“The Beverly Murphy Stow." 7:00 “Westchester Tony” and Tom Longo figure out the winners on current sports con tests. 8:00 Professional Wrestling presented by Baron s Drugs of Rutherford. 9:00“Drop In." Carmine Savino is host, SATURDAY, JUNE 18 A.M. 10 00 College comes from Bergen Community College. Credits are possible by contacting the registrar's office at the college in Paramus. MONDAY, JUNE 2t A.M. 8:00 “Meadowlands 13.” 9:00 “Drop In." Carmine Savino, host.

10:0fr"Wnt»."

11:00 “Dining with..." P.M. 12:00 “Meadowtootfs ‘83." l:0fr“DAYTIME.” 5 00 “Meadewlands 13." 6:00-“The Beverly Murphy Show." 7:00-“The Petonian Hour.” This show, hosted by Chet Grabowski, pub lisher and editor of the Post Eagle, con centrates on things and events Polish but is provocative enough for any viewer. 8:00 “The Front Pago." A free swinging inter view with men and women who write the news and sometimes make it. 9:00 “Drop In." Kathleen Donovan, the Lyn dhurst lawyer, is host. TUESDAY, IUNE 21 8 00 "Meadowlands H3.” 9:00 “Drop In.” Kathleen Donovan, host. 10:00 “Bingo." 11:00 “Dining with..." P.M. 12:00 “Meadowlands ‘83.” 1:0ft“DAYTIME." 5:00 “Meadowlands 13.” 6:00 “The Beverly Murphy Show." 7:00-Johs, Jths, Jobs. Ellen Werner, personnel ex peert, tells where jobs are and how to find them. 7:30The Sammartinos at Home. Dr. Peter and Sally Sammartino, founders of Fairleigh Dickinson University, invite guests to their home on Ridge Rd„ Rutherford, for an instructive and enter

taming half hour. 8:00“Ch«rch Ain." A consortium of local churches present a fast moving, insperac tional program ot deep interest to all. 9:0&“Drap hi." Ken Davie, West Hudson lawyer, moderates a program of diversified in terests. Davie, assis­ tant corporation coun­ sel for Kearny, brings a wide spectrum of knowledge and ex­ perience to his pro­ grams. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22 A.M. 8:00“Meadewlands 13.” 9:00“0np hi." Ken Davie host. 10:00 “Binge" 11:00 “Dining With...” P.M. 12:00-“M«adowMs 13." 1:00-“DAYTM." 5:00 “Meadowlands 13." 6:00 “Tto Beverly Morphy Show.” 7:00-To ho awoM coi 7:30-“Tom leap’s Sports Desk." Tin former Lyn d h o rst Nigh School, Notre Dame and Now York Cants star, hosts a stow of groat popalarity. Sports flfwos from near and far appear on the Longo stow. 9:00-“Drop la." Carmine Savino is host. Former legislator, former traffic court judge and former judge of the state court of tax appeals, Savino draws upon a vast fount of experience to make this a most instruc tive program.

Kearny Federal Savings’

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A new concept in ea rn in g p o w e r. .. K ea rn y sbook A f ccount gives you Fed era l’s M o n ey Mea rk e t Passbook eve ryth ing a saving s account should, Including the earning pow er of a m oney m arket fun di Ju s t look a t all th e advantages: • N o c o n fu s in g s ta te m e n ts stored in a co m p u te r and m a iled to yo u a m onth la ter! T he W iza rd g ives yo u a s ta n d a rd pa ssbook and re co rd s y o u r m oney m a rket e a rn in g s w h e n you com e in - you a lw a y s kn ow y o u r ba lance!

ongressional Reform idging from the publicity Rep. irt T o rric e lli h a s been receivsince he w a s elected last Noone might think he was official working in Washis hardly true. There our 50 states o ver 400 itatives and a ll of them, icelli, is vigorously camig fo r re-election to the they ju st have won. House of Representatives ions a re held every two years, means that a congressman ly has tim e to put his feet a desk before he must be up for the next election, stem keeps the cpnth in and th e ir constlrie d under tons of news detailing the virtu e s of tb e ir man — or woman — in Washington.

shows he is as adeept at fielding questions as he is in spotting weaknesses in the line ups of the foot ball opponents. A top ranked program. 9:00-“Drop In." Various guest moderators ap pear on this hour. One of them is Jan Staples who specializes in talking with women on the move,

WAIT! TheW izard is writing the book on Money Market returns! INTRODUCING Insured Money Market Passbook Account

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L 'J A 11:00 “Dmint WUitt.. A program of cooking done in the Cable 3 kitchen by experts. P.M. 12:00 “Meadowlands ‘83.” A repeat of the earlier show. 1:00 “DAYTIME." A four hour show brought to you by satellite with some of the most prominent people in the worlds of cooking (Julia Child), fashions,! health, etc. 5:00 "Meadowlands ‘83.” The morning show is repeated once again. 6:00 “The Beverly Murphy Show.” The noted newspaperwoman hosts an hour to which a wide as sortment of guests are invited. Some of Cable 3's most in teresting interviews have taken place at this hour. 7:00"Accent on Racing." Bob Marks, the handi capper, goes behind the scenes at Meadowlands and comes up with in teresting views and tips on winners, 7:30 “Fur, Fin, & Feather.” John Savino, an out doorsman, takes the outdoors indoors for some great shows which may emanate on one of the fishing streams, a golf course or a hunting lodge. They are always first rate and always interesting, 8:00“ The Phil Simms Show." The New York Giants Quarterback

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The woman had invited several friends to a party on June 4 Among the guests was Joseph Squillace, 31. of 143 Com­ mercial Avenue, Palisades Park Squillace had be­ come friendly with the hos­ tess after doing some work on her home

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He stayed on after the others left, and at about 11;30 P.M . suddenly and without provocation

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out a warrant charging Squillace with aggravated assault, threat to kill and burglary R y a n , D e te c tiv e Sgt Jerry Aponte and Det. Dan Calabrese w en t to Squillace s apartment.They were accompanied by of­ fic e r s f r o m P a lis a d e s Park

attacked the woman who police declined to identify. He remained at the house until m orning when he left after threatening to kill her if she reported what had happened. In late afternoon of June 5, a rela­ tive cam e to the house and after seeing her condition brought her to police head­ quarters She refused to gi v e a s t a t e m e n t a n d signed herself out of the hospital where she was taken for treatment. The next day, Squillace allegedly broke into her home, warned her that she was not to leave her home for a week, and repeated his threat to kill her if she told anyone of the assault At this point, convinced her life was in danger, she we n t to p o l i c e h e a d ­ quarters and gave a state­ ment. Detective Ryan took

A 71-year-old North Arl­ ington woman was alleged­ ly beaten by a male friend in an attack described by Detective David Ryan of the North Arlington Police Department as ‘one of the most vicious displays of vi­ olence I have ever seen " The victim suffered a cerebral concussion, m ul­ tiple traum a and bruises over her face and body.

Large plant e q uipped to copy anythi ng from the sm allest letter to the largest map.

^

S tapling • hole punchi ng • padd ing available.

P resle y Fans G o ‘ H o m e ’* The Klvis Presley Fan Club is sponsoring a one week trip to Graceland, Memphis, Tenn., August 13

wearing at the time the beating took place It has been sent to the State Po­ lice laboratory S q u i l l a c e wa s t ak en before Judge M ark Russello for a first appearance Unable to post the $45,000 cash bail set, he was re­ manded to Bergen County Jail

Squillace, described by police as "m eek as a la m b ,” denied he knew anybody living in North A r l i n g t o n . A c t i n g on a search w arrant obtained by Det Joseph Hughes, police confiscated clothing in the apartm ent matching the description of the clothing he was said to have been



R.S. KNAPP CO.. INC.

through 20 For information about the club or the trip, call 429-72Wi after ti P.M

P h o n e 4 3 8 -1 5 0 0

MENS SH O P



Valley Brook & Stuyvesant Ave., Lyndhurst C lip W

S a v e

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T h e s e

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“ w rm THIS COUPON AMD ADOITIONAL ! | PURCHASE OF *7.50 ON MORE. I I Coupon oood Sun- June 12 thru S e t, Ju n* tt, I ^ 1983. UmM ona per shopping fame*^

SOLID WHfTE ■IN OIL OH WATER AS AVAIL

Heinz K eetchup H e in z K t c h u p H | White Rose Tuna

j

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TOMATO

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DOUBLE C O U P O N S 0iU /DadOuA/§ed£(m //i6Z)ay | |_

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FR ES H AM ERICAN - SH O U LD ER

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I49 t

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488

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Cottage 2 t, H 9 9 Cheese______ COnt MEADOW GOLD SHARP Cheddar 10.oz pkg.

P o t

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12-oz.

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$^ 1■ 2 9

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can

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WHITE ROSE

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£ miL •. Cocktail

x59c

TURKEY BREAST Serrento S licin g PROVOLONECHEESE

2.59

Hess W hite or

1 . 8 9 i.

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Spring Water Peanuta in Shell

49-02

AVAIL MON 613

Thom as M u ffin s

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box twin 6-pk

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Vlnagar Mustard WHITE ROSE Alcapparado WHITE HOS€ Cleanser

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tfe-oi Q Q c bag

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69‘ $*|99

ASSORTED VARIETIES

o arM a ?J - Q e B Sauce

18bii02

89*

Sun., Juno 12 thru Sat.. June 18. 1963. rosarva the right to tor* on* can or package on salo Mams Roms offered for sale not available in case lots WE A RE NOT RESPON SIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERR O RS Soma Mams not a v M M in Nassau. Sufofc and Now Jersey stores

N. J.

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CLOSING FOR SUM M ER VACATION JUNE 30th Hours; Tues . Wed . Fri Thursday Saturday

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10 AM to 5 30 PM 10 AM to 8:00 PM 10AM to 3:00 PM

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1can 602RQC

Charcoal Briquets

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2 . 2 9 '»

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$ J3 9

59*

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Progresso Beans 59c r W H IT E R O S E

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can

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6-02

ib

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pkg.

MILDRED’S DRESS SHOP

Shoulder

Aluminum Foil

8 -o z

3

S p e c ia l R a c k o f $ 1 0 D r e s s e s & $ 2 0 P a n t s e t s

A R L IN G T O N ,

1* -°z. 12

89‘

P o rk

W HITE HOSE

Libby C o rn e d

B it * t u r k e y m a c a c h e e s e

Mixed Vegetable

Summer Closing Clearance

M EA LTIM E F A V O R IT E

Frozen Foods

M inute M aid Ju ic e

/

r

Sara Lee C ake

Case

SMOKED - WATER ADDED

» 59c

^

9

ROUND (N M Z .) ON NAISM POUNO

Cash and Carry Only-We reserve the right to limit quantities. All prices include sale tax We are not responsible for typographical errors

NO.

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NUTRITIOUS

J ,

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G ro c e r y A B SO R B E N T

JL

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Chuck $ ^ 69 $46! C h o p p e d _________itx

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119

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ib.

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FIRST CUT

CENTER CUT

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4 Itr

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f

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All Boor Reduced ^ i n Price

ROAD

Chuck Steak

h

Kraft Singles

cart.

1 50 Itr.

C

9 9 c D rum sticks to * 1 .1 9

U S D A CHOICE BEEF

Bottom R o u n d

FR ESH GRADE A BO N ELESS BREA ST

L e g s

SHOR GOOD

California a Strawberries pint

FRIENDSHIP REG OR LOW FAT

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bunch

RIPE

B ia n c o

—Schaeffer -A Schmidts 12 oz cans 49

146-B

Thigh a

7QC

Andy Boy Broccoli

a lk e r

£99

\

FRESH

S c o tc h

17;

L a m h rv s c o ,

Almaden Mountain Chablis 49

89c

99

R iw n ite

R o s e

89c

» * 1 .4 9

U.S.D .A. CHO ICE B E E F

79*

CUT UP

Large C an ta lo u p e s

YELLOW OR WHITE AMERICAN

R e d

99

C h ic k e n VINE RI.^E - IS S U E

Dairy D epartm ent J o h n n y

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■ 1.75 Itr

B a r d o lin o

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750 ml

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750 ml

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C h iv a s R e g a l i | O ld G r a n d I D a d B o u r lb o n S c o t c h

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MET GREEN SUPER MARKET

98 RIDQE RD., NO. ARLINGTON ★OPEN M-T-W-SAT. 8-6; TH.-F. 8-8; SUN. 9-2 *

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P ane 8— T H U R S D A Y . J U N E 16. 1983

G o t

a

fro n t-w h e e l s h im m y ?

P r o b le m A m o torist a lw a y s k n o w s that w h e n v ib r a tio n s t a r t s , th e c a r is t r y in g to se n d a m essage. T h is fro n t-w h e e l sh im m y is a c o n tin u o u s sh a k in g se n ­ s a t io n fe lt in th e s t e e r in g w h e e l, flo o r o r seat e v e n on a sm oo th highw ay.

Tied to speed I f the c o n d itio n is v ib r a ­ t io n , it w ill o c c u r at one d r iv ­ ing sp e ed , u su a lly fro m 50 to 70 m p h . and it w ill co n tin u e

N o Two Alike T w o c a r s c o m in g o f f the p ro d u ctio n lin e together w ill o f f e r u n lik e g a s o lin e m il e ­ a g e . e v e n i f th e y h a v e the sa m e d r iv e r . T h e m ile a g e e s t im a t e s p ro d u ce d b y the E n v ir o n m e n t a l P r o te c tio n A g e n cy n e v e r '^ tr e intended t o in d ic a iu ca - •. w h a t m ile a g e t h e y w o u ld get. T h e tests a re co nd u cted in a la b o r a t o ry u n d e r f ix e d c o n d it i o n s w it h no a llo w ­ a n c e fo r v a ria tio n s in d riv in g te c h n iq u e , w e a th e r, road oi m e c h a n ic a l co n d itio n s.

270,000 Missing T h e r e p re se n tly is a ra tio o f o n e m e c h a n ic to e v e r y 238 c a r s a nd m a n y m a in t e ­ n a n c e e x p e r t s b e lie v e th e o ptim um ra tio is 87 to I,t h e A u to m o tiv e P a rts & A c c e s ­ so rie s A s s o c ia tio n r e p o r ts . W ith 106 millk>n householdo w n e d v e h ic le s , t h is in d i ­ cates a m ech a n ic sho rtag e o f so m e 2 7 0 .0 0 0 . A P A A e s t i­ m ates.

A b e C a n H elp W a n t to k n o w a p p ro x im a ­ t e ly h o w m u c h t r e a d y o u h a v e r e m a in in g on y o u r tire s .’ A ll il ta k e s is a L in c o ln c e n t. Pros'* I.in e o ln h ead first in t o a t ir e tre a d g ro o v e . I f h is h ea d is u n c o v e r e d , le ss t h a n I 16 1 h o f a n i n c h r e m a in s and the tire n eed s rep la cin g .

A s automotive technology change advances, the n?ture o f p re v e n tiv e m ain ten an ce changes but doesn't go away, says C a r C are C o un cil Ig n i­ tio n points and condenser, once basic parts o f th : tuneup, are d isappearing w h ile new components are coming on the scene.

83 LESABRE

B u ic k, auto, tran s., pwr. strg. & b rk s. stereo, air con d., tint, gls, r. defog. tilt w hl., body sd. m lda.. w/w tires, floor m ats. St. 03378 L IS T P R I C E $11,887.

*9 ,1 7 5

*1 4 ,7 2 8

It m a y d isa p p e a r w h en the sp e e d is e x c e e d e d b u t w il l a lw a y s d is a p p e a r w h e n the c a r slo w s b elo w that speed. S t e e rin g a nd su sp e n s io n p ro b le m s th a t c a u s e v ib r a ­ tion a re w o rn sh o ck ab so rb ­ e r s , lo o se s t e e r in g lin k a g e , w o rn b a ll j o in t s a nd a m is ­ alig ned fro nt end . O th e r c o n d itio n s ca u sin g

D on 't confuse vibration with front-wheel tramp (tire thump). Front-wheel tramp is a cyclical thump-thumpthump sensation which is felt at about 25 mph. This can be caused b y bad shock absorb­ ers and out-of-round tires.

i l l

E l

A d d itio n a lly, there i , a m is­ conception among .ia n y car o w ne rs tha» tended service in ­ terv a ls.

SAVE NOW 1983 PLYMOUTH COLT

____________ !j 4 dr.. 4 spd . 1 4 liter, gg g g g g g P-B, rack power steer-1 mg, steel tires, vinyl I seats, tint glass. Ini _ stock. One low price. List Price $5876.00

2 0 0 C A R S IN S T O C K H e re are a fe w exam ples BftANO NEW $ *R i$ A L

B uick, 2 d r, V6. au to, pw r/strg/b rks, air co n d . A M /F M s te re o . B S M . rear d efo g , chrom mlrrs, W /W tires, d e lx wheel covers. 4.135 mi. LIST P R IC E $10,757

vibration are improper tire pressure, tire bulge, loose wheel nuts, out-oi-balance wheels, worn or loose frontwheel bearings, and driveshaft problems. Check problem

as long a s the c a r is d riv e n at that one speed.

M e a n w h ile , because m oney has been tight and re ­ c e n t v rin te rs jn s e a s o n a b !/ m ild , m any rnotorist« iir.ve found it easy to postpone rou­ tine m a ntena ’ ce.

$5876

' O V E R

83 PARK AVE.

v ib r a t io n

i'.'/m u ir M ech a n ics M a g a ­ zin e in te rv ie w e d o w n e rs of c a r s fro m 10 to 20 y e a rs old a n d fo u n d that th e y g e n e r­ a lly lu b rica te and change the o il m o re freq u en tly tha n sug­ gested b y the c a r's m a n u fa c ­ tu re r. _______________ K e y facto rs in a tune-up continue to be spark p lu gs, d istributor cap , rotor and ig n i­ tion w irin g . A djustm ents to ig n itio n tin a n g , ca rb u reto r and choke and attention o the P C V v j v e , fuel and air filter still ore essential parts o f a tur.e-up. A cco rd in g to the co u n cil, our n ation’s cars today are in the w orst shape ever. Th e a v ­ erage age o f an automobile is at an a ll-tim e hig h o f 6 .5 ye a rs .

Tune-up vital for electronic ignitions, too

P R IC E D

Eiectra, B u ick. auto, trans.. 8 cyl.. pwr strg. pwr. b rks. 4 d r . air cond., reclln. seat, pwr windows/locks/anten , puncture sealent tires, E T R sterpo cassette, weather gd. pkg St •'»3375 U S T PRICE $17,003

b e

IKKKPCAR YOtlNGl

W O M E N 'S W O R K W h ile o n ly a b o u t t h r e e p e rc e n t o f tho se w h o w o rk on th e ir c a rs a re w o m en , the A u to m o tiv e P a rts & A c c e s ­ so rie s A sso cia tio n p oints out that m o re and m ore o f them a r e b e c o m in g k n o w le d g c able about c a r ca re

PARK

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FAST AN [> F. ASY CAR W AXING poaalblr » ilh the row or ■ new generation of effort-ftaving liquid waxe* Mich an Rain Danee® Showroom Finish from Borden. The new waxes are designed to protect a car's exterior finish and maintain it, high-polished appearance.

P A R K M OTORS

*1 0 ,2 8 1

F ull N e w C a r W a rra n ty In clu ded P rices in clu de freight a n d dealer prep, ex clude tax & M V fees

W e w on't forget you after the sale.

C H R Y S L E R 300 Rutherford Ave. Rte. 17 So. Rutherford

P 1 V M 0 0 T R

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438-1100

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HerbJordan'sCarCareCenters

RU V ERE’S S ERV ICE CEN TER

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Prepare your car for safe summer driving C O U PO N ----------------

------- COUPON --------------

Q uaker State

YMONROEY

Oil Change, Oil Filter Chassis Lube Install b qts Quaker State Superbiend 10-30W

$ 1

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ea

N EW < P155-80R13 5 s 4 2 » Plus 1

42 95

F.E.T 1 48 1 60 1 64 1 91

S3995 _

_

_ _

4 W1

1 9 9 5

s1795

Most Pass cars From Wheel Drive S3 00 Extra

1----------------- COUPON

Air Conditioner ReCharge

Front D isc Brakes

$6 9 95 i r.;r'wreH Q 95

Includes Cutting Rotors] repacking Bearings Comp Brake inspection

1

teak inspect Beit

Plus

$1

P195-75R14

s5495

Plus S?

13

F FT

P215-75R15

P205-75R15

s5695

Pius S? b?

f

E 1

$5995

Plus S2 i l F E !

% .

4 3 8 -1 7 8 9

349 R ID G E R O A D , L Y N D H U R S T

I

CAR REN TA LS'

AMERI SB R General Steel Belted Radial Whitewall

$47915!

IMPORT SIZES 155/13

includes Plugs PVC Ai» Filter PVC Ad| Timm;} Ad| Cart)

P185-80R13

S3 F £ T

165/13 •13.95 1 7 5/70 /1 3 44.95 1 8 5/70 /1 4 49.95

I I •

S

— CO UPO N ----------------

Electronic Tune-Up

Wag Wheels $ £ 5 0 F xtra

Each installed

----- C O U PO N ---------------C O M P U T E R IZ E D

Dynamic Wheel Balance

Wheel Alignment

Monroe Matic HD Shocks

s2 9 95

A LT E R N A T O R S BRA K ES C A RBU RETO RS SM O CKS STARTERS PO W ER F LU S H CO O LIN Q S Y S T E M S B A T T E R IE S O IL C H A N G ES LU B R ICA TIO N ROAD S E R V IC E

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“ W e T u n e Y o u r C a r T o K e e p It A w ay F ro m T he P u m p ”

COUPON.

------------- CO UPO N ------------------

FROM THE SOURCE! P 2 2 5 /7 5 R 1 5

61

± tn J o Y sm a m r - DRIVING in A BRAND N tw CHEVY! j

Free Mounting ■Free High Speed Balancing -FREE Valve Stem $7.75 Value

PER MONTH

Group Purchase Discount May Not Be Applied To This Advertisement,

HerbJordan'sGeneralTire “We Don’t Ju st Sell Tires”

R te . 1 7 , E a s t R u th e rfo rd



2 lo 4 month*

IN C L U D E S : FULL IN S U R A N C E • LIM TID FREE MILEAGE'^

9 9 1 -4 2 0 0

9 3 3 -5 7 0 0

52nd & Kennedy Blvd.', North Bergen • 866-2232 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7:30 a.m. -7:00 p.m.; Saturday 8:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.

lT i* L S

____ OflYNH C»4lVROt»T

KEARNY AVEi. K b W h r

T H U R S D A Y , JU N E l t . 1M3—P a g e >

CD u D o n ’t f o r g e t : c le a n c a r ’s i n t e r i o r , t o o ! Don't neglect the interior when cleaning a car. Here are some tips from the Auto­ motive Parts & Accessories Association: • Thoroughly vaccuum the carpeting. If there is a s o i le d s p o t . it m a y be removed with carpet clean­ er. Make sure carpets are dry before closing windows and doors. • Wash bright metal parts with lukewarm water and a

mi l d soap. Ri nse. Do not use metal polishes. • Remove dust and loose dirt that accumulate on inte­ rior seat fabrics with a vac­ u u m c l e a n e r or wh i sk bro o m . S o ils, stai ns and spots can usually be cleaned away wi th a good-quality fabric cleaner. • Clean seat belts with a mild soap solution and luke­ warm water. See that they are not frayed — and use them.

A ll- s e a s o n , s te e l- b e lte d ra d ia ls a t lo w , lo w p ric e s l

P155 ’W1? BUdtnail PH»s Si ‘ No trade mneeded

Firestone TRAX 12' A strong tire with strong price oppeol Steel betted Trox <2 feature* a long ■ wearing, oM-season tread thot gives effective year round trottion A remarkoble rodial value!

DELUXE CHAMPION' P o ly e s te r co rd Economical, smooth riding.

P ic k u p s, V an s a n d RVs! ALL TERRAIH™ white letter tires

I"

S*f

»kxk

6 00 12 A78-I3 P155/80D13 B78 13 C78 14 D7B U E78 U F78 14 G78 14 5 60 15 6 00 151 G78 15 H78 15 ' 178 15

$27 7$ 32 10 32 10 35 65 39 20 40 50 41 55 43 00 45 00 39 70 42 05 46 35 48 50 5000

S
Price

P 155/80R 13 P165/80R13 P175/80R13 P185/80RI3 P185/75RI4 PI95/75R14 P205/75R14 P215/75R14 P225/75R 14 P165/80R15 PJ95/75R15 P205/75Rt5 P215/75R15 P225/75R15 P235/75R15

$4395 48 95 51 95 53 95 57 95 5995 639 5 65 95 67 95 49 95 6295 6495 6695 69 95 71 95

O u r finest steel-belted ra d ia l! Site whitewoU P-'*< MC * P 16 5/8 0R 13" 68 * P 175/70R 13 to * P185 /7 5R U KK PI9 5/7 S R 14 P205/75R 14 P205/75R15 71 * P215/75R15 P225/75*>5 P235/75R1S All prTc„pTu,$164 oS? 96 F F

L O W P R IC E D T R IU M P H ' Rodial performance, economy price P 165/80R 13 P185/75R 13 P19S/7SR14 P205/75R I4 P21S/7SR1S P2 2S /7 5R 15 P235/75R15

* » * 42 96 47* 61* 64 16 67 * 61*

S a le ends Ju n e 41

CUP *

S*W

NEW 1984 TOPAZ. SEE IT HERE. SEE IT NOW. NEW MERCURY TOPAZ GS • Front-wheel drive • New High Swirl Combustion engine • Excellent tuel economy

Drive Topaz— and se e what a new, enlightened approach can do tor your driving.

*6959

'Y o u r m ile a g e m a y d iffe r d e p e n d in a o n s p e e d , d is t a n c e , a n d w e a th e r A c tu a l h ig h w a y m iie a g p li 'T i t l e , ta x e s , c h a rg e s extra

MERCURY SA LES. S E R V IC E • PARTS • U SED C A R S

LINCOLN

LINCOLN • M ERC U RY, INC 626 RID G E ROAD, R T 17-S LYN D H U R ST, NEW J E R S E Y

o 939-6715

LY N N

S B tV K E C O U P O N S

CHEVROLET OFFERS THE BEST OF BOTH o APR



W ORLDS

F IN A N C IN G IF Q U A L I F I E D

ON NEW 1983 CHEVETTES • CITATIONS • CAVALIERS S-10 PICK UPS

O V ER

395 N E W 1983

LIM ITED TIM E O FFER

C H E V Y

Charge

9 0 DAYS

LYNN SELLS FOR LESS

- "C A S H

It!

LO U 'S SERV ICE CENTER 209 R ID G E R D ., NO. A R L IN G T O N 998-3339

IN0C0>

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P a g e H — T H U R SD A Y . J U N E l t , 1883

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FRIEDMAN, KATES &PEARLMAN

47 O rient W ay. Rutherford New jersey 070

438-5600

Saturday & Evening Appointments available

A d

E x e c

C h o s e n

ington. He is an army vet­ eran of the Korean War. T h e R u t h G o tt s c h o Kidney Foundatio n, founded in 1960, is a non­ p ro fit, v o lu n te e r group

Association in Montville and is an officer of the (Jnico organization. A native of Lyndhurst, he form erly resided in Parsippany and North Arl- ,

Nicholas J. Maio has been elected president of the board of trustees of the R u t h G o t t s c h o K idn ey Foundation

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Maio is president of Maio Associates, In., Lyn­ dhurst a 13-year old ad­ vertising and sales promo­ tion agency serving na­ t i o n a l a n d in te r n a tio n clients. A graduate of Pace U n i v e r s i t y , New Y o rk City, he lives in Montville, N .J He serves as presi­ dent of the Valhalla Civic

B y

F o u n d a t io n dedicated to helping peo­ ple afflicted w ith end-stage kidney disease. It provides dialysis m achines withoout charge to hospitals and in­ dividual patients and oper­

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R E S T A U R A N T 'IM M A C U L A T E A S T H E L E G E N D H E R S E L F '

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T H U R S D A Y . JU N E l t , IM S—P a ne 11

Sportswire Come Oct. 22 and Rutherford’s Dave Petrie, an otherwise sane gent, will be in Kona, Hawaii, to put his body to the crudest test man has yet devised for athletes. Dave w ill be trying to beat 99 other com­ petitors in completing in 17 hours three backto-back endurance events — a 2.4-mile open ocean s w im , a 112-mile bicycle race and a 26.2mile m arathon. That is why it is called the Ironman Triathlon World Championship. Prom oters of the event, who have Bud Light as a sponsor, say that they’ve restricted the entries to 100 and they don’t want any shenanigans. Those who have been accepted can’t trade or sell their entries and the or­ ganizers want the competitors to be sure to have their identification cards with them when they show up. As is usual with most track athletes, they pay their own way. However, the air lines have agreed to let the competitors take along their bikes for free. It m akes you wonder what matter of man — or w om an, because there will be women in the event — willingly subjects his body to the tortune of such a race. Well, Dave Petrie who is 27 is the son of the Ferdinand (he’s the highly talented, interna­ tionally reputed artist) Petries. He did his early running at Rutherford High School as a high hurdler, then competed for Penn State. He got his masters at the University of Delaware in bio-chemistry and then spent another year at Penn State on a fellowship. To get ready for the Ironman Dave pounds the pavement 14 miles every day, swims two miles and bikes 50 miles. This daily routine would seem murderous to the average guy. To Dave it is part of the thrilling excitement of bringing from his body the great resources which lie hidden in most people. It is the driving force which makes jogging and then competition in the long races so satisfying. There are many who test themselves in the marathon. But relatively few are willing to pit their bodies against the cruel demands of the triathlon. As a result most of the triathlon competitors will know each other They have been through the grind and they know pretty

much what they must face. A strange breed, indeed, the triathlon peo­ ple. On a recent Saturday morning they gathered at Bamegat Light on Long Beach Island. The race was won by Mark McIntyre of Greenwich, Conn. Dave Petrie finished third. But McIntyre’s race was the classic exam­ ple of m an refusing to let adversity down him. The race consisted of a half-mile swim, a 20mile bike ride and a 10-mile run. When McIntyre got ready to run he found himself without his running shoes. Never­ theless, he took off in his bare feet, borrowed a pair of shoes after two miles from a guy in a pace car, finally had his shoes brought to him, changed, and yet managed, after all that, to win in two hours 10 minutes and 25 seconds. Petrie cam e in at 2:18.08. Women are as fearless as the men. Sherry Walsh was the first woman to finish with 2:36.03. In high school Petrie did his track work on the high hurdles. Likewise at Penn State It was later that the marathon and then the triathlon fever overtook him. Dave set the course record in winning the Warriors Path Triathlon in Kingsport, Tenn. and won the Wilmington Triathlon Relay. In the Oxford Triathlon in Maryland the national competition brought together some of the nation’s best and Dave finished twelfth. He has run in the Boston Marathon. But those in the triathlon say that it is the greatest test of m an’s endurance. So many different muscles are engaged in such a race that three different kinds of training are neces­ sary.

C ount’s Corner

c a m p a i g n w i l l be 182 Records are made to be nights.______________________ broken One hears it so often at a race track, and it s u r e i s t r u e at t h e Meadowlands In recent days punters have seen, driving, stop-watch and training standards shat­ tered. “ Records are falling like ten pins,” jibed Ralph Morano, the New Jersey Standardbred and Breeders representative, after John Cambell set a F o r F a t h e r ’s D new m ark for drivers. “ And it a in 't going to F r o m R u th e rfo rd stop." C a m p b e l l p osted his 218th victory piloting Lon Todd Hanover to a rapid 1:54 mile in the ninth race June 4th That victory erased the m ark of 217 set by Bill O 'Donnell in 1982 for a 182-night campaign Campbell blasted the re­ cord into oblivion on the 121st day of the current cam paign “ If Cam pbell can keep up this pa ce ," said Steve Katz, a noted handicapper, “he may well hit 300 vic­ tories in one season And it's going to be a long time b e fo re s o m e b o d y wi l l knock off that number." cords are m ade to be bro­ k e n , " t he C ount sai d “ Yes," responded Katz. you're right But 300 is still a big number for one season."

NOW

a y W it h A G if t S p o r t in g G o o d s

R u t h e r f o r d S p o r t in g

O ’D o n n e ll also e s ta b ­ lished a track record for purse earnings. $3,747,954, last year at the Big M With most of the big purse races to come. Campbell, if he doesn't falter, is sure to s u r p a s s O 'D o n n e ll's wi nn in gs Campbell's horses had banked $2,415,958 after 120 racing nights The Meadowlands

G o o d s “ We Know S p o rts” H o urs: M on.-Thurs. 10-6; Fri. 10-8; S at. 9:30-6

32 Park Ave., Rutherford

438*7869

SH EA R P R O SP E C T IV E

B eauty &

BERLIN'S

fastest in the nation this year and equalled the track record for four-yearold pacers

WE HAVE EVERYTHING FOR THE SPORTS MINDED FATHER.

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The novitiate must learn to train for one section of the sport at a time. He must build up muscles for running, for swimming and for biking all of which subject the body to different strains. Tough? And yet there are many anxious to try. In the Warriors Path Triathlon Petrie had to swim 1.2 miles in 55-degree water which he entered at 6 :50 a.m. Then he had a 56-mile bike ride and, finally, a 13.1-mile run through beach sand. There were 210 at the start and 166 at the finish. Petrie toured the course in 4:4954. His runner up was Dave Hoffman, a Penn State buddy who was about nine minutes behind

T w o n i g h t s b e fo r e Campbell shattered the driving m ark, he piloted Irish J im m y to a 1. 53 mile.

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SUNDAYS 0-2

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N e x t to M a n d e e s 939-0043

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K E A R N Y • 991 9800

223 STUYVESANT AVE., LYNOHURST For an appointment call

438-9864or935-09*6 Open Late Thursday & Friday

Page 12—THURSDAY, JUNE lt, 1*83

E x e r c is e

C o u r s e s

King s C ourt Health and R acquetball Club. 525 R iv­

erside Ave. in Lyndhurst, will offer special 8 week

A r e

O f f e r e d

courses in dance and ex­ ercise starting the week of

G R E A T H A B IT T O G E T IN T O J

A i K in g ’s C o u r t

July 11, 1983 All classes are open to both members and non-members. Nonmembers of the club can now register for these pro­ fessional classes plus en­ joy the use o the provate lounge, showers, steam, and saunas. Classes of­ fe r e d i n c l u d e a e ro b ic stretch, ballet & jazz for adults and teens (13-17). Special sum m er classes in­ c l u d e p r e - b a l l e e t f or youngsters (7-12), creative movement for children (46), and a stretch and ten­ sion relieving class for men. T h i s p r o g r a m wa s created and is directed by Patricia Masters, dance and exercise coordinator for Param ount Pictures in N Y C and Harmon Cove To we r s , M e a d o w l a n d s N.J. All classes will be t aught by p rofession a l dancers-teachers and will be offered Monday-Sunday

DIRECT DEPOSIT of YOUR MONTHLY CHECK Does M ore Than P reve n t T h e ft— It S ta rts E a rn in g So o n er— ft's S u p e r C o n v e n ie n t— W h e th e r Y ou V e T ra v e lin g — III or Just "Not-ln-The-M ood To G o To The B a n k " — It's H ere At South B e rg en Saving s W o rk in g For You!

SOUTH BERGEN SAVINGS FSUC

mornings and evenings Ms Masters created this program to suit everyones needs. Aerobic Stretch Kxercise emphasizes 4 meth­ ods of exercising: 1) To reshape your body by lengthening your muscles 2) To firm your body by

N O T IC E

s t r e n g t h e n i n g your muscles. 3) Aerobic move­ ments to contemporary music to build stamina strengthen your heart. 4) Special tension relieving techniques that will teach you how to relax Jazz Dances For Beginners in­ c lu d e s s t r e t c h i n g and isometric exercises plus spe cially choreographed c o m b in a t io n s of dance movements to modern jazz music. Ja z z exercise pro­ m otes s to m a c h m uscle control and mobility in the upper body Ballet Dance F o r B e g i n n e r s is a graceful and fluid class us­ ing ballet techniques that will improve posture and a l i g n m e n t , st r e n g t h e n your stomach and lower back muscles and increase coordination. This class in ­ cludes traditional ballet b a r re e x e r c i s e s a nd stretches plus center floor ballet dance movements. Thi s s u m m e r Ki n g s Court will start 3 new types of classes: 1) Stretch For Men is a unique class for men that will teach how to properly stretch and strengthen muscles with strong emphasis on learning to relieve tension This class is great for the

T O

A N D

I

A L L T H E

C a ll f o r F r e e I n i t i a l C o n s u lta tio n

J A M E S B R IA N L A P P I N M e m b e r N e w J e r s e y & P e n n s y lv a n ia B a rs

f*r3*y Jfcolth For W om en

256 Stuyveeant Av«., Lyndhurst 1 Year 935-3311 1-3-6 Month S p e c i a l : 1 M o n th * 1 9 M

Memberships Available

K a s t R u t h e r f o r d , N e w J e r s e y 0 7 0 7 3 • (2 0 1 ) 9 3 5 - 3 S 5 5

H O W A R D

• Ejcw c Im CIm m s -Individual Supervision

• Roman Staam Room • Floridian Sunroom • Spadoua Modam Qym • Ruaalan Inhalation Room • Finnlah Sauna • Heated Whirlpool & Jacuzzi • Prtvata Shower* ft Oraaalng Room* • Aerobic Claaaaa: Moo-Wad-Frl- 8:30 PM Maaaagaa-Hot Wax-Vltamlna Hours M-F 9-9 Sat 9-1

A p r il 3 0 ,1 9 8 3 .

PBS*! |__ |

P u rsu a n t to its P lan of C o n v e rsio n , T h e H ow ard S a v in g s B a n k h a s co m m e n ce d a S u b scrip tio n O ffering to its d e p o sito rs a s of April 3 0 ,1 9 8 3 , w ho have first priority in p u rch a sin g its C o m m o n S to c k to be is su e d u nder th e P la n of C o n v ersio n . T h e S u b scrip tio n O ffering will expire on Ju n e 30 , 1983 E a c h depositor h a s the right to p u rc h a se up to 8 6 ,0 0 0 s h a re s of C o m m on S to ck in the Su b scrip tio n O ffering, su b je ct to the ava ilab ility of su fficien t sh a re s.

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Atlantic County Atlantic City 1232-1236 Atlantic Avenue Atlantic City. N J 08401 Som ers Point Bethel and New Roads Som ers Point, N J 08244 Allendale 78 W Allendale Avenue Allendale N J 07401 Ctoster 617 Piermont Road Closter, N J 07624 Elmwood Park 115 Broadway Elm wood Park. N J 07407 Hasbrouck Heights 322 Boulevard Hasbrouck Heights N J 07604 North Arlington 119 Ridge Road North Arlington N J 07032 Patisades Park 303 Broad Avenue Palisades Park, N J 07650 Park Ridge 165 Km derkamack Road Park Ridge. N J 07656 Ridgewood

70 East Ridgewood Avenue Ridgewood N J 07450

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Valley Brook & Stuyvesant Avs., Lyndhurst

J E R S E Y

S H A R E S B A N K

S T O C K P E R

S H A R E

D ir e c t C o m m u n it y O f f e r in g fo r N e w J e rs e y

R e s id e n t s .

C o n cu rre n tly with the Su b scrip tio n O ffering, T h e H ow ard S a v in g s B a n k h as also c o m m e n ce d a D irect C o m m un ity Offering of a n y u n su b sc rib e d sh a re s T h e s e sh a re s m ay be p u rch a se d directly from the B a n k by in d ivid u als (and th eir p e rso n al tru sts) who are N ew J e r s e y re sid e n ts. T h e B a n k will also pay a fee of $ .6 0 per sh a re to b ro kers registered u nd er the S e c u ritie s E x c h a n g e Act of 1934, who a s s is t p u rc h a se rs in the Direct C o m m un ity Offering and w ho a re n a m ed on the O rd er Fo rm s returned to the B an k. It is exp ected that an y sh a re s rem aining after com pletion of the Su b scrip tio n and D irect C o m m un ity O fferin g s on Ju n e 3 0 ,1 9 8 3 will be so ld by u n d erw riters in a Public Offering on a national b a sis. Th e S e c u r itie s a re not S a v in g s A c c o u n ts or D e p o s its a n d a re n o t in su re d b y the F e d e ra l D e p o s it In su ra n c e C o rp o ra tio n . S u c h s e c u r itie s are b e in g o ffe re d in the c o n v e rs io n p u rs u a n t to an e xe m p tio n from th e S e c u r itie s A c t o f 1933. T h e p la n o f c o n v e rs io n h a s b e e n a p p r o v e d b y th e D e p a rtm e n t o f B a n k in g o f the S ta te o f N e w J e rs e y . H o w ever, the S e c u r itie s h a ve not b e e n a p p ro v e d or d is a p p ro v e d b y th e D e p a rtm e n t o f B a n k in g o r th e F e d e r a l D e p o s it In su ra n c e C o rp o ra tio n n o r h a s s u c h D ep a rtm e n t or C o rp o ra tio n p a s s e d u p o n th e a c c u r a c y or a d e q u a c y o f th e S u b s c rip tio n O ffering Circular.

T h e s e c u ritie s are offered only by m e a n s of the S u b scrip tio n O ffering C ircu la r, and this a n n o u n c e m e n t is n either an offer to se ll nor a solicitation of an y offer to buy.

Bergen County

fe th a ^ D a y

N E W

D E P O S IT O R S

S U B S C R IP T IO N

$ 2 0 .0 0

D e p o s it o r s o f R e c o r d o n

K

B A N K

S A V IN G S

S u b s c r ip t io n O f f e r in g f o r

U nlim ited U N pf A ll Fbc IIR Im Including: U N IVE R SA L

COUNSELLOR AT LAW

W h itn e y B u ild in g • 1 8 6 P a t e r s o n A v e n u e • P .O . B o x 1 2 4

In co n nectio n with its plan to co n vert to a cap ital sto ck sa v in g s b a n k , T h e Howard S a v in g s B a n k is offering its d ep o sito rs of record on April 3 0 , 1983 and individual re sid e n ts of N ew J e r s e y the right to p u rch a se s h a re s of the C o m m o n S to ck w hich it p la n s to is su e T h e offer is being m ad e p u rsu a n t to a S u b scrip tio n O ffering C ircu lar, w h ich is ava ilab le, together with an order form a | e a c h banking office of the H oward a n crb y m ail if req uested by telep h o n e, 2 01-533-7 980. C o p ie s are also ava ilab le from certain registered se c u ritie s b ro kers in N ew Je rs e y .

at

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DIVORCE CRIMINAL LAW PERSONAL INJURY MEDICAL M ALPRACTICE

M A X IM U M

G E T IN S H A P E N O W F O R S P R IN G f t S U M M E R !

in

Protect your rights with legal representation.

C O M M O N

SWIM SUIT WEATHER IS ON IT S WAY!

Placement

classes w ill be according to earliest registration For schedule, fees, in­ formation and registration call P a tric ia Masters at King's Court (201) 460-0068 or stop by the club. Dance your way to helath. ..

It's What You Say and How You Say It...

R E S ID E N T S O F

P R IC E

t en t i on .

A rtic le V . B ill o f R ig h ts . C o n stitutio n o f t h « U n ite d S ta te ., D ecem ber IB. 1791

8 ,6 0 0 0 0 0

(a )

class for children <4-«) that helps develop rhythm, coordination and grace. Special dance movements and creative gam es are ex­ plored. C la s s e n r o llm e e n t is limited so that all students will receive individual at­

N o p e r s o n s h a ll b e ...d e p r iv e d o f l i f e , lib e r t y , o r p r o p e r t y w ith o u t d u e p r o c e s s o f la w ;

H O W A R D S A V IN G S

AN D LOAN A S S O C IA T IO N

250 VALLEY BOULEVARD WOOD RIDGE, N.J. 93»34M 20 WILLOW STREET. EAST RUTHERFORD. H I S39 5SM

working m a n who has a stressful job. 2) Pre-Ballet is a class for children (712) which will introduce them to classical ballet technique inorder to help develop grace, strength, flexibility and coordination 3) Creative Movement is a

Ruthertord 5 Sylvan Street Rutherford NJ 07070 Tenafly 26 W est Railroad Avenue Tenafly. N J 07670

Burlington County Willing boro 81 Beverly-Rancocas Road Willingboro. N J 08046

Camden County Audubon 157 South White Horse Pike Audubon. N J 08106 Gloucester 12 8 0 Blackwood-Ciementon Rd Clementon N J 08021 Runnemede 228 B lack Horse Pike Runnem ede N J 08078

Essex County Belleville 726 Washington Avenue Belleville N J 07109 Bloomfield Avenue 164 Bloomfield Avenue Newark. N J 07104 Broad Street 768 Broad Streel Newark, N J 07101

E ast Orange 679 Park Avenue E ast O range N J 07017 Ironbound 179 Ferry Street Newark N J 07105 Irvington 918 Spnngtield Avenue Irvington N J 07111 Livingston 210 South Orange Avenue Livingston N J 07039 Livingston Mall 111 Livingston Mall Livingston. N J 07039 Maplewood 187 Maplewood Avenue Maplewood N J 07040

Mtllburn 722 Morns & E s s e x Turnpike Short Hills. N J 07078 Nutley 375 Franklin Avenue Nutley, N J 07J10 South Orange 11 South Orange Avenue South O range, N J 07079 South O range Annex 7 Third Street South Orange. N J 07079

Springfield Avenue 356 Spnnglield Avenue Newark N J 07103 Stuyvesant Village 1097 Stuyvesant Avenue Irvington, N J 07111 University Anne* 251 University Avenue Newark N J 07102 Vailsburg 1044 South Orange Avenue Newark N J 07106 Weequahic 250 Chancellor Avenue Newark. N J 07112 W essex 27 Bloomfield Avenue North Caldwell NJ 07006 West Orange 412 Pleasant Valley Way West O range NJ 07052

Middlesex County Woodbridge 1588 St G eorges Avenue Avenel. N J 07Q01

M onm outh County Eatontown 231 Highway 35 Eatontown, N J 07724 Little Silver 517 Prospect Avenue Little Silver, N J 07739 M analapan Route 9 and Craig Road M analapan N J 07726 S e a Girt

Sea

Girl Mall

S e a G irt, N J 08750 Spring Lake Heights 2401 Route 71 Spring Lake Heights, N J 07762

Hudaon County

Morris County

Kearny 244 Kearny Avenue Kearny. N J 07032

Chatham 4 34 M ain Street C hatham . N J 07928

Marcar County Hamilton 90 Flock Road Trenton, N J 08619

Mount Olive 98 Route 46 ViHage G reen Shopping Center Budd La k e, N j 07826

the Howard! |

■ S A V IN G S B A N K | |

Subscription Ottering Circular, may be requested by telephone, 201-533-7900.

O caan County Brick Town 133 Van Zile Road Brick Town. NJ 08723 Toms River 1214 Hooper Avenue Toms River, N J 08753 Whiting 200 Lacey Road Whiting, NJ 08759 Paasaic County Clifton 2-4 Market Street Clifton. NJ 07012 Pompton Lakes 22 Lakeside Avenue Pompton Lakes. NJ 07442 Wayne 311 Valley Road Wayne. N j 07470 So m » r — t C o u n t y Montgomery 1225 State Road Princeton, NJ 08540 Union County Clark 1 1 6 1 Raritan Road Clark. NJ 07066 Springfield 871 Mountain Avenue Springfield, NJ 07081

T H U R S D A Y . JU N E I t , 1983—P M e 13

S.B. C o in .t'A

Exchang e,

New 3M Tabletop C op ie r Introduced By T hom as’

A new 3M ta b le to p copier, available locally at Thomas Printing and 01fice Supply Co., is com­ parable in size to standard

office typewriters and de­ signed to m ake 100 to 1,000 very high quality copies a

small business or home of fices - or for point-of-use stations in larger offices, says M r Thomas, Presi­ dent, of Thomas Printing and Office Supply Co., 313 Union Avenue in Rutherford The sheet-fed model will produce from one to 10

month. The 3M 273 Copier is an affordably-priced unit for

R u th m rfo rd rn qn allty

N O R T H A R L IN G T O N F IR E C R A C K E R 5 M IL E RU N J u l y 4 - 1 0 A .M .

c o in A • ta m p a to re C o a a p l« t « l l a « o f U .S . 9 fa a a p e A S u p p lie s W E P A Y IM M E D IA T E

r

AW ARDS* PLA Q U ES* MEDALS

CASH! For Gold C o in s, Silver Coins, Rare Corns and Anything Made oi Gold or Silver

$5.00 ENTRY FEE BY MAIL

$6.00 ENTRY FEE DAY OF RACE

N ew Je rse y H e a lth Spa

CHECK TIME: 1:30 A.M. — 9:30 A.M. SOOTH EN0 BERGEN COUNTY PARK

Paying 8 times face value for silver coins 1964 and before $4.00 for halves 1964 & before. $2.00 for quarters 1964 & before. 80* for dines 1964 & before. We pay the highest price for silver dollars 1878*1935

256 ST U Y V ES AN T A VE N U I LYNDHURST, N.j . 0707 1

YOU’LL HAVE A BLAST!

______________________ P h o n e : 2 0 1 - 9 3 3 - 3 3 J I SPA HOURS • 9 am to 9 pm Monday to Friday

Pleaje enter me in the North Arlington Five Mile Run. MONDAY. JULY 4th, 1983 I hereby tor myself heirs, executors and administrators do warn and release any and all rights and claim for damages of any nature which I might have against nay organization, municipality or individual associated with this event and agree to hold harmless from any claim such parties. I have been advised I must be in good health to participate in this event. I also give permission for the use without fee, of my name and picture in any broM cnt. teteoit or print media account of this event. Further. I acknowledge I have

and

BY

! * I | I

P O P U L A R

We guarantee the highest prices for U.S. Silver Dollars We pay the highest price for aid Gold.

Last Name

10K - 14K - 18K la your presence on state certified scales

W e b a y a ll G o ld C o in * 4 3 P a r k A v e ., R u t h e r f o r d • 9 3 5 - 9 0 8 0

Middle Initial

A G € S U to 14

Starts June 27th throigh August 26th, 1913

“*"■ " ° REFUNDS - i

CLASSES WILL . BE HELD

First Name

MONDAY

Street Address

^ge

Sex

Town

State

Zip Code

2 En joyab le M o n th s

Prices subiect to change doe to market fluctuation

McdicAl Dominick J. Ligresti, M.D. Board Certified Dermatologist

D is e a s e s o f th e S k in , H a ir a n d N a ils

G R E G O R Y

PARENTS TO ACCOMPANY PUPIL FOR ENROLLMENT

OFFICE HOURS BY APPOINTMENT

FINAL ENROLLMENT DATE JUNE 20th, 1983 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL (201) 935-3311

F. S U L L IV A N , D r. M a t t h e w J. Z e i l e r

M .D ., F.A.C.C.. P A

Obstetrics and Gynecology SUITE 404 5 FRANKLIN AVENUE BELLEVILLE, NEW JERSEY 07109

Specializing in

$ 4 0 ° °

directory Edwin J. Gevirtz, M.D., F.A.C.O.G.

CARDIOLOGY

O P T O M E T R IS T

Cardiac Catheterization &Angiography Stress Testing

Eyes exam ined by appointm ent Large selection of frames and lenses 2 0 % d iscount children and seniors 2 0 % d iscoun t second com plete pair of glasses Free fram e adjustm ents and repairs C o n ta c t Lenses -hard and soft H ouse calls available M aster Charge and Visa O pe n S aturday and Thursday evening O n e year frame warranty U nion plans, Medicare and M edicaid accepted

24-Hour Holter Monitoring Office Hours By A ppoin tm en t

Telephone (2 0 1)93 5- 53 76 ,

202 ORIENT WAY, RUTHERFORD. N . J ,

(201)751-3211

Has opened his office at

Clara M aass Protessional Center West 50 Newark Avenue — Suite 104 Belleville, New Jersey 07109

R O N A L D L . V IS C U S O , M . D .

D r . D anieI V. M ariano CHIROPRACTOR

Jeffrey M. Weil, D.M.D.

HIGH

6 0 Union A v e ., R u the rfo rd

PRACTICE LIMITED TO PERIODONTICS

935-4466

(Treatment of G u m Diseases)

Office Hours By A p p o in tm e n t

348 Ridge Road, Lyndhurst, N.J. 438-8668

AN N OU N CES THE OPENING OF A HYPERTENSION CLINIC FOR

By appointment

B L O O D P R E S S U R E AN D COMPLICATIONS. BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

ITS

J W

450 BERGEN ST., HARRISON, N.I (HARRISON PLAZA)

Available Now! M icroscopic

G

Diagnosis a n d M onitoring

240 Park Avenue Rutherford • 460-1333

±

SENIOR CITIZEN 20% DISCOUNT

Certified By The American Board Of Pediatrics

OISEASES AND SURGERY OF THE SKIN

Year Guarantee On Lenses and Frames MON. & THURS 10:00-6:00 TUES & FRI. 10 0 0 8:30 SAT. 10-2

P E D IA T R IC S , N E O N A T A L A N D

Fam ily D e n tist

In Office Surgical Removal Ot Tumors, Motes and Cysts

Formerly Of North Arlington

A D O L E S C E N T M E D IC IN E

Rutherford Office Plaza - Suite 1*12 Nitrous Oxide Sedation Surgical Implants Cosm etic Bonding Synthetic Bone Grafting

WEEKDAYS. EVENINGS & SATURDAY HOURS

17 Sylvan St.

D E L M O N IC O P H A R M A C Y

Rutherford

H O M E H EALTH C A R E D EPT.

9 3 9 - 0 9 3 3 Rutherford Office Plaza 17 Sylvan Street Rutherford. N.J.

By Appointment 460-0280

SALES & REN TALS

W eekday, Evening, Saturday Hours By Appointment

• Wheel Chairs • Walkers • Commodes • Crutches • Hospital Beds • Incontinent Systems • Plastic Hose • Back Supports Male & Female Fitters

Tel. 5 68-5130 ItostffCwi 1 Vin Entlewood Clift*. HI.

N O R T H A R L IN 6 T 0 N D E N T A L C E N T E R

7 2 2 R id g e Road, L y n d h u rs t

4 3 8 -2 2 1 3

193 RIDGE ROAD, NORTH ARLINGTON Dr. L. Telia, Dr. J. Telia, A. Telia, Dental Hygienist (201)933-1887

2 0 % Discount To Senior Citizens

PICILLO BROS. OPTICIANS “A FAMILYEYEWEARCENTER

Mon. 1 Thurs. 10-8:30 • Tues. & Fri. 10-6:00 Saturday 10-2:30 •Closed Wednesdays

Thank you for your patronage in the past.

Board Certified Internal Medicine

M A R K W A X M A N , M .D . Board Certified Internal M edicine and Gastroenterologist For The Practice of General Internal M edicine and D iseases o f the Stom ach For Adults and Adolescents

197 Ridge Road North Arlington, N.J. TelepHae

*17-1010 Oay, Evening end Week-End Houm Available________

Announces the opening of

We are continuing the tradition offer

T h e

(Located across from Queen of Peace Church)

W

L a te r T re a tm e n t

— Herpes Lesions — Tattoos — Birthm arks — Keloid Scars

l L O V I C H IL D R E N !

And Other Skin Conditions

W H Y D E L A Y Y O U R C H IL D ’S D E N T A L C A R E ?

For Information and Appointments

P ainless honest dentistry with OR. CHASOLEN, formerly children’s dentist for N.A. schools and Board of Health.

C a ll 7 5 1 - 1 2 0 0 Jo e e p h

Bring your child in to visit our pleasant office and friendly staff. After a check-up at no fee, he, can play PAC-MAN while we c o nsult with Mom or D a d .

DR. ROBERT CHASOLEN NO. ARLINGTON 998-7337

— W arts — Rosacea — Skin Tum ors — “S pid er Veins"

— Port W ine Stains

L O V I U S !

132 RIDGE RO.

C e n te r

For the Treatment of:

CAU. 996-2821 tor appointment

C H IL D R IN

A nnounces H is A ssociation With

FORMERLY THE PRACTICE OF JOHN FORLINE, M.O.

ing the latest techniques available with dentistry performed in comfort

312 RU6E ROAD____________ LYNOHURST. N.J._07071

E R IC M A R C IA C K S 0 N , M . D .

Th* Belleville Dermatology Center, P.A.

30 YEARS OF QUALITY DENTISTRY AT TH E SAME LOCATION

One Year Guarantee On Frames and Lenses

By Appointment

f i t i a i c i n

43 Ridge Road North Arlington • 997-9505

J a y G a n a p a t h y , M .D .

BoSrd Certified By The American Board Of Dermatology

Nicholas L. Tummillo, D.M.D. )

Office Heeri

d c L n c tu z

. . . where quality & comfort come first

M a n u e l R .M o r m a n , M . D .

W eekdays, Eves. & S at. by appt.

(201)933-1888

.

TELEPHONE 484-6900

KEYES APPROACH AVAILABLE

Evening I S»t. Heert MOPalisiOAva

.

fo r O nly Sponsored by North Arlington Recreation Commission. Adidas. Arlington Distributors, Bench Warmer, North Arlington Mayor and Borough Council.

(201)759-6569

• WEDNESDAY FRIDAY

10:30 lo I 1:30 AM

Mail to North Arlington Recreation Center. 96 Schuyler Ave.. No. Arlington, N.J. 07032

O PEN MONDAY THRU SA TU RD AY 12-6

• Saturday 9 am to 1 pm

DE MA N D

S p e c ia l P>io
§j?n®tur*: • • .................. ..................................................................................................(Parent/Guardian if under 18) I Painter hats to pre-registered runners post-registrators while supply lasts Please Print Clearly

S p e c ia l • $ 1 .5 0 fo r h a lv e * - 1 9 6 5 - 1 9 6 9

gle component toner in a disposable cartridge, book c o p y in g c a p a b ilit y and e n e rg y - s av in g “ instant on.” The 273 Copier measures 24 by 16 and a half by 6 in c h e s a n d w e ig h s S4 pounds It operates from standard home or office electrical outlets.

copies autom atically, six copies per minute, using 3M’s exclusive Parabond cold pressure fusing tech­ nology. Either 8 and a half by 11 or 8 and a half by 14 inch paper m ay be used. Mr. Thomas notes that convenience features of the 273 Copier include sin­

8 .

E a s te rn ,

M .D .

CLARA MAASS PROFESSIONAL CENTER WEST Suita 306 50 Newark Ava. Beltevilla

Certified, American Board of Dermatology Fellow, American Academy of Dermatology t Fellow, American Society For Laser Medicine & Surgery n

ih

m

m

m—

e«—

Page 14— T H U R SD A Y , J U N E 16, 1983

A DIRTY CAR IS THE START OF A

RUSTY CAR S o

w h y

ta k e

L e t u s w a s h

Its

F a t h e r s ! )a y

R e w a r d

B ad to

c h a n c e s ? y o u r

h im

f o r a

jo b

w e ll d o n e .

c a r

FREE o n

T h u rs d a y , J u n e

3 0

It's our way of letting you know that car washing is an important part of car c a re on the o. oasion of

r

a

HAPPY BIRTHDAY A M ERICA/ NATIONAL CARW ASH DAY

TIP-TOP CAR WASH 4 8 5 RIDGE ROAD NORTH ARLIN GTO N / 30 A m to 5 30 P M

F i n e F o

o

d

&

D

r i n k M)ir Tuesday thru Saturday, Dinner 4-10 p.m. Entertainm ent 9 p.m. 1 a.m. ('n il fo r in fo rm a tio n n nd n w m t i .

_____________ 460-1173_________

BOGGS

R enow n ed C h et Jo e (F re n c h y ) Regazzi preparing our fam o u s S izzlin g S te a k s, S e afo o d . D aily C h e f S p e c ia ls & other __________ Menu D e lite s__________________

ONE FR EE ENTREE!

A V E N U E LIQ U O R S

Any party of four w ill re ce ive one free en tree T u e s ., W ed., T h u rs . 4 p.m.10 p m , Frid a y 4-6 p.m.

M o n d a y

WITH TH IS A0 • Expires July 3 1 . 19S3

N ig h t

E n te rta in m e n t

434 Hackensack St. Carlstadt, N.J. 939-6706

T R IP L E S LIQ UO R & D E LI

F A H E Y ’ S B O TTLE SH O P 592 Ridge Road North Arlington - 991-6767

21 Park Ave., Rutherlord 935-9333

N ig h tly w ith the fa m o u s

“ Barbara Coast Banjo Band” formerly of “ Hambone Kelley’s”

S p e c ia l

C A R L S T A D T W IN E & LIQ U O R

375 Paterson Ave. Wallington, N.J. 935-9235

V IL L A G E W IN E & S P IR T S

9 p .m . - 1 a .m . So c o m e sing along with us

N U T L E Y W IN E SH O P

65 Park Ave., Rutherford 438-3949 • We Deliver - 438-3451

775 R IV E R S ID E A V E .. L Y N D H U R S T

558 Franklin Ave. Nutley. N .J.-667-1315

Prop**- Attire • Special Accomodations for Showers and Private Parties _ _ _

FINE DINING G13IBE

• Clams on Half Shell • Steamed Clams • Garlic Crabs

@ kon« 2 0 1 -9 9 1 -1 8 4 9

Jd W

• Mussels with Garlic

R ESTA U R A N T

d c M & m c J in

A La C arte D ining C A TE R I NG F OR

^

W EDDINGS, BAN Q U ETS AND LU N C H EO N S

< \/< n n a n t

[ffia r u & A a n d e fio t fu g u t M



455 Valley Brook Ave., Lyndhurst

'f a d c la i/ lo u n g e

620 STUYVESANT AVENUE L YNDHURST, N. J (201) >33 3400

Phone 9 3 5 -8 8 3 8

OPEN

1 8 8 - 1 9 0 • M id la n d -4 n e n a « , M e a t n y ,

DAYS A WEEK

tees

FORA UNIQUE DINING EXPERIENCE

H A P P Y

AV0RITES

to a

e a t in g e x p e r ie n c e .

635 Lexington Ave Clifton. N I (201)478 1977

(O r , tr y o u r v e r y p o p u la r

768 Stuyvesant Ave Lyndhurst. N J (201)939-3777

'S C R U P L E S '

P O L Y N E S IA N P A R T Y P L A T T E R

R E S T A U R A N T AND LO U N G E (L u n c h an d D inn er)

Blackboard Specials Daily Happy Hour 4 to 6 P.M. Monday through Friday SUNDAY 0INNER SERVED 2:30 -9=30 P.M.

Monday thru Thursday Dinner From 5 to 10 P.M . F ri. t S a t. till 11 P.M . Lunch from 1 1 :3 0 to 2 :3 0 Sunday Dinner from 2 :3 0 to t : 3 0 P.M .

5 2 8 R iv e rs id e A v e . L y n d h u rst

933-3888 & V V J*. ■P O R T S C O M P L I X

C ra m m e d with unusually g o o d tasting C hinese/Polynesian hors d'oeuvres A fabulous assortm ent of delicious morsels p re p a re d by the Ja d e 's very ow n chef. Supplied to you with this chafin g p a n a n d stand so you c a n ea t it all up. HOT! The coolest d e al under the sun!

.?

ROUTE 3 & 17. LYNDHURST 935-9294

SUNDAYS ARE SPECIAL AT THE

®JadeMintain

Bountiful Brunch 10 AM -2 PM

$ 6 .9 5

Italian Food Festival 3-9 PM

$ 8 .9 5

50 ttwnt!

re jm e to rsn f Yun i Chit NORTH ARLI NGTON 60? Road 9 °l S3//

CLIFTON 3?1 River Road 4/ 30 1/ /

Chilton M *r 12 Htff Priet, *Pta ta> tfn ta ity NO HOUMY INN COUPONS VXUD WITHIMS OffE*

PARAMUS Rt 1/ r,„p
BANQUET AND MEETING FACILITIES AVAJLABUE - J

9

Authentic Hunan Szechuan Gourmet Cuisine

f x,jtl, |siHn(jef Polynesian Drinks Friendly Servne Tropical Atmnsph* Rnsmessmans Lumehon Taut- Out Orders American Expres * Dmer s Club* Visa

D e lig h t f u lly D if f e r e n t

F ille d with enough fo od for 10 to 12 hungry p e o p le

P A L A C E Te, 998 0808

RESTA U RAN T

H aw aiian Isla n d e r

nearly a decade our chefs acclaimed by our guests for their reativity ingenuity m searching for special flavors will lead you 'I1 anothei gastronomic dimension Our Szechuan recipes-ac ‘•ntuatefl by e*utmg flavors .md a characteristic Szechuan spicy astc art- added to Lee s P01 YNf SIAN DELIGHTS and our CANTONESE

T r e a t h im

0703:



2 Ridge Road, N. Arlington, N.J. 07032 (corner of Belleville Turnpike)

998-7081

T H U R S D A Y , JU N E 16, IM S—P a g e 18

Obituaries P e t e r F e r r ie r o

Peter P.

Ferriero, 84, af Harrison died in West Hudson Hospital. Keamy. A Mass was held last Wednesday i n St . Anthony's Church, East Newark, following the fu­ neral from the Condor Me­ morial Home, Harrison. Mr. Ferriero was em­ ployed by the security de­ partment of ITT in Nutley for IS years. He retired 20 years ago. He was a mem­ ber of the Harrison Pleas­ ure Club and the Harrison Senior Citizens

Surviving are five sons, J a m e s A. G e o r g e J. Michael J., Peter J. and Joseph V . ; three daughters, Mrs Frances DeRosa, Mrs. Dorothy Compolattaro and Mrs. Marie Mondaro; survivors being residents of North Arlington and Lyndhurst, a brother, Sal; 23 grand­ children and 10 great­ grandchildren.

P A R K M A N O R

S p e c ia liz in g in Fem ale P a tie n ts * . . .

H u r le y

Patrick Hurley, *2, died Saturday at Clara Maass Medical Center, Belleville. Mr Hurley was bom in Jersey City and lived there for 48 years, until moving to Lyndhurst 35 years ago. Mr. Hurley is survived by his wife. Martha; a son, James of Wald wick, two daughters, Iris of Lyn­ dhurst and Ruth Kohler of Wayne, and three grand­ children. Funeral services were from the Nazare Memorial Home and at Sacred Heart Church. R o n a ld M in g o lo Ronald Mingolo, 23. died Saturday at Hackensack Hospital. Mr. Mingolo was bom in Hoboken and lived in Wall­ ington for the last 20 years He was a parishioner of S t. M a r y Church, Hubert ord

NURSING HOME

Dedicated lo Better Patient Care

PROFESSIONAL NURSING STAFF REHABILITATION PROGRAM PHYSICAL THERAPY OXYGEN t FRACTURE EQUIPMENT SPECIAL DIETS

Funeral

P a tric k

Bom in Brazil, he lived in Harrison for many years.

AGED CONVALESCENT CHRONICALLY ILL POST OPERATIVE

He was a machinist for the past five yean with Mongolo-P random Co.. Hackenaack. Mr. Mingolo is survived

23 Park Place, Bloomfield

743-7772

Ibr v otats x parents, Louis n d

Member ot NJ. * AmericanWaningHow Prof— t o n lC f tnAHo»wwtrowmiwt

■ H

Mary two brothan, Louis Jr. aw aad Mark, both of Wall-

held in St. Joseph's Villa, Flourtown, P a. and at Our Lady of Queen of Peace Church, North Arlington for Sister Jam e s Eileen Bradley, S .S .JJ., 76, who died June 9 in St. Michael’s Medical Center, Newark.

S en ate and as­ sembly bills designed eliininate to Teterboro from the pool sharing formula of the Hackensack M eadow lands De­ velopment Commis­ sion district seemed assured of passage to­ day.

Parow Fu n er al Home, North Arlington.

Sister Bradley was bom in P hiladelphia and en­ tered the Sisters of St. Joseph order many years ago.

F o rm e r S h e riff Joseph F. Job, who is L e a r n

S

S i s t e r B r a d l e y a ls o served as a guidance coun­ selor and as vice-principal and worked with the Alum­ ni Association at Queen of Peace Sister Bradley was the daughter of the late Ellen and Ja m e s Bradley and aunt of Eileen Bradley Dever of Drexel Hill, Pa and Mary Bradley Conner of Lynchburg, Va. The fa m ily requests that

A

S w im

A t

T h e

Mary.

L

S E N IO R C IT IZ E N S A G E S 9 9 T M M tM M M

a rronM ow T iom I offer a unique service triMd of a compete eon. We do all tha tfan | at tftis difficult time 5 from Holy Cross

$3,000 permanent Hft intwranM NO PHYSICAL K M M M t M I M M N i

m o u n t mmmly to imbo

NO PREMIUM INCREASES For details mail postcare to:

mtNSCAS RESTAURANT

SENIOR INSINMNCC 8M VM 77 Ridge Rd., N. ArtinfltoN, N J.079SC Give Address - Birthday - Phone

IH M V C R M M O NORTH MUNGTON

Y M C A ideal for youngsters since the water depth ranges from 2x2 feet to seven feet For more information on the YMCA s programs call 93S-S540 Monday through Friday, 10 A M to 5 P.M

E

b y VARI 1). 12 dia. triple Rope — $199.00

7). Gendia Genuine black onyx-weaved s ty le — $250.00

3

3). 20 dia W-14K gold shadow — $450.00

R a d i o C it y T r i p

4). Mens, 20 dia. double initial — $350.00

8). Gen dia & genuine black onyx— $125.00

• s

< :V '

7

) « ‘ 9

S

5). Mens dia. heavy 14K gold— $395.00

10

6). Mens double Initial — $300.00

11). 5-7 diamond double style — $69.95

V a r i J e w e le r s

12). 12 diamond - double band, 14K gold — $199 00

12 Ridge Road No. Arlington, N.J.

13). 12 diamond, 14K gold — $190.00

GET ACQUAINTED — IT S TIME

998-0707

CUP i SAVE FOR

A

9). Gen. black onyx 10K in­ itia l— $125.00 10). Ladies 10 diamond weaves s ty le 14K — $99.00

13

Many Styles Available - N ot Shown

P.M. Sandy Duncan stars.

Mm

g e t t i n g

‘ HIGHEST Q UALITY -SU PE R IO R CRAFTSM ENSH IP

Funeral arrangem ents w *re d i r e c t e d by the

Register now for the Rutherford Recreation De­ partment Trip to Radio City Music Hall s Summer te c ta c u la r on Monday, A i e 27 Tickets are 116 each and the bus leaves Memorial P ark at ( 30

B y

14K GOLD INITIAL RINGS

be m ade to St. Joseph's V illa , F l o u r t o w n , Pa. .

I of 1



Teterboro out of the district," said Job, “towns like Lyndhurst w ill get a bigger share of the pool total. It was unfair to put Teterboro in, in the first place.”

mer Classes are held on weekday mornings, week­ day evenings or Saturday mornings Instruction takes place in two above ground pools located on V e te ra n s B o u le v a r d in Rutherford. The pools are

OO

NOW!!!

Sen. Joseph Hirkala. Job said he “wholly and completely sup­ ports the bill.

Fo r D a d , G r a d , a n d M is s y

2). 12 dia. triple Rope W-14K gold shadow — $299.00

any m em o rial donations

T o

The Meadowianas A re a YM CA is offering swim­ ming lessons for individ­ ua ls aged 6 months through adults this Sum­ mer. There are several dif­ ferent sessions to choose from throughout the Sum-

She taught Latin and Mathem atics at Queen of Peace High School for 36 years, joining the faculty there in 1947 She had taught at St Hughes, St. B r id g e t ’s, Im m a c u la te Conception and Ascension High schools, all in Phila­ delphia, before coming to Queen of Peace

Bill

running on the Re­ publican ticket for state senate, today sent a telegram to each R e p u b lic a n member of the senate urging adoption of the bill. It failed narrowly when presented last week. Despite the fact the Senate bill was in­ troduced by his Dem ocrstic opponent,

m m

m l grandmother. Lucreria

policy

Jo b Supports H i r k a l a

Sister J. Eileen Bradley

CO M PLETE

AND

D EPEN D A BLE

JEW ELER

ifs time for comfort, H is time to said flowers.

FUNERAL HOME

19 L in c o ln A v e n u e , R u th e r fo r d 939-1050

For Sympathy flowers and plants, CALL

W alter R. Calhoun Owner-M anager

W ayne Purdv A ssistan t Manager

< s =

Bill’s Florist 80 Union Blvd. Wallington, N.J. 778-8878

Fu n era l Pre-Planning Specialists in Burial and Crem ation

BURK-KONARSKI FUNERAL HOME SERVING ALL FAITHS with Mfa
4 0 3 Ridge Road, Lyn dh urst, New Jersey 07071 ESTABLISH ED 1929

I. Paul Konarski, Mgr.

52 RIOGE R0A0, LYNOHURST, N.i. 939-0490 ■ large Chapels

A d ecade ago First National Bank of Kearny opened its Lyndhurst office It se. v e s its Lyndhurst cu stom ers and those in im mediately surrounding a re a s Our location in Lyndhurst is also open Saturd ay mornings for extra convenient banking W e offer two exciting Sw e ep stakes a s well a s A nn iversary so uvenirs for all our custom ers

M E M O R I A L H O M E , IN C .

438-7272 JO S E P H M. NAZARE. Mgr.

Parking on Premises ,

In a p p r e c ia t io n w e o ffe r T w o

PARO W

h

o f y o u r p a tro n a g e ,

G ra n d

h

F u n e r a l H o m e , Inc Serving Every Religion FU N ER A L HOME



185 Ridge Road

North Arlington - » ■

998-7555

.

it

1 5 . la w FisMm M e at Clare Maass Hospital

f tNeville Room. 10to4. Benefit of Hospital Bid* Fund

fwWi i SJttw at Fiesta-Kosary -Society of Mt Carmel Church ' “" " r, June 30, tickets at $15 by calling 933-7700 Tfc£ apect It contributed at a free service lo be used for i o f Church, Lodge, Club or Senior Citizens Te uae tbit space, just drep your brief by the newspaper office, 2S1 Wdge Road ll “ IppeMe-Stdtate Ad.” We w llf run as adi asepacepanaltt. Flret come, flrtt served.

K

We re ottering

(Jta e

E xe rcy cle s ^ youl ^ features included E xe ra se

CkiMsi Auction, Friday, lune 10 a Chinese Auction (nickd social for the benefit of the community at the Immaculat* Conception High School Cafeteria by Felician Sisters Jude 12. 3 P.M. - Festival of Mnlc by Carl Baccaro and Rutherford co-artists at First Baptist Church, Ridgefield Pk Flee will offering. 15 mins from Rutherford. 641-9447 for erections.

Of These Schwinn XH-7 Professional Exercycles

OWNER MANAGER

OWNER-MANAGER

* 2 5 R ID G E RO A D . LY N O H U R S T 438-4664

You Can Win One

HENRY S. PAROW

Louht J. Stellalo, Jr.

S w e e p sta k e s!

h l

* P lu s 1 0 - $ 2 S I

DIFFILY SERVICE TRUSTWORTHY • DEPENDABLE N E IG H B O R L Y S P IR IT While our services retain that neighborly spirit of sympathetic understanding, they ■Iso reflect high standards of efficiency i and competent direction.

home

You Can Win One Of These Boy’s or Girl’s Deluxe 10-Speed Racers 'n ,e rn a " ? nal

^

sS,a 2e6 ^

r

10-Speed

MhB Cr0P q“ al"> Each

TH O M A S J . D IF F IL Y FUNERAL HOME, INC. JOHNT. DIFFILY, Manager

41 Ames Avenue, Rutherford Phone 939-0098

TH E B A N K YOU V E B A N K E D ON S IN C E 1907

F IR S T N A T IO N A L 4

B

AND TRUST COMPANY OF KEARNY M .^ .r 0.c

Main Office 582 Keamy Ave N j 99i 3100 Convenient Oltices in Kearny Arlington East Newa'* Hamson No'tf1Aninqlon I SATURDAY BANKING ALL OFFICES encept Mam Q"ce and Soul^ Keam

YOUR DEPOSITS UP TO *100,1

Page 16— T H U R SD A Y . J U N E U . M jB P e te r S p o to , Chairman aw l M ahlea E arle, Nertk A r t ta f t n Lloos d a b P rn M e at, m ake p r a e a ta lle a t* Le«U C am panaro J r . W Lou'a Serviceater aad CaaacUman E d v a r d Sam aloai: ol Sckayler Texaea, h r tbeir year* af lervice to Ike U aaa aad tkelr G am ball Maeklae Fandralslng Program. Otkers wko received award* a re Harry Moacatello, Star A ato; Roger Ertle, Good Neighbor Aato; Joaeph Hugke*. Old Celeaial Steak Hoaae; John Maaetta. Met’* Food M arket; M ichael P a u a fn m e . Thom M cAa shoe !; Joaepk Laapada, Jo e ’* Bakery; aad Thoma* AatoaelU, FlrM National Bank aad Tratt Co.

C la s s if ie d s N otice to prospective ro n to n ; A ny rent* advorti*od herein fo r qualified real rental proparty m ay ba ««bja ct to any febato or credit required by State law ( N .J .S . at *aq .).

HEIP WJNTfO

C a s e y - B r a d y

Program fo r t h e ir d a v

GIFT SM ITH -C O R O N A '

J u n e

Children ages 8-15 may a tte n d th e p la y g r o u n d closest to their home free of charge for 7 weeks be­ ginning Jun e 27 from 9 to 4 P.M. Sports, trips, and arts and crafts will be some of the activities provided .

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Casey of Lyndhurst have announced the e n ­ gagement of their daugh­ ter, Jean nie M arie to How­ ard Brady, son of M r and Mrs. How ard Brady of North Arlington. Miss Casey is a graduate of The Berkeley School, Garrett Mountain, and is presently employed as a s e c re ta ry wi t h N P S I n ­ dustries, Secaucus. Mr B rady is a veteran of the U.S.M .C. and is a

L IN C O LN T R IP L E X

S p e c ia l

8 3 8 KEARNY AVE.

Free Cartridge or Ribbon with the purchase of any Smith Corona Typewriter.

ARUNGTON • 997-6873 Just One Block From Belleville Turnpike

S M IT H -C O R O N A ® ► keyboard corrector covers, mistakes in an instant; makes your work clean dear and error-free

PARKING AVAILABLE AT BEL. PIKE ONE BLOCK FROM THEATER

$1 8 4

E N T E R P R IS E

NOW SHOWING

* K1 character keybaord with refK-at actions, power space, electric backspace, power light and preset tabulator

CHRISTOPHER REEVE & RICHARD PRYOR

“ S U P E R M A N

S m ith - C o r o n a

3 ”

Coronomatic 2500 • • • • •

Cartridge -ribbon system Ofttco-sln keyboard Exscuthf* quality letters Time-saving features Oolux* double-walled casi

A R - W A R JT

RETURNS

List Price *439 -fl)

SHARP

w

PO C KET C A LC U LA TO R S

from

$695

C R O S S • PA R K ER and S H E A F F E R PEN & P E N C IL S E T S , & G R E ETIN G CAROS

PRINTING AND O FFIC E SUPPLIES 313 Union Ave Rutherford 939-0509

THOMAS

3-

mim

C H A IN E D H i

ill!

M it U

!| 1 ?

ib n ■

Judy Fisher Bride O f Peter Ruchser Miss Ju d y Fisher and Peter R uchser were m ar­ ried on Saturday May 2,1st in O ur Lady of Sorrows Church in Linwood, N.J. Fr. Leonard Carrieri was celebrant of the Mass. A reception followed at the Ouail Hill Inn., in Smithville. N .J . v The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs Allen S. Fisher J r ., of Somers Point The bridegroom is the son of M r and Mrs. Peter Ruchser of Wood­ land Ave Rutherford, Divine P la tt was matron of honor and Miss Elaine Fisher was m a id of honor.. Bridesm aids were Kandi Hayden and Debra Cham­ berlain Best m an was George Loder and ushers included David Bi rm ­ ingham, G reg Ham er and John D aLusio, and the Ruchse r Ruchser

,

W e have a co m p le te lin e of

An October wedding is planned

BANKING

TELLERS Multi-Billion Dollar First N ational S ta te B ank of New Jersey is currently seeking experienced full a n d part tim e Tellers. Experience is preferred, b u t will consider c an did ates w ith 2 years cash h a n d lin g or acc oun tin g related experience.

PART TIME POSITIONS AT: MIDTOWN BRANCH (Ctnter St.-Nutley)

Monday, Thursday and Friday - 9 AM to release.

BELLEVILLE AVE. BRANCH (Bloomfiald. N J.) Monday and Thursday 3 PM to 7 PM, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday 2 PM to 6 PM, Saturday 9 AM to 12 Noon.

FULL TIME POSITION AT: VERONA BRANCH M onday through Friday 10 AM to 6 PM, S aturday 9 AM to 12 Noon. We offer a salary c om m en surate with experience for a I employees a n d a generous be nefits package w hich inclu des 1 00 % tuition re fun d for full tim e employees If you have the qu a lific atio n s we are seeking a n d you w ant a more prom ising future , we will be a c ­ c epting applicatio ns for the above positions at;

BROOKDALE OFFICE 1080 BROAD STREET BLOOMFIELD, N .j.

g room s b r o t h e r s , Jo h n

W e c a rry m any

FIN E P R A C T IC A L G IF T S for DADS & G RA D S

graduate of Rutgers Uni­ versity. He is presently employed as a Special Agent w ith the U.S. De­ partment of Justice

^OOC ’xiiriK

t,pped O' *bev hod “Kcer* *be courage to survive

and

Paul

Mrs Ruchser is a gradu­ ate of the University of Delaware and is e m ­ ployed in the personnel de­ partm ent of the Tropicana Hotel in A tlantic City. Mr. Ruchser received his B S. d e g r e e f r o m S to c k to n State College in Pomona, N.J. and is an account ex­ e c u t i v e w i t h C a e s a r 's Boardwalk Regency Hotel, in A tlantic City. After a wedding trip to Acapulco, Mexico the cou­ ple will reside in Ventnor

Monday, June 20th 5:30 PM to 7 PM Also for your convenience we w ill also accept applications at our Corporate Headquarters. 500 Broad Street Newark, N.J. 07102 Monday to Friday 9 AM to 12 Noon FIRST NATIONAL STATE BANK OF NEW JERSEY 5 00 BROAD ST . NEWARK. N.J.

"OUR F IR ST CONCERN IS NEW JE R S E Y "

%

National State

E q u a l Opportunity E m p lo y er M/F/H/V

HELP WANTED

Jantzen

First

NEED A JO B ? Jobs Available NOW! Select The Job Of Your Choice! □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □

AMBULANCE DRIVER TRAINEE-CllfWde Park ASSISTANT MANAGER IN TRAINING Nutley* ALUMINUM WELDER-Mahwah* ASSEMBLERS (ELECTRONIC) Elmwood Park AIR CONDITIONER MECHANIC-Sprlng Valley. NY" BOOKKEEPER- Garfield BOOKEEPER-CIHMd* Park BILLING CLERK-Rochillt Park BOOKKEEPER CLERK-Uttle Ferry CABINET MAKER-Carlitadt CASHIER-Saddle Brook CONSTRUCTION WORKER-Ptterton* COOKIE MACHINE OFERATOR-Lyndhunt* COMPUTER OPERATOR-Gartleld COSMETOLOGIST-Short Hills* CONSTRUCTION WORKER-Englewood Clllh COST ESTIMATOR/ORDER-Carlstadt DRIVER SALES ROUTE-Garfield EMBROIDERY MACHINE OPERATOR-Emertan

□ □ a □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ u □ □ □ □ □ □

GLASS SCRIPTER-Lodl GRAPHIC ARTIST-Cartitadt JUNIOR DISPATCHER-Rochelle Park LAUNDRY OPERATOR-Westwood* MACHINIST Little Ferry MANAGEMENT TRAINEE-CllltonMETAL POLISHER-Edgewater PACKERS-Englewood PLATER HELPER-CarWadt PAINT SPRAYER-MahwahPALLETIZER OPERATOR-Teaneek* PRINTER TRAINEE-Lodl PRIME WINDOW ASSEMBLER •Hackensack SECURITY GUARDS-Fort Lee/Hackensack/Cllfton’ SILKSCREEN PRINTER-Carlstadt SCHOOL 8US DRIVER-Englewood SHOE PARTS CUTTER-Clllton* WELDER-Fairview WIRER-Engltwood

* You w ill need yo ur own transportation to and from work for this job. NAME OF APPLICANT .

SOCIAL SECURITY .

B E P R E P A R E D T O G O ON IN T E R V IE W S ! T U E S D A Y , J U N E 21 F R O M 9 A.M T O 3 P.M. You must be a Bergen County resident with a good work history and be economically disadvantaged. Y o u ’ll he re.ti.lv to r a c tio n th is s u m m e r w ith Sea I spo rt sh o rts fro m J a n tz e n . A c tiv e p o p lin s h o rts lo o k g re a t ip th e p o o l or o u t, C o o r d in a t e d w ith m a tc h in g k n it shirts.

B a t h in g

S u its

1 4 .0 0

to

2 0 .0 0

S h irt

' uMeEkNi cS e Su HA OD P Vallaybrook &Stuyvesant Am. IUuM a aM lkR i ml tl

June 19th

1 9 .0 0

R obert Guadagnlnoj Y O U M U S T B R IN G THIS Robert P. Pallotta Executive Director AD WITH Y O U ’ 8 C Freeholder Director

BERGEN COUNTY CETA, INC. 487-3400 AN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT « TRAINING AGENCY M/P/H.

OPEN FRIDAY TIL 8;30

~*~T

*

T H U R S D A Y , JU N K 16, 1983-Page 17

G irl Scouts

HELP WANTED

m m m m m

G i r l s a n d a d u lt s in ­ terested in cam p in g , learn­ ing c r a ft s , se rv ic e pro­ je cts, ta k in g trip s , m aking new frie n d s and just plain having a good tim e C a ll 939-9718 on above dates, betw een 6-fl p m if you have a n y questions

HOM E C A R E N u rse s. A id e s , C o m p a n io n s , H o m e ­ m a k e r s , a v a il a b l e fo r hom e c a r e o f e l d e r l y a n d hom eb o u n d . C a ll - S te e le 's H e lp in g H a n d s , I n c . , R u th e r fo r d , 9333451. p a r t T im e , HOME C A R E. th e e l d e r l y a n d 438-9413 a f t e r 3

f u l l t im e A v a ila b le fo r s h u t in s . C a ll P .M .

h a h n e ’s

NEWARK

WAITRESS/ WAITER We a re s e e k i n g a W aitress/W aiter experienced in Dining Room service to serve our S r E x e c u t iv e s , 15 hour w o rk w eek , 10-45 AM -2:45 PM.

OWN Y O U R OW N Je a n Sportswear, Infant-Preteen, Ladies apparel, combination store and accessories. Offer­ ing nationally known brands: B ritta n ia , Jo rd a c h e , C hic, Lee, Levi, Vanderbilt, Izod, Calvin Klein, E sp rit, Zena, Gunn? Sax, Ocean Pacific, E v o n P ic o n e , 300 o th e r brands. $7,900 to $24,500. Be­ ginning inventory, airfare, tra in in g , f ix t u r e s , grand o p e n in g , e t c . C a ll M r. Kostecky (501) 327-8031.

EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertised in t h is n e w s p a p e r is su b je c t to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 w hich m akes it illegal to advertise any preference, l i m i t a t i o n or d iscrim inatio n based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin or an in te n tio n to make any s u c h p re fe re n c e l i m i t a t i o n or d iscrim inatio n."

P lea se a p p ly to our Personnel Dept M onday-Friday, 10 am -12 noon or 1-4 pm

Please apply to our Employment Office Monday thru Friday, 10 a m,-12 noon or 1-4 p.m.

h a h n e ’s NO M O N EY DOWN. Bank repossessed lot. Take over payments. P riv a te lake comm n itv . Pa. Pocono M tv Call Mr. Rue eves. 1-800-23M160.

Th is newspaper will nqj know ingly accept any aavertising for real estate w hich is in violation of the law. Our readers are in f o r m e d th a t a ll d w e llin g s advert/sed in t h i s n e w s p a p e r a re available on an equal op­ portunity basis

ASSUM E P A Y M E N T S money down. For sale owner. Wooded building B x o n o M ts., P a. Central ter. Eves. 215-868-6161.

No bv lot wa­

REAL ESTATE RENTAL N ORTH A R L IN G T O N 3 Rooms & Bath. Heat and hot water supplied. P rivate en­ trance. No pets. Mature per­ son preferred. C all 996-2887.

LEADER NEWSPAPERS 251 Ridge Road Lyndhurst. N.J

NORTH A R LIN G TO N 4V? Room m odern ap artm en t, first floor. Rental $445. Plus security. Available. 998-7210 preferably a fte r 4 P .M

M A R Y 'S TH EATERl P A R T IE S

LY N D H U R S T 4 Rooms. No pets. No children. Rent $375 plus, utilities. C all 935-2358.

June 18 SAT, MATINEE Show boat

RUTHERFORD

J u n e 26 C la r id g e A .C . $25 R E T U R N

o ffic e space a p p r o x im a t e ly 560 Sq. F t. of

July 3 ENGLEBERT R e s o r ts A C

m

o

d

e

r

n

,

c a rp e te d , a irco nd itio ne d sp a c e - c e n te r of to w n w i t h b est N e w Y o r k v ie w , a cc ess to a ll t r a n s p o r t a t io n ;

Ju ly 17 T O M JO N E S

RESORTS AC Aug. 7 LIBERACI M A T INE E SHOW R E S O R T S A .C .

p

a

r

k

i

n

g

fa c ilit ie s .

Sept. 22 B R IG H T O N B E A C H

C a ll A lic e a t -

M E M O IR S

Oct. 1-15

(201) 935-1144.

S A N T F R A N C IS C O H A W A II & LA S VEGAS Res. Deadline June 22

609 Broad St. Newark, NJ «***! opportunity fmptoyw ml

p a r t

t im e

C L E R K T Y P IS T FULL TIME R e c o rd k e e p in g , f ilin g , diversified du ties Pleasant of fice located in Rutherford.

933-6868

LO C A L R E F U N D E R would I ike to buy b arter trade for your national brand empty boxes and labels from gro­ cery non-food items. I pick up from Lyndhurst - North Arlington - Rutnerford. For more i nfo drop me a postcard to Betty's Exchange, 68 Park Ave., Lyndhurst, N .j. 0/0/1.

998-1268

AVON IT PAYS TO MAKE PEOPLE HAPPY! Sell th e pro ducts people want to b uy. S e ll Avon Fxrp lle n t earn ings, flexib le hours. No e x ­ p erien ce required C all now for mor d e tails.

9 9 7 -4 2 6 2

To teach nutrition and-or weight m an agem en t. No e xp erie n ce needed. Fu ll training, flexible hours. 751 2 2 0 3 . 5 to 7 PM

Banking Opportunities F irst Jersey National B an k , one of New Jersey s fastest growing b anks, is currently seeking:

e TELLERS

• CRT OPERATOR (2nd SHIFT) • DATA CONTROL CLERK • WAREHOUSE CLERK If in terested and q u a lified for any of the above posi tio ns. p lease apply in person at our Personnel O ffice. Mon day thru Thursday 9 A M to 1 P.M or send resum e or let ter of app licatio n to Person nel

flR S T JER S EY

9 AM-12 Noon

LYN D H U RST N O RTH A R U N G TO N W O M EN

A P A R T M E N T W A N T ED Two Nortn Arlington re si­ dents to be wed in August seek 3-4 rooms in a twofam ily house. C all 998-0528. O F F E R IN G $500 for wnoever can find us a 5 room apart ment ,n L y n d h u rst. Rent $500. Fa m ily w ith 3 teen age children. As soon as possible. 751-7469. Call after 4 P.M .

ANY COLOR

ZENITH S P E C IA L IS T

LYNDHURST RADIO

TEAfrfER IH LYNDHURST w illin g to t u t o r any elementary student 1st to 8th g ra d e s . A fte r school and during sum­ mer REASONABLE

933 0293

R E C E P T IO N IS T 3 :3 0 — 1 0 :3 0 P .M . IN HEALTH CLUB

Experience required With pleasant personally Good salary K IN G ’ S C O U R T

998-0603 EXPERIENCED P.B .X . 555 OPERATOR FULLTIME

KITCHEN HELP WANTED Must be willing to do all phases of kitchen work. Apply in Person

CHICK-a-DEE RESTAURANT 627 Ridge Road, North Arlington

R E C E P T IO N IS T T Y P IS T . $200. Fee Paid. Im m ediate opening. R U T H E R F O R D EAA PLO YM EN T, 15 Orient V\fey, Rutherford, N .J. 9399416.

CLERICALS NO TYPING FEE PAID i4-450 per hour Permanent full tim e office clerks for corp. H D Q TRS. Nice hrs. No mtes, or weekends. E xc e l, benefits. Need good math, adding rrachine ability, 6 mo.-1 yr. exp. Need c a r to get to CO. C A L L LA U RA

935-5700

and benefits Apply in person.

525 Riverside Ave., Lyndhurst

AUTOMOTIVE

MECHANICS INSTALLERS FOR EXHAUST SYSTEMS, BRAKES, SHOCKS, FRONT END WORK.

Because of our great increase it business, our nationally-known cham of automotive service shops has several openings Must have own tools Previous experience in brakes, exhaust systems I.ont end service required We offer a salary, incentive programs, and many company paid benefits Ap ply in person to manager at the following locations daily 8 30 to 530 371 Bloomfield Ave .Bloomfield 450 Rid|e Rd N. Arlington

SHELLING & SHELLING 8Station Squaie Rutheifoid World s Largest

MIDAS M U FFLER SHOPS AnEqual OpportunityEmployer

Emolovment Service

AUTOMOBILES

PRINTING • PRESSMAN WANTED Experienced Reliable For Sheet Fed Presses

call 777-4054 MUSIC TEACHER

N O W B U Y IN G !! F O R C A S H !!

FULLTIME

A N Y TYPE C A R A N Y YE AR C A R

Including Marching B and director and all ancillary music activities. A pplicant should apply in w riting to.

B R IN G TITLE!!

Su perinten den t

A L F R E D A . M A R B A IS E

IM M E D IA T E P A Y M E N T

Becton Regional High School Paterson Ave. and Cornelia Street East Rutherford, N.J. 07073 by July 1, 1983

B E L L P IK E M O T O R S COR

B ELLEV ILLE PIK E & R IV E R RD

Atrtni from AH Dir»«r| 998-4368

We are an equal opportunity em ployer

h a h n e ’s N EW ARK

SECURITY GUARD Full Time We s e e k m a t u r e - m in d e d , security co nscio us p ersons to work e ith e r 11 am 5 pm or evening sch ed u le s No rounds required, but c a n ­ didates m ust be good at re ­ m embering d etails and ab le to follow through in m aintaining tig h t s e c u r it y p ro c e d u re s Previous secu rity related e x ­ perience a plus Plea se ap p ly tc our Emptoy m ent O ffic e , M o nday thro Frid a y. 10 a .m 12 noon or 1 4 pm.

h a h n e ’s 609 Broad Street Newark, N.J.

DOOGE C O L T 1979. 4 Speed 59,000 rmles. 1 O vn er. Call 939-3309. Asking $2600.

GUIDANCE COUNSELOR F u lly c e rtifie d w ith e ith e r a m ath c e r tif ic a t e or e le m e n ta r y s c h o o l t e a c h e r e n d o r s e m e n t . E x ­ p erie n ce p re fe rre d . A p p lic a n t sh o u ld a p p ly in w r it­ ing to.

A LFRED A. M A R B A IS E

Superintendent

Becton Regional High School *

P aterso n Ave. and C o rnelia S tree t East R utherford, N .J. 0 7 0 7 3 by July 1, 19 83

T R A V E L T R A I L E R , 1976. Sunline, 15 footer. Call 9390382.

TWO K IT T E N S FO R A DO P TION. 1 All black fem ale, 1 multi colored m ale. 6 montns old. Neutered. L itter trained. Had shots. Very affectionate Call 997-2348.

We are an equal opportunity em ployer

C H E V R O L E T , IM P A L A , 1979. 4 Door P S , P B , AC. Tinted windows, rear window defogger, c ru is e c o n tro l. Needs s lig h t body w o rk 75,000 highwav m iles. Asking S3,200 or best offer. M ust Sell. Call after 6 P .M 667-0378 T H U N D E R B IR D , I979 Good condition. 40,000 ru le s. F u llv equipped. $4600. Call 935-3505 after 8 P M

HELP WANTED

TEENAGERS

equal opportunity employer m-

D R I V E R

ood driving record nowiedge of New area are essential nvolves some weekend work. All company Paid INNEL

GS LITHOGRAPHERS [unity Employer

B A R M A ID at Scruples Restaurant Full Time 933-3888 L y n d h u r s t , N .J.

INSTRUCTIONS

SSJjStB LE FOR IN T E R V IE W CA LL SUSAN

TUTORING C e r t i f i e d e le m e n t a r y school teacher availab le for tutoring services d ur­ ing Ju ly & August. Call 998-0577.

S A L L Y ’S ART STUDIO CHILDREN & ADULTS

A T T E N T IO N

IN S U R A N C E P a rt Tim e A ssista n t to C o m m e rcia l U n­ d e r w r ite r . E x p e rie n c e essen­ tia l. P le a s a n t w o rking condi tions. N o rth A rlin g to n o ffice. Ca^l F r a n M affe tto n e at 9 91

EARN EXTRA MONEY FOR SPRING & SUMMER

9 3 9 -9 0 6 8

A tto rn e ys or B rokers JEW ELR Y A P P R A IS A LS

HELP WANTED

GRAD U ATES Im mediate office positions availab le . Ap­ p ly now . R U T H E R F O R D E M P L O Y M E N T , 15 Orient W&y, Rutherford, N .J. 9399416.

MON—FRI.

One Exchange Place Jersey C ity. N J 07302

TUTOR T V R E P A IR

G IR L S / B O Y S - Morning Routes a v a ila b le in L y n ­ dhurst and North Arlington. If interested please call 9332116 or 778-7239.

PART TIME

INSTRUCTIONS

W IT H T H IS C O U P O N

HELP WANTED W A N T ED H O M E M A K E R F o r f e m a le s e n io r , Rutherford. Mon., W ed., F r i., 10 to 4 p.m. Licensed d rive r r e t ir e d . Reply with your Phone number to Box 57, c/o C o m m e rc ia l L e a d e r , 251 Ridge Road, Lvndhurst, N .J. 07071.

call 484-6650

PERSONALS

in d iv id u a ls or groups C a ll fo r information

Off

w a n ted

M E D IC A L S E C R E T A R Y to w * in doctor's office in Bergen Countv Area. Send re su m e to B o x 55, C o m ­ mercial Leader, 251 Ridge 'toad, Lvndhurst, N .J 07071

RETIREE WELCOME Lead '"J S;?0010 ir1s Cgmoanv seeks a reliable person witn commercial

V IP » PA SSEN G ER L U X U R Y COACHES TO A TLA N T IC C ITY

I I

COMPANION F O R E L D E R ­ L Y L A D Y IN L Y N D H U R S T . 6 D A YS A W E E K , 9 to 5 P .M Light housekeeping. 261-8216.

Leader Classifieds

G eneral o ffice work. Custom er service & typ in g., 8-4:30

Equal Opportunity Employer M'F

A LL TH E ABO V E IN C LU D E S O RCH ESTRA S EA T S DINNER, T R A N S P O R T A T IO N TA X E S AND TIP FOR D INN ER

$1 1 0 0

STFN dG R A PH ER TY P ­ I S T . P a r t T i m e (1 -5 ). E x ­ p e r ie n c e d . M o d e rn o ffic e . C a ll 998-4800.

Horses, wild life , figures/portraits, landscaping, still life, drawing, oil, pastel^, acrylic, water colors, pen and ink & charcoal

Summer Classes Now Forming

991-4561

4 8 7 -3 4 0 0 You m ust be a Bergen County resident and com e from a low incom e family

A V A IL A B L E FOR • E S TAT E S E TT L E ME NT S • LEGAL DOCU M EN TS • I N S U R A N C E E VAL UATI ON

GUITAR LESSONS

lU ie l}

8e(inners • Intirmediate Theory • Retdint Improvisation

ft e w e lw

3 Ridge Rd.. North Arlington, N.J.

9919639

Pluast* C a ll or S to p Hy to A r r a n y r A n A p p o in tm e n t

Daily 10 A M . 6 P M

S at

10 A M

939-1024

BELFIORE ACCORDION STUDIO

Private Lessons Accordion I Drums Music for Parties 580 KEARNY AVENUE KEARNY, N.J. 991-2233

6 P .M

T. V. Distributor

..........MRS. Lfcfc, G ifted

C O U N T Y

Palm and Card Reader of R utherford P a st. Presen t and future A dvice on b u sin e ss, love m arriage and health You owe it to you rself to con su lt the gifted lady today She h a s helped thousands in all w a lks of life S h e can and will help you

Mercury Tube Distributor 1 3 4 W a s h in g t o n A v e . , N u t le y . N . J . 0 7 1 1 0 (B E T W E E N C E N T R E S T 1 P A R K AVE )

284-0522

T .V . P A R T S D IS T R IB U T O R

GRAND OPENING

Receiving Tubes -Semiconductors 40 % - 50% off list price

first tim e in area C a ll tot appointment

935-4625

284-0523

,

R u th e rfo rd , N .J .

M e c M M f M M lN M M f lf YOU* 0MC4MS S p e cia l 120 00 reading for • 1 0 . 0 0 THI* AC______

Cable Accessories -Photo Facts -Antennas Cable TV Converters Antenna Wire Cartridges-Needles Cassettes

VMS 8. BETA TAPES $ 10 .0 0 off on purchase of $ 7 .5 0 or more

O F

B E R G E N

PRIVATE INDUSTRY C O IN C IL ANb' jli A,

Robert P Pallotta Freeholder Director Robert G uadagm no Executive Director Anthony Guerra Private Industry Council Director

^*MLNT \rHAiNlN(j At it N'.

fWfofis

P a g e 18— T H U R S D A Y . J U N E 16. 1983

FO R THE SOUTH BERGEN COUNTY MLS LISTIN GS AND SA LES 1 9 7 7 thru 198 2

*

1

HOMETOWN agen cy

*

NORTH ARLINGTON BRICK — 2 FAMILY

1

Containing 5 * 5 large rooms 12 years old Separate gas heating units Both floors central a ir conditioning. Privata Parking Home in excellent condition throughout

MANY MANY EXTRAS ASKING $ 1 5 1 ,9 0 0

o

KEARNY JUST LISTED 1 Family Cape, containing 4 bedrooms Aluminum Siding Top location

ASKING $77,900 . OPEN 7 DAYS . WEEKDAYS TO 8 P.M SATURDAY & SUNDAY TO 5 P.M.

O U R S E R V IC E M A K E S T H E O IF F E R E N C E

N. ARLINGTON “BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY”

UEMBIH O f 2 BO M DS O f *[A L TORS

HOME OF THE WEEK

EAST RUTHCRFMO 2 fa n t a i n only $S4«. Excellent loc. often ex­ tra deep lot. spacious rms. 4 or 5 bed m s t ja r ideal for fiantfyman Asking $75,900

FLORIST & MOMUMFNT BUSINESS - Well established going business for 32 years Owner retiring, prime location, un­ limited potential, commercial building private & residential with five (5) mod rooms

"WE HAVE OTHERS"

fam brick i Ruth Cape G I mtf?e i Ruther Comm 1 4 bdrms 2 baths i Garfield 2 fam 16

Call for full particulars $ 3 0 0 ,0 0 0

RUTHERFORD "CHARMING COLONIAL”

i Condo 3Vi rooms

$110,000 $68,000

i Condo 3'/2 rooms ►E R 2 Fam

This 4 bedroom air conditioned home has large living room, dimng room. IV 2 baths, family room, above ground pool. 2 car det garage & many more pluses

$99,000 $70 000 *64 900 $79,900

$69 900 $75,900

RUTHERFORD “2 FAMILY”

$700 $465 $450 $350

BUS. & INVESTM ENTS

This ideally located home has 4 V2 rooms on 1st floor with 5 on 2nd Excellent for residential or professional use

Asking $99,000

LYNDHURST LYNDHURST SUPER STARTER!!

“COZY COLONIAL”

Asking $71,000

132 RIDGE ROAD. NORTH ARUNSTON

998-2916

REALTOR*

America's Number One Is

RENTALS

■New Condo Furn i Mod 3 rms H-HW >3M? rms. W H HW »3 Rms all incl

AsKing *1 0 4 ,9 0 0

This 3-4 bedroom home is located on a very residential street close to everything Has good size living room, dining room eat in kit that needs just a little TLC and ceramic tile bath Excellent starter home

O’HARA AGENCY

1 FAMILY COLONIAL IN CONVENIENT LOCATION LIVING ROM, DINING AREA, MOD. EAT IN KIT., 3 BEDROOMS AND MOD. BATH. FULL BASEMENT. GAS HEAT. ROOF APPROX 2 YEARS OLD. TAXES UNDER $900. YOURS FOR $69,500.

LYNOHURST-Beauty salon, $20,000 RUTHERFORD Commercial bldg of approx 1100 sq ft in busy west End retail area Full basement, hot water heat, can be divided into two stores Good income Excellent value Asking $64,900. M
Q nlu9£ 21 T

h o m

a s

R

w

a y n e

K .

e a l t o r s

NOW IS THE TIM E TO BUY!

• R EN TA LS• UST WITH USSAI^C AND GET READY TO MOVE! MORTGAGES AVAILABLE TOQUALIFIED BUYERS Mvmters of RENTALS NEEDED SOUTMBERGEN M .L .S Ht; 4 3 8 - 3 3 2 0 TENANTS WAITING OPEN 7 DAYS EVES DAILY till 9PM MtUNGTON-KEARNY M.L.S. NO FEE TO LAMOUMO Vifttlata* lic*nM4 Real tiu ti MOMS COUNTY M LS. ATjjO>inOWN_AgENCYYOjj1_TljE CUEWT ANOCUSTOMER ARE ALWAYS NO. 1 61 5 R ID G E ROAD

CARLSTADT: 1st floor, 4 rms !375 + Heat & Cooking gas RUTHERFORD 1st floor, 4V2 rooms $500 all utilities in­ cluded

Abbott B

r e m

S m a ll F ry A tte n tio n

e r F O R

In c ., R e a lto rs

LYNDHURST F IR S T TIM E O FFER N EW ER 2 FA M ILY 2 Family Immaculate condition First floor. 9 large rooms, plus 2 tile baths Second floor 6 large modern rooms. Finished basement with kitchen, dining room, living room, full bath 2 Car garage 2 gas units Plus much, much more. Executive type home for large family A lot to offer ASKIN G $ 2 1 5 ,0 0 0

S A L E

SECAUCUS - OPEN FOR INSPECTION Sunday Only June 19, 1-4 P M Condominium, 1138 Farm Road, Secaucus. N J 5 almost new rooms (2 large bedrooms) 2 lovely bathrooms, garage, oodles of closets, low maintainance Apt G $87,500 00 Directions Rt 3 west North on Paterson Plank Road 7 blocks to Farm Rd turn right to 1138

CARLSTADT - Lovely large attached home Modern with ex­ tra nice kitchen, carpeting and garage Taxes only $600 00 $79.500 00

RUTHERFORD - Beautiful almost new 5 + 5 Two family Aluminum and Brick on Highland Cross. Large 2 car garage Extra nice green lawn and shrubberies $141,750 00

NUTLEY LOTS — R ES ID E N T IA L. 50 x 102 ASKING $36,500

03

L Y N D H U R S T , N .J 0 7 0 7 1

Execellent location

R egistration is now tak­ ing place for September openings in the Small Fry Club which the YWCA of Hackensack sponsors in cooperation with St Paul's Episcopal Church, WoodRidge.

OPEN SAT i SUN BY APPT.

ATTENTION LYNOHURST— JUST LISTED 2 Family on 28 x 215 lot All brick and Aluminum First floor large eat-in kitchen, dining room, bedroom, liv­ ing room, tile bath Second floor, large eat-in kitchen, 2 bedrooms, living room, tile bath Large basement with gas heat Move m condition $114,900 Calello Agency 481-3400

E SavinoAgency . •

/51 Ridge Road Lyndhurst, N.J.

. . .

_ ?Q 'J , / u 1

EAST RUTHERFORD - Modern 4-4 two family in businesscommercul zone with ample parking tor at least 10 vehicles Finished basement with private entrance $124 ,900 00

LYNDHURST

REAL E S T A TE AGENCY 4 7 6 RIVERSID E AVENUE

|" T |

R E A L T IE S R EALTO R

A Duo!

56 U n io n Ave., R u th e rfo rd , N .J 07070 (201)933-2213

A 2 family in North Arlington featuring 6 rooms on the 1st floor and 6 rooms on the 2 nd floor. Finished basement with kitchen & bath. Separate heating. 2 car garage. Large lot. Asking $107,000.

9 3 3 -0 3 0 6

VA 8, FHA MORTGAGES AVAILABLE TO QUALIFIED BUYERS.

Member of 2 Boards. South Bergen, MLS &

AGENCY

Bloom field, Nutley. Glen Ridge & B elleville,M L!

You Want it! W e've g o t it! RENTALS GALORE & MORE

Lyndhurst

280 Stu yv e sa n tA ve n u e

LYNDHURST

939-2030

L Y N D H U R S T C O L O N I A L

$ 8 9 ,0 0 0 C H A R M

E R

In excellent area, near schools, shopping and transportation. Formal living room & dining room. Custom drapes and blinds. Modern eat-in-kitchen. Plus 3 bedrooms. S c re e n e d p a tio . M any ex tras. LOW TAXES.

ALAN V. MOLNER, Real Estate

$160,000

BUSINESS I COMMERCIAL PROPERTY $110,000 CALL FOR DETAILS.

PU8LIC NOTICE

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Weekdays 9 A .M .- 8 PM Saturday & Sunday 9 A.M. - 5 P.M.

839-4646

N O TIC E T A K E N O TIC E, that on June 9, 1983 a change occurred in the s t o c k n o ld in g s of K I N G 'S L IC E N S E , IN C ., tra d in g as KIN G S L IC E N S E , IN C , hotter of Plenary Retail Consumption -0232-33056-002 for premises lo­ cated at 525 Riverside Avenue, Lvndhurst, N .J. resulting m the following persons, residing at tneir to!Iowing respective ad­ dresses, each acquiring in the aggregate more than 10% of said corporate licensee's stock: No new acquisitions - former stock­ holders' stock returned as treas­ ury stock. Current stockholders are Ooiores Turco, 54 Enclosure, Nutley, N J 07110- W o J e r r y T u r c o , J r . , 54 Enclosure, Nutley, N J 07110 -

20°o

C arla Turco, 54 Enclosure, Nutley, N J 07110 • 20% Mmi Turco, 54 Enclosure, Nutlev, N J 07110 - 20% Jeryl Turco, 54 Enclosure, Nutley, N J 07110 - 20% T O T A L - 100% tl Am information concerning

LYNOHURST - Creampuff Two family, 4&4 brick and aluminum sided with 1 car attached garage 50 x 100 lot on quiet residential street Only 25 yrs old $95,000

2 FAMILY - Modern, 5 + 5 with large studio apt that would

2 FAMILY, 6 & 5 rooms, 2 baths, first floor Dish­ washer. Roofed Patio, 2 car garage. Separate utilities 5 years young. Residential location.

THE PERROTTA AGENCY 137 RIDGE RD

939-1022

FOR SALE LYNDHURST

ENTS APARTMEI ENt FORIREK NOME JVMAl:ISMS

Frank A. Volpe REALTOR

9 3 3 -8 4 1 4

Don’t Settle For Less! Come & take a look at this brick & shingle col­ onial in North Arlington. This home features large living room, dining room, modern kitchen, IV 2 baths & 3 large bedrooms. Finished base­ ment, driveway and garage. Asking $97,500. This 21 year old ranch in Secaucus could be your dream come true Featuring living room with pic­ ture window, dining room, large kitchen. 3 bedrooms and tile bath. Finished basement with kitchen & bath. Asking $120,000 Eves call Mary Lou 939-3088

MOOERN 2 F A M ILY , Aluminum 3V? & 3 ASKING $79,900

VINCENT AUTERI

Live In Style! In this 20 year young brick ranch in Lyndhurst, excellent tor professional use. Featuring living room, modern kitchen, 3 bedrooms, l'/ i baths and family room with fireplace Completely finished basement Asking $118.000

Picture Perfect!

MODERN 2 FA M ILY , Aluminum 4 & 3 + 2 Plus finished basement ASKING $89,500

WE HAVE OTHER TWO FAMILIES AVAILABLE.

F E E L CA G ED IN T H E C IT Y ?

be perfect for mother-daughter uses, lot size 62x232x86. Call for details

What Are You Waiting For! Open 7 Days a week for your convenience 114 Ridge Road, North Arlington

9 9 8 -0 7 5 3 Each Office Independently Owned 4 Operated

LYNDHURST - 3 bedroom cape with modern kitchen 2 full baths, dining room and living room. A 2 car garage adds to the value Won t last long at $74,500

LYNDHURST — This 2 family handyma.i special must be sold to settle estate. 1st. floor has 4 rooms and bath with 5 rooms and bath on 2nd floor. A deep lot adds to this house's value. Only $70,000 or best offer.

LYNOHURST - 11 units multi family on Ridge Road. Gross receipts $33,060 per year. Total expenses per year $13,190. $125,000. Mtg. at 9% avail. Asking $245,000

• RENTALS • Lyndhurst - one & half furnished rooms with all utilities in­ cluded for $200 woman perf.

Rutherford • 3 bedroom colonial with fireplace on lovely

LYNDHURST — S uyvesant Ave. Invest­ ment property. 3 Stores and 3 Apartment. $198,500. RUTHERFORD — Second floor. 3 room suite office space. $2 50 a month includ­ ing all utilities. LY N O H U R ST S tu yv e sa n t A v e . s a le .

L u n c h jn e t t e / D e li. B u s in e s s a i^ b u ild ln o fo r *

street. 750 + utilities. Avail. July 1.

Clifton - 6 very large rooms & two baths

PUBLIC NOTICE the qualifications of any of the above c u rre n t stockh olders should be communicated In w rit­ ing to: H erbert P e r ry , M u n icip al Clerk
FOR PERSONAL ATTENTION AND FAST RESULTS-UST WITH US! WE HAVE QUALIFIED BUYERS 251 RIDGE ROAD LYNDHURST, N.J.

438-3120-1

G A R F IE L D

N e w o f f i c e s p a c e fo r re n t .

LA TO RRA CA REA LTY

30 PARK AVE. RUTHERFMO

(201)935-78481

T H U R S D A Y , J U N E 16. 1983—Page I t

Leader Classifieds ■

B

O

B

!

PO R S A L E 1972 VAN

B

1 BU SIN ESS S E R V IC E S

NURSERY SCHOOLS

11

• • * * • • •

SO CIAL STUO IIS MUSIC A RTS A CRAFTS READIN G SCKN Ct ART • MAIM LANGUAGE

FREE TELETYPE SERVICE

ti«i* Aearooiltd ’ teeners Slot* LtcontM D*V Car* C«nt*r

W A N T E D T O B U Y . We buy antiq u e s. S m a ll lots or single p ie ce s. W hole contents of h o u se . W e c o n d u c t house sa le s . T h e Iv o ry B ird An­ tiq u e s, 555 B loo m fie ld A ve ., M o n tc la ir, N .J . 744-S23S.

2 B A S IC P R O G RA M S

ACES 2 >

H O T LU N CH Ptu« 1knacki

S U PERVISED A CTIV ITIES

O PEN A LL Y EA R

M e a d o w la n d s

DAILV FROM 7 30AM to 5 30PM

AUTO WRECKERS

157 Lafayette PI., Lyndhurst

438-6360

BUYERS OF JUNK CARS 4 SELLERS OF USED AUTO PARTS

139 Bergen St., Kearny

, 991-5684

RICHIE GALLO, Pres. Belleville Tpk NORTH ARLINGTON

WE HAVE EX PA N D ED OUR F A C IL IT IE S TO A CCO M M O DATE THE W O RKIN C PA REN T

B U Y IN G A lu m in u m Cans, n e w s p a p e r s , non fe rr o u s m e ta ls . A llie d W aste Prod u cts, 61 M id la n d A v e ., W all­ ington, N .J . 473-7638. 75C p er 100 pounds.

W AN TED Bib Auto Parts will pay to $60

Kirk't A u t o m a t ic

Transmission t it . 1952 Cu»tom«rj ore our ial«yn«fl" O n * of fhe m o il reputable ond finest tra n s,m in o r. sp*ciolijl shops m fhe oreo

For Any Full S u e Car Complete Used parts for all makes of cars 54 Stover Ave., Kearny



m

u Q

o s ii

take pride in our work Spring cleanup All types of lawn and shrub maintenance Free estimates Call anytime 939-3688 We

A ll WORK D O M E S TIC A N D FO R EIG N

99 8 -9 6 6 6 20 RIVER ROAD o f Belleville Pike NO ARUNGTON. N.J.

MODERN AUTO PARTS DISCOUNT PRICES! •

brakes



m u fflers

•CLUTCHES •SHOCKS • MACHINE SHOP DRUMS TURNED H f ACS REBUILT • HIGH PERFORMANCE PARTS & LABOR • TOOLS RENTED • PAINTS DUPONT & METAL FLAKE • MINI BIKES

W an ted in any co n d itio n or amount.

TOP CASH $$$ 467-0065

CALL LEE 933-5105

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALEK IT C H E N S E T - Table and five chairs. Apartment size gas range 26" wide, chord organ. Call 937-1685. G A R A G E S A L E Grandpa's furmture. Sundav, June 19, 1983, 11-3 P .m . - 98 Francisco Avenue, Rutherford. HONDA M O T O R C Y C L E , 1975. Model C B 360 T . Low mileage. It's a beaut. *525. 190 G A L L O N H E A T IN G O IL '/? D ric e , due to conversion to g as h e a tin g . Phone 998-9054.

DRESSER SALE!

MECHANIC ON 0UTY 6 RUTGERS ST.. BELLEVILLE OPCN SU N DAY 9 AM-2 PM

Miscellaneous for Sale

Asphalt Paving • Driveways • Parking Loti • Concrete Side»allu • Attaining Walls • Brick Walls •Ul. INSURED FREE ESTIMATES

991 -3247 Frank J. Scarola, Inc.

DRIVEWAYS GAROFALO GENERAL CONTRACTORS Asphalt Paviai New - Resurface All types of concrete work done Free Estim ates.

438-6858

ALUMINUM. BRASS. COPPER, LEAD, BATTERIES AND IRON

KEARNY SCRAP METAL

VACUUM C L E A N E R R E ­ P A IR S AND S E R V IC E on all m a k e s : H o over, E u r e k a , Kirby, Regina, etc. Free e sti­ mates. Free pick-up and de­ livery. All work guaranteed. Service calls made days and e ve n in g s. Phone 991-1413 anytime, West Essex Vacuuttv K earny, E st. 1951.

478 Schuyler Ave., Kearny

WE BUY WASTE PAPER recycling newpaper, IBM cards, c o r r u p t e d b o ie s . Newspaper drive arra n ie d . Newspapers $1.00 per hundred pounds - Gall 345-2293 Mon. thru Fri. 7 to 5 Sat. 7 to 4.

H O U S E S A L E . M O V IN G . ChancL, living room pieces, lamps, sofa, drapes, bedroom s e t for sale. Can be seen 11 to 4 P.M . Sat., June 18,1983 - 505 Davis Ave., Kearny. Second floor. G A R A G E S A L E . 350 King­ sland A ve., Lyndhurst. Satur­ day and Sunday, June 18 and J9th, 9 A.M.-4 P .M Brass Bed, S le ig h Bed, C h u rch f w , T iffany Lamp, Lots of B ric-A :B rac,

142 Midland Awe. Kearny . 998-6892

Handyman Prices PAINTING FLOOR SANDING LINO WORK, ETC. call 438-3120

A a n e n s e n 'a

• m i KSTtM ATH • •?20 *oh terncs irwtollalron

Overhead Garage Doors

B o b M c A llis t e r

C O M PLET E

• K IT C H E N S , B A T H S

MODERNIZED • BASEMENTS & ATTICS • ALUMINUM SIDING AND ROOFING • STORM W IN DOW S AND DOORS • REPLACEMENT W IN DO W S 438-3663

HOME IMPROVEMENTS GENERAL CONTRACTOR Vinyl-Alum Sidinf Loaders-Button Uditions-Dormers Decks-Porches

L E T YO UR LOVE SOAR W ITH A B A LLO O N LA U N C H ON Y O U R WEDDING

Fully Insured

546-1189

» ; PC C k r * ~ « '• • •

• C»l«K»«e! S**V r’"'« «* *Aopl* J149 • I h o ,n

W o o l o* »*•»«*1

OLD TOY TRAINS

Meyer Electric • Rewiring • Services • Smoke Alarms • Etc. BEST PRICES

T h u rt

I STORAGE

Jl I H A U L THUCKING • MOVING . DELIVERIES CLEAN-UPS C IU A M • A m e s • 8AXMCS

825-0947

OAYS

NlfiHTS

661-5172

S T O

M

C

B

A

K IT C IN

H

E N

E T S

B y JO H N B A B IR A D E S T . 30 Y E A R S

frt

lO 8

FLEA

A N T IQ U E S — A R T S — C R A F T S

N E W C A B IN E T S - A L L S T Y L E S V A N IT IES • C O U N T ER T O P S * B U ILT INS O L D C A B IN E T S R E C O V E R E D WITH FORMICA

NEW DOOMS ft DRAWERS

F R E E E S T IM A T E S -

Over 100 Dealers

MIS CUIIW HURRY, MA MMMIT I M tdMytor A n .. Kearny N.I. (M it to ACPI Calif lay H 1 - 4 M • M7-234t

0 3 3 -1 6 3 7 DAYS

Free Estim ates

F o r

EXTERIOR

997-4097

7 7 3 -5 7 9 1 EVENINGS

705 R ID G E RD.. LYN D H U R ST (Rear Building 2nd Floor)

“ M A G U IR E S " S O L A R S ID IN G Reliable & quality workmanship Aluminum siding, roofing windows & doors Spring Sale 10% off alum siding Replacement win dows Buy 4 Get t FREE D ONT MOVE ' I MPROVE Call Now' Frank Maguire Fully Ins Free Est

933-3695

JULIUS MALIK Tel. 546-2376

E S T IM A T E S

S a le P A IN T IN G

ahray*oitaMty

BLOCK CEILIN G S

<*u4ity (McMoy p»mtj

Installed Over Y o ir Old Ceiling

N.H. B R O O K S R O O FIN G C O N T R A C T S C o m m ercia l and R e sid e n tia l Roofing G u tters and le a d e rs 26 M e a d o w Rd R u th e rfo rd W e b ster 9-71 86

In terio r • E xte rio r F R E E E S T IM A T E S CALL CHARLIE

BUILT-RITE, INC. & ROOFING SH IN G LES -HOT TAR C H IM N EYS-REPAIRS FUUV INSURED FREE ESTIMATES

6 6 7 -2 3 2 2

W A L L P A P E R IN G A .

R I E G E R

935-5189

VICTOR TIRONDOLA

991-6518 991-3515

SPACE FO R S A L E

PAINTING CONTRACTOR

Interior & Exterior

• PAINTING • • GENERAL REPAIRS • Clapboards Roofs. Leaders & Gutters Also Some Carpentry Work

SORRENTO TILE IMPORT Sales & I nstal l ati on

667-1893

Complete Line of Tiles

P lu m b in g H e a t in g — Tinn in g of the B e tte r Kin d

S e rv in g A ll N o rth Je rs e y F R E E E S T IM A T E S RO O FIN GSIDIN G G u tt e 's Le a d e rs & R e p o irs A lu m S lo r r r W ndov»s D o o r

H a c k e n s a c k R o o fin g Co. 8 3 F irs t S t

RERGEN-ESSEX ROOFING CO.

KEARNY

FRtL ESTIMATES

997 -6 76 6 or 997-1745

KITCHEN C A B IN ET

R. FAGAN & SON

9 3 3 -3 2 7 2

REFINISHER

PUIMHK ( HE/Irare

E s tim a te s a b so lu te ly free Will m ake your old cab in e ts look like new. C all now and h ave p r o fe s s io n a l w ood fin ish er com e to your home and explain am azingly in ex­

f-u rn o c e s

R e p la c e d Hot W aer B a s e b o a rd In stalled Hot A ir F u rn a c e s R e f-la c e d Hot W a te r H e a te rs

EDWARD J.W1LK JR. PAINTING AND DECORATING 141 U H LA N D S T R E E T E A ST RU TH ERFO RD

pensive process

Call now between 10A.M. 4 6 P .M . MON — SAT

Specialist in Decorative Railings and Fire Escapes

998-2367

136 Partita

939-8282

40 I f

CLEANING

J O H N ’S C L E A N IN G S E R V IC E

Residential, Industrial Commercial

All Types of Floor Cleaning CARPETS - Shampooed & Steamed (double process)

Quality Workmanship

9 9 1 -6 6 7 1 EC O N O M Y

748-5390

ELECTRICAL

Industrial. Commercial Residential

L a r r y N i S i v a c c i a -------

H

u

m

a

n

COMPLETE

R e s id e n tia l

CONSTRUCTION SERVICES EXPERT C R A F T M A N S H M *! . . . r e a s o n a b le R a t e s !! J O S E P H M. BRO W N

746-8308

CRYSTAL CARPETS

440 V a lle y B ro o k A ve L y n d h u r s t . N .J 07071 933-2930

WALL TO WALL CARPET C U S T O M R UG SHAMPOOING SERVICE MAT RENTALS • LINOLEUM &TILES • AREA RUGS • STATUES PLAQUES PEDESTALS We S&vfce What We Sell

F R E E ESTIMATE

L ic e n s * No 3693

Plaat Maintenance • Smoke Alarm Systems • New Service Mr Conditioning

M I-7478

E D S. ELECTRICAL CONTRACTING. INC. RES..COM .INDUS,

Custom Control Systems. Designed and Installed. Bonded and Insured Lie 7070

FRABERTO UUNSTKUUIUN

CONCRETE WORK COMMERCIAL and RESIDENTIAL

935-7183

C a ll

LYNOHURST. N.l 07071

9 35 -5 92 6

MOVING & STORAGE

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS IN D U S T R IA L C O M M E R C IA L Residential Wiring lie No 3988

998-8656

Anthony J. DeAngelo ROOFING CONTRACTOR Roofing. Gutters, Leaders Alu m in u m T r i m fc Hot Asphalt Over 23 Years Experience

m

n s in s B H Fu rn itu re S e rv ic e REPAI RS

TO UCHUPS POLI SHI NG

PLUMBING I HEATING Bloomfield gas boilers % gas hot water heaters S pecial Rates on our Guaranteed Sewer and Dram Service HARRY JACOUM, PROP.

933-4169

Lyndhurst • 933-0466 Toms River • 929 2798

RUGS. ETC

DON MACNIVEN Plumbing & Heating Co.

R o o f in g . . . C u tte r s .0 3 2 f t a m le n ffaug* « H ESTIMATES FULLY INSURED 153 Sonferd Ave. Lyndhurit, N J .

MISCELLANEOUS

TRYLON RAILING & AWNING CO.

487 -50 50

ALL W O R K G U A R A N T E E D

Showroom located AT 3 1 3 KEARNY AVE.,

Coll 939-6308 H EN D ER SO N -B O Y D , Inc 5 V re e ta n d Awe., R u fh e r ford

HAFFELECTRIC INC.

1 D'ttX*

460-8637

Kingsland Aluminum

FR EE

99 1 -0 3 2 7

T«/ Kxtrkf*.

BERGEN-ESSEX ROOFING CO.

P A IN T IN G

OURPRICES WON'T SHOCK YOU

Of

D A N 'S

Get The B est For Your Money

• FULLY INSURED

9 9 8-6337

Lyndhurst, N .J.

9 3 3 -4 1 6 9

P A IN T IN G & P A P E R H A N G IN G F R E E E S T IM A T E S

Our Best Advertising is a Satisified Customer

Call 438-5290

• FREE ESTIM ATES OEVER 60 YEARS 3 GENERATIONS SERVING THE K EARNY AREA

O il

1 53 Sanford Ave.

939-4475 • 939-5557

Aluminum Products For The Home

( J lju r B t o n f a in t in g

&

FREE Estimates Fully Insured

Quality Work Reasonable R ates

in te r io r a n d E x t e r io r

INTERIOR

S I D IN G S A LL TY P ES

INT. EXT

Sunshine Painters COLLEGE STUDENT OPERATED

Interior Exterior Professional Painting Reasonable Prices Sherwin Williams Paint For Lasting Beauty

S p a c e

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

Saturdoy 10-5 4 4 PA SSA IC AVE KEARNY

OUTDOOR M A R K ET

y

1. B U S IN E S S S E R V IC E S

Bens Painting

No job too "s m a ll" or too B IG

J. O'OONNELL & CO. LYNDHURST, N.J. Paintini I Decoratinf Wallpapering 9 3 9 -2 3 8 2

LYNDHURST

Complete Bathroom Modernizing

9 97 -3897

TEL-STAR ELECTRIC

•fftn isriMAits.

(201)656-1037

515 M on , Tue*

I

Lionel, Flyer, Ives, etc. local collector pays top prices

U

f a

FR EE E S T .

997-9266

F R EEESTIM A TES

'933 5984 MOVING

C

DINETTES

e

GENNA TILE

Bathrooms Kitchens Door Repairs

License No. 1485

Call 387-9098

WANTED

HOCenter Street, Nutley

ALL TYPES OF ELECTRICAL WORK

Buck Steps Waterproofing Cement Grouting Pressure Grouting Concrete Patio 4 Driveway • Sidewalks • Iron Railings • Fencing ol all types

WANTED

• S A L E S • IN STA LLA TIO N Me DANIEL ENTERPRISES

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• • • • •

Immediate Cash Paid

Electric Door Openers

A fte r 4 pm call 991 3369

Br lictn w d CI»ti
M a so n C o n t r a c t o r

ALL PIANOS

• REPLACED • INSTALLED • SERVICED

_______

CHARLES CANGELOSI

Ask For Leon

BALLOONERY 667-3707

Also A'C w.rtig

— 39 9 4931

K it c h e n s 142 MIDLAND AVE.

ELECTRICAL SMOKE ALARMS INSTALLED *

. Concrete I Brick Wort . Porches . Brick Veneer Patios.Sidewalks. Walls Free Es'im aies call TOWNE anytime,

MsnuMceusmm

KEARNY, N.J.

e

1. BU SIN ESS S E R V IC E S

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FREE THERMOSTAT WITH FURNACE REPLACEMENT Modem BotHi N .J lie 5690

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f a

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Va l j ^ t s ONALL KINOS OF JOBS •ASPHALT . .CONCRETE. .MASONRY. New or Repair Fully Insured Free Estimates call 4 8 4 - 1 6 9 5

G as

JOSEPHOAMATO PAPERSTOCK 79 FLORIDAAVENUE PATERSON

Sat t Sun lune 18*13 10A.M. toSPM

667-4 9 7 6

V

EUROPE SENERAL s p c c

BRING IT IN

GARAGE SALE Our unfinished dressers are ireat to store your winter clothing in. Paint or stain them yourself for terrific savinfs! Selected paints I stains now at HALF-PRICE!

Q

1. BU SIN ESS S E R V IC E S

installed

DRIVEWAYS

INDOOR

*

C A U 991 -3617

F U L L L E N G T H FO X F U R COAT. Leather belt. Worn twice. $400. Originally $600. Negotiable. 933-4972,

759-5555

933-1779

TRAINS, TOYS, TROLLEYS, BASEBALL CAROS & SPORTS MEMORABILIA

Infant care starting at 6 wks old is available in the Meadowlands in­ dustrial Pk area For further info Call Lee at 933-5105 Daily from 7 .15 to 5:30 For Further Information

438-0185

s

In terio r. Exterior

OPEN ALL YEAR

DESICN I MAINTENANCE . PATIOS . WALKS .RAILROAD TIES. .PLANTINGS .SOD • S LAWN CARE

ONE DAY SERVICE

9 91-4 2 4 6 991-0081

MOTHERS OF NEWBORNS

O ak T re e L a n d s c a p in g

Co. FREE ESTIM A TES

HILL TOP DAY CARE CENTER

THE GREEN THUMB LANDSCAPING SERVICE

e

Reslic«m«irt Windows

BILLS AUTO WRECKERS HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR CARS OR TRUCKS ANY CONDITION Belleville Pike, No. Arlington 998-0966

h

1 B L S IN E S S S E R V IC E S

B U Y IN G Alum inum Cans, n e w sp a p e rs, non fe rro u s metals. Allied Waste Prod­ ucts, 61 Midland A ve., WallInoton, N .J. 473-7638. 65« oer 10? pounds.

----------- KIN D ERG ARTEN REA D IN ESS

201-991-0180

s

Home Improvements

LYN D H U RST & K EA R N Y DAY CA RE CEN TER

PKsenoer Chevrolet. 98,178 miles, minimum bid ac-

u

R. LANE MOVING SERVICES LOW, LOW RATES FULLY I N S U R E D

991-2302 MISCELLANEOUS

Bergen County Glass LOCKSMITHS Auto Safety 6latt instaHad Mass Foe Every Purposa 216 Rid|e Road, Lyndhurst

9 3 9 -9 1 4 3

HEDIGER’S FUEL OIL

FREE ESTIMATES 7 5 9 7066

BELLEVILLE NUTLEY GLASS CO

.•aRUlGE Ussl H8i . I vi>U C o m p le t e G /ass S o iv ic e

WE REPAIR » W a sh e rs • D ryers • R efrig e ra to rs • F re e ze rs • Air Conditioners E CRO SSLEYAN DSO N SERVICE 667 9278

Beat the High Cost of Energy Upgrade Your Heating Plant

CONSERVATION THROUGH MOOCRNIZATION Oil B umers-Boilers Ask about our 24 hour Diesel Club openings available

E. Rutnerford 839-2716

“ D ar T ru ck or C a r” FULL LINE OF AUTO REPAIRS FULL LINE OF TRUCK REPAIRS — 2 4 H o u r R o a d S e r v ic e — * Air Conditioning . Gas Engines > Brakes

• Diesel Engines • Electronic Ignition • Clutch

• Transmissions RENTALS AVAILABLE

AUTO SH O P

PETRO MART 1 ORIENT WAY

4 3 8 - 6 1 5 1

TRUCK SHOP 267 RIDGE ROAD LYNOHURST

I

Pm c f —T h u r s d a y , j u n e u , iw s

Baked Bean Supper F atal When murder foul but almost unseen struck down some of the most estimable resi­ dents of Northcutt’s Harbor and then made Mrs. Potter a target it was enough to make one’s hairline rise in indignation. True enough in “ The Cooking School Murders,” she had brushed aside danger to solve them, but now, “ In The Baked Bean Supper Murders,” it seemed that this marvelously resilient widow was about to be done in among the black flies and the lobstering of her tiny Maine village. Therefore it is with a sigh of relief to come to the final chapters and to know that Mrs. Potter comes through once again and more books and more murders will come from the

typewriter of Virginia Rich. Why not? Some suggested titles: “The Cheese Cake Murders,” “ The Pot Roast Mur­ ders,” “ The New York Steak Cut Murders," etc., etc. There are enough titles certainly. And just so long as the author continues the instruc­ tive habit of filling the inside of the book covers with mouth watering recipes that, allegedly, come from the characters in the book (those who escape the evil murderer) there will be no complaints. Here are some of the recipes from the book.

Giselle’s Acadian Plogues Ingredients: 1 cup white buckwheat flour

1 cup regular nour 4 teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon salt lV i cup cold water Vi cup boiling water

IC E C R E A M

dad

n t) B V S P W ftL 0 R D

_

V S P E C IA L IZ IN G

in fine ice cream cakes & pies for all occasions Hom em ade

hour.

Edna Birdsoo’s Blueberry Buckle Ingredients: % cup sugar */« cup shortening 1 egg, beaten V4 cup m ilk 2 cups sifted flour % tablespoon salt 2 teaspoons baking powder 2 cups blueberries

How to: Mix with cold water. Let stand for 10 minutes. Add boiling water. Drop to make thin 6-inch pancakes on hot griddle. At 400 F bake

V a g a b o n d in g

by Guy Savino

w

V A L L E Y D E L IG H T

Simmer until just tender. Drain, reserving u lt pork bean liquid. Put whole onion and halfI salt | ti, iand u lt in large bean pot. M ix syrup, muatard, with hot liquid to cover top of beans; top with remaining salt pork. Cover. Bake 6-8 hours at 275 F, adding hot bean liquid as it is needed. Uncover and top with heavy cream for final

on one side only until bubbled and firm. Serve on warm platter, cover with napkin. These make tender yellow cakes. Butter and fold. Eat as hot bread. Creamy Mussel Soup Ingredients: 3 doz. fresh mussels in shell 1 sliced onion 2 stalks celery 1 clove garlic mashed parsley (several sprigs) 3 tablespoons butter 3 tablespoons nour 2 cups milk 3 tablespoons cream How to. Scrub mussels well, rinse, discard any that are broken or open. Combine onion, celery, garlic and parsley with 1 cup of water in a large, stainless pot. Add mussels and steam until open. Remove, cover and Keep warm, discarding shells. Blend flour and but­ ter over medium heat, add milk and strained broth. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and add cream. Pour over mussels in hot soup plates. Amanda’s Baked Beans (Which Started It All) Ingredients: 2 pounds yellow eye beans '/2 pound lean salt pork, sliced 1 medium onion, peeled 2 tablespoons salt ‘/2 cup maple syrup 1 tablespoon dried mustard Vi cup cream How to. Cover beans with water, bring to a boil, set aside for an hour. Drain. Add fresh water.

How to: fe Cream sugar and shortening. Beat in egg and milk. Then sift dry ingredients. Stir in berries gently, turn into greased 9 inch x 13 inch pan and top with a crumbled mixture of Vi cup sugar, one-third Hour, 1 tablespoon cin­ namon and V4 cup butter. Bake 35 min. at 350 F. M argo’s Heretical Baked Beans

(Maybe these caused the murders!) How to: Remove pork from two large cans of baked beans, add 1 cup whiskey or rum. Turn into large casserole; edge top with half pineap­ ple slices, rounded sides up. Bake at 350 F to bubbling; top with 2 cups sour cream, reheat. Serve with rye bread, pickled herring and Pennsylvania Dutch cold meats. (Maybe it,, helps if not only the herring is pickled for this o ne !) Northcutt Fam ily Reunion Rocks Ingredients: 1 cup butter 1 cup shortening 2 cups brown sugar 4 eggs '/> teaspoon salt 3 tablespoons cinnamon 5 cups flour 1 tablespoon vanilla 1 tablespoon baking soda In 1 tablespoon hot water 1 cup chopped walnuts 1 cup raisins How to: Mix, drop by teaspoons on greased cookie sheets, bake 15 minutes at 400 F. Makes 10 dozen cookies These, as I said, are on the inside of the book cover (published, by the way, by Dutton at $12.95) and if you want a couple of more Happenstance Bay Fish Stew will be found in chapter seven and Lobster Pies by Frances, Jim and Laurie in Chapter 31.

T

FOR SERIOUS ATHLETES

ppade fresh daily on premises

H IG H SCHOOL AND C O LLE G E A G E STU D ENTS

featuring ft

S H A K E S • SU N D A ES

O i l ’l l

IN T R O D U C E S

FLO A TS • CO N ES • ETC.

4 0 f la v o r s 510 Valley Brook Ave., Lyndhurst

I V

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y o t h

u

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c r e

g l o a

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933-8496

r i n

s e l t h

r

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in

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JU N E 27 - A U G U S T 19 * T h is program is designed fo r serious athletes to in ­ crease th e ir streng th, tone and c o n d itio n in g (lu rin g the o ff season. T ra in fo r the sport of y o u r choice w ith supervised IN autilun in s tru c tio n , free w ei«h ts a n d a e r o b i c warm-ups. In d iv u a lly t a i l o r e d p r o ­ gram s are designed b y a p ro fe ssio n a lly tra in e d staff.

If you want natural looking curls curls that look like you were born with them . . . Roux

ULTRA PERM does just that. No frizz, no dryness just beautifully conditioned, longlasting curls that look terrific. Ask for Ultra Perm by Roux. Our stylists will do the rest.

2HOURSESSIONS• 4DAYS/WEEK * 8WEEKSFOR *9 5 IN C L U D E S : S h o w e rs , stea m , s a u n a , lo c k e r ro o m s , jo g g in g , tra c k a n d E q u ip m e n t in a n u ltra m o d e rn lu x u rio u s h e a lth c lu li.

U n iv e rs a l

LIM ITED ENROLLM ENT-REGISTERRY JUNE 15! S A L O N

For An Appointment Call: 438-9864 or 935-0996

SU M M E R SP O R T S T R A IN IN G PROGRAM

8 1

223 STUYVESANT AVE., LYNDHURST O pen Late Thursday & Friday

5 2 5 R iv e r s id e A v e ., L y n d h u r s t , I U . 460*008)1

1

The Leader N ew ipapm ■Bergen County Tn-Cenlemoal

T r i c e n t e n n i a l

O

7hursday. June 16. 1963 la

f B

e r g e n

C

o u n t y

Photo By John Sanders

By Gay Savino The wind soughing through the arching Umbs of a great cedar forest was the lasting music Capt. John Sandford would hear as he lay claim to 20,000-acre peninsula which had been granted to his uncle, one Kingsland of the Island of Barbados. It was July 4 in the year 1668 when Sandford completed the long voyage from the Barbados at the Newark Landing. Almost at once Sandford saw that the grant included a ridge, arrowing down the center of the acreage Uke a spine, presenting an upland height from which the land sloped W ily , west and east, toward two rivers. I t Sandford, who would have cattle to graze, hogs and horses to feed, gravitated toward the meadows which lay like an un­ dulating green blanket on the outskirts of the cedar forest. Here were all the elements that this vast new country offered. A forest to provide timber for housing and for roads, streams deep and swift running to slake the thirst aad to Irrigate the plantations, a rive r for transportation and fish so plentiful a man could catch a dinner of smelts with his hat. Game abounded. The Newark Council had agreed to pay 20 shillings for every wolf’i head shot down within the town boundaries. Ten shillings were offered for every bear’s bead and five shillings were promised for cubs. Given a gun, a supply of powder and an axe,any adventurous soul could provide for Mmaelf and his family all of their needs, toad, shelter and water. There were meadows and wetlands by the thousands oI acres all along New Jersey’s extensive shoreline. None ever held more promise than those along the Hackensack River and as Bergen County celebrates the three hundreth year of its settlement the promise ol those meadows at last are being realized. . There are many dates which are signifi­ cant to the history of the meadowlands. But none exceeds la Importance that day in 1121 when the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey was created. The irony of the fact that Al Smith, Robert Moses and other New Yorkers, fear­

would escape the strangling traffic of the city streets was needed. The bus terminal, recently doubled in size, was built and com­ muters find their way to jobs, shopping centers, the theater and other city offerings in comparative comfort. PATH was a deteriorated, jerky, unsafe railroad called the Hudson Tubes when it was acquired by the Port Authority at the insistence of New Jersey interests. At the same time New Jersey insisted that the trade center, a project fathered by the Rockefeller and lower Manhattan interests, t be built on the banks of the Hudson River instead of the East River, as New York desired and, at the same time, rehabilitated the Hudson Tubes. New York acceded. As a result the trade center, with its fountain of job opportunities, became closer to New Jersey and the meadowlands than most parts of New York. In 1952 PATH, boasting a clean, fast, safe and comfortable pde for only 30 cents, bore nearly S3 million passengers, the ma­ jority of them New Jerseyans, between Manhattan and New Jersey. In the same period the bus terminal serviced another S3 million, again most of them New Jerseyans. The London Port Authority was the pat­ tern upon which the American authority was developed. It has six members from New Jersey, an equal number from New York. Members are appointed by the governor, serve without pay and accept as their re­ numeration the prestige that goes with one of the most important jobs in the bi-state government arena. Secret of the authority’s success is the revenue bond. By adopting projects which supposedly can generate revenues to make them self supporting, the Port Authority has been able to obtain the financing for facil­ ities valued at $4 billion while amassing cash reserves of well over a half billion dollars. Having this giant almost in its backyard, so to speak, has been an invaluable asset for the meadowland communities. Jobs within the authority itself as well in the plethora of facilities it has built and operates have aided in keeping employment high in periods of economic stress.

ful that the island location of Manhattan could not withstand the threat of the New Jersey mainland and its railroad terminals, conceived the Port Authority plan. It was to see to it that a railroad tunnel would be built beneath the Hudson and, thus, take from New Jersey the advantages of its railroads. “ It cost so much to convey foodstuffs to Manhattan,” Smith told his Legislature “ it would bring tears to the eyes of a potato.” The proposed tunnel would have become a reality had the railroads agreed. Blindly, they opposed it. The Port Authority was given the Holland Tunnel as the motor vehi­ cle revolution got underway and rubber would replace the steel in transportation wheels. This revolution, which at first seemed to promise survival for the New York water­ front, became the series of pattern changes that have made the Port Authority the most important element in the growth of the meadowlands. The Lincoln Tunnel made Route 3 and the network of highways, including Seven­ teen, and Twenty, possible and the Turnpike and Parkway essential. The George Wash­ ington Bridge opened up the northern part of the county but also brought New England close to the meadowlands. Al Smith would have sobbed on Robert Moses’s shoulder could he see the flow of traffic, serviced by the Lincoln and Holland Tunnels and the great bridge, diminish the fortunes of the city they hoped the Port Authority could save. The piers rebuilt by the PA in Hoboken, the resurrection of Port Newark and the development of Newark Airport all added their opportunity to the meadowland area. Three other Port Authority projects, the ultimate impact of which was barely recog­ nized at their inception, have become major influences on the meadowlands. These are the great bus terminal at the New York exit of Lincoln Tunnel and PATH, the underground rail connection between New Jersey and Manhattan, and the World Trade Center, built upon the Manhattan ter­ minus of PATH. As buses replaced the trains for com­ muter transport the need for a facility that

The Port Authority success in raising revenues for projects outside the demands of budgets have led to the creation of author­ ities, some highly successful, others hardly so. However, in East Kutherford and Carlstadt the authority concept led to crea­ tion of sewer authorities which have given those communities meadowland sewer sys­ tems that made possible the influx of hun­ dreds of commercial structures into the meadowlands. The East Rutherford sewer system has made possible construction of the sports c o m p le x w here s e w e ra g e fro m the racetrack, football stadium and sports arena is accommodated without strain. There is in that system enough capability to provide the very essential sewer system for the Berry’s Creek Center, the billion-dollar project that still remains on the drawing boards. In 1968 the Legislature created the Hackensack .Meadowlands Development Commission, an agency that b>-passed the planning boards of Bergen and Hudson Counties and posed new and xexing prob­ lems for the area. The HMIH' was gieen the responsibiliH for finding means of handling the garbage which was flowing into the meadowlands from New York and the adjacent counties. So far no solution has been found. As a result garbage mountains ha> e been formed in the meadowlands with the hope that one day they will serve as the basis for a park larger than New York's Central Park. The park remains \ery much in the future. However, the flow of garbage con­ tinues and the mountains grow higher. Now the Port Authority is working with Essex County to build in Newark a resource recovery plant that will help dispose of the garbage from that area. This too is in the future and the meadowland mountains will rise still higher before it is in operation. The garbage mountains may yet become a revenue producer for the meadowland communities Experiments have shown it is possible te extract methane gas from the bowels of the garbage mountains. This may be converted into steam or electric power and sold.

The Continuing Celebration P R O ARTE C H O R A L E C O N C E R T — lune r « «> pm our Lady of Mount Carmel Church. I Passaic St Ridgew ood Final concert ot 1982-3J season. dedicated to the incentenmal W o rks bv V erdi and M o n ­ teverdi performed by chorus, orchestra and cham ber singers $ l 2 S8 Students, seniors $*♦ 50 Sb Into 445-405 2 D A N C I R E C I T A L — lune IB. 7 M) pm lohn Harms Englewood Pla/a for the Performing Arts. 10 N Van Brunt St Englewood Call 7M7-20'”

for tiefcetv

BERGEN

C O U N T Y TRICENTENNIAL STRAW BERRY FESTIV A L - l u r e 14. 1-8; (rain date lune 2b) M emorial Park N ew bridge Rd Oergenfiekl Booths, entertainment, m usic, contests Exhibits bv Bergen fte « dubs and organizations Sp on sored b y Borough o) Bergentield W A U O N G T O U R — June 2b. \-A pm O k J Bridge section, River Edge Local historian Into 262- 17“ 8

W A L K IN G T O U R — Sept Local historian Into 2b 2 -1778

F O U R T H O f JULY EVENTS BO ROUGH O f O H A D fLl — In io 2b5-0482 BOROUGH O f PARAMUS — M 10 a m Farview Ave tr() tury Rd to M idland Ave Paramus Three-division parade Tricen VILLAGE O f RIDGEFIELD PA R K — I I 10 am U nion PI M>uth on Mam to B rew ster Park Trieentenmal them e 14 divisions I 1 bands ( ar show at V eterans Park alter parade \ outh ac tiv itiex ELM W OO D PARK FAIR — noon to 10 pm Borough tield Boulev .if d & M arket Booths to o d games (lea m arket entertainm ent

>n |»*e Rd l eonia Animal and hor> ■Hi' departm ent and rest ue squad d'

Wo'™"' OCTOBER T R I-C tN T E N N IA l A R T S H O W — (> ,t Gallerv 12 I C.len A ce b52-t*b l5 J*

( >v erp eck County th ick en b arbecue

N m Kk1k,— ......... v i imi R idgew oo d ( ountv art.-sts juried show Inin

A M E R IC A N A D A Y — Oct w JJ-S A bram D em are e H om estead, O ld Hook & Se hraalenburgh Rds < loster Folk art lestiv al teaturmg woodcarving soapmakmg spinning blaeksmithmg Dem onstrations shop sells handm ade items Refreshm ents S< children tree Into WS ~ him

CHRYSANTHEM UM S H O W — o et

AUGUST 6TH A N N U A L R O D & C U S T O M C A R S H O W —

1-4 O ld Bridge sectio n , River Edge

Y o u ve C o m e a lo n g W ay la d ie s Y ou H ave a Long W a y To C o Sept 20. 8 15 pm W o m en 's Club ot Eng lew o o d l*#> Brinkerhoft Ct a tly d e c k e rS t Englew ood W o m en s progress m the last iOO years and the tuture Sponsored bv the American Assn ot Umversitv

tenmal them e

/G E N C O U N T Y 4H FAIR — Mv is

17

D IS C U S S IO N —

Aug

21

10-b Rear Param us Bowling la n e s & M alcolm k onn er C h evro let Rte 17 northbound Param us C rip p led and H andicapped Children benefit spon­ so red bv Param us Elks Hot-rods, custom design cars vans trucks antiques, exhibits and entertainment S i C hildren under 12 (w ith parent) S I 50 C hildren under 5 tree Into 445-2151 242-818$ 2 7*M 770

SEPTEMBER

C ou ntv W ildlile ( enter C rescent Ave will
is i h o u it. \ Bergen W ytkoM flo w e r arrangem ents

IULV

FOLK ART EXHIBIT — < River Edge Displays and dem tic ket pri< e

( ampbelt-Christie H o use, s ( all tB V 4 54M lor time and

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The Leader Newspapers Bergen County Trt-CerUenntai

2-a ■Thursday, June 16.1983

E a r ly L e a d e r s O f S o u th B e rg e n BY R O B E R T T h e g e n tle m e n w ho sig ne d th e c o m p a c t f o r m in g B e rg e n C o u n ty w ere, fo r th e m o st p a r t, w e ll edu cate d, m e n of w e a lth a n d p ositio n fr o m th e Is la n d of B a rb a d o e s , W e st In d ie s .

B y th e y ear 1645, the p o p u la tio n of B a rb a d o e s h a d g ro w n to m o r e th a n e ig h ty th o u s a n d se ttle rs, sp e arh e a d e d b y m e n s u c h as M a jo r W i lli a m S a n d fo rd an d C a p ta in J o h n B e rry w h o s a w new o p p o rtu n itie s in th e E a s t Je rs e y P ro v in c e . J o h n B e r r y had his tr a c t r u n n in g N o r th of S a n d fo r d ’s lin e (E a s t R u th e r fo r d ) k n o w n as N ew B a r b a d o e s , a n d , S a n d fo rd c a lle d h is p r o p ­ erties, r u n n in g fro m B e r r y ’s lin e S o u th w a r d to N e w a rk B a y , N ew B a rb a d o e s N eck . F o llo w in g S a n d fo rd a n d B erry c a m e Is a a c K in g s la n d in

M cFA D YEN 1673 a n d h is b ro th er, G u sta v u s K in g s la n d , in 1674. A ls o , in succession, c a m e C o lo ne l L e w is M o rris , C a p ta in R ic h a r d M o rris , C a p ta in J o h n P a lm e r a n d S a m u e l M oore. The M o rris e s , a lth o u g h o w nin g p r o p e rty in E a s t J e r s e y , d id not liv e in B erg en C o u n ty . T he B a r b a d ia n m en served on the G o v e rn o r ’s C o u ncil fr o m 1670 to 1700. B e rry served as D ep u ty G o v e rn o r w h ile P h illip C a rte re t w a s in E n g la n d . S a nd fo rd se rv e d a s Ju d g e a n d S h e r iff; Is a a c K in g s la n d se rv ed a s a S h e riff a n d onto G o v e rn o r’s C o u n c ils. P a lm e r

and M o o re b o th w en t to E n g la n d to s p e a k on behalf of th e y o u n g C olony an d they a ls o se rv e d on the C o u n c il. The m e n o f B a rb a d o e s w ere ex tra o rd in a ry im bued w ith a g re a t q u a lity . In th is T ri- C entennial Issue, w e w ill p re s­ ent, in d e p th , th e in d iv id u a ls a n d f a m ilie s w h o were here w h e n the County w a s b e in g fo r m e d . T hrough a lo o k a t th eir lives a n d a c c o m p lis h ­ m ents, w e h o p e the reader w ill g a in a g r e a te r perception a n d ap p reciatio n of th e a r e a in which they liv e .

P e te r S an d fo rd

M a r tin J . H yeerson

S a m u e l K ip

A rent H. S chuyler

A m b ro se C. K in g sla nd C d . Jo h n S ch u y le r

P eter S chuyler

C a p t. J o h n B erry

On The ‘Remarkable Peninsula’ In the year lt>09, Hen­ drick Hudson sailed up the river that would one day bear his name, aboard a small ship called The Half Moon He laid claim, for Holland, the lands we now know as New York and New Jersey The Dutch called New York. New Am sterdam and New Jersey. Nova Caesaria over w hich th e y m a in ta in e d control until 1664 At this time, without firing a shot, the English defeated Peter Stuyvesant. the irascible peg-legged Governor of New A m sterdam In 1664, King Charles II gave to his brother, the Duke of York (later Jam es II >, the territory of New Jersey to m ake of it what he could In 1666, after tir­ ing of the wilderness prov­ ince. he sold it to Ix)rds Berkely and Carteret and their associates. The new proprietors of New Jersey advertised their colony as a desirable place to settle It was probably those g lo w in g n a r a t iv e s that prompted M a jo r Nathaniel Kingsland of the Island of Barbadoes to purchase a large patent in the County of Bergen In 1668, King­ sland sent his nephew, Wil­ liam Sandford, to his new­ ly acquired territory to ne­ gotiate with the Indians, erect b u ild in g ^ a n d m ap the territory \'

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W illia m SAndford of Saint Mary's Pariah, Is­ land of Barbadoes, set sail

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in 1667 on the "Pennance Susanna," taking with him a girl by the nam e of Sarah W h a r t m a n . T hey were married aboard the ship by Kichard Vernon on March 27, 1667. on the River Surinam Sandford. for some unknown reason, kept his m arriage a secret and always referred to Sarah W hartm an as a friend It was not until after his will was approved in 1694 that the truth of his marriage to Sarah was re­ vealed The tract of land ex­ tended from Newark Bay in the South to present day Hast Kutherford in the N o r th , a n d fr o m the Passaic K iver in the West to the Hackensack River in The East. This comprised an area of more than 10.000 acres of meadowland and over 5.000 acres upland For this acreage Nathaniel Kingsland ..would pay the proprietors twenty pound sterling, annually forever This deed was approved July 4. 1668 On J u ly 20 of the same year, W illia m Sandford ne­ gotiated a land sale with the sons of the great Hackensack Chief Oratam H a n y a h a in , K e n a re n a w a e k , Cosque, Anaren, T am ack and Tantaqua The Indians called this land “Nighecticok TTie purchase amounted to 30 acres, 170 fathoms of b l a c k w a m p u m , 200 fathoms of white sampum.

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19 black coats, 16 guns. 60 double hands of powder, 10 p a ir s o f b r e e c h e s , 60 knives, 67 bars of lead, one anker of brandy, 3'^ vats of beer, 11 blankets, and 20 hoes W illiam Sandford had the deed m ade out in his ow n n a m e in s te a d of Nathaniel Kingsland. This matter later cam e to the attention of M ajor King­ sland and he .sent his brother-in-law, a Mr. Mandeville, to New Barbadoes Neck to confront Captain Sandford and set matters straight As a result of the arrangem ents made with Mr M a n d e v ille , M a jo r Kingsland would get all the land north of a line from Snake Hill to a blazed tree opposite the Second River (now B elleville), and W il­ liam Sandford retained the southern part in his own name W illia m S a n d fo rd re ­ sided in New ark until a suitable dw elling could be erected on his newly ac­ quired territory. In 1670, the first house was erected in this area It stood near the 1729 hom e of Colonel E d m o n d K i n g s la n d at S c h u y le r A v e n u e , L y n ­ dhurst In 1673, it was taken over by Isaac King­ sland and was known as the Kingsland Manor until 1729. The 1670 corner-stone from this sm aller home was incorporated into the 1729 structure. In 1669, William Sand-

y

ford was offered a place on the council of Governor Philip Carteret which he declined. However, after the firnal relinquishment of the province by the Dutch and the return of Governor C arteret, he ac­ cepted on November 6, 1674 and retained that posi­ tion for m any years. In 1675, Sandford was ap­ pointed C aptain of the M ili­ tary at New ark. He was later promoted to Major by G o v e rn o r T hom as Rudyard Sandford bu ilt another home south of the Belle­ ville Turnpike along pres­ ent day Schuyler Avenue, Kearny. It was there that he was buried in 1692 as he requested, without mourn­ ing pomp or expensive cer­ emonies. In his will which was approved in 1694, he requested his friends Colonell Andrew Ham ilton, Mr Jam es E m ott, Mr. Gabriel Minvielle, and M r W illiam Nicholls of New York, “to assist and favor the con­ cerns of a poor ignorant widow and five innocent children (another daugh­ ter having been bom ) with their best advice, help and counsel, to preserve them from those vultures and harpies w hich prey on the carcasses of widows and fatten with the blood of or­ phans.” M a jo r W i l l i a m a n d Sarah Sandford had six children. .

Nedemiah



married

(first) R ichard Berry, and after his death, leaving her w ith s e v e r a l c h ild r e n , married (second) Thomas Davies. Katharine — married Dr. Johannes Van Imburgh. Peregrine — not much is known about the first son of W illiam Sandford. Tlie only substantial record of his existence was an arti­ cle in the "N ew York Weekly J o u r n a l” of No­ vember 5, 1739, stating that he m ade cider and probably lived the life of a farmer along the slopes of New Barbadoes Neck. The item reads as follows: “We hear from Newark that the son of Peregrine Sandford, unhappily got his fingers in between the cogg d rollers of a Cyder Mill, which drew his arm up to the elbow, before he could be rescu’d to set of (off) his a rm above the elbow.” W illiam II next to his probably the tant member

— 1672-1732, father was most impor­ of the Sand­ ford family. He was made a member of Governor Lord Cornbury’s council in 1702, of Governor Lord Lovelace s council in 1708, and although opposed by the proprietors, he was again made a member of the council in 1709 under Governor Robert Hunter. In 1711, the New Jersey Assembly expelled him from the body because of

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an address to the queen which he and other mem­ bers of the council, along with Governor Combury himself, had signed in 1707. This address com­ plained of some of the pro­ ceedings of the Assembly Notwithstanding this re­ buke, his constituents in Bergen County returned him without a dissenting vote, and m ade him a pres­ ent of m oney for his ex­ penses, declaring that they should continue to elect him whether he was ad­ mitted or not In 1719, Wil­ liam Sandford II accused Philip Schuyler (first son of A r e n t S c h u y le r ) of ‘drinking a health to the damnation of the governor and the justices of the peace.” P h ilip Schuyler w as u n a n i m o u s l y a c ­ q u itte d . T h is in cid e n t, h o w e v e r, m u s t have caused a rift between the S a n d fo rd s a n d th e Schuylers In 1732 William Sandford II died and was buried on the Sandford plantation in Keam y next to his father, William Sandford I.

W illia m Sandford 11 married Mary Smith on February 1, 1696. By her he had seven children... William I I I , Michael, P e r e g r in e , R ic h a r d , Frances, Jennie and Anne. Grace — married Bame Cosans of New York. Elizabeth — married James Davis or Davies. W illia m Sandford HI

D a n ie l V a n W in k le was the fa th e r of Lieuten­ ant Peter Sandford and the oldest son of W illiam Sand­ ford II. R ecords on Wil­ liam III a re non-existent. Peter S andford was an activ e lo c a l personage, farmer and patriot. During the R evolution, the British made m a n y forays in the North A rlin g to n area for food and supplies. Lieuten­ ant Peter Sandford was in the v a ng u ard of those who resisted B ritis h encroach­ ments. Lieutenant Peter and E le a n o r Sandford had eleven childre n ...

William - b o rn October 9, 1761; Catharine - bom September 2, 1762; John bom November 10, 1765; Joseph - born September 17, 1767; Mary - bom Sep­ tember 1, 1769, Michael unknown; Thomas - bom September 29, 1773; Sarah - bom August 4, 1775; Abraham - bom April 14,

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1778; P eter - bom Febru­ ary 28, 1781, and Jane bom August 19, 1783. Toward the close of the e ig h t e e n t h c e n tu ry . J o s e p h . M i c h a e l and Abraham , in the dead of winter, uprooted the Sand­ ford hom e on the Arlington side of the Passaic River, slid it across the thick ice of the P assaic and settled in on w hat is now Main Street in Belleville. The S a n d fo rd family was for m any years social­ ly and politically promi­ nent in New Jersey. Two

members of this family be­ came governors of New Jersey — William Sand­ ford Pennington served as Governor from 1813 to 1115 and his son, William Sand­ ford Pennington U, served la the same capacity from 1837 to 1943. Continued on 4a

The Leader Newspaperi -Bergen County Tri-Centennial

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The Leader Newspapers Bergen County Trt-Centenmal

Early Leaders Of South Bergen

B erry’s Six Miles Contmued from 2a Captain Jo h n Berry, like Major W illia m Sandford. was also from the Island of Barbadoes in the West In ­ dies. and c am e to New Je r­ sey in 1669. However, in Volume Twelve of the New York Colonial Documents, there is a record of “three bushels of wheat from Cap­ tain John Berry, and Mr. Kdsall and others” on a patent for land s on the Del­ aware R iv e r which is date/ 1667. In all probabili­ ty. Mr K dsall, who was a close friend of John Berry, purchased the land two years prior to his coming to New Jersey and handled all of B erry’s transactions. Records further indicate that C aptain Berry and Mr Kdsall owned con­ siderable lands on the Pennsylvania side of the D e la w a r e R iv e r below Trenton In the same year, 1669, John Berry received a large grant of land from Governor Carteret extend­ ing north between the riv e rs fr o m S a n d fo rd ’s tract for a distance of six miles The following is an ac­ count from the records of the I^abadests, Catholic Missionaries, who were in New Jersey in 1686 ... “ We then cam e to high land, and wind failing us, we rowed up against the ebb tide to a house on the northeast side (Darwin a n d H a s t in g s A venues, Rutherford) belonging to one Captain Berry, where it being evening, and comm e n c in g to r a i n , we stopped, m ade the boat fast and took everything out of her. We entered the house, which was large enough but old and poorly furnished We found no­ body there except a negro, who could speak nothing but a little broken French. We w arm ed ourselves and ate from what we had brought w ith us. It was now tim e to see if we could not take some rest in a place not very well pro­ tected against the cold, and where there was noth­ ing to lie upon except the naked floor, but the negro, wishing to favor my com­ rade and myself, showed us a bunk in which there was nothing save a few leaves of m aize and these thin enough We lay down there but suffered greatly from the cold We slept very little and lay shiver­ ing all night, and the slave sometimes shaking us and waking us up We were so stiff we could not move But the night passed on as well as it could and we arose early It rained and we started at daylight (about six o'clock). went to the boat, and rowed into the stream " Captain Berry had a Manor-house in Bergen (Jersey C ity ) that was built by slaves brought from Barbadoes and ater turned into a prison This was the first prison in New Jersey and was used in that capacity for three or four years. T e r r it o r i e s n o rth of Sandford Springs (Boiling Springs) to Param us were known as New Barbadoes Berry, also, had properties along the Palisades, and it was there, in the vicinity of Fort Lee or Kdgewater that there was a “good house and a quanity of land improved by twenty ne­ groes or m o re ." It was here that C aptain John Berry and his fam ily had th e ir p e r m a n e n t r e s i­ dence John Berry was proba­ bly the most important man in Kast Jersey during the Seventeenth Century Jam es C arteret appointed Captain Berry his deputy during his absence. While so acting, Berry received a letter from the King con­ firm ing the authority of himself and council in the government of Kast Je r­ sey. When the Dutch com­ manders retook New York and their authority was es­ tablished i»ver ^ew Je r­

sey, the records clearly show. Governor Berry’s rule was abruptly sus­ pended D urin g the Dutch reoccupation, which lasted two years, ending in 1674, “ Berry and his neighbors, were confirm ed in their plantations and goods, but denied the privileges ob­ tained from their previous patrons." This, in all like­ lihood, refers to their of­ ficial position and the e m o lu m e n ts th e re fro m . Berry held no office under the Dutch, but upon the re­ establishment of Knglish rule, he resum ed his place on the council. To further document the fact that all the properties of Berry and his neigh­ bors, the Kingslands and Sandfords were placed in jeopardy during the re-oc­ cupation of the Dutch, the following appears on page three of O ld Houses of Rutherford, New Jersey, by Agnes B Concklin and Helen J . Swenson, 1964 “ According to the his­ torian W infield ... On the recapture of the country by the D utch they seized upon K ingsland s interest in this tract, and on Octo­ ber 1. 1673, ordered it to be sold. It was sold at public auction and a deed given ..." In this deed it is specif­ ically stated that the land "sold, transferred and con­ veyed unto W illiam Sand­ ford residing at Achter C ol" by N athaniel Kingsland is “ excluded from this conveyance, it being the re m ain in g two-thirds part of the aforesaid Neck of land with the valleys and other appurtenances thereof together with the houses, barns, fences and other buildings of the aforesaid standing, which is hereby granted and con­ veyed . .." This deed was signed by Anthony Colve, Governor General of New Netherlands, on November 29, 1673, a t Fort W illiam Hendrick on Manhattan Is­ land. Peace between Kngland and Holland, in Feb­ ruary. 1674 made New Netherlands an Knglish province a g ain later this year, and the Kingsland fam ily was able to reclaim its land In 1676. Jo h n Berry was made president of the B e rg e n C o u r t of J u d i ­ cature, and in 1677, 1678 and 1679 was president of the County Court. From 1675 to 1681 inclusive, he was C a pta in of the Bergen Foot C om pany In 1680, he was appointed by Gov­ ernor C arteret to succeed him in the government and continued in the council until the province was sold to the twelve proprietors in 1682 In D ecem ber of 1682, Deputy Governor Rudyard assumed the government of Kast Jersey for the new ‘ T w e n t y - f o u r P ro prietors," and one of his first acts was to appoint Captain Berry “to be of the Council " He took the oath of office on February 28, 1683, and on M arch 1, at­ tended the first meeting of the council W illiam Penn, one of the proprietors, was present On M arch 24, he was appointed Justice of the Q uorum , and in the fol­ lowing August was com­ missioned Justice of Court on Com on Right Decem­ ber 3. he w as appointed Mayor for the County of Bergen and on the same day. C hief R anger for the C ount y of B ergen Corp'ac'on He was re-appointed to the council by Governor Lowrie in 1684, by Gov­ ernor Lord Campbell in 1686 and Governor H am il­ ton in 1687 His last re­ corded attendance at a meeting was in May. 1687. although it has been clear­ ly established that he re­ tained his m em bership for som e y e a r s a fte rw a rd , probably until 1692. In 1702, he was recommended by Lord Clarendon for m em bership in the council of Governor; Lord Cor nbury, but n
appointm ent exists. (All a c c o u n t s o f th e g o v ­ ernm ental appointments of Captain Jo h n Berry ap^ pear in History of John B e r r y - C o m p i le d by Burton H Albee.) In 1696, John Berry donated to his friends in Hackensack, one morgen of land to b u ild the first Dutch R eform ed Church. A stone w ith his initials. “J .B ." in a monogram above the date “Anno 1696," with a shield, are still visible on the easterly side of the present day church. Captain Jo h n and Francina Berry had five chil­ dren ... Sarah, Richard, Francina, Hannah, and John In Jac o b Romm s History O f The Borough of North A rlington, New Je r­ sey, 1896-1936, he mentions that a W illiam Berry lived in North Arlington. " In 1677 a deed was confirmed by D e p u t y G o v e r n o r Berry, for his son William, w ho s e t t le d h e re a n d erected the first house in N o r th A r lin g t o n about 1677 It was built of stone and it was situated on the

West Side of Schuyler Ave­ nue on a plot lying between the present Barnard and Rot en berg H om e It was occupied up to 1912. About ten years ago it burned down and the stones were used for foundations and garages in the vicinity." A m ap draw n by a Wil­ liam Berry appears in the records and documents of the New York Historical Society. However, in Mr. Burton H A lbee’s fine His­ tory of John Berry, he makes no m ention of a son n a m e d W illia m . There­ fore, the W illiam Berry re­ ferred to in these historical documents and records w as m o s t p r o b a b ly a b ro th e r of Deputy-Govemor John Berry and the house in North Arlington was, more than likely, owned by John Berry's oldest son. Richard For m any years the Berry fam ily resided in Carlstadt and were very active during the forma­ tive years of our nation The o n ly t a n g ib le evidences left of the great empire of Captain John Berry are a few old docu­ m e n ts a n d a p o llu te d stream that runs through the great North Jersey Swamp and bears his name. “ The Picturesque Berry's Creek -'

Happy 300th

P t m iv e m r y

B erg e n C o u n ty from Mayor Leonard R. Kaiser Councilman Richard C. Bonanno Councilman Gary G. Burns Councilman John P. Chevalier Councilman Raymond J. Kopycienski Councilman Robert H. McCrea Councilman Kdward G. Sanzalone Borough Clerk Constance M. Meehan Borough Administrator Robert M. Landolfi

and all residents o f

N O R T H A R L IN G T O N

7hursday, June 16,1983 5-a

The Leader Newspapers Bergen County Tn-Centennuxl E a r ly L e a d e n

O f

S o u th

B e rg e n

P A R T T W O ...

The Kingsland Family Continued from 4a Henry Kingsland (June 7, 1745 - M ay 1, 1828), was the youngest son of Colonel W illia m K in g s la n d He m a r r ie d (1 s t) A n n a tje Haal in 1776 and (2nd) Helena Van Vorst in 1778. He issued five children Elizabeth, M argaret, Ann, Helen and W illiam Cor­ nelius. Henry Kingsland lived in a stone farm house located on the Hackensack to New­ ark Koad (Schuyler Ave­ nue, North Arlington), a p p r o x im a te ly w ere E c k h a r d t T e rr a c e now runs This hom e had two large rooms in the old stone section with a bee hive oven in the kitchen wall. Later in the ealy 1800 s a two story frame addition was added, a small stairw ay connected the old with new section. On the bottom floor of the new section was a dining room and parlor and a crude stairway that lead to the second floor, where three bedrooms ran off a c e n tr a l h a llw a y . T his house was torn down in 1906. Henry Kingsland also constructed barns, stables and other back buildings on his property However, the single most interesting structure was a 15 foot tower which was razed in 1917 when Mr George Eckhardt built his farm house at 500 Schuyler Ave­ nue. North Arlington This tower was contructed of dark wood w ith a door at the base facing Schuyler Avenue and a window ove r lo o k in g th e C e d ar Meadows Perhaps, Henry Kingsland used this tower to observe enem y ships a n d t r o o p m o v e m e n ts a lo n g t h e H a c k e n s a c k River and meadowland area, or as alookout for pirates and highway men that abounded in the cedar swamp. A c c o r d i n g to M r s C h a r lo tte H o d e n b e rg Schmale of North A rl­ ington (age 90), it was in this tower that Henry Kingsland was arrested on July 16. 1777 by Major Samuel Hanes on orders of G o v e rn o r W i lli a m L iv ­ ingston (F rom the Papers of W illiam Livingston Vol 2, page 22, a letter from M ajor Hanes to Governor Livingston regarding the arrest of Henry Kingsland and others): Sir I marched from Newark the 7th Instant to M om s Town in Expectation of Meeting the party from Sussex and M orris whare I wiatd till Thursday when I

had the Governors orders to March to pompton Meet the C o m m is s io n e r s the party then Consisting of about 100 Men Including the party I brought from Newark on Sunday At pompton I was Joined by 21 Men from Sussex 9 of whom C am e without Arms or Amunition whom I dis­ charged on Sunday (...) af­ ternoon I received Your Excellency order with a U st of the Nam es of the p e rso n s to be a p ­ prehended. In Obedience to the orders I marched to pompton on Munday 12 o'Clock to Newark whare west End of Snake Hill on the Island of Secacus In the C ounty of Bergen from which place I Marched th r o u g h th e E n g lis h N e ig h b o u r h o o d to th is place In which Rout I have apprehended Jo b Smyth. Garret V : Gesen, John Degrote Son of Peter Dee Grote his father being Sick unable to T ravail I was ob­ liged to leave behind. Michael Sm yth, Abraham Day, and Ja c o b Day his Son Jac ob Demot and Samuel Leydeker and John Sobriskie by a party I sent on Barbadoes Neck I have A p p r e h e n d e d A re nt Schuyler Henry Kingsland John E a rl D r. Jam es V: Bruner and Andrew V Buskirk. I have taken up In the E n g lis h N e ig h b o u rh o o d two Negros with Buttor & Going to New York whom I Keep Linder G uard I have Sent A N um ber of the per­ sons I have Apprehended to Morris Under the Care of M r Banks who Accom­ panied Me as a Volunteer I am Your Excellency Most O b e d ie n t H u m b le Servant Sami Hayes Henry Kingsland was never brought to trial and the charges against him were dropped Mr Kingsland becam e a Judge of Bergen County and a re spected citizen who was eventually regarded as a Patriot. M r. Kingsland is buried in Christ Episcopal Cemetery in Belleville

WILLIAM CORNELIUS KINGSLAND W illiam Cornelius King­ sland (1783-1853) was the only son of Henry King­ sland and received his father s property upon his father s death. W illiam C. K in g s la n d 's o c c u p a tio n was a farm er. He built a fine farm house on present day C anterbury Avenue, North A rlington, about the year 1805 This house was torn down by developers in 1965 W illiam Cornelius

Kingsland m arried Sarah Watson Hervey in 1806 and issued four children: Hen­ ry W illiam Harvey, E d­ mund W illiam , Cornelius Van Vorst and Jane Ann. 'Cornelius Van Vorst’s (1810-1850) occupation was also a farm er. Upon the early death of W illiam C. Kingsland's son, Cornelius Van Vorst Kingsland, all the Kingsland properties in North Arlington went to C o r n e liu s V a n V o rs t's three surviving sons Cor­ nelius Van Vorst married Margaret Vreeland. Tliey issued. John Henry, Wil­ lia m C o r n e liu s , E n o ch Isaac, S arah W., Helena (I^ n a ), and Jam e s Henry Jam e s Henry Kingsland (1848-1901) youngest son of Cornelius V an Vorst re­ ceived properties in the southern most portion on the fam ily tract. He m ar­ ried M ary J .P .F . Weber in 1886 and had no children Enoch Isaac Kingsland (1840-1893) was a farm er as well as a judge of the B e r g e n C o u n t y C o u r t. Judge K ingsland was a lo­ cal historian whose knowl­ edge. it was said, in the matter of the backgrounds of local fam ilies helped solve many boundary dis­ putes. Jud ge Enoch King­ sland resided in the home of his great grandfather Henry K ingsland until his death in 1893 Enoch Isaac K in g s la n d m a r r ie d Charlotte Out water in 1864 and they issued: Cornelius Van Vorst. John Henry, Harriet M arie. Adalaid, M a r y E ., C h a r l o t t e Estelle, E va Louise and Enoch Isaac

1860 ( M r s Emma C Vreeland Kingsland lived to be 101 years old dying in 1939.) They issued Wil­ liam Henry, Robert I^slie, A n n ie D e y , Jo h n . Margaret, Helen Ann Van Vorst, L illian (Lillie) Dey, H e rb e rt V r e e la n d and E m m a C.

As the work of renova­ tion progressed, it was dis­ covered that the massive foundation w alls measur­ ing eight feet thick, were nearly p lu m p from their exterior sides, but in the cellar it w as found there was a slight bulging of the interior, caused probably by shrinking to the extent of about four inches In this section of the house an in te re stin g h isto ric d is­ c overy w a s u n ea rthed South of the base of the immense chim ney that ex­

tends to the roof there was found a partition of solid ro c k t h a t fo r m e d the fourth wall of a small room that was undoubtedly used as a place of detention by the owners for their slaves when they were disobe­ dient Just w here the struc­ tural stone of the building came from that has been subjected to the elements for nearly two and a half c e n tu r ie s , h a s puzzled p r e s e n t - d a y archaeologists It is con­ jectured, however, that the

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rocks and stones must have been picked out of the fields of the neighborhood for their methods of trans­ portation were of such a character as to arrive at no other conclusion There are very few evidences of the blasts of winter and summ er storm s that have beat incessantly against the old house Some of the plaster has worn away and an occasional defect in some of the stones can be readily traced to the ele­ ments The enorm ous size of the

floor tim bers, hewn out of oak, seven by nine inches in size, were found to be in a perfect state of preserva­ tion as well as the parti­ tions, that are of the same material ten inches wide and two inches thick, and set apart on an average of two inches, covered with split lathe of great length held in place by hand­ made. wrought-iron nails In all the window and floor frames, wooden pegs only were used in the joints All the floors are of plank a Continued on 7a

e s t i n a t i o n :

C o r n e liu s V an V orst Kingsland II (1865-1916), son of Judge Enoch Isaac K i n g s l a n d m o v e d to Yonkers, New York He m a r r i e d H a t t ie J o n e s Courier and they issued: Cornelius V an Vorst. Hat­ tie Frances. Elsie Maud. Frank Hobart. Stanley. R a y m o n d W illo u g h b y . Sarah M argaret and Eva l.ouise W illiam Cornelius King­ sland II (1837-1931). was the son of Cornelius Van Vorst K ingsland I His oc­ cupation was a farm er and he resided in the farm house on Canterbury Ave­ nue. North Arlington He was the oldest son of Cor­ nelius Van Vorst 1 and re­ ceived the majority of land By the year 1920 he had disposed of all the fam ily holdings in North Arlington and removed to a p r iv a te h o m e on, R u t h e r f o r d A v en ue in Keamy. M r W illiam Cor­ nelius Kingsland II married E m m a C. Vreeland in

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Thursday. June 16.1983

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The Leader Newspapers Bergen County Tn-Centenmal

B e lle m e a d D e v e lo p m e n t C o r p o r a t io n ... P r o u d t o p a r t ic m a te in th e g ro w tn o f t h e M e a d o w la n d s .

Thursday. June 16,1MJ 7-a

The Leader Newspapers ■Bergen County Trx-Centennial

Early Leaden Of South Bergen

The Kingsland Family Continued from 5a foot wide and two inches thick There is every ap­ pearance that some years after the completion of the s tr u c tu r e th e w indow s from the second floor up were extended in length the width* of original key­ stones, which were re­ moved Attractive features of the interior of the historic place are the immense halls that traverse the en­ tire length of the house of both the second and first floors, twelve feet wide and forty feet long These remain intact with the ex­ ception that folding doors have been installed twelve feet from the front, reduc' ing the original hall space

one-third. A bedroom and bathroom have been parti­ tioned off from the upper hall. In the rear end of the lower hall is located an historic mahogany stair­ case that was built with the building and from an architectural point of view resembles those of the present day. The carving a n d w o r k m a n s h ip a re unique and substantial, with treads that are of the usual width. In the two large front rooms off the hall on the first floor are two im­ mense m antels tht were brought from England and in these fireplaces all the f a m ily 's s ilv e r w as bricked in at the outbreak of the Revolutionary War as a safeguard in case of

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capture as prisoners of war which occurred, for the house w as attacked by the B ritish and Edmund W Kingsland, who was the owner at th at time, was taken from the house, and, a fte r in te n s e sufferin g, was incarcerated in an old sugar house prison in New York, where he was de­ tained for m onths but the silver and valuables were found intact. The old fire­ places now have been bricked up. T he l a r g e k itc h e n e q u ip p e d w it h a ll th e m odem appliances for the execution of the culinary art was used for the same purpose by the Kingslands, and the s m a ll room off of the room w as used as an office by G eneral George

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K i n g s l a n d a b o u t th e middle of the last century. There are apparent in­ dications in the finishings of the north-west room in the front of the second floor that leads one to be­ lieve that it was the best apartm ent in the house, and it was here that Chief J u s tic e Jo se p h Hornblower, who died in Newark in 1864, was al­ legedly born His father, Josiah Hornblower, m ar­ ried Miss Kingsland. and they lived in the old house during the early prt of their m arried life. A large circular window, through which they light of day penetrated into both attics have been replaced by a modern window TTiere is no record in the The h o m e off H e n ry K in g s la n d w h ic h once stood on S c h u y k

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C O Y S )

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SEAFOOD

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P R IV A T E R O O M

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A V A IL A B L E 6 T O 60

MEADOWLANDS' FAVORITE SEAFOOD RESTAURANTS Located Just a ’/a Mile Away

PA TERSO N PLA N K RD., C LO V ER LEA F 64

HOBOKEN RD., EAST RUTHERFORD RIGHT ON TRACK

Before anybody thought of putting a sports complex in the Meadowlands, Caughey’s Restaurant was nearby, att­ racting diners to a wholesome and full b ill of fare. Now on racing or soccer evenings, at Caughey's (pro­ nounced Coy’s) you line up to get into that bustling place, enjoy nibbling at the yuouny french fried mushrooms which

are dropped on each table, and be served by an energetic and friendly serving staff. Since 1946 this restaurant in a converted and expanded house in East Rutherford has been packing and cramming ’em in. Space is tight, service is fast and furious at times but there’ s plenty to eat on th is reasonably priced menu.

possession of the present or former owners as to the date of the construction of the old stone extension 30 x 35 feet located in the rear of the m ain building, which was razed soon after the last transfer of the proper­ ty was made. There are evidences, however, that it antedated the main struc­ ture. It was used chiefly as a kitchen, for the huge oven a n d sm o k e h o u s e above it bear out that con­ tention On the second floor were several small rooms that might have been the slaves' quarters Back of the house about a quarter of a mile distant was located the old mill and the miller's house bordering on the mill pond beyond which was the the old Kingsland cemetery that was removed several months ago by the Lack­ awanna Company to make room for additional shops Years before, however, the bodies of the Kingslands were all removed to the Belleville Cemetery, but the tombstones were left behind and today there re­ mains a pile of stone near the cemetery site that have interested students in a rc h a e o lo g y , and upon some of them are these inscriptions: Isaac King sland, died May 17. 1779. aged 81 years. David King­ sland. died June 5. 1814, aged 87 years. Elizabeth, daughter of David and Anne Kingsland, died July 22. 1820, aged 14 years John E dm und Butler, son of Edw ard and Effe But ler. drowned Sunday. Au­ gust 27. 1791, aged 8 m o n t hs a nd 15 da y s . Samuel Mabbell. late Nine Partners. Duchess County. ,\ V , died April 8. 1786. aged 59. and Mary Anne Elizabeth, wife of John Jordan, died February 28. 1787. aged 2b years. For m any years Ed­ mund W Kingsland of Je r­ sey City, retained the prop­ erty in remembrance of his forefathers. In the spring of 1906. it was purchased by W illiam II and L o r e n z o C a s tle s Shortly after the property was transferred Lorenzo died and his brother Wil­ li a m p u r c h a s e d th e estate's interests in the place that were disposed of to Captain Brunner, m ak­ in g b o t h m e n e q u a l owners W illiam Kingsland (1704October 24. 1770) was the oldest son of Edmund Kingsland and the third lxird of Kingsland Manor He m arrie d Margretta, d a u g h te r o f I* h i l i p C oerte n. D e c e m b e r 12. 1732 Mr Coerten was a Huguenot who came to this country shortly after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes W illiam Kingsland was appointed Judge of the Bergen C om m on Pleas on March 8, 1749 They issued six children: Elizabeth, M a r ia , M a r y . E d m u n d W illia m . M a rg a re t and Henry. E liz a b e t h K in g s la n d , first child of W illiam King­ sland, was born March 2, 1734 She m arried Josiah H o r n b lo w e r (1729-1809 • who, in 1753. brought the fir s t s t e a m e n g in e to America at the request of Colonel John Schuyler to pump the water from his copper mines at North Arl­

A ven ue in N o rth A r lin g to n .

ington Mr Hornblower fought in the French and Indian W ar He became a patriot during the Revolu­ tionary W ar and held the rank of Captain in the local militia He became speak­ er of the House of the New Jersey State Legislature and was elected to Presi­ dent George Washington's First Congress He also held the post of Judge of Common Pleas until his death He changed the name of Second River. New Jersey, to the present name of Belleville His son. Joseph C Hornblower (1777-1864) became Chief Justice of the New Jersey Stale Supreme Court Maria, second child of W illiam Kingsland, died young Mary was born Septem­ ber 22. 1737 She married Edm und Leslie Edm und W illiam i b was born August 17, 1741 and died November 8, 1828 He m a r r i e d f i r s t . M a ry , daughter ol John Rich­ ards. in 1768 She was born March 20. 1741 and died October 16. 1798. second, Sarah Jauncey on October 3, 1801 She was born De­ cember 25, 1748 and died F e b ru a ry 9 . 1814 E d m u n d ’s father-in-law. C a p ta in J o h n R ic h a rd s adhered to the British dur­ ing the revolution, but left

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Barbadoes Neck Hearing that they were sick with th e s m a ll- p o x , he a t ­ tempted to visit them in January 1778 When near Bergen, he was captured by a couple of bandits un­ der the guise of patriots They took Captain Rich­ ards through the wood toward the Three Pigeons T avern B e f o r e th e y reached the tavern, they attempted to rob him When he resisted, they shot him It was alleged that Mr Kingsland sympa­ thized with the loyalist cause and left home to join the enemy, whereupon his wife was sent out of the American Lines This ac­ cusation by authorities is moot for E dm u nd W King­ sland spent m any months in the B ritish prison at New York, known as the “ Sugar H ouse W hile being m arched to this hellish prison, he was beaten in the face with his own beaver hat This ex­ perience prevented Mr Kingsland from ever wear­ ing a hat again during his life By his first marriage he issued eleven chi'dren. W illiam , born March 20. 1769. m arried Margaret Kingsland. died December 3. 1800 John, born 1770, married Eleanor C am pbell, died July 2, 1797 He had one child, W illiam S who died in infancy Burnet Richards, born August 6. 1771. married Eliza S m ith, died March 10. 1830 Margaret, born March 26, 1773. m arried first, her c o u s in , W illia m H o r n b lo w e r , se co nd. Charles Trinder H enr> W i lli a m , born June 4. 1774. married Sarah, daughter of Joseph Jauncey. July 30, 1803, ap­ p o in te d J u d g e of the Bergen Com m on Pleas. February 17. 1819. he died April 8, 1856, Sarah died September 11. 1858.

Richards, born Novem­ ber 29. 177b m a r r ie d Eleanor Cam pbell, widow of his brother John M aria, born February 21. 1778 Nathaniel, born April 9. 1779. died September 9. 1798 C a r o li n e , bo rn Mav . 1781. m a rrie d Francis L Ten Eyck, died October 20. 1866 George, born 1783 Harriet, born February 1785, m arrie d W illiam De Forest. Ja n u a ry 23. 1841 M argaret, fifth child of William Kingsland. was Ixirn Ju ly 2. 1743 She m ar­ ried E dm und Leslie Major N athaniel King­ sland and his brother Rob­ ert were direct descen­ dants of Nicholas Francis Kingsland II I . Viscount of K in g sla nd M a jo r K in g ­ sland was a sugar planta­ tion owner in Christ Parish on the island of Barbadoes His estate consisted of :*40 acres, a large manor home, 166 slaves and 5 white servants " He sent W illiam Sandford. in 1668. to claim and establish ownership of the East Je r­ sey Territory known as New Barbadoes Neck For the first time we present the records of the Kingsland fam ily of Christ P a r is h . Is la n d of B a r b a d o e s f r o m th e original Church register Kingsland Baptisms to 1700 16 5 0 O c t o b e r 25. Nathaniel, son of Nathan Kingsland 1651 November 13. Ann. daughter of Nathan and Hester Kingsland 1642 Jun e 7. Susanna, daughter of Nathan and Hester Kingsland 1654 September. Hester, daughter of Nathan and Hester Kingsland 1655 August 23. John, son of Nathaniel and Hester Kingsland 1656 Septem ber 20. Fran­ cis, sun of Nathan and Hester Kingsland 1H5 8 J a n u a r y 29. I s a b e l le , d a u g h t e r of N a t h a n i e l a n d H e ste r Kingsland 1659 August 11. Hester, daughter of Nathaniel and Hester Kingsland 1661 May 29. Caroline, daughter of Nathan and Hester Kingsland 1666 A p r i l 1. M a r y . daughter of Nathaniel and Mary Kingsland 1667 February 8. Hester, daughter of Nathan and Mary Kingsland 1668 M a y . F r a n c e s , daughter of Nathaniel and Mary Kingsland 1669 October 10. Lucin­ da. daughter of Nathaniel and Mary Kingsland 1674 February. Henry, son of N athaniel and E liz­ abeth Kingsland Kingsland Marriages to 1700 1648 A ugust 13. Nathaniel Kingsland and Hester Lewis

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Nathaniel Kingsland and Mary C olem an 1673 M arch 6. Henry H a r d in g a n d Is a b e lla Kingsland 1678 Ju n e 2, W illiam Watts and Caroline King­ sland 1682 D ecem ber 26, Wil­ liam W alley and Maria Kingsland Continued on 8a

■Thursday. June 16.19*3

The Leader Newspapers Bergen County Tn-Centenmal

Early Leaders Of South Bergen

The Kingsland Family Continued from 7a 1684 Novem ber 27, Hen­ ry Applewhaite and Hester Kingsland K in g s la n d 1700.

B u r ia ls to

1645 October 14, Wife of Nathaniel Kingsland 1653-4 M arch 9, Susanna, daughter of Nathan King­ sland. 1654 December, Hester, daughter of Nathan King­ sland. 1656 September 9, Fran­ cis. son of Nathan King­ sland 1660 April 27, Hester, daughter of Nathan King­ sland

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Nathaniel, son of Nathan Kingsland 1663 N o v e m b e r 13. Hester Kingsland 1670 September 2. Lucin­ da, daughter of Nathaniel Kingsland 1672 September 5. Ju dith, daughter of Nathaniel Kingsland 1674 February 21. Henry, son of Nathaniel King­ sland 1684 August 27. Francis Kingsland 1686 Marc h 26. Nathaniel Kingsland 1686 November 24. John Kingsland 1694 July . sland

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Isaac Kingsland. 1648 to 165)8. son of Robert and Nephew of M aj o r Nathaniel Kingsland. was the first Kingsland to set tie in New Jersey Prior to this, he was a clerk in a mercantile firm in Ix>ndon Contrary to his employer's wishes, he married the employer's daughter This so angered the father that lie turned them both out. f ir in g I s a a c In Isa ac Kingsland s hour of need, lie wrote to his weathy un­ cle, Nathaniel Kingsland of th«> Island of Barbadoes.

for aid In reply to Isaac's request. M a jor Kingsland promised hir.i the New Barbadoes Territory of Kast Jersey and a dwelling thereupon if he would go to America and settle there Isaac Kingsland came to New Barbadoes in 1673 with his wife Flizabeth They took the Sandford house which was located in Lyndhurst The structure was m ade of local brown stone and was built more for practicality than ap­ pearance There was one la r g e b a r n , y a r d and sm oke-house It's also quite likely that there was a cider m ill and barrel shop attached to the prop­ erty The Kingsland tract consisted of over 40.000 acres, some of it was up­ land but the majority was salt meadow Isaac Kingsland was an influential force in the de­ velopment of Fast Jersey He was respected by his peers not merely for his great wealth but. more im ­ portantly. for his astute­ ness in governmental ad­ ministration Isaac King­ sland served three times as a m em ber of the King's Council under lx>rds Niel and C am pbell He also field the title of Ixjrd High Sheriff and served under G o v e r n o r H a m ilto n in 1692 This piece appears in Trinity Church of Newark, New Jersey. Volume II. New Jersey The King slands of Barbadoes Neck, always a highly respect able fam ily, have also been Fpiscopalians from the earliest settlement of the country Their resi­ dences have been suffi ciently near Newark to enable them to attend re­ ligious service there, and a f t e r th e c h u r c h was formed they belonged to the parish " Out of this fam ily there died, in 1698 Isaac King­

sland. a member of the Governor’s Council during nearly the whole period of the Proprietary Govern­ ment Not far from the s a m e t i m e a ls o d ie d Gustavus Kingsland. and in 1710. Colonel Edmund Kingsland. a son of Isaac " (N.B. This date of death, 1710. appears to be er­ roneous as is evidenced by more valid information in the ensuing paragraph). "These men. thus enumer­ ated all lived and died (having with one exception c o n s id e r a b le fa m ilie s ) , p r io r to D o c to r M a c w h o r t e r 's d a te of 1732." Is a a c K in g s la n d died January . 1698 By his wife Flizabeth. he had seven children Kdmund, John. Mary. Hester, Flizabeth, Frances and Isaac Junior Colonel Kdmund King­ sland (1680-July 30. 1742) was the second Lord of Kingsland Manor He was the oldest son of Isaac Kingsland and received his father's land and otlier properties by the law of primogeniture He m ar­ ried Mary, daughter of Judge W illiam Pinhorne on November 8. 1703 He was commissioner under the Bill of Credit Act in 1723 C o lo n e l K d m u n d Kingsland sold a large tract of land to Captain Arent Schuyler of Albany (1662-1732) on which, in 1710, Captain Schuy ler dis­ c o v e re d c o p p e r and opened the famous Copper Mines of North Arlington Schuyler built a fine m an­ sion just south of the Belle­ ville Turnpike Colonel Fdmund Kingsland did build the f a m o u s K in g s la n d Manor although some his­ torians claim it was built by his son. W illiam Colo­ nel Kdm und Kingslands will is dated July 19. 1741 He had ten children W il­ liam. M aria. Mary, Klizabeth, Kdm und Rogers,

Isaac. John III, Anna, Hester (m arried Philip Schuyler (1687-1755). first son of Arent Schuyler) and Catherine. A good description of the K in g s la n d M a n o r a n d properties built by Colonel

Kdmund Kingsland is con­ tained in the following articles that appeared in the New Evening News. May 4, 1906 "Legends and historic facts are clustered about the old Kingsland Manor at this place, which is now undergoing m any changes It is located near the great shops of the Lackawanna Railroad on Schuyler Ave­ nue and is now owned, for the second tim e in its his­ t o r y . by W i l l i a m H

Castles, one of the oldest residents of the township, and Captain Robert A Brunner, of Company M of the National Guard For months the old house, whose cornerstone bears the m ark of 1670. has been un d e rg o in g a c om plete renovation, but no attempt has been m ade to change or alter the original attrac­ tive features of the land­ mark from an architec­ tural point of view. Continued on 10a

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An American Hero Continued from 8a P IE T E R S C H U Y L E R . 1710 - A pril, 1762, was the e ig h th c h i l d of A re n t Schuyler. P ieter was bom in, and spent most of his fo r m a tiv e y e a r s at Schuyler Heights Under his fa th e r’s tutelage he learned a ll the essentials of business which served as a guide through his tur­ bulent, colorful life Pieter m a r r i e d H e s t e r , th e daughter of John Walters, a m a n of great wealth from H anover Square in New Yo rk City He mar ried second to Mary --From his fa th e rs will be received seven hundred and sixty acres of land near the Rahw ay River in "E lizab eth Towne " He, also, received land in what n o w is c a l l e d S o u th Kearny, and it was where Belgrove Drive now runs t h a t he b u i l t P etersborough There is no pictorial re­ cord of Peterborough, but th is d e s c r ip tio n should bring to the reader as clear a picture was words can possibly give This ac­ count is from THE HIS­ T OR Y O F THE COUNTY O F HUDSON. NEW J E R SE Y , FROM IT S E A R L IE S T SETTLE MENT TO THE PRES­ ENT T IM E , by Charles H Winfield, Copyright. 1874 “ T he f a r m opposite Newark, owned by Colonel Peter Schuyler was known as P eterboro ugh It was a f t e r w a r d s o w n ed by Archibald Kennedy, who h a d m a r r i e d C o lo n e l Schuyler's only child. In 1768 he had it in a flourishing condition. It contained 906 acres, 265 of which were covered with t im b e r , 393 un d e r cul tivation; the rest was salt meadow On it was a stwostory brick dwelling house, a greenhouse seventy feet long, coach house, stables, ba m , overseer's house, cider house, ice and root house, an excellent gar­ den, an orchard capable of yielding two hundred bar­ rels of cider, a large quan­ tity of cedar timber and a shad fishery This fa rm was also graced with a deer park In 1800 the orchard pro­ duced three hundred bar­ rels of cider There were on the place two dwelling houses, a greenhouse con­ taining a large number of orange, lemon, lime and other West India fruit trees In the early part of 1802 the land was laid out into ninety building lots of at least one acre each, and advertised as A New Town At the close of the cele­ bration of the Fourth of July , 1815. the people of the place resolved that they "would Henceforth dist­ inguish the sm all district of country formerly known as Kennedy 's Farm, and to the extent of one mile north of the northerly bounds thereof, by the name of "The Village of L od i.” In 1746, there was a pro­ posed invasion of Canada and Pieter Schuyler was called on to recruit, he was then placed in com­ m and of the contingent of five hundred men from New Jersey On Septem­ ber 3, 1746, Pieter Schuyler and his com m and em ­ barked from Amboy and arrived at Albany on Sep­ tember 9 Due to the fail­ ure of the Engish War De­ partment to send addi­ tional troops the expedi­ tion was bogged down in Albany and the m ission was abandoned While his troops were encamped in . Albany, they experienced m any hardships On Feb­ ruary 26, 1747, Colonel Pieter Schuyler wrote to G o v e rn o r H a m ilto n a p ­ prising him of his men s need of m edical supplies, food and clothing In re­ turn, Governor Hamilton sent his compliments to Colonel Schuyler, and to his men he promised two speckled shirts and one pair of shoes for each man This cold response to such an urgent request all but

caused a m utiny In order to a v o id t h is , C olonel Schuyler paid every man fro m h is o w n pock et George Clinton, the coloni­ al governor of New York, did not appreciate such a brash move, but on De­ cember 17, 1747, the New Jersey Council approbated funds to partially reim­ burse Colonel Schuyler for his outlay This third phase of the French and Indian Wars was terminated in 1748 by the Peace Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle. Colonel Schuyler then returned to P eterborough to oversee his many business en­ terprises as well as his huge plantation In a letter written by M a jo r G e n e r a l P h ilip Schuyler, while still a boy, to his friend, Abraham Ten Hroeck in the autumn of 1753, he wrote that he was going to visit a kinsman. Colonel Pieter Schuyler, who had visited Albany during King George's War The Colonel, he mused, was a good soldier, "and as I believe we shall have war again with the French quite as soon as we could wish, young Schuyler ex­ pected the Colonel would again lead his Jerseymen in the field He expressed the desire for his friend and himself to go with the Colonel P H IL IP S C H U Y L E R , 1733 1804, d u r in g the afo rem en tio n ed trip also visited with John and Ann S c h u y le r a t S c h u y le r H e ig h ts . Y o u n g P h ilip d id n 't r e a liz e how a c ­ curate his prediction of another E nglish - French confrontation was. In 1754, two years before hostilities erupted in Europe, they commenced in earnest in the colonies Once again New Jersey called upon Colonel P ieter Schuyler and his New Jersey Blues to defend the homeland In J u ly of 1754, C o lo n e l Schuyler and his regiment moved up the Mohawk from Schenectady They arrived at Oswego on July 20. 1754 After Braddock's defeat. New Jersey was wide open to Indian attacks With the consent of G eneral Shirley, Colonel Schuyler, with half of his regim ent, left the northern frontier and re­ turned to protect the col­ ony fie set up his defenses for the protection of New Jersey along the banks of th e D e la w a r e . In th e Spring of 1755, Colonel Schuyler did get to Albany, but, because of delays there, he was not able to reach Oswego until July He then entered Fort On­ tario under the command of Colonel M ercer On the tenth of August. General Montcalm, with more than five thousand French and In d ia n s , a tt a c k e d both Forts Ontario and Oswego. In order to insure a quick v icto ry , M o n tc a lm s ta ­ tioned men on the roads b e tw e e n O s w e g o a n d Albany, precluding any at­ tempt by Couriers to se­ cure reinforcements for the beleaguered troops in the forts He, also, had two Men of W ar stationed in the harbor On August 12. 1755, M o n tc a lm opened fire on Fort Ontario with thirty cannons, mortars and h o w itz e rs C olonel Schuyler and half of his regiment escaped to Fort Oswego However, before they left, they destroyed as many cannons and sup­ plies as they could Using what cannons were avail­ able in Fort Ontario, to­ gether with his own artil­ lery. M ontcalm attacked Fort Oswego On August 13, with Colonal Mercer, dead, Fort Oswego surren­ d e r e d to M o n t c a l m . Among the fourteen hun­ dred prisoners was Colonel Pieter Schuyler He was taken to M ontreal and lat­ er transferred to Quebec. He rem ained a prisoner, suffering the sam e hard­ ships as his m en, until Oc­ tober 1757 M o n t c a lm r e le a s e d Schuyler u n d e r the condi­ tion that, if the British did not reciprocate by freeing a French officer of equal

rank, he would return to Quebec, on oath, as a gen­ tleman and a military c o m m a n d e r . C o lo n e l Pieter Schuyler arrived in New York fro m Quebec on November 19, 1757. His hero's fam e had preceded him When night came, most of the houses in the city were illum inated, a bonfire was kindled on the Common, an elegant enter­ tainment given to him at the King's A rm s Tavern, "and the public in general testified great joy on his safe a rriv a l." Once again, he returned home to P eterborough Upon a rriv in g he was saluted with a discharge of thirteen pieces of cannon The following night he vis­ ited Newark in the com­ pany of several prominent citizens and was again saluted with cannons. Bon­ fires were kindled and houses were illuminated as an honour due to his great Attachment to the in terest of his country, and uncommon Zeal for his Majesty's Service.-' An en tertainment was given, healths drank, and a gen­ eral joy appeared among

all the inhabitants. During the first week in January, 1758, he set out fo r “ T r e n t- to w n " At “ Prince-town" he was met by the people and pre­ sented with the following madrigal welcome, writ­ ten by a young lady and addressed. To the Honorable Colonel Peter Schuyler. ‘Dear to each Muse, and to thy C ountry Dear, Welcome once more to breather thy native air. Not half so cheering is the solar R ay. To the harsh region of a W inters D ay , Not half so grateful fan­ ning breezes rise. When the hot Dog Star burns the S um m er Skies; C aesaress Shore with Acclamation rings. And. w elcom e Schuyler, every Shepherd sings See, for thy brows, the laure is prepared. And justly deem 'd a Pa­ triot, thy R ew ard. E'en future ages shall enroll thy nam e. In sacred Annals of im mortal F a m e "

When the English re­ neged on their reciprocity a g r e e m e n t w ith th e French, Colonel Schuyler k e p t h i s p r o m is e to M ontcalm and returned to Qjebec to fin ish serving his sentence Montcalm, seeing how sick and tired

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Last

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J o h n A re n t Schuyler (F e b r u a r y 19, 1831Ju n e 15, 1870) was b a p tiz e d a t C h ris t C hurch, B e lle v ille a n d m a rrie d K a te M a n c h in i on Ja n . 14, 1863 They issued S id n e y Schieffelin S c h u y le r w h o m a rrie d H e le n S p e e r an d had an in fa n t so n , d.y. Jo h n

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Richard Jon*; d s p After her death. Kennedy mur ried Ann, daughter of John Watts and Margaret De lancey. and greal-grahd daughter of the Right Hon orable Stephan Van Cor t l a n d t a n d G e r tr u d e Schuyler Continued on 12a

C o lo n e l P ie te r and Hester Schuyler had one child, Catalina, married to Archibald Kennedy. Eari of Casselis She inherited her parents property as well as that of her grand­ father, John Walters She was also the heiress of

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B e rg e n

Founder Of The Copper Mine Continued from 10a P hilip Pieterse Schuyler and his younger brother David were the founders of the fa m ily in this country T hey cam e fr o m A m sterdam in 1650 and settled in old Fort Orange. D avid Schuyler married C a t ly n t je , d a u g h te r of A braham Is a a c s e n P la n c k , t h e o w n e r of Paulus Hook, on October 13, 1657 They had five sons P ie te r , Ja c o b u s, A braham , D avid and Myndert P h ilip P ie te r s e Schuyler. 1628-1684, sired what was to become the most celebrated branch of the Schuyler family He m a r r ie d M a rg a re tta . daughter of Herr Brandt A r e n t V a n S d c h le c tenhorst, m anager of the colony of Patroon Van R e n s s e la e r P h ilip Pieterse Schuyler's m ar­ riage increased l>oth h is wealth and his prestige in this new world However, it was not these attributes alone which would later es­ tablish him and his family as one of the leading politi­ cal and social forces in the Middle Colonies Philip was a progressive man in a not too progressive cen­ tury His bravery and inte­ grity was such that even the wary In d ia n s trusted him Being the son-in-law of the Patroon's commis­ sary. he w as afforded many opportunities As a result, he w a s able to en­ gage in the fur trade with the indians, a business pro­ hibited to private persons From this venture he ac­ cumulated an even greater ■ wealth without losing the adm iration and respect of either the red man or white m an alike He was elected m agistrate of Fort Orange in 1656. 1657, and 1661 P h i l i p P ie te r s e Schuyler and his wife Margaretta h a d ten childi en

GYSBERT July 2. 1652; p r e d e c e a s e d his father, date unknown. G E E R T R L 'Y D Febru­ ary 4, 1654; married The Right Hon Stephen Van Cortlandt on September 10. 1671 A LVDA February 23, 1656; m a rrie d Robert Liv­ ingston by w hom she had s e v e n c h i l d r e n ; dec March 27, 1729 P IE T E R September 17, 1657; m arried Maria, dau o f K i l l i a n V an Rensselaer, October 25, 1672. dec. February 20, 1724 He was the first Mayor of Albany , a m em ­ ber of the Council of New Jersey and New York in 1709. and appointed to command the Indians in the expedition against Can­ ada BRANDT December 18, 1659. m arried Cornelia Van Cortland on July 12, 1682 AK FN D T June 25, 1662; dec 1730 The fa­ mous Copper King SYB ILLA November 12, 1664 dec. December 9, 1664 P H IL IP Born Febru­ ary 8. 1666 JOHANN IS April 5. 1668. m arrie d Elizabeth Staats, A pril, 1695. dec February 27. 1747 He was Mayor of Albany from 1703 to 1706, and a member of the C o lo n ia l A ssem bly from 1705 to 1713. Johannis Schuyler was the Grand­ father of M ajor General Philip Schuyler, second in c o m m a n d to G e n e ra l George Washington MARGARET January 2. 1672. m a rr ie d John Col­ lins of Albany Arent Schuyler, born in Albany June 25, 1662, was the first of the line of Schuylars to settle in New Jersey Two short years after A re nt’s birth, 1664. old Peter Stuyvesant and

Niew A m sterdam fell into the hands of the British. The Dutch Colonists ac­ cepted their defeat, but re­ mained uniquely Dutch, taking only from the Eng­ lish Culture what was use­ ful and good. This com­ bination of Dutch common sense and English kwowhow produced shrewd busi­ ness m en as exemplified by Arent Schuyler. Arent’s earliest educa­ tion was received first at home and later at the schools of Albany While still a very young man, Arent vividly studied the workings of the Mercantile F irm s of New York City. In 1684, Arent opened a trading post in the home of his m other, Margaretta V an S c h le c te n h o r s t Schuyler Instead of a let­ tered sign over his door, Arent put a live eagle in a cage because Arent meant eagle in the dutch lan­ guage It was in this same year, 1684, on November 26, that Arent married Jenneke Teller, the daugh­ ter of a wealthy Albany business m an In 1688. W illiam and Mary of Orange took over the thron e o f En glan d and the repercussions of that j o i n t M o n a r c h y w ere worldwide The effort on North A m erica spawned the French and Indian Wars With his brothers Peter a n d J o h a n n e s . A re n t Schuyler played a leading role in resisting the efforts of Ja c o b Leisler to seize political control in Albany as he had in New York City W ith the French and Indian W ars fast becoming a g r im r e a l i t y , th e S c h u y le r s a n d o th e r citizens of Albany felt that they must combine their forces in order to secure a better defense Therefore, Albany yielded to Leisler the following month Op­

posed as he was to Jacob Leisler, Arent Schuyler did not a llo w p e rso n al animosities or political be­ liefs to lessen his patriotic fervor and did lead a scouting party into the War Zone He further d»>tin g u is h e d h im s e lf and earned the rank of Captain by leading a group of eight indians down the Richelieu River to C h a m b le y , killing two Frenchm en near the fort and, taking another as p r is o n e r C a p ta in Schuyler, like his father before him , had earned the respect of the indians and h is f e l l o w c o lo n is t s through his courage and determ ination. In 1692, acting Governor R ichard Ingoldesby called on Arent Schuyler to settle a d is p u te b e tw e e n Shawanoes and the Iro­ quois P acking no more than som e w ampum and letters of credit to the Gov­ ern o r o f P e n n s y lv a n ia , Arent Schuyler was dis­ patched to bring the group to New York His astute­ ness and impeccable repu­ tation stood him in good stead. He was able to get the Shawanoes, Iroquois and Governor Benjamin Flectcher around the con­ ference table with an end result that the Iroquois w o u ld a llo w th e Shawanoes to settle in the Minisink country Once again, on February 3. 1694, at the request of Governor Fletcher, Arent Schuyler w ent p o s t- h a s te to in ­ v e s t i g a t e r u m o r s of Frenchmen stirring the Miniscink Indians into re­ volt against the English The rum ors proved false but show ed A re nt Schuyler's deep com mit­ ment to the crown and his fellow colonists From his many missions for Governor Fletcher, he became acquainted with the Pom pton area. In 1695,

he and Anthony Brockholst formed a company to purchase in dian land in what is now Wayne Town­ ship. In 1697, they received a land patent from the East Jersey Proprietors

tlandt Late in the year of 1607, Arent moved into the house that is most com­ m o n ly k n o w n as th e Schuyler-Colfax house in Pompton, New Jersey On June 22, 1700 Jenneke Schuyler died. Arent re­ m arried, one Swantie Van Duyckhuysen About the

year 1700 is when Arent purchased s large tract of land from M r Edmund K i n g s l a n d o f N ew B arbado es Neck. This tract of land extended from the Passaic River to the Hackensack River, and approximately from what is now Melrose Avenue in present day North Arl­ ington, south to approx­ imately the Erie Railroad, Kearny He bought this N ew B a rb a d o e s Neck property in 1710 for three

h u ndred pounds. This turned out to be one of his wisest investments as lat­ er events will show. He further expanded his land holdings, a few years lat­ er, by acquiring all of the property owned by the wid­ ow Sandford. This proper­ ty extended from his pre­ vious line of the Erie Rail­ road southward to the Newark Bay. He built his Manor home overlooking the Passaic Continued on 13a

The Sch u yler Copper Mine

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The Van Winkles J a c o b W a li g e n c a m e from the v illage of Winkel. fifteen m iles from a larger town known as Hoorn in the North of Holland. He sailed to New Amsterdam (New York C ity ) aboard the ship Koning (King) David com m anded by Cap­ tain De Vries, in the year 1635. After a short stop here, he continued his voy­ age on board the same v e ss e l u p t h e H udson River one hundred and fif­ ty miles to the Dutch sett 1 e m e n t o f R e n s s e la e rw y c k , subse­ quently called Greenbush, opposite Albany. He re­ lum ed to New Amsterdam in Jan ua ry 1639 and about 1645 m a r r i e d T r y n tje Jacobs. Old D utch records have his n am e listed as “Jacob W aelingen.” O n A u g u s t 29, 1641, Jacob W alingen, or Jacob Waling Van W inkle (as he is now k n o w n ), was chosen one of the board of ‘The Twelve M e n ," represent­ atives of the ‘‘Commonalty of M anhattan, Breuckelen and P avonia. the latter now as Jersey City, New Jersey,'' to suggest means of punishment of the Indi­ ans for a m urder they had c o m m itte d . T h is board was abolished the follow­ ing year. In the year 1649, Jacob Waling Van W inkle and his associates petitioned the Dutch West India Com­ pany for permission to set­ tle and erect a Dutch com­ munity on Fresh (now Con­ necticut) R iv e r This peti­ tion was denied May 12. 1650, “ Jac o b Waelingen"

was at Rensselaerwyck with his wife and children, and was about to leave the colony. Efforts were made to restrain h im by offering him the choice of several farms, but he declined On October 1. 1650, he re­ ceived perm ission to move to M anhattan, where his son Jacob was baptized in the Dutch C hurch “in the fort" on October 16th of the same year He and his wife were enrolled as members of the D utch Church of New A m sterdam before the end of 1650. In 1654, P e tru s Stuyvesant gave a patent for land a m ounting to fiftythree acres to "Jacob W a len g en v a n H o o r n .'’ The land w as situated a ro u n d B e r g e n P o in t. Jacob W aling settled this land and built a com­ fortable fa rm house on it. He and other settlers of the present Jersey City area were driven from their homes by irate Indians in September, 1655 Over one hun d red D u t c h settlers were killed, m any taken captive, and their homes, cattle and grain destroyed. The Dutch retaliated and the num ber of Indian casu­ alties was staggering. On A pril 17, 1657. Jacob Waling was admitted to the rights of a small burgher, w hich entitled him to the freedom of trade, and the privilege of being received into the guilds of M anhattan. He died between that date and August 17th of the same year By his wife, Tryntje. who died M ay 11. 1677,

Jacob W aling had seven children: Maritje Jacobse. Waling Jacobse, see bio­ graphical sketch. Grietje Jacobse, bom about 1646; m arried Elias Michielse (Vreeland) Au­ gust 30. 1665. J a c o b J a c o b s e , bo rn about 1650; m arried (first) Aeltje D aniels, December 15, 1675; (second) Grietje Hendricks Hollings, March 26, 1695. ( J a c o m y n t ij e Jacobse, born about 1652; married Roelof Stetting Novemer 24, 1672. S ym o n J a c o b s e , b a p ­ tized Ju ly 24, 1653; m ar­ ried Annetje Adrianse Sip, December 15, 1675. Annetje Jacobse, bom January 2, 1656; married Johannis Steynmets, No­ vember 30, 1676. W a lin g J a c o b V an Winkle (W aling Jacobsen), eldest son of Jacob Waling Van W inkle, was bom about 1650. He lived at his father's fa rm in Bergen (Jersey C ity ) and must have received some for­ mal education because of the high regard in which he was held by his fellow colonists He was married to C a t h a r in a M ic h ie lse (Vreeland), a daughter of M ic h a e l V r e e la n d , on March 15, 1667. On August 15, 1674, he was nom inated by the set­ t le r s o f B e r g e n fo r Schepen (Judge or Jus­ tice) of the "Court of Jus­ tice at Bergen " This was a court with county juris­ diction. and “ only honest, intelligent persons, owners

The Copper Mine Continued from 12a R iv e r , t r e e - lin e d a n d crystal d e a r The house stood in the vicinity of where Bennet Avenue now runs Arent had in his employ some two hundred slaves for il required a lot of man­ power to run a plantation of this size Some of the slaves lived in the attic of the m anor house; these were house servants Oth­ ers were housed in small wooden shacks clustered in different sections of the plantation. It was one of these slaves, legend has it. who, while plowing, came across a green stone He brought it to his master who im m ed iately sent it to England for analysis The sample stone was found to be 80 percent copper So p le a s e d w a s A re nt Schuyler not only over his found fortune, but, also over the faithfulness of his slave, he granted the old man three wishes The old slave thought for awhile, then m ade his decision to stay with his master for­ ever. to have a fancy dressiilg* gown like liis master and some pipe to b a c c o A r e n t w as amazed at the old man s m o d e s t d e s ir e s and granted him another wish Once again, he old man thought, all he requested was additional pipe tobac­ co This story, though poignant, is only folklore, for. the truth of the matter was. Arent was aware of th e c o p p e r b e fo re he bought the property The year of this so-called ‘dis­ covery" was 1712. and must have proved quite a shock to E dm und King­ sland of hearing of it Schuyler's gain was his loss In the beginning, opera­ tions at the m in e were lim ­ ited to strip mining The ore was lo a d ed into horse drawn carts and taken along a path that followed present day Schuyler Ave­ nue to the brook where it was washed The brook was in the vicinity of the Schuyler Hose Company The ore was then taken to be loaded aboard ship at a dock on the Passaic River in the area of Stew­ art Avenue In 1723. Arent Schuyler aw arded a con­ tract to M r John Walters to ship a il his ore to Bristol and other British ports

C o p p e r a n d a il o th e r m e t a ls c o u l d not be smelted in the Colonies This was the only pro­ vision of the Navigation Acts to w hich Great Brit­ ain held her colonies Although Arent did not work the m ine as ex­ tensively as his son Jo hn , prior to his death he had shipped 1.386 tons to the Bristol Copper and Brass Works in E n g la nd Although Arent Schuyler was a very busy man, run­ ning the m ine and manag­ ing his huge plantation, he still found tim e to enter into works of civic im ­ portance In 1710, wheon Arent first c am e to New Barbadoes Neck, the only church the people had was a lean-to a ffa ir called the Dutch R eform ed Church of Second R iv e r, presided over by Reverend Henncus Coens In 1726. Arent gave the church a large grant and a new stone edifice was erected In re­ turn for this large dona­ tion, Arent and his family were to have the rows of pews in the southwest cor­ ner of the church Further, he and a group of church elders would iiave the right to hire or fire m inisters as they saw fit A church service in Arent's day lasted an hour and a half in the morning, and an hour and a half in the afternoon with time in between to eat. Pews, in the old church, had doors at either end People in winter would bring their own foot warmers for there was no heat in the church and the services were very long It can be n o te d h e r e t h a t t h is church, though remodeled several tim e s, is still in existence and still receives funds from the original grant of 1726 The past is still serving the present as well as the fu tu re Arent Schuyler also built the first roads in the New Barbadoes Neck area now known as North Arlington starting w ith the Belleville* Turnpike w hich originally extended from the mines in the above mentioned area to the Passaic River As production at the mines increased a n d larger sail­ ing ships were needed, the necessity of a port on the Hackensack R iver became evident. He, therefore, ex­ tended the Belleville Tum-

pike lo the Hackensack River The Turnpike was a plank road m ade from ce­ dar wood cut from the ce­ dar forests in the meadow area Arent built another road for com m ercial use that traveled up the hill from Schuyler Avenue, out through the Holy Cross Cemetery and curved on Ridge Road into Stover Av­ enue It then turned down the hill to join Belleville Pike at the Passaic River (Schuyler Avenue. Holy Cross Cemetery. Ridge Road and Stover Avenue are all present day names of locations in the North Arlington area of New Barbadoes Neck ) Arent Schuyler was m ar­ ried three tim es first to Jenneke Teller, who died June 22, 1700. he married 2d. Jan ua ry 2. 1703, Swantie V a n D u y c k h u y s e n . daughter of John Van Duyckhuysen, and grand­ d a u g h t e r o f E lb e r t Stoothoff She died in 1723. Arent m arrie d 3d, 1724, Maria W alter daughter of Robert W alter, daughtergrand of Jac ob Leisler Death cam e peacefully to Arent Schuyler on July 3, 1730 Children o f A rent and Jenneke Schuyler: M a r g a r e ta S chuyler, bapt Sept 27, 1685, in Albany, m arrie d Charles Oliver P hilip Schuyler, bapt Sept 11, 1687, in Albany; married Hester Kingsland. M aria Schuyler bapt Oct 6, 1689. d y Ju d ik Schuyler, bapt Mar 11. 1692. d y C a s p a r u s S c h u y le r, bapt , New York, May 5, 1695, died Apr 13. 1754. married 1st J a n e ---. 2d Mary --W illiam Schuyler, bapt New York, Jun e 2d 1700. d.y. Children of Arent and S w a n t ie (2 n d w ife ) Schuyler J o h n S c h u y le r born 1705-1772 m arried Anne Van Renesslaer Peter Schuyler, born 1710-1762 m a r r ie d 1st. Hester W alter; 2nd Mary Adomah Schuyler, bom 1716-1762 m a r r ie d Gertrude Van Rensselaer Eve Schuyler, married Peter B ayard Cornelia Schuyler, m ar­ ried Pierce de Peyster. Continued on 15a

of real estate, who wtre lover* of peace and profesaors of the Reformed R e l i g i o n " c o u ld be “chosen as judges” of this court. W a l i n g J a c o b Van Winkle received an Indian deed from Sachen Captahem for the territory of Acquackanonk, March 28, 1679. The Acquackanonk grant stretched from the northerly line of Newark, New Jersey, along the w e s t e r ly b a n k o f the Passaic R iv e r, to the base of the m oun tain beyond the Passaic F a lls at Paterson, New Jersey. This area was comprised of more than eleven thousand acres of la n d . “ W a lin g Jac o b s' was a m em b er of the gen­ eral assembly of the prov­ in c e o f A c q u a c k a n o n k (Passaic) in 1692, and the following year was a repr e s e n t a t i ve fr o m Barbadoes Neck. On M arch 26, 1687, ac­ cording to the first deed for Rutherford, property

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Hackensack, John Berry sold to W aling Jacob Van Winkle the western part of his land lying in the pres­ ent Borough of Rutherford, and thus M r Van Winkle became the first settler He enlarged an existing s tru c tu re th a t had belonged to Captan John Berry on a little hill just south of the present Union Avenue B ridge at approx­ imately D arw in and Hast­ ings Avenues The foundation could still be seen in the early nineteen-forties. Kingsland, wanting to dispose of the northern­ most portion of his property , s o ld it to a B a r th o lo m e w F e u rt of New York M r Feurt then sold it to Jac o n Van Northstrant (Van Nordstrandt) of Bergen (Jersey City). The section of the Feurt patent was sold to Jacob Waling Van Winkle. The following deed is from the Van W inkle fam ily collec­

tion and appears on page fourteen ' Things Old and New by M G Higgs, 1W "This indenture, made this twenty-eighth day of February, in the Sixth years of the Reign of our now sovereign Lady Ann. by the G rac e of God over English &c Queen anno Dom. one thousand seven hundred and seven Be­ tween Bartholom ew Feurt of the City of New York March and Magdilane his wife testified by her being a party to a n d Ensealing and Delivery of these pres­ ents of the one part and J a c o b W a llin g s e n V an Winkel of the county of Es­ sex in the province of New Jersey, Y eom an, of the other p a r t W itnesseth, that the said Bartholomew Feurt for and in Considera­ tion of five pounds Current m oney o f the province a fo r e s a n d a c e r t a in greater and m ore valuable Consideration and Greater Sum of m oney by the said

Ja c o b W alin g sen Van Winkle, in hand at and before the Ensealing and Delivery of these presents, to the said Bartholomew Feurt, well and duly paid and Satisfied, the Receipt h e reo f is h e re b y a c k n o w le d g e d and himselfe therewith Satis­ fied Contented and Paid &c Stc And the herby pay­ ment ensures every part of the premises with the ap­ purtenances for the benefit and behoofe of him the s'd Jacob, his heirs and as­ signs against the said Bartholomew Feurt. his wife their heirs and as­ signs. and against all per­ sons C laym ing or pretend­ ing to Clay m e any Estate Right title or Interest - of in o r to t h e a b o v e bargained premises." The first road in the area was Union Avenue, also known as Sandford Lane and Boiling Spring Road, originally thought to be an Indian trail During the

mid-eighteenth century, it was widened but, basical­ ly, remained a did path until the turn of the cen­ tury at which tim e it was paved Jacob WalinK Van Winkle's home was situ­ ated just south of Union Avenue and the Passaic River where, in 1716. a road two rods wide was established to run from the northeast corner of Jacob Waling Van Winkle's house to the bounds of Jacob Van N o rd stra n d s line This road extended from about the line of Paterson Ave­ nue to Union Avenue In November of the following year, the road was made four rods wide and ex­ tended to the Belleville bridge, now known as R iv ­ erside Avenue The next oldest road was Meadow Road, also known by the names of Newark Avenue and Hackensack Street This road was commonly referred to as the road fro m N ew ark to Hackensack

The leader Newspapers • Bergen County Tn-Crntnmal

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Lyndhurst Gets No Bids On 50 Acres of Meadows Board Told Dumping Right Would Speed Sale as Unit at $1,000 Per Acre Base LYNDHURST—The 50.24 acres of town-owned m eadow­ land w hich was put up for public sale at a $1,000 per acre minimum, drew no bidders last night at the Board of Com­ missioners meeting. •

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How would you like to buy 50.24 acres o f prime meadowland at $1,000 per acre? No need to stand in line. T he land was put up for sale 17 years ago. There were no takers. Today the land acreage would bring upward of $5 million. Why wouldn't anybody put up $1,000 per acre? The township was trying to dispose of tax title liens, levies put against properties on which taxes were delinquent. The meadowland tract was one such parcel. Later Lyndhurst put up 440 acres at even lower rates. There were no takers. In those days meaH^wland was asses­ sed on the tax rolls at $200 per acre. Many sales were negotiated at that figure. Bellemead C orp. which has established nourishing industrial parks in Rutherford and Lyndhurst, paid less than per acre for the huge tract it acquired about 30 years ago. Recently Bellemead sold off some of the acreage to a I rench investment firm and the going price was said to be better than $100,000 per acre. Carlstadt sold off much of its meadowland 30 years ago for about $25 per acre. Today the time for the meadowland has come. It took three centuries.

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Freeholder Director ROBRET P. PALLOTTA

GERALD A. CALABRESE

ARTHUR F. JONES

Deputy Freeholder Director ARCHIE F. HAY

BARBARA CHADWICK

RICHARD A. MOLA

DORIS MAHALICK

T h e B O A R D

JOHN F. CURRAN

CARMELLA PAVLICK

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C O U N T Y G O V E R N M E N T

Thursday. June 16. IMJ IS a

The Leader Newtpapert Bergen County Tn-Centenntal E a r ly L e a d e n

O f S o u th

B e rg e n

The Kips O f Rutherford Continued from 13a

The original home of Pe­ a r Kip still stands on the comer of E rie Avenue and Meadow R oad. John Stagg purchased this land from B a r th o lo m e w F e u rt on February 2. 1707. John Stagg and his brother, Wil­ liam . then sold the land to Peter Kip on March 23, 1741, and Peter Kip lived there for m ore than thirty yeats. The hom e and lands remained in the Kip family in excess of one hundred and nine years. In 1850, it was sold to Daniel Van Winkle and fo r many years was referred to as the Daniel Van W inkle Home­ stead. Peter K ip of Rutherford (1696-1787) was the direct descendant of Hendrick Hendricksen Kip. bom in Niewenhuys, Amsterdam in 1600. He m arried Tryntie Lubberts, twenty-five years old on April 20. 1624 H e n d ric k H endricksen Kip cam e to New Nether­ lands with his wife and five children in the year 1637. He died about 1665 and is­ sued seven children ... Abraham, Isaack, Berrt je n , J a c o b , H e in d r ik , Tryntjen and Femmetje H e n d ric k H endricksen Kip, the younger was bom in 1633 and m arried Anna de Browne. He died in Flatbush, New York in the year 1670. He had two sons ... H e n d r i c k I I I a n d Nicasius Kip. Nicasius Kip was bom in Flatbush, New York in 1666. He m arried Antie Breyant at Bergen on De( cember 20, 1691 She was baptized in New York, Sep­ tember 10, 1671, and was the daughter of Peter Cornelisse Breyent and Hendriecktje Arents who were married Ju ly 31. 1670 Nicasius Kip died at Polifly. New Jersey on October 10, 1713. Nicasius and An­ tie had eight children Hendrick, Peter, Isaac, Cornelius, Jacob, Annate, Catarina and Elizabeth. Peter Kip was bom in Hackensack, about 1605, and m arrie d there, on March 5, 1720, Elsie Van der Beek who was baptized on December 29, 1700 She was the daughter of Paulus Van der Beek and Jannetie Johannes, widow of Jacob Colve The will of Peter Kip was dated M arch 21, 1764, and probated May 26. 1787 ‘He nam es wife. Elsie Kip. to whom he leaves the m anagement of his state unless she should marry again He gives his Dutch Bible to his oldest son, Hendrick K ip ‘for his Birth rig h t," or a young horse, if he prefers. He leaves him also the planta­ tion where he then lived and the meadow on the west s id e o f B e rrie s Creed, " for which he was to pay his sister, Jannetie fWO after the death of her mother He leaves the plantation where they both lived called the Pollifly to his son A braham Kip in case he left a child or chil­ dren, but if he left no issue it was to be divided be­ tween his son Hendrick and daugher Jannetie. or their heirs He leaves his right in the place of Monagje to ^iis sons Hen­ drick and A braham , and if the latter leaves no issue then it is to be divided be­ tween Hendrick and Ja n ­ netie. If both Hendrick and Abraham inherit this plan­ tation. they were to pay their sister Jannetie each OOO. He appoints his three children his executors He also requests that if his daughter Jan n etje should m arry after his decease that she should receive a negro or negro wench, and a ‘ good outset so as is reato n a b le a m o n g th e nebours Peter Kip and Elsie Van der Beek issued three children ... H e n d r ic k . Abraham and Jannetje Hendrick Kip. the first •oh Ot Peter K ip. was bom September 1. 1720 and was baptised in Hackensack on September U. 1720 He married Jan n e tje Banta on v December 4, 1741. They is­

sued six children ... Peter, Cornelia. E lsjin, Jannetje, Agnietje and Jacob. The will of Henry Kip of New Barbadoes, County of Bergen, was dated Sep­ tember ^ 6 , 1793 and was probated on January 7. 1797 “ He leaves his wife Jannety all of his estates, real and personal, until her death or death or remar­ riage he gives eldest son P e t e r h is n e g r o m a n n a m e d T o m f o r h is birthright, and all of his la n d a n d m e a d o w s in Counties of Bergen, Essex or elsewhere, except 50 acres of land which is part of the land he purchased of Waling Van Vorst, and this he leaves to grandson, Henry Kip, son of Peter Kip. He divides the re­ mainder of his estate be­ tween the following heirs Henry, son of daughter Annanietye. dee d daughters Elsye and Jannetye; chil­ d r e n o f d a u g h e r Annaietye, d e e d ; grandson Jacob Vreeland, son of daughter Crelia, deed; and he appoints as Ex­ ecutors his. son Peter, sonin-law Jacob Van Winkle and g ra n d s o n Jac o b Vreeland '' He left a large estate and it is of interest to read in the in v e n to r y and a p ­ praisal the values of his v a rio u s s la v e s , "n e g ro man L75. wench HeserL65; child Dine L15; male child Tom L10. In 1682. Governor John Berry gave his daughter, Hannah Hall, a portion of his lands in Rutherford Mrs Hall lived in New York all of her life and her little interst in the New Barbadoes Neck property and had sold it to Gerritt Van Vorst in 1720. In ‘W infield's History of the Founders of Hudson C o u n t y " p a g e 432. he states: "Gerritt Van Vorst resided at New Barbadoes Neck, but it is doubtful that he built a home on Rutherford property " Gerritt Van Vorst (May 1689-1784) was a direct de­ scendant of Cornelius Van V o r s t , w h o , w ith his younger brother Jan, emi­ g r a t e d f r o m V o rst in B e lg iu m to New Amsterdam about the year 1633. There is little known about Cornelius’ first wife, his second wife Jannetje Ides, died in April 1641 Cornelius died in 1638. He issued one son, Ide Van Vorst. who was born about 1636 and was the first white child born in New Amsterdam Ide married Hillctje Ja n s on October 15. 1652. they had six chil­ dren Their third child, Cornelius Van Vorst, was born on Ju ly 30. 1662 He married Fitjegerrise Van Wagenen on April 6. 1685 They had eleven children Gerritt Van Vorst, sixth child of Cornelius and Fitzegerrise. was born in May of 1689 He married Sarah Van Winkle on May 22, 1714. Gerritt and Sarah had eight children. Fitje... Annitje. Jenneke Cornelius bom 1729. m a r r ie d f ir s t . A n netje Toers, second, Annatje O u t w a t e r , w id o w o f Abraham Berry Waling ... died very young Waling ... bom March 30, 1731 see biographical sketch M a ritje ... C atrina Gerritt Van Vorst died ,n 1784 and his will was proved on June 15, 1785 He leeded his properties in Kutherford to his two sons C o r n e liu s a n d W a lin g These lands extended west from Berry 's Creek, north­ ward to I'nion and Hackett Place W a lin g V a n V o rst (March 30. 1731-1814) was the third son of Gerritt and Sarah Van Vorst He m ar­ ried C atrina Van Eydestyn in September of 1755. They issued five children Gerritt 1756-1756 Sarah 1761 Gerritt June 22,^764

Casparus ... September 3. 1760 H endrick... On May 27. 1785. Waling Van Vorst conveyed his property in Rutherford to Hendrick Kip. After dis­ posing of all his father's property in Bergen Coun­ ty, Van Vorst moved his family back to Hoboken The will of Henry P. Kip of Township of Union, Bergen County, was dated May 18. 1878 and probated August 22. 1881. “ He nam es as his heirs h is w i f e , E f f i e , a n d daughters: Catherine, wife

of George G. Van Riper, Arrianna, wife of George A. N ew kirk; Euphemia, wife of John Terhune; son, Peter H. Kip; and grand­ c h ild , J a n V a n D ie n , d a u g h t e r o f d e ce ased d a u g h te r C la r is s a Van Dien. Peter H K ip the fourth child of Henry P. and Effie Kipp, died unm arried He was one of the founders of the Rutherford National Bank which later merged and becam e part of the p resen t N a tio n a l C o m ­ munity Bank of New Je r­ sey.

Service organizations have sparked many of the finest moments in South Bergen history. However, Kutherford Rotary Club, at the age of56, is probably the oldest and one of the most active of all of them. Rotarv ilseir came into existence in Chicago in 1905. The Rutherford unit was formed in 1919 and has flourished ever since, \hove is a pic­ ture of members who had perfect attendance records in 195(1. 5>o S O § C § * < E

Z Z H X E 5 E ^ E E E > » c O § C § o < E S : - 5 E • ----- :0

C o o p er L u m b e r C o m p a n y “ S in c e

1 8 8 5 ”

W e ’re c e le b r a t in g o u r 9 8 t h y e a r a n d w o u ld li k e t o t a k e t h e o p p o r ­ t u n it y to c o n g r a t u la t e B e r g e n C o u n t y o n it s and we hope to b e s e r v in g o u fo r a n o th e r th y e a r s .

O ur Founder JO S E P H

P. C O O P E R

M ayor of Rutherford 1891-1892

*■rr- ' u f l i n l t i

W e w ould also like to thank all of th o se w ho have h elp ­ ed us p ro g re ss from the sm all beginning in 1885 to our m od­ ern facility at Union A venue & Route 17 in E a st Rutherford.

........

Cooper Lumber Co. today

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The Leader Newspapers -Bergen County Tri-Centenmal

It Was Early In The Morning

Bithplace O f A University

A t 9 : 1 5 A . M . (so says the clock in the rear of the room) on a day in 1913, a photographer took this picture inside the Little Red Scboolbouse in Lyndhurst. The early hour may account for the beatific faces of the students. However, the late Edward Roeschke, a

B

Old Ivison Castle, once a monument to the distinguished ;ind wealthy early settlers of Rutherford, now is noted as the birthplace of Fairleigh Dickinson University. The Ivison fortune was built upon books. Knowledge is the rock upon which the university was founded. In a mere 34 years — F I)l was created in 1941 and accepted its first students in 1942 — the university advanced from a small two-year '■community College" designed to meet the educational and cultural needs of the student, the community and socie­ ty to one of the nation's largest privately operated educa­ tional plants. It is now the seventh largest independent in­ stitution of higher education in the country — with cam ­ p u s e s in R u t h e r f o r d . Te a n e c k - H a c k e n s a c k .

Horham-Madison and Wroxton, England, and it holds classes at St. Croix, one of the U.S. Virgin Islands, Fort Monmouth, Wayne. The university, under the brilliant direction of Dr. Peter Sammartino, took a mere six years to achieve four-year status and 14 years that of a universi­ ty. Today in all its branches the university has 8,000 full­ time undergraduates. 5,800 part-time undergraduates, 4,700 graduate students and 400 dental students. And it all came about because the hospitable doors of Ivison Castle opened wide to men and women of courage and imagination. Local folks can still remember the chic Union Club affairs once held in the castle. Others can remember if for its swim­ ming pool (now boarded over), tennis courts, now used for parking lots, and the gracious landscaping.

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member of the class (he’s in the rear with a necktie), said the good order was due entirely to the strict discipline enforced by the teacher, Edith Rice, stand­ ing in the rear. There were double benches in those days - and three classes in the single room.

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e n t e n n i a l s

In o r d e r to provide fo r c o u rts a n d b e tte r lo cal g o v e rn m e n t, as the E a s t Je rs e y are a b e c a m e m o re p o p u la te d , a n act w a s p a ss e d on M a r c h 11, 1675 to e s ta b lis h a “ C o u n ty ” v ag u e ly d e s c rib e d as “ B e r g e n a n d the a d ja c e n t p la n t a ­ tions a b o u t th e m .” O n M a r c h 1, 1683 a n A c t established th e C o u n ty “ to c o n t a in ” a ll se ttle m e n ts b e ­ tw een th e H u d so n a n d H a c k e n s a c k R iv e r s , b e g in n in g at C o n s ta b le s H ook, a n d so to extend to th e u p p e r m ost b o u n d s o f the P ro v in c e of E a s t J e r s e y , no rth w a rd b e tw e e n sa id R iv e r s .

t e n d e d f r o m th e H a c k e n s a c k R iv e r to th e P a s s a ic a n d P equanno ck R iv e r s . In fa c t, p a r t of B e rg e n C o u n ty ex tended in to a p o rtio n o f p resen t d a y R o c k la n d C o u n ty , N e w Y o rk . B e rg e n C o u n ty w as g r e a t ly reduced in size w ith the f o r m a t io n of P a s s a ic C o u n ty in 1837 a n d H u d s o n C o u nty in 1840.

T he g r e a te r p a rt o f B e rg e n C o u nty r e m a in e d w ith in E ssex C o u n ty u n t il the year 1710, w h e n its w e s te r n bo un daries w e re ex­

T e c h n ic a lly , B e rg e n C o u n ty sh o u ld h a v e tw o T ri- C entennial C e le b r a tio n s , one th is y e a r a n d one in th e y e a r 2010.

T he n a m e B erg en w as firs t used by the e a r ly D u tc h settlers to id e n ­ tify th e ir s e ttle m e n ts in p re se n t d a y J e r s e y C ity . M o st o f those settlers h a d co m e fr o m a s m a ll v illa g e n o r t h of A n te v e rp , H o lla n d n a m e d “ B e r g e n of Z o o n i.”

The South Bergen County Board O f Realtors, A fter 6 2 Years Congratulates Bergen County

R E A L T O R ' W H F T H F R YOU S F t.L OR BU Y

On Their 300th A nniversary . RUTHERFORD 07070

Van Winkle & Liggett 85 Orient Way Tel. 939-4343

Justin Realty Co.

300Union Ave Tel 939 7500

Kurgan-Bergen Inc. 41 Park Ave. Tel. 939-6200

Latorraca Realty Corp.

Susanne C. Bingham Realties 58 Union Ave. Tel 933-2213

Tel. 939-8000

Frank P. Nisi 14 Ames Ave Tel. 438-4421

Joseph C. Barnet 750 Paterson Ave Tel. 935-6888 WALLINGTON 07057 Fenix Real Estate Inc. 60 Union Blvd. Tel . 472-5222 SECAUCUS

RG Realty 151 Park Ave.

Tel. 438-2533 Charles B. Swensen Inc. 149 Chestnut St Tel. 935-4141 Prestia Realty Inc. 71 Park Ave Tel. 939-3912 A.W. Van Winkle ft Co. 2 Station Square Tel. 939-0500

A S *

705 Ridge Road Tel 933-3333 Vincent Auteri 476 Riverside Ave. Tel . 933-0306

EAST RUTHERFORD 07073

30 Park Ave. Tel. 935-7848

Ellwood S. New Inc. 4 6 Chestnut St.

LYNDHURST07071 Abbott & Associates

N.B. Kirk, Real Estate 18 Radio Avenue, Tel. 865-1818 LITTLE FERRY Gentry Realty Associates 159 Liberty Street Tel. 641-1333 CARLSTADT 07072 Harold A. Pareti 404 Hackensack St. Tel. 430-0550 Robert Zimawnnafln 335 Hackensack St. Tel. 939-1675

Bogle Inc. 300 Stuyvesant Ave. Tel. 939-1076 3-0 Agency 280 Stuyvesant Ave. Tel 939-1022 Gibbs Agency 1 Ridge Road Tel. 939-2100 Hometown Agency 613 Ridge Road Tel. 438-3320 The Perrotta Agency Inc. 137 Ridge Road Tel. 939-2030

USE T H E S E R V I C E S O F A R E A L T O R

Frank A. Volpe 158 Summit Ave Tel. 933 8414

WOOD-RIDGE 07075 Albert Gorab Agency 257 Hackensack St. Tel 438-1133 Jean Robert Realty 197 Valley Blvd. Tel. 939-2224 HarveyW. Young 271 Valley Blvd Tel. 939-8200

NORTH ARLINGTON 07032 Leonard & Cheval Real Estate It Insurance 77 Ridge Road Tel. 991-7500 O'Connor-McMullen Agency 600 Ridge Road Tel. 998-3600

Walter F. Sapinski 452 Ridge Road Tel. 438-6661

O'Hara Agency 132 Ridge Road Tel. 998-0753

Savino Agency 251 Ridge Road Tel. 438-3121

Wayne K. Thomas 114 Ridge Road Tel. 998-0753

The Leader Newspapers -Bergen County Tri-Centennial

Thursday, June 16,1983 ■17-a

William Carlos Williams: A Memoir

“ ...B u t th e o nly p er­ son I e v e r w orked w ith w as K it t y H o a g la n d .” W illia m C a r lo s W illia m s

P a r is R e view S u m m e r - F a ll, 1964

M y h u s b a n d an d I firs t m e t D r . W illia m s a n d h is w ife , F lo r­ ence, in th e mid-l930s, a t th e h o m e of the S p e n c e s i n R u th e r fo r d , new frie n d s of o u rs an d old frie n d s of the W il­ lia m s ’. M y husban d, C la y to n H o a g la n d , w a s e d ito r ia l w riter a n d lite r a r y c r itic for the N e w Y o r k Sun. B ill se e m e d h ap p y to m e e t u s - C la y to n h ad re v ie w e d tw o of his books, p r a is in g th em . A fter d in n e r , B ill read a lo u d th e u n p u b lish e d lib re tto o f h is opera, “ G e o r g e W a s h in g ­ t o n . ” I t w a s im -

one of th e firs t p u b lic a p p e a r a n c e s o f B ill as a p r o m in e n t poet in his o w n to w n . At the L ittle T h e a te r, B ill an d F lo r e n c e c a m e to see b o th m y p la y s an d s a id th e y w e re proud of m e . I th e n got p e r­ m is s io n to d ra m a tiz e a story f r o m B ill’s, “ L if e A lo n g T he P a s s a ic R iv e r ” ; his book of s h o rt stories. I chose “ To F a ll A s le e p ,” a n d changed the title to "M a llo w s in the M o o n lig h t.” B ill C a m e to a reh earsal. H e w a s a ne rv o u s as a d e b u ta n te , and a s­ sured us no one w ould co m e to see it. He a g r e e d to a ll m y c h a n g e s , s a y in g , “ Y o u ’ve m a d e a p lay ot i t . ” I t w a s a m ost succe ssful one; only one p e r fo rm a n c e . M ore th a n a hundred people sh o w e d u p and s t u f f e d t h e m s e lv e s into the c r a m p e d and

b r o u g h t A lle n G in s b e rg - th a t w as the f ir s t t im e I m et h im , a n d I r e m e m b e r h im as a p a le , clean­ sh av e n y o u n g m a n in a b ro w n s u it, w ho was of a v e ry intense, ner­ vous te m p e r a m e n t, an d w a n te d to ta lk only to B ill. T h at w as before “ H o w l" w as even c o n ce iv e d . B ill w as in h is e le m e n t in the v a r io u s groups; th e c o n v e r s a tio n s w ere a liv e w ith new fictio n , ne w a rt and new p o e try . *

*

n a tio n a l p u b lic a tio n s , has lectured on A m e r ic a n a n d Iris h lite r a tu r e a t New Y o rk U n iv e r s ity and v a r io u s o th e r c o l­ leg e s. T au g h t A m e r ic a n h isto ry at F a i r l e i g h D ic k in s o n U n iv e rs ity , a n d for h er w o rk in th is field w as a w a r d e d th e N a ­ tio n a l M e d a l of the

B Y K A T H L E E N (K IT T Y ) HOAGLAND, RUTHERFORD

tions of th e A m e ric a n R e v o lu tio n . H e r m o st recent w o rk , a short histo ry o f E llis Is la n d a n d its re sto ratio n, w as p u b lis h e d in 1976. She is n a tio n a l ViceC h a ir m a n o f the R e ­ s to re E l l i s Is la n d C o m m itte e , a n d a m em be r of the R u th e r fo r d Civil R ig h ts C o m m is s io n .

*

K A T H L E E N H O A G L A N D , author a n d h is t o r ia n , w as born in Ir e la n d . She is a d e s c e n d a n t of tw o p r o m in e n t Ir is h fa m i­ lies f a m o u s for their poets, s c h o la r s , rebels and statesm en th ro u g h o u t Ire lan d 's history. H e r novel, “ F id d le r in the S k y,” receive d n a tio n a l a c ­ c la im ; h e r anthology, “ 1000 Y e a r s of Irish P o e tr y ,” is th e sta n ­ d a rd re fe re n c e work in the fie ld . She has re v iew e d books for

D r. W illia m s in a “ fo rm a l” p o rtra it. [>r. W illia m s a n d S u s a n a t th e (ire a t F affs, in s p ir a tio n a n d p rim e m e ta p h o r o f h is epic w ork,

"f'aterson

P etrie’s Dream: W illiam Carlos W illiams Mural Ferdinand P e trie, one of the finest artists in A m erica, like D r William Carlos Williams has withstood the temptations of moving to far places in which to allow his art to grow. Instead P etrie has remained a painter in his own attic studio where adm irers clomp in to see and buy his work Many m agazines have used Petrie covers. Readers Digest is among the most notable However, his work hangs in prominent galleries around the country

Some years ago Petrie was approached on painting a m u ra l depicting the h istory of Rutherford P e trie promptly sketched out a rough idea of what he would do One of the big panels would have encompassed Rutherford his­ tory through the life and works of Dr W illiam Carlos W illiam s.

still going on In this Centennial issue The News Ix-ader is proud to present the rough sketches drawn bv Petrie They portray W illiams and include some of his most famous lines Taken from the poem "G u lls " which was in­ cluded in a sm all brown book entitled "Al Que Quiere" the poem not only emphasizes W illiam's dedication to Rutherford but probably speaks for the artist P etrie as well

So far the money to pay for the m ural has not been available But efforts to raise the money and to get P e trie 's m ural into public view are

Loyal wife and helper, Mr*. Florence W illiam s.

p ressive. W e enjoyed each o th e r v e ry m u c h a nd fo u n d we had frie n d s in c o m m o n , B ill a n d S a lly B ird of P a ris , F ran ce; we h a d v is ite d th e m the p re v io u s y e a r. L ater, th a t e v e n in g , I told B ill h is fo r tu n e w ith c a rd s, t e llin g h im th a t very soon he w ould h a v e a new p u b lish e r a good one. A few days afterw ards, F lo r e n c e sto p p ed m e on P a r k Avenue, R u th e r fo r d , an d said th a t B ill w a s sta rtle d th a t m o r n in g by re­ c e iv in g a n offer of p u b lic a tio n fr o m a m an nam es Jam es L a u g h lin (N e w D ire c ­ tions). A nd thus be g a n a frie n d sh ip w h ich la s t e d until B ill’s d e a th in M a rc h , 1963. In 1938 w e jo in e d the R u th e r fo r d L ittle The­ a te r . T h i s g r o u p ’s p la y h o u s e w a s th e v a ­ c a n t lo ft o f a fo rm e r m o tio n p ic tu r e th e a­ ter. T h is g ro u p con­ v erted it to a reaso n­ a b le s e m b la n c e of a little th e a te r . By this tim e W illia m s was our f a m ily doctory a n d a good one. H e h e a rd a lo t abou t the L ittle T h e a te r fro m m e. E a r ly in 1939 B ill rea d h is p oety a t the g r o u p ’s m o n t h ly work-shop. T h is w as a g re at succe ss, an d

^

u n c o m f o r t a b le T h e a ­ ter. B ill w a s re ally th r ille d . O n e d a y I to ld h im he h a d a m in d like a b lo ttin g p a p e r, an d th a t I v is u a liz e d h u n ­ d reds of p ie c e s of blot­ tin g p a p e r w ith these m ir r o r im a g e s of his on-the-spot im ­ p ressions. “ W h a t do you do w ith th em . B ill,” I a s k e d . “ I keep th e m file d un d e r m y u n d e rw e a r in the bot­ to m d r a w e r of m y b u ­ r e a u , ” h e r e p li e d , g r in n in g . E very Sunday m o r n in g fo r y ears B ill c a m e to v is it us. We live d n e a rb y . W e u su ­ a lly h a d frien ds or ne ig h b o rs v is itin g us on S u n d a y m o rn in g s: p a in te rs , poets, no v ­ elists a n d professors. S o m e c a m e out fr o m New Y o r k : T hom as Wolfe, the great A m e r i c a n n o v e lis t , O liv e r St. J o h n Gogarty, the Ir is h m a n of let­ ters a n d f r ie n d of W il­ lia m B u tle r Yeats, w ere a m o n g th e m If B ill h a d p o e ts or other w r it e r s v is it in g h im , he w o u ld ta k e th e m alo n g to v is it us, too. B ill b r o u g h t to see us T h e o d o re R o e th k e , R o b e r t L o w e l l , to m e n tio n b u t tw o, were a m o n g th e m . To one of our evening p a r t ie s , tw o h o u rs before tim e , Bill

THE LANOING AT NEWARK, MAY. .666.\

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The Leader Newspapers ■Bergen County Tri-Centennial

How The Complex Grew

A P R IL , 1976— Seats are going in, and the outer skin o f

Giants Stadium is going up rapidly as work crews from the Frank Briscoe Co., prime contractor for both the Stadium and Racetrack, race towards Fall, 1976 opening dates. The distinctive pairs o f ramp towers at each comer o f the Stadium are moving upward, and the paving o f parking facilities has begun to the right o f the Racetrack.

M A Y, 1975— The first fingers o f steel have begun to reach skyward (foreground') as the superstructure o f Giants Stadium begins to rise in two places. Beyond the Stadium, placement o f steel fo r The Meadowlands Racetrack grand­ stand is moving forward rapidly, and the shape o f the lagoon in the Racetrack infield is becoming discernible.

i$m is march­ ing steadily forward, and large sections o f precast concrete planks that form the seating decks are in place. The Race­ track Grandstand is being closed in. and beyond it a complex of twelve barns to house more than 1,300 horses takes shape.

u t o f t h e m a r s h a n d a c r e s of cattail stalks and after the carcasses of a thousand great cedar roots that were buried for a century had been uprooted rose this great athletic center which has made the meadowlands an international byword. D E C EM B ER , 1975—Stadium steel placement is all but fin ished, and placement o f seating decks has kept pace under

headed by Project Manager Francis H. (Dutch) Werneke. and personnel of George A. Fuller Co., construction manager on the project for the Authority. Bernard J. (Barney) Kelly led the Fuller team. Over at the Racetrack. the one-mile multi-puroose oval o f the main track looks ready to go, and light stanchions help trace its path.



to Bergen County on your th A nniversary

3 0 0

SCA SERVICES, INC. . . .IS

A N A

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T R E A T M E N T .

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R E C O V E R Y

T H E A N D

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C O L L E C T IO N , D IS P O S A L

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R E S ID E N T IA L

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I Name I I I Address I I City I I

State

The Leader Newtpapers Bergen County Tn-Cenlemaal

Early Weddings In Bergen County /Veu’ 1804 1805 1810 1812 1814

1819 1810 1811 1860 1861

1861

1862 1874 1875

7hursday. June Ib. 19H3 19 a

JM fwfg

Barbadoes Neck jjnpSy

10 Nov.- E lia s M a rk e t to S a r a h V and e rh o o f Tf / / / ]h" 20 Apr.- J a m e s P e rry to M a r g a r e t V a n B la r c u m \ 13 Jan .- O liv e r B ro w n to P e te r V a n R ip e r 24 Dec.- J a n ie s Jo r o lm e n to M a r y K in g s la n d 28 Apr.- H e n ry H o s m a n to C a ty H este r 5 May- D a v id D ix o n to S a lly B aile y 6 Oct.- A b r a h a m S an fo rd to P h e b e W illia m s 3 Dec.- H e nry V an E m b u r g h to P eg gy Shepherd 13 Dec.- B arn e y B u d d to N a n c y L ockw ood 22 June- J o h n M o rris K een to P e n in a S anfo rd 26 Aug.- W illia m S ip to S a r a h T uers 26 Oct.- L ew is L . T ilm a n to M a r ia D a v is 22 Aug.- W illia m K in g s la n d to M rs. J u ly J u n e 21 July- J o h n T erh u ne to C a th e rin e Sheat 21 M ar.- A le xan der C a r m ic h e l to A n n H utch ing s 24 Apr.- Jo h n R . F u lto b to L iz z ie C u m m in g s 15 May- W illia m M a x w e ll to S a r a h J . Stevens 18 May- G ilb e r t V a n D e rb e c k to R a c h e l V an O rd e n 4 Aug.- J o h n H . L u k e n s to A n n E . A c k e r m a n 9 Aug.- A lb e rt L u te to M a ry J . D ow ns 2 Nov.- N ich o las M a n n in g to H a n n a h T h om p so n 23 Jan .- G eorge E . C o n k lin to M a r y E . A c k e rm a n 26 Jan .- P e te r G . W e sterv elt to M a r y E . B irley 26 Oct.- H e n ry M . C a n n o n to E liz a b e th B urp o 24 M ar.- J a m e s H . B u tle r to A m e lia H ouse R u t h e r f o r d

1865 1866 1867 1869 1870 1871 1873 1874

1875

1876

1877

1871 1873 1874 1875

1877

15 30 4 30 10 9 12 1 3 16 9 15 25 28 12 5 30 6 25 6 25 28

Nov.- W illia m H . D a v is to E liz a b e th B. K oster May- E d w a r d B la k is to n to A gnes Y e re an c e Sept.- C h a rle s G a r r a b r a n t to M a ry L .R . Lee Dec.- H e n ry H . Y e re a n c e to E llie T ay lor Feb.- S tephen P . V re e e lan d to A m a n d a M ac h e tte Sept.- H e n ry D u B o is to C a th a tin e J a n e W illia m s Dec.- C h a rle s Z im m e r m a n to V ic to ria n Z im m e r m a n May- A u gu st N a a le r to E liz a b e th T yler M ar.- S a m u e l W a r d to M in ie C u tle r Ronedee Feb.- W illia m N. O r r to A n n ie F . R obedee Apr.- G eorge A. W e a v e r to M a r g a r e t V e ld r a m July - T h o m as V ero to J a n e S m ith Oct.- Jo h n C. D ’B o ras to S a r a h E liz a b e th G re e n Oct.- A d ro lp h u s L a n d m a n n to E m m a J . V e ld ra n June- M a r k R e y n o ld s to L iz z ie S tew art July - T heodore T h o m a s H e n ry to M a r g a r e t B irch Sept.- Ja s o n S. S tra tto n to M a ttie w A. B row n Jan .- G eorge C. G a le to K a te B rin k e rh o ff Aug.- R ic h a r d C ook B u n tin g to E liz a b e th E m m a A thell Sept.- H e n ry V a r ic k G ilb e r t to J a n e Burgess Sept.- J o h n R o h re to J u li a V olz Feb.- Jo s e p h B a u m a n to R o s a Jo h n s o n

23 5 18 26 14 31 13 19 20 30 30

(F ir s t P re s b y te ria n C h u r c h o f U nio n , R e v . R o s w e ll W . S m ith , p asto r) June- M a n u e l F r e s n id a to A n n a E lozanet] H ay s Dec.- P ro s p e r J . L u c e to M a r y H . W h itta k e r Feb.- E d w a in T. G a lla w a y to H a r r ie t E lle n P a g e Nov.- W illia m S. O d e ll to E m ily M . M u n se ll Ju ly - E lb e r t M . S m ith to A n n ie M ach ee tte Aug.- E d w a r d P . D o ty to J a n ie L a m o n t June- W illia m D o r r in g to n to E le a n o r T ich eno r Sept.- J a c o b M a n s e l to M a r y S tra n g w a rd Oct.- C h a rle s J . D e G r a w to M a r g a r e t M a r ia M a r tin Dec.- H e n ry P h ilip s to E le a n o r M a g ta le n R ie p e Apr.- E u g e n e L. M a c h e tti to F r a n c e s L a u r a F a ith

r

A m erican society's swift m obility upw ard was and has been a c ontin uing phenom enon! o f the nation. Desire for this m o b ility by breaking through the rigid lines o f leadership laid dow n by the British crown was one o f the m a jo r causes o f the Revolution. Joseph C . H ornb low er could become New Jersey's chief justice in the second generation o f his la m ih in the new country. Justice H ornblow er's father was Josiah H ornblow er. brought to this countr> before the Revolution to set up the first steam engine in the new world at the Schuvler C opper M ines in N orth A rlington. H ornblow er m arried one o f the Kingsland girls and became one o f the most ardent supporters o f the Revolution. M ost o f the K ingslands rem ained loyal to the crown. Justice H ornblow er was born M as 6. I 777. and died June I I. 1864. In New ark as he walked the streets adm irin g people would say. "T here goes a man w ho is older than the F la g .” In 1S44 Justice H ornb low er helped establish the New Jersey Historical Societv. serving as its first presi­ dent and hold ing the office the last 20 years o f his life.

C a r ls t a d t

1813 1821 1837 1838 1863 1867 1872

1877

1869 1870

1871

1876 1877

1878

18 29 25 27 3 26 25 25 17 12 12 15 4 7 3 3 4 7 10 14 24 5 5 26 12 26 23 31 27 4 3 4 17 8 19 6 6 15 26 5 14 12 1 9 9 2

Dec.- J a c o b K anou se to S a lly O ’B rie n Nov.- B e n ja m in B. W h itm a n to Is a b e lla S to rm s Nov.- J a c o b V an W a r t to C a th e r in e B lo o m e r Oct.- J o s h u a V a n W a g o n e n to E liz a J u n e Nov.- L e w is P e a rs a ll to S a r a h H orton Nov.- M ic h a e l J . M u r r e y to H a r rie t H unto n June- D r. F r a n k lin W . H u n t to E liz a F ie r m a n Feb.- C o rne lius M u ld e r to A a ltje S m it Feb.- C h a rle s D a n ie l H e im is h a to E m m a C arsten s May- L u d w ig S ch roder to J u lia n e V a n H em sen May- Jo h n K ir c k to D o ro th e a S c h a a rg e r Aug.- C la u s H enn L e m m e r m a n n to A n n a W ilje lm in e G ross Oct.- E d w in A. D ic k e rs o n to L in a H assel Oct.- F re d e ric k G m e h lic h to D o ro th e a N e ttm e ir Nov.- A n ton J a n s to A m m a D o r a S ta m p Nov.- H e nry E c k e l to A n n a Kahler- H eckel Nov.- Ja c o b D an ie ls o n to P o lly D ay Nov.- C h r is tia n R ic k to E liz a b e th D egever Ju ly - H e r m a n H . C h r is tia n to A lb e rtin e T a c k m a n n Aug.- Jo h a n n e s S te in h ilb e r to C h ris tin e B r a u n Nov.- D a n ie l M e rk e l to B a r b a r a Seifried Dec.- M a r tin B u r g b a c h e r to E rn e s tin e C. Z in c k Feb.- Jo s e p h Z im m e r m a n to M a r ia W e ila n d Feb.- H e n ry K e m p fe n to H e n rie tta W olf M ar.- A nto n D u fn e r to Sop h ie B elow M ar.- C h ris tia n R e is z to E liz a b e th R esch Oct.- M ic h a e l H e issie r to M in n a B lu m Oct.- G eo rg e B lu m e n sto c k to K a ro lin e S ta g m a y e r Jan .- A u gu st B oinow sky to A n n ie Jo h n s o n Feb.- L o uis R e m ic k to K a th e rin e H enkel M ar.- D a n ie l K. K la y to J o h a n n a S c h m id t M ar.- V a le n tin e N. K u h l to B ettie J . B ack h a u s M ar.- H e n ry C. B r a n d is to J o h a n n a W orsley Apr.- H e o n rich B e e k m a n n to L in a F isc h e r Apr.- J o h n W a g n e r to B e ate Stock May- K a rl S c h m id t to K a th e rin e G ra e b e r May- J a c o b L e m p e r t to C h a rlo tte O ld enbu tte el May- H e in rich s M a y e r to C h a r lo tte B ro k in g June- H e r m a n W a lk e r to M a t ild a K le m e n t Aug.- F r a n z G u e n th e r to A n n a P a d u c h Nov.- A d a m S c h m id t to M in n ie M u lle r Dec.- C h r is tia n D o r flin g e r to M a r y H o ffm a n n Jan .- V a le n tin e B r u n n b a u e r to E liz a b e th R ic h Jan .- Ja c o b M a c h e r to E m llie M a n d w irth Jan .- P h ilip B iegel to M a r g a r e th e G r a h a m M ar.- Jo s e p h H u h n to B a b e tte B u rg e r

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