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Ad Populos, Non Aditus, Pervenimus OUR 112th YEAR – ISSUE NO. 19-112 USPS 680020 Periodical – Postage Paid at Westfield, N.J. Thursday, January 17,...

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Ad Populos, Non Aditus, Pervenimus

OUR 112th YEAR – ISSUE NO. 19-112

USPS 680020 Periodical – Postage Paid at Westfield, N.J.

Thursday, January 17, 2002

Published Every Thursday Since 1890

(908) 232-4407

FIFTY CENTS

Deplorable Conditions, Renovations Force Westfield Tenants Out of Their Apartment By DEBORAH MADISON Specially Written for The Westfield Leader

An 83-year-old woman and her granddaughter, who have been residents of Westfield for 23 years, claim they have been forced out of their apartment due to faulty renovations, and they fear their superintendent will attempt to have them evicted. Beatrice Monterrosa and her grandmother, Elena Hernandez, who live at 122 East Broad Street, told The Westfield Leader that their superintendent, Anthony Schilling of Relocation Realty, who manages the building, has not lived up to promises to keep their apartment livable during a renovation process. They also asserted that Mr. Schilling has been verbally abusive to Ms. Monterrosa when she called to inquire about the situation. The

two women and several other tenants claimed they are no longer permitted to contact their landlord, Arthur Potyk of Soset Realty in Westfield, since Mr. Schilling took over managing the building a year ago. According to Ms. Monterrosa, she and her grandmother received a letter in November informing them that renovations would begin shortly, causing some minor dust, but not requiring them to leave their apartment. Several tenants in the building’s other apartments told The Leader they received a similar letter. The renovations on Ms. Monterrosa’s apartment began in early December and they were forced to leave the same week due to the excessive amount of dust and debris, Ms. Monterrosa claimed. Addition-

ally, what little heat there was in the apartment was escaping through large holes in the walls created by the renovations, she explained. They are still paying rent, even though they have not been able to live in the apartment since early December, Ms. Monterrosa stated. “The renovations embedded a tremendous amount of dust and debris in all of the furniture, which was not covered as promised. We both had difficulty breathing and all of the heat escaped,” she said. Westfield Leader reporters visited the apartment and verified that all of the five rooms had numerous wires hanging down out of large holes in the walls and ceilings. Some of the wires were at head level and impossible to avoid without ducking. The apartment was also ice-cold

Amy Horowitz for The Westfield Leader

HER HOUSE IS NOT A HOME…Beatrice Monterrosa stands in her kitchen, where loose wires have been left to hang, the wall remains un-renovated and debris blankets the appliances and furniture.

Officials Say Probe of Assault Was Handled Appropriately By DEBORAH MADISON

students from Scotch PlainsFanwood High School, all residents Union County Prosecutor Thomas of Scotch Plains, allegedly coaxed Manahan publicly released his deci- the victim out of the Park Middle sion to pursue charging five Scotch School building on Park Avenue, then Plains High School Youths as adults, forcibly dragged her to a creek emrather than juveniles, in connection bankment in a wooded area about with their alleged involvement in the 100 yards from the school. kidnapping and sexual assault of a Prosecutors said the girl may have 13-year old female Park Middle previously dated one of the boys and School student. Described by Pros- was acquainted with two of them. ecutor Manahan as “a senseless and Four of the boys forced her to horrible act by five individuals who perform oral sex, while one of the boys stood as lookout. The girl, who lives in Fanwood, was also slapped and Location Of Alleged punched, suffering cuts and Assault bruises, by one of the boys Athletic Fields in the group during the atFoot Bridge Park tack, according to local auMiddle School thorities. After the attack, the girl School Parking Lot ran back into the school Post Offic building, but was followed by one of the boys, who Park Avenue To Rte. 22 allegedly sexually victimHorace R. Corbin and Michael L. Bartiromo for ized her again in a stairwell, The Westfield Leader the girl told authorities. SITE SKETCH…A small map depicts the site The names of the five susbehind Park Middle School where the alleged pects, who are sophomores assault took place. and juniors at the high school, are being withheld took tremendous advantage of a 13- because they are all minors, between year-old girl,” he said that the nature the ages of 15 and 17. However, if of the crime warranted the more Superior Court Judge Rudolph serious charges. Hawkins, Jr. decides to uphold the The incident, which was reported Prosecutor’s decision to try the boys to local officials on January 2 by the as adults, their names will be regirl’s parents, has left many resi- leased. dents reeling from shock and anger After intensively gathering evithat something like this could hap- dence and questioning the suspects, pen in the relatively safe and quiet, Scotch Plains Police Chief Thomas upscale community. O’Brien said, the police arrested the The incident now has parents ques- five boys on January 5. tioning the safety of their children Three of the youths are being dewalking home alone after school. tained at the George W. Herlich DeAccording to prosecutors, the as- tention Center in Elizabeth on the sault on the eighth grader happened more serious charges of kidnapping shortly after 3:30 p.m., when five and aggravated sexual assault said Specially Written for The Times

INDEX

A&E...............Page 17 Education........Page 9 Classifieds......Page 16 Obituary ........ Page 8 Editorial ........ Page 4

Robert O’Leary, Executive Assistant Prosecutor for the Prosecutor’s Office. CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

and appeared to have only one gasheating unit in the living room. There was a thick layer of dust covering all of the furniture, which had been pushed into the center of the rooms. Currently, Ms. Hernandez is staying with relatives in Scotch Plains and Ms. Monterrosa is living out of hotels and with friends, while the renovations “drag on,” she explained. Ms. Monterrosa was told by Mr. Schilling that the delay in completing the renovations was the fault of the Building Department not coming out to inspect the work. However, the Building Department told The Westfield Leader and Ms. Monterrosa the delay was due to the electrical work failing to pass inspection numerous times. According to Ms. Monterrosa, Mr. Schilling told her, “If you don’t like it, you can get out,” when she called to ask when the renovations would be completed. The Westfield Leader left telephone messages for Mr. Schilling, but the calls were not returned. Wayne Augenstein, Westfield attorney for Mr. Schilling, called back and said all of the tenants were sent notices in November that the renovations might cause “some temporary inconvenience and minor dust.” He said there are a few small holes in the walls that must remain open until the inspections are completed, but that there is no reason why the women can’t occupy the apartment. Frank Hirsch, Westfield Construction Code Official, told The Westfield Leader, “Our department has had a lot of problems with this building and with the landlord’s representative (Mr. Schilling).” Mr. Hirsch said it was his understanding that the landlord intended on renovating the entire building, but hasn’t applied for the necessary permits or showed up with the plans, despite repeated requests. “He (Mr. Schilling) has a permit to complete electrical work in the one apartment, Mr. Hirsch confirmed. But that work was not done properly and has failed inspection,” he said. “We’ve been after him (Mr. Schilling) for months to submit the proper permits and complete the work, but he is ignoring our requests,” Mr. Hirsch stated. Other tenants in this building and the one next door told The Westfield Leader they will not permit Mr. Schilling to renovate their apartments. Rose Peer, a tenant in the next building, also owned by Mr. Potyk and managed by Mr. Schilling, said Mr. Schilling has harassed and threatened CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

Borough Council Says Sidewalk Cafés For Five Restaurants in Downtown Will be Permitted By LAUREN PASS Specially Written for The Westfield Leader

An ordinance allowing downtown restaurants to have sidewalk cafés in Mountainside was given a second reading by the Borough Council on Tuesday evening. The ordinance, proposed last August, arose when the owners of J&M Market and Daimatsu Japanese Res-

taurant requested that Mayor Robert F. Viglianti and members of the council consider allowing businesses to operate sidewalk tables. Councilman William Lane commented that it was a “long investigative process that the mayor and council went through to establish an ordinance that we felt would best fit the town.”

The council examined ordinances from other towns, including Westfield, Garwood, Springfield, Roselle Park and Chatham in order to develop their own guidelines. The borough’s ordinance would permit the presence of sidewalk tables for food establishments in

the downtown area of Mountain Avenue, excluding taverns. The businesses must apply for an annual permit, which will cost $75. The council will grant permits upon recommendations from the borough’s health and zoning officers. CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

AGENDA ITEMS PASSED IN RECORD TIME

Sommers Being Considered As Parking Service Director By NANCY CROSTA LANDALE Specially Written for The Westfield Leader

Amy Horowitz for The Westfield Leader

Religious ....... Page 7 Social ............ Page 6 Sports ............ Page 11

Amy Horowitz for The Westfield Leader

UNLIVABLE CONDITIONS…Wires hang from the tenants’ ceiling, pictured above. A small, shoddy heater, pictured below, is supposed to suffice for five small rooms in the apartment. These are some of the conditions which have made life unlivable for Elena Hernandez and Beatrice Monterrosa.

POLISH, BUFF AND SHINE…Joanne Yeo of Rainbow Nails, the new nail salon which replaced Bayberry Card & Gift on Mountain Avenue in Mountainside, polishes a customer’s nails to perfection. Rainbow Nails has two other locations, in Rahway and Linden.

CYAN YELLOW MAGENTA BLACK

In its regular meeting on Tuesday, the Westfield Town Council unanimously passed all of the items addressed in its conference session last week. Because there was no discussion on any item and no public comment, the meeting lasted less than a half hour. The items which passed included various resolutions authorizing the Treasurer to draw warrants so as to provide refunds for overpaid taxes; a resolution awarding a contract to Strategem Office Systems to supply furniture to the police department; an ordinance fixing the salaries of police and fire department employees; a resolution authorizing matching funds for the “Field of Dreams” grant, which entails the engineering evaluation of seven athletic/playing fields in town; and a resolution proclaiming January 2002 as School Board Recognition

Month, as urged by the New Jersey State League of Municipalities and New Jersey School Boards Association. An ordinance increasing membership fees for the Memorial Pool and establishing new membership categories also was passed. Resident families will now pay $242 (nonresident families will pay $454); resident families with full time childcare will pay $305 (such non-resident families will pay $598); resident families without children will pay $196 (such non-resident families will pay $380); and resident individuals will pay $144 (non-resident individuals will pay $270). According to Town Administrator James Gildea, this is the first of a two-year increase in pool fees to cover the $1.7 million bond approved for renovations at the complex. Two amending ordinances concerning the creation of a Parking CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

Page 10

Thursday, January 17, 2002

The Westfield Leader and THE TIMES of Scotch Plains – Fanwood

Officials Say Probe of Assault Was Handled Appropriately

Polidore Given Five Years For Embezzling Funds

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Kidnapping can refer to being forcibly taken from one place to another or being held against one’s will and not permitted to leave, explained Mr. O’Leary. Two of the boys are being charged with aggravated sexual assault only and were released to their parents. Mr. Manahan said that Judge Hawkins found sufficient evidence that the girl’s story was plausible and that three of the boys posed a significant enough threat to the community to warrant keeping them detained. The two boys who were released from custody have been suspended from school, according to Public Information Coordinator for the school district, Kathleen Meyer.

they could be held in a juvenile detention facility until they are 18. If tried and convicted as adults in New Jersey Superior Court, they could face sentences of 25 years to life on the more serious charges of kidnapping and up to 20 years for the charges of aggravated sexual assault. In arriving at the decision to charge the suspects as adults, Prosecutor Manahan said that many factors were examined including background, history of prior infractions and the nature of the crimes involved. He also had to consider whether he thought the boys would be rehabilitated with four years in a juvenile facility. Two of the boys are brothers who, according to community members, regularly attended St. John’s Baptist Church

A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION

By FRED ROSSI Specially Written for The Times

David B. Corbin for The Times

PRESERVATION AND PROTECTION…The Scotch Plains Public Library recently acquired the microfilm of its 1963 to 1979 copies of The Times of Scotch Plains- Fanwood. The library’s original newspaper copies were deteriorating, yellowing and some were torn. Seated, Scotch Plains Mayor Martin L. Marks and Councilman William F. McClintock, Jr. compare the original document to the microfilm version shown by Library Director Norbert Bernstein. Pictured, behind Mayor Marks, Horace R. Corbin, Publisher of The Times, looks on with pride. See related story on Page 2.

Less than nine months after he was arrested, former Scotch Plains Treasurer William Polidore was sentenced to five years in prison on January 11 for embezzling $332,000 in township funds. In addition to the stolen funds, Mr. Polidore, who served the township for two years, will also be liable for any other related costs the township government incurred, such as audits and legal fees, according to Township Attorney Douglas Hansen. Last April, Mr. Polidore was ar-

rested after township auditors found a number of discrepancies in various municipal accounts. The initial $150,000 that Mr. Polidore was suspected of having taken more than doubled as investigators looked further into the matter. Late last summer, Mr. Polidore pleaded guilty to the embezzlement charge. Mr. Hansen told The Times of Scotch Plains-Fanwood that the township will do all it can to ensure that it recoups the stolen money from Mr. Polidore. “We will haunt him for life,” the Township Attorney said.

Mr. Bernstein to Retire Deplorable Conditions Force On Sept. 13 After 30 Yrs. Tenants Out of Apartment As Library Director CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

her and the other tenants with eviction

By MARIA WOEHR Specially Written for The Westfield Leader

Deborah Madison for The Westfield Leader

UNDER INVESTIGATION…According to prosecutors, the site, pictured above, is where the alleged assault on an eighth grader by five students from Scotch PlainsFanwood High School occurred. According to officials, the victim was taken out of the Park Middle School building on Park Avenue, then forcibly dragged her to this creek embankment in a wooded area about 100 yards from the school.

They will have an opportunity to present evidence to school officials at a hearing to contest that suspension. School officials have the options of extending or waiving the 10-day suspension or deciding if the charges against the students warrant expulsion, Ms. Meyer explained. Because the other three boys are in custody, suspension is not an issue for them at this time, she added. In response to parents’ safety concerns, township and school officials are re-evaluating security measures in and around Park Middle School to determine if supervision during and after school is adequate to prevent such a crime from occurring again. Security guards who were hired shortly after the Columbine High School shootings in Colorado, but then let go, have once again been posted to monitor the hallways and grounds of the school, said Park Principal Rocco Collucci. However, many law enforcement and town officials agree that this type of incident could happen anywhere, anytime, and that no community is immune. “There is no way to guard every corner or wooded area in any town,” commented Chief O’Brien. Community residents have criticized public officials because parents were not informed of the incident until the story was publicly released on January 9, seven days after it occurred. However, Chief O’Brien pointed out that local police followed strict guidelines for gathering evidence and information for this type of incident. Ms. Meyer said that school officials were obligated to follow the directives of the police in keeping this investigation confidential until the police and prosecutors determined that release of the information was appropriate. “We made a determination that the community was not in any imminent danger and that to release this information sooner could have jeopardized gathering evidence for the case,” Chief O’Brien explained. Mayor Martin Marks praised the way the police handled the situation, which he said needed to be done discreetly in order to avoid mistakes in the investigation. Mayor Marks also said that he was comfortable with Prosecutor Manahan’s decision to aggressively pursue the charges against the perpetrators as adults. “This was a very adult crime,” the Mayor remarked, “The decision to charge them as adults is not only to seek justice, but to send a clear message to society that this type of crime will not be tolerated.” The Mayor told The Times that he thought that the public was justifiably concerned and angered by this incident, however, he said, “some branches of media have been unnecessarily hyping this incident with misinformation in an effort to sensationalize it.” “I have confidence that our community has the intelligence to see through the hype,” he added. If tried as juveniles in family court,

in Scotch Plains. One of the five boys, according to Chief O’Brien, had a history of prior run-ins with the law. Some community residents have characterized some of the boys involved as “outcasts” and “trouble-makers,” while others have described them as good, church-going kids. Mayor Marks said this type of incident speaks to what children are exposed to today and that it is incumbent on parents to counteract the negative effects of television and other messages with positive values and morals. “We not only have to protect them from becoming victims, but we have to protect them from becoming perpetrators, as well,” the Mayor remarked. “No community is immune to the negative influences on children that are rampant in our society,” he added. The Mayor also commented, “This incident does not qualify as a racial issue; it is about five individuals that lacked proper values. It crosses all boundaries and does not have anything to do with race.” The Reverend Kenneth Hetzel, President of the Scotch Plains-Fanwood Ministerium, said, “The community must be sensitive to the needs of the families involved; both the girl’s family and the families of the boys, which also need support, no matter what their degree of involvement may have been.” He also said he was very adamant that this was not indicative of any racial divide in the community, but rather an unfortunate incident of young people acting inappropriately. In reaction to the incident, school officials have made counseling services available to students in the middle schools and at the high school. Mr. Collucci said he is arranging for additional counseling in the classroom to give students the opportunity to air their views and concerns regarding this issue. Township leaders and officials agreed that this incident is not indicative of the character of Scotch Plains and was an isolated event. When news of the incident was released, network television stations and newspaper reporters swarmed the Scotch PlainsFanwood Board of Education offices and the grounds of Park Middle School, asking students and parents for their reactions. In a letter sent home to the parents of the district’s 4,800 students, school officials said the district would call local authorities to keep the media from trespassing on school property. “The overwhelming majority of Scotch Plains students are fine, upstanding young citizens and we are very proud of them,” said Reverend Hetzel. “It is very important that we publicly acknowledge their wonderful accomplishments and exemplary character,” he noted. Ms. Meyer said many parents had called the Board of Education offices expressing their desire to help support the community in some way or to do something that would enable the community to heal from the incident.

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SCOTCH PLAINS -- After 30 years serving as Director of the Scotch Plains Public Library, Norbert Bernstein has announced his retirement. He will step down on September 13. Over his 30-year tenure as Director, Mr. Bernstein has overseen several changes to the library. “Many improvements took place at the direction of our Trustees: a new roof, new carpeting, new and more efficient lighting, computers for Internet use in the adult room, new furniture for the children’s room, an additional professional librarian, easier handicapped access and this year an elevator from the main floor to the lower floor for easier access to our Meeting Room,” said Mr. Bernstein. He also ushered in the technology age when the library switched from a card catalog system to an automated catalog system. Last year, he helped the library celebrate its 200th anniversary.

An affable personality, Mr. Bernstein said his greatest accomplishment was maintaining great relationships with his colleagues. “My 30 years as Library Director have been blessed by many outstanding, devoted, and interested Library Trustees and so many dedicated, helpful and knowledgeable staff members,” he stated. The Board of Trustees for the library is currently searching for a replacement for Mr. Bernstein. Meanwhile, Jennifer Schulze has been appointed as the new Head of Reference at the Scotch Plains Public Library. Mrs. Schulze worked part-time at the library through high school, during college breaks, and through graduate school as a library assistant. After graduating with her Masters Degree in Library Science from Rutgers University, she worked as a cataloger for Baker & Taylor, a book distribution company located in Bridgewater, before returning to the Scotch Plains Public Library.

NEW EQUIPMENT…The Community Presbyterian Nursery School in Mountainside recently purchased and installed the new playground, pictured above. A Christian preschool established in 1958, the facility is sponsored by the Community Presbyterian Church of Mountainside and licensed by the state of New Jersey.

WESTFIELD POLICE BLOTTER

Parking Dir. Considered

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 2 • A Cliffwood resident reported that a VISA card and $60 in cash were removed from a purse in her unlocked vehicle, which was parked in the lot of a local house of worship. • A Scotch Plains resident reported the theft of $65 from a wallet that had been placed inside a locker at a local recreation facility. • A resident of Arlington Avenue reported that someone entered his open garage and removed a 26-inch, Trek mountain bicycle valued at $600. THURSDAY, JANUARY 3 • Approximately $3,200 in jewelry and $15 in cash were reported stolen from a Linden Avenue residence. • A broken window was reported at Jefferson Elementary School on Boulevard. FRIDAY, JANUARY 4 • Richard Garbinski, 42, of Scotch Plains was arrested and charged with driving while intoxicated, after being stopped in Tamaques Park. • A camera and figurines were reported stolen from Holy Trinity Elementary School on First Street. • Authorities confirmed that a parent turned in 22 pieces of jewelry that she believed had been stolen by her child. Among the items were a gold ring with a pearl and a blue stone; a silver turquoise necklace with a heart, and a gold cat pin. SATURDAY, JANUARY 5 • A resident of Warren Street reported the theft of a camera, valued at $300, from her home. • A North Avenue, West, resident reported that someone spray-painted his house. • John Lamotta, 41, of Springfield was arrested at Woodland Avenue and charged with driving while intoxicated. SUNDAY, JANUARY 6 • Ramon Juarez, 35, of Garwood was arrested at Saint Paul Street and North Avenue and charged with driving while intoxicated and with refusal to take a breathalyzer test. • Two outside mirrors were reported stolen from a 1997 Honda Civic that was parked on Clark Street.

Service Director/Management Specialist position also were approved. The stated duties and responsibilities of this new position include administration, management and marketing of the town parking permit and parking meter system; investigation, as well as the development and implementation of measures to increase the availability of off-street parking. Other responsibilities include the management of the commuter jitney system; coordination of parking enforcement activities with the police chief and captain; and, in conjunction with other department heads, contract providers, consultants, Town Administrator, Town Council and members of the Town Council’s Transportation, Parking and Traffic Committees, providing leadership and direction in the development of short and long range plans and gathering, interpreting and preparing data for studies, reports and recommendations. At the pre-meeting conference, council members met Barry M. Sommers, the final candidate for the Parking Service Director position. Since 1995, Mr. Sommers has served as the Director of the Office of Parking Services at the College of Staten Island. Mayor Gregory McDermott explicated Mr. Sommers’ experience with large scale parking issues, noting that in his most recent position, he was responsible for processing up to 10,000 parking permits. According to Town Administrator James Gildea, pending resolution of details surrounding an impending offer of employment, the new Parking Service Director should commence duties in early February. Mr. Gildea remarked, “I am extremely excited to have Barry come on board. He is very articulate, and I know he’ll help the town with its parking issues.”

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

CYAN YELLOW MAGENTA BLACK

Union County Legal Services said since he began managing the building. that if there are code violations or if the “I don’t think Mr. Potyk knows how building is unlivable, then the tenants horribly Mr. Schilling is abusing his might have a right to relocation assistenants or he wouldn’t allow this to go tance. Legal Services told The Leader on,” she added. Several other tenants that the tenants should organize in oragreed, but said they are no longer able der to protect their rights during this to reach Mr. Potyk. renovation process. Additionally, Ms. Monterrosa and the other tenants said they were told they had to sign a new regulations agreement and a month-to-month lease or face eviction. Ms. Monterrosa and her grandmother signed both, but the other tenants refused, claiming the regulations agreement was unreasonable. “Mr. Schilling is taking advantage of poor people who do not know their legal rights and is attempting to coerce tenants into signing away their legal rights through fear and intimidation tactics,” Ms. Peer remarked. “There must be some town official who is concerned that this type of business practice is not the type of reputation that Westfield wants,” she added. Mr. Potyk told The Leader the buildings Amy Horowitz for The Westfield Leader needed to be upgraded for MORE UNLIVABLE CONDITIONS…Tenant the health and safety of Beatrice Monterrosa shows The Westfield Leader the tenants. However, he the state of disrepair in which her bathroom shower maintained the apartments has been left. have been habitable during this process and that the tenants Tenants who fall below certain who chose to move out were “overre- income guidelines may be eligible acting to the minor inconvenience.” for legal services and should call the Mr. Potyk also said it was his under- Union County Legal Services Office standing that Mr. Schilling had been at (908) 354-4340 and ask for Mary very patient in explaining the situation Drier to determine if they qualify for to the tenants and had dealt with them representation and to learn about very fairly. their rights. “We’re trying to give the tenants a better quality of life by upgrading the electrical and heating systems,” Mr. Potyk said. He pointed out that the tenants have enjoyed many years of very low rent. Mr. Potyk also confirmed the electrical renovations on each apartment were CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 costing him $4,000 per apartment and The ordinance has multiple rethat the heating upgrades will cost an strictions, including the prohibition additional $4,000 for each apartment. He said it was only reasonable for of alcohol and music. In addition, the tenants to expect that they would the tables are only permitted to be have to pay more rent for these im- used until 10 p.m. and must be taken provements. inside by 10:15 p.m. Portable barriHe said he intended to increase the ers around the tables, which must rent a reasonable amount over a period measure between three and four feet of time to cover his costs. Mr. Potyk said that licensed electri- tall, will also be required. Business owners will also be recians were used and that he didn’t understand why the work did not meet sponsible for clean up and daily the approval of the Building Depart- washing of the sidewalks. Five busiment. “It is the Building Department nesses on Mountain Avenue will be that is delaying us from closing up the eligible to apply for a permit. holes in the walls,” he remarked. In other business, the council apRegarding the cold temperatures, he proved the transfer of the liquor lisaid the tenants have control over the cense from Alexus Steakhouse & heating unit and that they probably Tavern on Route 22 in Mountainside turned it off while they were not living to Arirang Hibachi Steakhouse and there. Regarding the holes in the walls, Mr. Sushi Bar. Joe Tranchina, a representative Potyk said “those are inside holes, not outside holes, which should not affect from Arirang met with the council last week. Mr. Tranchina explained the retention of heat.”

Sidewalk Cafés Okayed

WHS Class of 1962 To Reunite in Sept. WESTFIELD – The 40th Reunion of Westfield High School’s Class of 1962 will be held on Saturday, September 14, at the Woodbridge Hilton. Approximately 100 classmates are unlisted. If a classmate has not received a letter from the reunion committee, please forward the name and address to [email protected] or mail Reunion Committee, 414 Avon Avenue, Plainfield, 07080.

Peggy M. Doerr Earns Dean’s List Recognition WESTFIELD – Furman University in Greenville, S.C. recently reported that Westfield resident Peggy M. Doerr was named to the school’s dean’s list for the fall term of 2001. Peggy is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Doerr.

that Arirang was purchasing the liquor license and building from Alexus. He informed the council that they would be renovating the existing building and anticipated opening in six to seven months.

Chabrier and Hansen Elected to Honor Society WESTFIELD – Kent Place School in Summit has reported that Westfield residents Julia Chabrier and Charlotte Hansen have been inducted into the chapter of Mu Alpha Theta, the National High School and Junior College Mathematics Honor Society. The students satisfied the criteria for membership as having been enrolled in consecutive math courses during all of their Upper School years, having received yearend grades of A- or better in all mathematics courses and having no honor code offenses. Julia and Charlotte will also become peer tutors in mathematics for the rest of the student body.

OUR 44TH YEAR – ISSUE NO. 03-44

USPS 485200 Periodical – Postage Paid at Scotch Plains, N.J.

Thursday, January 17, 2002

Published Every Thursday

(908) 232-4407

FIFTY CENTS

Officials Say Probe of Assault Was Handled Appropriately By DEBORAH MADISON Specially Written for The Times

Deborah Madison for The Times

UNDER INVESTIGATION…According to prosecutors, the site, pictured above, is where the alleged assault on an eighth grader by five students from Scotch Plains-Fanwood High School occurred. Officials said that the victim was taken out of the Park Middle School building on Park Avenue, then forcibly dragged to this creek embankment in a wooded area about 100 yards from the school.

PTA and School Board Address Strengthening of School Safety By REBECCA TOKARZ Specially Written for The Times

Hours following the announcement Tuesday that the Scotch Plains Prosecutor planned to seek adult convictions against the teenaged boys charged in the recent sexual assault of a young Fanwood girl, representatives from the Parent Teacher Association (PTA) met with the Board of Education to discuss district plans to

make local schools more safe. As part of the ongoing construction currently taking place at district schools, intercom systems will be installed, Acting Superintendent Anthony Del Sordi explained. The systems will allow communication to exist among all rooms within the schools, as well as with outside agencies in the case of emergencies. It is a necessary component to

Polidore Given Five Years For Embezzling Funds By FRED ROSSI Specially Written for The Times

Less than nine months after he was arrested, former Scotch Plains Treasurer William Polidore was sentenced to five years in prison on January 11 for embezzling $332,000 in township funds. In addition to the stolen funds, Mr. Polidore, who served the township for two years, will also be liable for any other related costs the township government incurred, such as audits and legal fees, according to Township Attorney Douglas Hansen. Last April, Mr. Polidore was ar-

rested after township auditors found a number of discrepancies in various municipal accounts. The initial $150,000 that Mr. Polidore was suspected of having taken more than doubled as investigators looked further into the matter. Late last summer, Mr. Polidore pleaded guilty to the embezzlement charge. Mr. Hansen told The Times of Scotch Plains-Fanwood that the township will do all it can to ensure that it recoups the stolen money from Mr. Polidore. “We will haunt him for life,” the Township Attorney said.

strengthen the infrastructure and stabilize the safety of local schools, Mr. Del Sordi said. “Since September 11, the administration has met to redevelop and find ways to tighten security,” Mr. Del Sordi, who also serves as Business Administrator and Board Secretary, said. All doors serving as entranceways into the schools have been locked, with the exception of the main entranceway. The board is currently addressing the idea of placing camera and buzzer systems at entranceways as a method of keeping unwanted and unsolicited individuals from entering the schools unannounced, Mr. Del Sordi said. While safety was one of the main concerns expressed by the PTA representatives, a majority of the safety measures and possible precautions discussed involved the issue of unwarranted guests entering the schools, not the safety of the children after schools recess for the day. Most of those in attendance were guarded and unwilling to discuss the township’s most recent tragedy, in which a 13-year-old girl was sexually assaulted in a wooded area near the football field off of Park Avenue. This event occurred after the end of the school day. CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

Union County Prosecutor Thomas Manahan publicly released his decision to pursue charging five Scotch Plains High School Youths as adults, rather than juveniles, in connection with their alleged involvement in the kidnapping and sexual assault of a 13-year old female Park Middle School student. Described by Prosecutor Manahan as “a senseless and horrible act by five individuals who took tremendous advantage of a 13year-old girl,” he said that the nature of the crime warranted the more serious charges. The incident, which was reported to local officials on January 2 by the girl’s parents, has left many residents reeling from shock and anger that something like this could happen in the relatively safe and quiet, upscale community.

Fanwood Council Introduces New Downtown Plan Ordinance By SUZETTE F. STALKER Specially Written for The Times

An ordinance adopting a redevelopment plan for a block of land in downtown Fanwood was passed on first reading last Thursday with a 42 vote by the Borough Council during its inaugural regular meeting of 2002. Democrats Katherine Mitchell and Michael Brennan voted against the ordinance for the plan, which calls for a 6.5-acre parcel bounded by South, Martine and LaGrande Avenues, and by Second Street, to be improved through mixed retail and residential development. Councilwoman Mitchell cited ongoing concerns over the plan’s potential impact on existing businesses there, particularly a provision that would allow the borough to acquire a property through the right of eminent domain, despite officials’ claims that such action would only be considered as a last resort. The council initially unveiled an ordinance supporting the plan in November, but opted to delay its adoption after the Fanwood Planning Board, which approved the redevelopment plan last month, submitted 14 recommendations for the council to consider. The recommendations were re-

Mayor Marks Assures That Effective Measures Were Taken in Aftermath of Alleged Assault By FRED ROSSI Specially Written for The Times

Scotch Plains Mayor Martin L. Marks defended the actions of the township’s police department, the Union County Prosecutor and the Scotch Plains-Fanwood school district in their handling of the sexual assault alleged to have taken place near Park Middle School on January 2. At the top of the Township Council meeting on Tuesday night, Mayor Marks noted that some media outlets last week had attempted to focus on “the issue of a perceived delay in

reporting the incident itself or somehow warning the community of what had happened.” The arrests of the five youths in connection with the incident was not announced until a week after the incident is said to have occurred. However, Mayor Marks said local and county officials “acted appropriately in not immediately issuing a statement.” The mayor said law enforcement officials had determined, after the incident was first reported, that there was no immediate danger to students

or the community itself while the investigation, which, he pointed out, involved a minor victim and minor suspects, moved forward. “If this case was blown because it was prematurely leaked or officially noticed, it would be the very same press and 23,000 justifiably angered residents beating down our doors to find out why,” the mayor said. He pledged that the local government would do all it could to provide “all resources realistically available to help our school district “to improve security in and around the lo-

The incident now has parents questionLocation Of Alleged ing the safety of their Assault children walking Athletic Fields home alone after Foot Bridge school. Park Middle According to prosSchool ecutors, the assault School on the eighth grader Parking Lot Post happened shortly afOffic ter 3:30 p.m., when five students from Park Avenue To Rte. 22 Scotch PlainsHorace R. Corbin and Michael L. Bartiromo for Fanwood High The Times School, all residents SITE SKETCH…A small map depicts the site behind of Scotch Plains, al- Park Middle School where the alleged assault took legedly coaxed the place. victim out of the Park Middle School building on Park Av- was acquainted with two of them. enue, then forcibly dragged her to a Four of the boys forced her to creek embankment in a wooded area perform oral sex, while one of the about 100 yards from the school. boys stood as lookout. The girl, Prosecutors said the girl may have who lives in Fanwood, was also previously dated one of the boys and CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

cal schools. “He also repeated his feeling that “this ugly event occurred not because of some troubling problem distinct to Scotch Plains.” Instead, Mayor Marks said it was “an indictment of society as a whole,” noting that, “with what our children are exposed to on television, radio, the Internet and in the lyrics to the music they listen to, how can they not be negatively affected?” Later in the meeting, the council formally approved a resolution endorsing a state Department of

viewed at the governing body’s agenda session January 3 by officials and professional planner Richard Preiss, whose firm performed studies of the targeted area and who created the redevelopment plan for the block during the latter part of last year. A resolution with an attached memorandum detailing officials’ responses to each of the Planning Board’s recommendations was approved 5-1 by the council last week, with Ms. Mitchell the lone dissenter. She also voiced concerns on this matter about the plan’s impact on business owners. Joe Ponzio, a property owner on the block, echoed these sentiments during the public portion of Thursday’s meeting. While saying he is “100 percent” in favor of the

area being improved, he argued that further consideration ought to be given to the impact on current business owners, including addressing the needs of those which may need to relocate. He also asked whether any study had been done regarding the need for additional retail stores on the block. Mayor Louis Jung responded that a formal study had not been conducted, but that Mr. Preiss and developers with whom officials had spoken in the past had indicated more retail offerings would be a favorable option. The Planning Board now has 45 days to review the council’s memorandum and offer any additional recommendations, which the governing body has the option either to accept CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

Mr. Bernstein to Retire In Sept. After 30 Years As Library Director By MARIA WOEHR Specially Written for The Times

After 30 years serving as Director of the Scotch Plains Public Library, Norbert Bernstein has announced his retirement. He will step down on September 13. Over his 30-year tenure as Director, Mr. Bernstein has overseen several changes to the library. “Many improvements took place at the direction of our Trustees: a new roof, new carpeting, new and more efficient lighting, computers for Internet use in the adult room, new furniture for the children’s room, an additional professional librarian, easier handicapped access and this year an elevator from the main floor to the lower floor for easier access to our Meeting Room,” said Mr. Bernstein.

He also ushered in the technology age when the library switched from a card catalog system to an automated catalog system. Last year, he helped the library celebrate its 200th anniversary. An affable personality, Mr. Bernstein said his greatest accomplishment was maintaining great relationships with his colleagues. “My 30 years as Library Director have been blessed by many outstanding, devoted, and interested Library Trustees and so many dedicated, helpful and knowledgeable staff members,” he stated. The Board of Trustees for the library is currently searching for a replacement for Mr. Bernstein. Meanwhile, Jennifer Schulze has been appointed as the new Head of CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

Joseph Doyle Named SP Planning Bd. Chairman; Vo-Tech Proposes Addition to Raritan Rd. Facility By DEBORAH MADISON Specially Written for The Times

The Scotch Plains Planning Board met on January 7 for its yearly reorganization meeting in order to elect a new Chairman and other new officers and committee chairpersons. The board unanimously voted to elect member Joseph Doyle as its new Chairman. Mr. Doyle has been a board member for six years and a Scotch Plains resident for 10 years.

INDEX

Mr. Doyle has also been a New Jersey Planning Official for 10 years and is currently a member of New Jersey’s Municipal Land Use Law, Technical Review Committee. Prior to becoming a member of the Planning Board in Scotch Plains, Mr. Doyle was Chairman of the Belleville Planning Board for 11 years. While thanking board members for the honor of electing him, Mr. Doyle said that he hoped to follow

Business ........ Page 17 Education........Page 9 Classifieds......Page 16 Obituary ........ Page 8 Editorial ........ Page 4

Religious ....... Page 7 Social ............ Page 6 Sports ............ Page 11

the good example set by previous Board Chairman George Tomkin. Maria Sartor was elected as the board’s Vice Chairwoman and Alice Agran, a former Scotch Plains Mayor was elected as Board Secretary. Within the next few weeks, board members hope to select a new Board Attorney from among several candidates that submitted resumes. Officials from the Union County Vocational-Technical Schools (UCVTS) gave an informal presentation during Monday’s meeting to inform members about the school’s plan to construct a new academic

building at the existing facility on Raritan Road. Although a formal application is not required of the county-owned property, the presentation was made as a courtesy to allow the board an opportunity to have input into the project. Architects from MMR Architects of North Brunswick displayed preliminary site plans for the new academic building. Dr. Thomas Bistocchi, Superintendent of UCVTS, explained that the school has been granted permission to transition from a part-time, supplementary CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

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David B. Corbin for The Times

PRESERVATION AND PROTECTION…The Scotch Plains Public Library recently acquired the microfilm of its 1963 to 1979 copies of The Times of Scotch Plains- Fanwood. The library’s original newspaper copies were deteriorating, yellowing and some were torn. Seated, Scotch Plains Mayor Martin L. Marks and Councilman William F. McClintock, Jr. compare the original document to the microfilm version shown by Library Director Norbert Bernstein. Pictured, behind Mayor Marks, Horace R. Corbin, Publisher of The Times, looks on with pride. See related story on Page 2.

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Thursday, January 17, 2002

The Westfield Leader and THE TIMES of Scotch Plains – Fanwood

Deplorable Living Conditions, Renovations Force Westfield Tenants Out of Their Home By DEBORAH MADISON Specially Written for The Westfield Leader

An 83-year-old woman and her granddaughter, who have been residents of Westfield for 23 years, claim they have been forced out of their apartment due to faulty renovations, and they fear their superintendent will attempt to have them evicted. Beatrice Monterrosa and her grandmother, Elena Hernandez, who live at 122 East Broad Street, told The Westfield Leader that their superintendent, Anthony Schilling of Relocation Realty, who manages the building, has not lived up to promises to keep their apartment livable during a renovation process. They also asserted that Mr. Schilling has been verbally abusive to Ms. Monterrosa when she called to inquire about the situation. The two women and several other tenants claimed they are no longer permitted to contact their landlord, Arthur Potyk of Soset Realty in Westfield, since Mr. Schilling took over managing the building a year ago. According to Ms. Monterrosa, she and her grandmother received a letter in November informing them that renovations would begin shortly, causing some minor dust, but not requiring them to leave their apartment. Several tenants in the building’s other apartments told The Leader they received a similar letter. The renovations on Ms. Monterrosa’s apartment began in early December and they were forced to leave the same week due to the extreme amount of dust and debris, Ms. Monterrosa claimed. Additionally, what little heat there was in the apartment was escaping through large holes in the walls created by the renovations, she explained. They are still paying rent, even though they have not been able to live in the apartment since early December, Ms. Monterrosa stated. “The renovations embedded a tremendous amount of dust and debris in all of the furniture, which was not covered as promised. We both had difficulty breathing and all of the heat escaped,” she said. Westfield Leader reporters visited the apartment and verified that all of the five rooms had numerous wires

hanging down out of large holes in the walls and ceilings. Some of the wires were at head level and impossible to avoid without ducking. The apartment was also ice-cold and appeared to have only one gasheating unit in the living room. There was a thick layer of dust covering all of the furniture, which had been pushed into the center of the rooms. Currently, Mrs. Hernandez is staying with relatives in Scotch Plains and Ms. Monterrosa is living out of hotels and with friends, while the renovations “drag on,” she explained. Ms. Monterrosa was told by Mr. Schilling that the delay in completing the renovations was the fault of the Building Department not coming out to inspect the work. However, the Building Department told The Westfield Leader and Ms. Monterrosa the delay was due to the electrical work failing to pass inspection numerous times. According to Ms. Monterrosa, Mr. Schilling told her, “If you don’t like it, you can get out,” when she called to ask when the renovations would be completed. The Westfield Leader left telephone messages for Mr. Schilling, but the calls were not returned. Wayne Augenstein, Westfield attorney for Mr. Schilling, called back and said all of the tenants were sent notices in November that the renovations might cause “some temporary inconvenience and minor dust.” He said there are a few small holes in the walls that must remain open until the inspections are completed, but that there is no reason why the women can’t occupy the apartment. Frank Hirsch, Westfield Construction Code Official, told The Westfield Leader, “Our department has had a lot of problems with this building and with the landlord’s representative (Mr. Schilling).” Mr. Hirsch said it was his understanding that the landlord intended on renovating the entire building, but hasn’t applied for the necessary permits or showed up with the plans, despite repeated requests. “He (Mr. Schilling) has a permit to complete electrical work in the one apartment, Mr. Hirsch confirmed. But that work was not done properly and has failed inspection,” he said.

Fanwood Council Introduces New Downtown Plan Ordinance CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

or reject prior to adoption on second reading of the ordinance for the redevelopment plan, which is expected to occur at its next regular meeting on Tuesday, February 12. Several other resolutions were also passed at last week’s meeting. Among them was one approving a contract with Clayton Pierce, in the amount of $2,916, for his services as Fanwood Downtown Revitalization Coordinator for the period spanning January 1 until Thursday, February 28, of this year. A contract with him for the remainder of 2002 is expected to be approved at the end of this period, after officials and Mr. Pierce have finalized what the Coordinator’s objectives will be for this year. Council representatives also approved the appointment of Raymond Poerio as Shared Services Coordinator for recreation projects to be done jointly between Scotch Plains, Fanwood and the two towns’ Board of Education. Mr. Poerio serves as Recreation Director for the Township of Scotch Plains. Additionally passed were resolutions approving an increase in parking fines from $14 to $20; appointing Patricia Hernandez as Deputy Prosecutor for Fanwood and authorizing the Business and Professional Association of Fanwood to hold a Spring Festival on Sunday, June 9. The rain date is the following Sunday, June 16. It was noted that the festival, to be held along Martine Avenue between LaGrande and South Avenues, would incur no costs to the borough. A resolution was approved designating Sergeant Howard Drewes of the Fanwood Police Department and Deputy Fire Chief John Piccola as the borough’s Emergency Coordinator and Deputy Emergency Coordinator, respectively. Sergeant Drewes succeeds Fanwood Police Chief Robert Carboy as Emergency Coordinator, since the Chief will be retiring later this year. An additional resolution appointed Fanwood’s Emergency Response Coun-

cil, which includes elected officials, representatives of the local police, fire and rescue squad units, Director of Public Works Raymond Manfra, the media and others. At the outset of the meeting, the Mayor announced the appointment of Sophie Kauchak as Fanwood’s representative to the Plainfield Area Regional Sewerage Authority, for a term to expire February 1, 2007. She succeeds former Fanwood Councilman William E. Populus, Jr., who served for six years in that capacity. A resolution was presented to the family of Richard Berry, a longtime Fanwood resident who died November 5 at age 76. An architect with his own firm in Rahway, Mr. Berry designed the Fanwood municipal complex, the Fanwood Volunteer Rescue Squad building and renovations to the Fanwood Memorial Library, among other buildings. The governing body also passed a resolution recognizing Monday, January 21, as Martin Luther King Day. A proclamation was issued honoring Timothy Lee on attaining his Eagle Scout Award, the highest award bestowed by the Boy Scouts of America. For his Eagle Scout project, he planned and coordinated construction of a 140-footlong, raised boardwalk for visitors to utilize at the Fanwood Nature Center. In addition to his parents, Wayne and Elizabeth, Timothy also acknowledged the contributions of Dean Talcott, Chairman of the Fanwood Environmental Commission and Nature Center Caretaker, toward realization of his goal. All were on hand for the presentation to Timothy last week. Both during his report as Police Commissioner and at the conclusion of the meeting, Councilman Thomas Ryan expressed sorrow and concern over the sexual assault of a 13-year-old Fanwood girl on January 2, allegedly by five older Scotch Plains teenagers, and added that assistance would be available to the victim and her family through the Union County Victim/ Witness Program.

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Amy Horowitz for The Times

HER HOUSE IS NOT A HOME…Beatrice Monterrosa stands in her kitchen, where loose wires have been left to hang, the wall remains un-renovated and debris blankets the appliances and furniture.

“We’ve been after him (Mr. Schilling) for months to submit the proper permits and complete the work, but he is ignoring our requests,” Mr. Hirsch stated. Other tenants in this building and the one next door told The Westfield Leader they will not permit Mr. Schilling to renovate their apartments. Rose Peer, a tenant in the next building, also owned by Mr. Potyk and managed by Mr. Schilling, said Mr. Schilling has harassed and threatened her and the other tenants with eviction since he began managing the building. “I don’t think Mr. Potyk knows how horribly Mr. Schilling is abusing his tenants or he wouldn’t allow this to go on,” she added. Several other tenants agreed, but said they are no longer able to reach Mr. Potyk. Additionally, Ms. Monterrosa and the other tenants said they were told they had to sign a new regulations agreement and a month-to-month lease or face eviction. Ms. Monterrosa and her grandmother signed both, but the other tenants refused, claiming the regulations agreement was unreasonable. “Mr. Schilling is taking advantage of poor people who do not know their legal rights and is attempting to coerce tenants into signing away their legal rights through fear and intimidation tactics,” Ms. Peer remarked. “There must be some town official who is concerned that this type of business practice is not the type of reputation that Westfield wants,” she added. Mr. Potyk told The Leader the buildings needed to be upgraded for the health and safety of the tenants. However, he maintained the apartments have been habitable during this process and that the tenants who chose to move out were “overreacting to the minor inconvenience.” Mr. Potyk also said it was his understanding that Mr. Schilling had been very patient in explaining the

situation to the tenants and had dealt with them very fairly. “We’re trying to give the tenants a better quality of life by upgrading the electrical and heating systems,” Mr. Potyk said. He pointed out that the tenants have enjoyed many years of very low rent. Mr. Potyk also confirmed the electrical renovations on each apartment were costing him $4,000 per apartment and that the heating upgrades will cost an additional $4,000 for each apartment. He said it was only reasonable for the tenants to expect that they would have to pay more rent for these improvements. He said he intended to increase the rent a reasonable amount over a period of time to cover his costs. Mr. Potyk said that licensed electricians were used and that he didn’t understand why the work did not meet the approval of the Building Department. “It is the Building Department that is delaying us from closing up the holes in the walls,” he remarked. Regarding the cold temperatures, he said the tenants have control over the heating unit and that they probably turned it off while they were not living there. Regarding the holes in the walls, Mr. Potyk said “those are inside holes, not outside holes, which should not affect the retention of heat.” Union County Legal Services said that if there are code violations or if the building is unlivable, then the tenants might have a right to relocation assistance. Legal Services told The Leader that the tenants should organize in order to protect their rights during this renovation process. Tenants who fall below certain income guidelines may be eligible for legal services and should call the Union County Legal Services Office at (908) 354-4340 and ask for Mary Drier to determine if they qualify for representation and to learn about their rights.

Planning Bd. Mayor Marks CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

system to a full-time, fully-accredited high school. The UCVTS school system previously functioned on a shared-time delivery system, where students would attend regular high school half a day, then transfer over to UCVTS for half a day. However, beginning in September of 2002, UCVTS will accept its first class of full-time freshmen students. Each year, another freshman class will be enrolled until a full capacity of 500 students is reached over the next four years. Dr. Bistocchi explained that this transition was necessary in order for the school to meet new, stricter state graduation standards that would not be possible to meet with students attending each school only half a day. The new building will allow the school to provide for the state’s requirements of full-time science and physical education programs. The proposed, two-story building would be approximately 69,000 square feet and would include 10 classrooms, three computer labs, a gymnasium, a fitness center, a media center, science labs and several other teaching stations. The gymnasium, with a seating capacity of 800, would be equipped with a portable stage that would permit the school to hold graduation ceremonies indoors as well as providing for theatrical productions. The estimated cost of the new building and renovations to the existing parking lot would be approximately $13.8 million, which has already been approved by the Freeholder Board through a bond. Architect Peter Russo told the board that the estimated completion date would be September of 2003. The new facility would require 25 additional faculty members and two to three custodians. The existing parking lot would be renovated to accommodate busing students in from 19 different districts. The 100 full-time adult students that currently attend the school during the day would attend the school at night instead. Dr. Bistocchi said that there would actually be a surplus of parking after the daytime adult students were transferred to evenings. The board unanimously voted to give its approval to the plan. Mayor Martin Marks commented that the township has always had a good working relationship with UCVTS and that he was glad that the township and the school could serve students throughout the county.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Transportation (DOT) proposal to revamp the traffic flow in and around the Route 22 bridge linking downtown Scotch Plains with Bonnie Burn and New Providence Roads to the north. The DOT’s proposal involves expanding the existing bridge as well as widening the intersections at the northern and southern ends of the overpass. The resolution also includes the township’s desire for DOT and any other involved entities to work closely with Scotch Plains residents as the details of the project, and the construction timetable, are formulated. Several residents of Sunset Place, which intersects with Park Avenue across from the southern end of the bridge, expressed concern on Tuesday night that their street and neighborhood would be negatively affected by the project. Mayor Marks assured the residents that their concerns would be taken into account as planning moves forward, and he emphasized that the project itself would not get underway for another few years, at minimum. The council also approved a resolution extending its animal control contract with Associated Humane Societies of Newark for another year at an annual cost of just over $39,200. Councilwoman Paulette Coronato said the nonprofit group had done a good job over the past two years while also noting that, in the absence of any countywide animal control effort, there are not many options for municipalities to choose from in this regard. Editor’s note: For a complete transcript of the Mayor’s speech Tuesday night, please see page 5.

Mr. Bernstein CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Reference at the Scotch Plains Public Library. Mrs. Schulze worked parttime at the library through high school, during college breaks, and through graduate school as a library assistant. After graduating with her masters degree in Library Science from Rutgers University, she worked as a cataloger for Baker & Taylor, a book distribution company located in Bridgewater, before returning to the Scotch Plains Public Library.

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Officials Say Probe of Assault Was Handled Appropriately CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

slapped and punched, suffering cuts and bruises, by one of the boys in the group during the attack, according to local authorities. After the attack, the girl ran back into the school building, but was followed by one of the boys, who allegedly sexually victimized her again in a stairwell, the girl told authorities. The names of the five suspects, who are sophomores and juniors at the high school, are being withheld because they are all minors, between the ages of 15 and 17. However, if Superior Court Judge Rudolph Hawkins, Jr. decides to uphold the Prosecutor’s decision to try the boys as adults, their names will be released. After intensively gathering evidence and questioning the suspects, Scotch Plains Police Chief Thomas O’Brien said, the police arrested the five boys on January 5. Three of the youths are being detained at the George W. Herlich Detention Center in Elizabeth on the more serious charges of kidnapping and aggravated sexual assault said Robert O’Leary, Executive Assistant Prosecutor for the Prosecutor’s Office. Kidnapping can refer to being forcibly taken from one place to another or being held against one’s will and not permitted to leave, explained Mr. O’Leary. Two of the boys are being charged with aggravated sexual assault only and were released to their parents. Mr. Manahan said that Judge Hawkins found sufficient evidence that the girl’s story was plausible and that three of the boys posed a significant enough threat to the community to warrant keeping them detained. The two boys who were released from custody have been suspended from school, according to Public Information Coordinator for the school district, Kathleen Meyer. They will have an opportunity to present evidence to school officials at a hearing to contest that suspension. School officials have the options of extending or waiving the 10-day suspension or deciding if the charges against the students warrant expulsion, Ms. Meyer explained. Because the other three boys are in custody, suspension is not an issue for them at this time, she added. In response to parents’ safety concerns, township and school officials are re-evaluating security measures in and around Park Middle School to determine if supervision during and after school is adequate to prevent such a crime from occurring again. Security guards who were hired shortly after the Columbine High School shootings in Colorado, but then let go, have once again been posted to monitor the hallways and grounds of the school, said Park Principal Rocco Collucci. However, many law enforcement and town officials agree that this type of incident could happen anywhere, anytime, and that no community is immune. “There is no way to guard every corner or wooded area in any town,” commented Chief O’Brien. Community residents have criticized public officials because parents were not informed of the incident until the story was publicly released on January 9, seven days after it occurred. However, Chief O’Brien pointed out that local police followed strict guidelines for gathering evidence and information for this type of incident. Ms. Meyer said that school officials were obligated to follow the directives of the police in keeping this investigation confidential until the police and prosecutors determined that release of the information was appropriate. “We made a determination that the community was not in any imminent danger and that to release this information sooner could have jeopardized gathering evidence for the case,” Chief O’Brien explained. Mayor Martin Marks praised the way the police handled the situation, which he said needed to be done discreetly in order to avoid mistakes in the investigation. Mayor Marks also said that he was comfortable with Prosecutor Manahan’s decision to aggressively pursue the charges against the perpetrators as adults. “This was a very adult crime,” the Mayor remarked, “The decision to charge them as adults is not only to seek justice, but to send a clear message to society that this type of crime will not be tolerated.” The Mayor told The Times that he thought that the public was justifiably concerned and angered by this incident, however, he said, “some branches of media have been unnecessarily hyping this incident with misinformation in an effort to sensationalize it.” “I have confidence that our community has the intelligence to see through the hype,” he added. If tried as juveniles in family court, they could be held in a juvenile detention facility until they are 18. If tried and convicted as adults in New Jersey Superior Court, they could face sentences of 25 years to life on the more serious charges of kidnapping and up to 20 years for the charges of aggravated sexual assault. In arriving at the decision to charge the suspects as adults, Prosecutor Manahan said that many factors were examined including background, history of prior infractions and the nature of the crimes involved. He also had to consider whether he thought the boys would be rehabilitated with four years in a juvenile facility. Two of the boys are brothers who, according to community members, regularly attended St. John’s Baptist Church in Scotch Plains. One of the five boys, according to Chief O’Brien, had a history of prior run-ins with the law. Some community residents have characterized some of the boys involved as “outcasts” and “trouble-makers,” while others have described them as good, church-going kids. Mayor Marks said this type of incident speaks to what children are exposed to today and that it is incumbent on parents to counteract the negative effects of television and other messages with positive values and morals. “We not only have to protect them from becoming victims, but we have to protect them from becoming perpetrators, as well,” the Mayor remarked. “No community is immune to the negative influences on children that are rampant in our society,” he added. The Mayor also commented, “This in-

cident does not qualify as a racial issue; it is about five individuals that lacked proper values. It crosses all boundaries and does not have anything to do with race.” The Reverend Kenneth Hetzel, President of the Scotch Plains-Fanwood Ministerium, said, “The community must be sensitive to the needs of the families involved; both the girl’s family and the families of the boys, which also need support, no matter what their degree of involvement may have been.” He also said he was very adamant that this was not indicative of any racial divide in the community, but rather an unfortunate incident of young people acting inappropriately. In reaction to the incident, school officials have made counseling services available to students in the middle schools and at the high school. Mr. Collucci said he is arranging for additional counseling in the classroom to give students the opportunity to air their views and concerns regarding this issue. Township leaders and officials agreed that this incident is not indicative of the character of Scotch Plains and was an isolated event. When news of the incident was released, network television stations and newspaper reporters swarmed the Scotch Plains-Fanwood Board of Education offices and the grounds of Park Middle School, asking students and parents for their reactions. In a letter sent home to the parents of the district’s 4,800 students, school officials said the district would call local authorities to keep the media from trespassing on school property. “The overwhelming majority of Scotch Plains students are fine, upstanding young citizens and we are very proud of them,” said Reverend Hetzel. “It is very important that we publicly acknowledge their wonderful accomplishments and exemplary character,” he noted. Ms. Meyer said many parents had called the Board of Education offices expressing their desire to help support the community in some way or to do something that would enable the community to heal from the incident.

Board of Ed. CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

“It is a sensitive subject and the PTA is treating it sensitively,” said Scotch Plains High School PTA President Sharon Machrone. While the event was never directly mentioned, some concerned parents asked indirect questions concerning the safety of their children after school. Robert Painter of Scotch Plains, the parent of children who attend Park Middle School, addressed the board about a lack of parental monitoring outside of the school building following the final bell of the day. Mr. Painter felt that the issue needs to be addressed before the first-ever fifth-grade class makes the transition to the middle school in September. “As a parent, I am trying to address this in the best way as possible. Fifth and eighth graders are totally different in their maturity levels. I want the students to feel safe there,” Mr. Painter said. While Board of Education President Dr. Donald Sheldon agreed that extra security measures need to be taken to protect children outside of the school day, it is not something the Board of Education has jurisdiction over because it may be viewed as restricting students’ rights. “We already have restrictions in the airports and the schools. It is not that we are not concerned, but it is a matter of how far can we go to protect ourselves before we take away our rights,” Dr. Sheldon said. “It is an unfortunate incident. We wish that all children who could potentially be a problem are discovered far enough in advance before something like this happens, but we are limited in what we can do.” While physical safety of the children is a prominent issue within the overall context of a safe school environment, and parents have a right to be concerned, school board Vice President Jessica Simpson said other components that constitute such an environment already exist within the school district. The Scotch Plains-Fanwood school district has strong internal communications and the interest of the children at heart, Ms. Simpson said, adding communication also exists between members of the community, educational representatives and outside agencies, such as the police department, which is something she said not all districts have in place. PTA representatives also brought up their reservations about fifth graders moving to the middle school. Dr. Kathleen Regan, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, reassured the PTA that the transition is a slow process and care is being taken in its development process. This attention to detail will benefit the program the district is creating, she noted. Teams of five members each, comprised of teachers, administrators and elementary school parents, observed three school districts that have already implemented the transition of the fifth grade into the middle school and compared those districts with the Scotch Plains-Fanwood district’s plans for integrating fifth graders into the middle school. “We did what we thought was right, following the views of the parents, teachers and the administration, before we did visits; that way, we weren’t picking parts of other programs,” Dr. Regan said. She noted that the other districts were surprised that Scotch Plains-Fanwood had already addressed many curriculum concerns of parents that these other districts had not addressed until seven or eight years into the program. The addition of the fifth grade to the middle school raised questions regarding the ongoing teacher contract negotiations. While no concrete answers were provided, the board expressed its desire to have the issue resolved in the near future, hopefully before the budget is passed. The board spoke of the possible ramifications of the school budget being voted down. Board member Edward J. Saridaki, Jr. said, “Turning down the budget does not help the teachers. It causes cuts to be made, which means a decrease in personnel, and that means teachers.”

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The Westfield Leader and THE TIMES of Scotch Plains – Fanwood

Thursday, January 17, 2002

A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION

Two Westfield Residents Appointed As Administrative Law Judges By DEBORAH MADISON Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times

HONORING COUNTY EMPLOYEES…Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders recognized Ben Laganga, director of the Office of Emergency Management in Union County, for responding to a call for help during the September 11 terrorist attack on the World Trade Center, at a recent board meeting. Pictured, left to right, are: Ben Laganga, Freeholder Alexander Mirabella and Freeholder Chairman Lewis Mingo, Jr.

Two Westfield residents were appointed by Acting Governor Donald DiFrancesco to the offices of Administrative Law Judges. Town Attorney William S. Jeremiah, II and County Counsel Carol I. Cohen will be sworn in during separate ceremonies later this month to fill their new positions. Mr. Jeremiah, a 1968 graduate of Vanderbilt University School of Law in Nashville, was appointed as Westfield’s Town Attorney in January of 1999 after serving as Westfield’s Planning Board Attorney for 14 years. He has been active within his community through his participation on various boards and committees since passing the bar exam. Mr. Jeremiah served as President of the Westfield Foundation, President of the YMCA of Westfield and currently serves on its Board of Directors. He was a member of the Executive Committee of the

Westfield High School Boosters Club. Mr. Jeremiah also co-founded the Education Fund of Westfield, Inc., and served as the organization’s president. Currently, Mr. Jeremiah partakes in the New Jersey Association of School Board Attorneys, as the group’s vice president and a trustee. Professionally, Mr. Jeremiah represents Watchung Hills Regional High School, Warren Township, and

William S. Jeremiah, II

Emerg. Management Director Honored for Sept. 11 Response The Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders recently honored Ben Laganga, director of the Office of Emergency Management in Union County, for responding to a call for help during the September 11 terrorist attacks. Mr. Laganga, who holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Public Administration from Kean University, has been a Union County employee since 1990, when he was Deputy County Emergency Management Coordinator. In July 1991, Mr. Laganga was appointed to the County Emergency Management Coordinator. He was responsible for Emergency Management, Environmental Services, Environmental Health Enforcement, Solid Waste Investigation Unit, Hazardous Material Response Team, the Fire Services Training Academy and Fire Investigation Task Force.

Mr. Laganga, a resident of Roselle Park, currently serves as treasurer of the New Jersey Association of County Emergency Management Coordinators and is also a member of the Tosco/Infineum Community Action Panel (CAP). Mr. Laganga also served as vice president of the UnionMiddlesex Hazardous Materials Advisory Council (HMAC) and currently serves a member of its board of trustees. Freeholder Alexander Mirabella said, “Ben Laganga immediately responded and tirelessly volunteered his time and energies to provide back up assistance and communications so the New York Fire Department Emergency Medical Services could work to find individuals who were trapped in the debris. We are proud to recognize him for his valiant and fearless actions during a time of crisis.”

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Senator Cleans Up as Chair Of Environment Committee TRENTON – Senator Joseph S. Suliga has been selected (D-22) as the Democratic Chair of the Senate Environment Committee. “It’s not common for a new Senator to chair a committee,” said Senator Richard Codey, (D-27) “but Senator Suliga’s record of leadership on environmental issues speaks for itself. The people of New Jersey should

the Clean Ocean and Shore Trust (COAST), a wildlife preservation and port dredging advocacy group. He also sponsors a legislation that would require additional environmental monitoring of dredging and provide for the beneficial use of those materials. Currently, Senator Suliga represents the 22nd District, which in-

Garwood Boards of Education, as well as the Union County Educational Services Commission. During his experience representing school boards, Jeremiah has provided advice concerning all phases of school operations such as working in compliance with public bidding laws, construction contracts, students’ rights, school elections, and special education. He has also counseled the boards pertaining to issues involving personnel matters, grievances and arbitrations. Furthermore, Mr. Jeremiah handled the collective bargaining for all three districts. Additionally, Mr. Jeremiah maintains a general practice, where he serves as legal counsel and advisor involving commercial matters, zoning and planning matters, municipal

law, and real property transactions. He currently works for the Westfield law firm of Apruzzese, McDermott, Mastro and Murphy, located in Liberty Center. He was sworn in by Judge Edward Beglin on January 11 at the County Court House in Elizabeth. Ms. Cohen, the other judge selected, received her law degree from New York University and was appointed as Union County Counsel in 1998. With her appointment, she was the first woman to be chosen to that position for Union County. Prior to becoming County Counsel, Ms. Cohen was legal advisor to the Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders and all county offices in private, general practice since 1985. During that time, she was in charge of all civil litigation for the county and its offices. Previously, Ms. Cohen served as Assistant County Counsel of Union County. As recently as 1996, Ms. Cohen was a member of the Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders, noted for her work in establishing the first County Patient Advocates Program. She also worked as a liaison to Youth Services Commission, which searched for alternatives

Carol I. Cohen

Fanwood Republicans Install 2002 Officers

SWEARING IN…On January 8, 2002 Senator Joseph Suliga took the Oath of Office from Senate President Dick Codey at the State House in Trenton. His wife Annmarie looks on.

rest assured that clean air, clean water and open space will have an effective advocate holding the gavel of the Environment Committee.” The prime sponsor of the Landfill Reclamation Improvement Act, Senator Suliga also participates in

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cludes: Clark, Dunellen, Fanwood, Greenbrook, Linden, Middlesex, Plainfield, Rahway, Scotch Plains and Windfield. He also serves as the chief financial officer in Linden. “Clean air, clean water and other environmental issues touch everyone in New Jersey,” said Suliga. “I look forward to working with the new Administration and Senator McNamara (R-40), the republican chair, to protect our resources, fight sprawl and preserve our parks and open space for future generations.”

FANWOOD – The Fanwood Republican Club installed its officers for the year 2002 at its January 7 meeting at the Community House on North Avenue in Fanwood. Mayor Louis Jung installed the officers, including President, Thomas Drubulis; First Vice-President, Joseph Britt; Second Vice-President, Donna Gonnella; Treasurer, John Gurley; Recording Secretary, Christine Urbano, and Corresponding Secretary, Sophie Kauchak. Mayor Jung and borough officials also reviewed issues of concern to the borough and progress at the meeting, after which a holiday party buffet was served. Anyone interested in joining the club may attend its next meeting on Monday, February 4, or call Sophie Kauchak at (908) 322-3241. A guest speaker will be announced at a later date. Non-Fanwood residents are invited to join as associate members.

to incarceration. Ms. Cohen was formerly a chairperson of a lawyer’s referral service, which provides low cost legal advise to county residents. She also serves as President of the Union County Women’s Political Caucus. She previously served as trustee of Jewish Federation of Central New Jersey. Ms. Cohen will be sworn in on January 31 in Judge Beglin’s Chambers. The position of Administrative Law Judge is involved in the administration of laws governed by the New Jersey Administrative Code, which deals with issues involving the Department of Insurance and Banking, the Department of Education and Civil Service Jobs; to name a few of their areas of focus. They hear disputes on matters such as special placement of children in the educational system and civil service job loss appeals. The full Senate confirmed their appointments on January 7 after being nominated by the Governor.

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The Westfield Leader and THE TIMES of Scotch Plains – Fanwood

A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION

Thursday, January 17, 2002

Page 3

Bagger, Kean, Munoz Sworn Into Office, Set Agendas TRENTON — State Senator Richard H. Bagger and Assemblyman Tom Kean, Jr., both of Westfield, and Assemblyman Eric Munoz of Summit, representing the 21st Legislative District, were sworn into office January 8 at the State House in Trenton. Senator Bagger is beginning his first term in the upper House of the New Jersey State Legislature, after serving five terms in the General Assembly. Senator Bagger, a former Westfield Mayor and Councilman, will serve on the Senate Judiciary Committee and the Senate Law and Public Safety and Veterans Affairs Committees. The new Senator was also elected by the Senate Republicans as Deputy Whip for the 2002-2003 Legislative Session. “I look forward to serving in an even more significant capacity as a Senator. The committees on which I will be working are of great importance to not only the people of District 21, but all New Jerseyans,” Senator Bagger stated. Assemblyman Kean, who was

named to fill the vacancy left by the late Alan M. Augustine in April of 2001, has been assigned to the Assembly Budget Committee and the State Government Committee. Mr. Kean previously served as an aide to former Congressman Bob Franks. “As a member of the Assembly Budget Committee, I look forward to working on the issues of immediate concern to our state and to the people of District 21, including the development of a state budget that holds the line on taxes, restores fiscal stability and encourages economic growth,” Assemblyman Kean stated. Assemblyman Munoz joined the Legislature last spring to fill another vacancy in the Assembly. Assemblyman Munoz will serve on the Assembly Commerce and Economic Development Committee. Dr. Munoz is a trauma surgeon at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey in Newark. He is one of only two medical doctors in the Legislature. Assemblyman

Munoz is the Summit Republican Municipal Chairman and is a former member of the Summit Common Council. Assemblyman Munoz added that his background as a surgeon gives him a “unique perspective” in bringing to light important medical issues before the State Legislature, including the need to address bioterrorism. Senator Bagger, Assemblymen Kean and Munoz have joint legislative staff. Senator Bagger and Assemblyman Kean will share an office at 203 Elm Street in Westfield, (908) 232-3673. The satellite office of Assemblyman Munoz is located at 57 Union Place in Summit. District 21 includes Berkeley Heights, Cranford, Garwood, Mountainside, New Providence, Roselle Park, Springfield, Summit and Westfield in Union County; Chatham Township, Madison, Harding and Long Hill in Morris County, Warren and Watchung in Somerset County, and Millburn in Essex County.

A MOMENTOUS OCCASION…Senator Richard Bagger is surrounded by his family as he takes his oath of office January 8 in Trenton, administered by Acting Governor John Bennett. Joining them, pictured left to right, are: Senator Bagger’s mother, Elizabeth Bagger; his daughters, Kate, Jennifer and Meredith, and his wife, Barbara Bagger.

Center for Women Reveals Workshops for January

THE RUNNELLS LADIES…The Runnells Ladies, a volunteer group of women living at the Second Westfield Senior Citizens Housing Corporation, have designed and crafted jewelry boxes, knitted and crocheted shawls and lap robes, and crafted 40 holiday arrangements for residents’ night stands, and one dozen wall hangings. The Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders honored the ladies on their fifth anniversary by presenting the group with a resolution. Pictured, left to right, are: seated, Mimi Gladstone, Betty Fraga, Evelyn Badge, Betty Kenely, and Matilda Reitman; standing, Irene Doslik, Anita Munkascy, Kay Felter, Ivy Rezak, Freeholder Deborah Scanlon, Marian Connolly, Millie Boguski, Helen Vinegra and Edith Loland.

AIDS Benefit Committee To Hold Annual Auction WESTFIELD — The AIDS Benefit Committee of New Jersey (ABCNJ), a non-profit organization, will host its 14th annual auction on Saturday, March 9, at Temple Emanu-El, located at 756 East Broad Street in Westfield. Proceeds from the auction will benefit agencies that provide assistance to people living with AIDS. The evening will include an open bar, buffet and silent auction beginning at 6 p.m. A live auction with coffee and dessert will start at 8 p.m. Items to be auctioned off include art, antiques and services. Minimum bids range from $50 and up. The mission of ABC-NJ, made up entirely of volunteers, is to help people with AIDS live as comfortably as possible. It achieves this goal by raising funds for organizations that help people with AIDS but which may not have the ability or resources to raise substantial funds independently. John DeMarco, a Westfield realtor, founded ABC-NJ in 1986. A member of Coldwell Banker’s “President’s Circle International,” reserved for the top 1 percent of Coldwell Banker’s salespeople worldwide, he began raising money to help those afflicted

A

with AIDS in 1982, when he saw the disease becoming an epidemic. Mr. DeMarco’s vision and commitment will be honored at this year’s auction, with the presentation of the Fourth Annual “John DeMarco Humanitarian Award,” which recognizes individuals who make important contributions to persons living with AIDS. In addition to its annual auctions, the AIDS Benefit Committee has held holiday house tours and theater parties to raise money to help people living with the disease. The organization is also seeking corporate donations and major gifts this year. Tickets for the cocktails, dinner and the auction are $100 each. Individual sponsorships are available for $150 each and corporate sponsorships, which include 10 tickets and a listing in the program journal, start at $1,500. For information about the ABCNJ auction tickets, sponsorships or donations, please call Mike Kenny, ABC-NJ President, at (908) 2326770, extension no. 129 or (908) 928-1600, or Alan Zakin at (973) 966-5544. Donations may be sent to ABC-NJ, P.O. Box 847, Westfield 07090.

SCOTCH PLAINS – The Center for Women and Families (CWF), located at 1801 East Second Street in Scotch Plains, has announced its January 2002 Community Education Workshops. Tonight, January 17, holistic health counselor Kristi Bronico will present “Managing Stress Eating.” The workshop, to be held at CWF’s headquarters from 7:30 to 9 p.m., will address ways to cope with busy schedules and daily challenges while maintaining healthy eating habits. Ms. Bronico will also offer nutritional tips for minimizing stress eating and maximizing energy and overall health. On Tuesday, January 22, from 7:30 to 9 p.m., Headmaster C. Alan Simms will present “Basic Techniques in SelfDefense” at Karate N Motion, located at 1006 South Avenue in Westfield. This workshop will feature confidence-boosting, safety-enhancing techniques of self-defense, with tips on how to fend off attackers and effectively use ordinary items in self-defense. Headmaster Simms’ experience as a martial arts professional includes law enforcement training. On Thursday, January 24, Marlene Browne, an attorney at law and author, will speak at CWF’s offices from 7:30 to 9 p.m. on topics addressed in her book, “The Divorce Process: Empowerment Through Knowledge.” The workshop will touch on sensitive legal issues including filing for divorce, dividing assets, employment benefits, taxes and bankruptcy issues, marital fault, domestic violence, custody, visitation and other topics. A community-based, non-profit

Accredited by NAEYC’s National Academy of Early Childhood Programs

agency, CWF offers low- and no-cost professional counseling to adults, youths and families; legal consultations; support groups for adults and children; community education workshops; job skills training; help-line referrals and more. All CWF Community Education Workshops are $10, but as with all agency services, the fee may be partly or fully waived for those who cannot afford to pay. Proceeds for these services help support agency operations. Individuals interested in any of the workshops may call (908) 322-6007 for details or to register.

Lt. Michael Robertson Earns Rescue Award SCOTCH PLAINS — United States Navy Lieutenant Michael P. Robertson, the son of Judith M. and George W. Robertson of Scotch Plains, recently received the Sikorsky Rescue Award. Lieutenant Robertson was given the award for skill and courage while participating in a lifesaving mission with a Sikorsky aircraft. The award is presented by the management and employees of United Technologies to pilots and crew members. The lieutenant is currently assigned at Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kekaha, Hawaii. He is a 1988 graduate of Union Catholic High School of Scotch Plains and joined the Navy in January of 1993. Lieutenant Robertson graduated from Tulane University of Louisiana with a Bachelor of Arts Degree in 1992.

Westfield’s TV-36 Channel Elects Officers for 2002 WESTFIELD — The Westfield TV-36 Advisory Board elected new officers for 2002 during its December meeting. Eileen O’Donnell will serve as Board Chairwoman, taking over from Phil Falcone, who served as Chairman since the board’s inception in 2000. Ms. O’Donnell, who served as Vice-Chairwoman for the past two years, credited Mr. Falcone with laying the groundwork to enable Westfield Community Television to grow in the future. “The board has made significant progress in getting the necessary cameras and broadcasting equipment in place to produce quality productions,” said Ms. O’Donnell. “Phil and everyone on the board has worked extremely hard to bring us this far, and I look forward to seeing our investments and planning pay off in 2002.” Ms. O’Donnell said that she hopes to involve budding televi-

sion producers from the community to help expand the variety of programming available on TV-36. “In 2002, the Director of Operations and Television Advisory Board hopes to reach out to potential producers within the community,” she said. “We know there is interest out there, and the training of potential camera operators, producers, researchers and graphic artists will allow TV-36 to become a vital source of information within Westfield.” Next year, the Vice-Chairwoman will be Jeanne McCurdy, who joined the board in January of 2001. “I look forward to working with the board as it continues to grow and expand the services to the Westfield community in the coming year,” said Ms. McCurdy.

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The Westfield Leader and THE TIMES of Scotch Plains – Fanwood

Thursday, January 17, 2002

The Westfield Leader

THE TIMES

of Scotch Plains – Fanwood

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Scotch Plains Incident Is Distressing Wound That Strikes Security and Safety of All of Us Last week’s news of the arrests of five Scotch PlainsFanwood High School students for allegedly sexually assaulting a 13-year old middle school student was shocking and distressing, to say the least. The main question on the minds of everyone -- parents, students and local officials -- was how something like this could have occurred in Scotch Plains, reportedly on the edge of school property in broad daylight, and just a few yards from the township Post Office. It’s a wound that affects everyone: the young female student; the parents of all those involved; township leaders who express surprise that something this violent could occur in a suburban community; civic and religious leaders who might question how to soothe the pain, and parents worried about the safety and well-being of their own children. This incident will force leaders in Scotch Plains -governmental, religious, civic and educational -- to come together, not only to reassure parents that school property is safe and their kids are secure, but also to come up with some new ideas to prevent, as best they can, the type of thinking that led to the January 2 incident from occurring again. Scotch Plains-Fanwood High School is certainly not a building full of sexual predators; if the charges against the five students are true, it won’t mean there is a widespread problem at the school. It was an isolated incident -- horrifying, violent and criminal -

- but an isolated incident nonetheless. It does not reflect poorly on Scotch Plains or the high school. It does reflect poorly on those charged with the crime. However, it will still be up to local leaders to do what they can to create an environment in the schools that promotes respect and tolerance and doesn’t condone in any way the kind of attitudes, behavior and mindsets that may have contributed to the incident. The safety of the school buildings themselves also needs to be addressed. Apparently, the attack took place while the Park Middle School building was basically open to anyone; this needs to change. Most importantly, the responsibility of making sure another, similar incident doesn’t occur again rests with parents. The tone set at home -- in the forms of discipline, acceptable behavior, attitudes, the roles of family members and the limits that parents set -- often translates into the conduct of students outside the home. The arrests last week certainly were a shock to our area, but it can also provide the opportunity for some healing, a new emphasis on what’s acceptable and what’s not, and a renewed effort by parents and community leaders to focus on our children, especially those who may potentially be at the most risk. If there is a way to keep the nature of this in perspective – we must. We can’t let our fears wander with pre-conviction, although this incident is being tried on national television – but not yet in court.

Fanwood Award for Heroism Spotlights Courage and Character of Local Citizens Last month, Mayor Louis Jung and the Borough Council of Fanwood passed a resolution authorizing the creation of a Fanwood Award for Heroism. Divided into two categories, it calls for awards to be presented to “a heroic individual, Fanwood resident, volunteer or employee” who saves a life within the borough’s borders or with valor or extreme risk to his or her own life. Honorees, who must be nominated by another individual and whose heroic actions must be documented, will receive a resolution signed by the governing body and have their names displayed on a plaque in the Council Chambers. Additionally, those cited for heroism with valor or extreme risk will be presented with a special engraved gift. We commend the Mayor and council for seeking to honor fellow residents whose courage, compassion and quick response gave someone else a second chance to live. In just the past year alone, Fanwood has produced more than a few heroes, from trained emergency service personnel to an ordinary citizen called into action by unimaginable circumstance. In December of 2000, members of the Fanwood Volunteer Rescue Squad successfully revived a veteran firefighter who had suffered a heart attack in the borough’s fire headquarters, using a defibrillator to restore heart rhythm. This past June, the group was honored with the State of New Jersey Governor’s Volunteer Award 2001, in the category of public safety, presented at the governor’s mansion in Princeton. Adding a special touch to the occasion was the presence at the ceremony of Jack Ruh, the firefighter whose life they had saved six months earlier. This past May, Patrolmen Michael Schilling and Russell J. Yeager of the Fanwood Police Department

also used a defibrillator to restore the heartbeat of a 72-year-old Westfield man who went into cardiac arrest at a restaurant in the borough. The patient in this case survived as well. Most recently, Fanwood resident Tony Pecora, an accountant with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey at the World Trade Center, risked his own safety to help carry a quadriplegic colleague down from the 69th floor of Tower One after the September 11 terrorist attacks. Mr. Pecora and the others involved in that rescue escaped the tower’s collapse by 10 minutes. While they may not have been directly caught in the chaos immediately following the attacks, like Mr. Pecora, it would be remiss not to mention others from Fanwood who emerged as heroes in a different way as the result of the tragic events. As noted by Mayor Jung in his New Year’s Day address, 29 members of the borough’s police, fire and rescue squad ranks volunteered to assist with the search, rescue and investigation of the World Trade Center catastrophe, pitching in at Ground Zero and elsewhere. None among them has ever sought any personal recognition; nevertheless, in the eyes of their community and especially those who suffered as a result of the disaster, they are heroes just as well. While we have spotlighted individuals from Fanwood, we are equally cognizant that many others from Westfield, Scotch Plains and Mountainside, among many other communities, are equally deserving of recognition as heroes. We would suggest the governing bodies of other municipalities emulate Fanwood by finding a special way to honor those whose efforts gave another person the greatest gift of all – the gift of life.

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Has The Westfield Council Gone Stealth? Issues Can’t be Addressed by Short Session For the last several years, Westfield Town Council meetings and the day-to-day business have been noteworthy for lively discussion and debate of the issues. Some have criticized these past councils for being overwhelmed with partisan and acrimonious behavior. But the positive side of this has been that the citizens were well informed of the issues and of the directions intended by the town government. Does Tuesday night’s Westfield Town Council meeting, which concluded in 15 minutes, mark a new trend in how this government will be conducting

business this year? All items of the meeting swooped by and were passed without discussion or public comment. Efficient, we presume. There are major issues being contemplated by the Town of Westfield this year. There’s the perennial parking deck debate that has mushroomed into a $40 million proposal. There are neighborhood zoning and development issues. There are the budget, public works projects and pool expansions. To us, it’s a little eerie when government goes stealth. ABCDICTIONOPQRSTDECEPTIONUVWXYZ

Letters to the Editor Teachers Union, BOE Need to Reach Pact Soon For Sake of Communities Editor’s Note: The following letter was sent to the Scotch Plains-Fanwood Education Association (teachers’ union) and the Scotch Plains-Fanwood Board of Education and copied to The Times of Scotch Plains-Fanwood. The President’s Committee of the Scotch Plains-Fanwood Parent Teacher Association Council is dismayed by the lack of a new contract between the Board of Education (BOE) and the Scotch Plains-Fanwood Education Association (SPFEA). After one year of negotiations, the parties cannot seem to agree on the sal-

Scotch Plains Resident Requests Restoration Of Historic Landmark Did you know there are many homes in Scotch Plains, built in the 18th century, that are still standing and in their original location? There is one little gem in need of a bit of attention but which does have the basic built-in details that spell true early Americana. Wide board floors, original brick noggin, rough hewn beams and fireplace — all contribute to make this place special. But, like people, houses get tired and do need rejuvenation — with houses we call it restoration. It needs and deserves our attention. The story of Aunt Betsy Frazee refusing to give Lord Cornwallis some of her fresh baked bread is nationally famous. It actually took place here and we can’t let Betsy down. Incidentally, Aunt Betsy’s house is an ideal setting or link for the planned New Jersey heritage trail … which also includes women of New Jersey. Williamsburg touts its restored Colonial homes but most of them are not on their original sites — ours is. If you recall, “Old Ironsides” was once consigned to the scrap heap until someone remembered her history. Betsy’s house deserves a like fate. Her Revolutionary War history is just as important. What are we waiting for? Betty Lindner Scotch Plains

Holiday Concert Proves Big Success The Westfield Recreation Department wishes to thank the Westfield Community Band and the Edison Broadway Singers for their dedication and hard work for the 12th annual Holiday Concert that was held December 5 at Edison Intermediate School. The Westfield Community Band traces its heritage back to the mid 1890s, and Maestro Elias Zareva has conducted the band since 1979. The program consisted of songs such as “The Most Wonderful Time of the Year,” “March of the Toys/Toyland,” “White Christmas,” and much more. The Edison Broadway Singers is a choral group from Edison Intermediate School, directed by Kristine SmithMorasso, which performed such songs as “Up on a Housetop,” “Slow Dancing in the Snow,” a “Home Alone Medley,” and more. Thanks to all who attended and for those who made the event a successful one. M. Bruce Kaufmann, Director of Recreation Traci Kastner, Program Coordinator

Comcast Customer Relates Frustrations Thought you’d like to hear another saga on the Comcast front. We also put in that disc from Comcast that was supposed to convert everything. That caused our entire system (three home computers) to crash. So finally, on January 10, the computer doctor fixed it all so it would work; however, our e-mail is still messed up. Our outgoing e-mail goes on the new system (comcast.net), but our incoming e-mail is only received when addressed to the old address at @home.com. The whole thing is very frustrating and timeconsuming. We have spent endless hours on hold with Comcast and frankly, after four or five hours on hold, you have to hang up and get on with life. I’m not surprised they don’t think there’s much of a problem; we’re all on hold! Jean Badalamenti Scotch Plains

Old Guard Opens Bridge Group to All WESTFIELD — The Westfield Old Guard has announced that its Duplicate Bridge group is now open to all bridge players. The group meets in the Community Room of the Westfield Municipal Building, 425 East Broad Street, every Tuesday and Thursday at 12:30 p.m. There are no fees. For further information, please call John Ambos at (908) 232 7762.

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ary and benefits portion of the contract. The effect of this prolonged process is devastating to our schools and our communities. It is time for the SPFEA and the BOE to compromise. The parties must find a common ground whereby each can satisfy most, but maybe not all, of the expectations of their constituencies. We therefore urge the parties to enter the next negotiating session, scheduled for January 23, 2002, with open minds and a determination to resolve their differences with no further delay. This is essential to the health and integrity of our school system, the teachers’ union and our communities. The PTA Council President’s Committee requests that residents of Scotch Plains and Fanwood write to the negotiating parties immediately to urge settlement of the contract. Write to Mr. Ed Leonard, SPFEA President, Terrill Middle School, Terrill Road, Scotch Plains, NJ 07076 and to Dr. Donald Sheldon, SPF BOE President, Evergreen Avenue and Cedar Street, Scotch Plains, NJ 07076. It is important for all of us to show the parties that we are united in our desire for an immediate contract settlement. PTA President’s Committee Mary Ball Cappio, Barbara Cronenberger-Meyer, Lisa McNally, MaryAnn Bonacum, Caren Goldberg, Dorothy Lusk, Marianne Devlin, Sharon Machrone, Rose Hubbard, Susan Dyckman, Caroline Schuster, Karen Benovengo, Liz Murad, Celeste Pober, Jill Markovits

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Diction Deception Below are four arcane words, each with four definitions – only one is correct. The others are made up. Are you sharp enough to discern this deception of diction? If you can guess one correctly – good guess. If you get two – well-read individual. If you get three – word expert. If you get all four – You must have a lot of free time! All words and correct definitions come from the board game Diction Deception. Answers to last week’s arcane words. 1. Perfidious – Unfaithful; deceitful 2. Ommateum – Having a compound eye 3. Auletic – Pertaining to pipes or instruments of the flute family 4. Tetracerous – Having four horns TENTIGINOUS 1. Lasting for a thousand years 2. Covering vast areas with thick brush 3. Hesitant; delaying 4. Exciting lustfulness or lasciviousness SALTANT 1. Having a dry sense of humor 2. Leaping, jumping, dancing 3. Pertaining to a ruler of the Ottoman Empire 4. Harsh, acrid SALEBROUS 1. Rugged; uneven 2. Sociable; gregarious 3. Salty, saline` 4. Treacherous; marked by infidelity THURROCK 1. A medieval battering ram on wheels 2. The gland in a frog that enables it to croak 3. A breastplate of leather 4. The bildge of a ship Answers will appear in next week’s issue.

Reader Rebuts Westfielders’ Response to Anti-Semitism Idea I commend The Westfield Leader, as the official newspaper of the Town of Westfield, for its courage in publishing several Westfield residents’ “Letters to the Editor” regarding anti-Semitism in Westfield. (January 10). However, as the author of the previously published “Letter to the Editor”, which prompted these responses, I was dismayed by the contents thereof. The reason given by these residents for writing is that they were somehow “offended” by the mere fact that I raised the specter of anti-Semitism. Not one of the writers disagreed with my suggestion that the Mayor’s initial refusal to permit the erection of a menorah, coupled with his insidious insistence that Christmas trees were secular “Holiday trees,” was enough to call for a public discussion of the possibility that anti-Semitism was behind this pernicious ruse. Similarly, the writers did not dispute that the sale of the residential property adjoining Temple Emanu-El on the con-

dition that it not be resold to the Temple, coupled with the near-hysterical resistance to the Temple’s inchoate plans to use the property for parking, is itself sufficient cause for concern. Contrary to what these resident-writers would now have us believe, I never suggested that these facts, standing alone, constitute proof of anti-Semitism. Rather, I contend that these facts are more than enough to warrant discussion of the issue. It is that discussion which offends the residents of Westfield, and which they regrettably seek to avoid. Yes, even as an “outsider,” I submit that pretending that these facts do not warrant discussion of the issue of anti-Semitism in Westfield is tantamount to believing that the decorated Christmas trees erected at the train station are no more than secular holiday adornments. Here in Elizabeth, to that we would say: “Gimmeabreak.” Leonard R. Rosenblatt Elizabeth

Young Reader Requests Skateboard Park As Place For After School Recreation Editor’s Note: This letter was sent to Mayor Gregory McDermott and copied to The Westfield Leader. I would appreciate if you would build a skateboard park in Westfield. If you don’t want the benches, bike racks, curbs, steps, and even hand rails getting scratched up or even broken there’s only one solution: build a skateboard park. If you want the store owners to stop complaining about the skateboarding,

roller-blading and biking kids there’s only one solution: build a skateboard park. Best of all, it would be so much fun for all of the skateboarding, roller-blading and biking kids out there. It would give all the kids a place to go after school and keep all of the kids out of trouble, too. If you really want the kids to have fun, please build a skateboard park! Ben Lapidus Westfield

Community News Community Center To Elect Officers, Members of Board WESTFIELD – The Annual Membership Meeting of the Westfield Community Center, a member agency of the United Fund of Westfield, will be held on Monday, January 28, at 7:30 p.m. at the center, located at 558 West Broad Street. Officers to be elected are as follows: Lawrence W. Brown, President; Elizabeth McDiarmid, Vice President; Susan Jacobson, Vice President; Louis Francz, Treasurer, and Janice Williams, Secretary. The Board of Directors, to be elected for terms of three years, are James S. Avery, Donnell Carr, Judy Sheft, Judy Johnson and Maureen Regan. Those named to two-year terms are Chris Beck, B. Carol Molnar, the Reverend Leon Randall and Union County Freeholder Vice Chairwoman Mary Ruotolo. Ernest Davis, Esther Simon and Joyce Pretlow will each serve oneyear terms.

www.goleader.com

SP-F Historical Society To Celebrate 30th Year FANWOOD – The Historical Society of Scotch Plains and Fanwood will celebrate its 30th anniversary with a Birthday Party at its Tuesday, January 22 meeting beginning at 8 p.m. at the Fanwood train station, located at North and Martine Avenues. The evening’s program will feature a slide show, along with stories from the Society’s original founders. Everyone is invited to attend and help blow out the candles on the group’s birthday cake. The Historical Society’s initial focus was restoration of the Osborn Family Home in Scotch Plains, which became the Osborn Cannonball House museum. Today, the Society still maintains and operates the museum and its award-winning garden and also holds monthly meetings devoted to some topic of historical interest. Further information may be obtained from the Society’s President, Richard Bousquet, at P.O. Box 261, Scotch Plains 07076, or by calling (908) 232-1199.

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The Westfield Leader and THE TIMES of Scotch Plains – Fanwood

Thursday, January 17, 2002

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Scotch Plains Mayor Martin Marks Addresses Effect of Media on Recent Assault Issue The following are remarks from Mayor Martin L. Marks at the Scotch Plains Township Council Meeting on January 15, 2002. For the last week, our community has had to deal with the news and fallout of a despicable incident that allegedly took place in and around Park Middle School. While the school district sent home a statement to parents, and the County Prosecutor’s office held a press conference last Wednesday, much of what we learned from the event, as with any event, came from the news media. The news media plays a vital role for society in this regard as they are the disseminators of information to us. The news media also plays a role in holding people like myself and other elected officials accountable for their actions. One question that I have always had, and that was brought to the fore this past week was, “Who holds the media accountable for their actions?” For the most part, the reporting was fair and balanced. In some cases it was misinformed, sensationalized, and downright cruel. We must be ever cognizant, that the news media, however objective they would like to portray themselves, is in fact a business. They are in the business of selling newspapers, or attracting viewers and listeners, and in some cases, lose their objectivity in search for the more attractive story. One angle that was repeatedly played up in the media was the issue of a perceived delay in reporting the incident itself, or somehow warning the community of what had happened. As a parent of a twelve-year-old daughter and a nine-year-old son, I must confess I had this initial perception. However, after thinking for a moment, and consulting with Township officials, I realize that the Scotch Plains Police, the Union County Prosecutor, and the school district acted appropriately in not immediately issuing a statement. Keep in mind that officials, after events became clear to them, determined that there was no immediate danger to students or the community at large as the suspects were either in custody, or under close scrutiny. Also, the fact that we were dealing with a victim and suspects who are minors made this an extremely

sensitive case. Believe you me, if this case was blown because it was prematurely leaked or officially noticed, it would be the very same press and 23,000 justifiably angered residents beating down our doors to find out why. I commend our local and county officials for the manner in which they have handled this case thus far. I have stated several times that I believe that this ugly event occurred not because of some troubling problem distinct to Scotch Plains. I firmly believe, that this was an indictment of society as a whole. With what our children are exposed to on television, radio, the Internet and in the lyrics to the music they listen to, how can they not be negatively affected? The breakdown of the family unit and the overall diminishment of our values I am certain played a role in what happened in our community just two weeks ago. I think we would be naïve to believe that this could not happen again, either here or in another com-

NJ CORE Credits Available Through Rutgers Cooperative WESTFIELD – Individuals who are New Jersey Pesticide Applicators and need credits in the CORE Category from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJ DEP) are invited to attend a free class on Wednesday, March 6, from 9:30 a.m. and noon, at the office of Rutgers Cooperative Extension, located at 300 North Avenue, East, in Westfield. The NJ DEP will award five credits in the CORE category to individuals attending this class. Additionally, the class is designed to help those preparing to take the NJ CORE exam in the near future pass the state exam. Registration is required and space is limited. Interested individuals are asked to register by calling the Agriculture Department of Union County at (908) 654-9854. All Rutgers Cooperative Extension programs are open to the public without regard to race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation or marital or family status.

League of Women Voters To Hold Trade Discussion WESTFIELD – The Westfield Area League of Women Voters (LWV) has invited the public to join its membership this Saturday, January 19, for an open discussion of United States trade policy. The program will be held at 764 Carleton Road beginning at 10:15 a.m. Participants will discuss a trade position update which advocates support for United States participation in an open, worldwide trading system to include trade-related strategies that protect the environment and promote labor, politi-

munity. It could happen in an affluent community, or a poorer community. It could happen in an urban environment, a suburban town, or a rural area. This type of activity and its associated valueless perpetrators can cross all sorts of racial, ethnic, and religious boundaries as well. I feel it would also be naïve to think that somehow society and its values are going to improve anytime soon. It would be foolhardy to believe that there aren’t things we can be doing to improve security in and around our schools right now. Unfortunately, as with many things in life, we are called to action as a reaction to some terrible event. We saw this reaction to the events of September 11 and we are going to live this reaction to the event that just affected us here. I believe that this council and local government will stand behind me in promising all resources realistically available to help our school district in this regard. I have already reached out to the Superintendent of Schools, the

cal, religious and human rights. A non-partisan grassroots organization, the LWV is dedicated to informing the public on matters of important public policy. Local members participate in developing national League policy, which is periodically updated. The organization is open to all individuals of voting age. For more information, please call (908) 654-8628 or send an e-mail to [email protected] or visit the group’s Internet site at www.westfieldnj.com/lwv.

Sh ar i ng o u r se a s on s. . .

Board of Education President, and several Board members to let them know we will be active participants in giving our younger citizens the security that they need and deserve. I will also tell you that our Congressman, Mike Ferguson has reached out to me on two separate occasions since this disheartening news broke, to be updated and to offer his support for our community. In fact, Congressman Ferguson and I met this morning to go over some preliminary options that may be available to us. School Superintendent Carol Choye also joined our discussion. Congressman Ferguson has indicated to me that Scotch Plains and Fanwood will receive primary focus from his office as we deal with this critical issue. This is my sixth year serving on this body. I can tell you with all sincerity, that this issue of peace of mind and physical security for our younger citizens will receive more passionate attention than any other issue that has ever come before it.

A HORSE FOR THE HOLIDAY…Children who attended the 12th Annual Union County Holiday Tree Lighting and Charity Drive at the Watchung Stables in Mountainside on December 7 included Julia Jane Penczak, 6, of Westfield, pictured above, who enjoyed the festivities with her aunt, Jane O’Hara. The pair also enjoyed a petting zoo, carol singing, a barn tour and visits with Santa, Mrs. Claus and the elves. Admission for the event was a donation of a food item or toy. Food items collected were distributed throughout Salvation Army soup kitchens, homeless shelters and food pantries, while toy donations were distributed through the St. Clare’s Home for Children.

An Open Letter to The Public

Subject: Comcast Their Customer Service And The Cable Monopoly Their Contract With Westfield, Merger with ATT Cable Political Contributions, Soft Money and Deregulation Your Consumer Rights Dear friends and neighbors, Until I read the January 10 issue of The Westfield Leader, I thought I was alone, unable to get on the Internet and placed on hold for hours by Comcast. On Friday, January 11, I called the office of the Governor, Senators Torricelli and Corzine, Congressman Ferguson, State Senator Bagger, Assemblyman Kean, Mayor McDermott and Union County officials. Every public official office that I spoke with explained that I was the first consumer to complain. After speaking to them, I realized that my conservative Republican principals of deregulation might not work. 1. As of 5 p.m. on Friday, not one public official that I spoke with has taken any steps to hold Comcast accountable. Don’t Westfielders have any hooks in our contracts? 2. Maybe the merger of ATT cable and Comcast is not in the public’s interest. 3. Who will protect us if Comcast doubles our bills next month? 4. Does Comcast spend more on political contributions than on customer service? 5. Like Enron, Comcast spends large sums of money feeding both parties. Like Enron, Comcast has little interference from our elected officials. In 2000, Comcast gave $100,000 to both parties, (Senator Torricelli received $1,000 in 2000 and Congressman Ferguson received $250 in 2002). Over the last four years, over 60 congressmen and 20 senators received money from their Political Action Committee; and like Enron, Comcast gets what it wants. Call our senators to block the ATT/Comcast merger. 6. Telephone deregulation gave consumers higher overall charges and bills that we cannot understand. Tell our New Jersey officials that we do not want utility deregulation. 7. All the buzzwords at the top of this letter, I thought didn’t impact us in Westfield. They do! 8. Please join me in holding our elected officials accountable to us. Tell them we demand service from Comcast. 9. Ask our public officials to respond to The Leader as to how we common taxpayers can protect ourselves from the giant utilities that we must use. 10. I think we all must pay more attention to what our local, county, state and federal officials are doing to represent us. Because they have to raise so much money for the next year’s campaign, do we have to get the short straw?

Get Involved, Get Angry, and Demand Accountability! Sincerely yours, David M. Golush Westfield, NJ 07090

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Paid for by David M. Golush, representing his views, not the views of any organization in which he is involved.

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The Westfield Leader and THE TIMES of Scotch Plains – Fanwood

Thursday, January 17, 2002

Miss Shaun Draper Weds John Burrows, Jr. John R. Burrows, Jr. of Westfield and Miss Shaun Draper of Manhattan were married on Saturday, December 29, at the Church of St. Bean in Fowlis Wester, Perthshire, Scotland. The Reverend Sandy Bonar presided at the nuptials at the church, which dates to the 13th century. Miss Draper is the daughter of Ray and Yetta Draper, former longtime residents of Westfield, who now live in Fanwood. The bride’s father was an artist and her mother was the branch manager for Maritz Research, Inc. in New Jersey. Both are now retired. Mr. Burrows is the son of Mrs. Edith Burrows, who has lived in Westfield for more than 50 years. She had been an administrative assistant with Lockheed Electronics before retiring. His father, the late John R. Burrows, Sr., was a chemical engineer at Dupont, Inc. in New Jersey.

DR. AND MRS. SAMUEL KUNA

Dr. and Mrs. Kuna Celebrate 65th Wedding Anniversary Dr. Samuel and Olga Lehman Kuna celebrated their 65th wedding anniversary at a family gathering on December 26. The couple, married in 1936 at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in Richmond Hill, Long Island, has lived in Westfield since 1958. Dr. Kuna holds a doctoral degree in biology from New York University. He has enjoyed a distinguished career in toxicology and pharmacology, including having founded the toxicology graduate program at Rutgers University. He additionally served as President of the First Bank of Colonia and is currently President of the Lebanon Antiques Center in Lebanon. Besides taking care of her family, Mrs. Kuna has been active in various community organizations throughout the years. The couple has two children, Dr. Robert Kuna of Denville and Dr.

Samuel T. Kuna of Philadelphia; two grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

Alexandra Marie Born to Percivals Robyn and Horst Percival of Westfield have announced the birth of their first child, daughter Alexandra Marie Percival, on Friday, December 14, at 9:56 p.m. at Overlook Hospital in Summit. Alexandra weighed 6 pounds and 15 ounces and measured 19¼ inches in length at birth. The baby’s maternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Ken Brown of Westfield. Mr. Brown is Postmaster of Westfield. Her paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. David Percival of Tenants Harbor, Me., and Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Picariello of Dataw Island, S.C.

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The bride attended Columbia University and Baruch College in Manhattan. She is currently an Associate Director of Meeting and Event Production with Ernst & Young International. Her husband is a cum laude graduate of Seton Hall University in South Orange and was President of Pi Kappa Psi Fraternity during his college years. He is Production Manager for the Barbara Walters produced television show, “The View,” at ABC Television in New York. Both are graduates of Westfield High School. The couple, who met in high school, have known each other for 30 years. Their many chance encounters over the years culminated in a luncheon on December 26, 2000, and their wedding resulted from that particular day. It is the first marriage for both. Following their return from Scotland, the couple resides in Manhattan and Westfield.

Jewish Literacy Program To Feature Three Courses WESTFIELD – The Union County Torah Center in Westfield will present three courses as part of the winter session of the Jewish Literacy Program. The winter session will begin on Monday, February 4, with a course entitled “The Joy of Yiddish” that will take place on three consecutive Mondays, ending on February 18. Given by Rabbi Yisroel Zell, the class will acquaint participants with the Yiddish language through discussion, stories and famous Yiddish expressions. Rabbi Dr. Mitchell Bomrind will present a course on the historical background to the story of Purim on three consecutive Tuesdays, starting February 5. The ongoing weekly “Tea and Torah” class will be presented by Rabbi Levi Block, Director of the Torah Center, on Wednesdays from 8 to 9 p.m. The subject will be the weekly Haftorah of that particular week that will be read in the synagogue on the upcoming Shabbat. Described as an in-depth study of the Haftorah with many commentaries, the course will be offered as a joint program of the Jewish Community Center (JCC) and the Union County Torah Center and will take place at the JCC of Central New Jersey, located at 1391 Martine Avenue in Scotch Plains. There is no

charge for this class. “Beginner’s Talmud” will take place on three consecutive Thursdays beginning February 7 and will be given by Rabbi Block. The tractate of Passover will be studied and the class will delve into the laws and customs of the Seder night. The Torah Center will present a special lecture entitled “The Middle East: Past and Present – An Introduction to Understanding the Israeli-Arab Conflict,” on Wednesday, February 20, from 8 to 9:30 p.m. The lecture will be at the Wilf Jewish Community Campus, located at 1391 Martine Avenue in Scotch Plains. Professor Eli Rohn of the New Jersey Institute of Technology will present the program, which will cover the history of the Middle East from Biblical times to present day. He will augment his talk with various maps and illustrations. The Jewish Literacy Program was created by the Union County Torah Center with the intent of providing individuals with the knowledge to make informed choices regarding personal and communal Jewish life. The cost for each course and lecture is $10. All the courses will take place from 8 to 9 p.m. at the Torah Center, located at 418 Central Avenue in Westfield. To respond or for more information, please call the Torah Center at (908) 789-5252.

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Veteran Gardener Proves Growing Orchids Is Not All That Difficult By JODY MELLOAN

A vast panorama of metropolitan New Jersey can be seen from most of the windows in the Mountainside home of Ruth and Peter Metz. But for visitors who enjoy gardens and flowers, the most entrancing view is the wide bay window filled with orchid plants. Some are already in bloom; most of the others will be by mid-February. “I was always a dirt gardener; I liked to get down on my knees with my hands in the soil,” says Mrs. Metz. That hobby ended in 1991 when she and her husband, both world travelers, were visiting the Galapagos Islands. Leaping from a zodiac landing craft – the only way to get ashore – she broke her hip. Ten operations later, she walks with a cane but still loves to travel and to garden indoors. Many people regard orchids as exotic and difficult to grow, but Mrs. Metz likes to quote the old saying that orchids are the most forgiving of all plants. “I’ve found that to be true. They don’t like to be too hot, too cold or too wet, but as a rule they can recover from such neglect.” Choosing from more than 15,000 species of orchids, Mrs. Metz prefers to concentrate on three or four. Most of her collection are phalaenopsis, often called moth orchids. Blooming now on her window sill, they thrust out graceful arching branches with pink blossoms that may stay fresh for two or three months. Now budding are her dendrobiums, which will soon be covered with dainty white flowers. Peter Metz, who is an engineer, designed the bay window to provide ideal growing conditions: a southeast exposure and a porous metal base over a shallow tray which catches water and provides the hu-

midity that orchids need. Some of the orchids, purchased in Hawaii, grow in pots filled with lava rocks; others are planted in shredded bark. Mrs. Metz struggled with aphids that sometimes attack orchids until, one day, she found some tiny red ladybugs in the yard, brought them in, and placed them in the orchid pots. Now she has a resident family of unobtrusive ladybugs and no aphids. Her crowning achievement as an orchid grower occurred a few years ago, when two of her plants won “best in show” awards at a flower show sponsored by the Garden Club of Westfield, of which she is a member. They were gorgeous paphhiopedilus, often called slipper orchids. “Unfortunately, I left them at the shore too long and they died,” she says ruefully. Our chat about orchids eventually turned to the New York International Orchid Show, which has been held every April for 21 years in the Winter Garden at the World Trade Center. It was one of the most beautiful horticultural shows one could imagine. Like many other orchid fanciers who have attended the show, Mrs. Metz and I doubted, after the tragedy of September 11, that it would ever be revived in a new setting. But the website (www.manhattanorchid. com) of the Manhattan Orchid Society, one of the show sponsors, declares the show will go on again this coming April. They just don’t know where yet. And Mr. and Mrs. Metz, still inveterate travelers, will be off to Europe in May to cruise canals and attend the huge Floriade flower show, held for years in Holland. * * * * *

Jody Melloan is a member of the Garden Club of Westfield.

JCC Reveals Scholarships For Summer Israel Program SCOTCH PLAINS — The Jewish Community Center (JCC) of Central New Jersey, Wilf Jewish Community Campus, located at 1391 Martine Avenue in Scotch Plains, is accepting applications from area teenagers who would like to be considered for a financial scholarship to help offset the costs of an approved summer program in Israel. All applicants must be JCC members as of Friday, February 1, 2002. Scholarship forms and all related paperwork must be returned by Sunday, March 31, for review. To receive an application by mail or for further information, please call Lisa Bieber, Teen Outreach Coordinator, at (908) 889-8800, exten-

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Rotary Raffle Event Benefits Area Youth SCOTCH PLAINS — During its annual Christmas gathering, the Fanwood-Scotch Plains Rotary Club held its drawing for the 50/50 raffle for the “Share-in-Youth” program. The total amount collected was $18,260. The three winners included First Prize, Rick Liss of Scotch Plains, $5,478; Second Prize, Joe Curcio of Chatham, $2,739, and John Tosun of Westfield, $913. The other half of the proceeds from the raffle will be distributed to various organizations benefiting youth in the community. Each of these organizations will receive $1,304.28. They are as follows: Scotch Plains-Fanwood High School Student Leadership; Fanwood Community Foundation; Resolve Community Counseling Center; David Ringle Scholarship Fund; Fanwood-Scotch Plains YMCA; Gift of Life and CONTACT We Care. The Fanwood-Scotch Plains Rotary Club meets every Wednesday at noon at the Park Place Restaurant in Scotch Plains. Any business person interested in joining is invited to attend. For further information, please call Dr. Dick Dobyns, Membership Chairman, at (908) 232-3321.

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The Westfield Leader and THE TIMES of Scotch Plains – Fanwood

King Day Breakfast To Benefit Center WESTFIELD — Lawrence W. Brown, Acting President of the Board of Directors of the Westfield Community Center, has announced that the Martin Luther King Day Pancake Breakfast will be held on Monday, January 21, at the Community Center, from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. The breakfast is an annual fundraising event sponsored by the Board of Directors to support activities offered by the Westfield Community Center, a member agency of the United Fund of Westfield. Activities offered by the center are geared to all ages. They include an After School/Day Care program, which provides activities for youngsters 6 to 12 years old, from 3 to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday; the “At Risk” Youth Development Program for ages 12 to 17, and a Senior Citizen Social Recreation Program for adults age 60 and over. The center is located at 558 West Broad Street in Westfield. Tickets to the Pancake Breakfast may be purchased in advance or at the door. For further information, please call (908) 232-4759.

www.goleader.com PUBLIC NOTICE TOWN OF WESTFIELD Public Notice is hereby given that an ordinance of which the following is a copy was introduced, read and passed on first reading by the Council of the Town of Westfield at a meeting held January 15, 2002, and that the said Council will further consider the same for final passage on the 29th day of January 2002, at 8:00 p.m., in the Council Chamber, Municipal Building, 425 East Broad Street, Westfield, New Jersey, at which time and place any person who may be interested therein will be given an opportunity to be heard concerning said ordinance. Bernard A. Heeney Town Clerk GENERAL ORDINANCE NO. AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CODE OF THE TOWN OF WESTFIELD, CHAPTER 16, “PARKS AND RECREATION” BY CHANGING CERTAIN FEES FOR MEMBERSHIP IN THE MEMORIAL POOL AND BY ESTABLISHING CERTAIN NEW MEMBERSHIP CATEGORIES. BE IT ORDAINED by the Town council of the Town of Westfield as follows: That Section 16-12 “Fees established” be amended to read as follows: Class of Membership Resident Non-resident 1. Family $ 242.00 $ 454.00 2. Family with full time child care $ 305.00 $ 598.00 3. Husband and Wife without children $ 196.00 $ 380.00 4. Individual $ 144.00 $ 270.00 SECTION III. All ordinances or parts of ordinances in conflict, or inconsistent, with any part of the terms of this ordinance are hereby repealed to the extent that they are in such conflict or inconsistent. SECTION IV. In the event that any section, part or provision of this ordinance shall be held to be unconstitutional or invalid by any court, such holding shall not affect the validity of this ordinance as a whole, or any part thereof, other than the part so held unconstitutional or invalid. SECTION V. This ordinance shall take effect after passage and publication as soon as, and in the manner, permitted by law. 1 T - 01/17/02, The Leader Fee: $46.92

PUBLIC NOTICE SHERIFF’S SALE SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY, CHANCERY DIVISION, UNION COUNTY, DOCKET NO. F-3643-01 ALTEGRA CREDIT COMPANY, PLAINTIFF vs. OSCAR N. NAJARRO; ET ALS., DEFENDANT. CIVIL ACTION, WRIT OF EXECUTION, DATED SEPTEMBER 04, 2001 FOR SALE OF MORTGAGED PREMISES. By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution to me directed I shall expose for sale by public vendue, at the Union County Administration Building, 1st Floor, 10 Elizabethtown Plaza, Elizabeth, New Jersey on WEDNESDAY THE 30TH DAY OF JANUARY A.D., 2002 at two o’clock in the afternoon of said day. All successful bidders must have 20% of their bid available in cash or certified check at the conclusion of the sales. The judgment amount is SEVENTY SEVEN THOUSAND SIX-HUNDRED NINTY EIGHT & 79/100 ($77,698.79). Property Description: City of Elizabeth, County of Union, State of New Jersey Premises Known As: 809 East Jersey Avenue Lot: 283 Block: 7 Dimensions: Approximately 100 feet x 41 feet Nearest Cross Street: Division Street A full legal description of the property may be found in the office of the Sheriff and office of the Clerk of Union. There is due approximately the sum of EIGHTY TWO THOUSAND SIX-HUNDRED THIRTY ONE & 91/100 ($82,631.91) together with lawful interest and costs. There is a full legal description on file in the Union County Sheriff’s Office. The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this sale. RALPH FROEHLICH SHERIFF TOLL, SULLIVAN & LUTHMAN LAW OFFICES Suite 400 800 North Kings Highway Cherry Hill, New Jersey 08034 CH-756320 - (WL) 4 T - 1/03, 1/10, 1/17 & 1/24/02 Fee: $181.56

Page 7

St. Pat’s Parade Committee Selects General Chairman

LOCAL COUPLE RECOGNIZED…Jack and Eileen Lynch of Fanwood shared the St. Bartholomew’s Holy Name Society Family of the Year Award with Bob and Joanne Gurske of Scotch Plains, which was presented at the Holy Name Society’s November 11 Communion Breakfast at The Westwood in Garwood. Pictured, left to right, are: Communion Breakfast Chairperson Dick Bonner; the couple’s future son-in-law, Joe Blanchard; their daughter, Jennifer Lynch; son, Matthew Lynch; Eileen and Jack Lynch, their other son, Mark Lynch, and Peter Chemidlin, President of the Holy Name Society. The award recognizes recipients’ outstanding contributions to the parish over many years and their new and continuing efforts in the rigors of the Archdiocesan Deacon Program.

AREA – The 2002 Union County St. Patrick’s Day Parade Committee recently selected James F. Dougherty as General Chairman for the upcoming parade, which will be held on Saturday, March 16. A founding Parade Committee member since the event’s inception more than six years ago, Mr. Dougherty most recently served as the Ad Journal Chairman, responsible for raising approximately $20,000, which pays for all the expenses involved in staging the parade. “Having the opportunity to be a key member of such a dedicated group of volunteers, for all of Union County to enjoy that special day, is truly a joy and a pleasure, especially as an Irish-American,” he said. A Vietnam veteran, Mr. Dougherty began his career in law enforcement with the Newark Police Department. After six years he was appointed to the Essex County Sheriff’s Department, where he served as a detective

in the Bureau of Narcotics. Over the next 17 years, he rose through the ranks to become Captain and then Commander of the Bureau of Narcotics, before accepting a position as Deputy Chief for the Union County Prosecutor’s Office. Since April of 1998, he has been the Assistant Jail Director with the Union County Division of Correctional Services. He is responsible for managing administrative staff members and their functions. Mr. Dougherty is married to the former Jane Conway. Residents of Scotch Plains Township, they have three sons, Brian, James and Kevin and are active with St. Helen’s Roman Catholic Church in Westfield. He is a member of the Cryan Association, the Knights of Columbus, the Essex and Union Emerald Societies, the Union Irish, the Veterans of Foreign Wars, the Nugent Association and the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick.

Fanwood Library to Hold Storytime Registrations

Sixty Something Group Sets Pancake Breakfast SUMMIT – The Sixty Something group from St. John’s Lutheran Church in Summit will host a Mardi Gras Pancake Breakfast on Shrove Tuesday, February 12, at 9 a.m. Everyone is welcome. There will be a free will offering. For reservations, please call the church office at (908) 918-2507. St. John’s Church is located at 587 Springfield Avenue in Summit and is accessible to the handicapped. Anyone interested in learning more about the church may also visit www.stjohnssummit.org.

Thursday, January 17, 2002

OUTSTANDING PARISHIONERS…Bob and Joanne Gurske of Scotch Plains shared this year’s Family of the Year Award from the St. Bartholomew’s Holy Name Society with Jack and Eileen Lynch of Fanwood, presented during the Holy Name Society’s November 11 Communion Breakfast at The Westwood in Garwood. The Family of the Year Award honors families for their outstanding contributions to the parish over many years and their new and continuing efforts in the rigors of the Archdiocesan Deacon Program. Pictured, left to right, are: Communion Breakfast Chairperson Dick Bonner; Joanne Gurske; the couple’s daughters, Mary Beth Gurske and Kate Gurske; Bob Gurske; Mr. Gurske’s father, Charles Gurske, and Peter Chemidlin, President of the Holy Name Society. PUBLIC NOTICE THE BOROUGH OF FANWOOD PLANNING BOARD Notice is hereby given that the PLANNING BOARD OF THE BOROUGH OF FANWOOD after public hearing granted approval to 313 South Avenue Condo Association Inc. & Fanwood Plaza Partners to amend site plan approval to allow medical professional use on the property at 313/324 South Avenue, Fanwood, NEW JERSEY being Blocks 66 & 91 Lots 4 & 9. Documents pertaining to this application are available for public inspection at Borough Hall during normal business hours. The 313 South Ave. Condo Association Fanwood Plaza Partners, LLC 328 Park Avenue, PO Box 310 Scotch Plains, New Jersey 07076 Robert H. Kraus, Esq. 1 T - 01/17/02, The Times Fee: $18.36

PUBLIC NOTICE 2002 REGULAR MEETINGS OF THE ZONINGBOARDOFADJUSTMENT OF THE TOWNSHIP OF SCOTCH PLAINS In compliance with the Open Public Meetings Act, Chapter 231, P.L. 1975, regular meetings of the Zoning Board of Adjustment of the Township of Scotch Plains, Union County, New Jersey, will beheld in Council Chambers, First Floor, Municipal Building. 430 Park Avenue, Scotch Plains, New Jersey, at 7:30 p.m. on the following Thursdays in 2002: JANUARY 10, 2002 (Reorganizational at 7:00 p.m.) JANUARY 10, 2002 FEBRUARY 7, 2002 MARCH 7, 2002 APRIL 4, 2002 MAY 2, 2002 JUNE 6, 2002 JULY 11, 2002 SEPTEMBER 5, 2002 OCTOBER 3, 2002 NOVEMBER 7, 2002 DECEMBER 5, 2002 JANUARY 9, 2003 (Reorganizational at 7:00 p.m.) JANUARY 9, 2003 All interested parties may be present and be heard. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person that might require special needs should be in touch with the Board Office during normal business hours so that their needs may be addressed (visually or hearing-impaired, wheelchair-bound, etc.) Linda M. Lies Secretary to the Zoning Board of Adjustment 1 T - 01/17/02, The Times Fee: $35.19

PUBLIC NOTICE TOWN OF WESTFIELD INVITATION TO BID Sealed proposals will be received by the Mayor and Council of the Town of Westfield New Jersey, on Monday February 4, 2002, at 10:00 a.m. prevailing time at the Municipal building. 425 East Broad Street, Westfield, New Jersey for the following: The Furnishing of Uniforms for the personnel of the Police Department Proposals must be delivered at the place and before the hour above mentioned in a sealed envelope marked "Bid for the Police Uniform", bearing the Name and Address of the Bidder, addressed to the Town of Westfield, 425 East Broad Street Westfield New Jersey, and must be in the office of the Purchasing Agent on or before the hour named. Bids must be accompanied by a proposal guarantee in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or bid bond in an amount of 10% of the total bid, payable to the Town of Westfield. Each proposal must also be accompanied by a Surety company Certification stating that the said Surety company will provide the bidder with the required performance bond in the full amount of the contract. Bidders must be in compliance with all provisions of Chapter 127 pl 1975 supplement for the law against discrimination (Affirmative Action). Bidders Statement of Ownership, as required by chapter 33 of the Public Laws of 1977, must also be submitted with all bids. Specifications and proposal forms may be examined and procured at the office of the Purchasing Agent. 425 East Broad Street, Westfield, New Jersey 07090. Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:30 am. and 4:30 p.m. The Mayor and Council reserve the right to reject any and all bids, also waive any informality if is deemed advisable so to do. Marianne K. Horta Purchasing Agent 1 T - 01/17/02, The Leader Fee: $41.31

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FANWOOD – The Fanwood Memorial Library, located at North Avenue and Tillotson Road, has announced its winter session of storytime programs. The library will host a 3-year-old storytime with craft activity on Tuesdays at 11:15 a.m. and a 4- and 5year-old storytime with craft activity on Tuesdays at 10:30 a.m. Interested individuals may register in person for the 3-year-old and the 4- and 5-year-old storytime programs beginning at 10:30 a.m. on Tuesday, January 22, and ending at 4:30 p.m. on Saturday, January 26. There will also be a storytime with craft activity for 2-year-old children accompanied by a parent or responsible adult on Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m. This program is designed for each parent and child to participate PUBLIC NOTICE TOWNSHIP OF SCOTCH PLAINS, UNION COUNTY, NEW JERSEY

PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE OF REGULAR SCHEDULED MEETINGS OF THE TOWNSHIP OF SCOTCH PLAINS ENVIRONMENTAL COMMISSION

BOROUGH OF FANWOOD PLANNING BOARD WHEREAS, Article 4:05 (A) Land Use Ordinance of the Borough of Fanwood, County of Union, State of New Jersey required the Planning Board to determine the date, time and locations of the monthly meetings through January of the next year when it organizes in January. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Planning Board of The Borough of Fanwood that it will meet at 8:00 P.M., in the lower level meeting room of the Borough Hall, 75 North Martine Avenue, Fanwood, New Jersey on the following dates: AGENDAMEETINGS REGULARMEETINGS February 18, 2002 February 27, 2002 March 18, 2002 March 27, 2002 April 15, 2002 April 24, 2002 May 13, 2002 May 22, 2002 June 17, 2002 June 26, 2002 July 15, 2002 July 24, 2002 August 19, 2002 August 28, 2002 September 17, 2002 September 25, 2002 October 14, 2002 October 23, 2002 November 18, 2002 November 26, 2002 December 9, 2002 December 18, 2002 January 13, 2003 January 22, 2003 and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that & copy of this resolution be prominently posted on the bulletin board in the Borough Hall, mailed to The Times and the Courier News, filed with the Borough Clerk and mailed to any person requesting same in accordance with the requirements of the Open Meeting Act. Ruth K. Page Planning Board Secretary 1 T - 01/17/02, The Times Fee: $34.68

TOWNSHIP OF SCOTCH PLAINS ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT

(In compliance with the open public meetings act-chapter 231, P.L. 1975)

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that at the meeting of the Zoning Board of Adjustment of the Township of Scotch Plains held on January 10, 2002, the following decisions of the Board were memorialized: Granted a side-yard setback variance with conditions to George and Mary Bryant in conjunction with the addition of a deck with stairs at the property located at 8 Blue Ridge Circle (Block 15803, Lot 4), Scotch Plains. Denied an appeal brought by Richard Mnich pertaining to the issuance of permits regarding the property located at 1111 Clarks Lane (Block 15201, Lot 4), Scotch Plains. Granted a side-yard setback variance with conditions to Michael and Karen Casey in conjunction wit a garage addition at the property located at 2070 Elizabeth Avenue (Block 8903, Lot 6), Scotch Plains. Linda M. Lies Secretary to the Zoning Board of Adjustment 1 T - 01/17/02, The Times Fee: $23.97

Notice is hereby given by the Environmental Commission of the Township of Scotch Plains of the following Scheduled Meetings:

PUBLIC NOTICE SHERIFF’S SALE SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY, CHANCERY DIVISION, UNION COUNTY, DOCKET NO. F-8393-01 FIRST UNION NATIONAL BANK, ET ALS., PLAINTIFF vs. IGNACIO RAMOS AND MRS. IGNACIO RAMOS, H/W, DEFENDANT. CIVIL ACTION, WRIT OF EXECUTION, DATED SEPTEMBER 12, 2001 FOR SALE OF MORTGAGED PREMISES. By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution to me directed I shall expose for sale by public vendue, at the Union County Administration Building, 1st Floor, 10 Elizabethtown Plaza, Elizabeth, New Jersey on WEDNESDAY THE 23RD DAY OF JANUARY A.D., 2002 at two o’clock in the afternoon of said day. All successful bidders must have 20% of their bid available in cash or certified check at the conclusion of the sales. The judgment amount is ONE-HUNDRED TEN THOUSAND THREE-HUNDRED FOURTEEN & 80/100 ($110,314.80). The property to be sold is located in the CITY of ELIZABETH, NEW JERSEY 07206, County of UNION and Sate of New Jersey. Commonly known as: 148 MAGNOLIA AVENUE, ELIZABETH, NEW JERSEY 07206 Tax Lot No. 336 in Block No. 1 Dimension of Lot: approximately 25.00 feet wide by 100.00 feet long Nearest Cross Street: Second Street Situated at a point on the southwesterly sideline of Magnolia Avenue distance approximately 175.00 feet southeasterly from its intersection with the southeasterly sideline of Second Street. There is due approximately the sum of ONE-HUNDRED SEVENTEEN THOUSAND SEVEN-HUNDRED TWENTY FIVE & 94/100 ($117,725.94) together with lawful interest and costs. There is a full legal description on file in the Union County Sheriff’s Office. The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this sale. RALPH FROEHLICH SHERIFF FEIN, SUCH, KAHN & SHEPARD, P.C. Suite 201 7 Century Drive Parsippany, New Jersey 07054 CH-756296 - (WL) 4 T - 12/27/01, 1/3/02,1/10/02 &1/17/02 Fee: $197.88

PUBLIC NOTICE

January 14, 2002 February 11, 2002 March 11, 2002 April 8, 2002 May 13, 2002 June 10, 2002 July 8, 2002 August 12, 2002 September 9, 2002 October 28, 2002 November 25, 2002 December 9, 2002 All meetings are held at 8:00 p.m. on the second floor of the Municipal Building, Room 202, located at 430 Park Avenue, Scotch Plains, New Jersey. Cathy Budzinski Secretary to the Environmental Commission 1 T - 01/17/02, The Times Fee: $29.58

PUBLIC NOTICE

TOWN OF WESTFIELD Public Notice is hereby given that an ordinance of which the following is a copy was introduced, read and passed on first reading by the Council of the Town of Westfield at a meeting held January 15, 2002, and that the said Council will further consider the same for final passage on the 29th day of January 2002, at 8:00 p.m., in the Council Chamber, Municipal Building, 425 East Broad Street, Westfield, New Jersey, at which time and place any person who may be interested therein will be given an opportunity to be heard concerning said ordinance. Bernard A. Heeney Town Clerk GENERAL ORDINANCE NO. AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND GENERAL ORDINANCE NO. 1780 ENTITLED “AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CODE OF THE TOWN OF WESTFIELD CHAPTER 2, “ADMINISTRATION,” ARTICLE II, TOWN OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES, DIVISION 3, PERSONNEL POSITIONS AND SALARY SCHEDULE,” SEC. 2-12.28, “SCHEDULE.” BE IT ORDAINED by the Town Council of Westfield in the County of Union as follows: SECTION I. That the Code of the Town of Westfield be and is hereby amended by revising Section 212.28, “Schedule,” in Chapter 2, “Administration” Article II, “Town Officers and Employees,” Division 3, “Personnel Positions and Salary Schedule,” so that the same shall read as follows: JOB TITLE SALARY RANGE Library Assistant I $19,000 - $25,834 Custodian (Library) $19,000 - $28,840 Library Assistant II $21,000 - $30,139 Senior Custodian (Library) $21,000 - $30,139 Office Manager $25,000 - $34,445 Administrative Secretary $27,000 - $43,595 Municipal Court Administrator $30,000 - $50,591 Librarian $32,000 - $40,975 Supervisor Public Works $37,000 - $55,973 Payroll Benefits Manager $29,000 - $47,789 Zoning Officer $35,000 - $55,000 Town Clerk $41,400 - $66,737 Tax Collector $41,400 - $55,973 Human Services Director $41,400 - $60,278 Construction Official $45,000 - $75,000 Chief Financial Officer $41,400 - $59,202 Recreation Director $40,000 - $70,000 Assistant Director of Recreation $30,000 - $55,000 Tax Assessor $41,400 - $58,126 Town Surveyor $41,400 - $68,890 Assistant Director Of Public Works $41,400 - $72,800 Field Superintendent $41,400 - $68,890 Assistant Library Director $43,470 - $62,400 Field Engineer $36,225 - $55,435 Assistant Town Engineer $50,000 - $72,800 Health Officer - Regional $52,000 - $91,841 Assistant Town Administrator $42,000 - $70,000 Parking Director ManagementSpecialist $65,000 - $80,000 Deputy Fire Chief $50,000 - $80,730 Library Director $60,030 - $86,770 Police Chief $65,000 - $99,029 Fire Chief $60,030 - $93,647 Town Engineer $70,000 - $98,800 Town Administrator $75,000 - $116,252 SECTION II. The Personnel and Position Salary Schedule set forth in Sec. 2-12.28 as hereby amended, shall take place as of January 1, 2001. SECTION III. Any or all ordinances or parts thereof in conflict, or inconsistent, with any part of the terms of this ordinance are hereby repealed to the extent that they are in such conflict or inconsistent. SECTION IV. In the event that any section, part or provision of this ordinance shall be held to be unconstitutional or invalid by any court, such holdings shall not affect the validity of this ordinance as a whole, or any part thereof, other than the part so held unconstitutional or invalid. SECTION V. This ordinance shall take effect after passage and publication as soon as, and in the manner provided by law. 1 T - 01/17/02, The Leader Fee: $120.36

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and listen, seated together. All individuals interested in the 2year-old storytime must attend an orientation on Wednesday, January 23, at 10:30 a.m. Registration for this program will take place during the orientation. Individuals are asked to sign in for the orientation at the Children’s Information Desk upon arrival. Attendance will be an opportunity to sign up, but does not guarantee a place. Family storytime will be held on Mondays at 6:30 p.m. for children of all ages. Youngsters four years old and younger must be seated with an adult. Prior registration is not required for this storytime. Fanwood residents will be given priority in all registrations. All storytimes will begin the week of Monday, January 28, and end the week of Monday, March 11. For further information, please call (908) 322-4377. PUBLIC NOTICE TOWNSHIP OF SCOTCH PLAINS INVITATION TO BID Invitations are extended to qualified Bidders to bid for the following Project: Kramer Manor Park Toilet Renovations This project consists of renovation the existing toilets within the Park. This project will be partially funded by Union County Community Development Grant and the Township of Scotch Plains. Bids will be accepted only by mail or in person to the Office of the Township Clerk, Scotch Plains Municipal Building, 430 Park Avenue, Scotch Plains. New Jersey 07076 (ATTN: Barbara Riepe, Township Clerk) until 10:00 a.m. on Monday February 4, 2002. The Township of Scotch Plains (hereinafter "Township") shall not be responsible for any bid mailed which is lost in transit or delivered late by the Postal Service. At the above time, the bids will be publicly opened and read aloud, All bids must be presented in sealed envelopes, which are clearly marked "Bid for Kramer Manor Park (ADA Bathroom), Contract E2001-1A, 430 Park Avenue, Scotch Plains, New Jersey 07026". No bid will be received after the time and date specified. After receipt of bids, no bid may be withdrawn within sixty (60) days after the date of the bid opening except if provided for herein. The bid of any Bidder who consents to an extension may be held for consideration for a longer period of time as may be agreed upon between Bidder and the Township. All bids must be on the bid forms provided by the Township of Scotch Plains in the Bid Package. Plans and specifications for this work may be examined at Lauro Associates Architects, P.C., 1700 Galloping Hill Road Kenilworth New Jersey. during business hours, 9:00 as- to 4:00 p.m., beginning January 14, 2002, and purchased for a $75.00 non-refundable fee. Bid proposals and all required documents must be completed and submitted by the date as set forth above. All documents in the enclosed Bid Package must accompany the bid proposal. In addition to the above documents, a certified check, cashier’s check or bid bond issued by a responsible bank, trust company or insurance company, payable to the Township of Scotch Plains shall be submitted with each bid as a guaranty that if a contract is awarded the Bidder shall execute said Contract. The Bid Security shall be in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total amount of the bid or Twenty-Thousand Dollars ($20,000.00), whichever is lower. All Bid Security, except the Bid Security of the three (3) apparent lowest responsible Bidders shall, if requested in writing, be returned after ten (10) days from the opening of the bids (Sundays and holidays excepted) and the bids of such Bidders shall be considered withdrawn. The Township reserves the right to reject any or all bids, and to waive immaterial informalities, or to accept any bid which, in the opinion of the Township of Scotch Plains, will be in the best interest of the Township all in accordance with the New Jersey Local Public Contracts Law N.J.S.A. 40A:11-1 et seq. A-2. In the event of an equal or tie bid, the Township shall award the Bidder, which, in the Township’s sole discretion, best serves, the interest of the Township. The Township also reserves the right to reject any and all bids if sufficient funds are not available and/or appropriated. The selected Bidder, will, within seven (7) days of award of the bid, enter into an appropriate contact with the Township. All Bidders must comply with P.L. 1975, Chapter 127, entitled "An Act Relating to Affirmative Action in Relation to Discrimination in Connection with Certain Public Contracts and Supplementing the ‘Law Against Discrimination’ approved April 16, 1945 (P.L. 1945, Chapter 169)", N.J.A.C. 17:27, as amended from time to time, and the Americans With Disability Act. Where applicable, prevailing wage rate shall be paid to all workers on the job as per N.J.A.C. 34:11-56, 25 et seq. BY ORDER OF THE TOWNSHIP OF SCOTCH PLAINS OF THE COUNTY OF UNION, STATE OF NEW JERSEY. Thomas Atkins Municipal Manager Barbara Riepe Township Clerk 1 T - 1/17/02, The Times Fee: $87.72

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The Westfield Leader and THE TIMES of Scotch Plains – Fanwood

Thursday, January 17, 2002

Erika Diamond, 34, Intern/Counselor; Volunteer Also Did Mission Work Erika Marie Pluta Diamond, 34, of Monmouth Junction died on Thursday, January 10, at her home. Born and raised in Westfield, she lived in Monmouth Junction for the past year. Mrs. Diamond served as an intern/ counselor at Princeton House in Princeton. She had also held several administrative positions in the advertising field. She graduated from Cook College in 1991, earning a degree in communications, and was pursuing a master’s degree in counseling at the College of New Jersey. She was in her second year of the master’s program and was a member

Lee Sargenti, 80 Lee Perini Sargenti, 80, of Mountainside died on Thursday, December 27, at Runnells Specialized Hospital of Union County in Berkeley Heights. Born in New York, she moved to Mountainside 35 years ago. Mrs. Sargenti was a member of the Mountainside Women’s Club and a volunteer for the Circle of Compassion through the Our Lady of Lourdes Roman Catholic Church in Mountainside. Surviving are her husband of 58 years, Armando Sargenti; two daughters, Joy Leber and Denise Wood; two sons, Dennis Sargenti and Reymond Sargenti; a sister, Norma Stumm, and 11 grandchildren. A memorial Mass was held on Thursday, January 3, at the Our Lady of Lourdes Church. Interment was private. Arrangements were under the direction of the Dooley Colonial Home, 556 Westfield Avenue in Westfield. Memorial contributions may be made to the National Kidney Foundation of New York/New Jersey, 1250 Broadway, Suite 2001, N.Y. 10001.

of Phi Sigma Sigma Sorority. Mrs. Diamond was a volunteer with the Union County Rape Crisis Center and St. Joseph’s Social Service Center in Elizabeth and did mission work in Appalachia and Ethiopia. Surviving are her husband, Kent Diamond; her parents, Thomas and Barbara Pluta; two sisters, Ellen Pluta Ehlers and Jessica Pluta, and her grandmother, Leona Jezek. A Mass of Christian Burial was held on Tuesday, January 8, at the Holy Trinity Roman Catholic Church in Westfield. Interment was at Fairview Cemetery in Westfield. Arrangements were under the direction of the Dooley Colonial Home, 556 Westfield Avenue in Westfield. Memorial contributions may be made to St. Joseph’s Social Service Center, 118 Division Street, Elizabeth 07201.

Mary B. Seifert, 85, Claims Adjuster For GMAC For More Than 25 Years She was predeceased by her husband, Max Seifert. Surviving are a stepson, William Seifert of Lebanon Township, and a sister, Frances C. Brown of Scotch Plains. The funeral was held on Saturday, January 5, from the Memorial Funeral Home, 155 South Avenue in Fanwood. A Mass followed at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Roman Catholic Church in Scotch Plains. Interment was at St. Mary’s Cemetery in Plainfield. January 17, 2002

Marjorie S. Eldert, 83, Private Secretary To Local Artist and Author Harry Devlin D. Eldert, Jr.; a stepson, Richard A. Eldert; a stepdaughter, Patricia Dorward, and her sister, Norma Nolan Santangelo. A memorial service was held on Saturday, January 12, at the Willow Grove Presbyterian Church in Scotch Plains. Arrangements were handled by the Memorial Funeral Home, 155 South Avenue in Fanwood. Memorial donations may be made to a favorite charity. January 17, 2002

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The Reverend Hugh Livengood, 86, died on Saturday, January 12, at his residence at Fellowship Village in Basking Ridge. Born in Elizabeth, he had lived in Westfield for more than 30 years before moving to Basking Ridge. He maintained a summer residence, and was a lifetime summer resident, at Culver Lake in Frankford Township.

Sam Metz, 84 Sam Metz, 84, of Westfield died on Tuesday, January 8, at Saint Barnabas Medical Center in Livingston. Born in Chicago, he had resided in Linden prior to moving to Westfield 38 years ago. Mr. Metz was Vice President of Eichner & Metz, Industrial Builders, in Linden for 50 years. He was a member of B’nai B’rith and the Men’s Club of Congregation Anshe Chesed, both of Linden, and the Linden Independent Association. Surviving are his wife of more than 50 years, Lillian Metz; two sons, Robert Metz and Kenneth Metz; a brother, Morris Metz; a sister, Gertrude Young, and five grandchildren. Funeral services were held on Thursday, January 10, at Kreitzman’s Memorial Home in Union. Interment took place at Mount Lebanon Cemetery in Iselin. January 17, 2002

Marjorie S. Eldert, 83, of Scotch Plains died on Thursday, January 3, at the Ashbrook Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Scotch Plains. Born in Brooklyn, she had been a resident of Clark prior to moving to Scotch Plains many years ago. Mrs. Eldert had worked as a private secretary to the late Harry Devlin, a prominent artist and author in Westfield, for many years before her retirement. Surviving are her husband, Herbert

Rev. Hugh Livengood, 86, Served As Associate Rector at St. Paul’s

January 17, 2002

January 17, 2002

Mary B. Seifert, 85, of Middlesex died on Wednesday, January 2, at the Raritan Health and Extended Care Center in Raritan. Born in Plainfield, she resided there until moving to Middlesex 45 years ago. Mrs. Seifert had worked for GMAC in Somerset for more than 25 years as a claims adjuster prior to retiring in 1985. She was a member of the Our Lady of Mount Virgin Roman Catholic Church in Middlesex and the Senior Citizens of Middlesex.

– Obituaries –

•PERSONAL INJURY •ZONING •MUNICIPAL COURT •COMMERCIAL LITIGATION

Rev. Hugh Livengood

Following an 18-year career with the Edgcomb Steel Corporation in Hillside and serving as an active lay minister with St. John’s Church in Elizabeth, Reverend Livengood studied at General Theological Seminary in New York City and was ordained an Episcopal Priest in 1965. He served St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Westfield as Associate Rector for 30 years and, during his retirement, held several interim rector positions, including with St. John’s Episcopal Church in Little Silver, St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Roselle and St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in PrinceTown, Trinidad and Tobago. Reverend Livengood graduated in

Vera Stahnke, 84

1933 from The Pingry School, then in Elizabeth, and later earned his Bachelor of Science Degree from the University of Virginia. A First Lieutenant in the United States Army Third Armored Division in World War II, he landed in Normandy as part of the D-Day forces. He was a member of the Board of Trustees of Elizabeth General Hospital, where his father and grandfather both served on the medical staff, for more than 45 years. In 1995, Reverend Livengood was awarded the hospital’s Humanitarian Recognition Award for his “passion for community service and his unwavering belief in philanthropy.” He was a Trustee of The Pingry School and also served on the boards of the Vail-Deane School in Elizabeth; Evergreen Cemetery in Hillside; the Pruden Foundation and the YMCA, both in Elizabeth, and the Jackson Foundation of Westfield. Reverend Livengood additionally served two terms on the New Jersey Legal Ethics Committee (12th District). Surviving are his wife of 56 years, Winifred Wrightson Smith Livengood; a daughter, Rebecca Anne Livengood of Syracuse, N.Y.; two sons, Horace Rutherford Livengood of South Orange and John Christian Livengood of Washington, D.C., and seven grandchildren. The funeral service was held yesterday, Wednesday, January 16, at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Westfield. Arrangements and private burial were under the direction of the Gray Funeral Home, 318 East Broad Street in Westfield. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 414 East Broad Street, Westfield 07090, or to the Benevolent Fund of Fellowship Village, 8000 Fellowship Road, Basking Ridge 07920. January 17, 2002

Grace Ann Bannon, 89

Vera Stahnke, 84, of Westfield died on Friday, January 4, at Runnells Specialized Hospital of Union County in Berkeley Heights. Born in New York City, she had lived in Clark for 45 years prior to moving to Westfield. Mrs. Stahnke was active with the Deborah League of Colonia and the Clark Senior Citizens. She was predeceased by her husband, August Stahnke, and by two sons, Robert Stahnke and Kenneth Stahnke. Surviving are two sons, Jeffrey Stahnke of Colorado Springs, Colo. and Richard Stahnke of Petaluma, Calif.; a daughter, Nancy Camargo of Mountainside; a sister, Sonia Lucas of Rahway; two brothers, Anthony Kalescky of San Diego, Calif. and George Kalescky of Somerville, and nine grandchildren. A Mass was offered on Monday, January 7, at St. Helen’s Roman Catholic Church in Westfield, following the funeral from the Krowicki Gorny Memorial Home in Clark. Interment took place at St. Gertrude’s Cemetery in Colonia. Memorial contributions may be made to the Deborah Hospital Foundation, New Jersey Region, P.O. Box 820, Browns Mills 08015-0820.

Grace Ann Donovan Bannon, 89, of Westfield died on Monday, January 7, at Overlook Hospital in Summit. Born in Iowa City, Iowa, she had lived in Malvern, Long Island, before moving to Westfield in 1951. Mrs. Bannon was a 1934 graduate of the University of Iowa in Iowa City with a bachelor’s degree in the liberal arts. She was a member of the Phi Beta Kappa academic honors society and the Pi Beta Phi Sorority. She was a communicant of St. Helen’s Roman Catholic Church in Westfield. She was predeceased by her husband, Timothy Bannon, in 1995. Surv iv i n g a r e a d a u g h t e r, Joanne Bannon of Westfield; four sons, William Bannon and Frank Bannon, both of Westfield; John Bannon of Linwood and James Bannon of West Trenton; a sister, Agnes Cronin of Venice, Fla., and two grandchildren. A Mass of Christian Burial took place on Thursday, January 10, at St. Helen’s Church. Interment followed at St. Gertrude’s Cemetery in Colonia. Arrangements were under the direction of the Dooley Colonial Home, 556 Westfield Avenue in Westfield.

January 17, 2002

January 17, 2002

Marie Ann Perasso, 62, Parishioner; Was Secretary at Medical Center Marie Ann Perasso, 62, of Dunellen died on Sunday, December 30, at her residence. Born in New Brunswick on April 17, 1939, the daughter of the late August and Mary Kochan Skolek, she lived in Dunellen for the past 39 years. She was a secretary at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical Center in Piscatawa y fo r 25 years and a member of St. John’s Roman Catholic Church in Dunellen.

Surviving are a son, Robert Perasso of Mountainside; a brother, Thomas Skolek of Whitehouse Station, and two grandchildren. A Mass of Christian Burial took place on Wednesday, January 2, at St. John’s Church. Interment was at Resurrection Memorial Park in Piscataway. The Sheenan Funeral Home in Dunellen was in charge of the arrangements. January 17, 2002

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Dorothy Jennings, 89, Foster Mother; Was Church Organist For 50 Years Dorothy Rodrian Jennings, 89, of Collingswood died on Tuesday, January 8, in the Collingswood Manor. Born in Newark, she had lived in Garwood and Westfield for many years prior to moving to Collingswood. Mrs. Jennings graduated from the New York University School of Music in New York City. She was a foster mother with the Family and Children’s Society of Elizabeth from 1960 to 1970. She was an organist for St. Paul’s

David M. Green of Westfield and Boca Raton, Fla., died on Saturday, December 29, at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City. Born in Rahway, he had lived in Linden prior to moving to Westfield, and also maintained a home in Boca Raton. A Certified Public Accountant, Mr. Green was a partner in Mortiz, Waldman and Green in Union, which later merged with Wiss Inc. of Livingston, for many years. He was a graduate of Rutgers University in Newark and a board member of the university’s Beta Sigma Rho Fraternity.

Donnino DiVoni, 79, Active in AARP; Had Law Practice For Over 40 Years Donnino E. DiVoni, 79, of Fanwood died on Tuesday, January 8, at his home. Born in Newark, he lived in Fanwood since 1960. Mr. DiVoni was an attorney with a private practice in Union for more than 40 years before retiring in 1992. He was awarded a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Humanities from Rutgers University in Newark and earned his law degree from Rutgers Law School in Newark. He served in the United States Army during World War II. Mr. DiVoni was a member of the New Jersey Bar Association and was active in the Fanwood area chapter of the American Association of Retired Persons. He was predeceased by his wife, Rachel Collins Hylan, Choir Member Active Community Volunteer Rachel Lois Collins Hylan of Westfield died on Christmas Day. Tuesday, December 25, 2001, at her home. Born in Manchester, CT, Rachel grew up in East Windsor and South Windsor, CT. She graduated from the Northfield School for Girls, Northfield, MA, in 1952, and from Bates College in Lewiston, ME, in 1956 with a B.S. in Physics. She worked as a research assistant in the General Electric Research Lab, Schenectady, NY, and at the Bell Research Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ. She married a Bates College classmate, Robert C. Hylan, who predeceased her in 1993. Living in Westfield since 1957, Rachel had been an active community volunteer with the Westfield PTO, Mobile Meals, Wesley Hall Nursery School —where she taught music — and the Westfield Rescue Squad, where she was bookkeeper for 10 years and a dispatcher (1984-2001). She was also active in the Choral Arts Society of NJ (1976-2001) and the Musical Club of Westfield (President 2000-2001). She sang with the Berkshire Choral Festival, Sheffield, MA, since 1984. Rachel was a member of the choir of the First Congregational Church of Westfield from 1958 to 2001. She had been president of the church Women’s Fellowship and she also served as the church’s assistant treasurer for 20 years (1981-2001) and was bookkeeper for 16 years (1985-2001). Rachel is survived by 3 children — Heather Innocenti of Cranford; Heidi Hylan-Motyczka of Westfield; Timothy Hylan of Reigelsville, PA; 3 brothers — Glendon Collins of Phoenix, AZ, Sherrill Collins of Tolland, CT, K. Lee Collins of Lakeville, CT and 1 grandchild — Madeline Rachel Motyczka. A memorial service will be held at 2:00 p.m on Saturday, January 19, 2002 at the First Congregational Church of Westfield, 125 Elmer Street, Westfield. Interment will be private. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the Hylan Archives at the First Congregational Church of Westfield for the printing of the church’s history book update and upcoming 125th celebration OR the Scholarship Fund of the Musical Club of Westfield, c/o 45 Manitou Circle, Westfield, NJ 07090. Arrangements are under the direction of the Gray Funeral Home, 318 East Broad Street, Westfield.

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Mr. Green was also a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and the Men’s Club at the Suburban Center in Linden, as well as a board member of the Shackamaxon Country Club in Scotch Plains. Surviving are his wife, Joan Kornguth Green; a daughter, Debra Feldman; a son, Michael Green; a sister, Phyllis Jacobs, and five grandchildren. Funeral services were held on Monday, December 31, at the Menorah Chapels at Millburn in Union. Interment took place at Mount Lebanon Cemetery in Iselin. January 17, 2002

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January 17, 2002

David M. Green, Was CPA and Member Of Shackamaxon Country Club Board

MASTER MEMORIALS

Westfield

United Church of Christ in Garwood for 50 years. She was predeceased by her husband, Arthur B. Jennings. Surviving are two sons, Gordon H. Jennings and George A. Jennings. A private service was arranged by Cremation Funerals of New Jersey in Harrison. Memorial contributions may be made to the Cranford United Methodist Church, 201 Lincoln Avenue, East, Cranford 07016.

Anna Bozer DiVoni, and by a sister, Mary DiVoni. Surviving is a brother, Alfred A. DiVoni. Funeral services were held on Friday, January 11, at the Madison Memorial Home in Madison. January 17, 2002

Sophie Lovetri, 86 Sophie Oliszewski Lovetri, 86, of Raritan died on Friday, December 28, at her home. Born in Trenton, she was a lifelong resident of Raritan. Mrs. Lovetri had been employed with Johnson & Johnson for more than 28 years before retiring. A communicant of St. Ann Roman Catholic Church in Raritan, she was also a member of the Raritan Senior Citizens and the Raritan Fire Department Ladies Auxiliary. She was predeceased by her parents, Joanna and Alex Oliszewski, and by a brother, Joseph Oliszewski. Surviving are her husband, Joseph Lovetri, Sr.; a son, Joseph Lovetri, Jr. of Hillsborough; a daughter, Brenda Luria of Westfield; three grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held on Monday, December 31, at the B o n gi ov i F u n e ra l H o m e i n Raritan, followed by a Funeral Liturgy at St. Ann Church. Interment was at St. Bernard’s Cemetery in Bridgewater. January 17, 2002

Clara Miller, 93, Clara Bradbury Miller, 93, of Raritan Township died on Monday, January 7, at her home. Born in Brooklyn on September 8, 1908 to George E. and Mary Herson Bradbury, she had lived in South Plainfield, North Plainfield, Plainfield, Scotch Plains and in Fanwood for 25 years before moving to Raritan Township three years ago. A graduate of St. Mary’s Commercial School in Plainfield, Mrs. Miller had worked for the New York Telephone Company and later the New Jersey Bell Telephone Company, prior to retiring in February of 1969. She was a communicant of St. Magdalen’s Roman Catholic Church in Raritan Township and previously had been a communicant of several other Roman Catholic churches, including St. Bartholomew the Apostle in Scotch Plains, St. Mary’s in Plainfield and St. Joseph’s in North Plainfield. She was a member of the St. Mary’s and St. Magdalen’s Rosary Societies and was a volunteer at Muhlenberg Hospital in Plainfield for more than 50 years. A member of the Women’s International Bowling Congress, she bowled on various teams in the Plainfield area, including Eber’s Furniture Company, Driers Sporting Goods and AJ Marino, all of Plainfield; the Edison Diner of Edison, and Stacher Insurance of Newark. She was predeceased by her husband, William M. Miller, in August of 1953. Besides her parents and husband, she was predeceased by three brothers, Ziba Bradbury, Charles Bradbury and O. Joseph Bouton, and three sisters, Ellen B. May, Mary B. Buehler and Jeannette Bradbury. Surviving are a daughter, Linda Bellone of Raritan Township; three grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held on Thursday, January 10, at the Higgins Home for Funerals in North Plainfield. A Mass followed at St. Mary’s Roman Catholic Church in Plainfield. Interment took place at Holy Redeemer Cemetery in South Plainfield. Memorial contributions may be made to Hunterdon Hospice, 2100 Westcott Drive, Flemington 08822 and to the Amwell Valley Rescue Squad, 1141 Old York Road, Ringoes 08551. January 17, 2002

The Westfield Leader and THE TIMES of Scotch Plains – Fanwood

Thursday, January 17, 2002

University News THE

STUDENT

Concepts & Thought

VIEW

Far Brook School Schedules Open House on February 5

The weekly column written by local high school students

Bishop Incident: Not Best Way For Generation Y to Start 2002 By STEVE KRAKAUER Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times

2001 will forever be remembered for one date, September 11, and the effects of that year will echo in our country for decades to come. When 2002 came just over two weeks ago, many, myself included, felt relieved that the year from hell was finally over. Then, a quiet, 15-year-old boy from Palm Harbor, Fla. crashed a small plane into a Tampa office building on January 5. And things changed. This was only one of two major news items clotting our national papers in these nascent weeks of the new year that centered around teens of my generation. And these stories certainly are anything but encouraging. Charles Bishop looks frighteningly like some face I’ve seen but can’t quite match to a name. I wouldn’t be surprised opening my own high school yearbook and seeing that awkward, slightly goofy smirk glaring back at me. I think that’s what makes dealing with his actions so difficult for my generation. Bishop is not a terrorist, although reports say his suicide note displayed sympathy for Osama bin Laden and the September 11 terrorists. Bishop is not a crazed militant from a distant land. He’s a Florida suburbanite who liked English class and airplanes. His family is stunned, naturally, and so am I. Bishop was obviously a troubled teen, and the reasons behind his actions will most likely mark the first of the clandestine happenings of 2002. I feel sorry for Bishop, but I also find it extremely unfortunate that he chose to take his life in such a public, news-generating way. What will be the repercussions of his fateful flight? Will school psychologists need to take a closer look at who may feel sympathetic towards the acts of such household-name monsters as bin Laden or Atta or Moussaoui? When my four-year-old sister knocks her Little Tikes airplane into her block tower, should I report her to the Office of Homeland Security? “Well yes, Governor Ridge, I think she may have terrorist inclinations. Now she’s stuffing rocks into her shoes. I’ll report her right away.” Because of Bishop’s fateful

flight, the treatment teens receive with regard to civil liberties could diminish greatly. No, Charles didn’t contrive a Columbine-esque plan for destruction and taking lives, but he made the headlines, and he brought teens deeper into the negative light they’ve been placed in for years. The second story making headlines recently focuses not on Bishops, but on Princes, specifically Prince Harry of England. It seems 17-year-old Harry smokes marijuana and drinks alcohol. Now, this royal figure is certainly not the only 17-year-old indulging in these illegal activities in the world, but he’s Prince Harry. So everyone needs to hear about it. There was a teaser headline on the front page of Monday’s edition of USA Today boasting, “Police won’t rule out action against Britain’s Prince Harry.” Regrettably for his family, his country, and his (and my) generation, Harry’s admittance of his vices comes at an inopportune time. Just as Generation Y is smacked a blow with a Cessna, a disturbed adolescent Floridian and a note to no one in particular about bin Laden’s charisma, Prince Harry lights a J and throws back a few shots of whiskey. Thanks, buddy. Out of the national spotlight, local teens have had their reputation suffer as well in these initial days of 2002. On January 2, five Scotch Plains-Fanwood high school students picked an eighth-grade girl up from Park Middle School, drove her to a nearby wooded area, and proceeded to physically and sexually assault her. Some of these perpetrators may be tried as adults, but that doesn’t take away from the suffix “teen” glaring up at you at the end of their age. All the malicious offenders were between 15-17. We’ve spent just over two weeks in 2002, the year I graduate high school. I turn 18 this year. I move onto college, and in many respects, my teen years are fading away. I’d like to remember this year as something special, but the first two weeks have certainly not boded well for teens of the world and, more specifically, this community. We need to reverse this quickly. Bishop was a desperate child, Prince Harry an imprudent juvenile, the five high school students criminal misfits. Let’s get ourselves a hero.

Delbarton Summer Activities Expo Slated on February 2 MORRISTOWN — The Delbarton Mothers’ Guild will host its eighth annual Summer Activities Expo on Saturday, February 2, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The snow date is Sunday, February 3, 12 to 3 p.m.) in the Delbarton gymnasium.

Joseph Swingle Enrolls At Dartmouth College WESTFIELD – Westfield resident Joseph Swingle, the son of Kathryn L. McElroy and Joseph W. Swingle, has enrolled as a member of the Class of 2005 at Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H.

Send Education News to: [email protected]

Pre-Kindergarten through high school students and their parents are invited to explore summer options: day and overnight camps, sports camps, travel and study at home and abroad, languages, foreign exchange, arts, music, college study, computers, special needs, sailing, biking, wilderness and adventure programs as well as community service. Representatives, information, or brochures from more than 100 camps and programs will be available. There is no cost or obligation, and the public is invited to enjoy Delbarton’s hospitality and refreshments. For further information, please call (973) 540-8990. Delbarton School is located at 230 Mendham Road, two miles west of the Morristown Green. For the Expo, please use West Gate.

COMING SEPTEMBER 2002 !

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SHORT HILLS – Far Brook School, located at 52 Great Hills Road in Short Hills, will hold its Winter Open House on Tuesday, February 5, for parents who would like to consider enrolling children for the 2002-2003 school year. Now in its 54th year, Far Brook is an independent, co-educational day school for nursery through eighth grade, with an enrollment of approximately 220 students drawn from 32 communities in Essex, Union, Morris, and Somerset counties. The focus of the morning-long program at Far Brook will be to show interested parents how the school combines a curriculum of math, science as well as liberal and creative NEW CADET…Cadet Private James G. Dobis of Scotch Plains is congratulated by School President, Rear Admiral Peter A. C. Long, Ph.D., United States Navy (Retired) upon achieving full cadet status at Valley Forge Military Academy and College in Wayne, Pa. The college freshman was among 317 new cadets who swore to uphold the Cadet Resolution during a Recognition Day ceremony held recently at the campus.

Westfield Graduates Receive Special Technology Prizes WESTFIELD – Westfield High School (WHS) graduates Donald Bucciarelli and Ian Federgreen were the winners of technology prizes awarded by the Superintendent’s Advisory Committee on Technology. Donald and Ian were chosen in a random drawing, following a winter concert held at WHS, where graduates in attendance were asked to complete a short questionnaire. The survey, which was designed by the committee, was used to determine if the needs of WHS students are being met in regard to technol-

Local Student James Dobis Earns Full Cadet Status SCOTCH PLAINS – Cadet Private James G. Dobis, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard J. Dobis of Scotch Plains, has successfully completed six weeks of comprehensive new cadet training at Valley Forge Military Academy and College (VFMA and C). The new cadet is a college freshman and a member of F Company. School President, Rear Admiral Peter A.C. Long, Ph.D., United States Navy (Retired), personally recognized Cadet Dobis for his achievement. Cadet Dobis joined 316 other new cadets who swore to uphold the Ca-

arts with opportunities for individual self-development. The program will start with a “Morning Meeting,” a feature of life at Far Brook, when the entire school gathers daily for announcements, student presentations, faculty readings of prose, poetry, and group singing. A campus tour will follow, allowing observers to visit classes as they are in session. Comments and a question and answer period with faculty, students, and parents of alumni will conclude the program. Reservations for the open house are required. For more information or to make reservations, please call (973) 379-3442, or visit www.farbrook.org to learn more about the school.

det Resolution during a Recognition Day ceremony held on October 6 at the Wayne, Pa. campus. During the ceremony, he was recognized as a full-fledged cadet and was awarded his cap shield. The mission of the VFMA and C is to educate young men fully prepared to meet their responsibilities, to be alert in mind, sound in body and considerate of others, and to have a high sense of duty, honor, loyalty and courage. The school is home to more than 700 young men from grade 7 through the second year of college, hailing from 38 states and 34 countries.

ogy. Part of the district’s three-year technology plan is to survey recent graduates regarding their preparation at the high school. “It is important to get good feedback from our students to understand their needs,” stated Carol Swann-Daniels, Supervisor of Instructional Technology. Donald, a 1999 graduate, was the winner of a Microsoft program. Ian, who graduated in 2001, was awarded a $25 Amazon.com gift certificate, donated by a member of the committee.

Vermont Leadership Program To Include Graduate of WHS WESTFIELD – Tonia Garbowsky Fleming, a 1985 graduate of Westfield High School, was selected to be a member of the Leadership Southeast Vermont 2002 Program. The nationwide program aims to develop and stimulate “emerging

Brendan Ryan Enrolls At St. Michael’s College WESTFIELD – Saint Michael’s College in Colchester, Vt. announced that Brendan Ryan, the son of Mr. and Mrs. John Ryan of Westfield, enrolled as a first-year student at the school.

leaders” within the regions of the country. Ms. Garbowsky Fleming is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Garbowsky. She resides in Chester, Vt. with her husband, Paul, and their two children, Jeremy and Hannah. She received a Bachelor of Arts Degree from Wellesley College and a Master of Business Administration Degree from the University of Chicago. Currently, Ms. Garbowsky Fleming serves as Cooperate Marketing Manager at Dufresne-Henry in Springfield, Vt.

Shivani Parmar Enrolls At Dartmouth College SCOTCH PLAINS – Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H. has reported that Scotch Plains resident Shivani Parmar has enrolled as a member of the Class of 2005 at the college. Shivani is the daughter of Rupa and Mansukh Parmar of Scotch Plains.

PET FOOD DRIVE…Mrs. Rosander’s fourth grade class at McGinn Elementary School in Scotch Plains sponsored their annual pet food drive during the month of November. Donations of dog and cat foods were accepted from McGinn students and their families. The class collected 197 pounds of food, which was then distributed to animal shelters throughout the area.

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Delbarton School Places Leighton On Headmaster’s List SCOTCH PLAINS – Delbarton School in Morristown has placed Michael Leighton, a ninth grader from Scotch Plains, on its Headmaster’s List for the 2001 fall term. Michael received Highest Honors.

Join us for a Wine & Cheese Reception 7:00 p.m. Thursday, January 17th

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OPEN HOUSE Tuesday, February 5 RSVP: (973) 379-3442

Far Brook School 52 Great Hills Road, Short Hills www.farbrook.org All decisions on admissions are made without regard to race, religion, sex or national origin.

A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION

The Westfield Leader and THE TIMES of Scotch Plains – Fanwood

Thursday, January 17, 2002

Sports Section Pages 11-14

THE WEEK IN SPORTS

See it all in color at! www.goleader.com

Page 11

SILBER SHRINKS SMALL, CONNOLLY SINKS SEEMAN

Raiders Take It to the Limit, Nip Cougar Matmen, 35-31 By DAVID B. CORBIN Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times

Sophomore Derek Francavilla won a 13-0, majority decision in the final bout of the evening to give the 7-2 Scotch Plains-Fanwood High School wrestling team a 35-31 victory over a strong Cranford team on January 9 in Scotch Plains. Two major showdowns won by the Raiders along with some much-needed pins set them

in the right position for victory. Both the Raiders and the Cougars were positioning their wrestlers as in a chess match. “Cranford and us matched up in a way that it was going to be a close match. The kids wrestled with a lot of heart. We were down two varsity guys, (Pat) Romeo and (Ron) Ferrara,” explained Raider Head Caoch Dave Bello. “Cranford made

David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times

NO “SMALL” MATTER...Raider Andrew Silber, top, hangs on tightly to Cougar Brendan Small in a key bout at 171-lbs. Silber edged Small, 3-0.

some moves, we made some moves and it came down to the last match. It doesn’t get any better than this!” In the first bout, the 119-lb. class, coach Bello moved freshman Steve Mineo up a weight class to face Anthony Crecca. The result was an impressive 17-5, majority victory by Mineo. “I’m very happy with the way Steve wrestled. He wrestled a good kid and he was phenomenal,” said Bello. In the first showdown bout of the evening, sophomore Eric Connolly jumped up a class to 125 and recorded a takedown, an escape and a reversal to defeat Nick Seeman, 5-3, and to give the Raiders a 7-0 team lead. The Cougars won the next two bouts to take a 10-7 lead but undefeated, 9-0 Lucas Francavilla, from a single-leg takedown, smothered 140lb. Ed Aranzuzu in 1:34. Francavilla simply explained, “I took a single leg. He hung his head, so I just reached up for the head and it was there.” Senior Matt DeNichilo scored two head-and-arm, walk around takedowns on 145-lb. Cougar Anthony Donofrio before turning him in 3:25, with an Olympic arm bar. “I was out there for six (points) CONTINUED ON PAGE 12

MAURA GILLOOLY SINKS 19, CUSIMANO SCORES 16

Raiders’ Scoring Frenzy Ices Lady Blue Devil Cagers, 60-34 By DAVID B. CORBIN Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times

Depth from the bench definitely surfaced when freshman forward Maura Gillooly abandoned her seat and fired in 14 of her game-high 19 points in the second quarter to lead the 8-1 Scotch Plains-Fanwood High School girls basketball team to an

eyebrow raising, 60-34, victory over rival Westfield on January 10 in Scotch Plains. Gillooly’s presence on the court along with freshmen starters Jen Burke (point guard) and Hillary Klimowicz (center) indicated that the Raiders, although very young, have already acquired the savvy of a talented, mature team.

David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times

DOMINATING DEFENSIVELY...Raider Erin Gillooly, center, tightly guards Blue Devil Lisa Venezia, left. With some very fine shooting, the Raiders also dominated offensively.

The Raiders’ only loss came at the hands of fourth-ranked Malcolm X. Shabazz on January 3. Since then, the Raiders have defeated Linden, Cranford and Westfield by impressive margins. “That was a tough loss against Shabazz and we won since then. We are looking forward to playing one of the better teams again,” said Raider Head Coach Brian Homm. The Raiders pounded away at the Blue Devils with effective inside shooting in the first quarter and totally dominated the boards to take a 22-5 lead. Klimowicz, who had a game-high 13 rebounds and three blocked shots, scored 12 of her 18 points in the quarter and senior Erin Gillooly added four. As the Blue Devil defense adjusted in the second quarter to thwart the Raiders’ inside game, in came Maura Gillooly who frayed the net with four 3-pointers and a 2-point jumper to complete an effective inside-outside punch. Despite the Raiders’ scoring frenzy, senior Jackie Cusimano, who led the Blue Devils with 16 points, netted seven points in the quarter, including one of her two 3pointers; however, the Raiders carried a hefty 41-16 lead at the half. “They (Westfield) played man (deCONTINUED ON PAGE 13

Viking Lady Cagers Squeak By Mount St. Mary, 38-36 During the first half, we were letting them do whatever they wanted. The Determining a winner came down other thing was, in the first half, we to the final six ticks on the clock as must have missed 10 lay-ups, and the 8-2 Union Catholic High School you can’t do that. Then of course, the girls’ basketball team eked out a kids got a little frustrated and they narrow 38-36 victory over Mount St. got a little down. Good teams win on Mary’s on January 11 in Scotch bad days. Well this was not a good Plains. Kenyail Johnson, who led the day for us. We didn’t play well, didn’t Vikings with 13 points, rebound well, so we had a lot of nailed a key three-pointer problems. We were struggling, late in the final quarter. but they stuck with it mentally. The Vikings dominated We had a lot of kids making the first quarter and made mistakes that they don’t norit look easy, taking a 13-5 mally make. At the end, we lead. That cushion quickly made some shots, made a gut evaporated as the Lions check defensively and didn’t let retaliated with an effecthem have what they wanted.” tive full-court press while “I was somewhat disapincreasing their shot perpointed”, said Johnson. “We centages. At halftime, the play much better than that. We score was knotted 19-19. made many dumb mistakes, but Johnson led all scoring we found a way to tough it out. with 10 points. Lion That is what makes good teams.” Krissy Suckow, who finViking captain and forward, ished with 24 points, Lisa Mortkowitz, who contribcountered with nine. uted five points, added, “The “I was open so many game honestly took us by surtimes, so I just took the prise. I think we came out a little shots,” said Johnson. flat, but we managed to perseThe Lions continued to vere and pulled it through. I’m press the action in the third proud the team stuck together at quarter and took a 29-27 the end. At this point of the lead. Viking Amanda season, I believe our improveKelly stepped up defenment is definitely starting to sively in the fourth quarshow. This surely was a game we ter and the tide changed learned to never come out and Fred Lecomte for The Westfield Leader and The Times slightly. Johnson take another team for granted, HIGHLY GUARDED VIKING...Viking Amy Snyder, launched her huge 3- No. 21, tries to maneuver her way around two Lions. assuming you are going to win pointer from the outside or that you are better than anyperimeter to put the Vikings out in Viking Head Coach Kathy one. You have to come out prepared front 34-33. Matthews, somewhat disappointed and play hard, no matter what.” Minutes later, with nine seconds with the team’s performance, said, “I Mt. St. Mary 5 14 8 11 38 remaining and the Vikings leading don’t think our defense was real good. Union Catholic 13 6 10 7 36 By FRED LECOMTE

Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times

just 38-36, a costly turnover handed the ball to the Lions. However, an errant inbound pass bounced out of bounds and returned possession to the Vikings with six seconds left. Vikings Stephanie Green finished with 10 points, Amy Snyder and Kaitlyn Murray each had four and Kelly added two.

David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times

ROLLING IN THE LAY UP...Blue Devil Dan DeSerio rolls in a lay up against the Raiders. DeSerio scored a game-high 27 points and grabbed 15 rebounds.

DESERIO SINKS 27, GRABS 15; BRENNAN SCORES 19

Blue Devils Wreck Raiders, 63-51; Mark Best Hoop Start in 16 Years Malcolm X Shabazz on January 8, and the game before handed the Linden Tigers (ranked 16th in the state by the Star-Ledger) their second loss. Their win over Scotch PlainsFanwood advanced Westfield’s season record to 7-1, and the loss dropped the Raiders under the halfway mark, to 4-5. Senior co-captain Dan DeSerio again played an overpowering game, scoring his team’s first 10 points. On the season, DeSerio has been averaging more than 20 points and 15 rebounds. Against the Raiders, DeSerio

By STEVEN KRAKAUER Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times

Scotch Plains-Fanwood was hot, but Westfield proved to be hotter. On January 10 in Westfield High School, the Westfield Blue Devils boys’ basketball team defeated the Scotch Plains-Fanwood Raiders, 63-51. The Raiders were coming off a big victory against conference rival Cranford earlier last week, a buzzerbeater to take the win by a single point. Westfield, however, has been strong as well. Westfield defeated

Fred Lecomte for The Westfield Leader and The Times

VERY SMOOTH IN THE WATER...Zack Coppa placed second in three events against the very strong St. Joseph team.

showed much of the same, scoring 27 and grabbing 15 boards. He also had five steals and four blocks. The first half was fairly even, with the Raiders taking a slight lead going into the locker room. Powered behind senior Mike Brennan’s 13 points and Tom DeCataldo’s two threepointers, the Raiders were able to ride a 33-30 lead. However, the Blue Devils stepped up their defense in the second half, as well as their team play. Senior Jay Cook said, “We’ve always been a second half team. It’s our conditioning; in the fourth quarter when other teams are tiring, we’re getting our second wind.” By spreading the floor on offense, the Blue Devils were able to find the open shot. Co-captain Jim McKeon contributed well with two key, 3pointers when Westfield needed them most. Junior Eric Turner also played well, especially in the second half, hitting four three-pointers. He finished with 16 points and five rebounds for the game. Westfield was quite proficient in the assist category, outdoing the Raiders, 20-11. Those 20 assists were due in large part to the efforts of Cook and senior Louie Mercer, who tallied six assists each. The Raiders were playing without their leading scorer, point guard CONTINUED ON PAGE 13

Blue Devil Swim Boys Sank By No. 4, St. Joe’s Metuchen Westfield, now 7-1, will host another top-ranked team, Shawnee today at 4 p.m.

By DAVID B. CORBIN Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times

“We swam one of our better meets against St. Joe’s and got crushed,” indicated Westfield High School boys’ swimming Coach Bruce Johnson when the No. 4 ranked St. Joseph of Metuchen swimming team defeated host Westfield, 118-52 on January 9. The very strong St. Joe’s team placed first in all 11 events. The closest the Blue Devils came to winning an event was in the 200medley relay. “We swam well but just got touched out,” explained Johnson. The St. Joseph foursome touched in 1:44.11 and the Blue Devil foursome of Vin Shen, J. Sobala, Zack Coppa and Ryan Bartholomew touched in 1:44.3. Westfield out-pointed St. Joseph in the 100 butterfly event when Shen touched second in a personal best 0:56.25, Sam Gurdus took third in 0:58.28 and Rob Freundlich came in fourth with a time of 0:58.31. In the 100 breaststroke, Gurdus placed second at 1:08.57 and Sobala took third at 1:08.89. Zack Coppa touched second in the 200 individual medley with a time of 2:07.17 and Chris Heinen touched fifth with a personal best 2:10.85. Coppa also placed second in the 100 freestyle with a time of 0:50.64 and Heinen placed third in the 500 freestyle at 5:26.16. Josh Schoenfeld touched second in the 200 freestyle with a personalbest time of 1:55.61 and Shen took third in the 100 backstroke at 0:58.09. Bartholomew finished third in the 50 freestyle at 0:23.91. Schoenfeld, Dan Chabanov, Devin Power and Coppa finished second in the 200 freestyle relay and John Chiesa, Chabanov, Heinen and Bartholomew touched third in the 400-freestyle relay. Westfield rebounded to crush ninthranked East Brunswick, 103-67, on January 9. Schoenfeld won the 200 IM and the 500 freestyle and Shen won the 100 butterfly and the 100 backstroke. Schoenfeld and Shen teamed with Chabanov and Bartholomew to win the 200-medley relay. In comparison, Johnson commented, “We swam alright but not as well as against St. Joe’s.”

St. Josephs (Metuchen) (5-2) 118, Westfield (6-1) 52 (First Place) 200-medley relay: (S) (Sergio Rosales, Pat Mallony, Brian Gartner, Ryan Wierzduck), 1:44.11 200 free: Bob Savulich (S), 1:49.68

200 IM: Mallony (S), 2:06.14 50 free: Brian Sharkey (S), 23.06 100 fly: Gartner (S), 55.79 100 free: B. Savulich (S), 49.81 500 free: George Savulich (S), 5:07.61 200-free relay: (S) (Sharkey, B. Savulich, Bren Varone, Gartner), 1:36.14 100 back: Sharkey (S), 56.71 100 breast: Mallony (S), 1:05.41 400-free relay: (S) (Mallony, Sharkey, B. Savulich, G. Savulich), 3:31.14

Raider Steve Swenson Grabs First at Pirate Inv’tl Swim Scotch Plains-Fanwood High School senior Steve Swenson touched first in the 100 breaststroke with a time of 1:01.81 to pace his team to a fifth-place finish at the Pirate Invitational swim meet in West Windsor on January 12. St. Joseph’s of Metuchen captured the team title with a total of 276, the Westfield High School boys placed third with a total of 134 and the Raiders totaled 118. Swenson became the first Raider male swimmer in school history to win at that meet. His brother Eric placed fourth in the same event with a time of 1:03.94 and touched fifth in the 200-individual medley at 2:11.02. The Raiders also placed third in the 200-yard medley relay at 1:44.39 and fifth in the 200-yard freestyle

relay with a time of 1:36.53. Blue Devil Vin Shen placed third in the 100-yard butterfly at 55.99 and third in the 100-yard backstroke at 57.07. Zack Coppa took third in the 50-freestyle at 22.78 and placed fourth in the 100-freestyle with a time of 50.88. Ryan Bartholomew touched fifth in the 50-freestyle at 23.12 and Sam Gurdus finished sixth in the 100-butterfly at 57.88. Westfield also took fourth in the 200medley relay with a time of 1:46.02. TOP 10 TEAMS: 1. St. Joseph’s 276, 2. Greenwich (Conn.) 210, 3. Westfield 134, 4. Pennsbury (Pa.) 132, 5. Scotch PlainsFanwood 118, 6. East Brunswick 116, 7. Bridgewater-Raritan 104, 8. Seton Hall Prep 94, 9. West WindsorPlainsboro North 46, 10. West Windsor-Plainsboro South 43

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Page 12

Thursday, January 17, 2002

The Westfield Leader and THE TIMES of Scotch Plains – Fanwood

A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION

G. L. Matmen Silence Lions, Singe Red Devils By FRED LECOMTE Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times

David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times

EN ROUTE TO A KEY VICTORY...Raider Eric Connolly, left, jumped up a weight class to 125-lbs. and won a key, 5-3, bout over Cougar Nick Seeman.

Raiders Take it to the Limit, Nip Cougar Matmen, 35-31

The Governor Livingston High School wrestling team took to the mat with a vengeance as they silenced the Roselle Catholic Lions, 57-12, on January 11 in Berkeley Heights then edged Ridge, 40-34, in Basking Ridge on January 12. The Highlanders pinned their way through nine of the weight classes against the Lions and got a key victory from 171-lb. Marcello Cavallaro against the Ridge Red Devils. Recording pins for the Highlanders against the Lions were: Rick Lecomte, Mike Fullowan, Craig DiStefano, Eric Serrano, Greg Granholm, Cavallaro, Colin Price, Shawn Coughlin and Rob Hernandez. Freshman 112-lb. Mark Vanderveer persevered by edging Paul

“Unfortunately, he got a takedown on me. Then in the third period, I intended to use a Turk on him, but I couldn’t get it, being a little tired, but I’m happy.” With the score 34-34, junior 215lb Coughlin showed his opponent the lights at 0:43 to wrap up the victory. “Last year, before they went to the new format, I was used to wrestling last since we did not have a heavyweight, so I was used to the matches coming down to me,” said Coughlin. “I tried using the front headlock series. That brought him right to his back.” “The important thing is that we haven’t lost to any team we shouldn’t have lost to, said Head Coach Rick Iocono. “We just beat a team (Ridge) here that is at our level. I thought our

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11

today,” said DiNichilo. “We knew it was going to be a tight match, so every point mattered. I felt comfortable on my feet and confident on top. I got his arm across his back and scooped his head. Everything worked out right.” In a thriller at 152, Cougar Chris D’Amboia scored a reversal in the final seconds to skin Tyler Stender, 5-4. Raider Charlie Bachi scored three takedowns and a penalty point to defeat Steve Daubert, 7-2, at 160. In the second showdown bout, Cougar Head Coach Dom DiGioacchino moved Brendan Small – the 2001 District 11 champion at 140 – up a class to 171 to face talented sophomore Andrew Silber. After two scoreless periods, Silber escaped and added a shot-re-shot takedown to grab a 3-0 victory and to give the Raiders a 25-13 lead. “It was a big showdown and Andrew came through for us,” said Bello. The Cougars won the next two bouts (189 and 215) via fall to tie the match. In the 215-lb. bout, Cougar Greg Donofrio, ranked third in the state, presented himself to the mat PUBLIC NOTICE SHERIFF’S SALE SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY, CHANCERY DIVISION, UNION COUNTY, DOCKET NO. F-8587-98 EMC MORTGAGE, PLAINTIFF vs. THOMAS C. CHAMBERS, DECEASED, HIS HEIRS, ET ALS., DEFENDANT. CIVIL ACTION, WRIT OF EXECUTION, DATED AUGUST 29, 2001 FOR SALE OF MORTGAGED PREMISES. By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution to me directed I shall expose for sale by public vendue, at the Union County Administration Building, 1st Floor, 10 Elizabethtown Plaza, Elizabeth, New Jersey on WEDNESDAY THE 23RD DAY OF JANUARY A.D., 2002 at two o’clock in the afternoon of said day. All successful bidders must have 20% of their bid available in cash or certified check at the conclusion of the sales. The judgment amount is ONE-HUNDRED FIFTY SEVEN THOUSAND SIX-HUNDRED TWENTY EIGHT & 03/100 ($157,628.03). CONCISE DESCRIPTION Municipality: Elizabeth Street Address: 457 Walnut Street, Elizabeth, New Jersey 07201 Tax Lot: 1363 W12 Tax Block: 12 Approximate dimensions: 187.22 feet X 50.59 feet X 194.92 feet X 50.00 feet Nearest cross street: Mary Street There is due approximately the sum of ONE-HUNDRED SIXTY SEVEN THOUSAND SIX-HUNDRED SEVENTY FIVE & 03/100 ($167,675.03) together with lawful interest and costs. There is a full legal description on file in the Union County Sheriff’s Office. The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this sale. RALPH FROEHLICH SHERIFF PLUESE, ETTIN, BECKER & SALTZMAN A DIV. OF KATZ, ETTIN, LEVINE, 905 North Kings Highway Cherry Hill, New Jersey 08034 CH-756301 - (WL) 4 T - 12/27/01, 1/3/02,1/10/02 &1/17/02 Fee: $177.48

PUBLIC NOTICE SHERIFF’S SALE SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY, CHANCERY DIVISION, UNION COUNTY, DOCKET NO. F-4206-01 M & T MORTGAGE CORPORATION, PLAINTIFF vs. JORGE G. SUAREZ, DEFENDANT. CIVIL ACTION, WRIT OF EXECUTION, DATED SEPTEMBER 21, 2001 FOR SALE OF MORTGAGED PREMISES. By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution to me directed I shall expose for sale by public vendue, at the Union County Administration Building, 1st Floor, 10 Elizabethtown Plaza, Elizabeth, New Jersey on WEDNESDAY THE 23RD DAY OF JANUARY A.D., 2002 at two o’clock in the afternoon of said day. All successful bidders must have 20% of their bid available in cash or certified check at the conclusion of the sales. The judgment amount is ONE-HUNDRED TWENTY THOUSAND TWO-HUNDRED SEVENTY EIGHT & 02/100 ($120,278.02). LOCATED IN THE CITY OF ELIZABETH, COUNTY OF UNION AND STATE OF NEW JERSEY PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1018 FLORA STREET, ELIZABETH, NEW JERSEY 07207 TAX LOT NO. 727 BLOCK NO. 8 DIMENSIONS: 100.00 FEET X 25.00 FEET X 100.00 FEET X 25.00 FEET NEAREST CROSS STREET: NEW JERSEY STATE HIGHWAY ROUTE 25 There is due approximately the sum of ONE-HUNDRED TWENTY SEVEN THOUSAND FOUR-HUNDRED EIGHTY ONE & 53/100 ($127,481.53) together with lawful interest and costs. There is a full legal description on file in the Union County Sheriff’s Office. The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this sale. RALPH FROEHLICH SHERIFF SPEAR AND HOFFMAN, P.A. LAW OFFICES Suite 210 1020 North Kings Highway Cherry Hill, New Jersey 08034 CH-756307 - (WL) 4 T - 12/27/01, 1/3/02,1/10/02 &1/17/02 Fee: $181.56

TRYING HIS LUCK...Blue Devil Co-Captain Brian Luck tries his hand at ending the Bayonne Bees’ unbeaten streak. The Bees stung the Blue Devils, 3-0.

Blue Devils Icemen Stung By Bayonne Bee Ice Aces By BILL STEINFELD

first and recorded a fall in 0:45 for his 97th career victory – he expects to get his 100th victory today at Somerville. The Raiders presented Marc Giannaci to allow Matt Loomis to move up to the heavyweight class. Loomis baited Steve Carbone with a Mallory variation, walkover takedown and pinned him in 0:44 to give the Raiders a 31-25 lead. “He shot on me and I was waiting for him to relax for a moment. My hips were in place, I slipped in my arm and whipped him over,” Loomis described. With two bouts remaining, Cougar Steve DeMarco knotted the team score with a fall in 1:12 then, in the final bout, Raider Derek Francavilla moved up to the 112-lb. class and recorded three takedowns, two nearfalls and an escape to win a 130, majority decision over Tom Murray. “Our kids are in great condition,” stressed Bello. “I think that we broke them in a couple of classes and it worked out for us.” The Raiders will host Linden today at 5 p.m. WEIGHT BREAKDOWN: 103: — Steve DeMarco (C) p. Dakim Ganes, 1:12 112: — D. Francavilla (SPF) md. Tom Murray, 13-0 119: — Mineo (SPF) md. Crecca, 17-5 125: — Connolly (SPF) d. Seeman, 5-3 130: — Chris Taglia (C) md. Nick Bruno, 8-0 135: — Pat Daly (C) p. Chris Sprague, 1:18 140: — L. Francavilla (SPF) p. Aranzuzu, 1:34 145: — DiNichilo (SPF) p. A. Donofrio, 3:25 152: — D’Amboia (C) d. Stender, 5-4 160: — Bachi (SPF) d. Daubert, 7-2 171: — Silber (SPF) d. Small, 3-0 189: — Josh Haris (C) p. Marc Fabiano, 1:28 215: — Greg Donofrio (C) p. Mark Giannaci, 0:45 Hwt: — M. Loomis (SPF) p. Carbone, 0:44

PUBLIC NOTICE

The Westfield High School Blue Devils Ice hockey team faced off against the Bayonne Bees for the second time this season and lost, 3-0, on January 9 at Warinanco Skate Center in Roselle on a very cold night. The conditions proved to be in favor of the Blue Devils since Bayonne is accustomed to their own indoor climate-controlled rink. Bayonne came into the game with a perfect 10-0-1 record and left with their perfect record intact. The first period was even on the scoreboard although the Bees controlled play easily. Westfield goaltender Scott Nuzzo kept the Blue Devils in the Fred Lecomte for The Westfield Leader and The Times

FAR ANKLE BREAKDOWN...Highlander Rick Lecomte, top, uses a far ankle approach in his 119-lb. bout to breakdown Ridge Red Devil Kyle Sevits.

Donet, 6-5, and at 125, Tim Vanderveer responded with a bar and a tilt late in the third period to skin John Rapczak, 3-2. “He was tough to use my style against and he took me out of my game for awhile,” said Vanderveer. Against Ridge, Cavallaro had little trouble with Eric Kammerer, tossing him about the mat for a 17-1 technical fall. Ironically, Kammerer had beaten an opponent from A. L. Johnson, who defeated Cavallero in the Rahway Tournament. “The team score was close, so I knew I had to do something for the team. I knew a pin would be big, but a tech fall was good enough. It was redemption time so I pretended it was the (A. L. Johnson) guy. At first, I wrestled more defensively just to see how I could take advantage of his mistakes. Then I just put him to his back several times using a Turk and a cross-arm, racking up the points.” Junior 140-lb Serrano had a fine, 7-5 victory over Matt Peres. “I picked up four points early on,” said Serrano, PUBLIC NOTICE

TOWN OF WESTFIELD Public Notice is hereby given that an ordinance of which the following is a copy was introduced, read and passed on first reading by the Council of the Town of Westfield at a meeting held January 15, 2002, and that the said Council will further consider the same for final passage on the 29th day of January, at 8:00 p.m., in the Council Chamber, Municipal Building, 425 East Broad Street, Westfield, New Jersey, at which time and place any person who may be interested therein will be given an opportunity to be heard concerning said ordinance. Bernard A. Heeney Town Clerk GENERAL ORDINANCE NO. AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND GENERAL ORDINANCE NO. 1711 ENTITLED “AN ORDINANCE FIXING THE SALARIES OF CERTAIN EMPLOYEES OF THE POLICE AND FIRE DEPARTMENTS IN THE TOWN OF WESTFIELD AND VARIOUS AMENDMENTS THERETO.” BE IT ORDAINED by the Town Council of Westfield in the County of Union as follows: SECTION I. That General Ordinance No. 1711, as titled above, be and is hereby amended to read as follows: A. FIRE DEPARTMENT I. ANNUAL SALARIES (1) Effective January 1, 2001 the annual salaries of the Fire Department shall be as follows: Captain of Fire Department $ 73,627 Lieutenant of Fire Department $ 67,561 Firefighter in probationary period for one year $ 27,000 Firefighter in the 2nd year from date of appointment (grade1) $ 32,071 Firefighter in the 3rd year from date of appointment (grade 2) $ 36,116 Firefighter in the 4th year from date of appointment (grade 3) $ 42,136 Firefighter in the 5th year from date of appointment (grade 4) $ 48,159 Firefighter in the 6th year from date of appointment (grade 5) $ 54,178 Firefighter in the 7th year and all subsequent years from the date of appointment $ 60,601 (2) Effective January 1, 2002 the annual salaries of the Fire Department shall be as follows: Captain of Fire Department $ 76,572 Lieutenant of Fire Department $ 70,263 Firefighter in probationary period for one year $ 28,080 Firefighter in the 2nd year from date of appointment (grade1) $ 33,354 Firefighter in the 3rd year from date of appointment (grade 2) $ 37,560 Firefighter in the 4th year from date of appointment (grade 3) $ 43,821 Firefighter in the 5th year from date of appointment (grade 4) $ 50,085 Firefighter in the 6th year from date of appointment (grade 5) $ 56,345 Firefighter in the 7th year and all subsequent years from the date of appointment $ 63,025 (3) Effective January 1, 2003 the annual salaries of the Fire Department shall be as follows: Captain of Fire Department $ 79,520 Lieutenant of Fire Department $ 72,968 Firefighter in probationary period for one year $ 29,161 Firefighter in the 2nd year from date of appointment (grade1) $ 34,638 Firefighter in the 3rd year from date of appointment (grade 2) $ 39,006 Firefighter in the 4th year from date of appointment (grade 3) $ 45,508 Firefighter in the 5th year from date of appointment (grade 4) $ 52,013 Firefighter in the 6th year from date of appointment (grade 5) $ 58,514 Firefighter in the 7th year and all subsequent years from the date of appointment $ 65,451 II. ADDITIONAL COMPENSATION (1) Members of the uniformed paid Fire Department that are certified EMT’s will be compensated $500 each for calendar year 2002 and $750 each for calendar year 2003. (2) Members of the uniformed paid Fire Department who are licensed Fire Inspectors performing fire sub code inspections will be compensated $2,500 each for calendar years 2002 and 2003. (3) Members of the uniformed paid Fire Department below the rank of Deputy Chief shall be paid in addition to their annual salary thirteen (13) holidays at the regular weekly rate of compensation in effect for that year. (4) Members of the uniformed paid Fire Department below the rank of Deputy Chief shall be paid in addition to their annual salary overtime pay at the regular hourly rate of one and one-half (1-1/2) the regular hourly rate of compensation in effect at the time of the overtime occurrence, as provided for in the contractual agreement with the Firefighter’s Mutual Benevolent Association, Branch No. 30. SECTION II. Any or all ordinances or parts thereof in conflict, or inconsistent, with any part of the terms of this ordinance are hereby repealed to the extent that they are in such conflict or inconsistent. SECTION III. In the event that any section, part or provision of this ordinance shall be held to be unconstitutional or invalid by any court, such holdings shall not affect the validity of this ordinance as a whole, or any part thereof, other than the part so held unconstitutional or invalid. SECTION IV. This ordinance shall take effect after passage and publication as soon as, and in the manner provided by law. 1 T - 01/17/02, The Leader Fee: $139.74

team was stronger. I knew going in that the key match was Cavallero’s, and he goes out and physically destroys that kid.” Coach Iocono concluded, “We’re making progress, we’re getting there and it’s being noticed.” GL 57, ROSELLE CATHOLIC 12 103: Rubarski (RC) won forfeit 112: M. Vanderveer (GL) d. Murrillo, 6-5 119: Lecomte (GL) p. Rizzo, 3:32 125: T. Vanderveer (GL) d. Rapczak, 3-2 130: Fullowan (GL) p. Amato, 1:21 135: DiStefano (GL) p. Paraison, 0:35 140: Serrano (GL) p. Sinclair, 1:08 145: Granholm (GL) p. Artz, 5:31 152: Jon Regenye (GL) won forfeit 160: Dempcovitz (RP) p. M. Sharkey, 1:49 171: Cavallaro (GL) p. Donet, 0:28 189: Price (GL) p. Bace, 1:37 215: Coughlin (GL) p. Dercye, 2:30 Hwt: Hernandez (GL) p. Marcel, 1:06 GL 40, RIDGE 34 103: Bommier (R) won forfeit 112: M. Vanderveer (GL) p. Peres, 1:36 119: Sevits (R) p. Lecomte, 5:06 125: T. Vanderveer (GL) tf. Zaborsky, 170 5:36 130: Fullowan (GL) p. Huff, 1:09 135: Condon (R) p. C. DiStefano, 3:00 140: Serrano (GL) d. M.Peres, 7-5 145: Zaborsky (R) d. G. Granholm, 11-3 152: Regenye (GL) p. VanderMere, 0:21 160: Schwartz (R) p. Sharkey, 1:16 171: Cavallaro (GL) tf. Kammerer 17-1 5:36 189: Price (GL) d. Wahlgren, 7-3 215: Coughlin (GL) p. Weinwiser, 0:43 Hwt: Howlett (R) p. Hernandez, 1:35

PUBLIC NOTICE SHERIFF’S SALE SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY, CHANCERY DIVISION, UNION COUNTY, DOCKET NO. F-21163-00 NEW JERSEY HOUSING AND MORTGAGE FINANCE AGENCY, PLAINTIFF vs. NELSON ORTEGON AND ALIDA ORTEGON, HUSBAND/WIFE; ET ALS., DEFENDANT. CIVIL ACTION, WRIT OF EXECUTION, DATED OCTOBER 11, 2001 FOR SALE OF MORTGAGED PREMISES. By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution to me directed I shall expose for sale by public vendue, at the Union County Administration Building, 1st Floor, 10 Elizabethtown Plaza, Elizabeth, New Jersey on WEDNESDAY THE 6TH DAY OF FEBRUARY A.D., 2002 at two o’clock in the afternoon of said day. All successful bidders must have 20% of their bid available in cash or certified check at the conclusion of the sales. The judgment amount is ONE-HUNDRED TWELVE THOUSAND NINE-HUNDRED SIXTY SIX & 25/100 ($112,966.25). Being known and designated as lot number 4 on a certain map entitled “Proposed Subdivision of 268-276 First Street, City of Elizabeth, Union County, New Jersey and filed in Union County Register’s Office on April 8, 1991 as Map #786-C. Also known as Lot #138C, Block 1 on Tax Map of Elizabeth, New Jersey. The above premises are further described in accordance with a survey made by Paul J. Rinaldi dated March 3, 1995 as follows: Beginning at a point on the northwesterly line of First Street distant southerly 25 feet from the corner formed by the intersection of the southerly line of Inslee Place with the northwesterly line of First Street, thence running 1. Along First Street, South 54 degrees 20 minutes West 31.25 feet to a point, thence 2. North 35 degrees 40 minutes West 100 feet to a point, thence 3. North 54 degrees 20 minutes East 31.25 feet to a point , thence 4. South 35 degrees 40 minutes East 100 feet to the northwesterly line of First Street and the point and place of BEGINNING. Being commonly known as #276 First Street, Elizabeth, New Jersey. PREMISES are commonly known as 276 1st Street, Elizabeth, New Jersey 07206. THIS is a Purchase Money Mortgage There is due approximately the sum of ONE-HUNDRED EIGHTEEN THOUSAND EIGHT-HUNDRED TWENTY EIGHT & 34/100 ($118,828.34) together with lawful interest and costs. There is a full legal description on file in the Union County Sheriff’s Office. The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this sale. RALPH FROEHLICH SHERIFF FREEMAN & GERTNER, P.C. ATTORNEYS AT LAW Suite 104 76 South Orange Avenue South Orange, New Jersey 07079 CH-756336 - (WL) 4 T - 1/10, 1/17, 1/24 & 1/31/02 Fee: $252.96

CYAN YELLOW MAGENTA BLACK

game, however, and the teams went scoreless after the first period. Special teams came into play in the second period, as has been happening in many of the Blue Devils’ games this season. Bayonne erupted with three goals in that period, with one being on the power play and one being shorthanded. Bayonne’s first line, led by senior center and captain Leo Smith, accounted for all three of the Bees’ goals. Westfield picked up the play in the third, however but captains Neil Ciemniecki and Brian Luck and company could not crack the scoreboard. Westfield Bayonne

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Cliff Back Indoor Track Results: (Local High School Athletes) Governor Livingston High School middle-distance runner Megs DiDario beat her nearest competitor by five seconds to cross first in the girls’ 1,600meter run with a time of 5:29.79. Highlander Christine McCurdy finished 12th in the 55-meter hurdles with a time of 9.66. Mike Carmody crossed second in the boys’ 1,000-meter run with a time of 2:43.31 and Mike Prazak finished 10th at 2:50.27. Westfield High School speedster Ja’net Tiller placed fourth in the girls’ 55 meters with a time of 7.88 and Janelle Carter finished 22nd at 8.27. Blue Devil Emily MacNeil took third in the 600 meters with a time of 1:42.51. Anne Onishi at 1:49.64 and Stephani Bridgman at 1:50.78 placed 13th and 17th, respectively, in the event. Mika Cruz placed sixth in the 55-meter hurdles at 9.66 and Sara Burke came in eighth in the 300 meters at 45.58. Adam Wendel tied for fifth in the boys’ high jump with a height of 5’8”.

Blue Devils and Raiders Tie In UC Boys Indoor Track The Westfield High School and Scotch Plains-Fanwood High School boys tied for first with 35 points each at the Union County Boys Indoor Track Relays at Dunn Center in Elizabeth on January 10. Governor Livingston tied for sixth with Plainfield with 20 points. The Blue Devil foursome of Rich Miller, Alex Gonzalez, Earl Lambert and Diano Reavis edged the Raider foursome, featuring anchor Ray Williams, in the final event, the 4x400yard relay, to gain the tie. Westfield finished in 3:52.3 and the Raiders, who competed in another heat, were timed at 3:53. Last year, the Raiders shared the team title with Elizabeth. Westfield also took first in the team high jump when Adam Wendell and Lambert had a combined height of 11’2”. Westfield also took third in the 4x220-yard relay at 1:45.2 and placed fourth in both the 4x880-yard relay and the distance medley relay with respecPUBLIC NOTICE SHERIFF’S SALE SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY, CHANCERY DIVISION, UNION COUNTY, DOCKET NO. F-7649-00 CHASE MANHATTAN MORTGAGE CORPORATION, PLAINTIFF vs. LENIN JUNIOR RAMIREZ MOREL & MRS. LENIN JR. RAMIREZ MORAL, H/W, DEFENDANT. CIVIL ACTION, WRIT OF EXECUTION, DATED JULY 31, 2001 FOR SALE OF MORTGAGED PREMISES. By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution to me directed I shall expose for sale by public vendue, at the Union County Administration Building, 1st Floor, 10 Elizabethtown Plaza, Elizabeth, New Jersey on WEDNESDAY THE 23RD DAY OF JANUARY A.D., 2002 at two o’clock in the afternoon of said day. All successful bidders must have 20% of their bid available in cash or certified check at the conclusion of the sales. The judgment amount is ONE-HUNDRED TWENTY ONE THOUSAND FIVE-HUNDRED ELEVEN & 48/100 ($121,511.48). REAL ESTATE TAX DISCLOSURE If designated below, there are liens in the estimated sum as specified below. Plaintiff advises that the municipal tax office should be contacted to obtain any additional tax amounts that may be due. 1. Taxes: Current 2. Water & Sewer: $4,965.66 plus interest CONCISE DESCRIPTION 1. The property to be sold is commonly known as: 520 E. Jersey Street Elizabeth, New Jersey 07206. 2. Tax Block No.: Ward: 3 Lot No.: Acct#: 323.A 3. Dimensions of lot: 1.19 x 6.00 x 1.50 x 63.30 x 22.59 4. Nearest cross street: 5th Street There is due approximately the sum of ONE-HUNDRED THIRTY TWO THOUSAND SIX-HUNDRED FORTY FIVE & 94/100 ($132,645.94) together with lawful interest and costs. There is a full legal description on file in the Union County Sheriff’s Office. The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this sale. RALPH FROEHLICH SHERIFF HUBSCHMAN & ROMAN ATTORNEYS AT LAW 318 Bergen Boulevard Palisades Park, New Jersey 07650 CH-756299 - (WL) 4 T - 12/27/01, 1/3/02,1/10/02 &1/17/02 Fee: $206.04

tive times of 9:14 and 12:11. Although not winning any events, Scotch Plains-Fanwood placed in the top four in six of the eight events. Along with their finish in the 4x400, the Raiders crossed second in the distance medley relay at 11:34.3. They also placed third in the 4x880 at 9:12.2 and tied for third with Plainfield in the shuttle hurdles with a time of 34.9. The Raiders finished fourth in the sprint medley relay at 4:11.5 and in the 4x220 at 1:45.4. The GL Highlanders (Mike Prazak, Mike Carmody, Alex Hotz and Jeremy Pfund) shocked everybody by capturing first in the 4x880 relay with a time of 9:05. In the distance medley relay, the Highlanders crossed third in a time of 12:01.1. They also took fifth in the sprint medley relay at 4:14.4, placed sixth in the team shot put with a distance of 116’6.5” and finished sixth in the shuttle hurdles with a time of 35.4. TEAM SCORES: 1. Westfield, Scotch Plains-Fanwood 35, 3. Union 33, 4. Linden 24, 5. Roselle 23, 6. Governor Livingston, Plainfield 20, 8. Cranford 18, 9. Elizabeth 15, 10. Roselle Catholic 12.

PUBLIC NOTICE SHERIFF’S SALE SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY, CHANCERY DIVISION, UNION COUNTY, DOCKET NO. F-6770-01 WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA, PLAINTIFF vs. JANET TUDOR; ROBERT TUDOR; SOVREIGN BANK, DEFENDANT. CIVIL ACTION, WRIT OF EXECUTION, DATED OCTOBER 11, 2001 FOR SALE OF MORTGAGED PREMISES. By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution to me directed I shall expose for sale by public vendue, at the Union County Administration Building, 1st Floor, 10 Elizabethtown Plaza, Elizabeth, New Jersey on WEDNESDAY THE 6TH DAY OF FEBRUARY A.D., 2002 at two o’clock in the afternoon of said day. All successful bidders must have 20% of their bid available in cash or certified check at the conclusion of the sales. The judgment amount is ONE-HUNDRED SIXTY SIX THOUSAND FOUR-HUNDRED SEVEN & 20/100 ($166,407.20). LOCATED IN THE CITY OF ELIZABETH, COUNTY OF UNION AND STATE OF NEW JERSEY PROPERTY ADDRESS: 21 DEWITT ROAD, ELIZABETH, NEW JERSEY 07208 TAX LOT NO. 271.A W11 BLOCK NO. 11 DIMENSIONS: 85.53 FEET 20.15 FEET X 67.49 FEET X 55.00 FEET X 151.50 FEET X 85.00 FEET NEAREST CROSS STREET: NORTH BROAD STREET There is due approximately the sum of ONE-HUNDRED EIGHTY TWO THOUSAND EIGHT-HUNDRED EIGHTY FIVE & 21/100 ($182,885.21) together with lawful interest and costs. There is a full legal description on file in the Union County Sheriff’s Office. The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this sale. RALPH FROEHLICH SHERIFF SPEAR AND HOFFMAN, P.A. LAW OFFICES Suite 210 1020 North Kings Highway Cherry Hill, New Jersey 08034 CH-756330 - (WL) 4 T - 1/10, 1/17, 1/24 & 1/31/02 Fee: $187.68

A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION

The Westfield Leader and THE TIMES of Scotch Plains – Fanwood

Thursday, January 17, 2002

POWELL NOTCHES TWO MORE WINS AT 135-LBS.

Blue Devils Wreck Raider Hoopsters

Blue Devil Matmen Dismount Minutemen and Blue Knights By DAVID B. CORBIN Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times

The Westfield High School wrestling team improved its record to 63 with a 34-33 victory over Elizabeth in Elizabeth on January 9 followed by a 49-18 win over hosting Irvington on January 11. Junior Ethan Powell (135-lb.) continued to be the Blue Devils’ most impressive wrestler by adding two more convincing victories to his collection. Against the Elizabeth Minutemen, 130-lb. freshman Tom DelDuca saved the day in the final bout. With the Blue Devils nursing a 34-29 lead, DelDuca salvaged two team points by holding Minuteman Amin Queen – Region 3 runner up at 112 in 2001

– to a majority decision. “We told him that he could help the team even in defeat,” said Blue Devil Head Coach Glen Kurz of DelDuca. Powell got Westfield on the board first with an 11-1 majority decision over Isaiah Halsey at 135-lbs. Sophomore Lee Tomasso followed with an 11-4 win over Chris Patino in the 140-lb. class and sophomore Tom Byrne pinned Jose Soto in 1:20 at 145. Dan MacDonald at 152 outlasted Malcolm Jackson, 14-12. After Chris Gismondi pinned 171lb. Yvera Gelin in 3:21, the Blue Devils did not win a bout until 103lb. Freshman Sam Kramer pinned Tony Ly in 49 seconds. Junior Joe

David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times

LEADING BLUE DEVIL SCORER...Jackie Cusimano, dark uniform, led the Blue Devils with 16 points against a dogged Raider defense.

Lady Vikings Butt Ram Cagers, 52-39

Raiders’ Scoring Frenzy Ices Lady Blue Devil Cagers, 60-34 CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11

fense) in the beginning (first quarter) and we got the lead. They switched to zone and Maura hit some shots from the outside which kills the zone,” explained coach Homm. “Maura shot well today. It worked out well. We were fortunate to be on today.” With the game already out of reach, barring a catastrophe, coach Homm enjoyed the luxury of giving his entire bench court time in the second half. The catastrophe did not come as the Raiders out-pointed Westfield, 11-10. Blue Devil Tri-Captain Dana Passananti, who finished with seven points, led the third quarter with five points, including one from threepoint range. Maura Gillooly sank her remaining five points. In the final quarter, Cusimano hit for six points and Raider junior Lindsay Pennella, who finished with 12 points, put in four. “They (Westfield) were a little off in their shooting. Our good night of PUBLIC NOTICE SHERIFF’S SALE SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY, CHANCERY DIVISION, UNION COUNTY, DOCKET NO. F-4623-00 EQUICREDIT CORPORATION, PLAINTIFF vs. MARILYN J. LONEKER; ET ALS., DEFENDANT. CIVIL ACTION, WRIT OF EXECUTION, DATED OCTOBER 03, 2001 FOR SALE OF MORTGAGED PREMISES. By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution to me directed I shall expose for sale by public vendue, at the Union County Administration Building, 1st Floor, 10 Elizabethtown Plaza, Elizabeth, New Jersey on WEDNESDAY THE 30TH DAY OF JANUARY A.D., 2002 at two o’clock in the afternoon of said day. All successful bidders must have 20% of their bid available in cash or certified check at the conclusion of the sales. The judgment amount is TWO-HUNDRED SIXTY THOUSAND SIX-HUNDRED THIRTY FOUR & 90/100 ($260,634.90). The property to be sold is located in the CITY OF ELIZABETH, County of Union and State of New Jersey. It is commonly known as 1451 LEXINGTON PLACE, ELIZABETH, NEW JERSEY. It is known and designated as Block 11, Lot 595. The dimensions are approximately 35 feet wide by 100 feet long (irregular). Nearest cross street: Situate on the northerly line of Lexington Place, 136.13 feet from the easterly line of North Broad Street. Prior lien(s): The total amount as of 4/30/ 01 for property taxes and unpaid water/ sewer charges is in the aggregate sum of $13,331.18. SUBJECT TO UNPAID TAXES AND OTHER MUNICIPAL LIENS. AMOUNT DUE IS AVAILABLE IN THE SHERIFF’S OFFICE OR FROM PLAINTIFF’S ATTORNEYS UPON WRITTEN REQUEST TO PLAINTIFF’S ATTORNEYS. There is due approximately the sum of TWO-HUNDRED EIGHTY THREE THOUSAND TWO-HUNDRED EIGHTY SEVEN & 66/100 ($283,287.66) together with lawful interest and costs. There is a full legal description on file in the Union County Sheriff’s Office. The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this sale. RALPH FROEHLICH SHERIFF STERN, LAVINTHAL, FRANKENBERG, NORGAARD & KAPNICK, LLP Suite 300 293 Eisenhower Parkway Livingston, New Jersey 07039-1711 CH-756312 - (WL) 4 T - 1/03, 1/10, 1/17 & 1/24/02 Fee: $222.36

shooting and their off night combined for a win like that,” said Homm. “We were fortunate to get a lot of the bench kids involved today and they contributed. Burke finished with four assists and three steals, Pennella totaled four steals and four assists, senior CoCaptain Kellie LaForge had four rebounds and two steals and Erin Gillooly had five rebounds. Cusimano led everyone with five steals and also had four rebounds and three assists. “It was a big win for us. They (Westfield) came out aggressive and played hard until the end. We were fortunate to get an early lead and hold onto it,” said Homm. Westfield will be hosted by Newark East Side tomorrow, January 18, at 4 p.m. and Scotch Plains-Fanwood will host Irvington today at 4 p.m. Westfield Sc. Pl.-Fanwood

5 11 10 22 19 11

8 8

DeCampo recorded the last Westfield victory with a fall over Rajan Verma in 58 seconds. “We had some kids who wrestled well but we still have been giving up too many pins, too many bonus points,” Kurz expressed. The road to victory was much easier against the Irvington Blue Knights. Beginning at the 135-lb. bout, Powell got the Blue Devils on the board first again with a fall over Shakim Clark in 3:35. The Blue Knights pulled off a shocker when Jim Lovell won a 6-4, overtime decision over Tomasso at 140-lbs. At 145, Byrne defeated Daquan Yarborough, 10-5, then after Gil Arbitsman lost a tough 5-2 decision at 152, MacDonald edged Zaki Johnson, 5-2, at 160 to up Westfield’s lead to 12-6. Chris Gismondi won by forfeit at 171 and heavyweight Nick Gismondi pinned Clarence Rodette in 3:52 to begin a run of six-straight Blue Devil victories. Sam Kramer won a 14-5, majority decision over Ken McNeil at 103 and Craig Hewit showed Yusef Macon the lights in 1:11 at 112. At 119, Joe DeCampo scored a takedown in overtime to down Ricardo Gonzalez, 6-4. Eric Gale pinned 125-lb. Jeff Beckett in 5:24 and DelDuca demolished 130-lb. Mikial Millard in 1:24. “Powell is still doing a great job for us and I believe that Chris Gismondi and Mike Barbiere (189lb.) have recently stepped it up a notch,” expressed Kurz. “We are still waiting for some of our guys to get their confidence levels up on a regular basis.” Westfield will host Plainfield tomorrow at 5:30 then will host a showdown with a talented Cranford squad, featuring 215-lb. Greg Donofrio – ranked third in the state – on January 23 also at 5:30.

34 60

PUBLIC NOTICE SHERIFF’S SALE SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY, CHANCERY DIVISION, UNION COUNTY, DOCKET NO. F-609-99 SOVREIGN BANK, FSB, PLAINTIFF vs. ARNULFO RODRIGUEZ AND AIDA L. RODRIGUEZ, HIS WIFE; STATE OF NEW JERSEY, DEFENDANT. CIVIL ACTION, WRIT OF EXECUTION, DATED OCTOBER 10, 2001 FOR SALE OF MORTGAGED PREMISES. By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution to me directed I shall expose for sale by public vendue, at the Union County Administration Building, 1st Floor, 10 Elizabethtown Plaza, Elizabeth, New Jersey on WEDNESDAY THE 6TH DAY OF FEBRUARY A.D., 2002 at two o’clock in the afternoon of said day. All successful bidders must have 20% of their bid available in cash or certified check at the conclusion of the sales. The judgment amount is EIGHTY TWO THOUSAND NINE-HUNDRED THIRTY & 56/100 ($82,930.56). The property to be sold is located in the City of ELIZABETH, County of Union and State of New Jersey. It is commonly known as 139 CATHERINE STREET, ELIZABETH, NEW JERSEY. It is known and designated as Block 9, Lot 114 W09. The dimensions are approximately 30 feet wide by 100 feet long (irregular). Nearest cross street: Situate on the easterly line of Catherine Street, 60,00 feet from the southerly line of Lafayette Street. Prior lien(s): PD-004702-90 entered on 1/ 18/90 in favor of the Office of the Public Defender in the sum of $621.50. Plaintiff alleges that the judgement has been satisfied. The total amount due as of 9/30/01 for unpaid taxes/water/sewer is in the aggregate sum of $3,671.16. SUBJECT TO UNPAID TAXES AND OTHER MUNICIPAL LIENS. AMOUNT DUE IS AVAILABLE IN THE SHERIFF’S OFFICE OR FROM PLAINTIFF’S ATTORNEYS UPON WRITTEN REQUEST TO PLAINTIFF’S ATTORNEYS. There is due approximately the sum of EIGHTY EIGHT THOUSAND 19/100 ($88,000.19) together with lawful interest and costs. There is a full legal description on file in the Union County Sheriff’s Office. The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this sale. RALPH FROEHLICH SHERIFF STERN, LAVINTHAL, FRANKENBERG, NORGAARD & KAPNICK, LLP Suite 300 293 Eisenhower Parkway Livingston, New Jersey 07039-1711 CH-756338 - (WL) 4 T - 1/10, 1/17, 1/24 & 1/31/02 Fee: $226.44

The Union Catholic High School girls’ basketball team improved to 72 with a 52-39 butting of the Roselle Rams on January 10 in Roselle. Sophomore center Lauren Huber got the Vikings on a 14-5 roll when she netted six of her team-high 17 points in the third quarter. With a goal of holding all opponents to 30 points or less per game, it appeared that the Vikings would be lucky to hold the Rams to less than 40 since the half time score was 2622 Vikings. But Union Catholic found its defensive savvy in the third quarter and took control. Kenyall Johnson scored eight points and Amanda Kelly, Amy Snyder and Lisa Mortkowicz netted six apiece while Stephanie Green and Melinda Rosado added five and four, respectively. Luci Custis scored 18 for the 6-3 Rams. Union Catholic Roselle

11 14 14 13 12 10 5 12

52 39

PUBLIC NOTICE SHERIFF’S SALE SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY, CHANCERY DIVISION, UNION COUNTY, DOCKET NO. F-11056-99 COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC., PLAINTIFF vs. WILLIAM P. BARBA & MILUSKA BARBA, H/W; GLADYS NIEVES & MR. NIEVES, DEFENDANT. CIVIL ACTION, WRIT OF EXECUTION, DATED JANUARY 10, 2001 FOR SALE OF MORTGAGED PREMISES. By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution to me directed I shall expose for sale by public vendue, at the Union County Administration Building, 1st Floor, 10 Elizabethtown Plaza, Elizabeth, New Jersey on WEDNESDAY THE 23RD DAY OF JANUARY A.D., 2002 at two o’clock in the afternoon of said day. All successful bidders must have 20% of their bid available in cash or certified check at the conclusion of the sales. The judgment amount is ONE-HUNDRED SEVENTEEN THOUSAND TWO-HUNDRED SEVENTY FIVE & 32/100 ($117,275.32). ALL THAT CERTAIN tract or parcel of land and premises situate, lying and being in the City of Elizabeth, County of Union and State of New Jersey, being more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at a point in the westerly sideline of Grier Avenue therein distant 162.92 feet from the corner formed by the intersection of the westerly sideline of Grier Avenue with the northerly sideline of Summer Street; thence 1) North 79 degrees 41 minutes West, 200 feet to a point; thence 2) North 10 degrees 19 minutes East, 40 feet to a point; thence 3) South 79 degrees 41 minutes East, 200 feet to a point in the westerly line of Grier Avenue; thence 4) Along the same 10 degrees 19 minutes West, 40 feet to the point and place of BEGINNING. Known and designated as Block 4 Lot 742 on the Official Tax Map of the City of Elizabeth, Union County, New Jersey Commonly known as 551 Grier Avenue, Elizabeth, New Jersey 07202 THIS IS A PURCHASE MONEY FIRST MORTGAGE There is due approximately the sum of ONE-HUNDRED THIRTY NINE THOUSAND NINE-HUNDRED EIGHTY ONE & 37/100 ($139,981.37) together with lawful interest and costs. There is a full legal description on file in the Union County Sheriff’s Office. The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this sale. RALPH FROEHLICH SHERIFF STERN, LAVINTHAL, FRANKENBERG, NORGAARD & KAPNICK, LLP Suite 300 293 Eisenhower Parkway Livingston, New Jersey 07039-1711 CH-755792 - (WL) 4 T - 12/27/01, 1/3/02,1/10/02 &1/17/02 Fee: $240.72

Page 13

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11

David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times

IMPRESSIVE UNDER THE BOARDS...Raider Mike Brennan, dark uniform, pulled down seven rebounds and scored 19 points.

Union County High School Boys Basketball Results: JANUARY 8: Westfield 76, M. X. Shabazz 63 Dan DeSerio burned the net for a career-high 36 points and pulled down 17 rebounds. Jay Cook netted 15 points, Eric Turner bucketed 12 and Jim McKeon scored nine for the 6-1 Blue Devils. Westfield Shabazz

17 21 23 15 7 11 24 21

76 63

Scotch Plains-Fanwood 51, Cranford 50 Anwar Montgomery, who scored 15 points, rolled in a lay up with 10 seconds remaining for the 4-4 Raiders. Mike Brennan put in 15, Adam Bendik sank 10, Kyle Adams sank six and Steve Williams added four. Sc. Pl.-Fanwood Cranford (5-2)

12 12 17 10 12 19 9 10

51 50

Elizabeth 66, Irvington 49 Rashad Robinson scored 18 points for the 7-1 Minutemen. Elizabeth Irvington

22 12 15 17 13 10 17 9

66 49

Newark East Side 86, Union 60 Randy Foye fired in 41 points for the 8-1 Red Raiders and Kelvin Porter bucketed 33 for the 3-5 Farmers. East Side Union

15 22 23 26 6 19 13 22

86 60

JANUARY 10: Roselle 67, Union Catholic 23 Kevin Bailey, Brandon Banks and Don Volkert scored five points apiece for the Vikings. Jesse Holly netted 17 for the 10-0 Rams. Roselle Union Catholic

23 18 17 9 4 2 7 10

67 23

Linden 69, Cranford 48 In this catfight, the 5-2 Tigers gained the upper claw in the second quarter. Don Busby led Linden with PUBLIC NOTICE

22 points. Jon Brown sank 14 for the 5-3 Cougars. Cranford Linden

16 7 10 15 18 13 21 17

48 69

Plainfield 74, Union 47 The healthier Cardinals seem to be back on track and got 16 points from Jared Wormley and 15 each from Amir Dixon and Jihad Muhammad. Plainfield Union

14 18 20 22 12 6 20 9

74 47

JANUARY 11: Rahway 54, Governor Livingston 46 The Indians outscored the Highlanders, 11-4 in overtime. Cisco Garay netted 16 points for the Indians. Doug Caruso scored 15 for the Highlanders and John Tully sank 11 while Jason Gionta added eight. Gov. Liv. Rahway

12 6 12 12 4 4 11 21 7 11

46 54

JANUARY 12: Westfield 50, Union 43 Dan DeSerio bucketed 24 points, Jay Cook sank 17 and Adam Turner scored seven for the 8-1 Blue Devils. Westfield Union (3-7)

11 11 14 14 12 2 22 6

50 43

Scotch Plains-Fanwood 51, Kearny 31 Steve Williams had 12 points and eight rebounds and Mike Brennan scored 10 points while Adam Bendik and Tom DeCataldo each added eight. Kearny Sc. Pl.-Fnwd (5-5)

7 9 9 6 10 17 14 10

31 51

Newark East Side (9-1) 77, Cranford (5-4) 46 Elizabeth (8-1) 82, M. X. Shabazz 42 Linden 61, Irvington 50 PUBLIC NOTICE

TOWN OF WESTFIELD Public Notice is hereby given that an ordinance of which the following is a copy was introduced, read and passed on first reading by the Council of the Town of Westfield at a meeting held January 15, 2002, and that the said Council will further consider the same for final passage on the 29th day of January 2002, at 8:00 p.m., in the Council Chamber, Municipal Building, 425 East Broad Street, Westfield, New Jersey, at which time and place any person who may be interested therein will be given an opportunity to be heard concerning said ordinance. Bernard A. Heeney Town Clark GENERAL ORDINANCE NO. AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CODE OF THE TOWN OF WESTFIELD, CHAPTER 2, “ADMINISTRATION,” ARTICLE II, “TOWN OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES,” DIVISION 1, “GENERALLY,” SEC. 2-10, AND TO CREATE THE POSITION OF PARKING SERVICE DIRECTOR/MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST BE IT ORDAINED by the Town Council of the Town of Westfield in the County of Union as follows: SECTION I. A new section 2–10, entitled “Parking Service Director/Management Specialist,” is hereby added to Chapter 2, Article II, Division 1 of the Code of the Town of Westfield, which shall read as follows: “Section 2-10. Parking Service Director/Management Specialist (A) There is hereby established the position of Parking Service Director/Management Specialist. (B) The Parking Service Director/Management Specialist shall be appointed by the Town Administrator subject to the approval of the Mayor and Town Council. He shall receive such compensation as shall be provided in the Town salary ordinance. (C) Duties and responsibilities. The Parking Service Director/Management Specialist shall report directly to the Town Administrator and be responsible for the proper and efficient management of all parking-related activities within the Town, including, but not limited to, performing the following tasks: (1) administer, manage and market the Town parking permit and parking meter system; (2) investigate, develop, and implement measures that increase the availability of off-street parking and that maximize the Town’s municipal parking assets; (3) advise the Mayor, the Town Council, and the Town Administrator regarding all parking-related issues, policies, and ordinances; (4) be an integral part in the planning, design, construction, and operation of all planned parking facilities; (5) manage the operation of the commuter jitney system, if applicable, and investigate, develop, and implement other transportation systems to facilitate downtown/commuter access; (6) coordinate the organization, operation, and maintenance of parking meters, pay stations, parking signs, and pavement markings with the Superintendent of Public Works and the Town Engineer; (7) coordinate parking enforcement activities with the police chief and the police captain in charge of traffic safety; (8) manage and supervise assigned operations to achieve goals within available resources and review progress and direct change as needed; (9) in conjunction with other department heads, contract providers, consultants, the Town Administrator, the Town Council, and the members of the Transportation, Parking and Traffic Committee of the Town Council (“TPT Committee”), determine parking requirements of various constituencies, provide leadership and direction in the development of short and long range plans; gather, interpret, and prepare data for studies, reports, and recommendations; coordinate department activities with other department agencies as needed; (10) give presentations and status reports to the Town Council, the TPT Committee of the Town Council, and to boards, focus groups, and the general public; (11) communicate department plans, policies, and procedures to staff, vendors, customers, and the general public; (12) perform field work, including the observation of conditions and the issuance of parking summonses, and other enforcement activities; (13) assure that assigned areas of responsibility are performed within budget; perform cost control activities; monitor revenues and expenditures in assigned area to assure sound fiscal control; prepare annual budget request; assure effective and efficient use of budgeted funds and other resources; (14) prepare, solicit, and review proposals for hardware solutions, assist staff to diagnose and solve parking equipment problems; participate in technical projects, such as writing equipment specifications; (15) implement technology systems and the necessary technical support for staff utilizing these systems, as well as long-range technology plans; (16) other duties or activities assigned by the Town Administrator. (D) Qualifications. Parking Service Director/Management Specialist shall possess the following qualifications: (1) bachelors degree from a four-year college or university; 1. significant experience in parking management or similar experience; demonstrated computer literacy, database management, spread sheet, and word processing skills; excellent communications skills, both written and verbal, and the ability to read, write, and speak English. SECTION II. All ordinances or parts of ordinances in conflict or inconsistent with any part of this ordinance are hereby repealed to the extent that they are in such conflict or inconsistent. SECTION III. In the event that any section, part or provision of this ordinance shall be held to be unenforceable or invalid by any court, such holding shall not affect the validity of this ordinance as a whole, or any part thereof, other than the part so held unenforceable or invalid. SECTION IV. This ordinance shall take effect after passage and publication as soon as and in the manner provided by law. 1 T - 01/17/02, The Leader Fee: $143.82

CYAN YELLOW MAGENTA BLACK

Anwar Montgomery, who was ineligible for the game. Senior Steve Williams stepped up his gameplay, scoring 10 points and boarding four. Adam Bendik also contributed with a solid performance, scoring nine and dishing out four assists. The scoring leader for the Raiders was big man Brennan, who finished with 19 points as well as grabbing seven rebounds. Up next for Westfield are two tough match-ups against conference opponents. The Blue Devils will face Newark Eastside, currently ranked fourth in the Star-Ledger top 20, today at home. The Eastside game will bring Randy Foye to Westfield High. Foye is figured by many to be not only the best player in the conference, but one of the top high school players in the nation. Foye has been averaging close to 40 points in his past four games. Says Cook, “It’s like guarding Michael Jordan. You just have to hope he has an off-game.” Sc. Pl.-Fanwood Westfield

16 17 9 9 15 15 14 19

51 63

GL Cagers Topple Mount St. Mary The Governor Livingston High School girls’ basketball team upped its record to 3-6 by toppling Mount St. Mary, 47-33, in Watchung on January 10. Highlander Margaret Goodspeed led the attack with 13 points. GL immediately staggered the Mount hoopsters with a 14-5 run in the first quarter and were led by Katie Dotto, who netted six of her 12 points. Megan Butler and Rebecca Ringwood each had five points and Kathleen Dreitlein added four. Krissy Suckow scored 14 for 4-5 Mount St. Mary. Gov. Livingston Mount St. Mary

14 12 11 10 5 12 11 5

47 33

PUBLIC NOTICE SHERIFF’S SALE SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY, CHANCERY DIVISION, UNION COUNTY, DOCKET NO. F-9155-01 WELLS FARGO HOME MORTGAGE, INC., PLAINTIFF vs. CARLOS ZACARIAS, ET ALS., DEFENDANT. CIVIL ACTION, WRIT OF EXECUTION, DATED OCTOBER 10, 2001 FOR SALE OF MORTGAGED PREMISES. By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution to me directed I shall expose for sale by public vendue, at the Union County Administration Building, 1st Floor, 10 Elizabethtown Plaza, Elizabeth, New Jersey on WEDNESDAY THE 6TH DAY OF FEBRUARY A.D., 2002 at two o’clock in the afternoon of said day. All successful bidders must have 20% of their bid available in cash or certified check at the conclusion of the sales. The judgment amount is ONE-HUNDRED FIFTY ONE THOUSAND FOUR-HUNDRED EIGHTEEN & 03/100 ($151,418.03). The property to be sold is located in the city of Elizabeth in the County of Union, New Jersey. Commonly known as: 534 Richmond Street, Elizabeth, New Jersey 07202 Tax Lot No. 1298 in Block 4 Dimensions of Lot: (Approximately) 38 feet wide by 155 feet long Nearest Cross Street: Situate on the southwesterly sideline of Richmond Street 174.30 feet from the northwesterly sideline of Mckinley Street. There is due approximately the sum of ONE-HUNDRED SIXTY THOUSAND EIGHT-HUNDRED THIRTY SIX & 84/100 ($160,836.84) together with lawful interest and costs. There is a full legal description on file in the Union County Sheriff’s Office. The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this sale. RALPH FROEHLICH SHERIFF ZUCKER, GOLDBERG & ACKERMAN ATTORNEYS 1139 Spruce Drive PO Box 1024 Mountainside, New Jersey 07092-0024 1-908-233-8500 File: XFZ L 43211 CH-756335 - (WL) 4 T - 1/10, 1/17, 1/24 & 1/31/02 Fee: $191.76

PUBLIC NOTICE SHERIFF’S SALE SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY, CHANCERY DIVISION, UNION COUNTY, DOCKET NO. F-15918-98 ACCUBANC MORTGAGE CORPORATION, PLAINTIFF vs. CLAUDIA CURY N/ K/A CLAUDIA AFONSO, ET AL, DEFENDANT. CIVIL ACTION, WRIT OF EXECUTION, DATED AUGUST 27, 2001 FOR SALE OF MORTGAGED PREMISES. By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution to me directed I shall expose for sale by public vendue, at the Union County Administration Building, 1st Floor, 10 Elizabethtown Plaza, Elizabeth, New Jersey on WEDNESDAY THE 23RD DAY OF JANUARY A.D., 2002 at two o’clock in the afternoon of said day. All successful bidders must have 20% of their bid available in cash or certified check at the conclusion of the sales. The judgment amount is TWO-HUNDRED THIRTY ONE THOUSAND EIGHTHUNDRED THIRTY THREE & 33/100 ($231,833.33). CONCISE DESCRIPTION Municipality: Elizabeth Street Address: 594 Madison Avenue, Elizabeth, New Jersey 07208 Tax Lot: 642 Tax Block: 12 Approximate dimensions: 33.00 feet X 110.00 feet X 33.00 feet X 110.00 feet Nearest cross street: Fairmont Avenue There is due approximately the sum of TWO-HUNDRED FIFTY TWO THOUSAND EIGHT-HUNDRED EIGHTY NINE & 29/100 ($252,889.29) together with lawful interest and costs. There is a full legal description on file in the Union County Sheriff’s Office. The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this sale. RALPH FROEHLICH SHERIFF PLUESE, ETTIN, BECKER & SALTZMAN A DIV. OF KATZ, ETTIN, LEVINE, 905 North Kings Highway Cherry Hill, New Jersey 08034 CH-756298 - (WL) 4 T - 12/27/01, 1/3/02,1/10/02 &1/17/02 Fee: $181.56

Page 14

The Westfield Leader and THE TIMES of Scotch Plains – Fanwood

Thursday, January 17, 2002

Local Area High School Varsity Wrestling Results:

Union County High School Girls Basketball Results: JANUARY 8: Scotch Plains-Fanwood 55, Cranford 35 The 7-1 Raiders overwhelmed the visiting Cougars and were led by freshman Hillary Klimowicz with 24 points and 10 rebounds. Lindsay Pennella sank 11, Kellie LaForge scored 10 and Jen Burke added eight. Gillian Murray led the Cougars with 11 points. Cranford Sc. Pl.-Fanwood

11 6 12 6 12 16 11 16

35 55

M. X. Shabazz 56, Westfield 22 Shahida Williams netted 17 points for fourth-ranked Shabazz. Jackie Cusimano scored nine points and Dana Passananti put in six for the Blue Devils. Shabazz (8-1) Westfield (2-5)

7 4

21 13 15 8 3 7

56 22

Union Catholic 43, Governor Livingston 13 Defense seems to be taking hold as the 6-2 Vikings held the 3-6 Highlanders scoreless in the second and fourth quarters. Amy Snyder and Lauren Huber both netted 11 points, Amanda Kelly scored eight and Stephanie Green sank seven for the Vikings. Rebecca Ringwood put in five for the Highlanders. Gov. Livingston Union Catholic

9 0 4 0 9 13 10 11

13 43

Elizabeth 49, Irvington 24 Gezel Virella and Latrese McNair each sank 13 points for the 8-1 Lady Minutemen. Irvington Elizabeth

3 11 6 4 13 12 8 4

24 49

Union 68, Newark East Side 40 Monique Blake and Litissa Watson each fired in 18 points for PUBLIC NOTICE SHERIFF’S SALE SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY, CHANCERY DIVISION, UNION COUNTY, DOCKET NO. F-18962-99 CHASE MANHATTAN MORTGAGE CORPORATION, PLAINTIFF vs. JOSE M. DAVILA, SINGLE; MRS. JOSE M. DAVILA, HIS WIFE, DEFENDANT. CIVIL ACTION, WRIT OF EXECUTION, DATED JULY, 17, 2001 FOR SALE OF MORTGAGED PREMISES. By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution to me directed I shall expose for sale by public vendue, at the Union County Administration Building, 1st Floor, 10 Elizabethtown Plaza, Elizabeth, New Jersey on WEDNESDAY THE 6TH DAY OF FEBRUARY A.D., 2002 at two o’clock in the afternoon of said day. All successful bidders must have 20% of their bid available in cash or certified check at the conclusion of the sales. The judgment amount is ONE-HUNDRED NINETEEN THOUSAND THREE-HUNDRED FORTY NINE & 12/100 ($119,349.12). REAL ESTATE TAX DISCLOSURE If designated below, there are liens in the estimated sum as specified below. Plaintiff advises that the municipal tax offices should be contacted to obtain any additional tax amounts that may be due. 1. Taxes: $531.20 - 4th quarter, year 2001 2. Water & Sewer: $2,339.99 4. Liens: $2,470.07 - water, Taxes and sewer CONCISE DESCRIPTION 1. The property to be sold is commonly known as: 230 PINE STREET, ELIZABETH NEW JERSEY 07206. 2. Tax Block No.: 1 Lot No.: 456 3. Dimentions of lot: 100.00 x 25.00 4. Nearest cross street: Second Street There is due approximately the sum of ONE-HUNDRED THIRTY THOUSAND EIGHT-HUNDRED EIGHTY TWO & 98/ 100 ($130,882.98) together with lawful interest and costs. There is a full legal description on file in the Union County Sheriff’s Office. The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this sale. RALPH FROEHLICH SHERIFF HUBSCHMAN & ROMAN ATTORNEYS AT LAW 318 Bergen Boulevard Palisades Park, New Jersey 07650 CH-756329 - (WL) 4 T - 1/10, 1/17, 1/24 & 1/31/02 Fee: $204.00

the 6-2 Farmers. Union East Side

22 20 22 4 12 5 8 15

JANUARY 9: Roselle Park 39, New Providence 16

68 40

WEIGHT BREAKDOWN: 103: — Joe Blackford (RP) d. Ross Baldwin, 7-2 112: — Jon Reedy (NP) d. Troy McDermant, 9-2 125: — Dan Appello (RP) tf. Marc Neuwirth, 17-2, 6:00 130: — Nick Panetta (RP) tf. Jim Carroll, 15-0, 459 171: — Alex Pavlinov (NP) md. Jason McCrody, 11-0

JANUARY 10: Cranford 48, Linden 41 Katie Sands sank 13 points and Sharon Majors scored 12 while grabbing 10 rebounds for the 5-2 Cougars. Linden Cranford

4 13 13 11 0 19 11 18

41 48

Oak Knoll 54, St. Mary’s 20 The 9-1 Royals have royally hammered their opponents. Katie Cummings fired in 21 points and Monica Gargolo netted 11. Oak Knoll St. Mary’s (1-6)

20 14 14 8 0 6

6 6

54 20

JANUARY 11: Rahway 51, Governor Livingston 40 Marge Goodspeed and Katie Dotto netted 11 and 10 points, respectively, for the Highlanders. Dominique Walker and Chantae Small sank 19 and 18 points, respectively, for the Indians. Rahway Gov. Livingston

10 10 17 14 11 6 12 11

51 40

JANUARY 12: Union 91, Westfield 49 Jackie Cusimano had 25 points, including a WHS record seven 3pointers, five steals and five assists for the Blue Devils and Lisa Venezia scored 10 points. Union (8-2) Westfield

36 19 15 21 11 7 11 20

91 49

Scotch Plains-Fanwood 71, Kearny 44 Hillary Klimowicz netted 27 points and pulled nine rebounds, Kellie LaForge scored 14 and Maura Gillooly put in 13 points for the 9-1 Raiders. Sc. Pl.-Fanwood Kearny

19 13 14 25 15 11 9 9

71 44

M. X. Shabazz (9-1) 75, Elizabeth (8-2) 26 PUBLIC NOTICE

A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION

Rahway 45, Ridge 29 WEIGHT BREAKDOWN: 130: — Marcus Glascow (Ra) p. Don Huff, 0:16 Hwt: — Joe Giaccobbe (Ra) p. Chuck Howlett, 2:56

FIRST PLACE IN GYMNASTICS...The Level 6 gymnasts from Surgent’s Elite in Garwood recently placed first at University of Massachusetts Gymnastics Open, East Coast Invitational in Amherst, Massachusetts. Pictured, left to right, are: kneeling; Tyler Trendy, Danny Nizolak and Matt Lee; standing; Coach Russ Shupak, Sean Clark, Christian Barber, Will Bender and Paul Rizkalla Jr.

Local Gymnasts Score High in Tournament The Class VI, 7-9-year-old boys team from Surgent’s Elite School of Gymnastics in Garwood placed first in the University of Massachusetts Gymnastics Open, East Coast Invitational in Amherst, Massachusetts on December 9. Coached by Russ Shupak, three members placed in the top 10 out of 75 participants in their class. In level 6, Paul Rizkalla Jr. of Westfield took first place all around with a score of 52.7. His score of 9.6 on the high bar gave him the edge to pull ahead of the tight pack. He also scored a 9.3 on vault and a 9.1 on parallel bars. Also level 6, Danny Nizolak (age 7) of Scotch Plains, placed sixth all around, scoring a 50.6. He scored a 9.1 on the high bar and on the parallel bars. Christian Barber of Westfield placed 10th, scoring 50.2. He, too, showed his strength, scoring a 9.3 on parallel bars. Other participating team members included Sean Clark, Will Bender, Mathew Lee and Tyler Trendy. PUBLIC NOTICE

TOWN OF WESTFIELD Public Notice is hereby given that an ordinance of which the following is a copy was introduced, read and passed on first reading by the Council of the Town of Westfield at a meeting held January 15, 2002, and that the said Council will further consider the same for final passage on the 29th day of January 2002, at 8:00 p.m., in the Council Chamber, Municipal Building, 425 East Broad Street, Westfield, New Jersey, at which time and place any person who may be interested therein will be given an opportunity to be heard concerning said ordinance. Bernard A. Heeney Town Clerk SPECIAL ORDINANCE NO. AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND “EXHIBIT B” OF SPECIAL ORDINANCE NO. 2028 ENTITLED “AN ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE EXECUTION OR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT AND DELIVERY BY THE TOWN OF WESTFIELD (THE MUNICIPALITY) OF CERTAIN LEASE AGREEMENTS IN RELATION TO THE UNION COUNTY IMPROVEMENT AUTHORITY ISSUANCE OF GENERAL OBLIGATION LEASE REVENUE BONDS SERIES 2001 (CAPITAL EQUIPMENT LEASE PROGRAM) SECTION I. “EXHIBIT B” CAPITAL EQUIPMENT LEASE PROGRAM – SERIES 2001 Qty. Description of Equipment Estimated Cost Useful Life 1 Dump Truck with Snow Plow $ 85,000 5 1 Mason Dump Truck $ 30,000 5 1 Packer Truck (Garbage) $ 85,000 5 1 Salt Storage Shed $ 100,000 20 1 Engineering Computer Equipment (GIS & GPS) $ 15,000 5 1 Fire Dept. Pumper Truck $ 360,000 10 Fire Fighting Equipment $ 30,000 5 Police Dept. Computer Equipment $ 13,000 5 Police Dept. Radios & Radar Equipment $ 22,820 10 Police Equipment (Light Bars & Video Cameras) $ 10,050 5 Municipal Building Telephone System $ 55,000 10 Municipal Building Voice/Data Wiring $ 50,000 10 Municipal IT Improvements $ 100,000 5 Sewer & Catch Basin Trucks (to be substituted) $ 235,000 5 Street Sweeper (to be substituted) $ 125,000 5 Bond Issuance $ 56,028 Total $1,371,898 SECTION II. Any or all ordinances or parts thereof in conflict, or inconsistent, with any part of the terms of this ordinance are hereby repealed to the extent that they are in such conflict or inconsistent. SECTION III. In the event that any section, part or provision of this ordinance shall be held to be unconstitutional or invalid by any court, such holdings shall not affect the validity of this ordinance as a whole, or any part thereof, other than the part so held unconstitutional or invalid. SECTION IV. This ordinance shall take effect after passage and publication as soon as, and in the manner provided by law. 1 T - 01/17/02, The Leader Fee: $86.70

JANUARY 11: Roselle Park 61, Bound Brook 11 KEY BOUTS: 125: — Nick Panetta (RP) tf. John

Elizabeth Coalition Sets H. S. Basketball Classic ELIZABETH – Some of the Northeast’s best high school basketball teams will battle for ranking and improved conditions for local homeless people during the annual “Elizabeth Coalition to House the Homeless Basketball Classic” on Saturday, January 26 and Saturday, February 2. This year, the high school boys’ tripleheader will be played beginning at 5 p.m. on January 26 at the Dunn Arena in Elizabeth. The high school girls’ tripleheader will be played beginning at 5 p.m. on February 2 at Roselle Catholic High School in Roselle. Several of the top-10 ranked schools in New Jersey will

participate. Tickets for the boys’ tripleheader are $12 for adults and $8 for students. Admission for the girls’ tripleheader is $7 for adults and $3 for students. For ticket information, please call (908) 964-8103 or (908) 687-6963, or contact the participating schools. If not sold out, tickets will be available at the gate on the day of the game. Proceeds from the “Eighth Annual Elizabeth Coalition to House the Homeless Basketball Classic” will benefit the Elizabeth Coalition to House the Homeless, one of the first agencies to work with homeless people in the State of New Jersey.

PUBLIC NOTICE TOWNSHIP OF SCOTCH PLAINS RECREATION COMMISSION RESOLUTION WHEREAS, the Open Public Meetings Act (Chapter 231, P.L. 1975) requires that the Recreation Commission of the Township of Scotch Plains post and maintain posted throughout the year, a schedule of its regular meetings, AND WHEREAS, the Open Public Meetings Act (C.231, P.L. 1975) also requires that the Recreation Commission of the Township of Scotch Plains post and maintain posted through the year, the schedule of caucus meetings, NOW, THEREFORE, BE AND IT IS HEREBY RESOLVED THAT, the Recreation Commission of the Township of Scotch Plains, Union County, adopts the schedule of regular and caucus meetings listed below, pursuant to said act; 2002 REGULAR MEETINGS OF THE RECREATION COMMISSION 8:00 P.M. SCOTCH HILLS COUNTRY CLUB 820JerusalemRoad,ScotchPlains,NewJersey January 14 February 11 March 11 April 8 May 13 June 10

July 8 August 12 September 9 October 7 November 4 December 9

2002 CAUCUS MEETINGS OF THE RECREATION COMMISSION 7:30 P.M. ROOM 202 MUNICIPAL BUILDING 430 Park Avenue, Scotch Plains, New Jersey January 28 February 25 March 25 April 22 May 20

June 24 July 22 September 23 October 21 November 25

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT, The Recreation Commission will prohibit public attendance at any caucus meeting when items enumerated in C:lO:4-12 of the Open Meetings Act (Chapter 231, P.L. 1979) are to be discussed. BE AND IT IS FURTHER RESOLVED THAT, a copy of the schedule of regular and caucus meetings will be posted in the officially-established bulletin board in the Municipal Building Lobby, 430 Park Avenue, Scotch Plains. ED ZAZZALI, CHAIRMAN Scotch Plains Recreation Commission 1 T - 01/17/02, The Times Fee: $49.47

PUBLIC NOTICE SHERIFF’S SALE SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY, CHANCERY DIVISION, UNION COUNTY, DOCKET NO. F-10745-01 WELLS FARGO HOME MORTGAGE, INC., PLAINTIFF vs. MARQUINA MARVIN, ET AL., DEFENDANT. CIVIL ACTION, WRIT OF EXECUTION, DATED OCTOBER 01, 2001 FOR SALE OF MORTGAGED PREMISES. By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution to me directed I shall expose for sale by public vendue, at the Union County Administration Building, 1st Floor, 10 Elizabethtown Plaza, Elizabeth, New Jersey on WEDNESDAY THE 30TH DAY OF JANUARY A.D., 2002 at two o’clock in the afternoon of said day. All successful bidders must have 20% of their bid available in cash or certified check at the conclusion of the sales. The judgment amount is THIRTY EIGHT THOUSAND SIX-HUNDRED THREE & 62/100 ($38,603.62). Property to be sold is located in the City of Elizabeth, County of Union and State of New Jersey Premises commonly known as 306 Court Street, Elizabeth New Jersey 07206 BEING KNOWN as LOT 66, BLOCK 3, on the official Tax Map of the City of Elizabeth Dimensions: 100.00 feet x 25.00 feet x 100.00 feet x 25.00 feet Nearest Cross Street: 3rd Avenue The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this sale without further notice by publication. Subject to unpaid taxes, assessments, water and sewer liens There is due approximately the sum of THIRTY NINE THOUSAND NINE-HUNDRED NINTY ONE & 22/100 ($39,991.22) together with lawful interest and costs. There is a full legal description on file in the Union County Sheriff’s Office. The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this sale. RALPH FROEHLICH SHERIFF FEDERMAN AND PHELAN, P.C. Suite 505 Sentry Office Plaza 216 Haddon Avenue Westmont, New Jersey 08108 CH-756311 - (WL) 4 T - 1/03, 1/10, 1/17 & 1/24/02 Fee: $198.80

Perez, 16-1 130: — Dan Appello (RP) d. Andrew Flanagan, 9-7 135: — Nick Zangari (RP) p. Jason Gregor, 0:45

JANUARY 11: West Milford 39, Scotch PlainsFanwood 25 KEY BOUTS: 103: — Derek Francavilla (SPF) d. Dan Morgell, 6-0 112: — Steve Mineo (SPF) md. Ian Watson, 9-0 119: — Eric Connolly (SPF) p. Ryan Viscara, 3:45 145: — Matt DeNichilo (SPF) d. Lance Webber, 4-1 189: Marc Fabiano (SPF) d. Chris Gillan, 3-2 215: — MattLoomis(SPF)p.richCorter,1:57

Scotch Plains-Fanwood 53, North Warren 21 KEY BOUTS: 103: — Francavilla (SPF) p. Brian Carr, 1:39 112: — Mineo (SPF) p. Brian Lassa, 3:50 119: — Connolly (SPF) p. Ryan Pittala, 3:09 125: — Ron Ferrara (SPF) d. Corey McMahon, 14-12 145: — DeNichilo (SPF) d. Paul Smith, 7-3 160: — CharlieBachi(SPF)p.JeffCase,1:17 171: — Andrew Silber (SPF) tf. Keith McIntyre, 20-4 189: — Fabiano (SPF) p. Bob Cadell, 2:27 215: — M. Loomis (SPF) p. Will Kise, 0:30 Hwt: — Andrew Loomis (SPF) p. Mike Robins, 1:45

Scotch Plains-Fanwood 49, Wallkill Valley 24 KEY BOUTS: 103: — Francavilla md. Travin Kistle, 8-0 112: — Mineo tf. Brian Bundy, 15-0, 3:12 119: — Connolly p. R. J. Terrano, 3:24 140: — Chris Sprague (SPF) p. Joe Woodwound, 2:42 145: — DeNichilo md. Chris DePietri, 10-2 160: — Bachi p. Ian Sullivan, 1:16 171: — Silber p. Adam Howpesic, 1:56 189: — Fabiano won forfeit 215: — M. Loomis won forfeit

Rahway 36, North Plainfield 34 KEY BOUTS: 103: — Ryne Ludington (R) d. Dave Phimsipasom, 10-5 130: — Marcus Glascow (R) p. Bill Fonseca, 4:13 145: — Jim Keane (NP) tf. Mike Senosian, 23-7 171: — Dave Racelis (R) p. Matt Valasquez, 4:42 Hwt: — JoeGiaccobbi(R)p.JohnWells,3:41

Brearley 71, Manville 3 WEIGHT BREAKDOWN: 119: — Mark Yospin (B) p. Joe Kulscar, 1:39 135: — Stefano Serracino (B) d. Ed Matthewson, 7-4 160: — Dan Zika (B) tf. John Boot, 16-0, 3:15

PUBLIC NOTICE TOWNSHIP OF SCOTCH PLAINS INVITATION TO BID Invitations are extended to qualified Bidders to bid for the following Project: Jerseyland Park Toilet Renovations This project consists of renovation the existing toilets within the Park. Bids will be accepted only by mail or in person to the Office of the Township Clerk, Scotch Plains Municipal Building, 430 Park Avenue, Scotch Plains, New Jersey 07076 (ATTN: Barbara Riepe, Township Clerk) until 10:00 a.m. on Monday, February 4, 2002. The Township of Scotch Plains (hereinafter "Township") shall not be responsible for any bid mailed which is lost in transit or delivered late by the Postal Service. At the above time, the bids will be publicly opened and read aloud, All bids must be presented in sealed envelopes, which are clearly marked "Bid for Jerseyland Park (ADA Bathroom), Contract E2001-1A, 430 Park Avenue, Scotch Plains, New Jersey 07076". No bid will be received after the time and date specified. After receipt of bids, no bid may be withdrawn within sixty (60) days after the date of the bid opening except if provided for herein. The bid of any Bidder who consents to an extension may be held for consideration for a longer period of time as may be agreed upon between Bidder and the Township. All bids must be on the bid forms provided by the Township of Scotch Plains in the Bid Package. Plans and specifications for this work may be examined at Lauro Associates Architects, P.C., 1700 Galloping Hill Road Kenilworth New Jersey, during business hours, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., beginning January 14, 2002, and purchased for a $75.00 non-refundable fee. Bid proposals and all required documents must be completed and submitted by the date as set forth above. All documents in the enclosed Bid Package must accompany the bid proposal. In addition to the above documents, a certified check, cashier’s check or bid bond issued by a responsible bank, trust company or insurance company, payable to the Township of Scotch Plains shall be submitted with each bid as a guaranty that if a contract is awarded the Bidder shall execute said Contract. The Bid Security shall be in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the total amount of the bid or Twenty-Thousand Dollars ($20,000.00), whichever is lower. All Bid Security, except the Bid Security of the three (3) apparent lowest responsible Bidders shall, if requested in writing, be returned after ten (10) days from the opening of the bids (Sundays and holidays excepted) and the bids of such Bidders shall be considered withdrawn. The Township reserves the right to reject any or all bids, and to waive immaterial informalities, or to accept any bid which, in the opinion of the Township of Scotch Plains, will be in the best interest of the Township all in accordance with the New Jersey Local Public Contracts Law N.J.S.A 40A: 11-1 et seq. A-2. In the event of an equal or tie bid, the Township shall award the Bidder, which, in the Township’s sole discretion, best serves, the interest of the Township. In the event of an equal or tie bid, the Township shall award the Bidder, which, in the Township’s sole discretion, best serves, the interest of the Township. The Township also reserves the right to reject any and all bids if sufficient funds are not available and/or appropriated. The selected Bidder, will, within seven (7) days of award of the bid, enter into an appropriate contact with the Township, All Bidders must comply with P.L. 1975, Chapter 127, entitled "An Act Relating to Affirmative Action in Relation to Discrimination in Connection with Certain Public Contracts and Supplementing the ‘Law Against Discrimination’ approved April 16, 1945 (P.L. 1945, Chapter 169)", N.J.A.C. 17:27, as amended from time to time, and the Americans With Disability Act. Where applicable, prevailing wage rate shall be paid to all workers on the job as per N.J.A.C. 34:11-56, 25 et seq. BY ORDER OF THE TOWNSHIP OF SCOTCH PLAINS OF THE COUNTY OF UNION, STATE OF NEW JERSEY. Thomas Atkins Municipal Manager Barbara Riepe Township Clerk 1 T - 01/17/02, The Times Fee: $88.23

CYAN YELLOW MAGENTA BLACK

A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION

The Westfield Leader and THE TIMES of Scotch Plains – Fanwood

Thursday, January 17, 2002

Page 15

See it all on the Web!

www.goleader.com PUBLIC NOTICE

MAJOR DONATION…The Auxiliary to Children’s Specialized Hospital (CSH) recently donated $25,000 to the hospital to upgrade the adolescent area of the Mountainside inpatient rehabilitation unit. The funds will also provide computer technology for use by staff, patients and their parents. Auxiliary members and members of the Westfield, Mountainside, Scotch Plains-Fanwood and Short Hills Auxiliary Twigs raised funds for the donation during the past year. Pictured, left to right, are: Rex Riley, CSH President and Chief Executive Officer; Teddie Taranto, Auxiliary Treasurer; Janet Jackson, Auxiliary President, and Dr. Michael Dribbon, CSH’s Director of Psychology and Neuropsychology.

Scouts Plan Klondike Derby In Watchung Reservation MOUNTAINSIDE – On Saturday, January 26, at 8:30 a.m., Boy Scouts of the Patriot District of the Patriots’ Path Council will hold their 45th Klondike Derby sled race and scout skill contest at the picnic area above Surprise Lake in the Watchung Reservation in Mountainside. Keith Mellen of Westfield, a veteran of several past Derbies, will serve as Derby Governor, and about 100 adult leaders and volunteers from various scout troops will assist in conducting the event. On Derby Day, the Reservation will be transformed into the Klondike region of the Yukon Territory and the spots where different skill events occur will take on the names of Klondike towns. Scout patrols, using compass directions to map out their routes, will pull Eskimo-style sleds between the towns, where they will be graded on their performance of different scout-skill problems, such as first aid, lashings and knots, measuring and fire building. Each team’s test scores and elapsed times will be relayed to a central score board to determine the winners in each age group. If there is too little snow for sleds, the patrols will use backpacks loaded

Gardenaires to Hear Talk by Tree Expert SCOTCH PLAINS – The monthly meeting of the Gardenaires will take place on Wednesday, January 23, from noon to 3 p.m. at the All Saints’ Episcopal Church, located at 559 Park Avenue in Scotch Plains. The speaker for the meeting will be Martin Schmiede, a state certified tree expert. Mr. Schmiede has operated his family-owned business in the Westfield area for over five decades. He will discuss “Trees, From Seedlings to 4,000-Year-Old Specimens,” with a lecture and slide presentation. The general meeting of the Gardenaires is held on the fourth Wednesday of each month. Refreshments are served. Guests are welcome and there are no geographic limitations.

with the required equipment to hike around the course, but only severe rain or mud conditions will cause a cancellation. The public is welcome to visit at any time. Awards will be presented at about 2 p.m., when the last waves have completed the race. The Patriot District includes towns and troops in the area between Westfield, Scotch Plains, North Plainfield, Watchung, Millington, Summit and Garwood.

SHERIFF’S SALE SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY, CHANCERY DIVISION, UNION COUNTY, DOCKET NO. L-005890-91 CAROLE MILROAD, PLAINTIFF vs. STANLEY SEFCIK, SR., ET ALS., DEFENDANT. CIVIL ACTION, WRIT OF EXECUTION, DATED JULY 10, 2001 FOR SALE OF MORTGAGED PREMISES. By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution to me directed I shall expose for sale by public vendue, at the Union County Administration Building, 1st Floor, 10 Elizabethtown Plaza, Elizabeth, New Jersey on WEDNESDAY THE 30TH DAY OF JANUARY A.D., 2002 at two o’clock in the afternoon of said day. All successful bidders must have 20% of their bid available in cash or certified check at the conclusion of the sales. The judgment amount is ONE-HUNDRED THREE THOUSAND FOUR-HUNDRED SIXTY THREE & 22/100 ($103,463.22). Eric A. Arnold and Karen Arnold Know as 522 Magnolia Avenue Elizabeth, New Jersey 07201 Tax map reference NJSA 46 15-2-1 Municipality of Elizabeth, New Jersey Lot 751 Block no. 3 There is due approximately the sum of ONE-HUNDRED ELEVEN THOUSAND THREE-HUNDRED SEVENTY & 91/100 ($111,370.91) together with lawful interest and costs. There is a full legal description on file in the Union County Sheriff’s Office. The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this sale. RALPH FROEHLICH SHERIFF MICHALE A. TOTO ATTORNEY AT LAW 317 Rues Lane East Brunswick, New Jersey 08816 CH-756323 - (WL) 4 T - 1/03, 1/10, 1/17 & 1/24/02 Fee: $159.12

TURN-OF-THE-CENTURY VICTORIAN

Enchanting CRANFORD home with high ceilings and arched doorways, includes 5 Bedrooms, 3.1 Baths, Living Room with fireplace and French doors to enclosed, wrap-around porch, banquet-size Formal Dining Room, Eat-In Kitchen, full Basement and 3-car garage. $649,900.

CUSTOM BUILT CONTEMPORARY Situated on 1.5 acre of beautiful w o o d e d p r o p e r t y, t h i s w o n d e r f u l WATCHUNG home includes 3 Bedrooms, 3 Baths, Formal Dining Room, Family Room and Living Room with fireplaces, deck, fabulous Kitchen, cathedral ceiling and open floor plan. $499,950.

WONDERFUL COLONIAL This CLARK home is in pristine condition with large, spacious rooms and also offers 4 Bedrooms, 1.5 Baths, Formal Dining Room, updated Eat-In Kitchen, newer roof, refinished floors, Central Air Conditioning, and full Basement. A must see! 349,900.

17 Breeze Knoll Drive, Westfield

HEATHERMEADE SECTION COLONIAL

Lovely expanded Ranch tucked away on a picturesque property along a quiet cul-de-sac, this home features: large bright rooms, 5 Bedrooms, 3 1/2 Baths, new maple Eat-In Kitchen with center island, recessed lighting, hardwood floors, a magnificent deck off the L iv i n g R o o m a n d D i n i n g R o o m o v e r l o o k i n g t h e grounds, 2 zone air conditioning, central vac, on a 110 x 238 lot . A true opportunity. $849,000.

Lovely brick, 9 room, 4 Bedroom home in CRANFORD also offers 2.1 Baths, Formal Dining Room, Living Room, Kitchen, large Breakfast Room, Master Bedroom with full Bath / Laundry and lovely yard. $446,000

Jayne Bernstein

CHARMING COLONIAL

Sales Associate

Located in SCOTCH PLAINS, this charming home offers 3 Bedrooms, 2 new Baths, Eat-In Kitchen, Formal D i n i n g R o o m , n ew e r f u r n a c e , h u midifier and French drains, updated electric and plumbing, deep yard and new shed. $249,900.

NJAR Million Dollar Sales Club Silver Level ’98-’00 Phone - 908-233-5555 ext. 203 Cell Phone:908 403-9330 E-mail: [email protected] Westfield Office 209 Central Ave (908) 233-5555 ©1997 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Corporation. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office Independently Owned and Operated.

BRIGHT & SUNNY COLONIAL Wonderful home in WESTFIELD includes 4 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths, Living Room and Dining Room with inlaid hardwood floors, Eat-In Kitchen with newer appliances and breakfast area, moldings, high ceilings, 3 rd floor Master Bedroom with full Bath, Basement Recreation Room, newer roof and some windows.$374,500

In the Heart of “Wychwood” Charm surrounds you in this stately Center Hall Colonial that blends traditional elegance with today’s modern conveniences. The large gourmet Kitchen that opens onto an exceptional Family Room with a wood burning fireplace, graceful moldings, arched bookcases, slate roof, and a sunny front-to-back Living Room are just some of the desirable features that pervade this home. A balance of formal and family spaces is enhanced by a spacious and flowing floor plan. Sitting proudly on a large and beautifully landscaped property on a lovely quiet street, this home is just minutes from Westfield’s superb schools, wonderful in-town shopping, beautiful parks and transportation. Offered at $950,000.

T C RA T ON C ER D UN

For appointment Call:

Carol Tener 2000 NJAR Gold Member President’s Elite

Call Direct: (908) 233-2243 Westfield Office • 600 North Avenue, W. • (908) 233-0065

CYAN YELLOW MAGENTA BLACK

BRICK FRONT COLONIAL Handsome home in the Heathermeade section of CRANFORD offers 3 Bedrooms, 1.1 Baths, Formal Dining Room, Kitchen, Living Room with French door, screened porch, newer roof and garage roof, oak hardwood floors throughout, full Basement. A great opportunity and potential! $285,000.

Page 16

Thursday, January 17, 2002

The Westfield Leader and THE TIMES of Scotch Plains – Fanwood

A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION

CLASSIFIEDS :LQH/LEUDU\ NOW HIRING

FULLFULL TIME • TIME PART TIME Positions Available: CLEARANCE! Postitions Available: • Cashiers • •Stock Stock Persons Persons • Cashiers • Order Processors - 18 Years or Older - Must be able to work weekends - Flexible Hours - Experience in liquor trade a plus - Pleasant working conditions

:LQH/LEUDU\ 8 Millburn Avenue Springfield

CLASSIC COLONIAL PERFECT LOCATION

HELP WANTED

973-376-0005 www.winelibrary.com FOR LEASE RESTAURANT/FOOD TAKE-OUT/CATERING Fully equiped. 3000 sq ft, for immediate occupancy in center of Westfield. Excellent terms/ minimal up front expences. Adj. parking and NY trains. ph: 908-561-3583 email: [email protected] HOUSE FOR RENT

Westfield -- north side. 3 BR, LR, EIK, 2 full baths. Laundry room, Available Immediately. $1,550 mo. + Utilities, 1+1/2 mo. security. call 908-754-6373

Beautiful Ranch House in Fanwood, 2 BDR, Walking Distance to Train Stn. & Park. $1,300.00 per mo. w/opt. to buy. No Pets. 973-792-2257 908-754-1888 FOR RENT

Pristine split level home in Tamaques School area. 3 bedrooms, 1 full and 2 half baths. $2400/month. Call Sue Checchio at Coldwell Banker 908-301-2014.

Classic elegance abounds in this charming Center-Hall Colonial, located on a quiet, tree-lined street and a short walk from downtown Westfield. Gleaming hardwood floors, handsome moldings, copious windows and builtins add to the many amenities. Traditional elements mingle with romantic colors and textures in this spacious home. From the beautiful vestibule to the Family Room off the Kitchen, this home lends itself to convenience, comfortable living and gracious entertaining.

Rebecc aW ampler ebecca Wampler Realtor/Sales Associate NJAR Million Dollar Sales Club 2000 President’s Club 2001 908-233-8380

Upscale Private Club is hiring Ala Carte Servers, Banquet Servers and Bus Persons. Full & Parttime Positions Available. Call 908-232-4141

PET SITTING

Pets Prefer the comfort and safety of home while you are away. Sitting/Walks/Play/etc. Customized Home Visits. 908-289-4470 OFFICE SUITES AVAILABLE

Westfield. Prime location, center of town, in modern elevator building. High ceilings, palladian windows. Adj parking and NY trains. 4,200 sq. ft. to divide. email: [email protected] ph: (908) 561-3583 WANTED

Looking to Buy Used Upright Piano and Bench. Please Call 908-317-5910

A PHONE CALL AWAY…CONTACT We Care volunteers recently received special recognition for their service on the 24-hour hotline, which assists callers in need. Pictured, left to right, are: Front row, Mary Ann Foster, Cathy Cvetovitch and Ellen Anthony, and back row, Harry Lampon, Ed Mitchell, Cathy Buchanan and Carl Williams.

CONTACT We Care Honors Volunteers For Their Service

BERKSHIRES: 5 Bedroom house, 2 1/2 Baths in Lenox, MA. Near to skiing, lake, Tanglewood, Shakespear. Vacation or year round home. Call Barbara. Century 21 Broker. 800-570-0597

SCOTCH PLAINS — CONTACT We Care, a 24-hour telephone hotline that serves Union, Essex, Middlesex and Somerset counties, recently honored some special people during its annual Volunteer Recognition Party at the Scotch Hills Country Club in Scotch Plains. Almost two dozen local restaurants and businesses served as sponsors for the evening, contributing flowers for the volunteers and food platters for the buffet, as well as door prizes for the attendees. Volunteers at CONTACT We Care must complete a 50-hour training program before taking live calls. The program provides 24-hour confidential service to its callers. Special awards were presented to Ellen Anthony of Basking Ridge for completing 2,500 hours of on-line service. Juanita Hearn of East Brunswick was also honored for her completion of 1,000 hours of service. Volunteers who completed 500 hours of service included Cathy Cvetovitch of Scotch Plains, Mary

PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC NOTICE

TOWNSHIP OF SCOTCH PLAINS NOTICE is hereby given that at a meeting of the Township Council of the Township of Scotch Plains, held in the Council Chambers in the Municipal Building of said Township on Tuesday, January 15, 2002, there was introduced, read for the first time, and passed on such first reading, the following ordinance: ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE PRIVATE SALE OF CERTAIN LANDS OWNED BY THE TOWNSHIP OF SCOTCH PLAINS KNOWN AS LOT 15, BLOCK 8903 Purpose to allow the private sale of certain lands owned by the Township known as Lot 15 in Block 8903 (Elizabeth Avenue) to all persons owning real property contiguous thereto pursuant to N.J.S.A. 40A:12-13(b)(5) and N.J.S.A. 40A:12-13.2. A public hearing of same will be held on Tuesday, January 29, 2002 at 8:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers of the Municipal Building, or at any time and place to which a meeting for the further consideration of such ordinance shall from time to time be adjourned, and all persons interested will be given an opportunity to be heard concerning such ordinance. A copy of same may be obtained from the office of the Township Clerk, 430 Park Avenue, Scotch Plains, New Jersey, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday by any member of the general public who wants a copy of same without cost. Barbara Riepe Township Clerk 1 T - 1/17/02, The Times Fee: $33.15

BOROUGH OF FANWOOD PLANNING BOARD The Planning Board of the Borough of Fanwood at their regular meeting on January 23rd after regular business has been conducted it will open up the meeting to the public on the Downtown Redevelopment Plan dated January 2002. This should start about 9 P.M. If additional time is needed it will be carried over to the Agenda meeting on February 18th at 8 P.M. These meetings are held at Borough Hall in the Mayor & Council Chambers, 75 North Martine Avenue, Fanwood, New Jersey. Official action will be taken. Ruth K. Page Secretary Planning Board 1 T - 1/17/02, The Times Fee: $17.34

APARTMENT FOR RENT

Westfield CBD, 2nd Floor, 5 Rooms, 2 Bed & Deck, Completely Remodeled W/D, Dishwasher. $1695 mo. 908-232-2232 Ask for Dave APARTMENT FOR RENT

HOUSE FOR RENT

Offered at $699,900

HELP WANTED

Dental Hygienist, small pleasant private office in Mountainside, looking for personable individual with excellent dental skills. 908-789-2777

PLEASE APPLY IN PERSON TO:

SCOUTING FOR FOOD…Cub Scout Pack No. 270 from Washington Elementary School in Westfield recently participated in the annual “Scouting for Food” program. The cub scouts collected more than 225 bags of canned and packaged goods for the Holy Trinity food pantry, benefiting needy families in Westfield. Pictured are Assistant Cubmaster Allen Dunstan with three second-grade cub scouts.

HELP WANTED

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED Westfield Volunteer Rescue Squad seeks persons willing to train as Emergency Medical Technicians. No prior exp. needed. Valid NJ Driv. Lic., req., min. 4 hrs/wk. We offer 24 hr. coverage. Wkday 9am - 1 pm or 1-5pm slots are perfect for parents of school children. Childcare reimbursement available! Seeks trainees as Dispatchers. Min. 2 hrs./wk. All training provided. Call the Recruiting Team at (908) 233-2500 for details

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PUBLIC NOTICE BOROUGH OF FANWOOD NOTICE OF INTRODUCTION OF ORDINANCE 02-O1-R AND PUBLIC HEARING An ordinance was introduced by the Mayor and Council of the Borough of Fanwood on January 10, 2002. Copies of this ordinance can be obtained without cost at the Fanwood Borough Hall, 75 North Martine Avenue, Fanwood, New Jersey between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. The purpose of this ordinance is to ADOPT A REDEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR THE BLOCK BOUNDED BY SOUTH AVENUE, MARTINE AVENUE, LA GRANDE AVENUE AND SECOND STREET IN THE BOROUGH OF FANWOOD. This ordinance establishes a redevelopment plan for the Borough of Fanwood in accordance with the Local Redevelopment and Housing Law, N.J.S.A. 40A:12A-1, et seq. A public hearing on this ordinance will be held on February 12, 2002, at 8:00 PM. Eleanor McGovern Borough Clerk 1 T - 1/17/02, The Times Fee: $22.95

Ann Foster of Westfield, Ed Mitchell of Fanwood, Kathy Buchanan of South Plainfield, Krystal Hunter of New Brunswick and Carl Williams of Plainfield. Harry Lampon, a retired telephone worker and a member of the first trainee class at CONTACT We Care, was presented with a special award for his more than 3,500 volunteer hours on the hotline. Among the sponsors for the evening were Vicki’s Diner, South Side Bistro, Fuji, Clyne and Murphy, Mojave Grill, AJ’s American Catered Events and Bunches, all of Westfield; Veena Indian Cuisine, Highlander’s Restaurant, Hung’s Shanghai Restaurant, Nuts ’N Plenty, The Swiss Pastry Shoppe, My Town Bakery and Parker Greenhouses, all of Scotch Plains, and The Rice Inn of Fanwood. Others included Raagini of Mountainside, NEELAM in Berkeley Heights and Margie’s Cake Box in Plainfield. Door prizes were provided by Spanish Tavern, Paper Mill Playhouse, Union County Arts Council, the Theatre at Raritan Valley Community College, Brummer’s Chocolates in Westfield and Supplies Supplies in Kenilworth. For more information about CONTACT We Care, please call (908) 490-1480. PUBLIC NOTICE BOROUGH OF FANWOOD PLANNING BOARD Notice is hereby given that the PLANNING BOARD OF THE BOROUGH OF FANWOOD after public hearing granted approval to James Slifer to construct a deck on the property at 64 Portland Avenue, Fanwood, New Jersey being Block 22 Lot 3. Documents pertaining to this application are available for public inspection at Borough Hall during normal business hours. James Slifer 64 Portland Avenue Fanwood, New Jersey 07023 1 T - 1/17/02, The Times Fee: $13.77

PUBLIC NOTICE BOROUGH OF FANWOOD NOTICE OF INTRODUCTION OF ORDINANCE 02-02-R AND PUBLIC HEARING An ordinance was introduced by the Mayor and Council of the Borough of Fanwood on January 10, 2002. Copies of this ordinance can be obtained without cost at the Fanwood Borough Hall, 75 North Martine Avenue, Fanwood, New Jersey between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. The purpose of this ordinance is to AMEND CHAPTER 93 OF THE CODE OF THE BOROUGH OF FANWOOD RELATING TO LAND USE. A public hearing on this ordinance will be held on February 12, 2002, at 8:00 PM. Eleanor McGovern Borough Clerk 1 T - 1/17/02, The Times Fee: $17.85

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A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION

The Westfield Leader and THE TIMES of Scotch Plains – Fanwood

Thursday, January 17, 2002

Page 17

Duendé to Perform At Singer/Songwriter Showcase on Saturday WESTFIELD – Maria Woodford of Westfield and Alex Radus of Flemington, collectively known as Duendé, will perform at The Crossroads on Saturday, January 19, around 9 p.m. in a singer/songwriter showcase. Duendé will join fellow New Jersey musicians, including blues phenomenon Alvin Madison of Scotch Plains, Mike Alick and Robert Matarazzo.

SPECIAL DONATION...Proceeds from “Richard Rodgers: A Centennial Celebration of His Music,” the WYACT/Westfield Symphony Orchestra’s New Year’s Eve Concert, enabled WYACT to donate $3,224 to the United Fund. These monies will be dispersed to the local families who were impacted by the tragedy on September 11 in New York. Handing a check to Executive Director of the United Fund of Westfield, Linda Maggio, are WYACT participants: front row, Rachel Chodor, Sari Solomon, Olivia Ryan, Chana Biner, Ellie Eick, Ms. Maggio, Sarah Bridgeman, Kelli Paterno; second row, Seton, Chelsea Meyers, Josh Hemphill, and, WYACT Artistic Director Cynthia Meryl.

Kiley ‘Gets the Bugs Out’ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 18

LANDSCAPE OF UNION COUNTY...Berkeley Heights photographer and photographic instructor Nancy Ori will exhibit her latest showcase, entitled “Olmsted in Union County” at Reeves-Reed Arboretum in Summit through Monday, May 13.

Berkeley Heights Photographer Chronicles Local Landscaping SUMMIT – Berkeley Heights photographer and photographic instructor Nancy Ori’s latest exhibit,

Pen & Ink CONTINUED FROM PAGE 18

New Jersey, who hit it huge and kept it real, this is the most tragic example of a beautiful voice silenced by the big, bad award. So, what stops most of these artists from proving their staying power? Fear of the sophomore slump. Did you ever do something so well for the first time that, when you’re expected to do it again, you freeze, worried that you’ll never be able to duplicate such perfection? Many have and many of these artists fear the same fate. The contenders for “Best New Artist” in 2002 include India.Arie, who sang with John Cougar Mellancamp on the track, “A Peaceful World;” Linkin’ Park, David Gray, and Nelly Furtado. The aforementioned Keys, who is the industry’s favorite pick, possesses so much promise, so much skill and stick-to-itive-ness that it would be tragically out of tune to give her the award. Duck, Alicia, if you know what’s good for ya.

Artist of Week CONTINUED FROM PAGE 18

fantasy with a flair for perfection in detail. Whether or not there is any true relation between these artistic icons and the Campione family with which I am associated…I like to dream it so that we might all be a chip off the old block.

entitled “Olmsted in Union County,” at Reeves-Reed Arboretum in Summit records the work of Frederick Law Olmsted in local parks and gardens. The show will be on exhibit through Monday, May 13, in Wisner House at Reeves-Reed, which is open from Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. An artist’s reception will be held on Sunday, April 7, from 1 to 4 p.m. Best known as the landscaper who worked with Calvert Vaux to created the sweeping “greensward” look of Central Park, Olmsted also landscaped the park system in Union County. “I feel that these images can make a difference in our community by opening the eyes of residents to the many wonderful natural resources we have in Union County, said Ms. Ori. “The county fathers had such foresight to fight and establish the Union County Park System in the 1920s,” she added. Ms. Ori’s photographs are on display as a showcase for the county’s accomplishments in historic and natural preservation. The photos allow the viewer to explore significant park sites and learn about the rich history of environmental design in the community. Affiliated for many years with the Ansel Adams Workshop in California, Ms. Ori is also on the faculty of the New Jersey Center for Visual Arts in Summit, Peters Valley Craftsmen in Layton, and the Watchung Adult School. In 1990, she established the New Jersey Heritage Photography Workshop, which she holds every spring in Cape May. “Olmsted in Union County” was made possible in part by a HEART Grant in 1998 from the Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders.

WSO Friends Invite Prospective Members to ‘Coffee & Music’

WESTFIELD – The Friends of the Westfield Symphony Orchestra (WSO) will host a coffee on Sunday, January 20, for prospective members. Individuals interest in learning more about the Friends and its 2002 season of activities are invited to attend the reception, which will be held from 2 to 4 p.m. at a member’s home in Westfield.

Fanwood to Fill Winter Months With Ceramics Fun FANWOOD – The Fanwood Recreation Commission will sponsor a ceramics class this winter. Registration for the class will be on Tuesday, January 22, from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Forest Road Park. The classes will begin on Tuesday, February 5, at 7:30 p.m., with the ending date on Tuesday, March 12. All classes are held at Forest Road Park. Marion Yocoski will conduct the classes, as she has done for the past 15 years. The cost for the course is $35 for Fanwood and Scotch Plains residents and $40 for all other residents interested in joining the class. For more information, please call Ms. Yocoski at (908) 322-4219.

The afternoon will include musical performances, including piano selections by Shuang Guo, featured WSO pianist. “We are very proud of the Westfield Symphony, our many gifted professional musicians and our criticallyacclaimed conductor, Maestro David Wroe. We encourage individuals interested in becoming part of an organization that works to encourage greater awareness of this New Jersey musical treasure to find our more about the Symphony Friends on January 20,” stated Deirdre Malacrea, President of Friends. The WSO, now in its 19th season, has been recognized as one of New Jersey’s leading orchestras and serves as the Resident Orchestra of Union County. The Friends support the WSO and its music education and outreach programs through fundraising activities held throughout the year, including the popular Annual Tour of Notable Homes, which will be held on Saturday, May 4. Other scheduled events, according to Ms. Malacrea, include a progressive dinner on Saturday, March 2, and the “Celebrate America” Gala and Auction to be held on Saturday, April 20, at Shackamaxon Country Club. Individuals interested in attending the reception on January 20 should call the Friends Membership Director at (973) 218-1141 for more information.

Get Outta The House By CAROL F. DAVIS Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times

Henrik Ibsen’s An Enemy of the People opens at The Elizabeth Playhouse on January 18, and will run until February 17. The timeless 1882 story seems as fresh as ever as it tells the comic tale of one man’s discovery of an environmental problem — the spa water is polluted — and the subsequent reaction of an entire community. What has this doctor uncovered? See it on Fridays and Saturday at 7:30, and on Sundays at 2 p.m., for just $8 for general admission. The Playhouse is located at 1100 East Jersey Street in Elizabeth, and you can reserve your seats by calling (908) 355-0077. * * * * *

If you want to be in a play, rather than just sit there and watch one, the Mystic Vision Players will hold auditions for The Monogamist on Tuesday, January 29, and Wednesday, January 30, at 7:30 p.m., downstairs at El Bodegon Restaurant, 169 West Main Street, Rahway. The social satire examines art, love, and politics in an ever-changing world of new rules. Michael Driscoll, hailed by The Princeton Packet for two plays last year, will direct this comedy. There will be a variety of roles available — be prepared to read from the script. For more information, you can call (908) 925-9068. * * * * *

Opening on January 18, and on view through February 15, the Skulski Art Gallery of the Polish Foundation will present a group exhibit of landscape and still life paintings, as well as folk sculpture. Various Polish artists will be featured, and the gallery is open Tuesday - Friday, from 59 p.m., and on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. It is located at 177 Broadway in Clark, near Exit 135 of the Garden State Parkway. Call them at (732) 3827197. * * * * *

Westfield’s Presbyterian Church will present The Choral Art Society of New Jersey, Inc. on Saturday, January 19, at 2 p.m. The program will feature the works of three 20th century composers: Daniel Pinkham’s Sinfonia Sacra; Igor Stravinksy’s Symphony of Psalms; and John Rutter’s Gloria. James Little will conduct, with pianist Mary Beth McFall, organist Sandor Szabo, the Choral Art Society Brass Ensemble, and, of course, the chorus. General admission is $15 at the door. Pinkham and Rutter are contemporary composers, and you surely know the name Stravinsky. An additional treat for the audience attending this performance will be several numbers by the Cranford High School Women’s Ensemble, including Nigra Sum by Pablo Casals.

I Hate Hamlet Opens February 8 at CDC CRANFORD – The Cranford Dramatic Club, located at 78 Winans Avenue in Cranford, will present its winter production, I Hate Hamlet, a comedy penned by New Jersey native Paul Rudnick, on Fridays and Saturdays, February 8, 9, 15, 16, 22 and 23. Madge Wittel of Westfield is in charge of props, while Ed Wittel of Westfield is helping out with lighting design and sound. Carole McGee of Westfield will portray Lillian Troy, one of the supporting actors. All tickets are $8. For more information, please call (908) 2767611.

Duendé artists Maria Woodford and Alex Radus will dazzle the stage at The Crossroads in Garwood this Saturday.

Ms. Woodford has explained that the evening will feature a “Bluebird Café” style of performing, with four acts trading off songs. The café, which is located in Nashville, Tenn., has been renowned for the best in acoustic and country music since 1982. As for Duendé, their recentlyreleased, self-titled CD has been met with grand acclaim from music critics and audiences alike. The duo will head West at the end of January.

vertising analyst on Nightline, CNBC, CNN, the Today Show and other television news programs. A 1981 graduate of Westfield High School, Kiley lived within 30 driving minutes of his hometown until 1998. The youngest of six children, he feels he inherited his journalistic talents from his father who was an editor at The New York Herald Tribune and the editor-in-chief of The New York Law Journal. Presently, the author and his wife, Amy, a museum educator, live in Ann Arbor, Mich., where he is the Detroit Bureau Chief at USA Today. By the time this article is published, Mrs. Kiley will have given birth to the couple’s first child. Wherever his work takes him, however, Kiley carries fond memories of Westfield with him.

POPCORN™

Ali: Not Quite The Greatest One Popcorn, Poor • Two Popcorns, Fair • Three Popcorns, Good • Four Popcorns, Excellent By MICHAEL S. GOLDBERGER 2 ½ popcorns

A good percentage of the boxing cognoscenti concur that Muhammad Ali is the greatest. That he is, in his own words, “the greatest of all time.” And as is illustrated in Ali, the new film about the enigmatic champion’s tumultuous but nonetheless illustrious career, Ali was amusingly fond of reminding us of this greatness at every opportunity. Then there are those strict constructionists who insist the rhyming fighter’s popularity was more attributable to his flair for fluff than his actual stuff. They defiantly maintain that the controversial heavyweight champion of the world, who shocked white America by announcing he had become a Black Muslim shortly after gaining the title, couldn’t hold a candle to Joe Louis. Then, though in continually diminishing numbers, there are those who still hold that Rocky Marciano was the best. A short list of other worthies headed by Jack Dempsey collects the remaining votes. Personally, I think my dad could have licked them all. Yet regardless of whether or not Ali was indeed the greatest, the unfortunate news here is that director Michael Mann’s Ali is not. Hold on before you entirely count out this often entertaining film biography. There’s a very skillful Will Smith in the title role. And Jon Voight as Howard Cosell practically defies description. Good or bad (you be the judge), Voight’s etching of the famed sports announcer is a filmic delicacy all its own. Achieving a striking physicality, Smith’s interpretation of the former Cassius Clay, also known as The Louisville Slugger, is proof again that he can bob and weave amidst the ranks of heavyweight thespians. One senses the strength that the fighter can instantly summon, the ready danger in his fists. With a somewhat lesser enchantment, Smith realizes the wisecracking, silver-tongued thorn in conventional society’s side that Ali came to represent. The fight sequences, from the first Sonny Liston encounter through the fraught-with-symbolism rumble in the jungle in Zaire with George Foreman, are effectively recreated. But if you’re looking for a boxing movie per se, skip it. None of Ali is as exhilarating as what Scorsese and De Niro wrought in Raging Bull (1980). Director Mann’s semi-documentary recapitulation of the champ’s travails following his refusal to be inducted into the army during the Vietnam War, coupled with all the pertinent dates and domestic tragedies, perfunctorily plays like the standard boilerplate of 1960s history we’ve come to know. But by now we’re practically immune. Oliver Stone seared our brains with it in JFK (1991). A bit more soul with the civics lesson, which takes a surface peek into Elijah Muhammad’s Nation of Islam as well as the F.B.I.’s attempts to exert its influence on current events, might have perched Ali above the

CYAN YELLOW MAGENTA BLACK

small crowd of movies claiming the last word on the subject. This includes The Greatest (1977), a fairly decent, albeit unusual chronicling with Ali playing himself. Though lacking in style and depth, a nervy present-mindedness gave it a curiously unique validity. However, most disappointing about director Mann’s interpretation of Steven J. Rivele’s scr eenplay (adapted from Gregory Allen Howard’s story) is the lack of new information, especially about the title character himself. Granted, as Ali reiterates, the man’s place in history, his legacy as a civil rights advocate and once martyred exile, is indelibly written. But the question persists. Aside from being the World Champion and international media presence, who was Ali? Sure, we’re all familiar with boxing’s answer to Ogden Nash, who coined “Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee” (actually the invention of corner man Drew “Bundini” Brown). We chuckled at his numerous examples of prognosticating verse, which more often than not brazenly warned his opponents that certain behaviors would result in a speedier toppling (i.e.-About Doug Jones: “Jones likes to mix, so I’ll let it go six. But if he talks jive, I’ll cut it to five,” etc.). And to a somewhat lesser extent we’re cognizant of the religious Ali. Seemingly intent on perfecting his faith, in this film the prizefighter is forthcoming about his weaknesses, especially when it comes to women. The rise and fall of his marriages are delineated in basic detail. But about the actual man behind the icon, there is a blank. All of which either prompts us to surmise that there is an inner Ali that we will never know, or worse, in the words of Peggy Lee, leads us to wonder, is that all there is? Fact is, the film has a built-in problem. And that’s us. We have previously been warned not to expect too much of our heroes. So we question. Have we ultimately attributed too much myth to this famous jock? Certainly it should be enough of an accomplishment to show undaunted courage in over 60 fights and during three decades of public life. It’s quite something to be remembered for your bold convictions and witty ways of proclaiming them. But that’s a given. We learned all that in “Muhammad Ali No. 101.” And now, because of Ali’s debilitating illness, we feel cheated out of the senior statesman/raconteur we might have enjoyed long after his fighting power flagged. Being the insatiably fickle public, we want more. But aside from treating us to Voight’s quasi-caricature, curiosity piece portrayal of Cosell and Smith’s obviously dedicated performance, Mann’s Ali lacks the novel punch it needs to be a bona fide knockout. * * * * * Ali, rated R, is a Columbia Pictures release directed by Michael Mann and stars Will Smith, Jon Voight and Jada Pinkett Smith. Running time: 158 minutes.

“There are favorite streets (in Westfield) that I always drive down every time I come back. Lawrence Avenue and Tremont are my favorites. I love the houses on both those streets,” he stated in an online interview. A recent book signing at The Town Book Store in Westfield had a few surprises in store for the author. “I was so thrilled when some of my teachers came to my signing. Jane Sterling, Karin Ninesling Infuso, my eighth grade teacher and Karen Kashiack, one of my sixth grade teachers came,” reported Kiley. Sterling and Infuso are mentioned in the book’s introduction, along with the late Richard Veit, a beloved seventh grade geography teacher. All drove Volkswagen Beetles. The author credits his teachers for instilling in him a love of the car, one of which he himself owned by the time he was in college. “Getting the Bugs Out: The Rise, Fall and Comeback of Volkswagen in America” is published by John Wiley & Sons and is available at area bookstores as well as by calling (800) 225-5945.

My Take on It CONTINUED FROM PAGE 18

recently and he pointed out exactly what time of day “The Little Rascals” were on. He knew precisely what channel and what times, yes plural, that one could sit back and spend some time with Spanky and the rest of Our Gang. This is also a man who is known to watch reruns of “Little House on the Prairie.” A 35-year-old man watching “The Little Rascals” and “Little House.” Brilliant. It warms my soul. The success of “The Brady Bunch” movies still baffles critics, and if you tune in to NBC on weekday mornings, Danny Bonaduce (Partridge) is co-hosting a talk show with Dick Clark. I still think Gene Rayburn is a hoot, and I’d rather party with Richard Dawson and Charles Nelson Reilly than with some of the current vapid Barbie Dolls who call themselves entertainers. It is impossible to turn back the hands of time. And again, I know that the strides we have made in entertainment and technology are incredible. But, still. There is nothing quite so comforting as taking a journey back to an uncontaminated time. It’s like mom’s Friday night macaroni and fish-sticks for the soul. Chicken Soup. Homemade brownies. Pillow fights with your sister. Crying yourself silly over Hallmark commercials. Innocence. I tell you, if I had a choice between being Dark Angel or HalfPint for a day, I’d choose Half-Pint. Definitely.

Bronna Butler CONTINUED FROM PAGE 18

shared their connection with the painting and their personal experiences with the tragedy. When asked how the painting has changed her life, Butler replied, “I never expected men to connect with the painting. I wanted to comfort people. I wanted the painting to appeal to everyone. I’ve met firemen who have lost five of their closest friends. I’ve heard about finding body parts. I have found the firemen, and women, and the members of the police department, and all the volunteers a remarkable group of people. For me ‘The Rescue’ was a remarkable experience.”

The New E-mail For A&E News is: [email protected]

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Thursday, January 17, 2002

The Westfield Leader and THE TIMES of Scotch Plains – Fanwood

A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION

Author of VW Bug Book Has Soft Spot For Westfield Roots

Artist of the WWeek eek

Maestri Campionesi (12th-14th Century) By MICHELLE H. Le POIDEVIN Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times

Not long ago, I became puzzled by a dream about a foreign place filled with sculptures, tombstones, and large castles, all carved painstakingly out of earth. Somehow, the structures were connected to my family, but like so many of my dreams, there was no true meaning. Just, mindless, midnight wanderings. Until I stumbled upon a piece of history that might have united the missing pieces into some semblance of genealogical truth. For, in the 12th century, a group of artists from Italy, bearing my grandfather’s name, “Campione,” was responsible for constructing and sculpting some of the most remarkable buildings, sarcophagi, and mansions in Europe. Pretty eerie, huh? Especially when you consider that my greatgrandfather, Giuseppe Campione, came to the United States as a stonemason. Trained in workshops in Arles, France (where the great Vincent van Gogh produced some of his most fruitful artwork), the artisans have been called “The Maestri Campionesi” in all of the college textbooks. After studying in France, the Campionesi packed up their pen-

chant for Early Christian artistry and moved to Northern Italy, later migrating to Switzerland and Austria. In 1376, one of the more famous members, Bonino da Campione, was asked to sculpt the resting place of Cangrande della Scalla in Verona, Italy. All was not always morbid for the clan, however. They were more renowned for their creation of an amazing rose window on the façade of a magnificent cathedral of Duomo in Modena, as well as the Porta Regia on Piazza Grande, upon which lions and botanical themes are intertwined with marble. Later, between 1261 and 1319, Arrigo da Campione was responsible for the design of an intricate and lacy octagonal spire in the cathedral’s tower. Giovanni da Campione and Anselmo da Campione also contributed greatly to the reputation of these sculptors, who incorporated religion and Continued on Page 17

By MARYLOU MORANO Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times

WESTFIELD — Two things grace a shelf in the Michigan office of former Westfield resident David Kiley. Both are sentimentally tied to Westfield. One is a brick from the demolished Grant School. The other is a painted rock recently given to him by Jane Sterling, his second grade teacher. The rock resembles the yellow Volkswagon Beetle Cabrio driven by Sterling when Kiley was in elementary school. A lifelong love affair with the Volkswagon Beetle has inspired Kiley to pen “Getting the Bugs Out: the Rise, Fall and Comeback of Volkswagen in America.” The book chronicles the roller coaster ride experienced by Volkswagen of America during the last few decades of the 20th century. In the 1970s, Volkswagen of America held a 5 percent market share of the American auto industry. By 1990, it had dropped to 0.5 percent. Competition by Toyota and Honda and Washington’s tougher safety standards contributed to the decline. “Getting the Bugs Out” narrates the story of the Beetle’s origin and how the car’s name became synonymous with Volkswagen. The Beetle’s prototype, the Volksauto, was commissioned by Adolph Hitler as the

“people’s car” and sculpted by prominent automobile designer Frederick Porshe. In the United States in the late 1970’s, the Volkswagen endeared itself to first time car buyers, becoming the beloved means of transportation for a generation that espoused antiwar protestors, hippies and w o m e n ’ s libbers. The car’s charm and a ff o r d a b i l i t y compensated for its lack of horsepower. More than a history of a product or company, however, “Getting the Bugs Out” is a lesson in the decisions that make or break a business. With engrossing text and easy to understand language, Kiley explains Volkswagen’s underestimation of the Beetle’s brand name recognition. The book explains Volkswagen’s inability to profitably manufacture cars in the United States, and the role management played in the car producer’s demise and subsequent reincarnation with the New Beetle. Students of marketing and advertising will learn how fresh advertising campaigns brought back the New Beetle and saved the company in the United States. Kiley has been covering the auto industry for 15 years. He has been featured as an automotive and adContinued on Page 17

“The Rescue” by Mountainside resident Bronna A. Butler, oil painting, 24 x 36.

Bronna A. Butler’s ‘The Rescue’: Painting What Can’t Be Seen By MILLICENT K. BRODY Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times

MOUNTAINSIDE — When the horrifics of September 11 took place, Mountainside resident Bronna A. Butler wished she were a nurse. Then she wished she were a construction worker. Then she wished she could operate huge excavation equipment. “When the Twin Towers collapsed, my heart fell with them. Like millions of people, I wanted to desperately help those struggling. After telephoning the American Red Cross,

“‘The Rescue’ was painted to provide an alternative image to the many brilliant, though horrific photos of the September 11 attack on the World Trade Center. ‘The Rescue’s’ image is symbolic — it is not what the human eye would see. It is meant to show what the human spirit would feel. Even though our loved ones, heroes and heroines were not rescued as we had hoped, they were rescued.” Bronna A. Butler Mountainside

completed. Deciding “The Rescue” might be comforting to the families attending the Ground Zero Family Memorial Service, Butler and her husband, Michael, loaded up the 24 x 36 oil painting and headed into New York City. First stop Pier 94. With security naturally tight, a crowd immediately formed around “The Rescue” at the door. After being interviewed by Susan Kessler, a Red Cross Volunteer for Public Affairs, it was concluded that the Family Assistance Center was the place for the painting. At that time, Butler donated the painting to the Red Cross, where it has been quietly comforting family members and volunteers since that day. On Sunday, October 28, the City of New York held its multi-denominational Family Memorial Service at Ground Zero for families of the victims. At that time, urns filled with ashes from the site of Ground Zero were presented to loved ones. “Many of the family members stopped in front of the painting that Sunday, and e-mailed and telephoned me to express their feeling about ‘The Rescue,’” she said. “Most felt a sense of comfort from the image of the spiritual figure grasping the hand of the partially transparent figure/ soul of the victim, and pulling it out of the smoke filled window of the former World Trade Center.” Returning to Pier 94 on three different days Butler signed and distributed over 2,000 postcards of the painting. During those days many volunteers and family members of victims Continued on Page 17

to the universe,” she continued. Laying down the first smudge of paint on the canvas, Butler had no idea that the painting would eventually become an important point of comfort for grieving relatives at the Pier 94 Family Assistance Center. The strong handclasp that anBy Michelle H. Le Poidevin chors the middle of the painting, evokes yet stronger images for the firemen who wait patiently at Pier 94, for widows of fellow firefighters to come to the assisMillicent K. Brody for The Westfield Leader and The Times tance center for help. MOVING PICTURE...Bronna Butler of “The people who have been By MICHELLE H. Le POIDEVIN Mountainside with her original oil paint- drawn to the photograph are from Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times ing, “The Rescue.” all religious backgrounds,” she There’s a frightening blight on our musical society today and said. someone has to put an end to it. Develop a vaccine, make a patch to curb I discovered I had to be trained in By October 25, the painting was it. For years, the malady has been spreading out of control to some of disaster relief. No matter where I the most promising artists in the industry. Once this dastardly label is turned, I realized I could not find much comfort without some actual attached to them, it’s one giant trip hands-on assistance. I found a great down the ski slope to the place deal of solace attending the candlemany musicians fear to tread – the light service in Westfield,” she said. W I T H K ERRIANNE S PELLMAN C ORT end of those 15 minutes of fame. “One afternoon after returning Better known as the Grammy Award from a memorial service at the Mountainside Presbyterian Church, for “Best New Artist.” I felt a complete pull toward Ground With the exception of the Fab Zero,” Butler stated. Four in 1965, very few of the artists But thoughts and urges weren’t By KERRIANNE SPELLMAN CORT families working their problems out and ensembles that received this Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times enough. Wanting to desperately help with gentle, loving conversation and award on Grammy night went beFANWOOD — Long before the not through therapists or the court victims of the terrorist attack, her heart went out to the relatives of horrific events of September 11, system. yond this milestone. After The people with loved ones mercilessly which, almost mockingly forced us Yes, the Brady’s had a tendency to Beatles took it come in 1965, Carly all to slow down and take a look at trapped in the buildings. fall into pollyannaism, but weren’t Simon in 1972, and Crosby, Stills “I struggled with how to help and what is most important in life … they just so cool? I still have a crush & Nash in 1970, it’s all been downhow to deal with the great sorrow hadn’t there already been a slow, on Jan. Wait, did I say that? I meant hill from there. In fact, many music that had descended upon all of us,” subtle change in our way of think- Peter. ing? she said. critics consider it a curse – and if Is it just me, or is anyone else Influenced by Pope John Paul, II, the amazing piano playing vocalist feeling that intangible pull back in who said in a letter to artists, “May Lauryn Hill Alicia Keys doesn’t duck soon, it’s your art help to affirm that true beauty, time…back to our childhood, when about to hit her too. which as a glimmer of the Spirit of life was simpler, quieter and safe? Consider the awful realities of Our worst problems ranged from God, will transfigure matter, opening the human soul to the sense of the trying to ace an algebra test to decidmusical genius stunted before its ing what color velour sweater to eternal.” time: wear to the powder-puff football Butler picked up her paintbrush • Bette Midler (1974) – her real and strove to paint what could not be game. Broken hearts and skinned comeback was “Wind Beneath My photographed and what could not be knees were easily washed away with Wings,” but that’s about it. seen with the literal eye. Feeling the a gentle kiss from mom and nothing, image first, of the spiritual hand nothing was more exciting than stay• Sheena Easton (1982) – With reaching out, firmly but gently to ing at home on a Friday night eating “My Baby Takes the Morning grasp the hand of the soul, and pull it macaroni and cheese and watching Train,” she did a brief musical stint back to the eternal, she painted a “The Partridge Family.” with Prince and even that couldn’t Oh, but to go back in time…if only strong entity. be considered successful CPR. “The spiritual figure whose strong for a little while. The media, of course, has always hand grasps the hand of a partially • Cyndi Lauper (1985) – “Time been a strong indicator of our collectransparent person to pull the person After Time” we remember a multiAlicia Keys tive consciousness. With the success up and out, is intentionally vague,” color haired outrageous gal who kindler, gentler time in television Butler said. “I don’t know who the of such network and cable stations A writing and programming, as exhibnever got to show us her “True Colors.” such as Nick at Nite, The Game Show spiritual figure is, but whoever looks ited in “Little House on the Prairie.” • Bruce Hornsby & The Range (1987) – That may be just “The Way at it will usually know.” Network and American Movie Clas“I felt the grasp and spirit of the sics, isn’t it becoming increasingly It Is,” but even “Mandolin Rain” couldn’t keep these guys afloat. tragedy,” she added. “I felt the eter- obvious that we are desperately tryFor Christmas this year, I bought • Arrested Development (1993) – They traveled to “Tennessee” and ing to hold on to some semblance of nal grasp of the rescuer. I felt the pull my husband “The Brady Bunch Trivia never came back to give us more to play on our boom boxes. of the hand back to eternity, to heaven innocence? Book,” which he loved. I ordered it Yes, we have come a long way from a catalogue and it was no sur•Hootie & The Blowfish (1996) technically, scientifically and per- prise to me when the operator told – The dudes topped the charts 5(*,67(512: sonally. This is fascinating, awe-in- me it was on back order for at least with “I Only Want to Be With spiring and even necessary. Still, my three weeks and might not make it in You” and put us to sleep with nieces and nephew are growing up in time for Christmas. “Tucker’s Town.” We never got to a world that is a technological whirl“It’s just so popular,” she laughed. of wind and it breaks my heart to see hear them evolve into more than Along with the trivia book, my children being ridiculed today if they husband also received a Wooly-Willy just a laid back bunch of crooners. don’t own the latest Playstation or T-shirt. Remember Wooly-Willy? • Paula Cole (1998) – Never computer game. The blank faced guy trapped under mind “Where Have All the CowA recent two-hour “Brady Bunch” plastic that you could give crazy hair Classes for ALL ages and levels boys Gone?” – where’s your comeretrospective got me thinking about and a beard to with a little wand? Livingston all of this. It was a Sunday night and Wooly-Willy is right up there with back? We’d like to hear it. countless other programs were on, Etch-a-Sketch and Mr. Potato-Head. • Lauryn Hill (1999) – Perhaps Morristown Somerville but “The Brady Bunch” got our at- Genius. FREE the most talented musician from tention. I was glued to the screen. It Trial Class I was talking to a friend of mine  RU  was such a welcome change to watch Continued on Page 17 for NEW students Continued on Page 17

Pen & Ink

Desper ately Seeking the V accine to Cure Desperately Vaccine The Deadly Plague of ‘Best Ne w Artist’ New

MY TAKE ON IT

Re-Runs Provide Much-Needed Journey Down Memory Lane

New Jersey

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