1812 GRIMM'S FAIRY TALES THE PEASANT AND - PinkMonkey.com

1812 GRIMM'S FAIRY TALES THE PEASANT AND - PinkMonkey.com

1 1812 GRIMM’S FAIRY TALES THE PEASANT AND THE DEVIL Jacob Ludwig Grimm and Wilhelm Carl Grimm Grimm, Jacob (1785-1863) and Wilhelm (1786-1859) - Ger...

7KB Sizes 0 Downloads 7 Views

Recommend Documents

Grimms' Fairy Tales - Planet Publish
but a little way, he came to a wood, and by the side of the wood he saw a fox sitting; so he took his bow and made ....

1812 GRIMM'S FAIRY TALES THE DITMARSCH - PinkMonkey.com
Grimm, Jacob (1785-1863) and Wilhelm (1786-1859) - German philologists whose collection “Kinder- und Hausmarchen,” k

Grimms' Fairy Tales - Tri-National Seminar
KHM 28: The Singing Bone (Der singende Knochen). •. KHM 29: The ... KHM 88: The Singing, Springing Lark (Das singende sp

1812 grimm's fairy tales the hut in the forest - PinkMonkey.com
about in the forest until night, and then she, too, reached the house of the old man, was ... At length when it grew dar

FAIRY TALES AND TALL TALES
Today's tall tale is interesting because for a very long time, no one knew if the character John Henry was a real person

1812 GRIMM'S FAIRY TALES THE OLD WITCH - PinkMonkey.com
The Old Witch. (1812) - A disobedient girl goes to see an old witch despite her ... through your window, and saw not you

FAIRY TALES
Red” and the recent Little Red Riding Hood movie with Amanda Seyfried deal with Perrault's original concern about pred

1812 GRIMM'S FAIRY TALES HANS IN LUCK - PinkMonkey.com
heard Hans say this, and called out to him, “Well Hans, what are you doing on foot?” “I can't help myself,” said

Fairy Tales, Folk Tales, Tall Tales and Puppets! - cccoe.net
The idea: Students will read fairy, folk and tall tales and identify story elements. They will learn about and write the

1

1812 GRIMM’S FAIRY TALES THE PEASANT AND THE DEVIL Jacob Ludwig Grimm and Wilhelm Carl Grimm Grimm, Jacob (1785-1863) and Wilhelm (1786-1859) - German philologists whose collection “Kinder- und Hausmarchen,” known in English as “Grimm’s Fairy Tales,” is a timeless literary masterpiece. The brothers transcribed these tales directly from folk and fairy stories told to them by common villagers. The Peasant and the Devil (1812) - A peasant tells the Devil that he will give him what grows above ground and only keep for himself what lies below. After the crafty peasant plants turnips, the angry Devil tries to get even.

PEASANT AND DEVIL

THERE WAS once on a time a far-sighted, crafty peasant whose tricks were much talked about. The best story is, however, how he once got hold of the Devil and made a fool of him. The peasant had one day been working in his field, and as twilight had set in, was making ready for the journey home, when he saw a heap of burning coals in the middle of his field, and when, full of astonishment, he went up to it, a little black devil was sitting on the live coals. “Thou dost indeed sit upon a treasure!” said the peasant. “Yes, in truth”; replied the Devil, “on a treasure which contains more gold and silver than thou hast ever seen in thy life!” “The treasure lies in my field and belongs to me,” said the peasant. “It is thine,” answered the Devil, “if thou wilt for two years give me the half of everything thy field produces. Money I have enough of, but I have a desire for the fruits of the earth.” The peasant agreed to the bargain. “In order, however, that no dispute may arise about the division,” said he, “everything that is above ground shall belong to thee, and what is under the earth to me.” The Devil was quite satisfied with that, but the cunning peasant had sown turnips. Now when the time for harvest came, the Devil appeared and wanted to take away his crop; but he found nothing but the yellow withered leaves, while the peasant, full of delight, was digging up his turnips. “Thou hast had the best of it for once,” said the Devil, “but the next time that won’t do. What grows above ground shall be thine, and what is under it, mine.” “I am willing,” replied the

2

peasant; but when the time came to sow, he did not again sow turnips, but wheat. The grain became ripe, and the peasant went into the field and cut the full stalks down to the ground. When the Devil came, he found nothing but the stubble, and went away in a fury down into a cleft in the rocks. “That is the way to cheat the Devil,” said the peasant, and went and fetched away the treasure. THE END