1974 | City of Milwaukee

1974 | City of Milwaukee

TABLE OF CONTENTS GENERAL SECTION 1 Chief's Letter 7 Retirements- In Memoriam 2 Fire and Police Commission 8-18 Citations ( 13 & 14 photos) ...

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TABLE OF CONTENTS GENERAL SECTION

1

Chief's Letter

7

Retirements- In Memoriam

2

Fire and Police Commission

8-18

Citations ( 13 & 14 photos)

3

Organization Chart

19

In Memoriam

4

District Data & Index of Offenses, Traffic Accidents and Missing Persons by District

20-27

Awards of Merit to Citizens (22 & 23 photos)

28-29

Police Academy

5 6

City Map of Police Districts

30

Harbor Patrol

11

Vehicle Thefts

Promotions

STATISTICS SECTION

Off~mses

Reported - .27 Largest .Cities ·

1

Major

2 3 4

Major Crimes- Offenses Known to Police

12

Police Vehicles

Annual Report of Arrests -Adult & Juvenile

13

Positions and Salaries - Personnel Changes

Age, Race, and Sex of .Persons Arrested Under 18

14

Overtime Disbursement- By Purpose

5-6

Age, Race, and Sex of Persons Arrested Age 18 and Ov-er

15

Fiscal Operations

7-lO

Motor Vehicle Traffic Accidents (8 photo)

749 'J'EST STATE. STREET • POLICE .ADM.INISTRATIOH BUILDING MILWAUkEE, WISCONSIN 53233 HAROlD A. BREIER

CM.fof ,or,.. ,

IN H'lY tHU TO ,

The Honorable Henry W. Maier, Mayor The Honorable Common Council City of Milwaukee Milwaukee, Wisconsin Gentlemen: I am privileged to submit the 197 4 Annual Report of the CITY OF MILWAUKEE POLICE DEPARTMENT. The report reflects the efforts of all police personnel to provide efficient service to the citizens of our community. Your support and cooperation is gratefully acknowledged. Respectfully submitted,

tN~.~ HAROLD A. BREIER CHIEF OF POLICE HAB:RTW

HAROto CHIEF OF-!· BREIER rOLICE

FIRE AND POLICE COMMISSION Five citizens serve five-year terms, one term expiring annually in July. Appointments are made by the Mayor, subject to Common Council approval. The Commission annually selects one of its members to serve as chairman and the Commission appoints its own Secretary.

Chairman William I. Gore Appointed: June, 1973 Present Term Expires: July, 1978

2

Gilbert Jewell Appointed: N.ov., 1974 Present Tenp Expires: July, .1979

Charles W. Mentkowski Appointed: Dec., 1968 Present Term Expires: July, 1977

Marjorie L. Marshall Appointed: Jan., 1969 Term Expires: July , 1976

Arlene Kennedy Executive Secretary andChief Examiner Appointed By Commission: July, 1969

John Giacomo Appointed: Nov., 1971 Present Term Expires: July, 1975

FIRE & POLICE

CITY OF MILWAUKEE POLICE DEPARTMENT COMMAND AND ORCiANIZATION CHART

COMMON COUNCIL

SPECIAL ASSIGNMENT SQUAD

COMMISSION

BUREAU OF INTERNAL AFFAIRS

CHIEF OF POLICE

CAPTAIN

DEPUTY INSPECTOR

FIELD INSPECTION DEPUTY INSPECTORS

VICE SQUAD CAPTAIN

YOUTH AID BUREAU CAPTAIN CAPTAIN& CLERICAL PERSONNEL

DOCUMENT EXAMINATION

CAPTAIN Be INSTRUCTORS COMMUNI CATIONS SUPERINTENDENT

TRAINING TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT MOTORCYCLES

GENERAL INVESTIGATION

FINGERPRINT RECORDS

PERSONNEL RECRUIT AND IN -SERVICE

PHOTOGRAPHY SPECIAL SQUADS AS AUTO, SAFE, ROBBERY Be ETC.

PARKING ENFORCEMENT MOTORCYCLES

SCIENTIFIC INVESTIGATION

CLERICAL DIVISION

PARKING ENFORCEMENT SERVI-CYCLES

RADIO DISPATCH

FIREARMS INSTRUCTION MAINTENANCE INSPECTION OF UNIFORMS EQUIPMENT

INTERSECTION CONTROL-POST

AUXILIARY POLICE CIVIL DEFENSE

BUDGET Be PURCHASES

RADIO REPAIRS

BUILDING Be GROUNDS

TELETYPE RELAY

LICENSE CONTROL

TELEPHONE SWITCHBOARD MAIL SERVICES

ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION

BUSINESS OFFICE

VEHICLES PRINTING

SPECIAL SERVICES STORES

ACCIDENT RECORDS

RATING SYSTEM

FINES COLLECTION

UNDERWATER INVESTIGATION UNIT

NIGHT PARKING CONTROL

COURTS MEDICAL DATA SERVICES

TRAFFIC ENGINEERINGLIAISON

EACH DISTRICT STATION PROVIDES WITHIN ITS AREA THE FOLLOWING SERVICES: FOOT PATROL

MOBILE PATROL

PRISONER CONFINEMENT (UNTIL COURT APPEARANCE I

AMBULANCE SERVICE (EMERGENCYI

CRIME PREVENTION

FINES COLLECTION

SPECIAL COURT DUTIES WATER AND HARBOR PATROL

INVESTIGATION OF COMPLAINTS

OTHER POLICE SERVICES

3

DISTRICT DATA & INDEX OF OFFENSES, TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS AND MISSING PERSONS BY DISTRICT TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS

PERSONS REPORTED MISSIN
TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS REPORTED BY DISTRICTS 1974 ADULT JUVENILE DISTRICTS TOTAL RETURN MALE FEMALE MALE FEMALE DISTRICT

INJURY

FATAL

FIRST SECOND THIRD FOURTH FIFTH

PROPERTY DAMAGE OVER $200.00

PROPERTY DAMAGE UNDER $200.00

TOTAL

10

944

2112

1416

4482

7

908

1937

1158

4010

B

678

1647

6

769

1744

4814

6

824

1759

873

3462

SEVENTH

13

1221

2879

1273

5386

YEARLY TOTAL

59

6557

14412

7696

28724

SIXTH

480

62

38

241

157

731

55

45

302

368

1T36

1094

39

45

441

611

740

724

21

33

270

416

FIFTH

1186

1159

40

33

363

750

SIXTH

931

912

34

46

382

469

1077

1047

38

41

401

597

TOTAL AS OF DECEMBER 1974 6338

6147

289

281

2400

3368

FOURTH

3277

1258

498 770

THIRD

3293

758

2334

1213

9

960

FIRST SECOND

SEVENTH

REPORTED MISSING RETURNED OR LOCATED PENDING CASES

NOTE : DOES NOT INCLUDE PRIVATE PROPERTY ACCIDENTS

OFFENSES KNOWN TO POLICE

DISTRICT DATA

CRIMINAL OFFENSES REPORTED BY DISTRICTS 1974

DISTRICT FIRST

9305

HOM.

RAPE

13

51

ROBB. 322

AGG. BATT. 150

BURG.

THEFT

AUTO THEFT

BATTERY

THEFT FR. AUTO

SEX OFFS.

CRIM. DAM. TO PROP.

884

2529

790

432

1574

55

718

1970 CENSUS VICE

ALL OTHER

713

1074

SQUARE MILEAGE

YEAR BUILT

CONSTRUCTION COST

No. 1

54,939

4.99

1971

$6,300,000

No. 2

103,523

15.35

1953

$ 340,000

$ 135,000

SECOND

5673

16

113

69

681

1440

837

246

823

62

839

151

395

No. 3

81,868

7.97

1937

THIRD

4963

9

28

249

120

707

1421

618

192

591

42

384

233

369

No. 4

103,547

28.07

1964

$ 345,686

FOURTH

5090

4

11

84

46

580

1381

522

230

897

43

712

98

482

No.5

105,804

7.96

1960

$ 554,400

FIFTH

8894

21

56

391

230

1612

2111

894

476

114 1

69

868

468

557

No.6

121,670

15.43

1927

$

85,248

SIXTH

4678

4

12

95

57

621

1215

537

277

726

75

651

105

303 No. 7

145,748

16.00

1928

$

84,980

TOTALS:

717,099

SEVENTH YEARLY TOTAL

4

TOTAL

6338 6147 191

8788

10

22

393

155

1587

2468

895

336

934

62

917

217

792

47391

62

196

1647

827

6672

12565

5093

2189

6686

408

5089

1985

3972

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SOUTH 16th STREET

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5

PROMOTIONS

TO: FROM:

LeRoy A. Jahnke TO: FROM :

DETECTIVE, LEGAL & ADMINISTRATIVE POLICE SERGEANT John J. Mahlberg

TO: FROM:

6

3-10-74 3-24-74

6-09-74

DETECTIVE POLICE PATROLMAN David Sl iwinski Richard C. Luedke Robert A. Schneider Ernest R . Zwicke James D. Perlewitz David B. Clemence Eugene L . Brown Robert Bus ka Kenneth K. Dobesh R alph Jurasinski

2-10-74 3- 10-7 4 3-24-74 4-07-74 5-05-7 4 5-19-7 4 6-23-74 6-23-74 6-23-74 9-08-74

TO: FROM :

6-09-74

TO: FROM :

3-24-74 7-14-74 9-22-74 9 -22-74

TO: FROM:

TO : FROM :

7-1 4-7 4

C LERK TYPIST II CLERK TYPIST I Christ ine Roseberry Joni Jel inski

TO : FROM:

7-28-74

CLERK STENOGRAPHER Ill CLERK STENOGRAPHER II Sharon Warzala

TO: FROM:

12-08-74

GARAGE ATTENDANT CUSTODIAL WORKER II Carl A. Frank

TO : FROM:

6-09-74

CLERK IV CLERK TYPIST Ill Glo ria Ciezki

4-21-74 4-21-74 4-21-74 4-21-74 4-21-74 4-21-74 4-21-74 4-21-74 4-21-74 4-21-74 4-21-74 4-21-74 4- 21-74 4-21 -74 4-21 -74 9-08-74 9-08-74 9-08-74 9-08-74

5-05-74

MAINTENANCE MECHANIC GARAGE ATTENDANT Jerome E. Tracy

TO: FROM:

9-08-74 9-08-74 9-08-74 9-08-74 9-08-74 9-08-74 9-08-74 9-08-74 9-08-74 9-08-74

HEATING & VENTILATING MECHANIC I MAINTENANCE MECHANIC Herbert Conners

POLICE PATROLMAN POLICE AIDE Vincent Bobot Patrick H . Cieslik Thomas A . Ditscheit John Knappmiller Dwayne K. Koltermann Robert D. Krueger Jack 0. Lemke Robert Marczewski Larry R. Martin Craig H. Martinez Charles J. Myszkowski David A. Richardson Timothy A. Roddy Alan E. Seer John B. Wieseler John Buss David Conroy Greg C. Dobratz Denn is L. Drazkowsk i

POLICE PATROLMAN POLICE AIDE Gary E. Edman Charles A. Homa Dav id Huckstep Dale M. Jackson Joseph Lenarchich James A. Matt James Miller Thomas R. O'Grosky John Pedersen Stephen R. Tank

3-24-74 4-21-74 4-21-74 5-19-74 5-19-74 7-14-74 9-08-74

POLICE ALARM OPERATOR POLICE PATROLMAN Richard Repka Edmund Duzynski Michael R . Chubeck Robert L . Somogji

4-07-74

TO : FROM :

ADMINISTRATIVE POLICE SERGEANT POLICE PATROLMAN Elmer A . Beste

LIEUTENANT OF DETECTIVES DETECTIVE Ralph Brown Ronald R. Mehl

TO: FROM :

TO : FROM:

TO: FROM :

RADIO MECHANIC FOREMAN RADIO MECHANIC Keith Mciver

TO : FROM:

3-24-74 4-21-74 9-22-7 4

POLICE SERGEANT POLICE PATROLMAN Marvin Labeck i Alfonso J. Graham Thomas W. Hartman Cary J. Cameron Earl Marshall Paul Hoch Gerald Laskowski

3-10-74

CAPTAIN OF POLICE LIEUTENANT OF POLICE Raymond Beste Ralph J. Moder R ichard A . Noennig

TO : FROM:

4-21-74

CAPTAIN OF POLICE LIEUTENANT OF DETECTIVES Leo Gorlewski

TO: FROM:

TO : FROM:

DEPUTY INSPECTOR OF POLICE CAPTAIN OF POLICE

3-10-74 7-14-74

CLERK TYPIST II CLERKSTENOGRAPHER I Dian J. T rudell

7-14-7 4

RETIREMENTS RANK Police Patrolman Police Patrolman Detective Police Patrolman Lieutenant of Detectives Police Alarm Operator Captain of Police Police Patrolman Detective Police Ser~eant Detective Police Patrolman Police Patrolman Police Patrolman

NAME Stanley Szczepanski Ralph- A . Cox Peter J. Kuzniewski Walter Opolak Richard Polsen Alois Machnik Lewis R _Ohde Edward L. Fri.tz Robert H. Cash Robert G . Paasch Michael Collins Howard R . Senn Kenneth H . .Siiafier Herbert Leiske

RETIRED 1-10-74 1-12-74 1-28-74 2-10-74 3-18-74 3-19-74 3-21-74 4-09-74 5-01-74 5-09-74 5-16-74 5-29-74 5-31-74 6-08-74

APPOINTED

YEARS OF SERVtCE

11-29-45 7-08-40 5-13-46 5-13-46 11-29-45 3-08-46 8-01-33 7-26-48 4-22-49 4-22-49 7-19-43 3-08-46 8-23-43 1-24-49

28 33 27 27 28 28 40 25 25 25 30 28 30 25

RANK

NAME

Detective

Herman J: Sorgi

Detective

Louis Evica

Police Patrolman

Clarence Schultz

Detective

Chester R. Kasinski

Lieutenant of Police

Karl R. Stuhmer

Police Patrolman

Heinz G. Puff

Police Alarm Operator

William Forrestal

Police Alarm Operator

Ruggles Doudt

Captain of Police .

Edward R. Kondracki

Detective

Anthony L. D 'Amico

Police Patrolman Law Stenographer Ill Detective

Robert D . Boettcher Frances J . Wolf Gilbert Schultz

APPOINTED

YEARS OF SERVICE

6-11-74 6-15-74

1-04-37 2-02-42

37 32

6-18-74 6-19-74 6-25-74 7-11-74

10-26-42 5-1Q-43 1-03-47 1-24-49

32 31 27 25

7-23-74 8-01-74

5-28-36 -4-22-49

38 25

8-11-74 9-01 -74 11-18-74 11-26-74 12-25-74

6-01-42 4-22-49 4-22-49 3-{)1-43 5-28-29

32 25 25 31 45

RETIRED

IN MEMORIAM ACTIVE PERSONNEL

RANK Captain of Pol ice Police Patrolman Detective Deputy Inspector of Police Police Patrolman Police Patrolman Police Patrolman Police Patrolman Police Patrolman

NAME

APPOINTED

DECEASED

Frank Stachowiak Raymond J . Martin Thomas Manske Robert Bod ish Thomas G. Matulis Robert D. Riley Gordon J. Peters Edward Szymanski M ichael L. Drae~er

11-01-39 1-07-46 1-05-53 7-26-48 7-20-70 7-08-68 5-05-52 4-06-51 10-20-69

1-30-74 2-22-74 3-21-74 3-28-74 7-10-74 7-10-74 10-14-74 11-24-74 12-28-74

RETIRED PERSONNEL RANK Police Patrolman Detective Police Patrolman Lieutenant of Police Police Patrolman Police Patrolman Police Patrolman Police Patrolman Police Patrolman Police Patrolman Police Patrolman Police Patrolman Police Alarm Operator Police Patrolman Police Patrolman Police Sergeant Police Patrolman Police Patrolman

NAME Jo se ph Zinner George Williams Arthur Malczewski Walter Laabs James Warner William Fredericks Edward Zabel William Gutowsky Lawrence Lenz George B. Schmidt Clarence Block Thaddeus Sikorski Alfred Steinkraus William Michelson William Bersch Jr. Roy Geist Fred Molthen Alois Deppisch

RETIRED 4-19-67 5-03-51 7-08-72 9-01-53 7-08-55 3-07-42 12-14-40 12-15-41 10-10-!!2 9-01-57 3-25-52 6-16-37 1-15-67 5-01-44 4-11-43 6-01-52 5-16-43 8-11-42

DECEASED 1-03-74 1-04-74 1-12-74 1-18-74 1-18-74 1-22-74 1-22-74 2-26-74 2-27-74 3-02-74 3-11-74 3-14-74 4-17-74 4-19-74 4-27-74 5-01 -74 5-29-74 6-04-74

RANK

NAME

RETIRED

DECEASED

Police Alarm Operator Po lice Sergeant Police Patrolman Police Patrolman Police Patrolman Police Sergeant Police Patrolman Police Patrolman Police Patrolman Pol ice Patrolman Police Patrolman Police Patrolman Pol i-ce Patro Iman Police Patr olman Police Patrolman Pol ice Patrolman Police Patrolman Detective

Roy Whaley Charles Schwertfeger Louis Mrotek Clarence Troka Lester Nimmer Harry Hassel Emil Koehler Charles Goodmann William Eggers August Malson Elmer Rivay Walter Antkowiak Fred Schoenecker Arthur Rost Max Koenig Charles Mantei Walter W. Fisher Calvin Mooqy

3-24-56 2-01-54 7-10-50 9-28-56 7-18-72 8-06-49 2-01 -38 11-03-28 3-04-54 2-04-51 2-01-46 1-01-22 1-02-44 9-30-56 3-04-52 9-02-61 7-12-66 6-19-57

7-19-74 8-19-74 8-28-74 8-29-74 9-08-74 9-14-74 9-14-74 9-15-74 9-23-74 10-01-74 11-16-74 11-25-74 11-27-74 11-28-74 12-01 -74 12-19-74 12-22-74 12-22-74

7

CITATIONS "SERVICE ABOVE AND BEYOND THE CALL OF DUTY" At this time, Detective Beasley engaged Cohen in conversation in the immediate presence of Patrolman Gary Moe and attempted to persuade him to give himself up and release the boy hostage. The felon replied that he had killed two coppers in Chicago already; that he didn't care how many more he killed; and that he would do so to anyone who got in his way.

DETECT-IVE W.BEASLEY

Detective William H. Beasley awarded a Class "B" Citation for meritorious duty under the following circumstances: On February 28, 1974, Detective William Beasley and Patrolman Gary Moe, along with numerous other officers, responded to a dispatch of "F.B.I. Agent shot - suspect fleeing the scene on foot." Upon arrival, the officers learned that one Jacob Peter Cohen, who was being sought for the murder of two Chicago police officers, had taken refuge in the residence of 2506 N. T~rrace Street and that he was holding four children as hostage. In the ensuing minutes, Cohen released three of the children and demanded a getaway car and a driver. An F.B.I. Agent agreed to be the driver of the getaway car and proceeded to back the auto into the driveway of the residence.

8

The wanted felon then emerged from the residence holding 14-year-old Danny Brady as hostage. Cohen held Danny around the neck with his left hand and menacingly held a cocked revolver to the boy's head with his right hand. The barrel of the revolver was behind the boy's ear.

Undeterred by these comments, Detective Beasley continued to keep Cohen's attention while an F.B.I. Agent was boosted onto a garage roof within view of the getaway car parked in the driveway. At said time, the F.B.I. Agent was unable to fire at Cohen for fear of striking the boy hostage; however, Cohen then leaned forward to look into the back seat of the getaway car, and he placed the boy hostage below the roof of the auto and out of the Agent's line of fire. Detective Beasley then nodded to the Agent, who opened fire and struck the felon in the shoulder area. Simultaneously, the boy hostage fell forward and crawled under the auto. Cohen theri pointed his weapon in the direction of Detective Beasley and Patrolman Moe, and the former officer opened fire with his service revolver. During the subsequent exchange of gunfire between Cohen and numerous officers at the scene, Detective Beasley sustained a gunshot wound in hi~ right leg, and while he lay on the ground wounded, Patrolman Moe also directed gunfire at Cohen from a close, exposed position. At the time, Cohen was also laying on the ground wounded, but he was still in possession of his firearm which he had in firing position. The felon then succumbed to

gunshot wounds, and Patrolman Moe promptly went to the assistance of Detective Beasley, administered first aid, and caused a police ambulance to be summoned.

*** PATROLMAN A. WILKE

Patrolman Alan P. Wilke awarded a Class "C" Citation for meritorious duty under the following circumstances: On April 9, 1974, at 10:15 P.M., while on an undercover assignment, Patrolman Wilke entered his private car which was parked in front of 2805 W. North Avenue. Simultaneously, the car door was pulled open by a man who pointed a revolver at the officer, cocked the weapon, and ordered the officer to slide over to the front passenger seat. Upon entering the auto, the armed subject ordered Patrolman Wilke to slide back to the driver's seat, and he climbed into the front passenger seat. At this time, the subject pointed the cocked revolver at Patrolman Wilke's chest and demanded money; whereupon Patrolman Wilke handed the

CITATIONS "SERVICE ABOVE AND BEYOND THE CALL OF DUTY" subject his wallet as well as loose change from his pocket. The subject then demanded more money while continuing to train the revolver at Patrolman Wilke's chest. Fearing for his personal safety, Patrolman Wilke quickly grabbed the subject's revolver with his left hand, forcing it in the dir~ction · of the dashboard, and with his right hand, he reached under the seat, grabbed his weapon and shot the suspect twice. The subject was subsequently pronounced DOE at County General Hospital and found to be a known felon from Detroit, Michigan with a long police record. His weapon was found to be a loaded .22 caliber magnum revolver.

*** PATROLMAN R.BOYLE

PATROLMAN J.RYAN

Patrolman Robert ]. Boyle and Patrolman john D . Ryan awarded a Class "D" Citation for their actions under the following circumstances: On December 21 , 1973, at . 10:45 A.M., Patrolman Robert Boyle observed an auto travelling the wrong way in a one-way alley at

N. 13th and W. Vliet Streets. The motorist was stopped and advised of the traffic violation, and he indicated that he had no driver's license. He refused to answer when asked his name, and he refused to step out of the auto. Patrolman Boyle then summoned his partner, Patrolman John Ryan, to assist, and Patrolman Ryan also requested the driver to produce identification and to step out of the car. When he refused both requests and began rolling up the car window, Patrolman Ryan opened the car door. At this time, the subject produced a .38 caliber revolver, which he had concealed under a rag on the glove compartment console, and pointed same at Patrolman Ryan , stating, "Get away from the car or I'll kill you!" Both officers immediately backed off, drew their service revolvers and ordered the subject to drop the gun sev{!ral times. When the subject failed to comply with this repeated demand and proceeded to point his revolver in the direction of Patrolman Boyle, both officers opened fire, striking the subject twice. The man was then disarmed and taken into custody.

PATROLMAN

PATROLMAN R.COLLURA

J. EBERHARDY

PATROLMAN J. EC<;:EL

PATROLMAN M. JOURDAN

***

Patrolman Rosario]. Collura, Patrolman john H. Eberhardy, Patrolman James D. Eccel, Patrolman Michael K. Jourdan, Patrolman David M. Leist and Patrolman Richard B. Tarczynski awarded· a Class "D" Citation for meritorious duty under the following circumstances: On June 25, 1973 , at 10:35 P.M., squads were

PATROLMAN D. LEIST

PATROLMAN R. TARCZYNSKI

dispatched to investigate a disturbance at the Shell Service Station, N. 3rd and W. Center Streets. Upon arrival, the officers learned that a man, later identified as Warren Pettis, had

9

CITATIONS "SERVICE ABOVE AND BEYOND THE CALL OF DUTY" attacked the station attendant without provocation. As the officers approached Mr. Pettis, he wrapped a belt around his hand with the buckle end free, and began to yell profane epithets at the officers; whereupon, he was disarmed and placed under, arrest, At this time, a crowd began to gather in the area and sensing that these persons were becoming increasingly hostile, the officers quickly placed Mr. Pettis in the patrol wagon for conveyance to the Fifth District Station. Knowing the violent nature of Mr. Pettis from previous contacts, Patrolman· Rosario Collura requested a superior officer to alert other personnel to stand by in the Fifth District Station garage to render assistan.ce if necessary. Upon arrival at the station, Mr. Pettis was violently kicking the sides of the wagon and shouting threats and profanities at the officers. Patrolman Collura then opened the rear door of the wagon, observed that Mr. Pettis had ripped off most of his clothing, and requested the prisoner to exit the wagon. Mr. Pettis refused, and Patrolman Collura entered the wagon to escort the prisoner out, at which time he struck Patrolman Collura on the side of the head with his fist, causing Patrolman Collura to fall backwards. A violent s.truggle then ensued, primarily involving Patrolmen Collura, David Leist, and Michael Jourdan, and the obviously deranged prisoner succeeded in obtaining one officer's service revolver which he began firing. In rapid succession, Patrolman Jourdan sustained a gunshot wound to his right arm; Patrolman Collura to his right leg; Patrolman Richard Tarcynski (who was moving towards the affray to assist) to his right leg; and Patrolman 10 Leist to his left arm.

Responding to the sound of gunshots, Patrolmen John Eberhardy and James Eccel then entered the station garage. Upon observing Patrolman Tarczynski lying on the garage floor still in the line of fire and bleeding profusely, Patrolman Eberhardy ran to the fallen officer and dragged him to a place of safety behind a parked car. He then applied a tourniquet to stop the flow of blood from Patrolman Tarczynski's wound. In the meantime, Patrolman Eccel drew his service revolver, exposed himself to gunfire from Mr. Pettis, who continued to struggle with Patrolman Leist, and fired two shots at the deranged subject. The prisoner and Patrolman Leist then fell to the floor, but the struggle continued, at which time Patrolman Collura (who was lying on the floor wounded), fired one shot from his service revolver, striking Mr. Pettis in the side. This culminated the action, and the subject was subsequently pronounced dead at County General Hospital and was found to have sustained three gunshot wounds.

***

PATROLMAN R. MISZEWSKI

PATROlMAN J. OLIVA

PATROlMAN P. SIMET

Patrolman john G. Franckowiak, Patrolman Robert A. Jungbluth, Patrolman Richard ]. Miszewski, Patrolman James P. Oliva and Patrolman Peter]. Simet 'awarded a Class "D" Citation for their actions under the following circumstances: On September 16, 1974 at 3:15A.M., whil~ enroute to the Seventh District Station, Patrolmen Robert Jungbluth and Richard Miszewski observed smoke emanating from a second floor window of a rooming house at 1139 N. 12th Street, and they immediately summoned the Fire Department and called for police assistance.

PATROLMAN J. FRANCKOWIAK

PATROLMAN R . JUNGBlUTH

Within

moments, Patrolmen Peter Simet,

CITATIONS "SERVICE ABOVE AND BEYOND THE CALL OF DUTY" James Oliva and John Franckowiak joined Patrolmen Jungbluth and Miszewski and promptly moved to rescue numerous persons who were hanging out of windows, screaming hysterically for help. Unable to enter the building via the hallways because of smoke and flames, the officers found three ladders in the vicinity which enabled them to reach more than twenty persons whom __they carried or guided to safety. In several instances ; the officers smashed windows and crawled into smoke filled rooms to reach and effect the rescue of the occupants. While carrying out this action, all of the officers suffered smoke inhalation and other injuries.

*** PATROLMAN J. HUNDT

PATROLMAN J. NOWICKI

Patrolman james E. Hundt and Patrolman joseph E. Nowicki awarded a Class "D" Citation for meritorious duty under the following circumstances: On February 14, 1974, at 12:35 A.M., two brothers, Charles and Frank McCauley, entered the tavern at 1550 W. Mitchell Street and immediately became involved in an argument with another male patron. Shortly

afterwards, Frank McCauley drew a .45 caliber automatic pistol from his waistband and handed it to his brother, Charles, who proceeded to wave the pistol in the direction of the crowded barroom. Charles McCauley then walked towards the man, verbally threatening to kill him, whereupon, some patrons fell to the floor while others took cover behind tables. In the meantime, Patrolman James Hundt, who was in the tavern off duty, took cover behind the bar and drew his revolver, and Patrolman Joseph Nowicki, who was also in the tavern off duty, remained seated at the bar and also drew his revolver and held it at his side out of view. Charles McCauley continued to menace the customer with the automatic pistol but handed it back to his brother, Frank, after the man knocked the weapon to the side and dislodged the clip. Frank McCauley then walked towards the fran t en trance while he replaced the clip, activated the slide , and ejected one live round and inserted another in the chamber. Patrolman Nowicki then approached Frank McCauley and attempted to persuade him to leave the crowded bar. Before he could receive a response, Charles McCauley began to shout and urge his brother to shoot the customer. This prompted Frank McCauley to walk away from Patrolman Nowicki and hold the barrel of the pistol two inches away from the man's head. At this time, Patrolman Nowicki approached Frank McCauley from the rear, identified himself as a police officer and placed his service revolver at the back of Fr a nk McCauley's head. When Frank McCauley complied with Patrolman Nowicki's

order to drop the pistol , Charles McCauley attempted to gain possession of same at which time a brief scuffle ensued with Patrolman Hundt who was able to subdue Charles McCauley and recover the weapon with the assistance of a citizen.

*** PATROLMAN R.MATHENY

Patrolman Robert W. Matheny awarded a Class "D'.' Citation for meritorious duty under the following circumstances: On April 26, 1974, several officers responded to a report of "Man firing a shotgun in the home at 1504 W. Greenfield Avenue. " Upon arrival, a woman informed them that her husband had fired a shotgun twice in the home, which caused her to flee and summon the police. She also affirmed that he was still in the home and armed with a 12 gauge shotgun. After other officers had effectively surrounded the home, Patrolman Matheny proceeded to . the front porch, entered the residence, and called out the subject's name in an attempt to locate his position in the home.

11

CITATIONS "SERVICE ABOVE AND BEYOND THE CALL OF DUTY" Patrolman Matheny succeeded in locating the subject in a bedroom of the residence and requested him to lay down his weapon and surrender. The subject, who was in an obviously high emotional state, · refused numerous such requests. Patrolman Matheny then requested a cannister of tear gas, and the subject promptly moved to exit the bedroom with his shotgun in a raised, firing position. At this time, Patrolman Matheny unhesitatingly and quickly moved towards the subject and grabbed the barrel of the sho~gun, pushing it towards the ceiling of the home. Other officers then came to the assistance of Patrolman Matheny, subdued the man, and took him into custody on a charge of Reckless Use of Weapon.

*** PATROLMAN G.MOE

Patrolman Gary L. Moe awarded a Class "D" Citation for meritorious duty under the following circumstances:

12

On February 28, 1974, Patrolman Gary Moe and Detective William Beasley, along with

numerous other officers, responded to a dispatch of "F.B.I. Agent shot - suspect fleeing the scene on foot."

back seat of the getaway car, and he placed the boy hostage below the roof of the auto and out of the Agent's line of fire.

Upon arrival, the officers learned that one Jacob Peter Cohen, who was being sought for the murder of two Chicago police officers, had taken refuge in the residence of 2506 N. Terrace Street and that he was holding four children as hostage. In the ensuing minutes, Cohen released three of the children and demanded a getaway car and a driver. An F.B.I. Agent agreed to be the driver of the getaway car and proceeded to back the auto into the driveway of the residence .

Detective Beasley then nodded to the Agent, who opened fire and struck the felon in the shoulder area. Simultaneously, the boy hostage fell forward and crawled under the -auto.

The wanted felon then emerged from the residence holding 14-year-old Danny Brady as hostage. Cohen held Danny around the neck with his left hand and menacingly held a cocked revolver to the boy's head with his right hand. The barrel of the revolver was behind the boy's ear. At this time, Detective Beasley engaged Cohen in conversation in the immediate presence of Patrolman Gary Moe and attempted to persuade him to give himself up and release the boy hostage. The felon replied that he had killed two coppers in Chicago already; that he didn't care how many more he killed; and that he would do so to anyone who got in his way. Undeterred by these comments, Detective Beasley continued to keep Cohen's attention while an F.B.I. Agent was boosted onto a garage roof within view of the getaway car parked in the driveway. At said time, the F.B.I. Agent was unable to fire at Cohen for fear of striking the boy hostage; however, Cohen then leaned forward to look into the

Cohen then pointed his weapon in the direction of Detective Beasley and Patrolman Moe, and the former officer opened fire with his service revolver. During the subsequent exchange of gunfire between Cohen and numerous officers at the scene, Detective Beasley sustained a gunshot wound to his right leg, and while he lay on the ground wounded, Patrolman Moe also directed gunfire at Cohen from a close, exposed position. At the time, Cohen was also laying on the ground wounded, but he was still in possession of his firearm which he had in firing position. The felon then succumbed to gunshot wounds, and Patrolman Moe promptly went to the assistance of Detective Beasley, administered first aid, and caused a police ambulance to be summoned.

***

Patrolman Michael R. Neeb awarded a Class "D" Citation for meritorious duty under the following circumstances: On March 25, 1974, while patrolling in Squad 23, Patrolmen Michael Neeb and Gary Schneider observed three boys walking on thin ice of the Humboldt Park Lagoon. They were about to warn the boys to get off the ice when one -of the boys fell through the ice .

CITATIONS " SERVICE ABOVE AND BEYOND THE CALL OF DUTY" Class "E" Commendatory Letter for their actions under the following circumstances:

PATROLMAN M.NEEB

The other two boys instinctively started to run to his assistance but were warned by the officers to stay away and get off the ice. The young boy was about 200 feet from shore and tried to pull himself out, but ·the ice continued to break up around him. He was crying and starting to panic, but he heeded the officers' advice to remain calm. When an attempt by the officers to throw the boy a life preserver failed, Patrolman Neeb removed his boots, coat and gun, and he started walking out onto the ice. When he was several yards from sho"re, the ice broke, and he fell into the frigid water. Although the ice was about two inches thick, Patrolman Neeb continued towards the boy by breaking the ice with his hands and fists, and he succeeded in reaching the boy. Patrolman Neeb grasped the boy around the waist to hold his head above the water, and he walked him back to shore.

***

Sergeant Dale D. Ryan, Patrolman Robert D. Boettcher, Patrolman Gordon W. Hessel and Patrolman Edward B. Kamoske awarded a

SGT. D. RYAN

PATROLMAN E. KAMOSKI

PATROLMAN G. HESSEL

PATROLMAN R.BOETTCHER

On June 24, 1973, at 1:05 P.M., Sergeant Dale Ryan , Patrolmen Gordon Hessel, Edward Kamoske, and Robert Boettcher responded to a report of "family trouble - man may have a gun" at 1715 N. 33rd Street. Upon arrival, the officers learned that a man had confined himself to the second floor of the residence after arguing with his wife and that he had armed himself with a shotgun. It was also learned that the man had threatened members of his family. Sergeant Ryan assumed command at the scene, directing his men to remain under

cover in pos1t1ons around the residence and advising them as to what was transpiring. Patrolmen Hessel and Kamoske managed to gain entry to the first floor and cover a stairway leading to the second floor where the subject had confined himself. When they tried to ascend the stairway, using a bomb blanket as a shield , the armed subject . fired the shotgun, causing the officers to be thrown back down several stairs. Patrolmen Hessel and Kamoske were subsequently joined by Sergeant Ryan who was also fired upon by the subject as he crossed a yard at the rear of the residence. When Sergeant Ryan gained entry to the first floor, he also began to ascend the stairs to speak to the subject but was again fired upon by the armed man. While all officers maintained their positions, tear gas was fired into the residence , forcing the subject to flee the home via the front door. As he exit.ed, he was carrying a shotgun a.t port a!ms and =several police officers shouted for hill to drop the gun.The subject disregarded their order and placed the gun in a firing position at which time Patrolman Robert Boettcher fired one shotgun blast and felled the subject.

***

Patrolman Dennis ]. Carr and Patrolman Dennis P. Wargolet awarded a Class "E" Commendatory Letter for meritorious duty under the following circumstances: On July 13, 1973, at 6:45 P.M., Patrolmen Dennis Wargo,let and Dennis Carr were dispatched to investigate a "family trouble" compla~t at 1009-A W. Madison Street.

15

CITATIONS "SERVICE ABOVE AND BEYOND THE CALL OF DUTY" Patrolman Roger M. Cortez and Patrolman Robert D. Haller awarded a Class "E" Commendatory Letter for meritorious duty under the following circumstances:

PATROLMAN D.CARR

PATROLMAN D.WARGOLET

Upon arrival, the officers observed a man standing over his wife with ·a butcher knife pressed against her throat. In the presence of the officers, the man exclaimed, "I'm going to kill you." Since the officers were unable to draw their service revolvers without endangering other persons present, they properly distracted the man by shouting. When the subject took the knife away from his wife's throat for a brief moment, the officers subdued and disarmed him.

* '* *

On December 14, 1973, at 10:45 P.M., Patrolmen Roger Cortez and Robert Haller observed a building on fire at 2329 W. Highland Avenue, immediately summoned the Fire Department, and entered the burning building to alert the occupants. Upon learning that the building was vacant, they returned outside at which time they noted that an adjoining building at 2325 W. Highland Avenue was also engulfed in smoke. Patrolmen Cortez and Haller then entered said building and were able to arouse five adults and lead them i:o safety. In an effort to ensure that everyone had evacuated the building, they entered a second time, awakened a 64-year-old woman, and also led her to safety.

*** PATROLMAN J. EDWARDS

16

PATROLMAN R.CORTEZ

PATROLMAN R. HALLER

On September 9, 1974, at 1:05 A.M., while on squad patrol, Patrolmen John Edwards and Peter Habel observed smoke and flames emanating from the second floor of a building at 1743 N. Second Street and immediately summoned the Fire Department. Although the building appeared to be vacant, the officers forced open the locked front door and subsequently found two men asleep in a rear bedroom on the first floor which was filled with dense smoke. After leading the two men to safety, the officers re-entered the building and ascended to the second floor in search of other possible occupants. This effort was quickly deterred as the officers were driven back by dense smoke and extreme heat. Simultaneously, the Fire Department arrived on the scene and found that the second floor of the building was a blazing inferno. Patrolmen Edwards and Habel then proceeded to alert occupants of adjoining buildings which were endangered by flames and sparks emanating from the burning structure.

***

PATROLMAN P. HABEL

Patrolman john C. Edwards and Patrolman Peter M. Habel awarded a Class "E" Commendatory Letter for meritorious duty under the following circumstances:

PATROLMAN D. PALKOWSKI '

PATROLMAN R. RADOVICH

CITATIONS "SERVICE ABOVE AND BEYOND THE CALL OF DUTY" Patrolman David C. Falkowski and Patrolman Robert A . . Radovich awarded a Class "E" Commendatory Letter for their actions under the following circumstances: On May 10, 1973, at 7:35 P.M., Patrolmen David Falkowski and Robert Radovich observed a man perched on the bridge railing of the Sixth Street Viaduct prepar-ing to leap into the Menomonee Canal approximately 70 feet below. Both officers approached the subject and attempted to persuade him not to jump into the river. After the subject expressed his intention to kill himself, Patrolman Radovich lunged forward and grasped the man by his belt. At this time, the man was hanging freely over the bridge railing and nearly pulled Patrolman Radovich over; whereupon Patrolman Falkowski instinctively grabbed Patrolman Radovich and both officers were able to return the man to the safety of the pedestrian walk.

***

"E" Commendatory Letter for meritorious duty under the following circumstances: On March 21, 1974, while off duty and in his residence, Patrolman Nicholas Patsis heard a woman screaming. He immediately determined that the screaming was coming from a home across the alley, and proceeding to the home , he observed a woman and three children leaning out of an upstairs window, from which smoke was emanating. A fire of undetermined origin had started in an upstairs closet which resulted in damages totaling $10,000. When he arrived at the front of the burning residence , Patrolman Patsis was met by a male citizen whose attention was also drawn to the fire. After they made repeated attempts to force the locked door to the residence, Patrolman Patsis was in the process of removing a storm window when the woman called down and threw him the house keys. Patrolman Patsis and the male citizen then entered the home, groped their way through a smoke filled hallway and led the woman and her three children to safety.

***

Patrolman Patrick ]. Ross and Patrolman Dennis M. Schreiber awarded a Class "E" Commendatory Letter for meritorious duty under the following circumstances:

PATROLMAN N. PATSIS

Patrolman Nicholas P. Patsis awarded a Class

On February 17, .1974, while assigned to Squad 12A, Patrolmen Patrick Ross and Dennis Schreiber were stopped for a red light at N. 16th Street and W. Wisconsin Avenue when they observed an auto travelling north on N. 16th Street at an estimated 70 miles per

PATROLMAN P. ROSS

PATROLMAN 0. SCHREIBER

hour. With the squad in pursuit, the driver of the auto continued at a high rate of speed to 802 N. 14th Street where he stopped and parked and was abo.ut to be questioned by the officers when he sped away. Again with the squad in pursuit, the driver of the speeding auto struck three parked cars at 1032 N. 14th Street and continued north to 1120 N. 14th Street where he struck three more parked cars. At this point, the speeding auto burst into flames and the conflagration engulfed still another car in flames. Patrolmen Ross and Schreiber immediately exited their squad, ran through flaming gasoline and pulled the driver from his auto. The man was unconscious and wedged between the seat and dashboard on the passenger side of his auto.

*** 17

CITATIONS "SERVICE ABOVE AND BEYOND THE CALL OF DUTY" Patrolman Robert L. Sweetman and Patrolman Richard F. Zuba awarded a Class "E" Commendatory Letter for meritorious duty under the following circumstances:

'el

C .

.

'

On September 28, 1974, at 9:05 P.M., Patrolmen Robert Sweetman cind. Richard

Jmliltttauktt Jnlict ~tpartmtnf CLASS "B"

CLASS "C" W. BEASLEY

A. WILKE

CLASS "D"

PATROLMAN R. SWEETMAN

PATROLMAN

R. ZUBA

Zuba ware informed by a citizen that a scantily attired woman was walking on West State Street at North Third. The officers proceeded to the area in search of the woman and subsequently observed a body floating face down in the Milwaukee River at the rear of 1024 North Third Street. They immediately summoned . Police and Fire Department assistance, and three citizens in the immediate vicinity responded to their request to assist.

Jn the ensumg moments, Patrolmer.. Sweetman and Zuba and the three citizens formed a human chain and with great difficulty managed to pull the woman from the water and up to a two-foot bank where she regained consciousness. She weighed in excess of 350 pounds.

18

R. BOYLE

R. COLLIJRA

J. EBERHAAOY

J. ECCEL

J. FRANCKOWIAK

J, HUNDT

M. JOURDAN

A. JUNGBLUTH

D. LEIST

A. MATHENY

R. MISZEWSKI

G. MOE

M. NEEB

J.NOWICKI

J.O LI VA

J. RYAN

P. SIMET

R. TAACZYNSKI

R. CORTEZ

J. EDWARDS

P. HABEL

R. HALLER

G. HESSEL

E. KAMOSKE

D. PALKOWSKI

CLASS "E"

R. BOETTCHER

0. CARR

AM

Thomas G.

ichael L. Draeger

a suspect on Wednesday, as a result of injuries received in a squ

"THESE

19

AWARDS OF MERIT TO CITIZENS John A. Petcoff, age 46; and Lester G. Liederbach, age 37, who on August 12, 197 3, pursued a man who had attempted to rape a 17-year-old girl in the 4400 :Block of N. Hopkins Street. Mr. Petc<;>ff and Mr. Liederbach succeeded in overcoming the suspect and held him until Police arrived. Frederick L. Davis, age 30. On December 8 , 1973, while working in his basement, Mr. Davis noticed a car parked in the alley and saw two men leave the car and walk west in the alley in the 2400 Block ofW. State Street. He later observed the same men running down the alley and jump into the automC!bile and drive off. Being suspicious, Mr. Davis wrote down the license number of the car. Later, Mr. Davis heard a news broadcast of the murder of John Price who was working in his father's grocery store at 2420 W. State Street, and he immediately contacted the police and relayed his information to them. Through this information, police were able to apprehend both suspects who were subsequently charged with attempt robbery and murder. Herbert Schraufnagel, age 18 , who on January 27, 1974, while walking in the area of the Disciplinary Barracks, 6081 N. Hopkins Street, heard someone calling for help. Mr. Schraufnagel ran to his home , called the police and led them to the cell where a young man had accidentally locked himself in and had been confined there for over three hours in 22 degree weather.

20

***

Harold G. Luecht, age 58, and Leo R. Biba, age 34. On January 28, 1974, Mr. Luecht heard the sound of breaking glass at the residence at 3623 W. Maple Street. He called the police and then with his neighbor, Mr. Biba, assisted them in apprehending three juveniles who had broken into the home through a basement window and had stolen a radio, coins and keys. All the items were recovered, and the juveniles were charged with burglary. Irvin Kingman, age .31, who on February 11, 197 4, observed two men speeding from the Northridge Shopping Center parking lot as he was leaving the shopping center. Mr. Kingman re-entered the shopping center and lear.ned that the Northridge Bank had just been robbed. He related to the police what he had obs e rved, and this information was immediately broadcast which led to the arrest of the two suspects within minutes after the robbery. Gary Lee Squire, age 23; arid Russell Stewart, age 27. On February 11 , 1974, Mr. Squire and Mr. Stewart observed a police officer struggling with a man at N. 4th and W. Wells Streets and immediately stopped their cars and ran to the officer 's aid . The man, who had been stopped for a pedestrian violation ; had managed to get on top of the officer and was attempting to get his service revolver. With the assistance of Mr. Squire and Mr. Stewart, the officer was able to handcuff the man and maintain control of him until other officers arrived. He was later charged with

violation of the pedestrian ordinance, obstructing an officer, and battery to a peace officer.

Robert Bahr, who , while in a tavern at 1550 W. Mitchell Street on February 14, 1974, assisted two off duty police officers in subduing a man with a gun who had become involved in an argument with another patron. Mr. Bahr and the officer jumped the armed man and were able to overcome him and recover the weapon. Herbert Hoxie, age 50, FBI Agent in charge of the Milwaukee Office; FBI Agent Richard Carr, age 42; Daniel Brady, age 14, Erin Brady, age 13, Peter Brady, age 9, Patrick Brady , age 6; and Thomas Cahill, age 8. On February 28, 1974, it was learned that Jacob Cohen, wanted in Chicago for the murder of two police officers , had fled to Milwaukee and had taken refuge in an apartment at 2527 N. Stowell Avenue. FBI agents went to the address where they were spotted by the suspect who was in the second floor apartment. Cohen fled down a rear, outside stairway, encountering FBI Agent Carr, shooting him and wounding him in the shoulder. He then ran to the home of Robert Brady , 2810 W. Bradford Avenue, which was approximately six blocks away, where he held captive Danny, Erin, Peter and Patrick Brady, and also a neighbor, Thomas Cahill. Cohen had been followed to the home, and the residence was soon surrounded by law enforcement officers.

AWARDS OF MERIT TO CITIZENS At this tim~, Agent Hoxie telephoned Cohen at the Brady home and volunteered himself as hostage in exchange for the children. It was then that Erin, Patrick, Thomas and Peter ran out the rear door and informed officers that the suspect had threatened to 'kill D~y if he didn't get a get-away car. Agent Hoxie then backed a car into the driveway 9f the Brady home, and the suspect emerged with a gun at Danny's head, pushing · the boy in front of him. Danny then bolted free and slipped under the front wheel of the car. Cohen was subsequently shot and killed during an exchange of gunfire.

Walter Brookins, age 53, who on March 6, 197 4, while walking in an alley in the rear of his home, observed two juveniles in the back yard of a neighbor. Becoming suspicious, Mr. Brookins walked to the front of the house and saw three juveniles coming out of the house carrying a television set and a stereo. He called the Police Department and then returned outside to watch the boys who fled when they saw him. Mr. Brookins immediately gave chase and in his pursuit, he saw a squad car which he flagged down. Police officers then apprehended five juveniles who were charged with the burglary of the residence at 4044 N. 17th Street. Robert Pauley, age 28, and]udithPauley, age 27. On March 10, 1974, while traveling north on Highway 41, Robert and Judith Pauley observed a car also northbound on Highway 41 strike a detective squad which was stopped at the scene of an accident. The striking vehicle accelerated after the impact arrd

***

proceeded on the expressway to the Lloyd Street offramp and east on Lloyd Street. Mr. Pauley pursued the auto, obtaining the license number and description, and returned to the scene of the accident to relay this information to investigating officers. Due to the assistance of Mr. and Mrs. Pauley, the driver was arrested a short time later and charged with failure to render aid in a personal injury accident, inattentive driving, and operating an unregistered vehicle.

DolOres Karpinski, age 33, who on March 12, 1974, observed a suspicious man in the hallway of her apartment building. Mrs. Karpinski later heard walking in the apartment above her's and called the police. Upon arrival, officers caught a man in the act of burglarizing the apartment and recovered money which was taken from that apartment as well as jewelry and money which had been taken from another apartment in the building. Richard A. Vanier, Sr., age 41. On March 13, 1974, Mr. Vanier, who is a driver for the Yellow Cab Company, picked up a fare in the Greyhound Bus Depot. The man appeared to be extremely nervous and directed Mr. Vanier to drive notth on Seventh Street. As Mr. Vanier approached Wells Street, he observed two police officers at which time his passenger, who had also seen the officers, told him to drive through a red light. Mr. Vanier then stopped the cab, approached the officers and informed them of the man's strange behavior. A search of the passenger disclosed several aluminum foil packets containing a white powder suspected to be heroin. Further

investigation revealed that the man was wanted on a state warrant for delivery of a controlled substance (heroin).

Christopher Ferrie, age 28. On March 21, 1974, at about 11:45 P.M., Mr. Ferrie was attracted by screams coming from a nearby residence and saw a woman and her children leaning out of an upstairs window of the home at 2830 N. 41st Street. When he ran to the house, he was met by another neighbor, and the two men entered the home and located a stairway leading to the upstairs bedrooms. Going up the stairs, they encountered heavy smoke which forced them to crawl on their hands and knees in an effort to find the woman and her children. Mr. Ferrie and his neighbor were thus successful in leading the woman and her three young children out of the burning house. Herbert and Louise Frelka, age 44 and 46; and Theothor and Donna Braun,age 49 and 45, who on March 23, 1974, while driving on Oklahdma Avenue, observed a man attempting to break into the Drugtown Pharmacy at 950 W. Oklahoma Avenue. They then drove around the block and saw the man get into a parked auto which had a woman behind the wheel. The two couples again circled the area and noticed that the glass door of the store had been smashed. They then called the police, giving them the description of the car and the two occupants. Officers later apprehended the suspects who were returned to the scene and positively identified by all four of the witnesses.

21

,AWARDS OF MERIT TO CITIZENS Peter Sahagian, age 43, and Claude A. Bieniek, age 22. On March 27,1974, while investigating a fatal hit and run accident, police officers checked at the Sahagian Auto Body Shop, 1115 E. College ,Avenue, in an effort to identify parts of an automobile. Mr. Sahagian and one of his employees, Mr. Bieniek, willingly assisted the ··' officers in making phone calls, checking junk yards and parts houses. Mr. Sahagian later called the officers and asked them to return to the shop at which time they identified the pieces of the automobile. Because of the time and effort spent by Mr. Sahagian and Mr. Bieniek, the hit and run auto was identified. NathanialDavis, Jr., age 23. On Aprill, 1974, Mr. Davis' place of employment, the Pittleman Meat Market, 1451 N. 12th Street, was held up. As Mr. Davis went to assist his employer, he observed a man carrying a brown paper bag running through the alley. He then ran out of the store and was confronted by the suspect who pushed him aside and continued his attempt to flee. Mr. Davis regained his balance and continued the chase, succeeding in apprehending the suspect and holding him until police arrived. The $1700 which had been taken in the holdup was recovered and returned to the owner of the store. Elaine Bandt, age 33; judy Kolaske, age 34; and Mary Stultz, age 32. On April 2, 1974, a neighbor of Mrs. Bandt carne to her home and even though being a deaf mute, he conveyed to her that his home was filled with carbon

24

***

monoxide gas and that his mother and his two children were still in the home. Mrs. Bandt immediately went to the home and managed to get both children out of the house but was unable to lift the woman. She then had her daughter summon neighbors, Mrs. Kolaske and Mrs. Stultz, and the three women carried the older woman from the home . Meanwhile, the man had returned to the home and had collapsed on the couch and it was necessary to again assist him from the house. At this time, ambulances arrived, and all parties were conveyed to the hospital.

Roland E. Cole, age 39, who on April 16, 1974, saw two young men grab a woman's purse as she was walking in the 7 00 Block of N. Plankinton Avenue. Mr. Cole chased the boys and caught one of them, and the second youth then gave himself up. Mr. Cole asked another citizen to notify the police, and he held the suspects until officers arrived. Frank Raymond Gonzales, age 10, who on April 27, 1974, while buying groceries at Prijic's Grocery Store, 339 W. Greenfield Avenue, observed a man acting suspiciously. After leaving, Frank stood across the street watching the store and within a few minutes, saw the man run out of the store. The man, armed with a gun, had held up the owner of the store, obtaining $45. Frank followed the man through yards and saw him get ·into ~ auto driven by a second man, and the car sped away. Frank wrote down the liceryse number of the car and returned to the store and gave this information to. the investigating officers.

He further informed the officers that he had observed the suspect on previous occasions entering a home in the neighborhood, and he pointed out the house to them. Both the driver of the auto and the suspect were subsequently apprehended and charged with the armed robbery of the grocery store.

James Ksicinski, age 27, and his wife, Joanne, age 31, who while driving on his way to a reserve drill at 5:20 A.M. on May 4, 1974, saw flames coming from the window of a home at 2400 N. 49th Street. Mr. Ksicinski went to the home and started pounding on the door while his wife ran to a neighbo_ring home and asked him to call the Fire Department. After alerting the family in the lower flat, Mr. Ksicinski ran up the stairway to alert the residents of the upper flat but was driven back by flames and dense smoke. After attempting to make a second entry, he was told that no one was home upstairs. Upon the arrival of the Fire Department, Mr. and Mrs. Ksicinskr left. Gerold E. Block, age 22, and Sylvia Bonnichsen, age 19, who while walking in the area of N. 37th and Juneau at 6:40P.M. on May 6, 1974, observed a man running with something under his arm. The man got into an auto which was parked with another male inside. The young couple, becoming suspicious, jotted down the license number of the car and related this information to police officers who were in the area investigating a purse snatching in which a 72-year-old woman was knocked to the ground and her purse

AWARDS OF MERIT TO CITIZENS taken from her. Further investigation led to the arrest of two suspects for strong armed robbery.

Peter C. Abresch, age 15, who on May 28, 1974, while on his way to ~chool, noticed smoke coming out of the large door of the garage in the rear of 3400 W. H:wes Avenue. Peter ran into the garage and saw a ·man behind the wheel of an auto with the motor running. He pulled him out from behind the wheel and out of the garage. Peter attempted to revive the man until the Rescue Squad arrived; however, the man was already dead. jean Dumke, age 36, who, on June 24, 1974, at 10:00 P.M., witnessed an accident on W. Good . Hope Road at N. 76th Str.e et in which a 17-year-C?ld girl was struck by a speeding auto. Miss Dumke, who is a nurse at St. Joseph~s Hospital, immediately proceeded to the scene, identified herself as a nurse, and offered assistance. She rode to the hospital in the ambulance, applying heart massage to the victim. Although the young girl died at the hospital, Miss Dumke extended herself to the fullest in an effort to save the victim's life, and also assisted the police by giving them an accurate accounting of the accident. Thomas]. Caravella, age 19. On July 5, 1Q74, at 2:40 P.M., Mr. Caravella was returning home from work when two small children ran up to him screaming that they were robbed on the playground of the Pleasant View School, 50th and W. Capitol Drive. He parked his car and approached 50th Street at which

***

time three youths saw him and ran. Mr. Caravella chased the boys and caught one of them and walked him to a phone booth and called the police. While in the phone booth, four boys came over and kicked out one of the glass panels, causing Mr. Caravella to receive cuts to both legs. The boys finally left and a short time later police arrived and obtained information from the suspect which led to the arrest of eight other youths for strong arm robbery.

Gilbert Alvarez, Jr., age 13. On July 24, 1974, while checking the area of S. 9th and W. Lincoln Avenue looking for a suspect in a rape offense, police officers were approached by Gilbert Alvarez, Jr. who asked what they were looking for. Gilbert was questioned as to his knowledge of the suspect and was asked to ·notify police if he observed him. A short time later, Gilbert informed the officers that he had observed the suspect coming out of a basement and led them to the location. He w;ts subsequently apprehended and a warrant for rape was issued. Marc Wagner, age 28, who, on July 28, 1974, while talking to an off duty police officer in the rear of his tavern at 4919 W. North Avenue, heard the s~und ·of break-ing glas~. Running to the front of the b?ilding, they observed a youth crawling out of the front window of Ken's Gun Shop, 4910 W. North Avenue. The two men pursued the youth and found him hiding in some bushes. They ordered him out of the bushes and retrieved two handguns. However, the boy broke away

and the officer and Mr. Wagner again gave chase, apprehended the suspect and held him until police officers arrived. The juvenile was subsequently charged with burglary.

Mae Crivello, ~e 65; Thomas Sternig, age 21; and Karl Schefft, age 20. On July 31, 1974, Mae Crivello observed a man go into the Adelman Laundry, 1200 N. Van Buren Street, jump over the counter and struggle with the clerk. Mrs. Crivello alerted Thomas Sternig and Karl Schefft, and both men ran into the cleaners, pulled the man off .the clerk and held him until police officers arrived. The suspect was subsequently . charged with unarmed robbery. Richard A. Korpela, age 18, who, on August 3, 1974, while driving on W. Villard Avenue, heard the sound of breaking glass coming from the Jolly Food Store, · 5123 W. Villard Avenue. Although he did not see anyone, he went to the police station and reported the incident. As a result of his information, officers 'were dispatched to the store where they found a 15-year-old youth inside. The boy was charged with burglary and admitted breaking into the store five times within a two-month period. ]ames M. Wroblewski~ · age 27, and Willie Williams, age 56. On August 5, 1974, a mCl.Jl attempted to cash a Wisconsin State Refund check in the amount of $354 at the Bank of Commerce, 515 W. Wells Street. While Mr. Wroblewski was inspecting the check, the man ran out of the bank. Mr. Wroblewski gave

25

AWARDS OF MERIT TO CITIZENS

*** chase and was joined in the pursuit by Mr. Williams, a Northtown Security Guarg for the bank. The two men succeeded in apprehending the subject, ·handcuffed him and returned him to the bank. He was subsequently charged with forgery and uttering and was also wanted on a theft warrant.

Daniel Vahl, age 17. On August 7, 1974,·a man held up the Sentry Food Store, 4412 W. Capitol Drive, fled from the store and ran to a station wagon which was parked nearby. Daniel V ahl, being alerted to the robbery , followed the man from the store and commandeered an auto, informing the driver of the holdup and asking him to follow the station wagon. When it became necessary for the holdup man to stop for gas, Mr. V ahl called the Sen try Store and informed investigating detectives of the location of the suspect and a description of the auto. He also asked the gas station attendant to stall the suspect. Police squads arrived shortly and

26

arrested the subject as he was about to leave. The money taken in the holdup was found in the car, as well as the holdup note and an automatic pistol. The suspect admitted that holdup and also two other food store holdups.

Bruce Nason, age 33. On August 26 , 1974, an armed robbery occurred at the Sentry Food Store, 2938 N. Oakland Avenue, and a description of the suspect was bro.a dcast over the police radio. Bruce Nason, who is a newsreel cameraman for WITI-TV, was monitoring police radio calls, and while stopped at a traffic signal, saw a car next to him which matched the description of the getaway car, and also the occupants of the car matched the description of the suspects. He relayed this information to his dispatcher and told him to notify the police and continued to follow the suspects' car, keeping the dispatcher advised of his location. Police officers, re~ponding to the information received from Mr. Nason, arrested the suspect

***

as he was walking out of the Johnnie Walker Store , 3rd and W. Wells Street. The money that was taken and the gun that was used in the holdup was also recovered.

joseph Schmit, age 46, who on September 7, 1974, at approximately 4:50 P.M. while checking the security of his classroom at Pulaski High School where he is a chemistry teacher, observed a juvenile in the next room. Upon being observed, the juvenile fled to a small outdoor area where he was met by another youth. Mr. Schmitz apprehended one of the boys, returned him to the school and held him until police arrived. The boy later identified his accomplice and both boys were charged with burglary. Peter Lupo, age 52. On September 26, 1974, at approximately 12:45 A.M., Mr. Lupo was awakened by the shouting of another roomer, Donald Smith, at the residence at 806 S. 32nd Street and found the living room filled with smoke. He dragged the man into the kitchen

AWARDS OF MERIT TO CITIZENS

*** and ran downstairs to awaken other tenants and assisted in leading four children to safety. Noticing that Mr. Smith. was not outside, Mr. Lupo re-entered the burning home and found he had wander.e d back into the living room. Mr. Lupo succeeded in dragging him to an upper landing and assisted .him to safety.

Osborne E. Ehrlich, age 54, Randall E. Romans, age 19; and Scott H. Six, age 23, who on September 28, 1974, responded to a call from police officers to assist them in rescuing a woman who was attempting suicide by drowning in the Milwaukee River. These men formed a human chain with the police officers down the slippery river bank and succeeded in reaching the woman and pulling her to safety.

Wells Street, he observed a man park in front of his home, get out of the car and walk west on Wells Street. Upon nearing the cleaners, Mr. Prewitt again saw the man running north on 26th Street carrying a shirt over his hands. After entering the laundry, he learned that the clerk had just been held up by a man with a gun. Mr. Prewitt immediately returned to his residence where he saw the same man getting into the parked car. He noted the license number of the car and observed the suspect drive off at a high rate of speed. He then returned to the cleaners and furnished detectives with the license number and a description of the auto and driver. The suspect was subsequently apprehended and charged with armed robbery, and he also admitted numerous other armed robberies.

Carey Prewitt, age 21, a senior at Marquette University, School of Business Administration. On · September 20, 197 4, at approximately 10:45 A.M. as Mr. Prewitt was leaving his residence to pick up cleaning at the Adelman-Polly Prim Dry Cleaners, 2600 W.

john Axtell, age 37, and Rick Orr, age 36. On October 14, 1974, at 9:45 P.M., John Axtell and Rick Orr, both bus drivers for the Transport Company, during a layover in the 1300 Block of W. Van Norman Avenue, heard screaming and observed a man and a woman

struggling near a parked auto. They headed towards the couple, and as they approached, the man quickly entered the car and drove away. Mr. Axtell and · Mr. Orr noted the license number of the car and took the woman to a nearby laundromat and called police. Investigation revealed that the subject had attacked the woman in the laundromat, and when she resisted and fought him off, he dragged her outside with the intention of taking her away in his auto. The man was later apprehended, and a warrant for attempt rape was issued against him.

Lisa Biehle, age 14. On October 14, 1974, while shopping with her mother at the Jewel Food Store, 723 S. 27th Street, Lisa observed a man put a canned ham under his jacket and run from the stor~. Lisa reported what she had seen to store employees who ran out of the store in an . attempt to catch the man. A squad car cruising in the area observed the chase and the man was apprehended and charged with theft.

27

POLICE

28

ACADEMY

*

*

*

Completed in 197 4, the Police Academy street scene - consisting of a private residence and various business establishments - will enable instructors to teach recruits the proper method of patrol and observation.

29

HARBOR PATROL

30

••• ••• ••• •• ••• •• •••

• •• • • • • •• • • • • • •• • •• •• •• ••• •• • ••

Ill

---

J-

--~)

fElJERfil BUREfiU (]f u~~f(]Rr:l LR~r:lE

~~UE~T ~lJffT ~[]~

REP[]Rl

~g?a.. PREl~r:l~~fiRY ff~~Ufil RElEff~E r:lfiJ(]R []ffE~~ES K~[]l\l~ T[] P[]l~LE 27 Cities Having Population Over 400,000 Per 1970 u_ s_Census 1. New York 2. Chicago 3. Los Angeles 4 . Philadelphia 5 . Detroit 6. Houston 7. Baltimore 8 . Dallas 9 . Washington, D.C. 10. Cleveland 11 . 1ndianapolis MILWAUKEE 13. San Francisco 14. San Diego 15. San Antonio 16. Boston 17. Memphis 18. St. Louis 19. New Orleans 20. Columbus, Ohio 21. Pittsburgh 22. Denver 23. Kansas City, Mo. 24. Atlanta 25. Buffalo 26. Cincinnati 27. Minneapolis

Year

Crime Index Total

Murder, Non-negligent Manslaughter

Forcible Rape

1973 1974 1973 1974 .1 973 1974 1973 1974 1973 1974 1973 1974 1973 1974 1973 1974 1973 1974 1973 1974 1973 1974 1973 1974 1973 1974 1973 1974 1973 1974 1973 1974 1973 1974 1973 1974 1973 1974 1973 1974 1973 1974 1973 1974 1973 1974 1973 1974 1973 1974 1973 1974 1973 1974

475,855 519,825 214,515 243,237 211,677 215,558 72,263 81,706 118,151 139,308 82,426 91,091 65,449 76,235 69,850 82 ,246 51,041 54,644 42 ,140 52,022 29,615 34,201 30,523 33,748 57,509 55,912 45,556 52,845 43,241 50,549 52,492 65 ,722 42,907 50,162 63,852 66,401 35,199 38,877 31,327 39,320 26,224 29,253 44,049 47,746 32 ,346 40,675 45,058 48,650 22,783 25,246 28,903 30,800 33,165 33,651

1,680 1,554 864 971 489 484 430 444 672 714 263 330 280 293 230 196 268 277 277 306 71 73 66 62 107 140 56 66 128 145 135 134 153 142 215 203 208 199 64 68 48 70 96 76 81 109 263 248 62 64 68 67 35 39

3.735 4,054 1,619 1,920 2,146 1,972 694 796 1,148 1,260 557 520 499 486 575 635 596 561 440 441 291 306 175 196 540 434 173 208 255 339 376 351 479 522 565 445 243 260 295 362 274 274 461 403 302 363 468 440 191 192 203 258 236 333

Robbery

Aggravated Assault

Burglary, Breaking Or Entering

$50 & Over

Auto Theft

72,750 77,940 24,181 26,172 13,706 13 ,614 8,481 10,069 16,249 20, 190 6,265 7,245 8,612 10,208 3,156 3,144 7,171 7,941 4,621 6,113 1,352 2,343 1,085 1,647 4,817 4,436 1,422 1,981 1,578 1,751 5,969 7,195 2,531 2,983 5,177 5,300 3 ,033 3,829 1,508 1,854 2,647 2,501 2,410 2,307 2,333 3,002 4,140 4,357 1,924 1,937 1,386 1,653 1,928 2,058

38, 148 41,068 12,285 13,218 13,888 14,407 4,983 5,237 6 ,608 6,957 1,909 1,602 6,415 6,379 4,846 3,679 3,591 2,811 1,967 2,728 859 885 730 827 2,650 2,684 1,104 1,321 2,018 2,198 2,190 2,582 1,572 1,690 3,314 3,410 2,058 2,282 755 1,004 1,847 1,611 1,906 1,918 1,960 2,433 2,650 3,369 706 643 733 1,203 1,235 1,440

149,311 158,321 44,753 50,722 68,729 67,293 18,790 21,295 36,.5 37 42 ,299 28,462 33,160 15,606 18,790 22,161 26,232 11 ,801 14,126 9,109 12,791 9 ,190 10,578 5,617 6,672 15,366 14,125 11 ,575 13,548 14,808 17,228 13,731 16,403 14,414 19,362 19,033 19,885 9,224 9 ,905 10,411 12,577 6,988 8,989 15,067 17,140 10,394 13,406 15,901 16,802 5,702 7,375 10,337 10,511 10,719 10,607

127,500 163,157 93,654 114.792 82 ,184 86,657 21,490 27,061 33,789 42 ,305 32,935 35,400 25,795 30,865 33,121 42,277 22,901 25,004 13,058 16,003 14,241 16,053 17,631 19,251 24,690 25,644 26 ,699 30,880 20,050 24,765 12,093 16,686 20,209 21,677 25,930 28,441 14,081 16,019 14,960 20,138 7,792 9,190 17,095 19,506 13,392 17 ,643 16,739 19,320 9,703 11,134 13,551 14,253 14,422 14,281

82,731 73 ,731 37,159 35,442 30,535 31,131 17,395 16,804 23,148 35,583 12,035 12,834 8 ,242 9 ,2 14 5,761 6,083 4,713 3,924 12,668 13,640 3,611 3,963 5,219 5,093 9,339 8 ,449 4,527 4,841 4 ,404 4,123 17 ,998 22,371 3,549 3,786 9,618 8,7.17 6,352 6 ,383 3,334 3,317 6,628 6,618 7,014 6,396 3,884 3,719 4,897 4,114 4,495 3,901 2,625 2,855 4,590 4,893

MURDER

25 Cities Had More

RAPE

25 Cities Had More

ROBBERY

26 Cities Had More

AGGRAVATED ASSAULT

25 Cities Had More

BURGLARY

26 Cities Had More

LARCENY OVER $50

17 Cities Had More

AUTO THEFT

15 Cities Had More

1

Classification of Offenses

2 Offenses Reported or known to police (Include 'unfounded' and attempts)

3

Unfounded, i.e., False or Baseless Complaints

4

5

6

Number of actual offenses (column 2 minus column 3) (Include attempts)

Total offenses cleared by arrest or exceptional means (includes column 6)

Number of offenses cleared involving only persons under 18)

Submit Supplement"ary Homicide Report

1. HOMICIDE

Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter (Score attempts as aggravated assault) b. Manslaughter hy Negligence a.

66 62

4 36

62 26

50 21

4 3

173 23

0 0

173 23

73 14

7 2

1116 153 24 367

6 2 0 5

1110 151 24 362

625 103 16 235

92 41 3 93

631 142 14

0 0 0

631 142 14

329 97 11

47 17 0

40

0

40

27

6

2189

700

346

6437 234 1.

2913 66 0

1302 32 0

2. FORCIBLE RAPE a. Rape by force b. Attempts to commit forcible rape

3. ROBBERY

Include Attempts

a. Firearm b. Knife or cutting instrument c. Other dangerous weapon d. Strong-Arm (hands, fists, feet, etc.)

4. ASSAULT

Include Attempts

a. Firearm b. Knife or cutting instrument c. Other dangerous weapon d. Hands, fists, feet, etc. aggravated injury e. Other assaults simple, not aggravated

5. BURGLARY

Include Attempts

a. Forcible entry b. Un!awful entry - no force c. Attempted forcible entry

6. THEFT

2190

6439 235 1

2 1 0

19271

20

19251

2163

1460

4720 146 14 249

36 0 0 0

4684 146 14 249

936 19 0 41

705 13 0 26

36076

113

35963

8439

4199

Include Attempts

(Except Motor Vehicle THEFT)

7. MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT Include Attempts

a. b. c. d.

Autos Trucks and Buses Snowmobiles Other vehicles

GRAND TOTAL

2

.9~~U.9l

REP[]RT (]f RRRE~T~ RlJUlT .9~[] JUUE~~lE

CLASSIFICATION OF ARRESTS

TOTAL ARRESTS

MURDER-NONNEGL. MANS. MANSLAUGHTER BY NEGL. FORCIBLE RAPE ROBBERY AGGRAVATED BATTERY BURGLARY THEFT (Except Auto) AUTO THEFT OTHER BATTERY FORGERY EMBEZZLEMENT & FRAUD STOLEN PROPERTY WEAPONS PROSTITUTION SEX OFFENSES (Except Rape & Prost.) OFF . AGAINST FAM . & CHILD NARCOTIC DRUG LAWS LIQUOR LAWS DRUNKENESS DISORDERLY CONDUCT VAGRANCY GAMBLING LAWS DRIVING W/INTOXICATED CURFEW ORDINANCE RUNAWAY ORDINANCE CRIM. DAM . TO PROPERTY ARSON MISCELLANEOUS

114 9 114 921 775 2281 3887 1188 1486 236 687 336 1081 362 402 393 2285 34 10041 3495 2 271 2286 1703 1627 952 83 6404

TOTALS

43455

RECAP:

3

STATE

CITY

758 42 7 1 8 2 28 9887 1114 117 1918 8 584 14475

MALE

114 9 114 921 775 2281 3129 1188 1444 236 680 335 1073 362 400 39-2 2285 6 154 2381 2 154 368 1703 1627 944 83 5820 28980

107 8 113 864 676 2196 2825 1111 1280 152 450 307 931 82 326 341 1922 25 9258 2946 2 246 2146 1289 682 876 71 4631 35863

FEMALE

JUVENILE

7 1 1 57 99 85 1062 77 206 84 237 29 150 280 76 52 363 9 783 549

7 4 17 346 142 1634 2143 906 634 33 29 168 257 75 182 1 621

25 140 414 945 76 12 1773

35 21 1703 1627 597 61 3563

7592

16447

149 1492

--

TRAFFIC BREAKDOWN

ADULT

ADULT

107 5 97 575 633 647 1744 282 852 203 658 168 824 287 220 392 1664 34 9892 2003 2 236 2265 355 22 2841 27008 JUVENILE

CITY OFFENSE STATE AND MISCELLANEOUS OFFENSES PEDESTRIAN ORDINANCE PARKING ORDINANCE CAR KEY ORDINANCE OTHER MOVING TRAFFIC VIOLATIONS EQUIPMENT VIOLATIONS NEGLECTED CHILDREN DEPENDENT CHILDREN

14475 28980 4216 452858 864 58372 48185 57 52

FAILURE TO OBEY SIGNS AND SIGNALS FAILURE TO YIELD RIGHT OF WAY RECKLESS DRIVING SPEEDING AUTO AND DRIVERS LICENSE LAWS OTHER MOVING TRAFFIC

9265 2725 368 11874 16006 12884

630 203 63 819 1798 1737

TOTAL

53122

5250

TOTAL

608059

TOTAL MOVING TRAFFIC

58372

RlJE, SEX

R~[)

PERS[]~S

RRLE tJf 10 & Under M F

11-12 M F

RRRESTEU - LI~UER

13-14 M

15 M

F

17

16

M

F

F

M

F

--------------------------------------------------

Murder and Non-Negligent Manslaughter Manslaughter by Negligence Forcible Rape Robbery Aggravated Assault Burglary- Breaking or Entering Larceny - Theft (Except Auto Theft) Auto Theft Other Assaults Arson Forgery and Counterfeiting Fraud Embezzlement Stolen Property; Buying, Receiving, Possessing Vandalism Weapons; Carrying, Possessing, etc. Pr.ostitution and Commercialized Vice Sex Offenses (Except Forcible Rape, Prostitution, and Commercialized Vice) Opium or Cocaine and Their Derivatives (Morphine, Heroin, Codeine) Marijuana Synthetic Narcotics- Manufactured Narcotics Which Can Cause True Drug Addiction (Demerol, Methadones) Other - Dangerous Non=Narcotic Drugs (Barbiturates, Benzedrine, Inhalants) Bookmaking (Horse and Sport Book) Numbers and Lottery All Other Gambling Offenses Against Family and Children Driving Under The Influence Liquor Laws Drunkenness Disorderly Conduct Vagrancy All Other Offenses (Except Traffic) Curfew and Loitering Law Violations Run -Aways

0

0

0 0 4

0 0 0 0

1

1 0 0

38

71 101

4

10

1

175 241 35 57 19

8 42 4

2 0

0 5 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0

3

0

4

12 4

1 0 0 3

49

0

0 0 0

1 0 10

8

0

1

0

3

0

8

0

4

1

0

0

0

3

0

0 0

63 21 303 273 209 91

4

17 86 22 19

0 2 4 6 78 16

3 17

79 10 25 2 517 17 585 140 206 14 135 63

4 74 30 254 252 213 105

0 0

2

0

1 9

328 18 120 22 1576 58 1705 438 843 63 503 131 57 4

88 61 708 893 548 266 35 25 17

1

1

11

0

0 0

2 2 0 36 189

3 3 0

3 3 0

5

38 72

3 3 0 4

9

32

5

94 7

0 2 3

0

0

64 0

2

33

7 6 0 5 8

0

l7 12 0

28

154 550 212 22

14 47 45 53

14

25

17

15

29

~6

29

9

115

0

1

2

0

1

69

22

116

39

143

32

2

6

6

3

15

26

6 0 0

34 0 0 11

12

0 0

20

5 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

232 0

0

0

0

0

2

2

0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1

0

9

1

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

0

0

0

0

3

0

1

0

93

17

0 0 0 0 0 0 10 3 317 107 0 0

14 0 0 12 0

0 0

3

8

1

0 4 0

0 0 0

59

37 272

2 52

0

0

0

12 0 46

11

0 0 0 0 5 0 10

25 53

553 471 356 147 215 315

409· 367 326 . 128 140 279

497 311 474 100 141 187

281 35 0 0 460 226 46 13 92 107

1110 230

3400 1375

2364 1076

2732 871

2259 650

:o

1

171 73

19

4

75

355

25

0

62

17

3

0 10

0 0 7

16

6

1 49

42 14

4 5 0

0

0

0

1

12

0

27

8

10

3

0

9 88 7 19

7

81 54

22 9

0

0

7 5 6 0 31

17 0 4 0 0 0

70 33 256 253 179 103

36 65 53 19

0

0 0 0 0

8

8

0

o.

Total Under 18 M F WHITE

0 0

2

2

0

~8

5

0

86

'rERRS (]f RlJE NEGRO

4

12 248 78 899 1202 329

INDIAN

0

0

0

0

0 1 3 7

0 0 0 0 0

0 0 9 0

23

1

12

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

342

5

26

0 0 0 0

8 12" 0

2

120

77 170 131

26

47

4 3 0

67

105

71

4 2 381 103

6

0

379

8

84 0 0

416

YELLOW . OTHERS

21 0 0 0 0 3

7 3

0

2

0

0

6

97

0 4

0 0

4

21

2

0

0

0

24 0

76

32

0

0 0

0 0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

34 0 1

0

0

0 0

0 0

34

1

16 0

0 5 0

1 20 0

0

0

0

114 22 1222 270

8 466 0 1439 653 538

0 19 0 44 19 18

0 1 0

2132 1444 1289 414 682 945

127 988 0 2047 1003 1051

12220 4227

9125

0

20 24 17

0

0

0 0 0 0 f)

0

18 0 45 27 19

~-----------------------

TOTALS TOTAL POLICE DISPOSITION OF JUVENILES HANDLED WITHIN DEPT AND RELEASED

6927

164

5

226

16447 2882

4

111JE,

~E~ 11~[)

PER~[]~~ 11RRE~TEU - []UER ~8 YEI1R~

RI1LE []f 18

OFFENSE

Murder and Non-Negligent Manslaughter Manslaughter by Negligence Forcible Rape Robbery Aggravated Assau It Burglary - Breaking or Entering Larceny -Theft (Except Auto Theft) Auto Theft Other Assaults Arson Forgery and Counterfeiting Fraud Embezzlement Stolen Property; Buying, Receiving, Possessing Vandalism Weapons; Carrying, Possessing, etc. Prostitution and Commercialized Vice Sex Offenses (Except Forcible Rape, Prostitution and Commercialized Vice) Opium or Cocaine and Their Derivatives (Morphine, Heroin, Codeine) Marijuana Synthetic Narcotics - Manufactured Narcotics Which Can Cause True Drug Addiction (Demerol, Methadones) Other Dangerous Non-Narcotic Drugs (Barbiturates, Benzedrine, Inhalants) Bookmaking Numbers and Lottery All Other Gambling Offenses Against Family and Children Driving Under The Influence Liquor Laws Drunkenness Disorderly Conduct Vagrancy All Other Offenses (Except Traffic) 5

TOTAL

19

22

21

20

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

5

0

0 0

1

9

0

7 0

7

0

0 0 0

2

0

3 0 6

6

0

0 8

68

4

57

5

66

4

39

36

4

23

3

18

4

24

0 0 4 7

156

5

74

83

7

45

'176

78

128

2 77

85

63

68

4

36

5

31

53

11

49

8

46

0 2

77 29 46

2 6

0 9

0

0

1

0

6

16

8

7

11

13

10

14

15

22

21

24

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

12

15

3 1

16

1

20

19

45

10

47

7

22

13

40 54

1

40

8

48

8

33

8

2 2 13 35

17

0

15

0

21

0

23 F

0

7

24

M

F

M

F

25-29 M F

M

5

2

6

0

30

13

2

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

8

0 2

8

0

17

0

16

41

0

109

10

34

0 2

29

113

15

87

11

31

85

2

36

2

97

57

9

1

110

5

2

30-34

F

48

2

47

30

4

24

37

2

42

40

66

42

7

22 42

2 5

66 8 59

5

3

20

0 5

0 6

0 5

10

0

38

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56 437 414 323

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6

r:l[Jl[JR

UEH~LlE TRI1ff~L 11LL~UE~TS

NUMBER OF ACCIDENTS TYPE OF ACCIDENT All Accidents

Motor Vehicle: 1. 2. 3. 4.

5. 6. 7.

8. 9. 10. 11.

Ran off road Overturned on road Pedestrian Motor vehicle in traffic Parked motor vehicle Railroad train Bicyclist Aninlal Fixed object Other object Other non-collision

1. G-4 2. 5-9 3. 10-14 4. 15-19 5. 20-24 6. 25-34 7. 35-44 8. 45-54 9. 55-64 10. 65-74 11. 75 & over 12. Not stated 7

TOTALS

5

2 3 8 6 8 4 4 9 5 6

1 2 6 3 7 4 3 5 4 2

62

42

32 9

1 1 2

2

1 2 3

569 30 66

9

20268

59

5

198

65

6534

9

8

234 1186 277

47

148

298 2672 238 2 133

39 1

94

53

6

6

9

24

773

2178

Bicyclists Total Male Female

1

4

4 20

5

3

4

4

4

32

2 3

21

11

2

2

0

Total Killed

922 11

6

0

32 11

9059 3256 13

Total 558 27 815 6675 768

1 1 2

3 3

9

16

374 17 17

3583

13675

62

Total Injured Total Male Female

5 346 2 260 17 51 9524

INJURED a b 252 13 244 1694 336

45 9

125 7 25

90 9 17

901

2853

5770

1

PERSONS INJURED Pedestrians Total Male Female 57 130 54 43 38 49 33 23 15 11

55

42

30 77 34 41 26 22 14 11 20 14 10 13

9524 5329 4195

815

503

312

8

155

227 12 399 4512 359 3 142

1

87 207 88 84 64 71 47 34 35 25 18

191 293 240 878 995 1098 514 364 226 115 56 359

c

79 2 172 469 73 1 49

151 176 189 702 838 800 427 374 253 134 60 91

342 469 429 1580 1833 1898 941 738 479 249 116 450

2 1

2 2

157

2

1 1

2 2

Property Damage

c

165 374 69

4 328 2 186 13 49

PERSONS KILLED Pedestrians Total Male Female

7 2 2 2

NON-FATAL a b

420 19 697 4232 584

5

5

Total Killed Total Male Female

7

Fatal

1347 30 729 13300 3841 18 333

TOTALS

Age of Casualty

Total

NUMBER OF PERSONS

Bicyclists Total Male Female

2

2

66 122 86 37 14 4

47 97 59 22 10 3

2 5

2 5

2

1

1

6

4

2

346

252

94

19 25 27 15 4

Traffic laws must be strictly enforced and citizens must be "educated" in motoring practices to reduce or prevent the type tragedy depicted above.

8

TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS BY DAY & TIME TIME Hour Beginning

Tuesday All Fatal

Wednesday All Fatal -

Thursday All ,Fatal

Friday Fatal All -

Saturday All Fatal -

Sunday All Fatal -

202

2

225

0. Midnight

838

5

80

71

65

89

106

1. 1:00

692

4

64

47

59

81

77

171

2

193

2. 2:00

790

2

69

57

49

84

85

256

1

190

3. 3:00

408

20

13

13

15

24

60

263

4. 4:00

193

14

8

15

4

18

30

104

5. 5:00

170

15

33

12

23

37

42

6. 6:00

446

55

119

8 81

57

71

37

26

7. 7:00

898

132

261

169

126

134

50

26

8. 8:00

822

233

578

129 67

25 44

697

89 119

67 87

10. 10:00

7 2

145 77

106

9. 9:00

117 84

147

11. 11:00

904

2

148

188

53 88

12. Noon

993

13. 1:00

1022

14. 2:00

1130

15. 3:00

1631

5

16. 4:00

1593

17. 5:00

1313

18. 6:00

911

19. 7:00

932

20. 8:00

3

2

130

2

89

89

107

132

124

122

102

148

156

131

157

174

112

123

133

115 124

151

176

182

133

161

144

165

179

195

139

242

147 247

229

234

214

162

2

242

219

232

212

303 349

186

153

2

175

193

160

184

280

180

141

99

130

107

123

192

143

117

4

114

99

120

118

190

1

158

1

133

745

6

91

85

79

85

150

3

136

1

119

21. 9:00

775

5

92

101

90

94

163

138

2

97

22. 10:00

879

5

93

96

120

106

181

178

105

23.11:00

829

77

99

82

98

226

169

78

79

15

9

5 2499

6 2580

--

15

18

TOTALS

20268

2

59

2547

2

8

2899

4

2

1 2

2

93

24. Not stated 9

Total Accidents Monday Fatal All Fatal All

11

12

3557

13

--

3400

11

2786

Not Stated All Fatal

2

9

0

0

fa[]l[]A PEDESTRIAN ACTIONS BY AGE 1a. Crossing or entering roadway at intersection b. Same-not at intersection 2a. Walking in roadway w/traffic b. Same-against traffic 3. Standing in_roadway 4. Getting on or off other vehicle 5_ Pushing or working on vehicle in roadway 6. Other working in roadway 7. Playing on roadway 8. Other in roadway 9. Not in roadway 10. Not stated TOTALS

1. 2. 3. 4 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11 . 12.

AGE OF DRIVER 15 & younger 16 17 18- 19 20-24 25-34 35- 44 45-54 55- 64 65-74 75 & over Not stated TOTALS

UEHU~lE TAflff~L

Ped~strians

Killed 9 9 1

Total

0-4

5-9

297 300 16 5 31 20

8 57 1

50 123 2 1 2

9 8 37 44 40 40 847

3 1 8 32

All Accidents Fatal Accidents

72 654 1242 3195 6782 7931 4281 3827 2551 1208 415 2809 34967

1 3 7 9 13 6 8 4 1 1 2 55

PEDESTRIANS KILLED AND INJURED AGt 10-14 15-19 20-24 25-44 36 34 1

39 19 4

1 2

8 5

16 9 6

1 5 7 3

2 11 4 3

2 6

209

90

86

64

14 13

93

Non-Fatal Injury Ace. 26 193 391 1080 2350 2876 1486 1225 813 386 134 443 11403

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

13.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

CONTRIBUTING Cl RCUMST ANCES INDICATED Speed too fast Failed to yield right of way Drove left of center Improper overtaking Passed stop sign Disregarded traffic signal Followed too closely Made improper turn Other improper driving Inaccurate brakes Inaccurate lights Had been drinking TOTALS

All Acciden t s Fatal Accidents 21 1344 11 4458 291 248 258 1051 7 867 757 2693 3 304 3 65 1077 13 - 59 13413

flL L~lJEr;ilS

Non-Fatal Injury Ace. 408 1544 77 58 107 453 299 139 860 112 18 401 -4476

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

1. 2. 3. 4.

26 12 2 1 6 5

50 22 4 1 8 6

4

3 6 1 5 13 1 120

TYPE OF MOTOR VEHICLE All Passenger car Passenger car and trai fer Truck or truck tractor Truck tractor and semi -trailer Othe r truck combination Farm tractor and/or farm equip. Taxicab Bus School bus Motorcycle Motor scooter or motor bicycle Others and not stated TOTALS Special vehicles included above. Emergency vehicle (including privately owned)

45-64

65 & Older

Not Stated

42 16 2

34 10

12 7

l 5 1

l

3 4 74

48

Accidents Fatal Accidents 35472 44 7 2015 4 334 2

4 39 63 Non-Fatal Injury Ace. 11127 2 585 71

1 171 28 345 5 1765 40143

2 55

27

59 3 299 3 243 12392

13

ROAD SURFACE CONDITIONS Dry Wet Snowy or icy Other Not stated TOTALS

All Accidents Fatal Accidents 11678 36 17 5151 3116 4 232 2 91 20268 59

Non-Fatal Injury Ace. 4194 1661 593 69 17 6534

LIGHT CONDITION Daylight Dawn or dusk Sunglasses Not stated TOTALS

All Accidents Fatal Accidents 12135 23 537 3 7523 32 73 1 20268 59

Non-Fatal Injury Ace. 4036 144 2350 4 -6534

10

UEHU~lE CITY TOTALS

THEfTS MEANS

HOW

PLACE

ANNUAL 1974 1-

MAKE OF AUTO

TOTAL

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BUICK

730

367

26

87

225

14

11

-

-

7

2

CADILLAC

273

141

8

22

91

7

4

-

-

-

-

1497

754

54

129

506

35

19

-

-

27

89

40

5

15

25

4

-

-

-

3

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

DODGE

220

97

3

31

79

5

5

-

FORD

663

272

25

79

250

21

16

-

MERCURY

103

40

1

14

44

2

2

OLDSMOBILE

300

145

9

29

98

14

PLYMOUTH

172

72

5

23

66

PONTIAC

403

198

12

47

RAMBLER

137

63

8

FOREIGN

146

61

ALL OTHER

118 241

5093

CHEVROLET CHRYSLER DESOTO

CYCLES

TOTA L S

I

2

2 a: 0 22 w. w -I1-1- E:2 o..w >2w a: a: w2 0<( C}Q.. ::::>0

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3

596 234

<(

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0

w

1-1-

2~

2~

-0

-

438

64

12

53

85

-

188

3

5

31

-

-

-

525

1

942

197

34

90

6

2

2

1

-

-

71

-

::::>

0

...,$: ~5:2

i=

~(..)

1

0

1166

-

29

-

57

1

6

10

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

9

-

85

-

126

2

23

19

-

2

1

173

6

1

264

-

392

4

44

92

1

1

2

519

-

-

2

-

32

-

69

1

7

8

-

-

5

-

-

1

-

114

-

185

10

4

43

-

-

1

242

5

1

-

-

8

-

59

-

105

1

10

13

-

2

-

146

132

5

9

-

2

-

137

-

264

7

3

50

2

338

52

2

1

-

48

-

87

7

2

14

-

3

11

-

-

-

114

5

13

57

9

1

-

-

3

-

54

-

89

-

2

8

-

-

-

136

47

2

17

44

2

6

-

-

1

-

27

-

90

-

2

16

-

1

-

99

53

6

128

43

1

10

-

-

-

-

1

-

240

-

-

-

-

2351

169

645

1712

126

90

-

-

70

-

1973

11

w

we C}a:

<(<(

0

0

a:

*THEFTS ... . ..... . ........... . . STILL OUT . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . PERCENTAGE OF RECOVERIES ... . RECOVERED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. : .. OUT OF TOWN RECOVERIES .... . . VALUE OF THEFTS .... . ...... . .

5,219 488 90.6% 4,731 379 $3,720,457.

1

1

6

1744

1

3272

297

154

448

1974 5,093 668 86.8% 4,425 380 $4,773,663.

9

-

12

87

-

1

240

12

4167

1973

1974

**AUTO THEFT ARRESTS Juveniles Adults ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TOTAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1,026 267 1,293

906 282 1,188

***REPORTS CLEARED BY ARREST . ..

1,338

996

••••

0

• • • • • • • • • • •

0.

P[]l~CE UEH~ClE~

EQUIPMENT MODELS IN USE 12-31-74

TYPE OF SERVICE

NO.

Year

Model

10

1974 1973 1974 1974 1974 1973 1972 1970 1967 1973 1972 1974 1973 1972 1969 1967 1974 1973 1971 1969 1974 1974 1971 1970 1966 1967 1963 1971 1953 1951 1966 1973 1969 1965 1973 1972 1969 1973 1967 1966 1973 1971 1973 1974 1957 1972 1962

AMC Jeep Truck- Right Hand Drive AMC Jeep Truck- Right Hand Drive AMC Matador 4 door sedan Bomb Di sposal Trailer Chevrolet Carryall Chevrolet Carryall Chevrolet Carryall Chevrolet Carryall Chevrolet Carryall Radi o Truck Chevrolet Panel Truck Chevrol et Panel Truck Chevrolet Van Truck Chevrolet Van Truck Chevrolet Van Truck Chevrolet Van Truck Chevrolet Van Truck Cushman Personnel Carrier Cushman Personnel Carrier Cushman Personnel Carrier Cushman Personnel Carrier Dodge 4 door sedan Ford Panel Truck Ford Panel Truck Ford 4 door sedan Ford Econoline Radio Truck G.M.C. Community Relations, Bus Inland Seas Boat- 28 foot I.H.C. Metro Body Truck I.H.C. Metro Body Truck I.H .C. Metro Body Truck I.H.C. Pickup Truck Oldsmobile 4 door sedan Oldsmobile 4 door sedan Oldsmobile 4 door sedan Plymouth 4 door sedan Plymouth 4 door sedan Plymouth 4 door sedan Pontiac 4 door sedan Pontiac 4 door sedan Pontiac 4 door sedan Rambler, Matador 4 door sedan Rambler 4 door sedan Rambler Station Wagon Sea Ray Boat - 24 foot Semi-Highway Trailer Truck Westcoaster Personnel Carrier Willys Jeep Truck

Ambulance .............. . . . .... .. ........ .... . ... .. ........ Ambulance- Spares .. . ..... . .. . ........ . ... .. ... _ .. _ . . . . . . . . Boats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bomb Disposal Trailer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Civil Defense Trailers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . Community Relations Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cruising Wagons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crui sing Wagons- Spares . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Emergency Trucks or Wagons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Non Uniform Vehicles . .. ... . . .. . ..... .. • . ... . .... ... ..... . . . . Non Uniform Vehicles - Spares .. . ..... . ... . ................... Parking Checker Jeep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Patrol Wagons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Patrol Wagons - Spares . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Personnel Carriers .... . ........ . . . ..... . .. . .. . ... ... .. . ...... Radio Trucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Traffic Vehicle s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Traffic Vehicles - Spares . .. ........ . ................ : : : : :: : : : : Uniform Sgt. Vehicles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Uniform Squad Vehicles .......... . ........ ·... .. ..... .. .... ... Uniform Squad Vehicles- Spares ...•............ . .............. Utility Trucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vice Squad Truck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1

64 1

12 11 4 1 1

2 2 2 2 2

1 1 2

5 2 1 5 2 1 4 1 1 1

5 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

36 1

3 3 1

60 18 1 1

2 2 1

1974 FLEET, NO. & TYPES OF VEHICLES

1974 FLEET MILEAGE

22 5 2 1 2 1 5 2 3

98 10 11 8 4

122

17 4 8

49 14 2 1

1974 FLEET REPORTABLE ACCIDENTS

283 Cars, Trucks & Utility Vehicles

76 Motorcycles, 2 Wheel 44 Motorcycles, 3 Wheel 403 TOTAL VEHICLES

7,308,923 186 397,614 16 236,613 ~ 7,943,150 Miles 205 Accidents

1974 FLEET REPAIR COST Cars, Trucks, and utility vehicles: Accident Repairs ... . Speedometer Service . Tire Repairs . . . . . . . . Miscellaneous .......

...... $ 47,721.33 ....... 2,346.02 . . . . • . . 14,340.27 . .. . ... 379,951.94

$444,359.56 (.060796d per mile) Motorcycles: Maintenance & Accident Repairs .. $ 67,989.33 (.1 06528d per mile)

12

AUTHORIZED 12-31-74

ACTUAL 1-1-75

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 1 1 24* 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 22 26 10 1 •• 2 150 8 3 154 1 2 4 47 1639 16 2 7 9

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 1 1 24 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 22 22 11 1 2 153 8 3 153 1 2 4 47 1606 16 1 7 9

POSITIONS WITH POLICE POWERS Chief of Police Inspector of Police First Deputy Inspector of Police Inspector of Detectives Dep . Inspector of Police Academy Deputy Inspector of Traffic Supt. of Police -Communications Deputy Inspector of Pol ice Deputy I nspe'ctor of Detectives Deputy Inspector of Police Identification Captain of Police Asst. Supt. of Police Communications Secretary of Police Asst. Police Identification Supt. Supervisor of Police Data Services Police Electronic Technician Foreman

Chief Document Examiner Lieutenant of Police Garage Chief Operator of Police Alarm Lieutenant of Detectives

Lieutenant of Police Police Electronic Technician Detective, Legal and Administrative Asst. Chief Operator of Police Alarm Police Sergeant Administrative Poli ce Sergeant Police Sergeant Garage Detective

Custodian of Police Property & Stores Police Identification Supervisor Assistant Document Examiner

Police Alarm Operator Police Patrolman

Policewoman Asst. Custodian of Police Property & Stores ld
MAXIMUM BI-WEEKLY SALARY AS OF 12-31-74 $1,315.37 1,127 .94 941.64 905.10 905 .10 832.18 832 . 18 769.90 769.90 769 .90 717.50 688.96 659.79 659.79 634.35 623.25 623.25 608.93 608.93 608.93 608.93 602 .07 580.91 568.66 568 . 66 568.66 568.66 559.75 559.75 559 .75 540.00 540.00 504. 03 504.03 504.03 504.03 413.40

SEPARATIONS FROM SERVICE

With Police Powers

Voluntary Resignation

Without Police Powers

27

6

27

2

Retirement on Pension: Annuity Disability

0 0

Killed in Line of Duty

3

Deceased

6

0

Dismissed

4

0

Leave of Absence

4

5

0

4

72

17

13

47

ADDITIONS TO SERVICE Rec ruited During the Year Returned from Military Services

0

Returned from Suspension

0

Returned from Leave of Absence Returned from Duty Disability

0

Transferred from Other City Department

2

TOTAL ADDITIONS

0

18

49

CIVILIAN POSITIONS

13

1 1 1 5 4 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 35 1 9 2 6 5 13 35 0 1 52 0 0 30 0 5

1 1 1 5 4 1 1

0 2 1 2 34 1 g 2 6 5 8 30 0 1 51 5 4 4 6 5

2367

2304

,

Building Maintenance Supervisor II Building Maintenance Foreman II Building Maintenance Foreman I Heating & Ventilating Mechanic I

Maintenance Mechanic I Duplicating Equipment Operator Ill Clerk Stenographer IV Clerk IV Law Stenographer Ill Tabulating Equipment Operator II Duplicating Equipment Operator II Garage Attend ant

Custodial Worker II -City Laborer Clerk Ill Clerk Stenographer Ill Clerk Typist Ill Parking Checker Key Punch Operator II Clerk Stenographer II Clerk Typist II Key Punch Operawr I Key Punch Operator I (.50 man year) Police Aide Clerk Typist I Clerk Typist I (E.E.A.) Clerk Typist I (CETA) Clerk Stenographer I Pol ice Physician • One assigned to Mayor's office • • One assigned to City Attorney's office

578 . 17 497.49 477 .65 437.70 431 . 13 419.28 412 .38 412 .38 412.38 390.71 390.71 385.70 380.68 373.40 373.40 373.40 371.16 362.70 345.39 345,39 328.75 328.75 319.65 311.43 31, .43 311.43 311.43 172.60

RECAP Present for duty January 1, 1974 .. -.--.-- .. 2,326

.... ..... ... .

89

Additions during year . . . . . . . . __ . ....

67

Separations during year

Present for duty January 1, 1975 . . . . . ... . . . 2,304

AUTHORIZED I ACTUAL STRENGTH Civilian Employees

Personnel With Police Powers

Total Personnel

202

2150

2352

POSITIONS AUTHORIZED DURING 1974

30

2

32

POSITIONS DELETED DURING 1974

16

AUTHORIZED STRENGTH JANUARY 1,1974

17

TOTAL AUTHORIZED AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1974

216

2151

2367

ACTUAL STRENGTH AS OF JANUARY 1,1975

190

2114

2304

- 26

-37

-63

VACANCIES- JANUARY 1, 1975

[]UEAT ~l':'IE 1969 Total Compensatory Hours Earned

$

53,579.70

$

1973

61,511.35

$

1974

44,270.31 398,134.09

414,822.94

$ 446,733.6

$ 450,232.6

$ 419,745.75

$ 440,027.75

$ 442;404.40

$ 469,947.77

4.41

4.57

4.67

!i27

5.68

6.29

$1 '723,963.61

$1,813,106.90

$1 J11 ,059.05

$1,997,197.58

$2,262,545.23

$2,609,259.53

29,373.20.

87,866.10

Administrative Functions, General

10,281.26

Ambulance Service

22,842.9

27,016.5

24,272.6

$ 806,342.50 4,393.62

20,786.7

Judicial Proceedings License Processing and. Control

4,163.91

Buildings and Grounds Operations

13,928.72

Miscellaneous Police Services

3,306.16

Civil Rights & Building Security

47,512.64

Patrol Service

13,780.16

Communications Operations

10,189.29

Prisoner Conveyance and Care

13,523.75

Community· Education

642,921 .54

Roll Ca II and Preparation for Duty

2,551.21

Delinquency Prevention and Control

60,581 .02

Special Assignments, Other Agencies

6,343.41

Federat Grant Projects

76,145.40

Special Events

Investigation, General Offenses

42,537.18

Stadium Events

Investigation, Major Crime

65,997.88

Summerfest Events

177,700.20 17,448.75 121 ,163.06 4,926.19

Investigation, Traffic Accidents Investigation, Vice Investigation, Miscellaneous

55,124.83

378,516.40

16,564.39

30,701.12

$

366,166.05

Carry-Over of Compensatory -Hours From Previous Year - Time Owed

$

53,644.8

1972

396,587.8

Average Hourly Straight Time Rate Total Cost of Paid Overtime for Year

$

1971

391 '144.9

Paid Hours Performed

TOTAL OVERTtME HOURS

1970

55,588.7

$

[)~SBlJASEr:IE~T

113,173.26

Supervision and Administration -Police Service Divisions

24,165.96

Training

$2,330,342.58

TOTAL

14

EXPENDITURES Salaries and Wages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... .. . . ......... .. . .. ...................................... . ... ... $33,067,288.00 Supplies and Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . 595,351.00 Services .. ....... . .. ; . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,345,914.00 Equipment and Facility Rent . .. . .................... . ....... . . ..... ............ . ...... ........................ 303,615.00 Special Funds (Federal Grant- Police Computer System)....... .... . . . .. .. ..... ............... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56,737.00 TOTAL -OPERATING COSTS .......................................................................... $35,368,905.00 Additional & Replacement Equipment (func~ed through Capital Improvements) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 422,703.00

TOTAL FUNDING .......... .. . . .. . ..................... . .. .... ........... . . . .... _.............. . ·.. : . :$35,791,608.00 REVENUE FROM POLICE SERVICES Fines and Penalties ..... . .............................. . . . . .. ..... . . .. . . ........ ... ... . $3,611,605.93 Police Officer's Witness Fees & Officers Assigned to City Court .. . ........ ._ .... . ........ .. ... . .. . 234,744.25 Accident Report Copy Sales .. , . ....... . ...........................•........... . . .. ...... . 103,065.00 Fingerprint Services & Other Copy Report Sales ............... ....... .. . . ...... .. . ....... .. . 2,483.00 Parking Permits Sold- Night (On Street) . . ... ... . .... . .. .... ... ...... . ...... . ..... • . ..... . 830,552.00 Parking Permits Sold -Off Street ....................................................... . 2,522.00 20,474.08 Unclaimed Articles Sold at Auction ........................... . ........... . ............. . . Communication Repair Services Rendered Other City Departments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9,000.51 Other Miscellaneous Revenue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46,275.83_ Reimbursement from Wisconsin Conservation Department fo·r Op-e ration ofWater Safety Patrol ..... . .............. .".. . .. .. . ... . . .... . . ........ . ................ 31,341.79 Reimbursement of Federal Grant Projects Police Computer Program No.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82,676 .22 105,624.44 Police Computer Program No.3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Police Service Cost Benefit Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44,668.18 Project Before . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,825.48 Police Community Relations Grant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,009.92 17,030.05 Police Miracode Microfilm Grant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Police Recruit Training Program . ..... . ....... . ·.... .. ................ . ...... .. ...... 109,171.35 Police In-Service Training ·Program .. ... .. ......... ~ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40,440.00 Pol ice Personal Portable Radio System .... ~ ... . ..... . .... : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152,289.00 Police Academy Training Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53,514.49 Police Polygraph Grant .. ... .. .. ........ .. ....... . :............................... 2,061.17 Police Bomb Di·s-posal Unit Grant ...... ..... ..... .... . ..... ........ . ... .. . ... ..... :. . 2,531.60 ----'----

15

Net cost to the City of Milwaukee for the year 1973 = $27,708,637.20

T ·O TAL

$ 5,512,906 .29

FOR 1974

$30,278,701.71