1995 - Navy.mil

1995 - Navy.mil

I MAGAZINE OF THE U.S. NAVY True Colors JULY 1995 k ALLWND6 JULY 1995 Number 939 & Operations 4 8 10 USSPACECOM - the finalfrontier Theanat...

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MAGAZINE OF THE U.S. NAVY

True

Colors JULY 1995

k

ALLWND6

JULY 1995

Number 939

& Operations 4 8 10

USSPACECOM - the finalfrontier Theanatomyof a Medcruise Challengingoverpriced parts pays off

..im Environment 12 Hawaiianparadise - EarthDay ‘95 14 Natural gas - Navy’s fuel of the future

Training 16 20

MCMsrotate in minewarfarearena Northern exposure found in Norway

Navy Life 24 30 32 36

Colorsfly with CeremonialGuard WheelofFortunespins on Ike Cartoons humorous look at Naw life Prostheticsrebuildfaces,lives

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I+] Health & Safety 38 42

Navy gets tough on domestic violence Staycool,preventdrivingstress

2 Charthouse 44 Models of Success

45 Bearings 48 Shipmates Front cower: AN Marvin E.B. Grant of Live Oak, Fla., folds colors during a funeral at Arlington National Cemetery. Photo by PH1 Dolores L. Anglin

OOPS!

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April 1995 The credit line for the copyrighted artwork on Pages6 and 7 should read SallyJ. BensusenNisual Science Studio. May 1995 - The photo credit for the back cover photos should beJOI Ray Mooney.

June 1995 - The box on Page 26 should read as follows: “The declared nuclear powers include the United States, Russia, China,

Great Britain and France.”

Cha~house New recruits receive one-time PT clothing allowance New recruits will receive a physical training (PT) clothing allowanceto help them meet the requirementto participate in mandatory Navy fitness training. Recruits currently are requiredto

expense upon arrival

New funds will

readiness. KG’S 10 officers and 81 Sailors on July 1 began moving to Mayport, where they will continueto conduct underway training of the U.S. Atlantic Fleet, US. Coast Guard and foreign navies. R% Guantanamo will disestablish July 15. The 11 ETG billets will be reprogrammed into other areas of fleet concentration, primarily in the Mayport area.

“Tkoops to Cops” conversion program announced

million to the Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) programto assist with conversion efforts and expedite a presidential mandateto put 100,000 peace-keeping officers on the streets. Eligible veterans must have been a member of the Armed Forces on or after Oct. 1, 1993, and been honorably discharged. Veterans should contact their local transition officeto find out about police vacancies. More than 7,700 law enforcement agencies across the country were selected to receive COPS hiring grants. Grants may be usedto pay for academy, supplemental or in-service training costs for veterans hired after Jan. 1, 1995.

recruit with a

Recently separated and soon-to-be separated veterans can join the ranks of local peace keepers through a new BUPERS Access and police training grant program anSALTS additions nounced May 2 by DOD and the required PT gear. Department of Justice. The program, Each recruit will receive an allowBibliographies (Bibs)for advanceance for one set of sweat clothes, a “Troops to Cops,” provides up to ment study, Personnel Advancement knit cap, two sets of shorts and shirts $5,000 in training funds to eligible Requirements (PARS) and the Upand four pairs of socks. The allowance policing agencies for each veteran of $56.35 will begin Oct. 1, 1996. hired this year. DOD has awarded $1 5 dates to the Catalog of Nonresident Training Courses (NAVEDTRA 12061) are now available on the BUPERS r Access bulletin board and on the Fleet lkainingGroup Streamlined Automated Logistics moves to Mayport Transmission System (SALTS). Advancement handbooks can no longer be ordered from the Naval The Navy moved Fleet Training Education and Training Program Group (FTG) from Naval Base GuanManagement Support Activity. For tanamo Bay, Cuba, to Naval Station CY96, NETPMSA will mail each Mayport, Fla., and will disestablish the command a set of Bibs and PARs for Engineering Training Group (ETG) now all ratings in the form of a hard-copy at Guantanamo Bay. printout and a Wordperfect5.1 disk The Navy based the final decision file. to move FTG and disestablish ETG on For CY97 and beyond, commands a number of factors, including the must obtain Bibs andPARs from commitment to keep families together, BUPERS Access or SALTS. For improve the quality of life for Sailors, to information on SALTS, call DSN 442conserve money, and the unknown 1112 or (215) 697-1 112. For informafuture of Guantanamo Bay. The move tion on Bibs andPARs, call DSN 922to Mayport also decreases transit time 1663 or (904) 452-1 663. for ships, which allows more training time in other areas to heighten ships’

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After competitive bidding, the

qualified officers.

More information is available in Dental contract award contract to operate the program was delayed, premiums cut awarded to United Concordia Compa- NAVADMIN 82/95. nies, Inc. (UCC) of Camp Hill, Pa., on Feb. 6. However, the current contracEffective July 1, 1995, beginning tor, Delta Dental Plan (DDP), filed a protest of the award to UCC with the with the June payroll deduction, active-duty service members will see U.S. General Accounting .Office. The the monthly premiums for the dental GAO is expectedto rule on the merits plan reduced from$10 to $6.77 for of the protest by late June. one enrolled family member and from Meanwhile, the new contractor’s $20 to $16.92 fortwo or more enrolled planned starting date of Aug.1, 1995, family members. This represents a32 will be delayed. So there will be no break in service, DDP will continue to percent reduction in the single rate operate theTRICARE active-duty family member dental plan for an additional six months, through the end of January 1996.

TAR program available for active and Reserve officers Officers looking for a career in the Naval Reserve may apply for transfer or redesignation in the Training and and a 15 percent reduction in the family rate. Families who are signed Administration of the Reserve (TAR) up for the plan by their military spon- community. TAR officers serve in operational sors on or after June 1, 1995, will be enrolled at the lower premium. and Reserve management assignHowever, the transitionto a new ments. Applications are especially contractor for DOD’s TRICARE active- encouraged from Surface Warfare duty family member dental plan has department heads, Special Warfare officers with platoon commander been delayed, pending resolution of a protest by an unsuccessful bidder. experience and Special Operations-

Team makes disestablishments less painful Enlisted aviation detailers at the Bureau of Naval Personnel (BUPERS) are trying to make aviation squadron disestablishments easier for Sailors. Detailers now conduct disestablishment conferences for squadrons and use pre-slatingas part of the process. Pre-slating or pre-negotiating orders is conducted by command representatives based on command needs and priorities. This gives Sailors more career choices by opening more requisitions for a longer period of time. This method replaces the older system in which only requisitions at the time of the disestablishment conference were available for Sailors. The commanding officer of one of the first squadronsto use the preslating process, CDR John Miller of Fighter Squadron 142, had nothing but praise for the system. “1 can personally assure you that your efforts in making us the first command to pre-slate ... produced satisfied ‘Ghostriders’ checking out through my office,” said Miller. a

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Space Command Riding shotgun onthe ffnalfrontier Story and photos by JO1 Kevin Stephens

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tanding watch insidea hollowed-out mountain in Colorado, Sailors use space technology to sound the alarm for U.S. and allied forces when ballistic missiles are launched anywhere inthe world. The Sailors are assignedto U.S. Space Command (USSPACECOM), Colorado Springs, Colo., - a Cold War-era organization born 1985 in - but whose utility has gained importance countering the growing threat of missile technology in the Third World. The command began operating satellites and radar watchina for a missile attack from the foFmer soviet Union.USSPACECOM fed that warning data to the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) facility inside Cheyenne Mountain Air Station in Colorado Springs. That mission continues today. With more than20,000 nuclear weapons still in the hands of former adversaries, NORAD continues to watch for any aerospace attack. Within four minutes, the bi-nationalUS.Canadian command must provide the national leaders of Canada and the United States a warning and assessmentof any aerospace attack on North America. Inside Cheyenne Mountain’s While the possibility of attack on North America has diminished, the threat of missile attack command center, USSPACECOM and NORAD personnel against U.S. and allied forces deployed overseas has greatly increased. Providing the warning keep watch around the world, to those forces falls to USSPACECOM. The men and women of USSPACECOM sounded the constantly alert for any threat alarm when CNN broadcasted the sirens warning of incoming SCUD attacks during the Gulf America. to North War. The USSPACECOM Missile Warning Center is one of several warning and surveillance operations conducted 1,700 feet inside Cheyenne Mountain, a unique facility built in response to the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1961. “In the 1960s they were looking for a nuclear-survivable location for NORAD,” said Army Capt. Gary M. Kolb, Cheyenne Mountain plans and presentations officer. “This outcropping

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A Assigned to USSPACECOM’s space control center,OS2 Robert K. Baumgarten helps keep trackof the approximately 7,800 man-made objects in orbit around the Earth. of the Rockies is solid granite, so it met the hardness directors at the combinedNORAD and USSPACECOM criteria engineers were looking for.” command center. The Cheyenne Mountain complex remains the focal point Hundreds of times ayear, these watch centers inside the for a worldwide networkof space-based and land-based mountain receive indicationsof an event which setsoff a sensors usedto detect and track ballistic missiles, bomber global reaction. aircraft and cruise missiles anywhere in the world. It is “We’re talking about actual missile launches of all types, manned by about 1,500 sewice members from all branches many of which are launchesto put objects into space. But of the military. These personnel are divided into five crews then there are also training and testing launches of interwhich stand watch in the mountain’s centers. continental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) and sea-launched “We have a space control center; ballistic missiles (SLBMs),” said Kraft. an air defense operations center; “We know about some launches in systems and intelligence; a missile advance,” said Operations Specialist warning center; and a weather 1st Class Fred Rhines of Walton Hills, support unit,” saidCAPT Charles M. Ohio, a missile warning center crew Kraft Jr., oneof the five command chief. “With the Russians we do, but in the Middle East we usually don’t.’’ This The North Portal entrance leads into leads to some tense but exciting Cheyenne Mountain near Colorado moments as analysts siftdata and Springs, Colo., siteof the NORAD/USidentify the event. SPACECOM combined command center.

JULY 1995

I OPERATIONS I

“Wereceive information from intelligence, from our processing nodes around the worldand from the centers here in the mountain, They each lend the human element tothat final decision, ‘Is this a threat to North America!”’ CAPT Charles M,Kraft jr,

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“In the first1.5 minutes, a network of strategically placed personnel is connected by a communications system that circles the globe,” said Kolb. “In the next 2.5 minutes the significance of the event is evaluated.” “All of these centers provide information to the command center and ultimatelyto the command director,” said Kraft. “They assist in makingtwo decisions: One - Is the event Is it valid? Two being viewed on our displays a real event? - I f k valid, is it a threatto North America?” so Because decisions made in Cheyenne Mountain are critical to war or peace, the people who make them allow no margin for error. In our business, we have to make a correct assessment 100 percent of the time,” said Kraft. “There is no room for error and that’s why we don’t rely on machines to make the judgments. People make the judgments because machines are not always goingto show us reality. “We receive information from intelligence, from our processingnodesaroundtheworldandfromthecenters here inthe mountain. They each lend the human element to that final decision,‘Is this a threatto North America?’ When it comesto my desk, I can be sure my assessment is going to be correct 100 percent of the time,” he said. According to Rhines, accurately processing an event is the most challenging part of his job. “Lots of times things will be a little slow, but once a missile event goes, we start moving, especially if it’s an unexpected one or one that’s in the CENTCOM region [Middle East] withthe troops there.” “During the Gulf War, Iraqis were firing SCUDS into Saudi Arabia and Israel, and there was also the potential for launches that might go into the Persian Gulf,” said Kraft. “This system detected those short-range ballistic missiles when they were launched and cued the theater missile defense batteries, thePatriots, to the launchso they were ‘I...

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LTJG Yvette Dwonch’s duties in the Cheyenne Mountain’s Space Control Center include warning the space shuttle’s crew if they are in dangerof colliding with orbiting space debris.

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A Taken by a military surveillance satellite, this image of Port-au-Prince, Haiti, was used as a planning tool for Operation Uphold Democracy. USSPACECOM supervises the military’s fleet of satellites. 4 Three sets of three-foot thick blast doors are located one-third of a mile down a tunnel from the outside of Cheyenne Mountain. These doors sealoff the 15 buildings inside the hollowed-out mountain.

satellite or a shuttle could be catastrophic. “We build a safety box around the shuttle [so] it doesn’t get hit,” said LTJG Yvette Dwonch of Bollingbrook, 111. “That was very important with the rendezvous with Mir. We were giving them confirmation of how close they really were, making sure they weren’ttoo close. The shuttle approached to about 33 feet from Mir andthat’s avery dangerous position.So I was constantly updating Mir and ready and alert.” There is moreto USSPACECOM than its missile warning the space shuttle about where they were.” Duty deep inside a mountain is a far cry from assignmission. The Space Control Center inside Cheyenne ment to a ship. The multi-setvice environment and global Mountain tracks objects orbiting Earth to protect and mission of USSPACECOM offer Sailors assigned there a monitor space-based assets. “Right now we have abox score of about 7,800 objects,” unique opportunityto participate in operations that push said OS2 Robert K. Baumgarten, assignedto the mountain the envelope of military technology. as a space control officer. “These are all man-made objects “It was different, but once you get used to working in -we only track man-made. Out of that 7,800, only about the space element, it becomes very natural,” said Baumgarten. “I’ve been on crew for 2.5 years and I’ve seen 10 percent are active. The rest is debris associated with launches or dead payloads,” said the Casper, Wyo., native.launches and watched shuttles go up. The first barrier is The objects tracked by the Space Control Center rangethe hardest to overcome. Once you’re over that, it’s from Russia’s Mir space station to an astronaut’s glove and great.” a screwdriver lost on a space walk. Because these objects in orbit travel at about 17,000 miles per hour, a collision with aStephens is a photojournalist forAll Hands.

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OPERATIONS

Anatomy of a Med cruise

The frigate KlaMng makes tracks

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n October 1994, USS sional challenges, underway Klakring (FFG 42) got periods when days blend under way from Charles- into one another, foreign ton, S.C., to join USS ports to explore and a Dwight D. Eisenhower’s mission to fulfill. (CVN 69) battle group for a six-month deployment. Ike and the cruiser USS Anzio (CG 68) split from the group for duty in the Persian Gulf. Klakring, with the rest of the battle group, Klakring’s deployment steamed to the Med in covered 26,329 miles in support of various U.S.181 days. interest and United Nations Multiply that by the missions. number of ships in an Klakring deployed with average battle group and Helicopter Anti-submarine it’s easy to conclude the Squadron (Light) 42 Det. 2 Navy won’t go anywhere and two LAMPS 111 helos without its fleet of supply that logged 423 flight hours and support ships. on the cruise. The following ships During the deployment, transferred stores and fuel 29 crew members earned to Klakring and are among Enlisted Surface Warfare the many keeping our fleet Specialist (ESWS) pins and under way every day. four Surface Warfare Officer (SWO) devices were USS Detroit (AOE 3) awarded. USS Platte (A0 186) This is alook at USNS Kanawha (T-A0 196) USNS Concord (T-AFS 5) Klakring’s cruise places USNS Sirius (T-AFS 8) visited, exercises completed USNS Leroy Grumann and milestones for the crew. (T-A0 195) It was a deployment similar Spanish Oiler Marques in many waysto those de la Ensenada experienced by Navy men Canadian Ship HMCS and women every day, filled Preserver with personal and profes-

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Dee. 29 Jan. 3 Port visitto

Transfer on the high seas

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Intermediate maintenance availability with USS Shenandoah (AD 44) in L

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Jan. I O 18 U.S.-Spanish amphibious exercise, refuel at Rota, Spain

Jan. 5 I 1 On station with the Amphibious Readiness Group, USS Nassau (LHA 4),USS Ponce (LPD 15) and USS Gunston Hall (LSD 44) inthe Adriatic Sea

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Repair 5 fire fighters check their oxygen breathing appattus before attacking a simulated main space fuel oil fire.

Nov. 28 = Dec. 12 On station conducting search and rescue ops with USS Nassau (LHA 4) off Bosnia in the Adriatic Sea Feb. 7 = 13 Port visitto Greece Corfu, Trieste, Italy

TI,

Port visitto

A EWS(SW)ByronMyers, Klakring's Athlete of the Year, is ready for all comers during the Psuedo Wresting Match as part of Halfway Night events.

Port visitto

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Feb. 20 = 23 Port visit to

Jan. 25 Relieved USS Robert G. Bradley 49) Souda at Bay, Crete, interdiction for operations during Sharp Guard off Yugoslavia in the Adriatic Sea

Port visit to Augusta (FFG Bay, Sicily, prior to transiting stateside Operation I

Jan. x 4

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PASSEX with Turkish navy

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Crac~n$down on t

Story by Scott Fireoved

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oilet seats for$2,000 and hammers for$500 are a You can do this by reporting those itemsto the Navy’s supply officer’s nightmare, and since every Sailor is a “Price Fighters” via the Price Challenge Hotline.You get taxpayer, there’s no question that eliminating such extra money and the Navy avoids high costs and saves waste is in everyone’s best interest. But what if Sailors money. could get paidto look for examples or overpriced parts of To date, more than$270,000 has been awardedto consumables bought by the Navy? challengers. Cash bonuses can range from$50 to The Navy’s Price Challenge Hotline provides that $25,000, depending on the type and amountof savings. opportunity. All you need to do is identify overpriced spare Cash bonuses are also presentedto challengers who parts or consumables managed by the DOD supply identify spare parts or consumables that: system. $ Are identical and would achieve a reduced price

DSN: 565-1 786 Commercial: (804) 445-1 786

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Ical Years through combined demand by consolidating their management under one national stock number (NSN). $ Would achieve a reduced price through a new commercial source of purchase. $ Would achieve a reduced price through a new source of repair. $ Would achieve a reduced priceas a result of a buy/ make decision. The Navy is willingto create these opportunities because it needs your helpto reduce costs. lt would be impossible for every procurement official to know the intrinsic value of allthe complex items they buy for today's sophisticated weapon systems. Therefore, they need to rely on your technical knowledgeto identify overpriced spare parts and consumables and provide feedback using the Price Challenge Hotline. NAVSUPPUB 485 provides a mailing format which identifies the minimum reporting requirements.If you need to report via telephone, be preparedto provide the com-

JULY 1995

mand's address, your phone number, NSN or part number of the item, contract number (found on receipt paperwork) when identifying items by part number only, item's price, source of the price and why you think the item is overpriced. Any additional information submitted on the item could increase your chancesof receiving an award and reduce the price challenge's processing time. A letter of acknowledgment will be sent to the price challenger confirming receipt of each price challenge. If the price challenge results in a cash bonus, the funding authorization will be forwardedto your command's supply officer or disbursing officer. The cost avoidances and savings realized by this program help the Navy get a bigger bang for each buck. For more information, contact your supply officer, the Navy Pricing Hotline Coordinator or the Price Fighters. Take the challenge ... the Navy Price Challenge. a Fireoved is assigned to Naval Supply Systems Command, Arlington, Va.

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Tampa, Fla., native AG2 Jeff Scooler, assigned to Naval Pacific Meteorological and Oceanography Center, uses a pocket knife to free ropes tangled in the lava rocks at the James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge on Oahu’s North Shore.

Story and photos by JO1 Rebecca Fox Celli

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tidal wave of Navy volunteers swept over the Hawaiian islandof Oahu in April, during a weeklong scheduleof events commemorating the 25th anniversary of Earth Day. Commander, Naval Base (COMNAVBASE) Pearl Harbor sponsored several events that spread military and civilian Navy volunteers from the North Shore to Diamond Head. The Navy’s kick-off event was the beach-front cleanup of James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge on the North Shore. Representatives from a dozen Pearl Harbor area 12

commands removed more than150 bags of debris. About 300 pounds of rope and netting were also freed from the jagged lava rocks near the shoreline. Honolulu Mayor Jeremy Harris suitedup with Navy divers to participate in the state’s first underwater cleanup at the mouth of Ala Wai Yacht Harbor and Canal. “The Navy has always been active in community affairs, giving their time and talents and doing what they can to make Honolulu a better place,” said Harris. “They have a great track record with the local community and we’re very ALL HANDS

Military and civilian volunteers fight strong winds on Oahu’s famous North Shore to clean litter and debris from the beach. Volunteers were cautious not to disturb the endangered blacknecked stilts nesting nearby.

appreciative of that. They certainly make a difference involved in the cleanup, “Because whenI have kids somehere.” day, I want themto have a clean place to play.” “People here in Hawaii talk a lot about protecting the The largest cleanup effort focused on the Pearl Harbor Naval Complex perimeter and outlying roadways frequently land and keeping it clean,” added Aerographer’s Mate 2nd traveled by Navy personnel. More than500 volunteers Class Jeff Scooler, assignedto Naval Pacific Meteorological fanned out across an area roughly15 miles long. More and Oceanography Center. “Maybe our getting out and cleaning up areas like this will motivate someone elseto do than 700 bags and tonsof larger articles, including cars, were piled along the roadside awaitingpick-up by state the same.” a litter control crews. Other events during the week included assembly and Celli is assigned to the public affairs office, Naval Base Pearl Harbor: distribution throughout the complexof 12 recycled plastic picnic tables. The tables were purchased from a plastics recycling company and represent the equivalent of 2,700 one-gallon milk jugs. The annual Diamond Head cleanup drew a large contingent of Navy personnel. After six full days of workingto better the world surrounding them, Navy volunteers and their family members were treatedto a Sunday afternoon Earth Day concert by the Pacific Fleet Big Band. “All in all, I think we did real well out there,” said Electrician’s Mate 3rd Class Craig More, stationed on boardUSS Fletcher (DD 992). The SalisAcollectiveeffortofNorfolkNavy WireService. bury,Mass.,nativesaidhegot

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ENVIRONMENT 1

Fueling the Navy’s future Story by J03 Sarah E. Burford, photos by JOl(AW) Laurie Butler

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hen Henry Ford began building automobiles, it’s a safe bet he didn’t have any idea cars would be blamed for a large part of today’s air pollution. During the years since widespread car use began, many alternative fuels have been introduced to

combat pollution problems associated with gasolinepowered engines, but none have been successful until now. The Navy is one of the leaders in the developmentof just such a solution. It’s called a compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicle, and it may be the waveof the future. In 1993, when CNG first caught the Navy’s attention, the Public Works Center, Washington, D.C., had only one vehicle that burned the alternative fuel.Two years later, the center has 52 CNG vehicles, with 60 more slated for conversion thisyear. The story is the same throughout the fleet. At Naval Construction Battalion Center(CBC) Port Hueneme, Calif., 12 vehicles have been converted for CNG use, and another 87 will be converted before year’s end. CBC hopes to convert its entire fleet overto the CNG system. “It’s a pretty gutsy move,” said JimmyHarvey, a transportation specialist at CBC, “but we think it’s tried and true and we are goingto prove it.” The concept of the CNG vehicle is simple. Regular gasoline-burning enginesare converted with equipment that enables them to burn compressed natural gas.The natural gas is stored in a cylinder similarto that used to store helium for balloons. Vehicles can be converted strictly to CNG or can be equipped to use both CNG and gasoline.

Bob Gill, transportation director at PWC Washington, D.C., gases up at a fast fill station located at Naval Station Anacostia. Many cities are offering incentives to those driving the environmentally-friendlyvehicles. In the Washington, D.C. area, where heavy traffic is a fact of life, those driving CNG vehicles are now allowed to use the lanes set aside for carpools.

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CNG vehicles are the wave of the future. By the end of this year, the Navy will have more than800 CNG vehicles. The procurement of alternative fuel vehicles is part aofunified plan to increase the useof domestic fuels and reduce air pollution.

Using natural gas as an alternativeto more traditional gasoline and diesel fuel has several benefits. Because natural gas is readily available in the United States, CNG is less expensive than gas ”about $4 for a 12-gallon equivalent tank. It also burns cleaner, with about 50 percent fewer emissions than unleaded gasoline. “This program was originally sold on its economic value,” said Bob Gill, transportation director at PWC Washington, D.C. “But it has turned more into the right thing to do.” While CNG vehicles are now mostly being driven in industrial fleets, several U.S. automakers, Ford and Chrysler, will introduce CNG vehiclesto the general public in August 1996. Who knows, in a coupleof years we may be telling our dealer, “Hey ... make mine a natural!” Butford is assigned to the public affairs office, Port Hueneme, Calif. Butler is a photojournalist assigned to All Hands.

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STGP(SW) William Andrzejewski (left) of Toledo, Ohio, and STGl(SW) Chester Lamb of Mason City, Neb., perform monthly maintenance on a mine neutralization vehicle. Both Sailors are members of MCM Rotational Crew Bravo on board USS Champion (MCM 4).

MCM crews rotate and deploy Program called the “renaissance of mine wartiare” Story by JO1 James Kohler, photos by Francoise Kieschnick

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rebirth of the mine warfare community is under way as aging minesweepers are decommissioned, making room fortwo new classes of mine warfare ships. CAPT Richard L. Owens, commander, Mine Countermeasures Squadron 3, calls this the “renaissance of mine warfare.” It began with 14 Avenger-class mine countermeasures ships, all homeported at Naval Station Ingleside, Texas. The renaissance continues with the ongoing construction and homeporting 6f 12 Osprey-class coastal minehunters.

Forward presence Maintaining a strong forward presence is an important part of the mine warfare renaissance. MCMs have made successful deployments throughout the world, andtwo MCMs, USS Guardian (MCM 5) and USS Patriot (MCM 7), are forward deployed, operating from U.S. Naval Base

Sasebo, Japan. They are manned by crews that rotate to the ships from lngleside every six months. The rotational crew plan grew from the need for a continued forward presence in the Persian Gulf. “We determined it would be bestto forward deploy two ships and develop a rotational crew concept,” explained Owens. “So we ended up developing the six ships and eight-crew concept.”

More crews than ships “There was a lot of concern about Sailors not being identified with a specific ship anymore,” said Owens. “They are Rotational Crew Alpha through Hotel Sailors, and they don’t have an identity with a ship until they re-embark on one.” Owens added that while this could be frustrating for the rotational crew members, the Sailors understand the unique nature of the situation and have adjusted nicely. 17

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SR James West of Hot Springs, Ark., paints USS Senfry‘s (MCM 3) anchor as his shipmates watch him at the safety tending lines. West, who has been in the Navy eight months, is a Mine Countermeasures Rotational Crew Delta Sailor on board Senfry, homeported at Naval Station Ingleside, Texas.

LT John Gray, executive officer of Rotational Crew Delta, likes the rotational crew plan. “We have the rotational crews because minesweepers sometimes lack the speed to keep up with the battle group,” Gray explained. “With the ships forward deployed and Sailors rotating through them, wecan maintain PERSTEMPO[personnel tempo] goals. We keep a qualified, well-motivatedand wellrested crew ready forcombat at all times.” “The hardest part [about rotating to another ship] is getting used to how each ship is setup,” explained Gunner’s Mate (Guns) 1st Class (SW) Billy Gordon, who has been with Crew Delta since September. “Even though these ships are from the same class, each one is configured a little differently.” Owens acknowledged there are still some bugs to work outof the rotational crew system. But,as with any new endeavor, that is to be expected. The program willbe in full swing when the Bravo and Delta crews deploy to Japan later this year. They will be the first rotational crews trained fromscratch for the program. Owens added he looks forward to watching the next chapterof this new Navy mine warfare renaissance unfold. A Kohler and Kieschnick are assigned to public the affairs office, Naval Station Ingleside, Texas.

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MCM Rotational Crew Golf, one of eight rotational crews for six mine countermeasures ships, is currently based ashore. While at Naval Station Ingleside, Texas, crew members will undergo fourto five months of training. The crew will move on board USS Sentry (MCM 3) later this month.

Crew Rotation Cycle Rotational crews serve for six months aboard forward-deployed ships (USS GuardianNSS Patriot)

Rotational crews fly to lngleside and begin traininghedraining in temporary facilities (four to five months)

Rotational crews move off training ships for a three to four week standdown period before next deployment

Rotational crews move aboard Ingleside-based ships USS Sentry, USS Champion, USS Devastator, USS Scout to continue training for next deployment (about nine months)

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TRAINING

Northern Played out in the cold of Norway, Strong Resolve prepares NATO

members forhture conflicts

U.S. service members learned the true meaning of teamwork recently when they and troops from 11 other nations converged upon Norway I I during Strong Resolve ‘95,NATO’s largest post-Cold War military exercise. stdesigned exercise towas The

and employment of multinational maritime, air and land forces. “It was great interacting with the other nations and learning how they operate,” said Senior Chief Gas Turbine System Technician (SW) David Coker, a craftmaster assigned to Assault Craft Unit

Exposure Story by J02 Michael Blankenship, photos by CPOA (Phot) Ric Burch JULY 1995

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(ACU) 4. Coker’s unit was responsible for moving nearly3 million pounds of equipment and Marines from the amphibious ship USS Wasp (LHD 1) to the shore in their air-cushioned landing crafts. Though Strong Resolve is a continuation of the alliance’s traditional teamwork exercises, new tactics were employedto improve NATO’s responseto future military operations.

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A Norwegian soldier (left) and a German Army mortar team share training tips during the three-week exercise.

Traditionally run by one of NATO’s two major commands, Allied Command Atlantic (ACMNT) or Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE), this marked the first time the exercise was run jointly. The two staffs, located in Belgium and Norfolk, used teleconferencing to coordinate the 22

exercise. According to German Navy Rear Adm. Klaus Schwabe, ACLANT’s deputy assistant chief of staff for operations, this technology was crucial. “We were able to talk to them at length, face to face,” said Schwabe. Strong Resolve also tested NATO’s abilityto carry out a seabased combined joint task force (CJTF), which is a deployable force capableof establishing alliance presence in an area without an in-place NATO command structure. While all involved are touting this year’s exercise as a success, plans are already under way for Strong Resolve ‘98. “I’m sure all the exercises we undertake between now andStrong Resolve ‘98 will reflect the benefitsof the lessons we learned this year,” said United Kingdom Navy Vice Adm. Sir PeterAbbott, deputy SACLANT. Blankenship is assigned to Supreme Allied CommanderAtlantic, Norfolk. Burch is a member of the United Kingdom navy.

4 Soldiers of the U.K. Royal Green Jackets patrol the Nordic hillside. 4 4 A U.S. Marine Corps MH-53 helicopter lifts off after deploying Marines in Trondheim, Norway.

JULY 1995

23

?

TRUE CO'LORS Story and photos by pH1 Dolores 1. Anglin 24

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Guard members prepare for full honors funeral at Arlington National Cemetery.

aloosethread,arenegadefinger-TheGuard,locatedatNavalStation print, a spoton a white hat, but found Anacostia, Washington, D.C., is the first none. Haircuts - 4.0. Uniforms permanent duty station for some of the squared away. Brass - flawless. Navy's newest and sharpest Sailors. Made Satisfied with what he saw, he stepped up of roughly180 men and women, the back and called his squad to attention. Ceremonial Guard represents the Navy in "Color guard,ATEN-HUT!" With that, the official functions and public ceremonies. door to the church swung open and a Funerals, wreath-layings at the Tomb of the to the coffin was wheeled out. Welcome Unknown Soldier and state dinners at the work spaces of theUS. Navy Ceremonial White House are routine for the Guard. "I love thisjob. It's great. I would do this JULY 1995

25

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mywholeNavycareerifthey hadabilletfor it,” said“Werequire themen to be atleast 6 feettallandthe women have to be at least 5 foot 10. You need a good Machinist Mate 3rd Class Matthew C. Tabisz. complexion and no bad facial scarring,” said Thompson. Tabisz, a native of Plano, Texas, has been with the other requirements include being within weight stanGuard since March 1994. He is squad leader for the colors (flag)unit,andistheonewiththediscerningeye.dards,having good posture,possessing good coordination Enterprise Hall, headquarters for the Ceremonial Guard, and Passing a background security Check. The ckarance buzzes like a bee hive before every ceremony. A salty chief needed, termed a “Yankee white,” means that a recruit’s bellows out some last minute details from the operations civilian and military records are spotless. officewhileguardmembersmaketheirwayoutthedoor,TheGuarddoesrecruitfromthefleet, but those billets uniformsinhand.Inthewintereveryonecarriesfouraregenerallyassigned to pettyofficerswhofillthestaff hangers of uniforms to every job, just in case the weather positions Of yeoman, boatswain’s mates and ship’s servicechanges. Summer uniforms aren’t complicated. as man. Pre-ceremonypreparationscanappearchaotic.SailorsUponreporting to thecommand,recruitspassthrough shuffle about, carefulofmetal taps ontheirshoesthatseveralphasesoftraining that rangefromlearning to dryconstantlythreaten to throwtheirlegsoutfromundercleantheiruniforms to marchingasaunit.Thisinitial them.Thesteadyhumofhairclippersfromthebarbertraininglastsaboutfourmonths.Recruitsalsolearnthe shop and the constant chatter of Sailors in varying stages of readiness might lead a visitorto think that there is no rhyme or reasonto all the activity. But, within moments, the halls are nearly empty, except for the chief, who watches a bus full of spit-shined Sailors head for Arlington National Cemetery. The scene will be repeated three more times that day. Recruited straight from boot camp, these young men and women voluntarily serve a two-year tour of duty with the Guard before attending an “ A school of their choice. Senior Chief Boatswain’s Mate Clyde Thompson, the senior enlisted Sailor at the Guard, travels to Great Lakes Recruit Training Center once a quarter to recruit new members. Acceptance standards are strict. Candidates must be recruiting-poster perfect.

.

_ ”

$4

i i

A AN Ann Bozung (right), of Greenville,Mich., tapes her pant legs down for a ceremony. Grommets, seen here around her upper leg, are made of water hose filled with BB’s. These help to give pant legs a bloused look. FA Irene Rivera (left), of New York City, secures her locker.

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<

MM3 Matthew Tabiv, of Plano, Texas, inspects his unit one last time just priorto a ceremony.

A Brass plates on the inside of shoes give Guard members an audio cue during performances.

<

SN Daniel Hsiung, right, from Torrance, Calif., (right), and Jason L. Matthews, from Lousville, Texas, perform a funeral in Arlington National Cemetery.

JULY 1995

27

NAVY LIFE skills they will need before they are assigned to a specific unit. Carrying the colors, firing weapons for a 21 -gun salute and executing close-order rifle drillsare practiced and refined until the team’s movements appear as a single, precise motion. After this first phase of training, some recruits will be assignedto the display shipBarry (DD 933), berthed at Washington Navy Yard. TheBarry has about 45 Sailors who provide toursto the public and support various official ceremonies. Their tour on board is alsotwo years. Sailors who think they learned about attentionto detail in boot camp better think again. Boot camp can’t hold a candle to what guard members learn about shined shoes, polished heel brass and teamwork. This aspect of training comes out in the many personnel inspections they stand, often several in one day. Lockers are another tool used to drive this lesson home. An inspection-ready locker is expected to have uniforms pressed and hanging precisely two inches apart. To be inspection ready anytimecan’be stressful, and the pressure brings out light-headed, one-upsmanship within the ranks. “We have competitions among ourselvesto see who has the sharpest uniform,” said Seaman Daniel Hsiung. “Every time I go out on a set (a funeral),I say ‘Hey, my brass is better than your brass’ or ‘My shoes look better than your shoes.”’ Hsiung, with shoulders that could block out the sun, is assigned to the body bearers unit of the Guard. Having served 20 months with the Guard, he triesto share his knowledge and experience with the newest membersof his close-knit squad. “The body bearers stick together. If one of us needs help or something, we tryto help each other out as a team,” Hsiung said. Staff personnel also play a major role in helping to develop these fledgling Sailors, and this role is brought into greater focus as a Guard member’s tour of duty comesto an end. In aneffort to prepare departing members for life in the fleet, the staff encourages TAD trips and on-the-job training. Staff personnel set up transportation, cut hair and counsel these young men and women, who become fountains of fleet knowledge. “With all the petty officers here, I get to talk to them a lot one-on-one. They tell me how the fleet is, what to watch out for, what ratings are like and how those ratings can prepare you for life in the civilian community,” said SN Miriam A. Samuels. “The petty officers here really look out for you.” What draws a new recruitto the Ceremonial Guard? Travel, prestige, curiosity - you name it. The reasons are as varied as the people. “What attracted me to the Guard was that I would be A Guardmembersfold a flag inArlingtonNationalCemetery.

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A

SR Lenelle Williams, from Savannah, Ga., performs field day duties in Enterprise Hall.

4 FN Lyntress D. Brooks, (left) from Indianapolis, and YN3 Conshombia D. Tate, from Augusta, Ga., practice drilling maneuvers in the vacant upper floors of Enterprise Hall. don’t question, they just go[do it]. We should all be like that.” The Guard is in Arlington National Cemeterytoday for yet another funeral. “I don’t know how [well] this person was respected before, but I’m going to [show] respect todayto the fullest capacity that I can, just becauseI’m proud they were in the Navy,” said Tabisz. Tabisz kneels in front of a grieving spouse and speaks the words slowly. “On behalf of the President of the United States, a grateful nation and a proudNavy, I present this national ensign to you for your loved one’s dedication and service to the United States Navy and the United States of America.” These are heavy words fora young Sailorto have to say so early in his career. But he walks away from the scene fully realizing the seriousness of his job and his purpose for that day.

representing the Navy in a way very few people get a chance,” said Tabisz. “I’ve done a lot of ceremonies and spent whole days in Arlington National Cemetery doing funerals, but I still get butterflies.” “It’s prestigious,” said Airman AnnM. Bozung. “You get to perform in events where the President of the United Anglin is a photojournalist assigned toAll Hands. States is standing four feet away or you meet famous people, diplomats and VIPs. I would never see this in Greenville, Mich., which is where I’m from.” Developing a green recruit into one of the Navy’s finest is a role that is not taken lightlyat the Ceremonial Guard. More often though, the success of guard members comes from within themselves, with the staff helpingto draw out character already present. “I’ve never worked around a groupof young people who have so much pride andare willing to do anything you ask,” said Thompson.“You tell them to do something, they JULY 1995

29

n NAVY LIFE

Story and photos by JOI Ron Schafer

‘ith their 12th season winding down, producers of the Wheel of fortune - called the world’s most popular game show- were looking for something special to finish out the year. They found it aboard USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). The show dropped anchor in Norfolkto tape 10 episodes aboard Ike, five of which featured soldiers, Sailors, airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen as part ofWheel of Fortune’s Armed Forces Week. The carrier also played host to more than 5,000 audience members during thetwo weeks of taping. Taping the show aboard an aircraft carrier presented unique challengesto the crews ofboth the show and the ship. Cranes lifted cars, boats, two aircraft and 280,000 pounds of set, scenery and equipment aboardIke. The crews then transformed the ship’s hangar deck into a sound stage. Working side by side,both crews quickly formed a mutual admiration for each other. “We’re so in awe of this ship and the personnel and the way everything just gets done,” explained Charlie O’Donnell, the show’s announcer. “We’reso in awe of them and they’re in awe of what we’re doing down here

30

LT Steven Newlund (center), assigned to tC I I - USS - - - Gunston - -. (LSD 44) competes against his Army and Marine counterparts during Wheel of Fortune. Newlund was just oneof many military contestants participating in the recent twoweek taping of Wheel of Fortune aboard USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69).

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“It’s a very unusual placeto do a show,” said the popular Chicago native. “This is certainly the first aircraft carrier game show, and everybody’s been great. Logistically, it’s very toughto mount a show like this in a non-broadcast facility. So, the officers and the men and women on the ship have been terrific. One thing you forget when you’re out of the military for a while is how people work as a unit. It’s great to see teamwork. it’s kind of an inspiration for our show.” For Quartermaster 3rd Class Brian Grilli of Naval Station Norfolk, the experience as a contestant was certainly inspirational - and profitable. He walked away with a new Corvette. “Awesome,” he said. “Incredible. I can’t get over with the show.We kind of laugh at them and they laugh at it.” “It was a once-in-a-lifetime experience,” said Cooper. us. But, it’s just fabulous.” Sailors for the Armed Forces Week shows were selected “In the last year I’ve met the President, the Secretary of from the carrier’s crew during a competition held last year Defense, been on Wheel of Fortune and been around the in Norfolk. Soldiers and airmen were also selected during world. You can’t beat that.” & the same competition. Radioman 1st Class David Cooper Jr., of Riverdale, Md., was picking up his leave papers Schafer is a Norfolk-based staff writer forAll Hands. following the ship’s return from a six-month deployment when he found out he had been selected to represent lke BM2 Yvonne Dunn, as a contestant. stationed aboardIke, “I had a ball,” said Cooper. “I’ve never been so nervous plays the bonus round in my whole life. You can sit at home and play this game with Pat Sajak. She until the cows come home and it’s easy. But when the won more than $6,000 lights and the camera are on you and the pressure’s on, in cash and prizes. you’ve got to maintain your composure and tryto think about what’s going on. I didn’t even think about the money. VChicago native QM3 Brian Grilli and I hadn’t a clue how much moneyI had because I was fiance Cindy, get a concentrating on the board.” “This is a very simple game,” said O’Donnell. “It’s theold first-hand look at their new Corvette. children’s game, Hangman, that anybody can play. But it’s He also won $47,000 that combination of the wheel, the jeopardy of in cash. ‘lose-a-turn’ and ‘bankrupt.’You may know every puzzle up there and,if the wheel is playing against you, tough luck.” Pat Sajak and Vanna White are two of the

“In the last year I’ve met the President, the Secretary of Defense, been on Wheel of Fortune and been around the world. You can’t beat that;’’ RM1 Davld Cooper Jr.

-

“This is probably one of the most memorable trips we’ve taken,” White said. “Being aboard an aircraft carrier is justso spectacular. I don’t know howto describe it. The size qf the ship, being on the ship, knowing where this ship has been, it’s just overwhelming.’’ Sajak is no strangerto the military. He spent 18 months with Armed Forces Radio in Saigon during a tour in the Army from 1968 to 1970. But, he admits, nothing he has seen compared with his “tour” aboard Ike. JULY 1995

31

NAVY LIFE I

I

Editor's note: Several months ago we asked Sailors to send us their cartoons.The next four pagesreflect only some of the submissionswe received, and we intend to run more of t h i s batch in the nextfew months. We hope to make this a regular featurein the magazine, so keep those cards and cartoons coming in. (Right) DMC(SW) Michael M. Luck Patrol Squadron 30 NAS Jacksonville, Fla.

(Below) DM Jeffery Thompson USS Gary (FFG 51) CS-2

I ' "Honey, I sewed your 'crows' on all of shirts by myself to save nwney.

your

RJ

44%-

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(Left) QMl(SW) John I? Shea NavigationDept. USS Estocin (FFG 15) (Below) Retired CAPT John T. Williams Bonita, Calif. J \

JULY 1995

33 I

NAVY LIFE

(Right) SR Tramaine Michael King USS Peleliu (LHA 5) (Below) PRl(AW) Jeff Hobrath NAS JRB Willow Grove, Penn.

1

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*,wb

A

'

"Zhere's no such thing as 'relativeharing grease!'''

c

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(Left) ICP(DV) Daniel R. Knauss SlMA Charleston, S.C.

"Yes,w do have a ship called USS mterprise, Lxlt I can neither confirm or deny that we have photon torpedoes. ''

1

(Below) MS1 Nick J. Prieto National Naval Medical Center Bethesda, Md.

35

HEALTH 8 SAFETY

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make overs Story by JO1 Ray Mooney

M

ost of us probably take our faces for granted. Our eyes, nose, ears and teeth are there every morning when we get up, and aside from some daily hygiene and maybe a little cosmetic magic, we don’t really give them much thought. But what if a routine exam turned up a spotof malignant A CDR Robert Taft (left) and DT2 Steven Wheeler examine a cancer and your ear had to be removed? Or suppose you prosthetic ear. caught a line drive with your teeth instead of your glove? Or maybe it was all just fun and games until someone lost an eye. Well then, meet CDR RobertM. Taft and Dental Technician 2ND Class Steven T. Wheeler. They put stuff back where it’s supposedto be at Naval Medical Center San Diego. “It’s replacing parts of the head and neck area lost dueto traumatic injury or cancer,” Taft said. It’s called maxillo-facial A Before and after a prosthetic mouth piece was created for prosthetics, and with the help of modern dental tools and a patient. The teeth snap onto permanent metal posts and supplies such as acrylics, new noses, ears, eyes and teeth can be removed for cleaning. become a reality. “I say the head and neck area, but wedon’t limit they had the surgery,” Taft said. With that in mind, they look at hiding the prosthesis. “We’ll sit down and map out the ourselves to that. We do go below the headto include digits and various parts of the body,” said Taft, a native of person’s face, find the normal areas of shadowing and cut the prosthesisto fill in those areasso you won’t seeit. To Utica, N.Y. But these prosthetics don’t comeoff the rack like a end it on a flat surface, it would be easy to pick out. “It’s painstaking. It takes time. And many times we’re cheap suit, according to Taft. “If you went into a hospital unhappy and we’ll do it over, and we’ll do it over, and we’ll and saw an orthopedic prosthesis service, you’d walk in and see spare legs hanging up. That’s not what we do do it over,” Taft added. And’thejob’s still not finished. Every patient has a here. Everything we do here is custom-made. Nothing is stock. Everything is done by hand.” different skin tone, or freckles, or a patternof moles, or something else that makes thejob a bigger challenge. And that’s because their work is open to such scrutiny, Armed with more acrylic, dyes, paints, brushes, bits of Taft said. “People who have anything done to the external thread, and even pieces of their own hair, these artisans part of the face are left opento public criticism, andso put colors, textures, bumps, lumps, lashes, veins and people are very conscious of those things.” Every patient has a unique face and a unique concern, vitality into their creations, all in an effortto get it right. providing constant challenges for this two-man team. “We’re more critical of our work than our patients are,” Once they’ve decided what they’re going to do, that’s just Taft said. “Most people are just thrilledto get anything.” the beginning. There’s moreto it than just making a mold “Sometimes I find that the patient’s happy and it looks great,” Wheeler said. “But with most of my prostheses that and casting a nose in acrylic. leave here, I [always] think I could have done it better.” “Our patients wantto look the way they looked before

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And the compassionto do a job like this,to work intimately with patients who are missing parts of their face, doesn’t comeeasy. “I started as a basic lab tech where you sit and you don’t even see the patient,” Wheeler said. After two years on the job here he admits, “I’m still tryingto perfect it.” “It’s a learned skill. It’s not something you’reborn with,” . . . ’

Taft explained. “What happens is, your abilityto overlook the obvious grows out of your compassion and your feeling for what that patient is going through.” And at the end of a 10- or 12- or 14-hour day of supporting other departments thatrequire prosthetic services; meeting a new patient just medevaced in from Guam; reevaluating an old patient who wants a nose with a summer tan; and repairing or remaking a prosthetic device that has worn out; maybethere’s a postcard in the mail maybe from a patient from years before, or from just last week, dropping a line to say thank you for what was done - to say know how much it helped. And then it’s all worth it. a Mooney is a San Diego-based photojournalist assigned to All Hands.

A

A prosthetic eye.

They’re making eyes at you Story by Georgianna Lear

A DT1 Laura Tooley carefully trims the eyelashes on a partial facial prosthesis.

D

ental Technician 1 st Class Laura Tooley remem- training. From creating eyes of every color,to custombers the first eye she made for a patient who hadmade tracheotomy tubes(an opening in the trachea through the neckto allow the passage of air), ears, faces been wearing tape and sun glasses to cover up and cranial plates, Tooley has made them all. her lost eye. “When I finally placed the eye, she just Tooley is one of only seven people inthe Navy who do started cryingand gave me a hug,” Tooley said. ‘ 1 can never make the perfect replacement compared this specialized kindof work. Currently only five hospitals offer this particular care for Navy personnel and their to [the real thing], but I can try,” said Tooley, who is families. “My recruiter said my chances were slim,but I responsible for all maxillo-facial needs of patients at Naval Medical Center, Oakland, Calif. The maxillo-facial thought, ‘If it is meant to be, I will get it,”’ she said. area is the upper jaw area of the face and cheek bones. The handiwork of nature will neverbe replicated Tooley said the most difficult partof her job is that she perfectly, either through artistic or scientific means. However, the work done in the maxillo-facial department is a perfectionist. “It means a lotto me to do my best in helping to make the patient feel whole again,” she said. is proof of the valiant effortto restore people’s lives with It’s a big order recreating a face, but patients are grateful. good reproductions of nature’s creation. Tooley has made manybody parts since coming to Oakland two years ago from the Navy School of Health Lear is assigned to the public affairs ofice, Naval Medical Center;Oakland,Calif. Sciences, Bethesda, Md., where she received her L

JULY 1995

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Breaking the silence Navy combats domestic violence Story by Patricia S. Oladeinde

T

his sickness does not discriminate. It has no friends abuse and gradually builds to physical confrontation. and manyenemies.It’s on the rise, and touches all “There is usually a combination of factors that can add to economic, ethnic and social groups. Some people manfamily tensions,” said Grady, “especially for the E-Is to E-6s. age to escape it, most people know someone who’s affected For instance, a lot of our Sailors are young and away from by it and still others do everything they can to stop it. It’s called their families for the first time. Distance, along with financial domestic violence. problems, feelings of isolation, a history of witnessing vioThe military cannot shield itself completely from the dev- lence as a child, substance abuse and many other compoastating effects of abuse. However, the Navy is doing a great nents that makeup military and personal lifestyles, take a toll deal to educate its people in preventing abusive behavior on these young Sailors or couples, and minor problems are and helping stop the cycles that have already begun. exacerbated to out-of-control situations.” According to Eileen Grady, a clinical social worker (advo“A significant amount of abuse stems from a lackcomof cacy-licensed), at National Naval Medical Center (NNMC), munication and parenting skills,” said Angelique Nolan, comBethesda, Md., domestic violence tendsto work in a cycle. munity health nurse for family support advocacy at NNMC. A husband who abuses his wife may also abuse his children. According to Nolan, the Family Advocacy Program (FAP) not An abused wife may take her anger outon a child. Children only provides counseling services for families of domestic vithen often abuse other siblings who may growup to contin- olence, but also provides victims with information on support ue the cycle abuse. of The cycle usually starts with emotional groups, shelters, CHAMPUS benefits and safety planning.

The effects of domestic violence can lasta lifetime + Domesticviolenceoccursamongallracesandsocio-economic groups.

+

Approximately 95 percent of the victims of domestic violence are women.

+ Violence will occur at least once in two-thirds of all marriages. + During the six-month period following an incident of domestic

violence, approximately32 percent of women are victimized again.

+

National Crime Survey data show that women are the victims of violent crime committed by family members at a rate three injured, raped or killed by a male partner than by any other type times that of men. of assailant. Crimes committed by relatives are more likely to result in an Anestimated 3 to 4 millionAmericanwomenarebattered attack and injury than those committed by acquaintances or each year by their husbands or partners. strangers.

+ In the United States, a woman is more likely to be assaulted!

+

+

Research suggests that wife-beating results in more injuries that require medical treatment than rape, auto accidents and muggings combined.

+

Eachyear,morethan 1 millionwomenseekmedicalassistance for injuries caused by battering.

+ +

Spouses or ex-spouses commit more than half of all violent crimes by relatives and about two-thirds of all crimes by relatives against women.

+

Battering often occurs during pregnancy. These women have twice as many miscarriages as nonbattered women.

+ The FBI reports that40 percent of female homicide victims are + Children from violent homes have higher risks

killed by their husbands or boyfriends, while 6 percent of male homicide victims are killed by their wives or girlfriends. 3% L

of alcohol and

drug abuse and juvenile delinquency.

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Nolan said the rise in reported cases is based on the fact Child abuse andneglektindicators that military agencies are more aware of signs of abuse and are mandated to report them to Navy officials. In addition, Physical indica tors the Navy has increased its family service center staffs to inunexplained bruises clude more programs and servicesto reach the community unexplained burns and its victims. unexplainedfractures. “All states now require people in public service positions Behavioral indicators -doctors, teachers and child-care workers -to report susextreme aggressiveness or withdrawal pected abuse or neglect,” said Grady. There is also “good wary of people faith” reporting, which protects people who report suspectfeels deserving of punishment. ed abuse or neglect cases from being sued by the person if Emotional abuse: the report was made in good faith, with no intentionof malPhysical indicators ice. shallow, empty facial appearance “This is not a ’guilty until proven innocent’ kind of thing,” failure to thrive in a normal way said Grady. “Our main concern is to protect the child or lags in physlcal development. spouse.” Behavioral Indicators If you suspect that a child or spouse is being abused, depression report it to family advocacy. They will have those involved poor self-esteem come in for an initial consultation. After that session, sothe developmental lags. cial worker decides if an abuse case needsto be opened. “Family advocacy is here to help you, not judge you,” said Neglect: Physical indica tors Nolan. “We always give the support, training and referral if underweight, poor growth pattern needed to anyone who seeks help. This way, we can all work consistent hunger, poor hygiene together to break the abuse cycle and prevent another one lack of supervision. from starting.” Behavioral indicators Early identification increases the chance of a positive and safe outcome and most importantly, it will help cure this some- inappropriate seekingof affection extended staysat school times-fatalsickness. & avoids other children, embarrassedto be with others. abuse: Oladeinde is a staff writer for All Hands. Physical indica tors difficulty walking or sitting torn, stained underclothing venereal disease early pregnancy. Behavioral indicators sophisticated or unusual sexual behavior or knowledge sexually acting out with other children acting out guilt with self-destructive behavior.

I

,

.

.

If you are aware of a violent episode in progress, report it. keek help if you are involved in an abusive relationship and refer any individual in a violent relationship to a family violence, crisis or counseling resource. For mare ihformation, contact your local family service center. JULY 1995

SOURCE National Naval Medical Center

39

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Signs to look for in a battering personality Jealousy: At the start of a relationship, an abuser may say, “Jealousy is a sign of love.” Jealousy has nothing to do with love, it’s sign of possessiveness and lack of trust. Controlling beha (L.

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

:’

The batterer will say this type of behavior is based on a concern for the safety of the abused individual.

nt: Many battered women dated or knew their abuser for less than six months before they married or lived

together. .G: Abusive people will expect their partners to meet all their needs. They expect the perfect spouse, Unrealistic e:.,&ta,.ti fathedmother, lover and friend.

Isolation: The abusive person tries to cut the abused person off from all resources. Victims who have friends of the opposite sex are “whores;” those with friends of the same sex are “homosexual.” Victims who are close to family to are the“tied apron strings.” B’

-oblc

If abusers are chronically unemployed, someone always is doing them wrong, a or out to get them.

rsensitivity: Abusers are easily insulted. They claim their feelings are “hurt” when really they are mad. They also take the slightest setbacks as personal attacks. H

Cruelty to anAnabusermaypunishanimalsbrutallyorbeinsensitivetotheirpainorsuffering;thisindividual may expect children to be capable of doing things beyond their ability. For example, an abuser may whip a one-year-old for wettin a diaper. I ast I ering: Abusers may say they abused before because the victims “made them do it.” Batterers will beat anyone they’re & SOURCE National Naval Medical Center with the victims if stay around long enough for the violence begin. to

Spouse AbuseOffenders (by age) 140

120 100

80 60 rc

0

f

a

I

40

E

3

z

20

0

20-30

31-40

41-50

Age 40

51 61-60 SOURCE: Naval Natlonal

+ Center Medical

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'

Spouse (6%)

1

Family & Friends (6%) Medical (20%)

Security/Police (8%)

0Command (22%)

z_/ Transfer-In (10%)

Other (9%)

FAPs (17%)

SOURCE National Naval Medical Center

4vailable in +%e M i P - y through FAP A four-week I - An open-ended, inter-

Tr-tment SeryC-c ge - the military.

I to Without Live Vin -3ry training courst -

.-

A i c violence in per - groupup

-

,,

- 91I L - - .-. - behavior change followfor men previously treated in structured group.

-

Women's educational group - A six-week educaCouples' group counseling Time limited educational group for women who experienced violence in a tional, interpersonal group for couples who have experienced domestic violence. relationship. Women's theraF -Along-term, insight-oriented, interpersonal therapy group women for who have complete" short education group.

-

I :E A 20- to24-week educational, behavior change, interactional group for men involved in perpetrating domestic violence.

-

17-week 4to141 Mc dts A long-term interlong behavior change, education and insight-oriented actional group for individuals sexuallyabused as children. treatment group for men who have perpetrated violence ' ' within a relation! ). Parenting treatment group -An 8- to 13-week educational and behavioral change program for parents. Domesticviolence trec.-~ arc fbs Aluth, Minn., moc - A 2 ' - . J G G R uG. or cnange, Children's !nt co t re education and insight oriented treatment group for men )grams - A 6- to 10-week interactional, educational who have perpetrated violence within a relationship. program for children and parents (separately). & ~

~

Training mayvary from command to command. SOURCE National Naval Medical Center

HEALTH & SAFETY I I

Ifeeping a How your moods affectyour driving Story courtesy of Parlay International

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t’s a fact of life - we all havegood and bad Temper, temper moods. But, when you’re driving, you have It’s inevitable you’ll lose your temper once in to keep those moods under control - es- awhile. But learningto handle your angeris pecially the negative ones. important because angry people can become Keeping cool, calm and collected under all dangerous people when they’re driving motor circumstances is important to your safety. A vehicles. mature Sailor maintains his or her self control. It may be difficult to keep your anger under control,but it can be done. Your own attitude is a starting point. For instance, you maybe tempted to get back at another driverwho does something foolish.But, as a professional, you makea wiser choice.You know the other driver has createda dangerous situation and you could make it even worseif you react in anger. Take some deep breaths, keep your lid on and remind yourself your own safety is more important thanany urge to react. Set a good example for other drlvers- including the one who made you angry. As long as you stay in control, chances are the situation won’t escalate into something more perilous than it already is. Being a defensive driver can make your driving life safer and easier. You need good judgment when there’s risk involved. Emotional responses only make the risk greater. 42

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~ o ohead l Impaired driving

negative mood when you’re tired. The food you eat also plays a part in your If you start your day in bad a mood,it can moods. Avoid junkfoods and too much sugar. actually impair you physically. Your normal reactions may be clouded by anger, anxiety Eat balanced meals, eat grief. starting or By out under stress you moderately and go easy on headdevelop caffeinated can and early atire can beverages, as ache, upset stomach other problems. orspicy as well foods that It’s good to know how to respond to upset can your stomach. stressful situations and how to avoid them There’s doubt your that no if possible. If you can’t, make sure your mind state of governs way the you drive. Make sure your driving is orderly and careful.Your good mind is in a positive mode habits will carry you through. before you start out- and do

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your utmost to keepit that day way. your It’ll make a lot

Learn to relax If you are stressed out, try some relaxation techniques.Stop if you can. Get out, stretch and walk around a little. Put some soothing music onthe radio. Do some deep breathing while you’re atthe wheel. On the other hand, it canbe dangerous to get overly relaxed when you’re driving. A blissfulmood may be pleasant but it can cause youto daydream. Your mind may wander and, in a tight squeeze, your reactions maybe tooslow. Keeping an even keel is your best bet.

Keep in shape The condition of your body plays abig role in the control of your moods. Avoid fatigue when you’reon the road. It’s easy to fall into a JULY 1995

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Be Safe

Buckle Up

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Models of Success All Hands focuses on the Navy’s role models Seaman Than2 Pham

Command; Navy/Marine Corps Reserve Center, Ebensburg, Pa. Hometown; Sacramento, Calif. Job Description: Staff corpsman for 10 active-duty and 80 reserve Marines Hobbies: Aerobics, softball and painting Marital Status; Married with four children ranging in age from fourto 23. Key to Success: “Be positive. Carry out your duties with a sense of honesty and fair play. Let instruction be your guide, and be consistent in their use. Always temper all assignments with humanity. Remember, we are all in this together. Remain focused on each new challenge. Fa vorite quote;Lead by example.A

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Ship; USS Barry (DDG 52) Hometown; Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam Job Description; Deck hand aboard USS Barry Hobbies; Volleyball, swimming and basketball Marital Status; Single Achievements; “I left Vietnam in 1987, lived in Thailand until1989 when I moved to Hawaii, received my citizenship anddecided to join the Navy. I had to muster all the courage I had to leave my family and countryto make a name for myself inthe United States.” Key to Success; Dedication to self-improvement. Favorite quote; You never really lose until you stop trying.” a

Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Libby Ann Valeskf

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nvironmental protection is a vital concern everywhere these days,but aboard USS John F; Kennedy (CV 67), undergoing a two-year overhaul at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, hazardous material (HAZMAT) control isa definite challenge. “Because of our present environment and the Navy’s policy on hazardous material, we track all HAZMAT from what is called the ‘cradleto the grave,”’ said LTJG Me1 C. Davis, SK2 Casey A. Tuggles uses a forklift to Kennedy’s HAZMAT officer. Davis and load used nitrogen bottles ona truck for proper disposal. his team make sure all HAZMAT is controlled from the time of requisition to the time of disposal. are specifically labeled with warnings Total accountability is one of the and identification numbers that make things that makes the program them easier to track. By the end of the successful. “We begin issuing hazardwork day, we have an accurate ous materials, such as primer, paint accounting of every container.” and lube oil at 7:30 a.m. We continue Each person is given a receipt for issuing material throughout the day,’’ any material issued. When that person Davis said. “The containers we issue returns any unused material,the

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issued receipt is stamped and the copy onfile is also stamped. “If, at the end of theday, the material hasn’t been returned, the tracking process is at thetip of our fingers,” Davis said. While Kennedy is in the shipyard, quite a bit of primer and paintis being used, but the HAZMAT staff issuesthe precise amounts needed for a job. “We use special-ordered measuring cans so primer waste will not occur,” Davis said. Davis estimates that USS John F: Kennedy’s HAZMAT Program is saving the Navy more than $900 a week on primer alone.“Whenyouhave concerned people working with hazardous materials,” said Davis, “your program will be a definite success.” Story byJ02 John Oliver Moulton and photo by pH2 Peter R. Kline, both assigned to USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67).

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Airmen earn their sea legs

Air Force Tech. Sgt. he number of Air Force people fer, officer-in-charge of the small Robert H. who can tell sea stories grew by detachment. “We maintained stand-by Mayer, a refueling five recently when airmen from services after the fuel system came mechanic, back on line.” Travis Air Force Base, Calif., got under inspects a way with USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70). Schaffer was impressed, especially hose on a fuel during flight operations. “We gotto One mechanic, three operators, an truck during a see how a sister service does things. recent at-sea officer-in-charge and an R-11 refueler period aboard That was really something. We saw truck were aboard the carrierto proUSS Carl how you do business and compared vide backup JP-5 aircraft fuel while Vinson (CVN the ship’s own fuel system was being notes.” 70).

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re-certified. Fuel certification hasto be done after an extended ship’s restricted availability,” said Fuels OfficerLT William Bailey. “We need clean fuelto give the embarkedair wing.” “We topped off three helos the first day,” said Air Force Capt. Tim Schaf46

All five Air Force personnelgot to experience exactly what a Navy ship does at sea, and they enjoyed every minute of it, according to Air Force Sgt. Mark P. Rios. “We had a real good tour of the ship,” he said. “We got to see how they do business upstairs on the flight deck. We went

up to Vulture’s Row about10 times. That was a real rush.” Story by JOl George Hammond, photo by William Dagendesh,both assigned JO1 to public affairsofice, USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70).

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f mess management specialists (MSs) from Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station (NCTAMS), Eastern Pacific, Hawaii, had their way,the number of high school dropouts would decrease dramatically. The number of“ A s would increase astoundingly and the number of high school grads going on to be chefs might skyrocket. When five MSstook over a local high school’s home economics class for the dayto prep students for the Hawaii Student Culinary Exposition, the students refusedto leave whenthe bell rang. “You guys need to go to English,” insisted Laura Sato, the school’s home economics instructor. ‘ll’ll give five extra credit pointsto anyone who goes to English.” The students sat quietly, obliviousto the bell and the teacher’s voice. They watched intently as MS3 Samuel Reed squeezed out frosting rosebuds on a cake. “How about 10 extra credit points,” MS1 Moises Lovinaria watches as a student carves a flower out of a potato.

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pleaded Sato. The enrapt students pretended notto hear. They wanted more. “It was amazing!” said Sato. “We had very active participation from the students. They really loved it. “NCTAMS has been coming out here every year for about four years. It’s always an excellent chance for the students to get hands-on experience.” The students were “wowed” by the MSs wielding their culinary expertise. MS2 Glenda Perez showed howts make a napkin stand on three corners during her napkin folding demonstration. MSl Moises Lovinaria turned an orange into a bright, colorful flower using mashed potatoes and food coloring. MS2 Gilbert0 Eleazar made a flying duck out of a carrot and MS3 Ernie Scheer joined Reed in cake decorating. “Another 20 or so more and you’ll get the hang of it,” encouraged Lovinaria, as high school student Randy Fernandez attemptedto make

MS2 Glenda Perez watches as students attempt to recreate her napkin folding techniques.

an edible flower. “This isn’t so tough. I think 1’11 make one of these for the exposition,” said Fernandez as he “spooned” blue mashed potato petals onto an orange. “You see them progress in a matter of minutes,” said Reed. “What we’re showing them today directly relates to what they’ll be doing at their culinary exposition. It’s also fun coming out here. It feels good to interact with the students and the community.” NCTAMS Food Services Officer, MSCM Danilo Batac, echoed his MSs’ feelings. “They are very eagerto learn. We look forwardto coming out here every year. We keep getting invited back, so they must like it, too!” $

Story arid photos by J02 Robert Benson, NCTAMS EASTPAC Public Affairs.

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Shipmates

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Yeoqan 1st Class Joyce Blandwas recently selected Military Sealift Command Far East’s Shore Sailor of the Year. “Working with MSC has exposed me to working with other services,” Bland said. Her advice to other sailors is: “Cross train yourself and know every area of the mission of your command.” A native of Gary, Ind., Bland is attached to MSC Okinawa. CAPT William J. Phillipswas recently presented with “The Order of the Long Leaf Pine,” by North Carolina Governor James 6. Hunt Jr. Phillips, a native of Kannapolis, N.C., was officer-in-charge of theUS. Navy Band, Washington, D.C., until his retirement last month. The award is the state’s highest service award and was presented in recognition of Phillips’ outstanding achievement during his38 years of naval service.

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JO1 (AW) Laurie Butler JOl ISW) Jim Conner

Aviation Boatswain’s Mate 1st Class (AW) Joseph D. Howard was recently named USS Theodore Roosevelt’s (CVN 71) Sailor of the Year. Howard credits his success with a simple concept: “Follow up. When you delegate a task to someone, you needto follow up on it,” Howard said. Howard, hailing from Connellsville, Pa., works as career counselor for the ship’s air department. Dr. Thomas L. Reinecke, head of the Electronic and Optical Properties Section, Electronic Materials Branch of the Naval Research Laboratory’s Electronics Science and Technology Division, was recently awarded the 1994 Humbolt Research Award for SeniorUS. Scientists. The award is granted by the Humbolt Foundation to “outstanding U.S. scientists in recognition of accomplishments in research and teaching.” Aviation Structural Mechanic DebraA. Samborski was recently chosen to participate in the Navy’s Enlisted Commissioning Program. Samborski, a native of Chicago, is attached to the Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department, Naval Air Station Fallon, Nev. Of the 700 applicants, 150 Sailors were chosen for the 1995 program.

Quartermaster 1st Class(SW) Daniel J. Nicholson was recently selected the Atlantic Fleet Surface Force Sea Sailor of the Year. Nicholson, from Reading, Mass., was cited for his exceptional achievements as USS Clifton Sprague’s (FFG 16) assistant navigator, Enlisted Surface War Specialist Coordinator, command financial specialist and Combined Federal Campaign coordinator. 4%

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JULY1995

watch station as Main Engine Operator.

Hometown: Paris, Tenn. Hobbies: Sports, especially tennis Watch responsibilities: Main Engine Operator, Whidbey Island ,,

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Jobresponsibilities: HydraulicsShop i' Division - performs maintenance on snlp's

Places visited while in the Navy: South America, East Africa, Puerto Rico and Cuba. Best part of the job: Humanitarian relief in the Straits of Florida. 'It was a rewarding feeling helping the Cuba,n rnfl Innee AI wiqg Onnrltinn Able Vigil. :'$I. 9'

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