2 0 1 5 I M P A C T R E P O R T - Youth Policy Institute

2 0 1 5 I M P A C T R E P O R T - Youth Policy Institute

2 0 1 5 I M P A C T R E P O R T Transforming Lives and Neighborhoods F or more than 30 years, the Youth Policy Institute (YPI) has been breaking t...

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2 0 1 5 I M P A C T R E P O R T

Transforming Lives and Neighborhoods

F

or more than 30 years, the Youth Policy Institute (YPI) has been breaking the cycle of intergenerational poverty by providing access to education, workforce training, and essential services for youth and families.

Originally part of the Robert F. Kennedy Memorial, YPI was founded in Washington, D.C., in 1983. In 1996, YPI relocated to Los Angeles to focus on direct education and comprehensive services including early childhood education, tutoring, operating K-12 schools, college preparation, computer labs, case management, financial literacy, and job training.

Now over 1,600 YPI employees serve some of the city’s lowest-income neighborhoods, reaching more than 115,000 youth and adults annually at 136 program sites in Los Angeles. YPI is the only nonprofit in the country to receive all three signature White House Neighborhood Revitalization Initiative grants: Promise Neighborhoods, Choice Neighborhoods, and Byrne Criminal Justice Innovation; and is lead implementation partner for the Los Angeles Promise Zone.

We are humbled by these endorsements of YPI’s work and consider them a call to do even better. In the years ahead, we will continue to build and strengthen collaborations, invest in our staff, and sharpen our ability to measure the impact of our work. We are honored to provide these services in Los Angeles, and thank you for your support of our efforts.

Our Mission from cradle to college and career YPI transforms Los Angeles neighborhoods using a holistic approach to reduce poverty by ensuring families have access to high quality schools, wrap-around education, and technology services, enabling a successful transition from cradle to college and career.

From Our Executive Director Dixon Slingerland

I

am honored to share with you some of the impact YPI created and fostered in 2015. It was a year filled with educational milestones for our

youth, great strides for our families, and compelling transformations for the communities we serve.

In 2015, YPI collaborated with more than 130 community-based, business, and governmental partners to make our city a better place for all who live and work here. This included a new data-sharing agreement with the Los Angeles Unified School District—the first time the district has shared student-level data with an external agency. This unprecedented partnership will help YPI and our partners create better place-based solutions to benefit thousands of students. It will also allow us to track student results at 119 schools, and follow their stories year after year.

For our youngest learners and their families, YPI was thrilled to secure a competitive contract with Los Angeles County that will enable us to open two Early Head Start facilities in 2016. This opportunity creates high quality learning experiences for infants and toddlers, and jumpstarts their readiness for school.

Also in 2015, Los Angeles was selected by the Obama Administration for the first ever round of Performance Partnership Pilot Awards for Disconnected Youth (P3). One of only five cities selected, P3 allows Los Angeles to integrate programs and blend funding streams to improve outcomes for Opportunity Youth ages 14-24. Importantly, it gives flexibility around federal program rules and regulations that have proven to be barriers in serving older youth who drop out of school and are not employed—building on our work in the Los Angeles Promise Zone.

We will continue to strengthen our city’s youth and families by integrating and expanding our programs in response to community needs. We want to ensure that our neighborhoods are safe, positive places to establish careers and build lives of hope and promise.

I could not be more proud of the work our YPI staff achieved in 2015. With your help, I’m excited to see what we will accomplish next.

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Educational Achievement

Y

PI’s education programs present a focused, diversified, and thorough commitment to academic success. Our initiatives prepare learners for postsecondary education and meaningful lifelong careers. Our K-12 educational efforts impact 119 district and charter schools throughout Los Angeles, including five schools YPI directly operates: three charter schools and two LAUSD schools. Throughout the city, YPI provides a vast range of tutoring and after-school programs, and has opened 83 public computer centers. Our 1,600-person staff and numerous volunteers work closely with many partner organizations to provide additional educational enrichment services that support YPI's mission and vision for our clients.

a college promise YPI’s Promise Scholars Program includes a critical financial component. We help low-income students pay for college through a unique 3:1 match that puts up to $981 per student into a special savings account. This amount covers the financial gap for the first year of community college after financial aid. Providing this match makes it three times more likely that students enroll in college—and four times more likely they’ll graduate.

In 2015, more than 23,000 individuals took part in YPI’s extended learning opportunities before and after school. On average, we served 2,387 elementary and middle school students and 3,059 high school students daily—making us the largest after-school provider for high school students in the state of California. YPI’s tutoring and project-based learning programs offer individual program assessments, identifying areas of need for each student, and bring trained teachers to address those needs.

Our range of academic and youth development programs and services include:

⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅

4

Strong curriculum and tutoring programs focused on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). After-school tutoring and developmental programs, such as Supplemental Educational Services tutoring and GEAR UP. Summer school programs that encourage continued learning in engaging environments. College workshops, visits, and counseling/career advising for more than 3,000 students per year.

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⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅

College access programs specifically focused on immigrant youth. An alternative high school for homeless youth, and support for disconnected youth who have dropped out of school through YouthSource Centers. An in-house GED program with YouthBuild. Physical education and general wellness programs. Translators for parent conferences in Spanishspeaking neighborhoods. Broadband and computer access.

This is remarkable leadership in action … This community and these young people are going to help prove to the country what children who weren’t born with a silver spoon in their mouth can do if we give them opportunities. – Arne Duncan

former U.S. Secretary of Education

Making a Difference in High-Need Schools YPI programming has been proven to work at all kinds of schools: charter, district, and pilot. We now operate three charter schools: Bert Corona Charter Middle and High Schools in Pacoima, and Monseñor Oscar Romero Charter School in Pico-Union/Westlake. We also operate two LAUSD schools: San Fernando Institute for Applied Media Pilot School and Sylmar Biotech Health Academy. In addition to the breadth and scope of these educational programs, YPI is expanding its reach to target specific neighborhoods and schools greatly impacted by poverty. This immersive work began within the Los Angeles Promise Neighborhood, where YPI is providing a saturation of services across the area’s 18 schools.

For the 2014-15 academic year, each of the seven LAUSD Promise Neighborhood high schools increased their graduation rates, with an average increase of 6.6%:

⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅

Cesar E. Chavez Learning Academies-Teacher Prep Academy: 75% graduation rate, an increase of 18.7 percentage points. STEM Academy in Hollywood: 79% graduation rate, an increase of 9 percentage points. San Fernando High School (2,370+ students): 83% graduation rate, 9 percentage points above the district average. Cesar E. Chavez Learning Academies-Academy for Scientific Exploration increased 13.4 percentage points, to an 87% graduation rate. Cesar E. Chavez Learning Academies-Social Justice Humanitas had a rate of 94%, continuing its graduation success and making it a strong role model working toward a 100% goal.

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Supporting Families

Y policy into action In 2015, YPI helped 149 youth apply for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Program, supporting undocumented youth in learning more about national and California policies regarding access to college and career opportunities. By the end of the year, 50 had received work permits, 38 had obtained jobs, and 17 had entered postsecondary education.

Fresh produce from the Community Supported Agriculture Program is distributed at YPI's FamilySource Center, one of many services available here.

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PI is the only Los Angeles organization operating the full range of center-based programming through the city’s YouthSource, FamilySource, and WorkSource Centers. Collectively at these Centers, YPI provides families in need with job training, skill building, employment support, financial literacy, tax preparation, legal services, assistance applying for public benefits, computer classes and access, adult education programs, parenting classes, leadership development training, cultural and recreational activities, and referrals to health care, housing, and emergency services. YPI supports families by utilizing an intensive case management system at our Hollywood FamilySource Center. YPI’s WorkSource Center in Pacoima houses an innovative Financial Opportunity Center, which integrates financial coaching with workforce development and assistance obtaining income supports. Clients are encouraged to move through the entire continuum of services in order to maximize the benefit of each.

The Youth Policy Institute is a leader for social change in Los Angeles, improving the well-being of our struggling communities with intelligent and innovative approaches for L.A.’s new war on poverty. – Fred Ali

President and CEO Weingart Foundation

Helping Families Build Assets YPI’s Asset Building Programs provided almost 3,881 hours of financial education in 2015, serving more than 1,000 clients and helping families save more than $100,000—and these programs are continuing to expand. They are another crucial component in achieving our mission to fight poverty.

⋅ Financial capability workshops in English and Spanish that use the FDIC MoneySmart curriculum. ⋅ One-on-one financial coaching to provide personalized support that helps clients improve their own ⋅ ⋅



financial capacities. 1,269 individuals have received comprehensive financial education workshops in order to start saving for college. Free tax preparation services through the VITA program. $145,084 in Earned Income Credit has been provided to the community. The total refund amount provided to the community was $335,553. Matched savings accounts specifically earmarked for college costs, home purchase, or to start a business. 363 matched savings accounts were opened in 2015.

At YPI’s Hollywood FamilySource Center alone, families that participated in our Asset Building Programs collectively increased their income more than $600,000 in 2015.

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Creating the L.A. Promise Zone

W

hen YPI moved to Los Angeles in 1996 with the mission to fight intergenerational poverty, we knew our work would include providing as many programs and services as possible to neighborhoods most in need.

closing the gap Government grants provide much needed funding. But these dollars don’t nearly cover all of the costs of our integrated service delivery. Private support makes government dollars work harder and smarter to make sure YPI’s programs are effective and successful.

Our successes continued to build over time, and in 2012-13, YPI received all three signature White House Neighborhood Revitalization Initiative grants—the only organization in the country to earn this honor. The Promise Neighborhood, Byrne Criminal Justice Innovation, and Choice Neighborhood grants have provided YPI with the opportunity to dig deeper and do more within targeted communities, while creating innovative place-based collaborations with partners seeking the same results. The recognition of these grants—and more importantly the work behind them—led to another enormous honor and opportunity: In 2014, Los Angeles became one of the first five federally designated Promise Zones in the country, with YPI as lead implementation partner.

Luke Tate, Special Assistant to the President for Economic Mobility, speaking at our 2015 gala.

The L.A. Promise Zone encompasses the communities of East Hollywood, Thai Town, Little Armenia, Koreatown, and Pico-Union/ Westlake. The needs in these communities are profound, but YPI and our 50 Promise Zone partners are confident we can affect meaningful, long-term change through job creation, increased economic activity, improved educational opportunities, improved public safety, leveraged private capital, preserving and expanding housing affordability, and through smart growth policies. We recognize that to succeed we must overcome formidable obstacles. We are happy to report that we are succeeding, thanks to collaborative partnerships across the Promise Zone communities and beyond.

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The needs of the L.A. Promise Zone are startling: ⋅

35% of the population lives at or below poverty level, compared to 20% city-wide. ⋅ 33% of households earn less than $20,000 per year. ⋅ 31% of the population is under the age of 25. ⋅ 37% of residents age 25+ do not have a high school diploma. ⋅ Only 20% of 6th graders are proficient in math; only 28% are proficient in English Language Arts. ⋅ 77% of households with children under 18 receive CalFresh (food stamps). ⋅ At the 45 schools in the Promise Zone, more than 80% of students are eligible for free and reduced lunch. ⋅ The unemployment rate is 14%, nearly double the city average. ⋅ Violent crime is twice the city-wide rate.

YPI’s saturation of programs and services for youth and their families in the Promise Zone is just getting started. To date, we are seeing high school graduation rates rise, and increases in both

A bridge between L.A.’s promise and its potential, the Youth Policy Institute is a one-of-a-kind organization that makes real change—by challenging the status quo and delivering innovative solutions that make our communities stronger, safer, smarter, and more stable. As Mayor, I’ve found YPI to be one of our strongest, most creative partners in facing down obstacles to academic achievement, job success, and financial stability. It operates each type of the City’s most critical resource centers and partners effectively with charter and district schools to break down barriers and maintain focus on our young people and their future success. YPI has also been a cornerstone of L.A.’s recent success in drawing federal dollars to support our most vulnerable communities.

academic proficiency and family income. There

– Eric Garcetti

is much work ahead to address community

Mayor, City of Los Angeles

needs, and to create neighborhoods of opportunity and promise.

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YPI in Action: Helping the Whole Family the enciso family story

J

ulian and Sylvia Enciso came to the United States more than 20 years ago to give their children a chance for greater opportunities. Sylvia has a 6th grade education. Julian is a mechanic and wishes he could have had a better education. Their sons Julian Jr. and Luis were doing well in elementary school, but everything changed when Julian Jr. was 10 and Luis was 6, and their 13-yearold sister died after a long illness. Devastated, they became disillusioned with school, and struggled with their grief. “They didn't want to try,” Sylvia explains.

Turning to YPI for Help Sylvia came to YPI and enrolled Julian in the GEAR UP program, which helped him focus on his studies and succeed in school. Now 21, Julian has a child, works with his father, and attends Mission College. Sylvia herself started attending nutrition courses through YPI and took part in programming to help support the family through their difficult transition.

Luis Gets His Life Back: Without YPI “I’d be dead or in jail.” The biggest change was in their son, Luis, now 17. “I ended my freshman year as a D student,” Luis shares. In 10th grade, a YPI staff member learned about his artistic talent, and recruited him to help create a student mural at his school, Sylmar Biotech and Health Academy. “Having something I enjoyed about school, something I looked forward to, and something I was good at gave me confidence,” Luis says. “It was then I started to realize the importance of school and my future.” Luis is now an honor student, is class vice president, and has started a tutoring program for freshmen students. In October 2015, Luis spoke passionately at YPI’s annual gala about his experiences, and YPI’s impact on his life and his future: “I found out I am bright. I am smart. I have started taking college classes. Thanks to [YPI] I have a lot of confidence now … I realize that anything is

Luis is proud of the mural he helped create at YPI’s Sylmar Biotech and Health Academy. Luis discovered: “I have an amazing mind. My mind is really big.“ Parents Julian and Sylvia with Luis, 10-year-old brother Estif, and 4-year-old brother Joey.

possible if you try.”

The many gifts Luis will graduate high school in 2016. He is preparing to study computer science in college. He wants to give back to kids, and to YPI.

and unstoppable

Words of Gratitude

have made them

energy of YPI’s staff

The Enciso Family is just one example of the thousands of families we help every day. Their words are a testament to the care and hard work of our teachers, volunteers, staff, and supporters. “I went through a huge transformation because of the people who never lost faith in me: my family, friends, and the YPI staff,” Luis says. “They never stop caring. They gave me my start, and I give them my thanks.”

a critical factor in advancing academic achievement in Los Angeles. – Steve Zimmer LAUSD Board President

His father, Julian, says, “They change a life at a time. They plant a seed of hope in our kids and in this society. Because of them, our family and our sons have changed.” Sylvia adds, “People who donate, do it with humility. You are giving a donation to save a youth, a family. It’s an investment.”

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Harvard Bound

N

oemi Valdez was a straight-A student in Mexico. When she was 9, her family moved to the United States, where her grades suffered severely as she struggled to learn English. Through hard work, she mastered the language and began to excel in her coursework again. In high school, Noemi had a 4.3 GPA but never thought about a college career. “A lot of first generation kids don’t know about college,” she says. During her junior year, she enrolled in YPI programs that help students navigate the route to college. She participated in YPI’s College Ambassador and Cash for College programs, in addition to workshops on college applications, personal statements, and financial aid. Noemi learned that she had a good possibility of getting into private and prestigious schools, but she knew she would need significant financial aid in order to enroll. “[YPI’s programs] expose you to the different options that are available,” Noemi says. In 2015, Noemi graduated with honors from San Fernando High School and received a full scholarship to Harvard. She is studying archaeology and mathematics with the goal of becoming a university professor. She is proud to be the first in her family to go to college. Of her experience with YPI, Noemi says, “I want to thank them for making it possible for me to be here and get me the help that I needed.”

From Juvenile Hall to College

A

nthony Chavarria was just a kid when he served a four-year sentence in juvenile hall. As a teenager, he passed through four different high schools and eventually dropped out. By the time he was 20, he was homeless and living on the streets. Anthony’s life changed when a fellow homeless friend told him about YPI. He visited YPI’s YouthSource Center in Pacoima and got help receiving his GED, preparing a resume, and securing job interviews. Today, Anthony works at Olive View UCLA Medical Center, transporting patients. While working full time, he is attending Valley College at night studying music technology, with a goal to transfer to the University of Southern California. Anthony also volunteers as a guest speaker for YPI programs that help younger students and Opportunity Youth. “Now I say, I’m stressing over a midterm final. Then, I was stressing over where to sleep that night.” Most importantly, Anthony says, “Now, I’m creating a future for myself.”

YPI Impact – 2015 By the Numbers $602,846

Increase in collective family income through YPI’s FamilySource Center programs.

44,364

Individuals provided with Internet access.

29,477

Hours of academic tutoring.

Students participated in educational 18,907 enrichment programs. 4,204

Students engaged in physical education and general wellness programs.

Hours of financial education helped 3,881 families collectively save more than $100,000. Elementary and middle school students and 3,059 high school students 2,387 attended after school programming daily. Students received access to college visits, workshops, and counseling. 2,895 Adults received workforce training. 1,821 Matched savings accounts were opened with YPI’s help. 363 Y P I

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Your Support is an Investment in the Children and Families We Serve!

T

he Youth Policy Institute continues to grow and increase our positive impact on students, families, and communities. Hundreds of YPI staff and volunteers serve some of the city’s lowest-income neighborhoods, reaching more than 115,000 youth and adults at 136 program sites in and around L.A. The need is great. Over 35% of Promise Zone residents live at or below the poverty line (compared to 20% city-wide), with 1/3 of households earning less than $20,000 per year. We invite you to join the YPI Promise Network of donors, philanthropists, and businesses committed to the future of Los Angeles and the transformative success of the youth, families, and individuals working their way out of poverty. We cannot do this work without you. Gifts of all levels are welcome and may be targeted to the interests of the donor or directed where they are needed most. Here are some of the ways you can help …

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hope

$25 – $1,000 Provides 1:1 tutoring in Math and Language Arts, plus much-needed supplies for after-school enrichment programs at more than 70 different schools.

access

$1,000 – $25,000 Contributes to educational programs like Promise Scholars, career building, and workforce training programs.

empower

$25,000 – $100,000 Funds essential education in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math), Arts, and Culture.

transform $100,000 and up

Helps build Full-Service Community Schools. Coaches families and individuals in financial literacy to break the cycle of intergenerational poverty.

donate at

ypiusa.org/donate

90%

of YPI’s operating budget goes directly to program services. All donations are tax deductible. The Youth Policy Institute is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt nonprofit organization.

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Youth Policy Institute Statement of Activities Ending June 30, 2015 (in thousands)

86%

SOURCES OF FUNDS n Contracts and Grants n Contributions and Other FY 07

5,212

4 TOTAL

FY 08

$36,004 9

FY 09

15

FY 10

22

USES OF FUNDS

FY 11 n Program Services FY 12 n Management and General FY 13

14%

$30,792

25

$31,785

23

FY 14

1%

9%

445 27 $35,235 $769

Totaling Increase in Net Assets

FY 15

3,005

21

n Fundraising

90%

36

FY 16

43

$0

$10

$20

$30

$40

PROGRAM EXPENSES BY POPULATION SERVED

$50

1.9%

n Pre K

n College

n K– 8

n Adults

8.1%

n High School

n Families

9.1%

38%

38%

n Opportunity Youth

2.1%

1.9%

YPI BUDGET (EXPENSES) FROM FY07 TO FY16 $50

43

IN MILLIONS

$40 36 $30 25 22

$20

27 23

21

15 $10 9 $0

16

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FY 08

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FY 09

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FY 10

FY 11

FY 12

FY 13

FY 14

FY 15

FY 16

Our Funders and Supporters YPI is deeply grateful to the donors listed below for their generous financial support. These partnerships allow us to serve some of the most vulnerable communities in Los Angeles, and help create neighborhoods of opportunity and promise.

CORPORATIONS AND FOUNDATIONS The Accelerated Schools

Johnny Carson Foundation

Adams Legacy Foundation

JP Morgan Chase

AEG

Kaiser Permanente

Ahmanson Foundation

Kindel Gagen Associates

AltaSea at the Port of Los Angeles

Korea Times

Annenberg Foundation

Los Angeles Department of Water

Aszkenazy Development

and Power

Athens Services

Los Angeles Dodgers Foundation

Bank of America

Liberty Hill Foundation

Bank of the West

Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC)

Bright Future International

Loyola Marymount University School

The Broad Foundation

of Education

California Emerging Technology Fund

Los Angeles Giving Circle

The California Endowment

Los Angeles Mayor’s Fund

The California Wellness Foundation

Marcled Foundation

The Carol and James Collins Foundation

The Katie McGrath & J.J. Abrams Family

Catapult Learning

Foundation

Telacu Time Warner Cable Tristar Group

Celerity Charter Schools

Microsoft

Center for Nonprofit Management

Mitchell Silberberg Knupp

Citi Community Development

The Music Center

Citi Foundation

National Council of La Raza (NCLR)

Coca-Cola Government Relations

NBC Universal/Comcast

Conrad N. Hilton Foundation

Nederlander of California

David Bohnett Foundation

Paramount Pictures

DirecTV

Points of Light Foundation

Disney

Ralph M. Parsons Foundation

Dwight Stuart Youth Fund

Recology

Edison International

REDF

Eisner Foundation

Riordan Foundation/RX for Reading

First 5 LA

Rose Hills Foundation

Fox Entertainment Group

Scholastic

Aileen Getty Foundation

SEIU Local 721

David Abel and Brenda Levin

Gibson Dunn

Showtime

Aileen Adams and Geoffrey Cowan

GRACE Inc.

SoCal Gas

Ambassador Frank and Kathy Baxter

Hershey Cause Communications

Soledad Enrichment Action

Jay Berger

Home Depot

Sony Pictures Entertainment

Carol and Frank Biondi

Hudson Pacific Properties

Sound Body Sound Mind

Andrew E. Bogen

Imagine Learning

Taproot Foundation

Union Bank Foundation United Way of Greater Los Angeles Up2Us UPS The USC Sol Price School, Center on Philanthropy and Public Policy Verizon Ware Disposal Weingart Foundation Ziffren Brittenham

INDIVIDUALS

continued

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Our Funders and Supporters INDIVIDUALS continued

Valerie Braimah

Jim Mangia

Andrew Bridge

Judy and Steve McDonald

Kathleen Brown

Karen McNulty

Anne Lee Carpenter

Keith McNutt

George Cheung

John Megaw

Conway Collis

Nathan Megaw

Rose Contreras

Ricardo Mireles

Angelina Corona

Marc Mitchell

Glen Dake

Terry Monteleone

Craig Darian

Frank Moran

Bill Delvac

Noramae Munster Bradley Myslinski

Alyssa Do

Jesse Noonan

Percy Duran

Claire O’Farrell

Eugene Fisher

Sherrie Pastron

John Fogelman Brenda and Tom Freiberg Robert Friedman Matthew Given Marcia Haber Winnie Holzman and Paul Dooley Myung Ki “Mike” Hong

Alex Reza

U.S. Department of Agriculture

Ernest Roberts

U.S. Department of Education

Michael Robin

U.S. Department of Health and

Jesse Shapiro

Jenny Johnson Mitch Kamin Mike Keeley Mary Keipp Enrique Koenig Joanne Kozberg Ari Lanin

Mitchell Silberberg

U.S. Department of Labor

Bill Simon

California Department of Education

Nancy Sinata

Los Angeles County Department Los Angeles County Office of Education

Gene Straub

Los Angeles County Workforce

Tom and Janet Unterman Gustavo Valdivia

Matthew Laycock

Carlos Vaquerano

Mia Lehrer

Jon Vein

Vikki Levine

Belinda Walker

Elizabeth Hirsh Levitt

Ferris and Debbie Wehbe

Ellyn Lindsay

Daniel Weiss

Rodger Lowenstein

Anne Williams

Monica Lozano

Jonathan Williams

Rick Lynch

Harriet Zaretsky

Jamie and Michael Lynton

Jeff Zarrinnam

I M PA C T

R E P O R T

of Probation

Ron Stone

Tamara Larsen

Y P I

Urban Development U.S. Department of Justice

Sithu Thein Swe

Eugene La Pietra

Human Services U.S. Department of Housing and

Ritz Sherman

Phil Star

Doris Koplik

Community Service Internal Revenue Service

Tony Salazar

Lida Jennings

Corporation for National &

Rei Reid

Tom Safran

Patricia Howe

18

Fidel Ramirez Lisa Cleri Reale

Art Gastelum

GOVERNMENT AGENCIES

Jaime Perez

2 0 1 5

Investment Board City of Los Angeles Economic & Workforce Development Department City of Los Angeles Housing & Community Investment Department City of Los Angeles Mayor’s Office of Economic Development, L.A. Promise Zone City of Los Angeles Mayor’s Office of Gang Reduction & Youth Development Los Angeles Unified School District

Our Leadership Team Board of Directors Percy Duran, President Senior Law Partner, Law Firm of Percy Duran, III

Angelina Corona Executive Director, Hermandad Mexicana Nacional

Dixon Slingerland, Vice President Executive Director, Youth Policy Institute

Brenda Freiberg Community Activist Board Chair, New Village Girls Academy

Sandra Lee, Secretary President & CEO, ES Advertising, Inc. David Abel Chairman & Managing Director, VerdeXchange Institute James Alva Sr. VP & Southern CA Market Manager, Citi Community Development Andrew E. Bogen Retired Partner, Gibson Dunn Weingart Foundation Trustee

Dr. Myung Ki “Mike” Hong Founder & President, Dura Coat Products, Inc. Michael F. Keeley Attorney Ari Lanin Partner, Gibson Dunn Tom Unterman Founding Partner, Rustic Canyon Partners Board Chair, California Community Foundation

Executive Team Dixon Slingerland Executive Director

Jesse Noonan, EdD Chief Academic Officer

Iris Zuñiga Chief Operating Officer

Stan Saunders Chief Grants Officer

Steve Schultz Chief Financial Officer

Ruth Dineros Director of Human Resources & Operations

Jodi Delaney Chief Development Officer

Tara Watford, PhD Director of Research & Evaluation

Our children are the most precious natural resource we have. Every day, cycles of poverty leave them stripped of the opportunity to improve their own lives. Children find themselves not only born into poverty, but enveloped in it for the rest of their lives. And without the ability to better themselves, making lasting positive contributions to their families or communities is almost impossible. We are losing generations of children to poverty. For every incredible story of a child who “beats the odds,” there are innumerable stories of children who don’t. That statistical reality exists, regardless of where you fall on the political spectrum. What’s unique about YPI is the manner in which it works to break the cycle by embracing its communities. It’s a wraparound approach, an everything approach. And the difference between having access to these services or not can mean the difference between breaking the cycle or reliving it. – Ari Lanin

YPI Board Member

2 0 1 5 I M P A C T R E P O R T

• Educational Achievement • Supporting Families • The Los Angeles Promise Zone • Success Stories • How You Can Help

Thank you to our funders and community supporters who partner with us to transform lives and neighborhoods. This essential work is only possible because of your generosity.

YOUTH POLICY INSTITUTE 6464 Sunset Boulevard, Suite 650 Los Angeles, CA 90028 ypiusa.org | [email protected] 213.688.2802

This impact report was made with the support of the Taproot Foundation. taprootfoundation.org