2014 Annual Report - Threshold Foundation

2014 Annual Report - Threshold Foundation

2014 Annual Report 1 Our Mission Threshold is a community of individuals united through wealth, and a progressive foundation mobilizing money, peop...

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2014 Annual Report

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Our Mission Threshold is a community of individuals united through wealth, and a progressive foundation mobilizing money, people and power to create a more just, joyful and sustainable world.

Our Purpose To be a powerful and visible model of conscious, effective philanthropy. To create a fertile training ground that supports the full and authentic expression of our passions and purpose. To be a dynamic forum for learning about social issues and the people working to address them. To cultivate and continually renew the heart and soul of our community. To be a vibrant, growing and diverse multi-generational membership organization. To transform wealth into an instrument of change.

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About Threshold Threshold provides a place where people with significant financial resources, a commitment to social change and an interest in their own emotional, psychological, and spiritual development can come together to scheme, dream, learn, work, play and see what happens. We have observed that social change flows from personal growth so we work on our inner lives and social responsibility simultaneously. Threshold meetings are an ongoing experiment — an evolving form designed to encourage members to discover their most meaningful work and purpose, and engage in the world from that place. Threshold Foundation serves the social change movement through collaborating with and funding innovative national and international nonprofit organizations and individuals working towards social justice, environmental sustainability, humane economic systems and peaceful coexistence. Member volunteers administer the Foundation with the assistance of Tides Foundation which is located in San Francisco. Granted funds are raised annually with almost all donations coming from the membership. New members join Threshold Foundation, primarily through a personal relationship with an existing member or by referral from a membership committee. Information about submitting a grant request to Threshold Foundation can be found on page 24 of this report and at www.thresholdfoundation.org.

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Letter from the President

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This was the year of sharing passions, inspiring each other to expand in all ways and being nourished by the puddle of love this vibrant community creates. For the first time, two of our funding circles led the content of our conferences beginning with Thriving Resilient Communities. Joanna Macy encouraged us to see that our work in the Great Turning must be to create the future. Larry Harvey, one of the founders of Burning Man, shared the new mission of the thriving community he has been part of growing since 1986. Stepping out of the old patterns into new creations, solutions, experiments and possibilities had us inspired all year. So often we come together around giving and learning that is tightly focused on the ‘world that calls itself the world’ that it was nice this year to drop in and share our personal passions and loves. Last year our Justice and Democracy committee modeled giving with community partners so effectively that Sustainable Planet is now adding partners to their committee. These committees serve to both find the most effective and cutting edge organizations that are leading change to fund and to create a grantmaking university for our members. Our grantmaking work is a deep and time consuming process, but one that educates the whole community on issues we care about regardless of how intimately involved they are with the process. This year, Election Integrity achieved their mission by convening the field of donors and experts to report on the last 5 years of funding and inspiring another generation of leaders. The entire community is profoundly proud of all this funding circle has done to expose the needs in this area and mobilize a larger base of support. In their place, a new and robust funding circle was formed which immediately attracted dozens of members and major funding. With fiery passion and seasoned leadership, the Food and Farming funding circle emerged and is leading a growing agriculture movement. Food and Farming led the content of our summer conference which included a rich pre-planning gathering at a former Threshold President’s farm in Missouri.

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In all of our grantmaking work, the importance and value of story has always been clear. This respect and appreciation for narrative led to another funding circle— High Impact Documentary Films. We partnered with The Sundance Institute to help us find the edgiest and most inspiring stories to fund. The first films we funded are “Shadow World” and “The Hunting Ground”. When I took on the responsibility of President, I had three goals. 1) To move all of our money—where it is, what it is doing and how radically it was engaged to create change. 2) To move the leadership of Threshold to the next generation and have every member engaged in co-creating the community. 3) To spend more time exploring the mystery school of life; embracing the idea that building relationships with what is hidden in plain site affects what we see and how we are in the world. I am thrilled to move on and have those goals fulfilled. The incoming leadership is not only under 40, but the fully engaged community includes three generations of families. Our summer meeting was facilitated by an 18- and 24-year-old and we had a class of 9 youth under 18 with programs designed for them including their own grantmaking program. Our money and our time are much more fully invested in the changes this world needs, with deeper wisdom and understanding of the mystery and complexity of what it is to be human in 2014. The world is changing fast and we are building the relational and resilient muscle to keep pace with it, while learning the skills of making puddles of love where ever we engage. I bow in gratitude for the opportunity to serve in this way and look forward to learning from the next generation and their leadership.

Onward to peace, justice and equality, Jodie Evans

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2014 Grant List Threshold Foundation is a membership organization comprised of individuals with significant financial resources who contribute their time, money and energies to support progressive social change through volunteer-based philanthropy. Grant funds are derived from a combination of annual member contributions and payout from our endowment. We serve the social change movement by funding innovative national and international non-profit organizations working to further the causes of social justice, environmental preservation, humane economic systems and the peaceful coexistence of individuals, communities and cultures. The Justice and Democracy and Sustainable Planet Committees are the more permanent, institutional fixtures in Threshold’s philanthropic constellation. Funding Circles are authorized in a yearly charter process and remain in the foundation’s orbit for a more limited scope of work or length of time. For more information about current Core Committee and Funding Circle guidelines and funding criteria, please visit the Threshold Foundation website at www.thresholdfoundation.org.

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Justice and Democracy $609,500 Threshold Foundation’s Justice & Democracy Committee is a donor-based fund with a two-fold focus for our 2013-2014 grants cycle

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Justice and Democracy

Incarceration Reform

Civic Participation

We support organizations working to protect the

We support organizations aimed at expanding

rights of incarcerated, formerly incarcerated, and

political awareness, rights and participation for those

convicted people and their families, inside and

who live in current and historically disenfranchised

outside of prison.

communities.

We fund organizations aimed at reforming the criminal

We fund organizations incorporating a sustainable,

justice system either directly through civic action

bottom-up model of electoral power building led by

and legislative initiatives or through the development

and for underrepresented constituencies. Strategies

and implementation of re-entry and rehabilitation

include leadership development, community

programs and alternatives to incarceration. This

organizing, coalition building, and voter participation.

includes organizations working to reform policies that negatively impact youth (for example, harsh juvenile sentencing and systems enabling a “school to prison pipeline”).

All of Us or None

$38,500

NC A Philip Randolph Institute

American Indian Prison Project Working Group

$38,500

Project South - The Institute for the Elimination of Poverty and Genocide

$38,500

Boys and Girls Club of the Northern Cheyenne Nation

$38,500

Rescue, Release and Restore, Inc. NFP

$38,500

Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation

$38,500

Union of Minority Neighborhoods

$70,000

Communities United for Restorative Youth Justice

$100,000

Fuerza Unida

$70,000

Homies Unidos

$38,500

$100,000

Justice and Democracy

All of Us or None $38,500 - General Support Los Angeles, CA / allofusornone.org All of Us or None is a national organizing initiative that seeks to build a movement to win full restoration of the human and civil rights of people with past convictions. Co-founded in 2003, All of Us or None gives collective voice to people with criminal records in the policies that affect them. A New Way of Life is the convener and coordinator of All of Us or None’s Los Angeles chapter.

American Indian Prison Project Working Group $38,500 - American Indian / Alaska Native Alternatives to Detention program St. Paul, MN American Indian Prison Project Working Group works to empower American Indian and Alaska Native communities with the skills and resources to significantly reduce the detainment and incarceration rate of youth and adult tribal members in federal, state and tribal prisons.

Boys and Girls Club of the Northern Cheyenne Nation

Communities United for Restorative Youth Justice

$38,500 - General Support

$100,000 - General Support

Lame Deer, MT / www.ncbgclub.org

Los Angeles, CA / homiesunidos.org

The Boys & Girls Club of the Northern Cheyenne

The mission of Communities United for Restorative

Nation is a youth guidance organization dedicated

Youth Justice (CURYJ, pronounced courage) is

to promoting healthy lifestyles, social, educational,

to interrupt the cycles of violence and poverty

vocational, cultural, character and leadership

by motivating and empowering young people

development. It strives to help young people to

that have been impacted directly and indirectly

improve their lives by building self-esteem and

by the criminal justice system to make positive

development of values and skills during critical

changes in their lives and prepare them to

periods of growth. The club endeavors to achieve its

become the community leaders of today.

goals through collaborative efforts with others.

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Justice and Democracy

Fuerza Unida

Homies Unidos

$70,000 - General Support

$38,500 - General support

San Antonio, TX / lafuerzaunida.org

Los Angeles, CA / www.homiesunidos.org

Fuerza Unida Inc’s mission is to empower and

Homies Unidos is a nonprofit gang violence

educate women worker’s to become advocates for

prevention and intervention organization. Its mission

social change and organizers for economic justice.

is to provide youth and communities positive and

Their purpose is to ensure the rights of workers in

productive opportunities that permit the reduction and

general from their community. They provide guidance

prevention of violence and allow for personal growth.

and accessible information to areas of limited services

It is a community-based organization committed

and resources. They promote the awareness and

to developing creative alternative to violence and

education of environmental and occupational health

drugs through access to alternative education,

and safety standards . Their goals are to develop

leadership development, self-esteem building, and

leadership, educate the community, redefine the

health education programs. These include: Violence

working environment and to encourage dialogue

Prevention and Intervention, Strengthening Families,

between workers. Their programs include workshops,

Alternative Education, Arts Program, and a Health

leadership development, training and networking, in

Care Education Referral Program.

addition to a sewing cooperative and food bank.

NC A Philip Randolph Institute $100,000 - General support Raleigh, NC The mission of the North Carolina A. Philip Randolph Institute is to improve the quality of life for economically disadvantaged families by providing the necessary resources that improve their standard of living, foster self improvement, self empowerment and self sufficiency. The agency is dedicated to those disenfranchised by situation, circumstance or indifference.

Project South - The Institute for the Elimination of Poverty and Genocide $38,500 - Southern Movement Participation Project Atlanta, GA / projectsouth.org Project South is a community-based membership institute that develops and conducts popular political and economic education and action research for organizing and liberation. It organzies and develops popular educators from grassroots and scholary backgrounds, bringing them together on the basis of equality to join in the process of understanding and transforming society.and other state and local positions.

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Justice and Democracy

Rescue, Release and Restore, Inc. NFP

Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation

$38,500 - Project R.E.S.T.O.R.E

$38,500 - Thunder Valley Regenerative

Riverdale, IL / rescuereleaserestore.org

Community Engagement Project

By rescuing gifts, releasing potential and restoring

Porcupine, SD / thundervalley.org

the promise of our youth within their communities,

Empowering Lakota youth & families to improve the

Rescue, Release and Restore’s mission transforms

health, culture and environment of our communities,

the self worth and empowers at risk youth through

through the healing and strengthening of cultural identity.

leadership training, artistic expression and mentorship. It aims to establish a year-round camp facility under RRR’s leadership to help youth and youth-based organizations replicate and sustain the RRR philosophy.

Union of Minority Neighborhoods $70,000 - General support Jamaica Plain, MA unionofminorityneighborhoods.org Union of Minority Neighborhoods works across Boston and across Massachusetts to ensure that communities of color can effectively organize around the issues facing them. UMN trains and empowers people of color to address the problems in their neighborhoods, in their regions, and in their country, and to work successfully for change.

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Sustainable Planet $446,000 Threshold’s Sustainable Planet Committee supports organizations and programs that focus on ensuring the long-term healthy functioning of our planet and the maintenance of its biodiversity.

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Sustainable Planet

Meeting the Needs

Grants

Threshold’s Sustainable Planet Committee meets

Our grants address global ecological issues such as

the needs of people now without compromising

climate change, habitat destruction, water quality and

the needs of future generation and by bringing

supply, and biodiversity conservation. They contribute

human activities into harmony with nature for the

to: empowering local and indigenous communities,

benefit of all beings.

creating strong energy policies, deploying new clean technologies, and developing effective communication

This implies transforming human activity, culture

strategies and messages that increase support for

and technology to live within the physical limits

protecting and enhancing the natural environment at

of local and global ecosystems, and protecting

local, regional and global levels.

threatened ecosystems and species. We often assist organizations and programs that have been neglected by other funders for a variety of reasons, and highly encourage organizations that implement creative and innovative solutions for resolving the environmental crises that threaten life on Earth.

Borealis Eco Strategies

$38,000

Carbon Tax Center

$25,000

Conversations for Responsible Economic Development

$25,000

Dogwood Alliance

$30,000

Earthworks $30,000

National Fisheries Conservation Center

$20,000

Oregon Environmental Council

$25,000

Other Worlds

$25,000

Partnership for Policy Intergrity

$25,000

Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility

$30,000

Environmental Justice League of Rhode Island

$30,000

Fondo Acción Solidaria, A.C.

$37,000

Sightline Institute

$25,000

Lost Light Projects

$21,000

Tides Foundation

$30,000

R.A.V.E.N $30,000

Sustainable Planet

Borealis Eco Strategies

Carbon Tax Center

$38,000 - General Support

$25,000 - General Support

Sointula, V0N 3E0, Canada / borealiscentre.org

New York, NY / carbontax.org

Borealis Eco Strategies, with its partner entity

Carbon Tax Center (CTC) is the sole U.S. organization

Borealis Centre for Environment and Trade Research

focused on advancing a federal carbon tax as the

in Canada, is a leading international research

central and essential policy to slash U.S. greenhouse

organization for the non-profit sector focusing

gas emissions equitably, effectively, and quickly, and

on environmental impacts through the chain

to provide both a model and economic incentives

of production, as well as financial and political

for other nations to follow suit. Throughthe website,

mechanisms. Borealis provides research and related

papers and blog posts, economic modeling, and

services to NGOs, with emphasis on unique trade flow

indefatigable and strategic networking, CTC educate

and chain of custody research, environmental impact

citizens, NGO’s and public officials and help them

research, markets analysis and many other areas of

advocate effectively for carbon taxing at the federal

information gathering and dissemination primarily for

and state level.

the non-profit sector.

Conversations for Responsible Economic Development

Dogwood Alliance

$25,000 - Research, education, organizing energy

Asheville, NC / dogwoodalliance.org

and pipeline development in British Columbia Vancouver, Canada / credbc.ca Conversations for Responsible Economic Development is a collection of professionals and business leaders from the tourism, real estate, tech, health, creative and other service-based sectors who are committed to participating in informed dialogue about long-term prosperity on Canada’s west coast.

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$30,000 - Our Forests Aren’t Fuel Campaign

Dogwood Alliance is a growing regional network of fifty-three organizations engendering and uniting broad-based, mainstream support to protect the native forests of the southeast from the increased threat of industrial clearcutting.

Sustainable Planet

Environmental Justice League of Rhode Island

Fondo Acción Solidaria, A.C.

$30,000 - General Support

Mexico working to advance the social, economic,

Providence, RI / ejlri.org

and environmental sustainability of their communi-

$37,000 - Work to strengthen grassroots groups in

ties The Environmental Justice League of Rhode Island (EJ League) is an alliance of individuals and organizations working together to promote environmental justice in Rhode Island through advocacy, education, networking, organizing, and research. Its mission is to build power in the communities most affected by environmental burdens by developing leaders to take action to promote safe and healthy environments for all; for a healthy place to live, work, and play regardless of race, ethnicity, or income.

La Paz, Mexico / fasol-ac.org Fondo Acción Solidaria, A.C. (FASOL – The Action in Solidarity Fund) is an independent, charitable, Mexican grantmaking organization that provides grant support for grassroots groups working on the critical social and environmental issues that confront their communities. Through this initiative FASOL strengthens grassroots groups in Mexico that are working to advance the social, economic and environmental sustainability of their communities.

Lost Light Projects $21,000 - General Support Brooklyn, NY / insideclimatenews.org

National Fisheries Conservation Center $20,000 - Global Ocean Health Program Ojai, CA / nfcc-fisheries.org

Lost Light Projects’ InsideClimate News is a Pulitzer prize-winning, non-profit, non-partisan news orga-

National Fisheries Conservation Center supports

nization that covers clean energy, carbon energy,

collaborative efforts to improve marine resource

nuclear energy and environmental science—plus the

management and conservation. It focuses on

territory in between where law, policy and public opin-

problems where progress is impeded by controversy

ion are shaped. Its mission is to produce clear, objec-

and polarized discourse, or by lack of access to

tive stories that give the public and decision-makers

helpful information and tools.

the information they need to navigate the heat and emotion of climate and energy debates. It publishes investigations, daily stories, posts on two dedicated blogs, two headline aggregations every day, a weekly newsletter, ebooks and documentary video collaborations with larger media entities (This American Land, The Weather Channel, Vice).

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Sustainable Planet

Oregon Environmental Council

Other Worlds

$25,000 - Pacific Northwest Laboratory:

$25,000 - General Support

Putting a Price on Carbon project Portland, OR / oeconline.org

Victoria, British Columbia / raventrust.com Other Worlds is a multi-national, multi-media, multi-

Oregon Environmental Council (OEC) safeguards what Oregonians love about Oregon – clean air and water, an unpolluted landscape and healthy food produced by local farmers. Since 1968, OEC has helped forge Oregon’s reputation as a national leader in environmental protection. OEC’s current programs focus on reducing greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming and pollution control and

lingual education and organizing collaborative that works to inspire hope and knowledge that another world is possible, and to help build it. Other Worlds compiles and brings to light political, economic, cultural, social, and gender alternatives that are flourishing throughout the world, and inspires and helps the public throughout the Americas open up new pathways to adapt and replicate them.

prevention, especially with regard to toxic chemicals.

Partnership for Policy Integrity $25,000 - General Support Pelham, MA / pfpi.net The Partnership for Policy Integrity (PFPI) uses sci-

RAVEN (Respecting Aboriginal Values and Environmental Needs) $30,000 - Work to assist First Nations peoples within Canada to protect and restore their

ence, policy analysis and strategic communications to

traditional lands and resources

promote sound energy policy. PFPI provides science

Victoria, Canada / raventrust.com

and legal support so that citizen groups, environmental organizations, and policymakers can better understand energy development impacts on air quality, ecosystems, and the climate. Its current work focuses on biomass energy.

The mission of RAVEN is to assist Aboriginal peoples within Canada in protecting or restoring their traditional lands and resources and addressing critical environmental challenges such as global warming by strategically enforcing their Constitutional rights through the courts in response to unsustainable settlement or industrial exploitation supported by the State.

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Sustainable Planet

Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility $30,000 - Defending Climate Science and Scientists program Washington, DC / peer.org

Sightline Institute $25,000 - Pacific Northwest: Putting a Price on Carbon Seattle, WA / sightline.org Sightline Institute (formerly Northwest Environment

Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER) is a national alliance of local state and federal resource professionals. PEER’s environmental work is solely directed by the needs of its members. PEER works nation-wide with government scientists, land managers, environmental law enforcement agents, field specialists and other resource professionals

Watch) is a not-for-profit research and communication center--a think tank--based in Seattle. Founded in 1993, Sightline’s mission is to bring about sustainability--a healthy, lasting prosperity grounded in place. Nonpartisan and wholly independent, Sightline’s only ideology is commitment to the shared values of strong communities, fair markets, and responsible stewardship.

committed to responsible management of America’s public resources.

Tides Foundation $30,000 - Tides Foundation’s Canopy Fund for Canopy Style: Fashion Loved by Forests San Francisco, CA / tides.org Tides Foundation partners with donors to increase and organize resources for social change. It facilitates effective grantmaking programs, creates opportunities for learning, and builds community among donors and grantees.

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Thriving Resilient Communities Funding Circle $162,500 A Thriving Resilient Community (TRC) is sustainable, just, and compassionate: a place where people can respond to any challenge and thrive in the process into the future.

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Thriving Resilient Communities Funding Circle

Thrivingresilience

Mission

There is a growing awareness that community resil-

The TRC Funding Circle’s mission is to build collective

ience requires an integral approach to the challenges

wisdom, map the field, and fund best practices and

posed by climate, energy, and economic instability. An

leading-edge work in community thrivingresilience.

integral approach fosters compassion, inner resilience

Priority will be given to capacity-building within and

(healthy, caring relationships) and outer resilience (fair,

networking among regional and national thrivingresil-

sustainable sharing systems) within an eco-social re-

ience network hubs and to replicable local whole-sys-

gion. What we call the “thrivingresilience” community

tems toolkits and approaches In addition to support-

movement (see thrivingresilience.org) includes place-

ing capacity building projects within an organization,

based community initiatives with similar visions using

funders are particularly interested in catalyzing

a variety of names such as Healthy, Livable, Local,

multi-organization collaborative projects. 

Peace, Resilient, Sustainable, Thrive, and Transition.

Bay Localize

$18,500

New Economics Institute

$18,500

Daily Acts

$22,000

Thriving and Resilient Communities Collaboratory

$20,000

Generation Waking Up

$22,000 Transition US

$28,000

Institute for Policy Studies

$17,500

Post Carbon Institute

$16,000

New Economics Institute

$18,500

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Thriving Resilient Communties Funding Circle

Bay Localize

Daily Acts

$18,500 - Bay Localize’s Map Your Future Project

$22,000 - General Support

Oakland, CA / baylocalize.org

Petaluma, CA / dailyacts.org

Bay Localize confronts the challenges of climate change and economic recession by boosting the Bay Area’s capacity to provide for everyone’s needs, sustainably and equitably. It achieves this equipping grassroots community leaders with flexible tools, models, and policies that strengthen their communities.

Daily Acts Organization’s vision is to foster a healthy, just, and reverent culture. Its mission is to transform its communities through inspired action and education which builds leadership and local self-reliance.

Generation Waking Up

Institute for Policy Studies

$22,000 - Generation Waking Up’s

$17,500 - Jamaica Plains New Economy

Thrive Fellowship

Transition project

Oakland, CA / movementgeneration.org

Boston, MA / ips.org

Generation Waking Up is a global campaign to ignite

Since 1963, Institute for Policy Studies (IPS) has

a generation of young people to bring forth a thriving,

been a leading progressive, multi-issue, analysis

just, sustainable world. Their goals are to: (1) awaken

and advocacy organization. Its public scholars

in young people a clear sense of who they are as a

have crafted policies to help those in society

generation, give them an understanding of the urgent

with the least power and to give their advocates

global challenges and opportunities they face, and

intellectual ammunition to make changes in public

call them to take action; (2) empower young people

policy consistent with the values of demilitarization,

with the training, mentoring, and support needed to

social justice, economic, racial and gender equality,

thrive as global citizens, leaders, and change agents

environmental sustainability, and democratic

in the 21st century; and (3) mobilize young people

participation. The Institute has strengthened and

locally and globally across issues, geography, and all

linked social movements through articulation of

lines of difference, unleashing the collaborative power

root principles and fundamental rights, research

of this generation.

and analysis on current events and issues, and connections to policymakers, academics, and activists at all levels.

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Thriving Resilient Communities Funding Circle

Post Carbon Institute

New Economics Institute

$16,000 -Weaving, Gathering, & Sharing

$18,500 - New Economy Coalition’s

Amongst the Thriving/Resilience and New Economy

Conference and General Assembly

Santa Rosa, CA / postcarbon.org

Great Barrington, MA / centerforneweconomics.org

MetaFoundation, doing business as Post Carbon

New Economics Institute (NEI), formerly the E.F.

Institute, is a virtual organization designed to address

Schumacher Society, is working to make the new

the growing global environmental catastrophe in

economics, one which supports people and planet,

fundamentally new and largely untried ways. Much

mainstream in the United States. The current economic

of the current focus of attention is on technological

system is failing in its essential purpose: to provide

solutions, such as increasing the efficiency with which

fulfilling and healthy lives for all people while nurturing

people consume the Earth’s resources.

the social and natural systems on which the economic system depends.

Thriving and Resilient Communities Collaboratory

Transition US

$20,000 - Thriving and Resilient

Sebastopol, CA / transitionus.org

Communities Collaboratory’s general support Freeland, WA / thrivingresilience.org Thriving Resilient Communities Collaboratory is an invitational action research network project exploring tipping-point strategies for scaling the community resilience movement and engaging the mainstream in North America. The intention is to build collective wisdom, map the field, and fund best practices and leading-edge work in local community resilience. The Collaboratory is a learning community of practice, an agile collaborativefunding incubator, and a call to conscious collaboration

$28,000 - REconomy project

Transition US is a resource and catalyst for building resilient communities across the United States that are able to withstand severe energy, climate or economic shocks while creating a better quality of life in the process. Its mission is to inspire, encourage, support, network and train individuals and their communities as they consider, adopt, adapt, and implement the Transition approach to community empowerment and action. Transition US accomplishes its work by helping to launch and support Transition Initiatives (also known as “Transition Towns”) across all regions of the country.

and co-creation in service to the Great Transition.

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Election Integrity Funding Circle $153,000 The Election Integrity Funding Circle seeks to insure that every American can vote

Every Vote Counts

Black Box Voting

$10,000

Psephos Inc.

$52,500

Save Our Votes

$20,000

Verified Voting Foundation

$70,500

Election integrity means that votes will be counted as cast and voter suppression and barriers to honest, fair, and legal voting are eliminated.

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Election Integrity Funding Circle

Black Box Voting

Psephos Inc.

$10,000 - Americans United for Democracy,

$52,500 - General Support

Integrity, and Transparency in Elections

La Honda, CA

Pima County Project Renton, WA / blackboxvoting.org Black Box Voting is a grassroots civic participation organization founded to encourage independent action around voter fruad, although it does not control

Psephos Inc was founded in 2007 to promote election integrity issues, primarily the integrity of American voting processes. The National Election Integrity Coalition (NEIC) is currently the sole funded project of Psephos Inc.

or directly organize. Instead, it works in solidarity with relentless, clever, loosely allied people, taking actions they have figured out for themselves, using common sense and whatever resources they can bring to bear.

Save Our Votes

Verified Voting Foundation

$20,000 - General Support

$70,500 - Protecting Election Integrity and

Hyattsville, MD / saveourvotes.org

Stopping Internet Voting project

SAVEourVotes is a statewide nonpartisan grassroots nonprofit organization working for Secure, Accessible, Verifiable Elections in Maryland.

Carlsbad, CA / verifiedvotingfoundation.org Verified Voting Foundation (VVF) is a non-partisan nonprofit organization championing transparent, reliable and publicly verifiable elections. Its goal is to enable voters to have unqualified and justified confidence in election results.

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High Impact Documentary Films

High Impact Documentary Films $155,000 Threshold’s High Impact Documentary Films (HIDF) funding circle will fund documentaries addressing the most important issues facing the world today with a plan of action that is powerful, innovative, and unexpected.

Film making

Grantmaking

We are in a golden age of documentary films. Progressive issues are being exposed in a powerful new light with various creative channels for marketing and distribution. Documentary filmmakers are filling the void left by a mainstream media that is unwilling to take on the controversial issues we face today.

The High Impact Documentary Films funding circle will partner with the Sundance Institute to make high-impact grants that utilize the resources of an organization at the forefront of the documentary world. By making more aggressive and larger grants than those that are usually available, we seek to become a leading force in the documentary field, gaining greater visibility for the Threshold Foundation and making more impact as change makers.

The Shadow World

$60,000

The Hunting Ground

$60,000

Sundance Film Institute

$35,000

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High Impact Documentary Films

Shadow World Productions, LLC

Sundance Institute

$60,000 - Shadow World Productions, LLC’s

$35,000 - General Support

New York, NY / theshadowworldbook.com/the-film

Los Angeles, CA / sundance.org

Shadow World LLC embarks on a devastating and courageous exploration of the international arms trade the only business that count its profits in billions and its costs in human lives.

Sundance Institute is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the discovery and development of independent artists and audiences. Through its programs, the Institute seeks to discover, support, and inspire independent film and theatre artists from the United States and around the world, and to introduce audiences to their new work.

Salt Lake City Film Center and Artists Collaborative $60,000 - Documentary film project The Hunting Ground Salt Lake City, UT / utahfilmcenter.org Utah Film Center, also known as the Salt Lake City Film Center and Artists Collaborative, brings the world of film to local audiences through free community screenings and discussions, outreach programs, and visiting artists and professionals. Emphasizing social content and artistic excellence, the Center presents documentary, independent, and dramatic cinema year-round. The organization collaborates with various educational and community organizations to promote a diversity of ideas, to provide forums for underrepresented groups, and to develop new audiences for film.

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Informal Funding $291,275 Informal Funding occurs at Threshold meetings and raises funds for organizations presented by members to members. These are closed, rapid funding cycles and as such do not accept unsolicited letters of inquiry.

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Informal Funding

Passionate Grantmaking Informal Funding is a playful granting mechanism that allows Threshold members to introduce the community to new organizations that members are passionate about. These are immediate grants, as opposed to grants that are directed by Committees and Funding Circles over the course of a year-long decision-making process.

BoxoPROJECTS $9,285

Intervale Center Inc.

$22,075

Consulting for Organizational Reflection and Effectiveness

Klamath Basin Rangeland Trust

$16,375

Learning and Violence Collaborative

$11,800

Living Tongues Institute for Endangered Languages

$16,250

Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies

$22,725

Power of Hope

$17,575

Runa Foundation

$21,165

Southern California Streets Initiative

$12,735

$9,990

Farm Hack

$26,550

Film Odyssey

$15,650

Global Greengrants Fund

$27,400

Green Cities Fund

$19,575

Honor the Earth

Immediate Life Inc.

$20,150

$21,975

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Informal Funding

BoxoPROJECTS $9,285 - General Support Joshua Tree, CA / boxoprojects.com

Consulting for Organizational Reflection and Effectiveness $9,990 - General Support Madison, WI / consultingforchange.org

BoxoPROJECTS is dedicated to exploring contemporary art at the new frontier. While frontier may conjure a geographic image, it is actually a spirit that lives in many places simultaneously. The artists that BoxoPROJECTS cooperates with address a range of subjects, in a variety of media, working freely, boldly and independently. Some are located in places that

Consulting for Organizational Reflection and Effectiveness (CORE) aims to bring together organizations, consultants, and funders in the greater Madison area to build capacity for social justice, social change, advocacy, and community building work.

nurture the open spirit, while others create their own free space within the metropolitan fabric. These artists engage a dialogue concerning freedom, choice and responsibility. BoxoPROJECTS fosters their work and is their conduit to a wider audience.

Farm Hack $26,550 - General Support Lee, N / farmhack.net

Film Odyssey $15,650 - Dalai Lama Film Washington, DC / odysseymedia.org Film Odyssey produces educational videos used by the public broadcasting system throughout the United States.

Farm Hack is an open source nationwide community based non-profit that facilitates designing, building and documenting open source tools for resilient agriculture. First organized in 2011, Farm Hack maintains an active online community with thousands of all volunteer contributors and provides a platform for collaborating across organizations and between individuals that currently hosts over 100 innovative tools, including the Farm Hack web site itself. Farm Hack tools attracted approximately 200,000 unique users in the last year and Farm Hack believes that in order to produce a changed agricultural “culture”, that the research and development process should also become open-source. Despite being an all volunteer organization, Farm hack has partnered with many national organizations and hosted more than 20 events across the nation documenting and improving new tools through local collaboration and support.

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Informal Funding

Global Greengrants Fund

Green Cities Fund

$27,400 - OPEN Fund

$19,575 - Solar Fruit Drying project

Boulder, CO / greengrants.org Global Greengrants Fund supports a wide range of community-based initiatives that protect the environment in the most underserved and threatened regions on Earth. Global Greengrants Fund believes that grassroots groups are key to solving the intractable problems of poverty, powerlessness and environmental destruction and that there is no better investment than supporting passionate people with great ideas. Since 1993, they have made more than 3,500 grants in over 120 countries.

Oakland, CA / greencitiesfund.org Green Cities Fund, Inc. was established in 2005 as a California public benefit corporation, and is tax exempt under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code . Its founders have been involved in public service work for many years, starting in the 1950’s with Canada’s “Frontier College”, the predecessor of the Peace Corps, where college students spent their summers working on railway gangs and in mining camps teaching the workers at night, and handling a myriad of problems that develop in these tough and remote environments.

Honor the Earth

Immediate Life Inc.

$20,150 - Honor the Earth’s Stop the

$21,975 - HoneyBeeLujah campaign

Sandpiper Pipeline campaign

New York, NY / revbilly.com

Callaway, MN / honorearth.org Honor the Earth is a Native-led organization, established by Winona LaDuke and others in 1993 to address the two primary needs of the Native environmental movement: the need to break the geographic and political isolation of Native communities and the need to increase financial resources for organizing and change. Honor the Earth works to a) raise public awareness and b) raise and direct funds to grassroots Native environmental groups. It is the only Native organization that provides both financial support and organizing support to Native environmental initiatives.

Immediate Life Inc. aka Reverend Billy and the Stop Shopping Choir is a New York City based radical performance community, with 50 performing members and a congregation in the thousands. Reverend Billy and the Stop Shopping Choir are wild anticonsumerist gospel shouters and Earth loving urban activists who have worked with communities on four continents defending community, life and imagination. The Devils over the 15 years of the church have remained the same: Consumerism and Militarism. In this time of the Earth’s crisis - the organization is especially mindful of the extractive imperatives of global capital.

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Informal Funding

Intervale Center Inc.

Klamath Basin Rangeland Trust

$22,075 - General Support

$16,375 - A River Runs Between Us:

Burlington, VT / intervale.org

Why the Klamath Matters Klamath Falls, OR

Located a unique agricultural setting, partially within the urban limits of Burlington, Vermont, the Intervale Center is continuing 15 years of effort to revitalize a historically significant community and agricultural resource. As a center for sustainable, ecological ventures focused on farming, and value-added food, fiber and fuel production, the Intervale’s integrated

Klamath Basin Rangeland Trust’s mssion is to restore and conserve the quality and quantity of water in the Upper Klamath Basin to enhance the natural ecosystem and supply needed water for downstream agriculture, ranching, native fish and wildlife populations.

approach includes a network of farms, programs and ventures that are restoring agricultural land, providing jobs, healthy food, and clean energy to our community. We strive to be a replicable global entrepreneurial and restoration model.

Learning and Violence Collaborative $11,800 - Learning and Violence Collaborative’s Too Scared To Learn project Toronto, Ontario M6R 1T6, Canada learningandviolence.net

Living Tongues Institute for Endangered Languages $16,250 - General Support Salem, OR / livingtongues.org Living Tongues Institute for Endangered Languages seeks to facilitate dialogue between indigenous communities and the larger global community through informational awareness and bridging the technology gap between these worlds, allowing indigenous minority speech community members to integrate with, rather than assimilate to, the majority language communities, and to provide opportunities for such under-represented communities to cross the digital divide. Capacity building through technical training is a key part of realizing these aims.

Learning and Violence Collaborative is a new organization currently in formation. Learning and Violence Collaborative is a diverse group of 8 individuals with extensive experience and training in all levels of education, social work, counselling, bodywork, meditation, working with assaulted women and children, qualitative research and the arts. Learning and Violence Collaborative are connected to a range of organizations and institutions (including Community Builders Youth Leadership, Parkdale Project Read, Barbra Schlifer Clinic, George Brown Community College, the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto.) Learning and Violence Collaborative has worked locally, nationally and internationally with a wide range of organizations including The UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning. Individually Learning and Violence Collaborative has carried out groundbreaking research, initiated innovative practice, and offered numerous trainings to address issues of learning and violence from many different perspectives and standpoints.

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32

Informal Funding

Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies $22,725 - Treatment for posttraumatic stress

Power of Hope $17,575 - General Support Victoria BC, Canada / powerofhope.ca

disorder (PTSD)

Power of Hope unleashes the positive potential

Santa Cruz, CA / maps.org

of youth through arts-centered multicultural and

Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) is a membership-based research and educa-

intergenerational learning programs that value selfawareness, leadership, environmental stewardship, community and social change.

tional organization. MAPS seeks to assist scientists to design, fund, obtain approval for, conduct and report on government-approved research into the risks and benefits of psychedelic drugs and marijuana. MAPS particularly focuses on developing the therapeutic uses of these drugs with the goal of developing them into FDA-approved prescription medicines.

Runa Foundation $21,165 - Rios Nete Program Brooklyn, NY / runa.org Runa Foundation is the nonprofit branch of a rapidly growing social enterprise. Its mission is to harness environmentally-friendly agricultural practices to

Southern California Streets Initiative $12,735 - Freelance reporter fees for Streetsblog Los Angeles’ coverage of key issues of sustainable living in the San Gabriel and San Fernando Valleys Los Angeles, CA / la.streetsblog.org

create and support sustainable livelihoods for smallholder farmers in the Amazon and beyond. The

Streetsblog is a daily news source connecting people

Foundation works closely with the commercial branch

to information about sustainable transportation and

of Runa, which produces guayusa tea beverages.

livable communities.global capital.

The Foundation acts as a watchdog to the company, conducts scientific and participatory research, engages in community outreach, and promotes crosscultural exchange.

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Discretionary Grants $7,480 Each year Threshold’s Board of Directors (the Circle) directs grants on behalf of the Threshold community to special projects, including local and/ or global tributes to organizations in the communities where Threshold’s bi-annual Meetings are held.

Black Rock Arts Foundation

Esalen Institute

$2,520

$500

Jobs With Justice Inc.

$1,960

Tides Foundation

$2,500

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Discretionary Grants

Black Rock Arts Foundation

Esalen Institute

$2,520 - General Support 2014

$500 - General Support

Winter Local and Global Tribute

Big Sur, CA / esalen.org

San Francisco, CA / blackrockarts.org Black Rock Arts Foundation is a national non-profit arts organization based in San Francisco. The mission of the Black Rock Arts Foundation is to promote community-based interactive art. Its programs seek to 1) Furnish artists with direct financial aid for the production and display of interactive art works, with particular emphasis on those artists whose careers exist beyond the institutional mainstream; 2) Help artists develop communal networks and make contact

The Esalen Institute was founded in 1962 as an alternative educational center devoted to the exploration of what Aldous Huxley called the human potential, the world of unrealized human capacities that lies beyond the imagination. Esalen soon became known for its blend of East/West philosophies, its experiential/didactic workshops, the steady influx of philosophers, psychologists, artists, and religious thinkers, and its breathtaking grounds blessed with natural hot springs.

with public institutions that can supply them with material resources, volunteer services and financial aid; 3) Identify and support public venues for the display of interactive artwork, with special emphasis on venues that impart to the work a civic function; 4) Educate the public concerning the spiritual value and social relevance of interactive art; 5) Assist artists in documenting and representing their work in public

Jobs With Justice Inc. $1,960 - General support Burlington, VT / workerscenter.org

media and to other institutions. Jobs With Justice, Inc, also known as Vermont Workers’ Center, is a democratic, member-run organization dedicated to organizing for workers’

Tides Foundation $2,500 - General support San Francisco, CA / tides.org

rights and living wages for all Vermonters. It seeks an economically just and democratic Vermont in which all residents have living wages, decent health care, childcare, housing and transportation. It works to build a democratic, diverse movement of working and low-income Vermonters that is locally focused and coordinated on a statewide basis. It works with

Tides Foundation partners with donors to increase

organized labor in moving towards economic justice

and organize resources for social change. It facili-

and in strengthening the right to organize. They

tates effective grantmaking programs, creates op-

are committed to taking action on the full range of

portunities for learning, and builds community among

issues of concern to working people, and to building

donors and grantees.

alliances nationally and internationally.

35

Information for Grant Seekers

Introduction

Grant Types and Sizes

Threshold Foundation’s annual grants program includes

We support organizations aimed at expanding

two Core Grantmaking Committees — the Justice and

Threshold Foundation provides grants for general

Democracy Committee and the Sustainable Planet

operating expenses as well as special projects.

Committee — and a number of funding circles, which

We do not give emergency or discretionary grants

change on an annual basis. For current information

outside of the annual grant cycle.

about Core Committee and Funding Circle guidelines and funding criteria, please visit the Threshold

Grant amounts typically range from

Foundation website atthresholdfoundation.org

$15,000 to $30,000. Organizations seeking grants must have 501(c)

Grants Process The annual grant cycle begins in September with the

(3) tax-exempt status or 501(c)(4) lobbying status from the IRS or must be exclusively organized for charitable or educational purposes, inside or outside the United States.

submission of Letters of Inquiry (LOI). Each year this process is determined as an open solicitation process or invitation only. Please check the Threshold website in September for the current LOI process. From the LOIs the grant committees invite a limited number of organizations to submit a proposal. After reviewing the proposals, the grant committees select a subset of organizations for a site-visit and evaluation. Once the site-visit and evaluations are complete evaluations are reviewed and grant committees finalize their grant recommendations to the Circle (Board of Directors) in July. Grant agreements and funds are disbursed at the end of September.

36

Applying for a Grant Note that guidelines for applying to the annual grant cycle often change, as we are continually trying to improve our process based on feedback from grantees and committee members. Therefore, we recommend that grantseekers visit the Threshold Foundation’s website in September for the most up-to-date information regarding the deadline and application process for the following year’s cycle.

Endowment Investment Report Introduction The endowment investment principles of Threshold Foundation complement its philanthropic goals. The entire portfolio has a social investment focus with positive and negative screens: seventy percent is in socially screened stock, bonds, and cash with Boston Common Asset Management, Calvert, Miller/Howard Investments, and Trillium Asset Management; twenty percent is in Program Related Investments, primarily Community Development Loan Funds that are listed here; the remaining ten percent has been designated for high growth, venture-type investments

Endowment Gifts You can make an endowment gift to Threshold Foundation through a charitable trust, real estate gift, or by means of a bequest in your will. Because grantee organizations, grantee needs and other conditions change over the years, it will help avoid legal complications if simple unrestricted language like the following is used in wills:

“I hereby give and bequest to Threshold Foundation, a not-for-profit taxexempt public charity founded under the laws of the State of New York, having as its principal address PO Box 29903, San Francisco, California 94129-0903, for the general purposes of Threshold Foundation.”

If you want to discuss the language of your bequest, or if you want more information on planned giving possibilities (including real estate gifts), the staff or Circle (Board of Directors) would be happy to discuss with you. To schedule a meeting contact the Foundation Manager at 415-561-6400.

37

Program Related Investments

Accion International

Loan Amount

$55,000

Boston, MA / accion.org

Cooperative Fund of New England

$20,000

$25,000

Opportunity Finance Network

$100,000

Philadelphia, PA / opportunityfinance.ne

$25,000

(Formerly Enterprise Corporation of the Delta)

Root Capital

$20,000

(formerly EcoLogic Finance)

Jackson, MS / hope-ec.org

Human/Economic Appalachian Development, Inc. Community Loan Fund (HEAD Corp.)

New Hampshire Community Development

Loan Amount

Concord, NH / communityloanfund.org

Wilmington, NC / cooperativefund.org

HOPE Enterprise Corporation

Program Related Investments

Cambridge, MA / rootcapital.org

$20,000

Self-Help Credit Union

$25,000

Durham, NC / self-help.org

Berea, KY / headcorp.org

Self-Help Enterprises Institute for Community Economics

$25,000

$45,000

Visalia, CA / selfhelpenterprises.org

Springfield, MA / icelt.org

National Federation of Community Development CU

$50,000

Shared Interest Development CU

$25,000

New York, NY / sharedinterest.org

New York, NY / natfed.org

The Loan Fund (formerly NM Comm Dev Loan Fund) Albuquerque, NM / loanfund.org

$20,000

39

Independent Auditor’s Report Board of Directors Threshold Foundation September 30, 2014 We have audited the accompanying financial statements of Threshold Foundation (the “Foundation”), which comprise the statement of financial position as of December 31, 2013, and the related statements of activities and cash flows for the year then ended, and the related notes to the financial statements. Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America; this includes the design, implementation, and maintenance of internal control relevant to the preparation and fair presentation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the entity’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of significant accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion. In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position ofthe Foundation as of December 31, 2013, and the changes in its net assets and its cash flows for the year then ended in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. We have previously audited the Foundation’s 2012 financial statements and our report dated September 16, 2013, expressed an unmodified opinion on those audited statements. In our opinion, the summarized comparative information present herein as of and for the year ended December 31, 2012, is consistent, in all material aspects, with the audited financial statements from which it has been derived.

Statements of Financial Position Years Ended December 31, 2013 & 2012

Assets Cash and cash equivalents

2013 2012

851,393

563,567

Pledges receivable

12,650

12,580

Interest receivable

7,005

6,281

Other current Assets

16,886

12,367

Deposits

20,500 16,750

Investments, at fair value Program related investments Intangible assets, net Total assets

Liabilities Accounts payable Grants payable Refundable deposits Total liabilities

Net Assets

2,886,590

2,430,272

448,657

458,223

40,751

6,500

4,284,432

3,506,540

2013 2012

14,551

2,961

214,000

171,000

65,835

47,355

294,386

221,316

2013 2012

Unrestricted Net Assets General operations

519,486

530,649

50,679

64,479

Designated for endowment purposes

2,744,275

2,353,282

Total Unrestricted Net Assets

3,314,440

2,948,410

675,606

336,814

Total Net Assets

3,990,046

3,285,224

Total Liabilities & Net Assets

4,284,432

3,506,540

Designated for grantmaking pool

Temporarily Restricted Net Assets

Statements of Activities Years Ended December 31, 2013 & 2012 Temporary Support & Revenue Unrestricted Restricted 2013 Total Grant and Contributions

2012 Total

$994,011

$569,606

$1,563,617

$1,322,279

Membership fees

138,474

106,000

244,474

293,541

Conference revenues

228,075

— 228,075 317,730

Investment Income: Interest and dividends

73.883

73,883

63,618

Investment fees

(19,802)

(19,802)

(18,929)

Net realized gain/(loss)

227,057

227,057

52,899

Net unrealized gain/(loss)

138,646

138,646

104,423

Net assets released from restriction Total support and revenue

1,780,344 336,814 2,117,158

675,606 2,455,950 2,135,561 (336,814) 338,792

2,455,950

2,135,561

Expenses Program Services Grants

1,225,740 1,225,740 1,389,159

Conference Expenses

245,022

245,022

294,788

Membership Services

81,966

81,966

74,626



1,552,728

1,758,573

64,120

64,120

82,841

Board/Corporate support

134,280

134,280

98,173

Total support services

198,400

198,400

181,014

1,751,128

1,939,587

Total Program Services

1,552,728

Supporting Services Grantmaking support

Total expenses

Change in Net Assets

1,751,128



366,030 338,792 704,822 195,974

Net assets at beginning of year

2,948,410

336,814 3,285,224 3,089,250

Net assets at end of year

3,314,440

675,606

42

3,990,046

3,285,224

Statements of Cash Flows Years Ended December 31, 2013 & 2012

Cash flows from operating activities Change in net assets

2013 2012

$704,822

$195,974

Adjustments to reconcile change in net assets to cash used in operating activities: Amortization 8,592 – Realized gains on investments

(227,057)

(52,899)

Unrealized gains on investments

(138,646)

(104,423)

Contributed stock

(106,132)

(51,283)

Pledges receivable

(70)

30,630

Interest receivable

(724)

(748)

Other current assets

(4,519)

(10,042)

Deposits

(3,750) (250)

Accounts payable

11,590

(958)

Grants payable

43,000

171,000

Refundable deposits

18,480

(22,935)

305,586

154,066

(1,191,738)

(629,118)

1,226,387

677,789

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

Net cash used in operating activities

Cash flows from investing activities Purchase of investments Proceeds from sale of investments Website Change in program related investments

(42,843) (6,500) (9,566)

(21,777)

Net cash provided by investing activities

(17,760)

20,394

Net change in cash and cash equivalents

287,826

174,460

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year

563,567 389,107

Cash and cash equivalents at end of year

$851,393 $563,567

43

2014 Board of Directors

2014 Staff

Jodie Evans

President

Doug Seckinger

Foundation Manager

Anne Golden

Treasurer

Stephanie Alston

Conference Coordinator

Ibrahim Al Husseini Secretary

Julia Diao

Membership Coordinator

Allan Badiner

Director

Traci Cho

Foundation Accountant

Terrence Meck

Director

And other staff of Tides

Annie Irwin

(not pictured)



Director

Dawn Newton Director

Photography All photos provided by long-time Threshold member Tim Jones. Special thanks to him for sharing his talent and artwork with our community.

44

In Memoriam Remembering Richard Rockefeller and Anastasia Dickinson Payne

Richard Rockefeller 1949–2014

Richard Rockefeller, MD and his first wife, Nancy Anderson, joined Threshold in 1991 at the Sedona meeting sponsored by Margot and Roger Milliken. They were all friends from their community in Falmouth, Maine where Richard was practicing family medicine. They came to meetings at Bard, Williams, Banff, and the memorable Carmel. They brought their songbooks and he-his sense of adventure and an emerging presence as a world leader and a healer. Had you been walking by on that July afternoon you’d have plunked down under the cover of the big beechtree on the Williams College Campus drawn in by Richard’s magnetic energy, his guitar playing and their sweet singing of American song book favorites. On talent night, Richard’s quest to “put something in” had them crooning the Scarecrow’s song, “ If I only had a Brain”. Richard loved the theater improvs we did. I can see him in the Banff meeting room all puffed up, stiff legged and leading with his heels as he strode the floor as a Canadian Mounty.

46

Roger noted Richard’s initial observations upon his arrival in the Threshold Community. Roger was just taking on the mantle of leadership as President of the Threshold Foundation. They both shared a need to heal from families where wealth, power and leadership had come at a great personal cost. Richard watched carefully the viability of leadership being consistent with values of the deepest self that were encouraged in the greenhouse of Threshold. My sense of Richard’s time as a member of Threshold was that he moved through with grace giving yet also receiving some vital medicine he needed to finish his time on earth as himself, the good Doctor, who both healed himself and the worlds he inhabited. I had just moved to Maine at the time when I met Richard at Threshold and we became friends.  My husband and I were lucky enough to be invited by Richard to join him on some of his adventures which were fun and always interesting. It was on his beloved Bartlett Island, that a group of us spent a long Memorial Day weekend with him and his wife, Maeve, a few weeks before he died. I hadn’t seen Richard in a while and his fierce openheartedness was notable.  In the last decade of his life, he was truly happy with his children, his marriage, his grandchildren, and his work. His sister Peggy said he felt like a person who was fully realized. Chogyam Trungpa’s words were chosen to underline Richard’s smiling face on the front of his memorial program, “Opening to oneself is opening to the world.”  Richard took big risks and put himself and his Rockefeller name behind what he believed in. In his last year, he was talking increasingly about his work with Doctors without Borders around the world and at home with MAPS and their work healing the victims of PTSD, and the difference small investments in public health or preventive care could make. He was a champion for Maine’s natural world through the Maine Coast Heritage Trust. His hands were out stretched to heal the seas through the Sargasso Sea Project. These were the projects he had distilled to love at the end, but he had touched so many more. Richard died June 13, 2014, at 65 years old, when the plane he was piloting solo, crashed in dense fog on take off. He had flown down from Maine the night before to attend his Father’s 99th birthday party.  He stood at the opposite end of the long family table and toasted his father for being, “A deeply kind person whose love of family had kept them together”. His sister, Eileen, reflected, that Richard was projecting his own compassion and kindness and that it was also he who he had a big hand in healing the wounds of his five siblings and their father. Richard’s referred to as a renaissance man; bagpipe player, photographer, wood carver, outdoorsman, mushroom hunter, hiker, sailor, skier, pilot, family physician turned world healer, guitar player, singer, improviser, outdoor lover and manager of beauty. The term his friend, James Fallows, wrote in his Atlantic Magazine eulogy captured the moving target of Richard with the most focus, “ intellectually inventive and omni-curious”. We have Richard’s legacy to inspire and enhearten us at every moment. Lucinda Ziesing

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Stacy Payne 1971–2014

Named Anastasia Dickinson Payne when she was born on June 17, 1971, Stacy carried a legacy of wealth from both sides of her family. Stacy joined Threshold at the 2000 summer meeting at Hollyhock. When I met Stacy at my first Threshold Foundation meeting in June of 2001, I asked her birth order, which I thought was an easy question. I learned that was a bad assumption as she said she had two half-brothers, a full sister and two step sisters. Talk about a blended family! Stacy engaged in a lot of personal growth programs throughout her life, and she openly and joyfully shared what she had learned with others. Stacy volunteered at Esalen, particularly with Terry Hunt’s programs. She was a big advocate for Challenge Day and sponsored their powerful program that gives high school students the opportunity to be vulnerable and compassionate – to see the humanity in each other and to be kind. The program breaks down cliques and reduces bullying. She volunteered at many Challenge Days and brought the program to five high schools in West Virginia. She was also involved in The Mosaic Project, which works toward a peaceful future by uniting children of diverse backgrounds, providing them with essential community building skills and empowering them to become peacemakers. She helped create their tagline, “Peacing it Together.” 48

Stacy wanted to help kids grow up healthy and strong. She absolutely adored her experiences at Camp Mont Shenandoah, where she was a camper and then a counselor for as long as they would let her be. She was recognized with the 1990 Camp Counselor Award. She had fond memories of family travels to remote places, particularly a family retreat in Canada and talked about all the games that were always played. Stacy was cheerful, playful, outgoing, thoughtful, honest and brave. While Stacy grew up near Charleston, WV, when I met her she had moved to Marin County where she studied expressive arts therapy at Tamalpa Institute and completed a master’s degree in psychology at Sonoma State University. While she was glad to be free of the environment where she was known by the family she was from, she renovated a cabin she inherited on family lands to provide a base for her desired children. Stacy came to the 2003 winter meeting at Jekyll Island just weeks after her father’s death, and we gathered around her in a group hug that hummed like a beehive. Shortly after she received a call that her uncle had died suddenly and she had to leave the meeting. Stacy came to every Summer Institute from 2005 until her illness prevented her attendance in 2013 and she co-lead the four-day personal growth program for inheritors of financial wealth and their partners three times. She was intelligent, quick-witted, funny and wise. Her eyes reflected the connections her brain was making as she came up with ideas, especially ones that challenged the status quo. Her laugh and smile were contagious and her gmail address was hugstacy. While a member of Threshold, Stacy got her beloved dog, Maggie, and her next goal was to have a child. When she reached her mid-to late thirties without having found the right partner, she decided to have a baby on her own. That is when the marvelous Ethan Hurley, who matched her energy, quick wit and humor, and balanced her in many other ways came into her life. They quickly conceived and their daughter, Grace Grover Payne-Hurley (whom she called Gigi, and Ethan calls Gribbles), was born in August of 2011. Sadly, Stacy began to feel unwell in the late spring of 2013. After she was diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of unknown primary site in June of 2013, she returned to her cabin in West Virginia to live with her beloved Ethan and daughter Gigi. She tried everything she could to try to beat the cancer, and had an incredibly positive outlook. Many of us wore green every Wednesday in solidarity with Stacy. On April 10, 2014, ten days before she died, she posted a message on Facebook that let us know she knew she was dying. Her message was, “Live your life with no Regrets. Make choices based in LOVE. Recognize the Blessings.” - Stacy Payne 4/10/14 Stacy often signed emails, Love you ALL ways. On April 16 she posted again on Facebook, this time in response to a video a friend from camp made playing Taps for her. Stacy wrote, “Hearing ‘Taps’ has always given me a sense of calm and of peace. It will mean goodbye to the day. It will mean that I will love you ALLways. I will soon be gone from the physical plane. Allow me to stay in your heart. XXXOOO. Stacy.” She died at 42 on Easter, April 20, 2014. May Stacy’s wisdom inspire you to have the courage to be yourself and to ask for support when it will help you. May her story touch your heart and open it to love.

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