2030 Comprehensive Plan - City of Columbus, Minnesota

2030 Comprehensive Plan - City of Columbus, Minnesota

2030 Comprehensive Plan November 2009 Metropolitan Council Consistency Review Completed October 28, 2009 Table of Contents I Introduction and Bac...

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2030 Comprehensive Plan

November 2009

Metropolitan Council Consistency Review Completed October 28, 2009

Table of Contents I

Introduction and Background Conditions ............................................................................1 A. Purpose and Authority ........................................................................................................ 1 B. Community Planning Process ............................................................................................. 1 C. History................................................................................................................................. 2 D. Population, Households and Employment.......................................................................... 3 E. Existing Land Use............................................................................................................... 7 F. Public Utilities and Community Facilities........................................................................ 10 G. Natural Features ............................................................................................................... 11 H. Transportation ................................................................................................................... 16

II 2030 Land Use Plan ...............................................................................................................19 A. Community Goals and Policies......................................................................................... 19 B. Regional Development Framework .................................................................................. 20 C. 2030 Land Use Plan .......................................................................................................... 22 D. Community Facilities and Services Plan .......................................................................... 27 E. Parks, Trails and Open Space ........................................................................................... 28 F. Public Utility Plan............................................................................................................. 30 G. Natural Areas and Water Resources Protection Plan........................................................ 34 H. Transportation Plan........................................................................................................... 37 III Implementation Plan .............................................................................................................41 Appendix A – Zoning Map Appendix B – Land Use Staging and Density Calculations Appendix C – Water Supply Plan

ii

List of Tables 1. City/County Population 1970-2006 .....................................................................................3 2. City/County Households 1970-2006....................................................................................3 3. City/County Persons per Household 1970-2006 .................................................................4 4. Columbus 2000 Age Distribution ........................................................................................4 5. Columbus 2000 Race/Ethnicity ...........................................................................................5 6. Columbus 2000 Households by Type and Ownership.........................................................5 7. Columbus 2000 Age Distribution of Home Owners and Renters........................................6 8. Columbus 2000 Households by Householder Type.............................................................6 9. City/County Employment 1970-2006..................................................................................7 10. Existing Land Use Acreages..............................................................................................10 11. City-wide Population, Household, Employment Data and Forecasts................................21 12. Sewered/Unsewered Population, Household, and Employment Forecasts .......................21 13. 2030 Future Land Use Acreages........................................................................................22 14. 2010-2030 Average Annual Sewer Flows .........................................................................31 15. Traffic Assignment Zone Forecasts ...................................................................................39 16. Capital Improvements Plan................................................................................................42

List of Figures 1. Location ............................................................................................................................. iv 2. Existing Land Use................................................................................................................8 3. Soil Associations................................................................................................................12 4. Water Resources ................................................................................................................14 5. Upland Natural Resources .................................................................................................15 6. Transportation ....................................................................................................................17 7. 2030 Future Land Use Plan................................................................................................23 8. Sewer Staging Plan ............................................................................................................32 9. Sanitary Sewer Collection System.....................................................................................33 10. Watermain Distribution System.........................................................................................35

iii

Bethel

St. Francis

Linwood Township East Bethel Nowthen

Oak Grove

Columbus

Ramsey

Andover

Ham Lake

35

Dayton

Anoka

Coon Rapids

Blaine

Lexington

RAMSEY

WASHINGTON

CARVER

35E

Centerville

Circle Pines

Figure 1 - Location and Planning Area Designation

Fridley

Hilltop Columbia Heights SCOTT

Lino Lakes

Spring Lake Park

ANOKA

HENNEPIN

35W

City of Columbus Anoka County, MN

DAKOTA

Metropolitan Council Geographic Planning Areas Diversified Rural Rural Center

Rural Residential Developing Area Developed Area

I

Introduction and Background Conditions

A. Purpose and Authority The City of Columbus has developed this Comprehensive Plan to fulfill comprehensive planning requirements under the Metropolitan Land Planning Act. Under Minnesota Statutes 462.351-365 and 473.851-871, the City of Columbus has the authority to prepare a comprehensive plan to direct development and manage growth. Minnesota Statutes require the update of comprehensive plans in the seven-county metropolitan area at least every ten years. This Plan replaces the Comprehensive Plan that was developed in the late 1990s and adopted in 1999. B. Community Planning Process This Comprehensive Plan does not change the basic land use strategies or land use categories included in the 1999 Plan, except as modified through amendments in the I-35W/I-35E freeway corridor. One of the major changes in the community since 1999 has been the implementation of public utilities in the freeway corridor. A series of plan amendments redefined land uses within the corridor and segments of the municipal sewer and water system have been constructed. While not affecting the concepts for future growth, another major change in the community since 1999 has been the incorporation of Columbus as a city. An Incorporation Committee, appointed in 2005 by the former Town Board, evaluated the pros and cons of incorporation, concluding that incorporation was in the best interests of the community. As a part of that process, the 1999 Comprehensive Plan was revisited and reconfirmed as a valid guide for future community growth. An Administrative Law Judge ordered the incorporation of Columbus in the summer of 2006. Following incorporation the City began a process of reorganization from the township form of government to the city form of government. Special and general elections were held to formally elect members of the City Council. In early spring 2007, the City prepared and adopted the Columbus Shoreland Management Ordinance and Columbus Floodplain Management Ordinance, after approval by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR). In the spring and summer of 2007, the Columbus City Council, Planning Commission, Economic Development Committee, and Park Board participated in land use training and visioning sessions to review and discuss existing growth patterns, goals and policies, and potential changes to the 1999 Plan. General consensus and guiding principles for the update of the 1999 Plan included: ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Maintain the rural character of the City and the 5-acre rural development density. Emphasize business development within the existing Lake Drive / I-35 corridors. Pursue Lake Drive corridor public utility options with the City of Lino Lakes. Retain housing options in the northwest and southeast corners of the I-35 corridor. Coordinate the development of pedestrian/bicycle trails on major roadways. Develop sidewalk and trail connections within all I-35 corridor developments. Establish a long-term plan for the surfacing of gravel roads in the City. Reserve long-term options for business expansion on Lake Drive and Broadway Ave.

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C. History The history of Columbus is influenced by both Native Americans and the European settlers that followed. Human settlement of areas within Columbus City can be traced back to the presence of the Hopewell tribe of Native Americans. Archeologists believe that the Hopewell tribe established extensive trading with tribes over the entire continent. Burial mounds are located around Howard Lake in the Lamprey Pass Wildlife Management Area. Three large mounds were discovered in 1889; and it was not until 1977 that an additional three smaller mounds were discovered. Each of these areas are designated and protected as historic sites by the Minnesota Historical Society. In addition, the Minnesota Historical Society believes that remnants of Native American settlements may exist along Kettle River Boulevard northeast of Howard Lake and along Rice Creek. The City supports archeological research prior to or in conjunction with any excavation or building in these areas. Following European settlement, the City became a predominantly agricultural area, although less than half of the land area was suitable for crop cultivation due to extensive wetland areas. Activities included small farming operations, such as grass harvesting for the assembly of mats, poultry farming, and wild rice harvesting. Several historic farmsteads of European settlers are also located in the City, which include the Yost, Hans Hanson, J. T. Elwell, and Thurnbeck farms. The Anoka County Historical-Genealogical Society maintains files called Century Farms that include photographs, plat maps, crop information and other information related to historical farms. The Township of Columbus was platted in 1856 and a Town organization was formed in 1857. Early settlers sought to develop a village center on the St. Paul-Kettle River Road, one of the earliest stage lines to be developed in the State. This site, known as “Boehm’s Corner,” contained a sawmill and hotel. Efforts to encourage the development of a village center met with no success. The Township lost a bid in the mid-1860’s for the Anoka county seat and it was passed over as a potential route for the St.Paul-Duluth Railroad. The village center never materialized and, by 1879, the Township abandoned efforts to establish a village at that site. A number of structures and building sites have had historic value for Columbus. The first public structure built in Columbus was a post office in 1858. The post office closed after plans for the Village of Columbus did not materialize. The first school house was built in 1866 in the northern part of Columbus. It was a log structure and provided facilities for instruction for three to four months per year. No remnants of these structures exist today. Other structures in the City still remain. The Republic School, built in 1890, had a Grange Hall upstairs and a school downstairs. The Grange refers to a lodge or local branch of the “Patrons of Husbandry,” an association for promoting the interests of agriculture. It is now a private residence located on Lake Drive. The old Town Hall was built in 1902 and the City inquired into the historical significance of the structure. However, due to extensive renovation over many years, the Minnesota Historical Society did not feel it had the historic value to warrant preservation. The only City site that is on the National Register of Historic Places is the Carlos Avery Game Farm, located at County Highways 17 and 18. It has been on the Register since 1991. It is the

City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

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site of buildings built by the WPA in the 1930’s and includes an entrance gate to the site that is built of stone and iron. During that era, it was a national showplace for the rearing of quail. The facilities are now the home of the north metro wildlife office of the Department of Natural Resources (DNR), the headquarters for the DNR’s Carlos Avery Wildlife Management Area, and the Wildlife Science Center, a nonprofit group that conducts research on wolves. D. Population, Households, and Employment Population and Households Recent population and household growth in Columbus was strongest in the 1970s and 1980s. This growth reflects an region-wide, outer-ring suburban trend, which largely resulted from the development of the interstate highway system. Communities surrounding Columbus, as well as Anoka County, experienced similar if not more rapid growth. The large lot, rural residential character of housing and the limited amount of developable land in Columbus has resulted in a decrease in the rate of growth since 1990. Communities with greater land supplies, particularly those with municipal sewer and water, have maintained an accelerated pace of growth since 1990. Columbus’ rate of growth has been more similar to that of the overall growth rate of Anoka County. Table 1 and Table 2 illustrate population and household trends in Columbus, adjacent communities, and Anoka County from 1970 to 2006. Table 1 City/County Population 1970-2006 Community Columbus Linwood East Bethel Lino Lakes Forest Lake Anoka County

1970

1980

1990

2000

2006

‘70-’06 %

1999 1004 2586 3692 6197 154,712

3232 2839 6626 4966 9927 195,998

3690 3588 8050 8807 12,253 243,688

3957 4668 10,941 16,791 14,440 298,084

4135 5190 12,142 19,736 17,424 328,614

106.9% 407.0% 370.0% 434.6% 181.2% 112.4%

Source: U.S. Census; Metropolitan Council

Table 2 City/County Households 1970-2006 Community Columbus Linwood East Bethel Lino Lakes Forest Lake Anoka County

1970

1980

487 299 706 812 1770 39,688

870 833 1955 1388 3331 60,716

1990

2000

2006

1129 1328 1423 1146 1578 1797 2542 3607 4032 2603 4857 5868 4424 5433 6743 82,437 106,428 119,138

‘70-’06 %

Annual %

192.2% 501.0% 471.1% 622.7% 281.1% 200.2%

5.53% 19.3% 18.1% 24.0% 10.8% 7.7%

Source: U.S. Census; Metropolitan Council

Household size has declined in all communities and the County since 1970, which parallels the City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

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national trend. Columbus has maintained one of the higher number of persons per household throughout the period. Columbus is the only community which may have reversed the trend between 2000 and 2006; although, the population and households in 2006 are only estimates and may not be reliable. Table 3 identifies the declining household size in Columbus, adjacent communities and Anoka County from 1970 to 2006. Table 3 City/County Persons per Household 1970-2006 Community

1970

1980

1990

2000

2006

Columbus Linwood East Bethel Lino Lakes Forest Lake Anoka County

4.11 3.36 3.66 4.55 3.50 3.90

3.72 3.41 3.39 3.58 2.98 3.23

3.27 3.13 3.17 3.38 2.77 2.96

2.98 2.96 3.03 3.46 2.66 2.80

2.91 2.89 3.01 3.36 2.58 2.76

Source: U.S. Census; Metropolitan Council

Table 4 is an illustration of the age distribution in Columbus in 2000. Columbus’ age characteristics compare to Anoka County age statistics, except the young adult population (2534) in Columbus is significantly lower than the County. This may be a reflection of limited housing options for adults in the City. The median age in Columbus is 38.2 compared to 33.1 years of age county-wide. Table 4 Columbus 2000 Age Distribution

Age

Columbus 2000#

Columbus 2000%

Anoka County 2000%

217 305 363 216 204 94 330 839 751 391 160 66 21

5.5% 7.7% 9.2% 5.5% 5.2% 2.4% 8.3% 21.2% 19.0% 9.9% 4.0% 1.7% 0.5% 100.0%

7.6% 8.3% 8.3% 4.7% 4.9% 3.4% 15.0% 19.1% 13.7% 7.9% 4.2% 2.2% 0.6% 100.0%

Under 5 5-9 10-14 15-17 18-21 22-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 Over 84 Totals

Source: U.S. Census; Metropolitan Council

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The racial background in Columbus is predominantly white, non-Hispanic (97%). This compares to approximately 92% in Anoka County as a whole. Persons with multi-racial or mixed ethnicity make up the largest minority population in Columbus, followed by Hispanic, American Indian, Asian, and African American. Table 5 illustrates the 2000 census breakdown of race in Columbus. Table 5 Columbus 2000 Race/Ethnicity White/non-Hispanic White/Hispanic American Indian African American Asian/Pacific Islander Multi-racial/Other Total

3839 23 22 7 22 44 3957

97.0% 0.6% 0.6% 0.2% 0.6% 1.1% 100%

Housing in Columbus is predominantly single family detached, which is characteristic of rural communities. Approximately 96% of the occupied housing stock (1280 units) in 2000 was detached single family, compared to 4% attached single family residences (48 units). This compares to 72% single family detached homes county-wide and 18% attached single family or multiple family residences county-wide. There are no multiple family residences in Columbus. Home ownership is also a predominant characteristic in Columbus. Over 97% of the households (1290 units) in Columbus are owner-occupied, compared to only 3% renter-occupied units. The county-wide level of home ownership is 83%. Table 6 illustrates the 2000 census breakdown of housing type and ownership in Columbus. Table 6 Columbus 2000 Households by Type and Ownership Household Type

Owned Units

Rented Units

1261 12 17 1290

19 12 7 38

Single family detached Single family attached Duplexes Total Households Source: U.S. Census; Metropolitan Council

Table 7 illustrates the distribution of owner-occupied and renter-occupied households in Columbus by age according to the 2000 census. Nearly two-thirds of all households are occupied by the median and middle-aged group from 35-54 years of age. Over 25% of the households are occupied by “empty nesters” and retirees. Under 10% of the households are occupied by persons under the age of 35.

City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

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Table 7 Columbus 2000 Age Distribution of Home Owners and Renters Householder Age

Owners

Renters

3 100 413 408 220 96 50 1290

3 9 14 4 4 2 2 38

15-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75+ Totals

Source: U.S. Census; Metropolitan Council

Married couples dominate housing occupancy in Columbus (75%). Families, including male and female heads of households, make up nearly 85% of household occupancy. Approximately 15% of all households are occupied by non-family occupants, including single person households (11%) and multiple person non-family households (4%). Table 8 identifies the breakdown of 2000 households by family/non-family occupancy. Table 8 Columbus 2000 Households by Householder Type # Households

Householder Type Married Couples Male Householder Female Householder Non-family (single) Non-family (2 or more) Total Households

995 55 71 148 59 1328

Source: U.S. Census; Metropolitan Council

Employment The economic base of Columbus is transitioning from a more traditional rural service center to a regional sales, service, and entertainment center. Columbus is home to a number of businesses that have historically served recreational and service needs, such as watercraft, snowmobile, recreational vehicle conversions, and vehicle sales and service centers. The Lake Drive (CSAH 23) commercial/industrial area is home to expanding construction services, trucking, floral production, landscaping, trade services, warehousing, light manufacturing, and vehicle sales and service. Employment throughout Columbus increased ten-fold between 1990 and 2006. Employment opportunities within the Interstate 35 corridor have increased dramatically since 2000 with the development of Gander Mountain, Ziegler Caterpillar, Coates RV, Brinkman Trailer, and the Running Aces harness racing and card room facility. There are substantial employment growth City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

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opportunities remaining in both the Lake Drive and I-35 commercial and industrial development corridors. Columbus conducted an informal survey of 72 businesses in the City in the spring of 2008. A response by 55 businesses (75%) revealed a current total of 1094 full time jobs and 283 seasonal/part time positions. The survey also revealed the anticipation of 366 new-hires within a year. Approximately 350-400 full and part time jobs will be added at the Running Aces card room upon opening in 2008. It is apparent that current employment in Columbus is exceeding agency estimates. Table 9 illustrates historic employment levels in Columbus, area communities, and Anoka County from 1970 to 2006. The ratio of jobs to population is an indicator of the strength of local employment. Based upon 2006 estimates of employment and population, the ratio of jobs to population in Columbus is 23.7%, which is the average ratio of area communities and Anoka County. Considering the results of the 2008 local employment survey, the job to population ratio in Columbus could be closer to 45% in 2009. Table 9 City/County Employment 1970-2006 Community Columbus Linwood East Bethel Lino Lakes Forest Lake Anoka County

1970

1980

1990

2000

2006

’06 Job:Pop.%

80 * * 430 1520 29,170

100 50 404 771 3514 63,317

100 50 457 1229 5135 81,132

507 154 1374 2671 6636 110,091

981 330 1598 3920 7312 116,551

23.7% 6.4% 13.2% 19.9% 41.9% 35.5%

Source: U.S. Census; Metropolitan Council; DEED; *unsubstantiated

E. Existing Land Use Wetlands and surface waters dominate the landscape in Columbus, covering nearly two-thirds of the City. While Columbus is a large community (48 sections ~ 30,573 acres), the amount of developable land in the City is much less than surrounding communities. In addition to the high percentage of wetlands, there is also a considerable amount of publicly held land in the City – mostly state-owned wildlife management areas (WMAs). Existing land use is illustrated on Figure 2 and Table 10. Vacant/ Agricultural Approximately 7330 gross acres of land are currently vacant or agricultural land. The net buildable vacant/agricultural area (gross acres less wetlands, surface water or floodplain) is approximately 2400 acres. There is very little commercial agriculture in Columbus, due to smaller isolated parcels of uplands and sandy or overly wet soils. There is no separate agricultural land use classification in Columbus; hence, vacant or agricultural land is designated either residential, commercial, industrial, or commercial/industrial in the future land use plan.

City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

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Coon Lake County Park 193RD AVE NE

Coon Lake

Linwood Township

LEXINGTON AVE NE

197TH AVE NE

WMA

Carlos Avery Wildlife Management Area

185TH AVE NE

LEXINGTON AVE NE

Chisago County

Wyoming

Little Coon Lake

Sunrise R iver

LEXINGTON AVE NE

East Bethel

17

Higgins Lake

Twin Lakes

62

BROADWAY AVE NE

Washington County

18

Carlos Avery Wildlife Management Area

TLE KET

ER RIV

BLV

D

62

NE

Mud Lake Howard Lake

Lamprey Pass WMA

23

Clear Lake

Forest Lake

POTOMAC ST NE

19

Ham Lake

Coon Creek

School Trust Fund Land

Columbus Lake

Rice Creek Chain of Lakes

LA KE

DR N

E

W FREEWAY DR NE

35

Crossways Lake

54

Rice Cre e

k

23

Regional Park Reserve

0.25

0.5

1

1.5

2

Miles

35E

Hugo

Blaine

35W

Lino Lakes

20TH AVE N

54

Rondeau Lake

0

Houle WMA

Rondeau Lake

Figure 2 - Existing Land Use

Existing Land Use Catagory Vacant/Agriculture

Park

Rural Residential

Utilility

Commercial/Industrial

Wildlife Management Area

Public/Institutional

School Trust

Lakes

City Hall

Creek/Ditch NWI Wetlands Floodplain

Source: Anoka County

May 2009

Rural Residential Approximately 9300 gross acres and 5660 net acres of land are currently used as rural residential. The corresponding zoning district is RR Rural Residential, which requires a 5-acre minimum lot size. The majority of the privately owned upland areas and associated wetlands in Columbus are used for rural residential purposes. The current density in the developed rural residential area is one home per 6.5 acres. Commercial/Industrial There are two separate and distinct commercial/industrial areas in Columbus. Lake Drive (CSAH 23), north of Lino Lakes, is a 2-mile long corridor which is guided commercial/industrial and zoned commercial/industrial. The corresponding zoning district is C/I Commercial/Industrial, which for most of the corridor currently extends 1000 feet east of Lake Drive and 400 feet west of Lake Drive. The C/I District allows pre-existing homes as permitted uses in the district; however, the area continues to transition from residential to business uses. Interstate 35W, Interstate 35E, and Interstate 35 form a 3-mile long business corridor in Columbus, north of Lino Lakes. The mile-wide corridor is bound on the east by Forest Lake and on the west by Rice Creek and it’s large wetland basin. The “freeway corridor” is the only area in Columbus developing with municipal sewer and water. Corresponding zoning Districts within the freeway corridor include CR Community Retail, CS Commercial Showroom, LI Light Industry, and HR Horse Racing. The Freeway Corridor is home to several older and several newer businesses. There are approximately 670 gross acres and 375 net acres of developed commercial and industrial uses within the Lake Drive and Freeway corridors. Public/Institutional The public/institutional land use category includes the Columbus City Hall, Fire Hall, and Public Works complex on Kettle River Boulevard and Notre Dame Street; public utility facilities; four churches; the Columbus Elementary School; State “school trust” land; and three WMAs. The gross public/institutional acreage is approximately 11,175 acres, or over 36% of the total City acreage. The WMAs account for the vast majority of this land use category. Carlos Avery WMA is the largest urban WMA and ninth overall largest WMA in the State. It occupies portions of Columbus, Linwood Township to the north and extends into Chisago County to the northeast. There are over 9800 acres of Carlos Avery WMA in west central and north central Columbus. Recreational opportunities within the Carlos Avery WMA include hunting, fishing, hiking, bird watching, cross-country skiing, and snow shoeing. A game farm is located on CSAH 18, where prairie chickens, pheasants, grouse, deer and water fowl are reared. Lamprey Pass WMA covers over 1040 acres in east central Columbus, surrounding Howard Lake and Mud Lake. Lamprey Pass WMA protects one of the largest and most diverse heron colonies in the State. Discovered in 1979, this colony supports four different species of herons including great blue herons, great egrets, black-crowned herons, and double-crested cormorants. Houle WMA is located east of I-35 on the border with Forest Lake. It is an 80-acre wetland complex.

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Table 10 Existing Land Use Acreages Category Vacant/Agriculture Rural Residential Commercial/Industrial Wildlife Mgt. Areas Public/Institutional Park Land State “School Trust” Utility Right-of-way Wetland/Floodplain Lakes* TOTAL

Gross Acres

Gross %

Net Acres

Net %

7332.14 9305.82 672.24 10,930.22 88.0 653.76 157.10 0.17 1045.60 388.15 30,573.20

23.9 30.44 2.20 35.75 0.29 2.14 0.51 0.0 3.42 1.27 100.0%

2394.72 5661.61 375.88 1008.76 66.53 119.45 9.55 0.17 1045.60 19502.78 388.15 30,573.20

7.84 18.52 1.23 3.29 0.22 0.39 0.03 0.0 3.42 63.79 1.27 100.0%

Source: Anoka County GIS; Resource Strategies Corporation (Gross acres exclude dedicated ROW; Net acres exclude dedicated ROW, wetlands/floodplain & lakes*) * All but four smaller lakes are included in the wetland/floodplain calculations

Parks and Recreation There are approximately 654 acres of City and County park land in Columbus which provide active and passive recreation opportunities to residents and businesses. The City currently has one community park, three neighborhood parks and three undeveloped, natural areas. The community park is adjacent to the City Hall and includes land on either side of Kettle River Boulevard. This facility includes four ball fields, tennis courts, a volleyball court, a picnic area and shelter, and a sandbox/playground area. A new ball field or soccer/lacrosse field will be constructed on the site of the former public works facility. Coon Lake County Park is located in the northwest corner of Columbus on the east side of Coon Lake and includes a swimming beach, boat access, and picnic facilities. Anoka County has acquired over 400 acres of land along Rice Creek, which is part of Rice Creek Chain of Lakes Regional Park Reserve. This area is undeveloped and largely inaccessible wetlands. Active use areas within the park reserve are located in Lino Lakes. F. Public Utilities and Community Facilities The Columbus City Hall, Fire Hall, and Public Works facility are located on Kettle River Boulevard at Notre Dame Street. Columbus provides a full level of municipal services in the community, including street and park maintenance, planning and zoning, elections, licensing, auditing, building inspections, prosecution, and general administration. The City owns and operates a volunteer fire department through a joint powers agreement with the City of Forest Lake and Wyoming Township. Police protection is provided through a contract with the Anoka County Sheriff’s Department. A privately operated non-profit senior citizen center is attached to City Hall.

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Columbus is located within the Forest Lake Area School District (Independent School District 831). Columbus Elementary School, which serves kindergarten through sixth grade, is located in the City on Notre Dame Street, south of Broadway Avenue. Junior and senior high schools serving the Columbus area are located in the City of Forest Lake. There are four churches in Columbus. Crossroads Covenant Church and Immanuel Baptist Church are located along Broadway Avenue, Hope Free Lutheran Church is located along CSAH 17 south of Coon Lake, and Centennial Evangelical Free Church is located at Lake Drive and Potomac Street. Columbus began implementation of a public utility district within the 3-square-mile Interstate 35 corridor in 2000. The district was established with basic infrastructure assessments that would provide sanitary sewer trunk benefits to the entire district. In 2004 a central lift station and force main and limited lateral service was constructed. Wastewater is conveyed to a trunk sewer line in Forest Lake and ultimately to Metropolitan Interceptor 70-29, located in Forest Lake. The sewer system was expanded from 2005-2008, providing lateral service on the west side of I-35 and the northerly two-thirds of the east side of I-35. In 2005 Columbus began implementation of the municipal water system with the installation of test wells and initial segments of the permanent water system. Three operating wells and two pump houses currently provide water service to portions of both sides of the Freeway Corridor. A 150,000 gallon ground storage tank and pumping facility are planned to be added to the system in 2012, and a 500,000 gallon elevated storage tank is planned be added by 2030. G. Natural Features Columbus has a variety of environmental amenities, such as recreational lakes, wetlands and forested areas, which make the City an attractive location for rural residential development. A limited amount of land is available for development, however, because of the extensive wetlands and the physical characteristics of soils. Columbus lies primarily within an area known as the Anoka Sand Plain in which depressions are common, formed when blocks of ice with fine sands melted from retreating glaciers 13,000 years ago. There are no aggregate resources in Columbus. Soils There are three general soil associations (related soils) within the City of Columbus, as identified in Figure 4. The Nessel-Dundas-Webster Association is roughly located along the Interstate 35 corridor. This soil association was formed in loamy glacial till and the soils range from being nearly-level to gently-sloping and from being well-drained to poorly-drained. Much of the association is moderately to poorly suited for certain urban uses, due to the high water table levels and the fertility of the soil. The Zimmerman-Isanti-Lino Association covers approximately 40% of the City, along areas west and east of Crossways Lake, Howard Lake and Higgins Lake. The association is relatively wellsuited for urban development and moderately well-suited for farming; however, a high water table limits many uses. The main concerns related to the management of this soil association are controlling soil blowing, improving fertility, and controlling the level of the water table in lowlying areas.

City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

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Sunrise R iver

Little Coon Lake

Higgins Lake

Twin Lakes

62 BROADWAY AVE NE

POTOMAC ST NE

Forest Lake

18

170TH LN NE

Coon Creek

19

E RIV TLE T E K

LVD RB

NE

62

Mud Lake

Howard Lake

Clear Lake

23 Columbus Lake

LA KE

DR N

E

W FREEWAY DR

NE

35

Washington County

LEXINGTON AVE NE

185TH AVE NE

Ham Lake

Wyoming

193RD AVE NE

LEXINGTON AVE NE

East Bethel

Coon Lake

Chisago County

Linwood Township

197TH AVE NE

54 Crossways Lake Rice Cre e

k

23

Rondeau Lake

Blaine

35E

Figure 3 - Soil Associations

Generalized Soil Associations HAYDEN-NESSEL-DUNDAS (MN188) RIFLE-ISANTI-MARKEY (MN191) ZIMMERMAN-ISANTI-LINO (MN190)

Hugo

Lakes

Creek/Ditch

Source: Anoka Co.

May 2009

The Rifle-Isanti Soil Association covers approximately 53% of the City and includes the Carlos Avery Wildlife Management Area. This association is comprised of a series of large, level bogs dominated by organic soils and small sandy island-like features that rise several feet above the level of the surrounding bogs. The association has a naturally high water table and it ranges from moderate to low fertility and the available water capacity ranges from low to very high. These soils are poorly suited for urban or agricultural uses. The main concerns related to the management of this soil association are control of the water table and maintaining soil fertility. Water Resources Wetlands and surface waters are the predominant features in Columbus. Approximately 20,939 acres in Columbus are encumbered by wetlands and floodplain areas. There are another 1757 acres of surface waters, which combined represent nearly 75% of the total acreage in the City. Wetlands are protected by state law and several lakes and rivers are designated public waters with shoreland management regulation required by the state and implemented by the City. Columbus is located within three separate watersheds: Rice Creek, Coon Creek and Sunrise River. A watershed is an overland drainage area where precipitation flows into wetlands, lakes, rivers and streams. They are named for and associated with particular rivers and streams that carry these waters. Water resource management and planning within watersheds is conducted through the watershed management organizations and by the City. Figure 4 illustrates the water resources and watershed boundaries in Columbus. The Rice Creek Watershed includes Rondeau Lake, Crossways Lake, Columbus Lake, Howard Lake, and Mud Lake, all of which are Natural Environment Lakes. Rice Creek is classified by the DNR as a Tributary River, and it is surrounded by a large wetland basins. The Rice Creek Watershed is organized as a watershed district and it acts as the Local Government Unit (LGU) for permitting in Columbus. The Sunrise River Watershed includes a portion of the Sunrise River, a tributary river, Coon Lake, Little Coon Lake, Twin Lakes, Higgins Lake, and several unnamed lakes. All of the lakes are classified as Natural Environment Lakes, except Coon Lake, which is a General Development Lake. The northerly portion of Carlos Avery WMA in Columbus comprises much of this watershed. The Sunrise River Watershed is organized as a watershed management organization and Columbus is the LGU for permitting. The Coon Creek Watershed includes a portion of Coon Creek, a tributary stream along the westerly border of Columbus, and an unnamed Natural Environment Lake located within Carlos Avery WMA. Coon Creek Watershed covers much of west-central Columbus including the southerly half of Carlos Avery WMA. Coon Creek Watershed is organized as a watershed district and acts as the LGU for permitting in Columbus. Upland Natural Resources There are substantial areas within Columbus that are identified in the Minnesota Land Cover Classification System (MLCCS) as “high biodiversity significance” and “outstanding biodiversity significance.” The latter is generally located within and around Carlos Avery WMA. The former is located near Rondeau Lake. Figure 5 identifies these resources.

City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

13

193RD AVE NE

Coon Lake

Linwood Township

LEXINGTON AVE NE

197TH AVE NE

Little Coon Lake

Sunrise R iver

SUNRISE RIVER

185TH AVE NE

LEXINGTON AVE NE

Chisago County

Wyoming

LEXINGTON AVE NE

East Bethel

17

Higgins Lake

Twin Lakes

62

BROADWAY AVE NE

Washington County

18

BLV

D

62 Mud Lake Howard Lake

Lamprey Pass WMA

23

Clear Lake

Forest Lake

POTOMAC ST NE

COON CREEK

TLE KET

ER RIV

NE

Ham Lake

Coon Creek

19

Columbus Lake

W FREEWAY DR NE

35

LA KE

DR N

E

RICE CREEK

Crossways Lake

Rice Cre e

k

23

54

35E

Hugo

Blaine

35W

Lino Lakes

20TH AVE N

54

Rondeau Lake

Rondeau Lake

Figure 4 - Water Resources Lakes

Creek/Ditch NWI Wetlands

Watershed Management Organization/District

Floodplain

Source: Anoka County

May 2009

193RD AVE NE

Coon Lake

Linwood Township

LEXINGTON AVE NE

197TH AVE NE

Chisago County

Carlos Avery WMA Sunrise R iver

Little Coon Lake

Wyoming

LEXINGTON AVE NE

East Bethel

17

LEXINGTON AVE NE

185TH AVE NE

Higgins Lake

Twin Lakes

62

BROADWAY AVE NE

Washington County

18

TLE KET

ER RIV

BLV

D

NE

62 Mud Lake Howard Lake

Lamprey Pass WMA

Ham Lake

Coon Creek

POTOMAC ST NE

19

23

Clear Lake

Forest Lake

Carlos Avery WMA

Columbus Lake

LA KE

DR N

E

W FREEWAY DR NE

35

Crossways Lake

Rice Cre e

k

23

35E

Hugo

35W

Lino Lakes

20TH AVE N

54

Rondeau Lake

Blaine

Houle WMA

54

Rondeau Lake

Biodiversity Signficance MCBS site with high biodiversity significance

MCBS site with outstanding biodiversity significance

Plant Community

Figure 5 - Upland Natural Resources

LOWLAND HARDWOOD FOREST

ALDER SWAMP

MIXED EMERGENT MARSH (FOREST)

EMERGENT MARSH

MAPLE-BASSWOOD FOREST (EAST CENTRAL) MIXED HARDWOOD SWAMP

OAK FORESTS DRY & MESIC SUBTYPES

HARDWOOD SWAMP FOREST

TAMARACK SWAMP; SOME MINEROTROPHIC SUBTYPE WET MEADOW

Wildlife Aanagement Area

CATTAIL MARSH

FEN (RICH/RICH) SHRUB SWAMP

State Forest Lakes Creek/Ditch NWI Wetlands Floodplain Source: Anoka County and MnDNR

May 2009

H. Transportation Columbus is served by a network of federal, state, county, and local roadways. Interstate highways 35E and 35W converge into I-35 in a 3-mile corridor in the southeast corner of the City. The interstate highways are functionally classified as Principal Arterials. One interchange is located in Columbus at County State Aid Highway (CSAH) 23 and state Trunk Highway (TH) 97. TH 97 is classified as an A Minor Expander and extends eastward into Washington County. Less than a quarter mile of TH 97 is located in Columbus. CSAH 23 (Lake Drive) is classified as an A Minor Reliever, extending westerly from I-35 then southerly into Lino Lakes where it intersects with I-35W. CSAH 62 (Kettle River Boulevard) is an A Minor Reliever, connecting CSAH 23 in the center of the City and CSAH 18 (Broadway Avenue) to the north. CSAH 62 extends north of CSAH 18 into Chisago County, but this segment of the roadway is classified as a Major Collector. CSAH 18 is an A Minor Expander, connecting CSAH 17 (Lexington Avenue) at the western Columbus border with Ham Lake to Interstate 35 in Forest lake via Washington County Highway 2. CSAH 17 is an A Minor Expander in the northwest corner of the City, extending southward through Ham Lake and Blaine to the Ramsey County Border. County Road (CR) 19 (Potomac Street) is B Minor Arterial connecting CSAH 23 to CSAH 18 in the center of the City. CSAH 54 (West Freeway Drive) is an A Minor Reliever extending southward from CSAH 23 near the I-35 interchange through Lino Lakes and Centerville to Ramsey County. Pine Street is identified as a Major Collector. There are approximately 4.3 miles of interstate and state highways and approximately 35.3 miles of county highways in the City. Columbus maintains a network of local streets throughout the balance of the City. Columbus currently maintains approximately 53.7 miles of City streets, 31.5 miles of which are gravel and 22.2 miles are paved. Figure 6 illustrates the transportation network in Columbus, including functional classifications, existing traffic counts and 2030 traffic forecasts. Transit Columbus is located in Market Area IV outside of the metropolitan transit taxing district. A parkand-pool rideshare parking lot has operated near the I-35 interchange for many years and was relocated in 2008 to the Running Aces harness race track west of I-35 on Lake Drive. This facility has 300 parking spaces and is operating in 2008 as a park-and-ride facility with temporary express bus (route 288) service to Minneapolis. The Metropolitan Council began operating the demonstration service with a one-year grant from the USDOT in response to the I35 bridge collapse in Minneapolis. Service is scheduled to end in the fall 2009, unless extended. Columbus and adjacent cities in Market Area IV have evaluated opting into the metropolitan transit taxing district in 2008 and 2009. Columbus has formally opted in the taxing district. Columbus is a member of the Rush Line Corridor Task Force, a joint powers organization including cities, townships and counties between St. Paul and Duluth. The Task Force is coordinating with multiple agencies on feasibility studies for the planning and development of commuter rail or light rail transit within the twin cities and Duluth and local bus alternatives.

City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

16

NOTRE DAME

STANFORD

3400

XINGU

TLE KET

B ER RIV

LVD

Wyoming

ELMCREST

33 00

DIMAGGIO HOW A RD

LAKE

NE

Mud Lake Howard Lake

121 00

133 00

580 0

155TH

620 0

97

Columbus Lake

12

HORN0,000 SB Y

WAYS LAKE

97

86,0 00

CROS S

FRE EW AY EUREKA

23

152ND 152ND

2

Clear Lake

CAMP THREE

ZODIAC

Ham Lake

168TH 16 7T H

42 00

159TH

153RD

AR

23 50

161ST

TAZ 17

VA SS

165TH

162ND

Coon Creek

INDU S KWEI MACKENZIE

PACKARD

167TH

8400

172ND

5000

OPAL

19

164TH

5700

2150

170TH

165TH

176TH

ELMCREST

XINGU

176TH

172ND

H 166T

62

178TH

177TH

Higgins Lake

IVERSON

HEIDELBERG

178TH

10400

171ST

161ST

VASSAR

TULANE

URAL

ZODIAC

178TH

FURMAN

12,800 6300

BROADWAY AVE NE

18

11,500

GT ON

179TH

POTOMAC

LE XIN

181ST

ZIE

LEVER

4700

180TH

184TH

GEHRIG

2550

Twin Lakes

EN MACK

LEXINGTON AVE NE

182ND

181ST

17

OPAL

186TH

BENDER

TAZ 16

185TH AVE NE

VASSAR

18 8T H

Sunrise R iver

LAUREL

189TH

Little Coon Lake

JENNINGS

189TH

LYONS

191ST

LEXINGTON AVE NE

9T 18

90TH H1

6700

JUNIPER

LEVER

COLLEN

197TH

193RD AVE NE

Coon Lake

East Bethel

T ON FR

TRI OAKS

LEXINGTON AVE NE

197TH AVE NE

Linwood Township

NG MI YO W

Chisago County

22

Forest Lake

JODRELL

20 0T H

1

Rice Cre e 1.5

UCK

Functional Classification Principal Arterial A Minor Reliever

A Minor Expander

A Minor Connector B Minor

10,200

Major Collector Minor Collector Local Road

MTC Route 288

Park & Pool Lot

37 , Rondeau Lake

Potential Future Roads A Minor Expander A Minor Reliever B Minor

35W

Potential Rush Line Corridor Bus Route

35E

82ND

Peltier Lake

Hugo

00

0

Lino Lakes

20TH AVE N

ZODIAC

NORDIN

2 Miles

MAPLE

45,000 60,000

0.5

Rondeau Lake

66 ,0 00

0.25

4TH

0

OLIVE

DIANE

APOLLO

Blaine

DD WOO

LEVER

ANDALL

S PINE OAK

131ST

135TH

3050

PINE

5300

JODRELL

137TH

Washington County

35

k

140TH

145TH

Lyons

Crossways Lake

141ST

INTERSTATE 35 SERVIC

TAZ 18 JULLIARD

630 0

145TH

FREEWAY DR W

LA KE

FURMAN

DR N

E

54

Figure 6 - Transportation City Hall

Traffic Volumes

Streams

2006/7 MnDOT 2030 Anoka County

DNR lakes Floodplain

Traffic Assignment Zone (TAZ) Source: Anoka County

NWI Wetlands

May 2009

The Rush Line Corridor Task Force is also evaluating express bus route alternatives from Columbus through the Forest Lake Transit Center to downtown St. Paul. The Anoka County Traveler Dial-a-Ride is the only other bus service available in Columbus. The Anoka County Transportation Management Organization (TMO) coordinates volunteer driver services, vanpooling, and other alternative transportation services within the County. Aviation The nearest airport is the Forest Lake Airport, located 1.5 miles east of Columbus on TH 97. The Forest Lake Airport has a turf runway and is considered a special purpose airport (business and pleasure). Plans have been prepared for a paved runway expansion of the airport. Columbus is a member of a Joint Airport Zoning Board with the City of Forest Lake. Anoka County-Blaine Airport is a minor reliever airport in the metropolitan system, located six miles southwest of Columbus. Howard Lake, Mud Lake, Coon Lake and nearby Clear Lake are all identified for seaplane use. There are currently no obstructions in the City to navigable airspace.

City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

18

II

2030 Land Use Plan

The City of Columbus is a rural residential community with emerging urban characteristics in the Interstate 35 corridor. The rural development pattern is consistent with the extraordinary amount of wetlands and lakes and extensive woodland areas in the community. This Plan maintains the rural character of the majority of the City while also focusing on the more dense development of commercial and industrial uses with access to public utilities within the I-35 corridor. Columbus does not have much developable land left in the community. A. Community Goals and Policies Goals and policies are official statements that provide the basis for strategies to manage growth and change in Columbus. Goals are general statements that reflect community values regarding the built and natural environments, and are listed below. Policies are more specific, official positions of the City that guide planning decisions and implementation strategies, such as capital improvements, zoning and other official controls. Policies are included with each future plan element of this document. General Growth Management Goal It is the goal of the City of Columbus to manage future growth in a manner consistent with the protection of public health, safety and welfare; the preservation of natural features and environmental systems; the protection of the rural character and identity of the City; and the development of new employment opportunities and tax base in the community. Rural Area Goals It is the goal of the City of Columbus to: ¾ Protect the rural character in the City. ¾ Maintain land use patterns which ensure compatibility and function of uses. ¾ Establish land use patterns that reflect natural amenities and environmental constraints. Residential Goals It is the goal of the City of Columbus to: ¾ Provide for the orderly development of safe and efficient housing opportunities. ¾ Maintain housing opportunities that will be consistent with the rural nature of the City and the protection of environmental systems. ¾ Protect the health and safety of residents, as well as insuring stable residential areas. ¾ Protect residential areas from incompatible uses. ¾ Provide higher density housing alternatives in the I-35 public utility corridor. Commercial/Industrial Goals It is the goal of the City of Columbus to: ¾ Provide a variety of development opportunities in the City, including rural and urban business centers. ¾ Promote opportunities to expand employment opportunities and the tax base in the City. ¾ Evaluate areas for potential future commercial and industrial expansion.

City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

19

Environmental Goals It is the goal of the City of Columbus to: ¾ Protect high quality functioning environmental systems from unnecessary impacts of future growth and development activities. ¾ Maintain and enhance the natural amenities of the City for future generations to enjoy. ¾ Protect the surface waters and wetland areas of the City to promote aesthetic qualities, natural habitat areas, and ground water recharge. Transportation Goals It is the goal of the City of Columbus to: ¾ Maintain a safe and efficient road transportation system. ¾ Improve the current transportation system to relieve congestion and allow growth. ¾ Enhance transit opportunities in the City. Park and Recreation Goals It is the goal of the City of Columbus to: ¾ Provide convenient active and passive recreation opportunities to all residents of the City. ¾ Enhance the existing park and recreation areas in the City. ¾ Develop trail corridors through the City to link Columbus with adjacent communities and regional parks and regional centers. Community Facilities Goals It is the goal of the City of Columbus to: ¾ Promote safe neighborhoods and crime prevention in the City. ¾ Retain the quality of life in the City. ¾ Provide efficient and responsive services to residents and businesses. ¾ Maintain the quality of education available to residents. ¾ Provide cost-effective public utilities within the I-35 corridor. ¾ Develop a long-term plan for the paving of all public thoroughfares in Columbus. B. Regional Development Framework The Metropolitan Council’s Development Framework is a growth strategy for the region that identifies future areas for development and investments in regional infrastructure, such as highways, sewers, parks, and airports. The Development Framework divides the region into geographic planning areas. Columbus is primarily located within the Diversified Rural Area, which is a rural service area with large lot residential uses and little regional investment, except in regional parks. The I-35 corridor is designated as a Developing Area, which allows more traditional suburban development and planned regional investments in transportation and sewers. The I-35 corridor is located within the 2030 Metropolitan Urban Service Area (MUSA). Population, Household and Employment Forecasts The Development Framework includes forecasts for population, households, and employment for jurisdictions in all geographic planning areas. Regional investments are based upon these forecasts and are expected to be used to the extent practicable in all communities. Table 11 identifies the Metropolitan Council’s revised city-wide population, household and employment forecasts for Columbus through the year 2030.

City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

20

Table 11 Metropolitan Council Population, Household, Employment Data and Forecasts

Population Households Employment

2000

2006

2010

2020

2030

3957 1328 507

4135 1423 981

4000 1450 1100

4240 1600 1400

4680 1750 1500

Source: US Census; Metropolitan Council; DEED

As evidenced in Table 11, the Metropolitan Council’s 2006 estimate of population exceeds the 2010 population forecast and is nearly at the 2020 forecast. Columbus averaged 18 housing starts per year from 1990-2006. A simple straight projection suggests the 2010, 2020, and 2030 household forecasts will be low. Perhaps the more significant determination for potential new households is not the average or recent trend of rural residential dwellings that will continue to develop, but is the potential for suburban residential development in the I-35 public utility corridor. The City conducted its own employment survey (75% return from businesses polled) in the spring 2008, identifying 1094 full time jobs and 283 seasonal positions. The survey also revealed approximately 350-400 jobs were anticipated to be created at the Running Aces harness racing facility by the end of 2008. Other employers surveyed indicated over 350 new hires are expected in 2009. The current weakened economy has already affected some of those expectations. Table 12 illustrates the combined forecasts for sewered and unsewered population, households, and employment growth proposed by the City of Columbus. Table 12 City of Columbus Population, Household, Employment Data and Forecasts

Population Households Employment

2000 3957 1328 507

2010 1 4200 1450 1200

2006 4135 1423 981

2020 2 5150 1885 1600

2030 3 5850 2185 2000

Source: US Census; Metropolitan Council; DEED; City of Columbus

1

Maintains Metropolitan Council forecast of 1450 households (includes 5 existing homes temporarily converted to sewer); 2.90 persons per household (pph); assumes 600 rural employment and 600 sewered employment 2 Adds 10 rural homes per year and removes one household annually by demolition in sewer district; adds 350 sewered households; 2.73 pph; assumes 700 rural employment and 900 sewered employment 3 Adds 10 rural homes per year removes one household annually by demolition in sewer district; adds 210 sewered households; 2.68 pph; assumes 800 rural employment and 1200 sewered employment

City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

21

C. 2030 Land Use Plan This Plan builds upon existing land use patterns and the rural nature of the City. The 2030 Land Use Plan is nearly identical to the 2020 land use strategy in 1999 Comprehensive Plan. Figure 6 identifies the 2030 land uses that will serve as a framework for the development of the City over the next two decades. Primary land uses in Columbus will continue to include rural residences, substantial permanent open space, rural business development, urban business development, and suburban housing opportunities. Table 13 illustrates the breakdown of acreages in the 2030 land use categories. Table 13 2030 Future Land Use Acreages Category Rural Residential Suburban Residential Commercial Industrial Commercial/Industrial Public/Institutional WMAs State “School Trust” Park Land Right-of-way Wetland/Floodplain Lakes* TOTAL

Gross Acres

Gross %

Net Acres

Net %

14902.58 318.52 830.02 387.05 627.05 88.0 10,930.22 157.10 898.89 1045.59 388.18 30,573.20

48.74 1.04 2.71 1.27 2.05 0.29 35.75 0.51 2.94 3.42 1.27 99.9%

7153.82 183.63 447.91 151.79 436.08 66.53 1008.76 9.55 178.61 1045.59 19,502.78 388.15 30,573.20

23.40 0.60 1.47 0.50 1.43 0.22 3.29 0.03 0.58 3.42 63.79 1.27 100.0%

Source: Anoka County GIS; Resource Strategies Corporation (Gross acres exclude dedicated ROW; Net acres exclude dedicated ROW, wetlands/floodplain & lakes; * All but four smaller lakes are included in the wetland/floodplain calculations)

Rural Residential Area Columbus is unique with its many open spaces, wetlands, and large amounts of land held in permanent public ownership. The City will continue to maintain a permanent rural character of Columbus by continuing to permit only low density rural residences in the majority of the community. Agricultural uses are permitted in the Rural Residential area, but the reality is that agriculture is not a dominant activity or major economic force in the community. Columbus is also unique in that there are 48 sections of land versus the traditional 36 sections in a standard township. There are approximately 30,573 acres of land in Columbus. The RR Rural Residential zoning district covers the entire City, except for the five commercial and industrial zoning districts, which is approximately 2140 acres. Subtracting zoned commercial and industrial areas, the gross acreage is 28,435 acres, which could theoretically support 2844 rural households at a gross 10-acre density. Due to the extensive amount of public-owned land and wetlands in Columbus, the City has required a maximum density of one home per five acres and minimum lot size of five acres for several decades and will develop the remaining rural residential area at this density.

City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

22

NE

Linwood Township LEXINGTON AVE NE

197TH AVE NE Coon Lake County Park

WMA

Little Coon Lake

Wyoming

East Bethel

17 LEXINGTON AVE NE

Carlos Avery Wildlife Management Area

LEXINGTON AVE NE

185TH AVE NE

Higgins Lake

Twin Lakes

62

BROADWAY AVE NE

18

Washington County

LAUREL RD

Chisago County

193RD AVE NE

Coon Lake

Sunrise R iver

G

IN VIK

VD BL

170TH LN NE

Columbus 19 POTOMAC ST NE

ER RIV TLE T E K

BLV

62

E DN

Mud Lake Howard Lake

Lamprey Pass WMA

Ham Lake

Coon Creek

School Trust Fund Land

Clear Lake

Forest Lake

Carlos Avery Wildlife Management Area

23 Columbus Lake

Rice Creek Chain of Lakes

W FREEWAY DR NE

35

LA KE

DR N

E

Regional Park Reserve

Crossways Lake

54

Rice Cre e

k

23

Houle WMA

0

Lino Lakes 0.25

0.5

1

1.5

Rondeau Lake

2 Miles

Commercial

Commercial/Industrial Light Industrial

Public/Institutional

54

Peltier Lake

Figure 7 - 2030 Land Use

2030 Land Use Catagory Rural Residential

35E

Hugo

Blaine

35W

20TH AVE N

Rondeau Lake

Suburban Residential Overlay Park Wildlife Management Area SchoolTrust

Lakes Creek/Ditch NWI Wetlands Floodplain

Proposed East Anoka County Regional Trail City Hall

May 2009

Rural Residential Polices It is the policy of the City of Columbus to: ¾ Maintain the existing density of rural residential areas. ¾ Require adequate lot sizes, minimum buildable areas, and MPCA Rules Chapter 7080, as amended, to sustain individual sewage treatment systems. ¾ Prohibit unplanned commercial or industrial uses from developing near residential areas. ¾ Encourage the rehabilitation of the existing housing stock in the City as a source of affordable housing. ¾ Coordinate with the Anoka County Housing and Redevelopment Authority to provide housing improvement assistance to residents. ¾ Participate in appropriate programs that will enhance housing opportunities for senior citizens. I-35 Corridor Suburban Residential There are several existing single family residences within the various land use areas of the Freeway Corridor. Residences in existence on May 1, 2003 in the Freeway Corridor are permitted uses in the corridor zoning districts, but no new single family detached dwellings are allowed in business zones. Columbus has established a residential zoning district for single family attached dwellings and assisted living senior citizen housing. The SR Suburban Residential District allows single family attached residential dwellings at a density of three units per acre. A density of six units per acre may be allowed through the Planned Unit Development (PUD) provisions of the Columbus Zoning Ordinance. Senior citizen housing is currently a conditional use in the CR District. The 2020 Comprehensive Plan (1999) indicated that perimeter locations in the Freeway Corridor were best suited for future potential residential development, particularly in the northwest corner and southeast corner. The 2030 Land Use Plan established the “Suburban Residential Overlay” in these locations. The Freeway Corridor public utility district and associated financing mechanism were established on the basis of planned commercial and industrial land uses. The Suburban Residential Overlay areas are identified on Figure 7 with underlying commercial and industrial land use designations. The Planning Commission and City Council have agreed to formally identify these acceptable Suburban Residential locations, while allowing land owners assessed for business development the flexibility of developing residential, business, or mixeduse developments. The Suburban Residential Overlay in the northwest corner provides the best amenity location within the Freeway Corridor. It is removed from I-35 and is adjacent to Howard Lake and the Rice Creek Chain of Lakes Regional Park Reserve. This area includes approximately 61 acres of net developable land and will support 183 housing units at the minimum density of three units per acre. The Suburban Residential Overlay in the southeast corner is adjacent to the Houle WMA and planned residential development in the City of Forest Lake. This area contains approximately 122 acres of net developable land and will support 366 housing units at a minimum density of three units per acre. The acreages in Table 13 accurately reflect the gross and net acreages for the Suburban Residential areas, rather than the underlying commercial or industrial acreages.

City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

24

Consideration for development of residential uses within the Suburban Residential Overlay areas will not require a comprehensive plan amendment, but will require rezonings of commercial or industrial land to the SR Suburban Residential zoning district. The revised 2010-2020 Metropolitan Council goal for 53 units of affordable housing in Columbus is most likely to be met within Suburban Residential development concepts in the Freeway Corridor. The Anoka County Housing and Redevelopment Authority (ACHRA) administers housing and redevelopment services and economic development services in Columbus. The City will work with the ACHRA to provide housing assistance for affordable and life cycle housing opportunities within the Suburban Residential area and general housing rehabilitation assistance throughout the rural residential area. Suburban Residential Policies It is the policy of the City of Columbus to: ¾ Limit single family attached residential development to locations within the Suburban Residential Overlay areas in the Freeway Corridor. ¾ Encourage the development of single family attached residential development in the Suburban Residential Overlay areas to expand life cycle housing alternatives and housing price options that do not exist in the rural residential area. ¾ Encourage the development of single family attached residential development in the Suburban Residential Overlay areas to provide additional housing choices for increasing employment opportunities. ¾ Promote the development of senior citizen housing, including assisted living and similar adult care facilities in the Freeway Corridor. ¾ Minimize the impacts on future residential uses due to area commercial and industrial land uses and freeway proximity. ¾ Maintain high design and development standards within all residential development areas. ¾ Coordinate affordable housing needs with the Anoka County Housing and Redevelopment Authority. Commercial/Industrial Mixed Use Area Business development along Lake Drive has historically allowed a mix of commercial and industrial land uses. The corresponding zoning district for this area is the C/I Commercial/ Industrial District. Residences in existence on May 1, 2003 in the C/I District are permitted uses, but no new residences are permitted. This area is transitioning from residential and business mixed uses to all commercial and industrial uses. The zoning boundary for the commercial/industrial area has historically been 1000 feet east of Lake Drive and 400 feet on the west side. Several parcels have been split by this zoning boundary and individually rezoned to the length of the parcel. The 2030 Land Use Plan identifies the outer limits of the parcels within the current zoning boundary, creating an irregular shaped land use area. The City plans to amend the Zoning Map to correspond with the illustrated land use designation. Existing residences in the C/I District are identified as permitted uses, but no new residential development is permitted.

City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

25

The Lake Drive commercial/industrial area is currently served with private sewer and water systems. The types of uses permitted in this area are dependent upon the demonstrated capability of providing private utilities. Columbus staff have initiated discussions with the City of Lino Lakes to examine the feasibility of extending public utilities from Lino Lakes to the Lake Drive commercial/industrial area. Coordination of such municipal service options are also dependent upon metropolitan sewer interceptor improvements and local trunk sewer alternatives. The City of Columbus will continue to examine alternatives for public utilities in this area. I-35 Corridor Commercial Uses The I-35 corridor is planned with several commercial land use distinctions. The corridor is benefited with municipal trunk sewer and water facilities. The highest intensity uses – retail, office, restaurant, hospitality, and entertainment – are planned nearest to the I-35 interchange. The corresponding zoning district in this area is CR Community Retail. The Community Retail District requires the highest architectural and design standards within the Freeway Corridor. Columbus has become the home of the Running Aces harness race track, opened in 2008. As a regional entertainment facility, the race track is located close to the I-35 interchange and is situated among other planned higher intensity commercial retail uses. Because of its unique characteristics, a separate zoning district was established for this use. The HR Horse Racing District allows standard bred horse racing, pari-mutuel betting, simulcasting, card clubs, and food and beverage services. The HR District also requires the highest architectural and design standards within the Freeway Corridor. The center section of the Freeway Corridor is planned for more extensive retail uses and service facilities, such as “big box” retail, building supply centers, office/showrooms, automobile sales, fitness centers, and hospitals. The corresponding zoning district is the C/S Commercial/ Showroom District. The C/S District is a transition area from higher intensity retail uses to more land intensive light industrial uses. Municipal trunk sewer and water facilities are now in place to serve the commercial showroom area. I-35 Corridor Industrial Uses The southern portion of the Freeway Corridor and locations without direct visibility from I-35 are planned for light industrial uses. The corresponding zoning district in this area is the LI Light Industrial District. The LI District allows warehousing, equipment sales and service, wholesale distribution and sales, light manufacturing, greenhouses and landscape businesses. An example of uses in this area is the Ziegler Caterpillar heavy equipment sales and service center. Municipal sewer and water is available to light industrial users on the west side of I-35 and the northerly portion of the light industrial area on the east side of I-35. Complete utility service in this area is dependent upon utility staging plans and petitions for sewer and water service. Commercial and Industrial Policies It is the policy of the City of Columbus to: ¾ Allow for intensification of commercial/industrial opportunities in the Lake Drive corridor, consistent with the rural character of the City, and compatible with adjacent residential uses. ¾ Maintain adequate lot sizes and minimum buildable areas for commercial/industrial uses

City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

26

¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾

in the Lake Drive corridor to provide for convenient and safe access, to ensure adequate installation and operation of private utilities, and to allow site buffering and landscaping. Promote shared driveways and frontage roads in the Lake Drive corridor in order to minimize highway access points. Minimize potential incompatibilities between commercial/industrial and residential uses. Coordinate and promote marketing of Lake Drive and Freeway Corridor business development opportunities. Maximize existing investment and development opportunities within the Lake Drive business area and Freeway Corridor before expanding or establishing new business development areas. Maintain high design and development standards within all business development areas. Pursue and coordinate potential extensions of public utilities in the Lake Drive corridor with the City of Lino Lakes and the Metropolitan Council. Maintain a hierarchy of land uses within the Freeway Corridor, reserving land adjacent to the I-35 interchange for the highest intensity uses and land furthest from the interchange for more extensive land uses. Promote a pedestrian friendly development standard within the Freeway Corridor to provide internal non-vehicle access options and ensure future residential development has pedestrian access and circulation within the Freeway Corridor.

D. Community Facilities and Services Plan The City Hall is located on the east side of Kettle River Boulevard adjacent to Howard Lake. This site also includes the City’s fire hall, public works facility and a senior citizen center. Fire fighting services are provided through a joint powers agreement between Columbus, the City of Forest Lake, and Wyoming Township. Police services are provided by the Anoka County Sheriff. It is the intent of the City to provide a range of cost-effective services to the community, including police and fire protection, street maintenance, public utility maintenance, and parks and recreation, based on priorities set by community residents. The City also seeks to continually evaluate the efficiency of the services offered. Privatization, cost sharing, joint services with other units of government, and capital improvements planning are options that the City will consider as part of an evaluation process. Currently, the City has no plans for new or expanded facilities; however, the City acknowledges that it is imperative to identify long range needs in order to serve anticipated new residential and commercial/industrial development. Solar Access Protection Columbus recognizes the importance of protecting solar access from potential interference by adjacent structures. Due to the rural, low-density character of Columbus, it is unlikely that solar energy systems would be precluded by structure inference in most areas. Provisions within the Zoning Ordinance related to density, height, and structure setback in residential, commercial and industrial areas provide adequate protection for solar energy access. Historic Preservation The history of Columbus is influenced by both Native Americans and the European settlers that followed. Human settlement of areas within Columbus City can be traced back to the presence

City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

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of the Hopewell tribe of Native Americans. Archeologists believe that the Hopewell tribe established extensive trading with tribes over the entire continent. Burial mounds are located around Howard Lake in the Lamprey Pass Wildlife Management Area. Three large mounds were discovered in 1889; and it was not until 1977 that an additional three smaller mounds were discovered. Each of these areas are designated and protected as historic sites by the Minnesota Historical Society. In addition, the Minnesota Historical Society believes that remnants of Native American settlements may exist along Kettle River Boulevard northeast of Howard Lake and along Rice Creek. The only buildings in Columbus that are on the National Register of Historic Places is the Carlos Avery Game Farm, located Broadway Avenue. It has been on the Register since 1991. It is the site of buildings built by the WPA in the 1930’s and includes an entrance gate to the site that is built of stone and iron. During that era, it was a national showplace for the rearing of quail. The facilities are now the home of the north metro wildlife office of the Department of Natural Resources (DNR), the headquarters for the DNR’s Carlos Avery Wildlife Management Area, and the Wildlife Science Center, a nonprofit group that conducts research on wolves. The City supports efforts to preserve the heritage of the community. Columbus also supports archeological research prior to or in conjunction with any excavation or building in areas known or suspected to contain burial mounds and other archeological features or artifacts. The city will work with the Anoka County Historical Society and the Minnesota Historic Preservation Office to preserve the cultural resources in the community. Community Facilities and Services Policies It is the policy of the City of Columbus to: ¾ Explore expanded joint service initiatives and potential utility feasibility through continued communication and cooperation with city, county, and school officials. ¾ Promote effective communication with residents, business owners, educators and volunteer organizations to maintain an understanding of community goals and objectives. ¾ Establish priorities for basic services to ensure that the highest levels of safety and accessibility are provided in the City. ¾ Maintain adequate and efficient administrative, public works, and emergency services to respond to growth in the City. ¾ Maintain appropriate development standards to ensure adequate protection for the use of solar energy systems. ¾ Work with the Anoka County Historical Society and the Minnesota Historic Preservation Office to preserve the cultural resources in the community. E. Parks, Trails and Open Space Plan Because of the low density rural development in Columbus, the City has not pursued the development of traditional neighborhood parks. Rural residential lots are typically larger than neighborhood parks and residents are afforded personal recreation and open space opportunities with rural residential lifestyles. Current emphasis will be placed on maintaining and improving the Community Park near the City Hall. A survey and master plan for future Community Park redevelopment options were recently completed.

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Columbus will develop a Parks and Trails Master Plan that evaluates current City, County, and regional resources, identifies potential needs, identifies partners for parks and trails coordination, establishes plans for park and trail improvements, and creates a timeframe and budget for implementation. Columbus is interested in maximizing the potential development of local and regional trail corridors through the City that connect existing and planned trails, existing parks and recreation facilities, existing neighborhoods and commercial destinations. The City will also examine the potential parks and pedestrian circulation needs in the Freeway Corridor. The Rice Creek Chain of Lakes Regional Park Reserve is located in Columbus. The park reserve has limited access and limited facilities in the City. Acquisitions to make the park facilities more accessible have not been completed. Anoka County has plans for the future East Anoka County Regional Trail along CSAH 17. This will connect residential areas in the extreme northwest portion of the City with Coon Lake County Park. Washington County also has plans to eventually extend a trail to the City’s border along Trunk Highway 97. The City should evaluate and coordinate extending this trail with Anoka County to serve areas along Lake Drive and other destinations. Recreation and open space opportunities are also provided at the expansive Carlos Avery WMA, the Lamprey Pass WMA, and the Houle WMA. The City has worked closely with the DNR to identify issues regarding the use implications and recreational opportunities of the WMAs, as well as the potential expansion of Carlos Avery WMA and Lamprey Pass WMA. The City will continue to coordinate use and expansion opportunities of the WMAs with the DNR through long range planning and mutual understanding of the City’s concerns over potential impacts to adjacent residential land uses and the loss of taxable property. Parks, trails and WMAs are identified on Figure 7. Parks, Trails and Open Space Policies It is the policy of the City of Columbus to: ¾ Design and maintain parks to ensure public safety and efficient services. ¾ Accept land gifts and forfeitures in areas with potential recreational development opportunities that benefit the community. ¾ Require dedication of cash in lieu of land in conjunction with the subdivision of all rural residential properties. ¾ Review and consider park land dedications within the Freeway Corridor to provide active and passive recreation opportunities for business employees and future residents. ¾ Develop a Parks and Trails Master Plan that evaluates current City, County, and regional resources, identifies potential needs, identifies partners for parks and recreation coordination, establishes plans for park and trail improvements, and a timeframe and budget for implementation. ¾ Coordinate the potential for area-wide, on-road trail corridors in the City with Anoka County, Washington County, Chisago County, the DNR, and adjacent communities. ¾ Coordinate use, development, and limited expansion of WMAs with the DNR to ensure safe hunting practices, minimize use impacts on adjacent residential properties, minimize the loss of taxable land, and maximize recreational opportunities for all potential users of the WMAs. ¾ Coordinate use of regional parks with Anoka County to maximize recreation opportunities and develop trail corridors to enhance pedestrian access to all facilities.

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F. Public Utility Plan Sanitary Sewer The I-35 corridor is currently located within the 2030 MUSA. Columbus has been designing and constructing components of municipal sewer and water facilities within the public utility corridor since 1998. The 1999 Comprehensive Plan included a “Tier I” sewer plan component, which identified estimated sanitary sewer flows from 2000-2020 and identified sewer staging areas for the same timeframe. At the Metropolitan Council’s request, the City prepared a “Tier II” Sanitary Sewer Plan in 2004. The Tier II Plan is a more detailed plan for sewer services, including sewer trunk, lift station and facility design information, metropolitan system connection details, and average and peak flow data. The Tier II Plan and amended Tier I plan were submitted to the Metropolitan Council for approval in the spring of 2005. While the sewer plans were acceptable in form and content by the Metropolitan Council staff, downstream interceptor capacity restrictions caused the Metropolitan Council to put the plans on hold. The 1999 Tier I plan was deemed sufficient by the Metropolitan Council to allow construction of the proposed sewer improvements in the Freeway Corridor. In 2007, Columbus received petitions for expanded utility service within the northeast and northwest sectors of the Freeway Corridor. The City prepared and forwarded a sewer staging plan amendment to the Metropolitan Council to allow the expansion of public utilities in these areas. The amendment was approved by the Metropolitan Council and current sewer staging within the Freeway Corridor identifies service potential for the entire utility district by 2010. Figure 8 identifies the current and proposed Sewer Staging Plan. Figure 9 illustrates the current sanitary sewer collection system. Table 12 in Section II B. identifies sewered residential household and employment forecasts from 2010 to 2030. The Tier II Plan identifies five sewer sub-districts within the public utility corridor, totaling approximately 1610.53 gross acres and 791.91 net developable acres (gross less wetland). Sanitary sewer trunk systems and some lateral services have been extended to benefit four of the five sewer sub-districts. The Tier II Plan identifies the maximum annual sewer flows within the sewer system with complete district development occurring by 2030. Table 14 illustrates the proposed average annual sewer flows from 2008-2030, based on the sewered household forecasts in Table 12 and the average annual addition of six acres of commercial and industrial development between 2010 and 2030. Inflow and Infiltration Because of the newness of the Columbus sewer system, including construction materials and construction techniques, and ordinance prohibitions for storm drain, roof drain or floor drain connections to the sanitary sewer system, there are no inflow or infiltration problems in Columbus. The City will establish an ongoing maintenance and inspection program in the future to monitor potential sources of inflow and infiltration in the sanitary sewer system.

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Table 14 2010-2030 Average Annual Sewer Flows Year

Residential Flows (mgd)

Commercial Flows (mgd)

Cumulative Flows (mgd)

2008 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030

0.001 0.049 0.096 0.125 0.153

0.028 0.043 0.081 0.113 0.156 0.193

0.028 0.044 0.130 0.214 0.281 0.346

Residential flows are based on an average 274 gallons per day per unit; commercial/industrial flows average 1250 gallons per day per acre

Future Service Considerations Columbus has held discussions with the City of Lino Lakes to examine the feasibility of extending public utilities from Lino Lakes to the Lake Drive commercial/industrial area. Coordination of such municipal service options is also dependent upon metropolitan sewer interceptor improvements and local trunk sewer alternatives. The City of Columbus will continue to work with the City of Lino Lakes and the Metropolitan Council to examine alternatives for public utilities in this area. Columbus has attended meetings with the Metropolitan Council and City of East Bethel discussing potential metropolitan sewer treatment alternatives in East Bethel and potential municipal sewer service in the Coon Lake area. There are approximately 50 residences in Columbus that are located on Coon Lake. The City is interested in continuing discussions with East Bethel and the Metropolitan Council to participate in potential municipal sewer service to the Coon Lake area. Municipal Water In 2003, several property owners within the I-35 Freeway Corridor petitioned for installation of municipal water to complement metropolitan sewer service. In 2005, the first trunk watermains were constructed in West Freeway Drive and Well No. 1 became operational in February 2007. The initial capacity of Well No. 1 at 400 gpm was disappointing. In 2006, Ziegler, Inc. began planning for a new Caterpillar dealership on West Freeway Drive. The fire protection needs of Ziegler exceeded the production of Well No. 1 and its 7,500 gallon hydropneumatic tank, therefore Ziegler planned a private 150,000 gallon ground storage tank with booster pump. The City entered into an agreement with Ziegler to purchase the ground storage tank and pumping facilities no later than December 31, 2012. The storage tank and pumping facilities were carefully designed to meet public water supply standards. Planning began in 2003 for a harness racing track and card room in the I-35 corridor. Although the path to approval would ultimately take longer than for Ziegler, the City realized additional water supply and fire fighting capacity would be needed. The City implemented a search for the site of its next two wells. Wells No. 2 and No. 3 came on line on April 30, 2008, with a total combined capacity of 2,100 gpm, in time for the full occupancy of the harness track facility. City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

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Howard Lake

Howard Lake LAK E

DR N

E

LAKE DR NE Zurich St. NE

23

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CAMP THREE RD

Columbus Lake

152nd AVE NE

FELLE R

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145TH AVE NE

JULLIARD ST NE

144TH AVE NE

Washington County

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Service Areas

Outside of public sewer service area Existing Sewer Service Area

2010 Sewer Service Area Addition

54

35E

Hugo

Figure 8 - Sewer Staging Lakes/Surface Water

Creek/Ditch

NWI Wetlands Floodplain

May 2009

Plot Date: 06/25/2008 Drawing name: K:\standards\muni\maps\columbus\Comp Plan\Sanitary-comp.dwg Xrefs:, plmap

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LEGEND 6" SANITARY SEWER 8" SANITARY SEWER 10" SANITARY SEWER 12" SANITARY SEWER 15" SANITARY SEWER 16" SANITARY SEWER FORCEMAIN (SIZE as Noted)

ASSOCIATION

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CITY'S LIFT STATIONS

The current watermain network is illustrated on Figure 10. By the end of 2008, about two-thirds of the I-35 corridor will have water service available to it. Water service is extended upon property owner petition. It is anticipated that the entire I-35 corridor will be served within the planning period. The following is a summary of the City’s water supply. No additional supply is anticipated to be needed within the planning period. WELL NO. 1 #731131 2 #749393 3 #749394

LOCATION Pumphouse No. 1 14405 West Freeway Dr. Pumphouse No. 2 9052 147th Avenue Pumphouse No. 2 9052 147th Avenue

DEPTH

FORMATION

CAPACITY

180 ft.

Drift

400 gpm

168 ft.

Drift

1,000 gpm

396 ft

Ironton/Galesville

1,100 gpm

All well water is treated with chlorine for disinfection, fluoride for prevention of dental decay, and polyphosphate to sequester iron and manganese. Current storage consists of a 7,500 gallon hydropneumatic tank at Pumphouse No. 1. Prior to the end of 2012, the City will purchase the 150,000 gallon ground storage tank and booster pump from Ziegler and incorporate it into the municipal system. Near the end of the planning period, it is anticipated that 500,000 gallons of elevated storage will be added. The City has already acquired a site on Zurich Street, about onequarter mile south of Lake Drive for the elevated tank. (Appendix C includes the Water Supply Plan). G. Natural Areas and Water Resources Protection Plan Columbus is committed to the protection and preservation of natural resources. The City will comply with all federal, state, and watershed regulations regarding activities that may impact these resources. The following are specific environmental areas, which the City will address in order to protect natural resources in the City and surrounding areas. ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾

Groundwater Supply and Quality Shoreland and Floodplain Management Woodlands Protection Water Resource Management

Groundwater Supply and Quality Groundwater from wells is a principal source of water for many households and communities. It resides in large, underground bedrock storage areas known as aquifers. Geologic and soil characteristics impact the sensitivity of these aquifers to contaminants from the surface, such as those contained in stormwater (e.g., natural and chemical pollutants). To varying degrees, pollutants are filtered from stormwater before they penetrate the aquifer. The aquifer units that underlie Columbus are the glacial drift, the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville, and the Mount SimonHinckley.

City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

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Plot Date: 06/25/2008 Drawing name: K:\standards\muni\maps\columbus\Comp Plan\Watermain-comp.dwg Xrefs:, plmap

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5

IN L ESM & T

DRA INAGE & UT ILIT Y EASEMENT

14

N.

1

13

7

6

3

6

3

6

5

4

5

4

5

4

DRA INAGE AND UT ILIT Y EA SE ME NT OVE R ALL OF OUTLOT B

3

1

2

5

6

7

8

4

3

2

1

5

6

7

8

5

4

LD FIE EN

E. AV

3

5

3 DRA I NA GE AND

12"

2

EA SE

2

1

7

8

3

2

1

6

7

8

206TH ST. N.

9

DRA INAGE & UT ILIT Y EASEMENT

ME

18

NT

1 3

4

2

1

2 17 8

3

DRA INAGE & UT ILIT Y ESMT

7

20 6T H

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3

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4

5

22

6

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4

DRA INAGE AND UT ILIT Y EASEMENT

1

8

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ST .N .

UNI TE D POWE R AS SN E AS EM ENT DOC 339093

9

2

7

OUT LOT E

E

10 8

5

8

3

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7

N.

6

7

1

7

4

5

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6

ENFIELD CIRCLE

1

6

7

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3 4

11

3

2

8

1

5 2

6 5

2

12

1

3

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1

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3 4

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50

6"

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1

8

OUT LOT H

8

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N.

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6

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5

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4

DRA IN & UTI LI TY ESMT

12"

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2

A NOK A COUNTY

3

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2

DRA INAGE AND UT ILIT Y EASEMENT

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6"

2

6

2

7

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DRA INAGE AND UT ILIT Y EASEMENT

8"

1

7

8

1 8

2

1

6 5 4 3 1

4 3 2 1

OV E R A LL OF OUTLOT A

8"

OUT LOT F

8

5

1

8 1

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5

OU

12 6"

6" 6"

8"

7 6

207TH ST. N.

3

8"

2 3 4

OUT LOT C

OUT LOT A

12"

4

OUT LOT B

6"

6"

OUT LOT D

8 1

CSAH 23

6"

OUT LOT G

6"

85

COM MON ELEM ENT

6"

6"

OUT LOT C

6"

FENWAY AVE. N.

6"

6"

DRA INAGE & UT ILIT Y EASEMENT

6"

6"

STA

12"

FENSTON AVE. N.

12"

6"

97 WAY HIGH

FALC ON

12"

UNI TE D POWE R AS SN E AS EM ENT DOC 342671

6"

4

OU TL OT C

N.

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3

1

2

9

16

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6

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UTILITY ESMT

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N.

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TON

& UTI L IT

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ENT EAS EM Y ILIT UT D AN AGE IN DRA

3

1

2 3

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5

6

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4

4

COUNTY

N.

CT.

A NOK A

5

6 8

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3

4

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UNI TE D POWE R AS SN E AS EM ENT DOC 339092

3

1

2

3

1

2 5

4

DRA INAGE AND UT ILIT Y EASEMENT

1

3 OU TL OT B

4

3

4

7

EN FIE LD

5

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4

3

7

8

5

6

4

9

202ND ST. N.

EVERTON AVE. N.

6

ENFIELD

8"

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. .N DR

3

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2

6"

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1

2

3

4

7

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12 10

9

11

13

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16

17

15

14

1

18 20

22

21

1

2

3

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Y EAS EMENT

19

1

2

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14

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GE

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2

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16

17

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8

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23 22 21

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46

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9

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FALCON AVE. N.

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35 37 38

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4

6

12

3

5

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1

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30

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ILIT UT AND

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6

10 6

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NT ME

10

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33

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9

11

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11

12

13

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14

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FENWAY AVE. N.

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27

12

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E ASE

13

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DRA INAGE & UT ILIT Y EA SE ME NT OVE R ALL OF LOT 47

13

14

4

5

34

6

5

4

8

15

16

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7 3

2

4

EXPLORER CT. N.

17

6"

DR AI & N EASUTI AGE LITY E MEN T

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INTERS TATE 35

1 2

8

3

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6"

2

3 4

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FELL ER S T

8"

6"

ST.

6"

50

2

3

11

10

20

10"

2

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1 1/2" 6"

6"

12"

8"

6"

UNI TE D POWE R AS SN E AS EM ENT DOC 339092

152nd AVE.

12"

. .N DR

6"

H 6T 20

1 1

16"

2

5

11

14

AN

DRA INAGE AND UT ILIT Y EASEMENT

24

200TH ST. N. UNI TE D POWE R AS SN E AS EM ENT DOC 339092

10

4

3

5

6

9 1 10

2

2

9

8

7

6

5

4

2

7

8

5

6

200TH ST. N.

1 3

1

3

4

4

5

5

2

6

3

4

5

DRA INAGE AND UT ILIT Y EASEMENT

1

2

3

4

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50

INAGE

& UT ILIT

AVE. N.

8"

1

3

NSP ESMT DOC 910772

Y EASEMEN T DRA INAGE AND UT ILIT Y EASEMENT

12"

12"

S 1 /4 C OR -24

6"

6" 6"

6" 12"

6"

6"

85 FOOT WIDE UNITED POWER ASSOCIATION UTILITY EASEMENT PER DOCUMENT #459077

12"

145TH AVE.

A NOK A

COUNTY

AVE. N.

16"

FENWAY

WELL NO. 1

6"

85 FOOT WIDE UNITED POWER ASSOCIATION UTILITY EASEMENT PER DOCUMENT #459077T

ELMCREST AVE. N.

16 "

6"

AVE. N.

12"

25

6"

A NOK A

6"

6"

AVE. N.

COUNTY

HORNSBY ST.

12"

12"

12"

FENWAY

th A VE . 6"

147

190TH

FENWAY ST.

N.

N.

190TH ST.N.

N.

AVE.

W FREEWAY

DRAINAGE & UTILITY EASEMENT

FENWAY

EVERTON

NT ME SE EA Y IT IL UT & GE NA Y

EA

SE

ME

NT

16"

6"

1

DRAINAGE AND UTILITY EASEMENT

DR AI

INTERSTATE 35

16"

8"

DRAINAGE AND UTILITY EASEMENT

85 FT WIDE UNITED POWER ASSOCIATION ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION LINE EASEMENT PER DOC 459076

DR.

16" S 1 /4 C OR -25

AVE.

85 FOOT WIDE UNITED POWER ASSOCIATION UTILITY EASEMENT PER DOCUMENT #459077

16"

6"

DR AI

NA

GE

&

UT

IL

IT

2

A NOK A COUNTY

12"

85 FT WIDE UNITED POWER ASSOCIATION ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION LINE EASEMENT PER DOC 459076

8"

3

12 "

0'

300'

600'

1200'

SCALE EASEMENT

36

CT. N.

LINE TRANSMISSION PER DOC 334863 ELECTRIC

ELMCREST

UNITED POWER ASSOCIATION PER DOC 339088

ELMCREST AVE.N.

REVISED: JUNE 2008

LEGEND

PER DOC 339087

INTERSTAT

E 35E

6"

85 FT WIDE

6"

12"

WELL NO. 2 & 3

FENWAY

85 FOOT WIDE UNITED POWER ASSOCIATION UTILITY EASEMENT PER DOCUMENT #459077

12 "

6"

6" WATERMAIN 8" WATERMAIN 10" WATERMAIN 12" WATERMAIN 16" WATERMAIN RAW WATERMAIN GATE VALVE HYDRANT & VALVE WELL

ACTIVE WELL

Sandy soils aggravate aquifer contamination much faster than loam or clay soils. The permeable nature of the glacial drift aquifer allows for downward movement of any contaminants spilled into the drift to seep into the bedrock aquifer. Additionally, the bedrock aquifer is carved with many valleys and subsequently filled with glacial outwash and till. These valleys allow for easy mixing of any water between the valley drift and the bedrock aquifer. This allows for downward moving waters, and any pollutants it carries, to quickly infiltrate the aquifer system. The City of Columbus has adopted, by reference and as amended, Individual Sewage Treatment System standards of the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, cited as Minnesota Rule Chapter 7080. Chapter 14, Article VI of the Columbus City Code outlines restrictions and requirements for the evaluation of treatment sites and the installation, construction, maintenance, repair, and inspections of individual sewage treatment systems. All individuals performing site evaluation, installation, inspection, and pumping of individual sewage treatment systems must be licensed and maintain MPCA certification to perform such work. There are approximately 1475 residential, commercial, and public ISTSs in Columbus. The owner of each individual sewage treatment system must submit an inspection report of the system once every three years, indicating that the system meets minimum maintenance standards for individual sewage treatment standards. If a property owner fails to submit a triennial report, the Zoning Administrator will direct the Building Inspector or other qualified individual to inspect the owner’s system on their behalf. The costs of such inspections are billed to the owner. Columbus’ ISTS inspection and maintenance program was heralded by the Metropolitan Council in 1999 as a model ordinance for ISTS management. The City recognizes the importance of groundwater sensitivity and has established environmental protection policies that will enhance protection of groundwater in the City and region. The City will ensure protection of local groundwater through implementation of its ordinances regulating individual sewage treatment systems, wetland protection, and stormwater management. Shoreland and Floodplain Management Shoreland and floodplain area development activities in the City are subject to standards and permitting requirements contained in Columbus’ Shoreland Management Ordinance and Floodplain Management Ordinance. The City’s ordinances were approved by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources in 2007. Lakes and rivers are classified for regulatory purposes by the Department of Natural Resources. Columbus, Crossways, Higgins, Howard, Mud, and Rondeau Lakes are classified as “Natural Environment Lakes” and Coon Lake is classified as a “General Development Lake.” Rice Creek is classified as a Tributary River. Water bodies and water courses located within Carlos Avery WMA, including Twin Lakes, Little Coon Lake, and several unnamed Natural Environment Lakes, are also regulated under the Shoreland Management Ordinance. Rice Creek, Sunrise River, and Coon Creek are all classified as Tributary Rivers. Woodlands Protection Columbus values the extensive woodlands areas throughout the community. The City has

City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

36

adopted a Forestry Regulations chapter in the City Code. The Forestry Regulations provide restrictions for the unnecessary removal or destruction of trees, requirements for tree protection plans when warranted, and Oak Wilt Disease and Shade Tree Pest inspection and treatment programs. Columbus has created a Tree Board to oversee tree protection in the City and hires the services of an arborist to assist in the enforcement of the Forestry Regulations. Natural Areas and Water Resources Protection Space Policies It is the policy of the City of Columbus to: ¾ Enforce all local and state regulations for activities occurring in naturally or environmentally sensitive areas. ¾ Protect the woodland resources in the City through the prohibition of clear cutting practices, through disease and pest prevention and treatment programs and standards, through landscaping replacement requirements, and through minimum landscaping requirements in new developments. ¾ Restrict or prohibit development in floodplain areas, wetlands, shoreland areas, and other natural areas which serve important environmental functions and values. ¾ Enforce development standards consistent with soil suitability, steep slopes, groundwater, and aquifer sensitivity. ¾ Enforce wetland protection and mitigation standards consistent with area watershed management organizations and the Wetlands Conservation Act. ¾ Enforce MPCA Rules Chapter 7080, as amended, for individual sewage treatment system design, installation, maintenance, expansion, inspection, and repair. ¾ Require that stormwater ponds meet the applicable design standards of the National Urban Runoff Program (NURP). ¾ Establish erosion and sedimentation control standards consistent with the MPCA’s “best management practices.” Local Water Management Plans Columbus has completed draft local water management plans for the Rice Creek Watershed, the Sunrise River Watershed, and the Coon Creek Watershed. These plans address stormwater management, wetland protection, and water quality. The individual water management plans have been reviewed by the Metropolitan Council and each watershed organization and are in final stages of completion. The Rice Creek Watershed District recently approved the “JD 4 Resource Management Plan,” which includes the Freeway Corridor area in Columbus. The Columbus City Council has entered into an agreement with the Rice Creek Watershed District to complete a Resource Management Plan for the balance of the watershed within Columbus. H. Transportation Plan The metropolitan highway investment system is made up of principal arterials. They include all interstate freeways and other major roadways that provide long distance connections within the metropolitan area. Interstates 35, 35W, and 35E are principal arterials that are located in Columbus and serve the region. The secondary system of major roadways are classified as Minor

City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

37

Arterials and Collectors. The functional classification of the roadways, existing traffic trips, prepared by MnDOT, and 2030 traffic forecasts, prepared by Anoka County (2008 transportation model), are illustrated on Figure 6 in Section I. Columbus has been coordinating design alternatives with Anoka County for the future relocation of CSAH 54 and new intersection with CSAH 23, west of the I-35 interchange. This is in conjunction with coordination efforts with MnDOT, Anoka County and Washington County for the CSAH 23/TH 97 bridge replacement over I-35 and the redesign of the interchanges and frontage road relocations. Most design considerations have been completed with exception of the relocation of CSAH 54. There is no specific timetable for the improvements to the I-35 interchange. Columbus has participated in several area roadway corridor studies including the TH 97 Study and the CSAH 14 Study. Columbus will remain a participant in continuing studies regarding a new interchange on I-35E between Columbus and Centerville. Columbus continues to participate in discussions with Forest Lake, Washington County, Anoka County, and MnDOT on a potential I-35 bridge crossing at Washington County Road 83 (11th Avenue) that would potentially connect with Howard Lake Drive in Columbus. Howard Lake Drive is illustrated on Figure 6 as a potential B Minor Arterial. Anoka County has identified the need for a new A Minor Arterial Reliever Corridor Study on the east side of I-35. This corridor study would look at the potential of establishing a county road through the Columbus Freeway Corridor connecting TH 97 in Columbus and County Road 140, where the potential new I-35E interchange could be located. Columbus is very interested in the implications this study and its outcomes may have for the development potential in the Freeway Corridor. For the sake of illustration and future consideration, Hornsby Street, 145th Avenue, and Lyons Street in the Freeway Corridor are identified on Figure 6 as a potential A Minor Reliever Arterial. Anoka County has also identified the need to continue studying corridor improvements in the larger southeast sector (East Central Sub-area) of the County. Roadways with potential impacts to Columbus include an identified east-west extension of CSAH 116 from CSAH 17 in Ham Lake to CSAH 23 (141st Street alignment in Columbus). The County has also identified the potential extension of CR 53 from Lino Lakes/Blaine along the westerly border of Columbus to CSAH 18. Both are identified as potential A Minor Expanders. The future highway corridor studies suggest the City must evaluate the implications for future right-of-way needs for potential expanded corridors and potential new corridors. Columbus will also continue to work with Anoka County to implement appropriate access spacing for development adjacent to all highways. The City will consider incorporating the Anoka County Access Spacing Guidelines in the Subdivision Ordinance as the guidelines for access spacing. The City will encourage shared access locations and discuss frontage and backage road concepts with the County in future and existing developed areas, particularly within the Freeway Corridor. All roads and highways in Columbus are 2-lane roads, except the interstate highways. 2030 Transportation Plan capacity needs identified by Anoka County in Columbus include the upgrade

City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

38

the upgrade of the CSAH 23/I-35/TH 97 interchange and the upgrade of a 3-mile segment of CSAH 18 to a 4-lane highway between the CSAH 17 and CR 19. Anoka County has identified several intersections in Columbus that may warrant signals in the future: CSAH 18/CSAH 17; CSAH 18/CR 19; CSAH 18/ CSAH 62; and CSAH 23/CR/19. Traffic Analysis Zones The metropolitan area is divided into “traffic analysis zones” (TAZs) for the purpose of analyzing existing growth and forecasting future growth to determine potential impacts and needs on major roadways. Columbus is divided into three TAZs: TAZ 16 is located north of CSAH 18 (Broadway Avenue), TAZ 17 is located between CSAH 18 and CSAH 23 (Lake Drive), and TAZ 18 is located south and east of CSAH 23 (see Figure 6). Table 15 is the breakdown of forecast data for population, households, and employment within each TAZ for 2010, 2020, and 2030. The forecasts are based on the City’s proposed 2010-2030 forecasts illustrated in Table 12, in Section II C. Table 15 2010 – 2020 – 2030 TAZ Forecasts 2010 TAZ 16 TAZ 17 TAZ 18

2020 TAZ 16 TAZ 17 TAZ 18

2030 TAZ 16 TAZ 17 TAZ 18

Population

1055

2520

625

1095

2540

1515

1180

2650

2020

Households

365

870

215

400

870

555

440

990

755

Employment

100

200

900

100

300

1200

100

400

1500

Transit Columbus is located in Market Area IV outside of the metropolitan transit taxing district. A parkand-pool rideshare parking lot has operated near the I-35 interchange for many years and was relocated in 2008 to the Running Aces harness race track west of I-35 on Lake Drive. This facility has 300 parking spaces and is operating in 2008/2009 as a park-and-ride facility with temporary express bus (route 288) service to Minneapolis. The Metropolitan Council began operating the demonstration service with a one-year grant from the USDOT in response to the I35 bridge collapse in Minneapolis. Route 288 has now been continued Columbus and adjacent cities in Market Area IV have evaluated opting into the metropolitan transit taxing district in 2008 and 2009. Columbus has formally opted in the taxing district. Columbus also is a member of the Rush Line Corridor Task Force, a joint powers organization including cities, townships and counties between St. Paul and Duluth. The Task Force is coordinating with multiple agencies on feasibility studies for the planning and development of commuter rail or light rail transit within the twin cities and Duluth. The Rush Line Corridor Task Force is also evaluating express bus route alternatives from Columbus through the Forest Lake Transit Center to downtown St. Paul. The Anoka County Traveler Dial-a-Ride is the only other bus service available in Columbus. The Anoka County

City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

39

Transit Office coordinates volunteer driver services, vanpooling, and other alternative transportation services within the County. Aviation The nearest airport is the Forest Lake Airport, located 1.5 miles east of Columbus on TH 97. Forest Lake Airport has a turf runway and is considered a special purpose airport (business and pleasure). Plans have been prepared for a paved runway expansion of the airport. Columbus is a member of a Joint Airport Zoning Board with the City of Forest Lake. Anoka County-Blaine Airport is a minor reliever airport in the metropolitan system, located six miles southwest of Columbus. Howard Lake, Mud Lake, Coon Lake and nearby Clear Lake are all identified for seaplane use. There are currently no obstructions in the City to navigable airspace. The city will notify the federal aviation administration of any structures proposed in excess of 200 feet height. Transportation Policies It is the policy of the City of Columbus to: ¾ Restrict access to major highways in the City by encouraging shared access and frontage roads and implementing appropriate County and State access spacing guidelines. ¾ Coordinate transportation planning and system improvements with Anoka County, Washington County, MnDOT, the Metropolitan Council, and area communities. ¾ Evaluate potential community impacts resulting from potential new arterial highways in the City. ¾ Coordinate transit development and service expansion opportunities with Anoka County, the Metropolitan Council, the Rush Line Task Force and area communities. ¾ Maintain City involvement and interaction in area-wide transportation and transit studies and potential system improvements. ¾ Develop priorities to maintain and upgrade local streets. ¾ Coordinate safety improvements to the transportation system with Anoka County and MnDOT. ¾ Evaluate long range transportation system improvements and effective techniques to preserve long range right-of-way needs. ¾ Evaluate land use development standards to maintain compatibility with transportation system needs and improvements. ¾ Coordinate highway corridor trails development opportunities with Anoka County, MnDOT, adjacent counties, and adjacent communities. ¾ Develop a community trail system master plan.

City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

40

III. Implementation Plan The implementation of the Comprehensive Plan does not end with adoption. The City’s official controls, such as the zoning ordinance and subdivision regulations, will ensure day to day monitoring and enforcement of the plan. The regulatory provisions of these ordinances, as revised, will provide a means of managing development in the City in a manner consistent with the Comprehensive Plan. Over time, the Comprehensive Plan may require amendments to address community priorities and changing conditions. A Capital Improvements Plan will guide capital expenditures needed for growth to be programmed and implemented in a timely and cost effective manner. Official Controls As part of the planning process, the City will evaluate its land use controls and consider amendments to existing ordinances which eliminate inconsistencies with the Comprehensive Plan, enhance performance standards, protect public and private investments, conform to mandatory State and Federal regulations and make it an understandable document. The Plan identifies a number of specific changes to the ordinances which need to be considered by the City. Some of these changes include: ¾ Update of the stormwater management ordinance upon completion of local water management plans for the three watersheds in the City. ¾ Update of the City’s ISTS ordinance in response to recent amendments to the MPCA’s Chapter 7080 Rules. ¾ Monitoring ordinance provisions which require connection to public sewer and water when available. ¾ Establish a routine maintenance and inspection program for monitoring potential sources of inflow and infiltration in the sanitary sewer system. ¾ Consider formally incorporating Anoka County or MnDOT Access Spacing Guidelines in the Columbus Subdivision Ordinance as the guidelines for highway access spacing. ¾ Evaluate the feasibility of establishing housing and economic development initiatives at the City level or contracting with the Anoka County HRA for similar services. ¾ Development of a city-wide Parks and Trails Master Plan. Plan Amendment Process The Comprehensive Plan is intended to be general and flexible; however, formal amendments to the Plan will be required when land use elements or growth policies are revised. Periodically, the City should undertake a formal review of the plan to determine if amendments are needed to address changing factors or events in the community. While a plan amendment can be initiated at any time, the City should carefully consider the implications of the proposed changes before their adoption. When considering amendments to this plan, the City will use the following procedure: 1. Landowners, land developers, the Planning Commission or the City Council may initiate amendments. 2. The Planning Commission will direct staff or the planning consultant to prepare a

City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

41

3.

4.

5. 6. 7.

thorough analysis of the proposed amendment. Staff or the planning consultant will present to the Planning Commission a report analyzing the proposed changes, including their findings and recommendations regarding the proposed plan amendment. The Planning Commission will decide whether or not to proceed with the proposed amendment. If a decision to proceed is made, a formal public hearing will be held on the proposed amendment. Following the public hearing the Planning Commission will make a recommendation to the City Council. The City Council will receive the recommendation from the Planning Commission and make a final decision on whether to adopt the amendment. All amendments must be submitted to area review jurisdictions and the Metropolitan Council for review prior to implementation.

Capital Improvements Plan The City budgets for any capital improvements on an ongoing basis and will annually review capital expenditures that may arise as a result of implementing the Comprehensive Plan. The capital improvements plan should include public investments in infrastructure, park expenditures, infrastructure repair and replacement, building maintenance and repair, and other planned capital expenditures. Like the Comprehensive Plan, the capital improvements planning process is ongoing and subject to modification, as appropriate. Table 15 identifies the current capital improvements plan expenditures, excluding public sewer and water expenditures. Table 16 Capital Improvements Plan Year

Expenditure

2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009

Public Works Equipment Pickup Truck Seal-coating Patching/filling Overlay Ladder Truck First Engine & Fire Rescue TOTAL

-

2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010

Public Works Equipment Small Dump Truck Seal-coating Patching/filling Overlay Ladder Truck First Engine & Fire Rescue Community Park/Trail TOTAL

-

City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

Total Cost Annual Cost Funding

-

-

42

Total Levy

$85,030 $36,550 $36,045 $20,000 $74,800 $24,930 $19,215

Levy Levy* Levy Levy Levy Levy Levy

$85,030 $36,045 $20,000 $74,800 $24,930 $19,215 $260,020

$85,030 $56,135 $36,045 $20,000 $74,800 $24,930 $19,215 $10,000

Levy Levy* Levy Levy Levy Levy Levy Levy

$85,030 $36,045 $20,000 $74,800 $24,930 $19,215 $10,000 $270,020

Year

Expenditure

Total Cost Annual Cost Funding

2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011

Public Works Equipment Seal-coating Patching/filling Overlay Ladder Truck First Engine & Fire Rescue Community Park/Trail TOTAL

-

$85,030 $36,045 $20,000 $74,800 $24,930 $19,215 $10,000

Levy Levy Levy Levy Levy Levy Levy

2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012

Public Works Equipment Grader Plow Truck Seal-coating Patching/filling Overlay Ladder Truck First Engine & Fire Rescue Community Park/Trail Ground Storage Tank/Pumphouse TOTAL

-

$85,030 $151,261 $135,000 $36,045 $20,000 $74,800 $24,930 $19,215 $10,000 $779,000

Levy Levy* Levy* Levy Levy Levy Levy Levy Levy Bond

2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013

Public Works Equipment Ladder Truck First Engine & Fire Rescue Seal-coating Patching/filling Overlay Community Park/Trail TOTAL

-

$85,030 $24,930 $19,215 $36,045 $20,000 $74,800 $10,000

Levy Levy Levy Levy Levy Levy Levy

$85,030 $24,930 $19,215 $36,045 $20,000 $74,800 $10,000 $270,020

2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014

Public Works Equipment Ladder Truck First Engine & Fire Rescue Seal-coating Patching/filling Overlay Community Park/Trail TOTAL

-

$85,030 $24,930 $19,215 $36,045 $20,000 $74,800 $10,000

Levy Levy Levy Levy Levy Levy Levy

$85,030 $24,930 $19,215 $36,045 $20,000 $74,800 $10,000 $270,020

-

* Part of average annual levy for all public works equipment Note: Fire equipment costs vary with JPA-member allocation formula

City of Columbus 2030 Comprehensive Plan

43

Total Levy $85,030 $36,045 $20,000 $74,800 $24,930 $19,215 $10,000 $270,020 $85,030 $36,045 $20,000 $74,800 $24,930 $19,215 $10,000 779,000 $1,049,020

Appendix A Zoning Map

City of Columbus - Zoning Map Coon Lake

28

25 27

Little Coon Lake

RR

CR 17

Carlos Avery Wildlife Management Area

32

Sunrise River 26

34

33

RR

35

Higgens Lake

6

5

3

4

2

1

Broadway Avenue

CR 18

7

8

Potomac Street

CR 62

9

10

11

12

RR CR 19

Coon Creek

Mud Lake

18

17

16

tle

Ket

15

lvd er B Riv

Howard Lake Lamprey Pass Wildlife 13 Management Area

Carlos Avery 19Wildlife Management Area

RR 20

CR 23

Lake Drive

CR

21

Co lum

22 CR 23

Cro

ssw

bu s

23

24

La ke

35

ays

HR

riv

e

CR

eD

400'

CS

Houle WMA

Crossways Lake

W Freeway Drive

C/I

RR 31

Rice Creek

La k

29

Furman Street

30

Hornsby ST NE

RR

1,000' CR 21

36

LI

Rondeau Lake

0

0.3

0.6

1.2 Miles

Zoning Districts RR Residential

C/S Commercial Showroom

DNR Lands

C/I Commercial / Industrial

HR Horse Racing

Coon Lake Overlay

Primary Arterial Minor Arterial/Collector Road Local Road

CR Community Retail

LI Light Industrial

Lakes

City Hall

FP Floodplain

Shoreland Areas

Source: City of Columbus, Anoka Co., FEMA, and MnDNR

August 2008

Appendix B Land Use Staging and Density

City of Columbus Sewered Residential Land Use Staging and Density

The Suburban Residential Overlay area contains 318.52 gross acres and 183.63 net developable acres. Net acres exclude wetlands, floodplain, and existing right-of-way. Approximately 62 net acres are located in the northwest portion of the existing sewered Freeway Corridor. Approximately 122 net acres are located in the southeast sewer sub-district, identified as a 2010 sewer service area addition. All residential development in the sewered Freeway Corridor will be attached residences. The following illustration assumes the net density will be a the low end of the range for density (3 units/acre); although, the Columbus PUD provisions allow the density to double to 6 units/acre. No public parks are proposed within the Suburban Residential Overlay area which may reduce net developable areas. Private parks do not decrease the acreage for density calculations and certain amenities may, in fact, qualify for density bonuses.

2010

2015

2020

2025

2030

New residential units

0

175

175

100

110

Cumulative units

0

175

350

450

560

Net residential acres

0

58

58

32

36

58

116

148

184

3.02

3.02

3.04

3.04

Units/Net Acreages

Cumulative acreages Net residential density

0

Source: City of Columbus; RSC

Commercial and Light Industrial Development in the Freeway Corridor is anticipated to consume land at an average annual rate of six net acres per year throughout the planning period.

Appendix C Water Supply Plan

DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES - DIVISION OF WATERS and METROPOLITAN COUNCIL WATER SUPPLY PLANS These guidelines are divided into four parts. The first three parts, Water Supply System Description and Evaluation, Emergency Response Procedures and Water Conservation Planning apply statewide. Part IV, relates to comprehensive plan requirements that apply only to communities in the Seven-County Twin Cities Metropolitan Area. If you have questions regarding water supply plans, please call (651) 259-5703 or (651) 259-5647 or e-mail your question to [email protected] Metro Communities can also direct questions to the Metropolitan Council at [email protected] or (651) 602-1066. DNR Water Appropriation Permit Number(s) Name of Water Supplier Address Contact Person Title Phone Number E-Mail Address

Permits applied for. City of Columbus 16319 Kettle River Blvd.,Columbus, MN 55025 Elizabeth Mursko City Administrator 651-464-3120 [email protected]

PART I. WATER SUPPLY SYSTEM DESCRIPTION AND EVALUATION The first step in any water supply analysis is to assess the current status of demand and supplies. Information in Part I, can be used in the development of Emergency Response Procedures and Conservation Plans. A. ANALYSIS OF WATER DEMAND. Fill in Table 1 for the past 10 years water demand. If your customer categories are different than the ones listed in Table 1, please note the changes below.

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TABLE 1 Historic Water Demand Year

Total Population

Population Served

Total Connections

2007 2008

4108 4108

2 5

2 4

MG – Million Gallons

Residential Water Sold (MG)

C/I/I Water Sold (MG)

0.0226 0.1092

1.3241 7.3167

MGD – Million Gallons per Day

Wholesale Deliveries (MG)

0 0

Total Water Sold (MG)

1.3467 7.4259

Total Water Pumped (MG)

2.7723 16.0041

Percent Unmetered/ Unaccounted

51.5 53.6

Average Demand (MGD)

0.007 0.044

Maximum Demand (MGD)

0.037 0.094

Residential gallons/ capita/day

31 60

Total gallons/ capita/day

3798 8769

C/I/I- Commercial, Industrial, Institutional

Residential. Water used for normal household purposes, such as drinking, food preparation, bathing, washing clothes and dishes, flushing toilets, and watering lawns and gardens. Institutional. Hospitals, nursing homes, day care centers, and other facilities that use water for essential domestic requirements. This includes public facilities and public metered uses. You may want to maintain separate institutional water use records for emergency planning and allocation purposes. Commercial. Water used by motels, hotels, restaurants, office buildings, commercial facilities, both civilian and military. Industrial. Water used for thermoelectric power (electric utility generation) and other industrial uses such as steel, chemical and allied products, food processing, paper and allied products, mining, and petroleum refining. Wholesale Deliveries. Bulk water sales to other public water suppliers. Unaccounted. Unaccounted for water is the volume of water withdrawn from all sources minus the volume sold. Residential Gallons per Capita per Day = total residential sales in gallons/population served/365 days

Total Gallons per Capita per Day = total water withdrawals/population served/365 days

NOTE: Non-essential water uses defined by Minnesota Statutes 103G.291, include lawn sprinkling, vehicle washing, golf course and park irrigation and other non-essential uses. Some of the above categories also include non-essential uses of water.

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Water Use Trends. Discuss factors that influence trends in water demand (i.e. growth, weather, industry, conservation). If appropriate, include a discussion of other factors that affect daily water use, such as use by non-resident commuter employees or large water consuming industry. See Attachment 1 TABLE 2 Large Volume Users - List the top 10 largest users. Customer Gallons per year Running Aces Harness Track 6.2023 MG (part year) Ziegler, Inc 1.1144 MG

% of total annual use 38.75 6.96

B. TREATMENT AND STORAGE CAPACITY. TABLE 3(A) Water Treatment NA Gallons per day Water Treatment Plant Capacity Describe the treatment process used (i.e., softening, chlorination, fluoridation, Fe/Mn removal, reverse osmosis, coagulation, sedimentation, filtration, others). Also, describe the annual amount and method of disposal of treatment residuals, if any. Chemical addition of polyphosphates at wellhead to sequester iron and manganese, chlorination, flouridation. No treatment residuals. TABLE 3(B) Storage Capacity - List all storage structures and capacities. Total Storage Capacity Average Day Demand (average of last 5 years) 7,500 Gallons 25500 Gallons per day Type of Structure Number of Structures Gallons Elevated Storage Ground Storage Other:Hydromatic tank 1 7,500

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C. WATER SOURCES. List all groundwater, surface water and interconnections that supply water to the system. Add or delete lines to the tables as needed. TABLE 4(A) Total Water Source Capacity for System (excluding emergency connections) 2,500 Gallons per minute Total Capacity of Sources 1,400 Gallons per minute Firm Capacity (largest pump out of service) TABLE 4(B) Groundwater Sources - Copies of water well records and well maintenance information should be included with the public water supplier’s copy of the plan in Attachment . If there are more wells than space provided or multiple well fields, please use the List of Wells template (see Resources) and include as Attachment .

Well # or name 1 2 3

Unique Well Number 731131 749393 749394

Year Installed 2006 2007 2007

Well & Casing Depth (ft) 180, 150 168, 145 396, 226

Well Diameter (in) 18 18 18

Status: Active use, Emergency, Standby, Seasonal, Peak use, etc. Geologic Unit: Name of formation(s), which supplies water to the well

TABLE 4(C) Surface Water Sources Intake ID Resource name NA GPM – Gallons per Minute

Capacity (GPM)

Geologic Unit

Status

400 1,000 1,100

Drift Drift IrontonGalesville

Active Active Active

GPM – Gallons per Minute

Capacity (GPM/MGD)

MGD – Million Gallons per Day

TABLE 4(D) Wholesale or Retail Interconnections - List interconnections with neighboring suppliers that are used to supply water on a regular basis either wholesale or retail. Water Supply System Capacity (GPM/MGD) Wholesale or retail NA GPM – Gallons per Minute

MGD – Million Gallons per Day

TABLE 4(E) Emergency Interconnections - List interconnections with neighboring suppliers or private sources that can be used to supply water on an emergency or occasional basis. Suppliers that serve less than 3,300 people can leave this section blank, but must provide this information in Section II C. Water Supply System Capacity (GPM/MGD) Note any limitations on use

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GPM – Gallons per Minute

D. DEMAND PROJECTIONS.

MGD – Million Gallons per Day

TABLE 5 Ten Year Demand Projections Year

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019

Population Served 5 109 213 317 421 525 645 765 885 1000

MGD – Million Gallons per Day

Average Day Demand (MGD) 0.038 0.055 0.072 0.089 0.106 0.123 0.140 0.157 0.174 0.191

Maximum Day Demand (MGD) 0.099 0.143 0.187 0.231 0.276 0.320 0.364 0.408 0.452 0.497

MGY – Million Gallons per Year

Projected Demand (MGY) 13.870 20.075 26.280 32.485 38.690 44.895 51.100 57.305 63.510 69.715

Projection Method. Describe how projections were made, (assumptions for per capita, per household, per acre or other methods used). Water only available in the Freeway Development District. Entire area zoned commercial or industrial. Medium density residential allowed as an overlay district in two areas totaling 183 net acres. Population projections and water demand equals projected sewer flows in Comprehensive Plan. E. RESOURCE SUSTAINABILITY Sustainable water use: use of water to provide for the needs of society, now and in the future, without unacceptable social, economic, or environmental consequences.

Monitoring. Records of water levels should be maintained for all production wells and source water reservoirs/basins. Water level readings should be taken monthly for a production well or observation well that is representative of the wells completed in each water source formation. If water levels are not currently measured each year, a monitoring plan that includes a schedule for water level readings must be submitted as Attachment 2. TABLE 6 Monitoring Wells - List all wells being measured. Unique well Type of well Frequency of number (production, Measurement observation) (daily, monthly etc.) 731131 Production annually 749393 Production annually 749394 Production annually

Method of Measurement (steel tape, SCADA etc.) SCADA SCADA SCADA

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Water Level Data. Summarize water level data including seasonal and long-term trends for each ground and/or surface water source. If water levels are not measured and recorded on a routine basis then provide the static water level (SWL) when the well was constructed and a current water level measurement for each production well. Also include all water level data taken during well and pump maintenance. Attachment 2: Provide monitoring data (graph or table) for as many years as possible. Ground Water Level Monitoring – DNR Waters in conjunction with federal and local units of government maintain and measure approximately 750 observation wells around the state. Ground water level data are available online www.dnr.state.mn.us/waters. Information is also available by contacting the Ground Water Level Monitoring Manager, DNR Waters, 500 Lafayette Road, St. Paul, MN 55155-4032 or call (651) 259-5700.

Natural Resource Impacts. Indicate any natural resource features such as calcareous fens, wetlands, trout streams, rivers or surface water basins that are or could be influenced by water withdrawals from municipal production wells. Also indicate if resource protection thresholds have been established and if mitigation measures or management plans have been developed. No threatened natural resoirces have been noted. No resoircr protection thresholds or mitigation measures have been developed. Sustainability. Evaluate the adequacy of the resource to sustain current and projected demands. Describe any modeling conducted to determine impacts of projected demands on the resource. Resource expected to be adequate based on test pumping of wells. No modeling has been coducted to our knowledge. Source Water Protection Plans. The emergency procedures in this plan are intended to comply with the contingency plan provisions required in the Minnesota Department of Health’s (MDH) Wellhead Protection (WHP) Plan and Surface Water Protection (SWP) Plan. NA Date WHP Plan Adopted: Date for Next WHP Update: NA In Process Completed Not Applicable SWP Plan:

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F. CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN (CIP) Adequacy of Water Supply System. Are water supply installations, treatment facilities and distribution systems adequate to sustain current and projected demands? Yes No If no, describe any potential capital improvements over the next ten years and state the reasons for the proposed changes (CIP Attachment ). 150,000 ground storage expected to be added in 2012. 500,000 elevated storage expected to be added by 2030. Proposed Water Sources. Does your current CIP include the addition of new wells or intakes? Yes No If yes, list the number of new installations and projected water demands from each for the next ten years. Plans for new production wells must include the geologic source formation, well location, and proposed pumping capacity.

Water Source Alternatives. If new water sources are being proposed, describe alternative sources that were considered and any possibilities of joint efforts with neighboring communities for development of supplies. NA Preventative Maintenance. Long-term preventative programs and measures will help reduce the risk of emergency situations. Identify sections of the system that are prone to failure due to age, materials or other problems. This information should be used to prioritize capital improvements, preventative maintenance, and to determine the types of materials (pipes, valves, couplings, etc.) to have in stock to reduce repair time. System is new.

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PART II. EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES Water emergencies can occur as a result of vandalism, sabotage, accidental contamination, mechanical problems, power failures, drought, flooding, and other natural disasters. The purpose of emergency planning is to develop emergency response procedures and to identify actions needed to improve emergency preparedness. In the case of a municipality, these procedures should be in support of, and part of, an all-hazard emergency operations plan. If your community already has written procedures dealing with water emergencies we recommend that you use these guidelines to review and update existing procedures and water supply protection measures. Federal Emergency Response Plan Section 1433(b) of the Safe Drinking Water Act as amended by the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 (Public Law 107-188, Title IV – Drinking Water Security and Safety) requires community water suppliers serving over 3,300 people to prepare an Emergency Response Plan. Community water suppliers that have completed the Federal Emergency Response Plan and submitted the required certification to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have satisfied Part II, Sections A, B, and C of these guidelines and need only provide the information below regarding the emergency response plan and source water protection plan and complete Sections D (Allocation and Demand Reduction Procedures), and E (Enforcement). Provide the following information regarding your completed Federal Emergency Response Plan: Emergency Response Plan Contact Person Emergency Response Lead Jim Fraley, PW Supervisor Alternate Emergency Response Lead Jim Windigstad, Ulility Lead Emergency Response Plan Certification Date NA

Contact Number 651-755-7085 651-775-8511

Operational Contingency Plan. An operational contingency plan that describes measures to be taken for water supply mainline breaks and other common system failures as well as routine maintenance is recommended for all utilities. Check here if the utility has an operational contingency plan. At a minimum a contact list for contractors and supplies should be included in a water emergency telephone list. Communities that have completed Federal Emergency Response Plans should skip to Section D.

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EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES A. Emergency Telephone List. A telephone list of emergency contacts must be included as Attachment 3 to the plan (complete template or use your own list). The list should include key utility and community personnel, contacts in adjacent communities, and appropriate local, state and federal emergency contacts. Please be sure to verify and update the contacts on the emergency telephone list on a regular basis (once each year recommended). In the case of a municipality, this information should be contained in a notification and warning standard operating procedure maintained by the warning point for that community. Responsibilities and services for each contact should be defined. B. Current Water Sources and Service Area. Quick access to concise and detailed information on water sources, water treatment, and the distribution system may be needed in an emergency. System operation, water well and maintenance records should be maintained in a central secured location so that the records are accessible for emergency purposes and preventative maintenance. A detailed map of the system showing the treatment plants, water sources, storage facilities, supply lines, interconnections, and other information that would be if these records and useful in an emergency should also be readily available. Check here maps exist and staff can access the documents in the event of an emergency. C. Procedure for Augmenting Water Supplies. List all available sources of water that can be used to augment or replace existing sources in an emergency. In the case of a municipality, this information should be contained in a notification and warning standard operating procedure maintained by the warning point for that community. Copies of cooperative agreements should be maintained with your copy of the plan and include in Attachment NA. Be sure to include information on any physical or chemical problems that may limit interconnections to other sources of water. Approvals from the MN Department of Health are required for interconnections and reuse of water. TABLE 7 (A) Public Water Supply Systems – List interconnections with other public water supply systems that can supply water in an emergency. Water Supply System Capacity (GPM/MGD) Note any limitations on use none GPM – Gallons per Minute

MGD – Million Gallons per Day

TABLE 7 (B) - Private Water Sources – List other sources of water available in an emergency. Name Capacity (GPM/MGD) Note any limitations on use none GPM – Gallons per Minute

MGD – Million Gallons per Day

D. Allocation and Demand Reduction Procedures. The plan must include procedures to lr-WaterSupplyPlan.doc

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address gradual decreases in water supply as well as emergencies and the sudden loss of water due to line breaks, power failures, sabotage, etc. During periods of limited water supplies public water suppliers are required to allocate water based on the priorities established in Minnesota Statutes 103G.261. Water Use Priorities (Minnesota Statutes 103G.261) First Priority. Domestic water supply, excluding industrial and commercial uses of municipal water supply, and use for power production that meets contingency requirements. NOTE: Domestic use is defined (MN Rules 6115.0630, Subp. 9), as use for general household purposes for human needs such as cooking, cleaning, drinking, washing, and waste disposal, and uses for on-farm livestock watering excluding commercial livestock operations which use more than 10,000 gallons per day or one million gallons per year. Second Priority. Water uses involving consumption of less than 10,000 gallons per day. Third Priority. Agricultural irrigation and processing of agricultural products. Fourth Priority. Power production in excess of the use provided for in the contingency plan under first priority. Fifth Priority. Uses, other than agricultural irrigation, processing of agricultural products, and power production. Sixth Priority. Non-essential uses. These uses are defined by Minnesota Statutes 103G.291 as lawn sprinkling, vehicle washing, golf course and park irrigation, and other non-essential uses.

List the statutory water use priorities along with any local priorities (hospitals, nursing homes, etc.) in Table 8. Water used for human needs at hospitals, nursing homes and similar types of facilities should be designated as a high priority to be maintained in an emergency. Local allocation priorities will need to address water used for human needs at other types of facilities such as hotels, office buildings, and manufacturing plants. The volume of water and other types of water uses at these facilities must be carefully considered. After reviewing the data, common sense should dictate local allocation priorities to protect domestic requirements over certain types of economic needs. In Table 8, list the priority ranking, average day demand and demand reduction potential for each customer category (modify customer categories if necessary). Table 8 Water Use Priorities Customer Category Allocation Priority Average Day Demand (GPD) Residential 1 299 Institutional Commercial 2 16,992 Industrial 2 3,053 Irrigation Wholesale Non-essential 6 23,502 (for flushing) 43,846 TOTALS

Demand Reduction Potential (GPD) none 9,100 2,200 20,000 31,300

GPD – Gallons per Day

Demand Reduction Potential. The demand reduction potential for residential use will typically be the base lr-WaterSupplyPlan.doc

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demand during the winter months when water use for non-essential uses such as lawn watering do not occur. The difference between summer and winter demands typically defines the demand reduction that can be achieved by eliminating non-essential uses. In extreme emergency situations lower priority water uses must be restricted or eliminated to protect first priority domestic water requirements. Short-term demand reduction potential should be based on average day demands for customer categories within each priority class.

Triggers for Allocation and Demand Reduction Actions. Triggering levels must be defined for implementing emergency responses, including supply augmentation, demand reduction, and water allocation. Examples of triggers include: water demand >100% of storage, water level in well(s) below a certain elevation, treatment capacity reduced 10% etc. Each trigger should have a quantifiable indicator and actions can have multiple stages such as mild, moderate and severe responses. Check each trigger below that is used for implementing emergency responses and for each trigger indicate the actions to be taken at various levels or stages of severity in Table 9. Water Demand Water Main Break Treatment Capacity Loss of Production Storage Capacity Security Breach Groundwater Levels Contamination Surface Water Flows or Levels Other (list in Table 9) Pump, Booster Station or Well Out of Service Governor’s Executive Order – Critical Water Deficiency (required by statute) Table 9 Demand Reduction Procedures Condition Trigger(s) Actions Daily voluntary reductions Stage 1 production over (Mild) 1 MGD Daily Odd-even sprinkling restriction. Stage 2 production over (Moderate) 2 MGD Well drawdown Ban on all outdoor use. Stage 3 not recovering (Severe) between cyles Executive Order Stage 1: Restrict lawn watering, vehicle washing, golf Critical Water by Governor & course and park irrigation and other nonessential uses Deficiency Stage 2: Suspend lawn watering, vehicle washing, golf (M.S. 103G.291) as provided in above triggers course and park irrigation and other nonessential uses

Note: The potential for water availability problems during the onset of a drought are almost impossible to predict. Significant increases in demand should be balanced with preventative measures to conserve supplies in the event of prolonged drought conditions.

Notification Procedures. List methods that will be used to inform customers regarding conservation requests, water use restrictions, and suspensions. Customers should be aware of emergency procedures and responses that they may need to implement. telephone notification because of limited number of connections

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E. Enforcement. Minnesota Statutes require public water supply authorities to adopt and enforce water conservation restrictions during periods of critical water shortages. Public Water Supply Appropriation During Deficiency. Minnesota Statutes 103G.291, Subdivision 1.

Declaration and conservation. (a) If the governor determines and declares by executive order that there is a critical water deficiency, public water supply authorities appropriating water must adopt and enforce water conservation restrictions within their jurisdiction that are consistent with rules adopted by the commissioner. (b) The restrictions must limit lawn sprinkling, vehicle washing, golf course and park irrigation, and other nonessential uses, and have appropriate penalties for failure to comply with the restrictions.

An ordinance that has been adopted or a draft ordinance that can be quickly adopted to comply with the critical water deficiency declaration must be included in the plan (include with other ordinances in Attachment 7 for Part III, Item 4). Enforcement responsibilities and penalties for non-compliance should be addressed in the critical water deficiency ordinance. Sample regulations are available at www.dnr.state.mn.us/waters Authority to Implement Water Emergency Responses. Emergency responses could be delayed if city council or utility board actions are required. Standing authority for utility or city managers to implement water restrictions can improve response times for dealing with emergencies. Who has authority to implement water use restrictions in an emergency? Utility Manager City Manager Other (describe): Mayor

City Council or Utility Board

Emergency Preparedness. If city or utility managers do not have standing authority to implement water emergency responses, please indicate any intentions to delegate that authority. Also indicate any other measures that are being considered to reduce delays for implementing emergency responses. none

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PART III. WATER CONSERVATION PLAN Water conservation programs are intended to reduce demand for water, improve the efficiency in use and reduce losses and waste of water. Long-term conservation measures that improve overall water use efficiencies can help reduce the need for short-term conservation measures. Water conservation is an important part of water resource management and can also help utility managers satisfy the ever-increasing demands being placed on water resources. Minnesota Statutes 103G.291, requires public water suppliers to implement demand reduction measures before seeking approvals to construct new wells or increases in authorized volumes of water. Minnesota Rules 6115.0770, require water users to employ the best available means and practices to promote the efficient use of water. Conservation programs can be cost effective when compared to the generally higher costs of developing new sources of supply or expanding water and/or wastewater treatment plant capacities.

A. Conservation Goals. The following section establishes goals for various measures of water demand. The programs necessary to achieve the goals will be described in the following section. Unaccounted Water (calculate five year averages with data from Table 1) Average annual volume unaccounted water for the last 5 years 8,578,200 (2008) gallons Average percent unaccounted water for the last 5 years 53.6 (2008) percent AWWA recommends that unaccounted water not exceed 10%. Describe goals to reduce unaccounted water if the average of the last 5 years exceeds 10%. See Attachment 1

Residential Gallons Per Capita Demand (GPCD) Average residential GPCD use for the last 5 years (use data from Table 1) 45 GPCD In 2002, average residential GPCD use in the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area was 75 GPCD. Describe goals to reduce residential demand if the average for the last 5 years exceeds 75 GPCD.

Total Per Capita Demand: From Table 1, is the trend in overall per capita demand over the past 10 years increasing or decreasing? If total GPCD is increasing, describe the goals to lower overall per capita demand or explain the reasons for the increase. too little data to determine

Peak Demands (calculate average ratio for last five years using data from Table 1) Average maximum day to average day ratio 2.13 in 2008 If peak demands exceed a ratio of 2.6, describe the goals for lowering peak demands. lr-WaterSupplyPlan.doc

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B. Water Conservation Programs. Describe all short-term conservation measures that are available for use in an emergency and long-term measures to improve water use efficiencies for each of the six conservation program elements listed below. Short-term demand reduction measures must be included in the emergency response procedures and must be in support of, and part of, a community all-hazard emergency operation plan. 1. Metering. The American Water Works Association (AWWA) recommends that every water utility meter all water taken into its system and all water distributed from its system at its customer’s point of service. An effective metering program relies upon periodic performance testing, repair, repair and maintenance of all meters. AWWA also recommends that utilities conduct regular water audits to ensure accountability. Complete Table 10 (A) regarding the number and maintenance of customer meters. TABLE 10 (A) Customer Meters Number of Number of Connections Metered Connections Residential 2 2 Institutional Commercial 1 1 Industrial 1 1 Public Facilities Other TOTALS 4 4

Meter testing schedule (years)

Average age/meter replacement schedule (years) 1 / 25 / 1 / 25 1 / 25 / /

Unmetered Systems. Provide an estimate of the cost to install meters and the projected water savings from metering water use. Also indicate any plans to install meters. No junmetered connections. TABLE 10 (B) Water Source Meters Number of Meter testing Meters schedule (years) Water Source 3 (wells/intakes) Treatment Plant NA

Average age/meter replacement schedule (years) 1 / 25 /

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2. Unaccounted Water. Water audits are intended to identify, quantify, and verify water and revenue losses. The volume of unaccounted-for water should be evaluated each billing cycle. The AWWA recommends a goal of ten percent or less for unaccounted-for water. Water audit procedures are available from the AWWA and MN Rural Water Association. Frequency of water audits:

each billing cycle

yearly

Leak detection and survey: every year every years Year last leak detection survey completed:

other: periodic as needed

Reducing Unaccounted Water. List potential sources and efforts being taken to reduce unaccounted water. If unaccounted water exceeds 10% of total withdrawals, include the timeframe for completing work to reduce unaccounted water to 10% or less. See Attachment 1 3. Conservation Water Rates. Plans must include the current rate structure for all customers and provide information on any proposed rate changes. Discuss the basis for current price levels and rates, including cost of service data, and the impact current rates have on conservation. Billing Frequency:

Monthly Other (describe):

Bimonthly

Quarterly

Volume included in base rate or service charge: 0gallons or

cubic feet

Conservation Rate Structures Increasing block rate: rate per unit increases as water use increases Seasonal rate: higher rates in summer to reduce peak demands Service charge or base fee that does not include a water volume Conservation Neutral Rate Structure Uniform rate: rate per unit is the same regardless of volume Non-conserving Rate Structures Service charge or base fee that includes a large volume of water Declining block rate: rate per unit decreases as water use increases Flat rate: one fee regardless of how much water is used (unmetered) Other (describe): Water Rates Evaluated: every year Date of last rate change: January 2009

every

years

no schedule

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Declining block (the more water used, the cheaper the rate) and flat (one fee for an unlimited volume of water) rates should be phased out and replaced with conservation rates. Incorporating a seasonal rate structure and the benefits of a monthly billing cycle should also be considered along with the development of an emergency rate structure that could be quickly implemented to encourage conservation in an emergency. Current Water Rates. Include a copy of the actual rate structure in Attachment current water rates including base/service fees and volume charges below. $2.18 per 1,000 gallons

or list

Non-conserving Rate Structures. Provide justification for the rate structure and its impact on reducing demands or indicate intentions including the timeframe for adopting a conservation rate structure.

4. Regulation. Plans should include regulations for short-term reductions in demand and long-term improvements in water efficiencies. Sample regulations are available from DNR Waters. Copies of adopted regulations or proposed restrictions should be included in Attachment 4 of the plan. Indicate any of the items below that are required by local regulations and also indicate if the requirement is applied each year or just in emergencies. Time of Day: no watering between am/pm and am/pm (reduces evaporation) year around seasonal emergency only Odd/Even: (helps reduce peak demand) year around seasonal emergency only Water waste prohibited (no runoff from irrigation systems) Describe ordinance: Limitations on turf areas for landscaping (reduces high water use turf areas) Describe ordinance: Soil preparation (such as 4”-6” of organic soil on new turf areas with sandy soil) Describe ordinance: Tree ratios (plant one tree for every 3,000 square feet to reduce turf evapotranspiration) Describe ordinance: Section 7A-820 Performance Standards for Landscaping in Zoning Code. Prohibit irrigation of medians or areas less than 8 feet wide Describe ordinance: Permit required to fill swimming pool every year emergency only Other (describe):

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State and Federal Regulations (mandated) Rainfall sensors on landscape irrigation systems. Minnesota Statute 103G.298 requires “All automatically operated landscape irrigation systems shall have furnished and installed technology that inhibits or interrupts operation of the landscape irrigation system during periods of sufficient moisture. The technology must be adjustable either by the end user or the professional practitioner of landscape irrigation services.” Water Efficient Plumbing Fixtures. The 1992 Federal Energy Policy Act established manufacturing standards for water efficient plumbing fixtures, including toilets, urinals, faucets, and aerators.

Enforcement. Are ordinances enforced? Yes No If yes, indicate how ordinances are enforced along with any penalties for non-compliance. City employs full time Code Enforcement Officer/ Building Official.

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5. Education and Information Programs. Customers should be provided information on how to improve water use efficiencies a minimum of two times per year. Information should be provided at appropriate times to address peak demands. Emergency notices and educational materials on how to reduce water use should be available for quick distribution during an emergency. If any of the methods listed in the table below are used to provide water conservation tips, indicate the number of times that information is provided each year and attach a list of education efforts used for the last three years. Current Education Programs Times/Year Billing inserts or tips printed on the actual bill Consumer Confidence Reports Local news papers Community news letters Direct mailings (water audit/retrofit kits, showerheads, brochures) Information at utility and public buildings Public Service Announcements Cable TV Programs Demonstration projects (landscaping or plumbing) K-12 Education programs (Project Wet, Drinking Water Institute) School presentations Events (children’s water festivals, environmental fairs) Community education Water Week promotions Information provided to groups that tour the water treatment plant Website (include address: ) Targeted efforts (large volume users, users with large increases) Notices of ordinances (include tips with notices) Emergency conservation notices (recommended) Other: List education efforts for the last three years in Attachment NA of the plan. Be sure to indicate whether educational efforts are on-going and which efforts were initiated as an emergency or drought management effort. Proposed Education Programs. Describe any additional efforts planned to provide conservation information to customers a minimum of twice per year (required if there are no current efforts). City will consider posting links to water conserving tips on it's web site and utility bill inserts. A packet of conservation tips and information can be obtained by contacting DNR Waters or the Minnesota Rural Water Association (MRWA). The American Water Works Association (AWWA) www.awwa.org or www.waterwiser.org also has excellent materials on water conservation that are available in a number of formats. You can contact the MRWA 800/3676792, the AWWA bookstore 800/926-7337 or DNR Waters 651/259-5703 for information regarding educational materials and formats that are available.

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6. Retrofitting Programs. Education and incentive programs aimed at replacing inefficient plumbing fixtures and appliances can help reduce per capita water use as well as energy costs. It is recommended that communities develop a long-term plan to retrofit public buildings with water efficient plumbing fixtures and that the benefits of retrofitting be included in public education programs. You may also want to contact local electric or gas suppliers to see if they are interested in developing a showerhead distribution program for customers in your service area. A study by the AWWA Research Foundation (Residential End Uses of Water, 1999) found that the average indoor water use for a non-conserving home is 69.3 gallons per capita per day (gpcd). The average indoor water use in a conserving home is 45.2 gpcd and most of the decrease in water use is related to water efficient plumbing fixtures and appliances that can reduce water, sewer and energy costs. In Minnesota, certain electric and gas providers are required (Minnesota Statute 216B.241) to fund programs that will conserve energy resources and some utilities have distributed water efficient showerheads to customers to help reduce energy demands required to supply hot water.

Retrofitting Programs. Describe any education or incentive programs to encourage the retrofitting of inefficient plumbing fixtures (toilets, showerheads, faucets, and aerators) or appliances (washing machines). generally not applicable in commercial industrial zones. Plan Approval. Water Supply Plans must be approved by the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) every ten years. Please submit plans for approval to the following address: DNR Waters or Submit electronically to Water Permit Programs Supervisor [email protected] 500 Lafayette Road St. Paul, MN 55155-4032 Adoption of Plan. All DNR plan approvals are contingent on the formal adoption of the plan by the city council or utility board. Please submit a certificate of adoption (example available) or other action adopting the plan. Metropolitan Area communities are also required to submit these plans to the Metropolitan Council. Please see PART IV. ITEMS FOR METROPOLITAN AREA PUBLIC SUPPLIERS.

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METROPOLITAN COUNCIL PART IV. ITEMS FOR METROPOLITAN AREA PUBLIC SUPPLIERS Minnesota Statute 473.859 requires water supply plans to be completed for all local units of government in the seven-county Metropolitan Area as part of the local comprehensive planning process. Much of the required information is contained in Parts I-III of these guidelines. However, the following additional information is necessary to make the water supply plans consistent with the Metropolitan Land Use Planning Act upon which local comprehensive plans are based. Communities should use the information collected in the development of their plans to evaluate whether or not their water supplies are being developed consistent with the Council's Water Resources Management Policy Plan. Policies. Provide a statement(s) on the principles that will dictate operation of the water supply utility: for example, "It is the policy of the city to provide good quality water at an affordable rate, while assuring this use does not have a long-term negative resource impact." It is the policy of the City of Columbus to provide good quality water at a price necessary to operate and maintain the Utility, while assuring no long term negative impact on the resource. Impact on the Local Comprehensive Plan. Identify the impact that the adoption of this water supply plan has on the rest of the local comprehensive plan, including implications for future growth of the community, economic impact on the community and changes to the comprehensive plan that might result. The local comprehensive plan anticipates commercial and industrial growth in this Freeway District. This water supply plan is consistant with the growth projections in the plan. Demand Projections Year

2010 2020 2030 Ultimate

Total Community Population 4000 4240 4680

Population Served 5 1040 1620 1830

Average Day Demand (MGD) 0.038 0.209 0.341 0.990

Maximum Day Demand (MGD) 0.099 0.543 0.887 2.574

Projected Demand (MGY) 13.87 76.29 124.47 361.35

Population projections should be consistent with those in the Metropolitan Council’s 2030 Regional Development Framework or the Communities 2008 Comprehensive Plan update. If population served differs from total population, explain in detail why the difference (i.e., service to other communities, not complete service within community etc.). The water service area is limited to the Freeway Development District, an area of less than 800 developable acres.

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The plan will be reviewed by the Council according to the sequence outlined in Minnesota Statutes 473.175. Prior to submittal to the Council, the plan must be submitted to adjacent governmental units for a 60-day review period. Following submittal, the Council determines if the plan is complete for review within 15 days. If incomplete, the Council will notify the community and request the necessary information. When complete the Council will complete its review within 60 days or a mutually agreed upon extension. The community officially adopts the plan after the Council provides its comments. Plans can be submitted electronically to the Council; however, the review process will not begin until the Council receives a paper copy of the materials. Electronic submissions can be via a CD, 3 ½” floppy disk or to the email address below. Metropolitan communities should submit their plans to: Reviews Coordinator Metropolitan Council 390 Robert St, St. Paul, MN 55101

electronically to: [email protected]

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ATTACHMENTS TO WATER SUPPLY PLAN City Of Columbus, Minnesota TKDA Project No. 14295.000

1.

2.

WATER USE TRENDS

The wells and distribution system are designed for fire protection and ultimate build out of the Freeway District. At this time, there are just four customers on the system. Because of the low domestic use and the large volume in the watermain system, the water can remain in the system up to 10 days from the time it was produced to the time it reaches the customer. By this time, the required chlorine residual has dropped below required levels. Because of this, it is necessary for operators to flush the system regularly to provide fresh water to the ends of the distribution system. For this reason, the unaccounted water for 2007 and 2008 respectively was at 52% and 54% of all water produced.

WATER LEVEL MONITORING

Static water levels are monitored daily at each Pumphouse; however, they have not been recorded. The only recorded levels are from initial construction and on May 18, 2009, as follows: Well No. 1 Well No. 2 Well No. 3

6/16/06 9.0 ft

10/25/07 13.0 ft

12/27/07 6.9 ft

5/18/09 8.9 ft 10.6 ft 15.9 ft

It is the City’s plan to record water level readings monthly.

3.

EMERGENCY TELEPHONE LIST

Personnel Jim Fraley Jim Windingstad

Public Works Supervisor Utility Lead Person

(651) 755-7085 (651) 775-8511

Watermain Repairs Olson’s Sewer Service Forest Lake Contracting

(651) 464-2082 (651) 464-4500

Pump and Motor Repair E.H. Renner and Sons

(763) 427-6100

Electrical Repair Hymark Electric

(651) 307-0322

Controls Repair In-Control

(763) 783-9500

Chemical Feed Larsco

(763) 421-3319