A Cinderella Comparison - EduCore

A Cinderella Comparison - EduCore

A Cinderella Comparison LDC Argumentation Module Template | © Literacy Design Collaborative, September 2011 1 Information Sheet for Argumentation ...

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A Cinderella Comparison

LDC Argumentation Module Template | © Literacy Design Collaborative, September 2011

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Information Sheet for Argumentation Module Module title:

A Cinderella Comparison

Module description (overview): Template task (include number, type, level): Teaching task:

Students will compare various cultures and gain an understanding of what is important in different cultures, through analyzing various versions of the fairy tale Cinderella. Task 6: Argumentation/Evaluation L1 [Insert question] After reading _____ (literature or informational texts), write a/an _____ (essay or substitute) that discusses _____ (content) and evaluates _____ (content). Be sure to support your position with evidence from the texts. How are a culture’s values reflected in literature? After reading a version of Cinderella from a different culture, write an essay that discusses the similarities and differences between each story and evaluates how they reflect which values are most important in that culture. Be sure to support your position with evidence from the texts. 7th Grade

Grade/Level: Discipline: (e.g., ELA, science, history, other) Course:

English/Language Arts

Authors:

Donna Schaidle, Kevin Biddle, Michelle Heckman, Monica Cressman, Jeremy Troop

Social Studies/Reading Course: 7th Grade Ancient Civilizations

LDC Argumentation Module Template | © Literacy Design Collaborative, September 2011

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Section 1: What Task? TEACHING TASK How are a culture’s values reflected in literature? After reading a version of Cinderella from a different culture, write an essay that discusses the Teaching task: similarities and differences between each story and evaluates how they reflect which values are most important in that culture. Be sure to support your position with evidence from the texts. Multiple cultural versions of Cinderella (see materials list) Reading texts: Background to share with students: Extension (optional):

Background: Cultural values are aspects of a culture that portray what is important and acceptable in the lives of people, such as honesty, respect, belief in a higher power, and so forth. As a result of these values, many popular stories develop differently from culture to culture. From these differences, we can discern what each culture values. N/A

CONTENT STANDARDS FROM STATE OR DISTRICT Standards Pennsylvania State Standards source: NUMBER CONTENT STANDARDS R7.A.1 Understand fiction appropriate to grade level R7.A.1. Make inferences, draw conclusion, and make generalizations based on texts R7.B.1.1 Interpret, compare, describe, analyze, and evaluate components of fiction R7.B.1.2 Make connections between texts

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COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS READING STANDARDS FOR ARGUMENTATION “Built-in” Reading Standards (Bold addressed in module) “When Appropriate” Reading Standards (Bold addressed in module) 1: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the test.

3: Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

2: Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

5: Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.

4: Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

6: Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.

10: Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

7: Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words. 8: Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. 9: Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

WRITING STANDARDS FOR ARGUMENTATION “Built-in” Writing Standards (Bold addressed in module) “When Appropriate” Writing Standards (Bold addressed in module) 1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

3: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

5: Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

6: Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.

9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

7: Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

10: Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audience.

8: Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.

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SCORING RUBRIC FOR ARGUMENTATION TEMPLATE TASKS Scoring Elements Focus

Controlling Idea

Reading/ Research

Development

Not Yet 1 Attempts to address prompt, but lacks focus or is off-task. Attempts to establish a claim, but lacks a clear purpose. (L2) Makes no mention of counterclaims. Attempts to reference reading materials to develop response, but lacks connections or relevance to the purpose of the prompt. Attempts to provide details in response to the prompt, but lacks sufficient development or relevance to the purpose of the prompt. (L3) Makes no connections or a connection that is irrelevant to argument or claim.

1.5

Approaches Expectations 2 Addresses prompt appropriately and establishes a position, but focus is uneven. Establishes a claim. (L2) Makes note of counterclaims. Presents information from reading materials relevant to the purpose of the prompt, with minor lapses in accuracy or completeness. Presents appropriate details to support and develop the focus, controlling idea, or claim, with minor lapses in the reasoning, examples, or explanations. (L3) Makes a connection with a weak or unclear relationship to argument or claim.

2.5

Meets Expectations 3 Addresses prompt appropriately and maintains a clear, steady focus. Provides a generally convincing position.

Advanced 4 Addresses all aspects of prompt appropriately, with a consistently strong focus and convincing position.

Establishes a credible claim. (L2) Develops claim and counterclaims fairly.

Establishes and maintains a substantive and credible claim or proposal. (L2) Develops claims and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly.

Accurately presents details from reading materials relevant to the purpose of the prompt to develop argument or claim.

Accurately and effectively presents important details from reading materials to develop argument or claim.

Presents appropriate and sufficient details to support and develop the focus, controlling idea, or claim. (L3) Makes a relevant connection to clarify argument or claim.

Presents thorough and detailed information to effectively support and develop the focus, controlling idea, or claim. (L3) Makes a clarifying connection(s) that illuminates argument and adds depth to reasoning.

Organization

Attempts to organize ideas, but lacks control of structure.

Uses an appropriate organizational structure for development of reasoning and logic, with minor lapses in structure and/or coherence.

Conventions

Attempts to demonstrate standard English conventions, but lacks cohesion and control of grammar, usage, and mechanics. Sources are used without citation.

Demonstrates an uneven command of standard English conventions and cohesion. Uses language and tone with some inaccurate, inappropriate, or uneven features. Inconsistently cites sources.

Demonstrates a command of standard English conventions and cohesion, with few errors. Response includes language and tone appropriate to the audience, purpose, and specific requirements of the prompt. Cites sources using appropriate format with only minor errors.

Content Understanding

Attempts to include disciplinary content in argument, but understanding of content is weak; content is irrelevant, inappropriate, or inaccurate.

Briefly notes disciplinary content relevant to the prompt; shows basic or uneven understanding of content; minor errors in explanation.

Accurately presents disciplinary content relevant to the prompt with sufficient explanations that demonstrate understanding.

LDC Argumentation Module Template |© Literacy Design Collaborative, September 2011

3.5

Maintains an appropriate organizational structure to address specific requirements of the prompt. Structure reveals the reasoning and logic of the argument.

Maintains an organizational structure that intentionally and effectively enhances the presentation of information as required by the specific prompt. Structure enhances development of the reasoning and logic of the argument. Demonstrates and maintains a welldeveloped command of standard English conventions and cohesion, with few errors. Response includes language and tone consistently appropriate to the audience, purpose, and specific requirements of the prompt. Consistently cites sources using appropriate format. Integrates relevant and accurate disciplinary content with thorough explanations that demonstrate in-depth understanding.

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Section 2: What Skills? SKILL

DEFINITION

SKILLS CLUSTER 1: PREPARING FOR THE TASK 1. Bridging Conversation

Ability to establish knowledge base and assess skills and strategies necessary to manage task.

2. Task analysis

Ability to understand and explain the task’s prompt and rubric.

3. Student project planning

Ability to plan a task so that reading and writing processes are accomplished on time.

SKILLS CLUSTER 2: READING PROCESS 1. Reading “habits of mind”

Ability to select appropriate texts and understand reading strategies needed for the task.

2. Note-taking 1

Ability to read purposefully and select relevant information; to summarize and/or paraphrase.

3. Note-taking 2

Ability to prioritize and narrow supporting information.

SKILLS CLUSTER 3: TRANSITION TO WRITING 1. Bridging Conversation

Ability to transition from reading or researching phase to the writing phase.

SKILLS CLUSTER 4: WRITING PROCESS 1. Initiation of task

Ability to establish a controlling idea and consolidate information relevant to task.

2. Planning

Ability to develop a line of thought and text structure appropriate to an argumentation/evaluation task.

3. Development

Ability to construct an initial draft with an emerging line of thought and structure. L2: Ability to analyze competing arguments. L3: Ability to make clarifying connections and/or provide examples.

4. Revision

Ability to apply revision strategies to refine development of argument, including line of thought, language usage, and tone as appropriate to audience and purpose.

5. Editing

Ability to apply editing strategies and presentation applications.

LDC Argumentation Module Template |© Literacy Design Collaborative, September 2011

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Section 3: What Instruction? PACING

SKILL AND DEFINITION

PRODUCT AND PROMPT

SCORING (PRODUCT “MEETS EXPECTATIONS” IF IT…)

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

No scoring

 Conduct a class discussion to help students focus on the task’s question or ideas and to open their minds to possible ways of thinking about the prompt.

SKILLS CLUSTER 1: PREPARING FOR THE TASK 10 – 15 minutes

1. Bridging conversation Ability to establish knowledge base and assess skills and strategies necessary to manage task.

Prompt: In a quick write, explain in your own words what culture is. What characteristics of the story might you use to identify what makes culture unique? Product: short response

5 – 10 minutes

2. Task analysis Ability to understand and explain the task’s prompt and rubric.

3. Student project planning Ability to plan a task so that reading and writing processes are accomplished on time.

Prompt: In your own words, write a brief explanation of what the task is asking you to do.

No scoring

Product: Short constructed response

A timeline for completion of the project will be provided by the teacher. Product: Timeline

N/A

PD/preparation  Discuss in detail the type of writing you will use.  Do the task to ensure understanding of the demands and cognitive processes embedded in the task.  Create a template for students to use during the writing process.  Have students share responses so that students can hear/know what one another are doing, and encourage them to help each other when appropriate.  Review each student’s response to ensure she/he understands the task. Ensure relevant reading material is selected or provided.  Discuss in detail the prompt, type of writing and structure, the product, and the rubric. PD/preparation  Collaboratively plan the task: How much time to teach each step? How much time to score? How to conduct scoring? Do we need any training on specific aspects of the task? What resources can support teaching? Who has the expertise?  Provide students with a timeline.  Discuss the importance of planning. PD/preparation  Create timeline to support student planning.

SKILLS CLUSTER 2: READING PROCESS LDC Argumentation Module Template |© Literacy Design Collaborative, September 2011

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1. Reading “habits of mind” Ability to select appropriate texts and understand reading strategies needed for the task.

Prompt: Identify/review the literary elements of a story and how they might reflect cultural values or differences.

N/A

Product: class discussion

 Have students decide which literary elements to focus on as they read; which would give students the best insight into the country’s culture? Example: Plot, setting, and characters’ actions.  Demonstrate reading strategies relevant to a type of text to prepare students for next steps in the ladder. PD/preparation   

1 class period

2. Note-taking 1 Ability to read purposefully and select relevant information; to summarize and/or paraphrase.

Prompt: Use a graphic organizer to identify the geography, culture/customs, government/economy, and other categories of social studies for both versions of Cinderella. Product: graphic organizer

Meets:  Accomplishes task by selecting relevant source material to support controlling idea as a claim.  Writes in readable manner.

Discuss and analyze the appropriateness of texts for specific tasks; teachers select text for students based on student lexile scores/levels. Review and discuss reading strategies that pertain to specific types of texts (e.g. literary, information, technical) and to the task. Review and discuss literary elements so students have consistency of terminology within the grade level.



Agree on a bibliographic format.



Plan for students who need extra time, resources, or assistance.

 Provide students with a note taking method and template (Comparing Cultures in Cinderella).  Model how to read a chunk of the story, applying reading strategies to find literary elements and apply them to the elements of culture on the graphic organizer.  Discuss the term “relevant” and what it means to stay on task—two demands embedded in the rubric.  Teach strategies for identifying and selecting source material in the form of quotes, passages, data, and so forth as it relates to a controlling idea as a claim and task. PD/preparation  Strategies for teaching note-taking skills.

LDC Argumentation Module Template |© Literacy Design Collaborative, September 2011

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3. Note-taking 2 1 class period

Ability to prioritize and narrow supporting information.

Prompt: Prioritize relevant information in your notes on which to build your sequence or process. Product: notes and graphic organizer

Meets:  Provides a prioritized set of notes that connect points for logic structure or line of thought.



 Suggests implications drawn from information about the issue or topic.

PD/preparation

No scoring

 Have students refer to their prioritized notes to identify the top three elements of culture. What conclusion can they draw about cultural values based on this information?  Discuss the prompt and what students need to do to complete the writing portion.

Use the graphic organizer and a highlighter/colored pencils to identify differences in the story elements that may reflect cultural values and characteristics.

 Strategies for developing cognitive strategies as well as practical ones for prioritizing ideas, supporting evidence.

SKILLS CLUSTER 3: TRANSITION TO WRITING 10 minutes

1. Bridging Conversation Ability to transition from reading or researching phase to the writing phase.

Prompt: What are three similarities and differences between the two stories? What do those differences tell you about the culture in which the story was written? Product: short response (with bullets) class work

 Refer to rubric—point out demands and qualities of performance, such as “substantive and credible, clear, thorough, relevant," etc.

SKILLS CLUSTER 4: WRITING PROCESS 1 class period

1. Initiation of Task Ability to establish a controlling idea and consolidate information relevant to task.

Prompt: Write an introductory paragraph that clearly states your thesis (claim). Product: Paragraph

Meets:  Paragraph identifies key points that support development of information and/or explanation.



Writes in readable prose.

 Provide a checklist for the “ingredients” of an opening paragraph for an argumentative essay.  Model the process for writing a hook, definition of culture and fairy tale, and thesis statement (claim). PD/preparation  Deconstruct the demands and qualities of performances embedded in the rubric. What strategies or methods can help students acquire these skills and qualities of performance?

LDC Argumentation Module Template |© Literacy Design Collaborative, September 2011

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1 class period

2. Planning Ability to develop a line of thought and text structure appropriate to an argumentation/evaluation task.

Prompt: Complete a graphic organizer that outlines the key elements for each paragraph. Product: graphic organizer

Meets:  Applies graphic organizer strategy to develop reasoning for argument  Draws a credible implication from information about an issue or topic

 Use mini-lessons in logic structures.  Use discussion-based strategies to develop thinking relevant to prompt.

 Writes in readable prose

 Teachers develop templates

 Have students connect ideas among the arts, literature, and events. PD/preparation  PD in discussion-based strategies, questioning and logic structures

1 class period

3. Development Ability to construct an initial draft with an emerging line of thought and structure.

Prompt: Write an initial draft of the five-paragraph essay that includes topic and concluding paragraphs. Product: First draft

L2: Ability to analyze competing arguments. L3: Ability to make clarifying connections and/or provide examples.

Meets:  Provides an opening to include a controlling idea as a claim and an opening strategy relevant to the prompt  Provides an initial draft with all elements of the prompt addressed  Writes in readable prose

 How to open and end an argumentation composition (with a claim, counter claim, background information, a question, quote, or grand sweeping statement)  How to end a composition (e.g., as a comment about next steps, a restatement of main finding or a description of unanswered questions)  Use of template for all levels to guide students through first draft  Student-led revision sessions PD/preparation  Drafting strategies—conferencing and whole group  Discuss use of technology to manage some of the feedback to students

LDC Argumentation Module Template |© Literacy Design Collaborative, September 2011

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1–2 class periods

4. Revision Ability to apply revision strategies to refine development of argument, including line of thought, language usage, and tone as appropriate to audience and purpose.

Prompt: Apply revision strategies for clarity, logic, language, cohesion (students should do at least two drafts).

Meets:



Product: Revised drafts (two or more)



1 class period

5. Editing Ability to apply editing strategies and presentation applications.

Prompt: Finalize draft for the readership; apply finishing touches (e.g., visuals, neatness, formatting, copyediting). Product: Next to final draft

Demonstrates use of revision strategies that clarify logic and development of ideas; embeds relevant details; improves word usage and phrasing; and creates smooth transitions between sentences and paragraphs Applies a text structure to organize reading material content and to explain key points related to the prompt

Not yet: Attempts to meet the criteria for “meets” Meets:  Demonstrates use of strategies that enhance the readability and appearance of the work for presentation Not yet: Attempts to meet the criteria for “meets”

Final Draft

    

Develop ways to manage revision process so that students get feedback in timely and helpful ways Draft study (students volunteer a segment for class or small group help and discussion) Peer feedback on clarity of thinking and development of claim/argument Read-aloud for peer and adult feedback Strategies for embedding information— citation methods, quoting, paraphrasing

PD/preparation 

Identify strategies for revising for IDEAS and LOGIC before editing grammar. Strategies such as individual & group mentoring, “what’s good, what’s needed” feedback and peer feedback

 Use of error analysis to encourage self-correction of language usage and grammatical errors  Use of copyediting mark PD/preparation  Editing strategies  Technology and publishing methods

Submit your final draft before or on due date for scoring and feedback.

MATERIALS, REFERENCES, AND SUPPORTS FOR TEACHERS Multiple cultural versions of Cinderella: Louie, Ai-Ling, and Ed Young. Yeh-Shen: a Cinderella Story from China. New York: Puffin, 1999. Print.

FOR STUDENTS Comparison graphic organizer Pre-writing graphic organizer Computers Cinderella versions

Hickox, Rebecca, and Will Hillenbrand. The Golden Sandal: a Middle Eastern Cinderella Story. New York: Holiday House, 1998. Print. Silverman, Erica, and Susan Gaber. Raisel's Riddle. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1999. Print. Mehta, Lila, Meredith Babeaux. Brucker, and Youshan Tang. Anklet for a LDC Argumentation Module Template |© Literacy Design Collaborative, September 2011

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Princess: a Cinderella Story from India. Fremont, CA: Shen's, 2002. Print. Climo, Shirley, and Ruth Heller. The Egyptian Cinderella. New York: Crowell, 1989. Print. Coburn, Jewell Reinhart., and Connie McLennan. Domitila: a Cinderella Tale from the Mexican Tradition. Auburn, CA: Shen's, 2000. Print. McClintock, Barbara, and Charles Perrault. Cinderella. New York: Scholastic, 2005. Print.

LDC Argumentation Module Template |© Literacy Design Collaborative, September 2011

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Section 4: What Results? STUDENT WORK SAMPLES [Include at least two samples of student work at each scoring level.] CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT TASK (OPTIONAL: MAY BE USED AS PRE-TEST OR POST-TEST) Classroom assessment task Background to share with students (optional): Reading texts:

ARGUMENTATION CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT RUBRIC

Focus Reading/Research Controlling Idea Development Organization Conventions

Focus Reading/Research Controlling Idea Development Organization Conventions

LDC Argumentation Classroom Assessment Rubric MEETS EXPECTATIONS Addresses the prompt and stays on task; provides a generally convincing response. Demonstrates generally effective use of reading material to develop an argument. Establishes a credible claim and supports an argument that is logical and generally convincing. (L2) Acknowledges competing arguments while defending the claim. Develops reasoning to support claim; provides evidence from text in the form of examples or explanations relevant to the argument. (L3) Makes a relevant connection that supports argument. Applies an appropriate text structure to address specific requirements of the prompt. Demonstrates a command of standard English conventions and cohesion; employs language and tone appropriate to audience and purpose. NOT YET Attempts to address prompt, but lacks focus or is off-task. Demonstrates weak use of reading material to develop argument. Establishes a claim and attempts to support an argument but is not convincing. (L2) Attempts to acknowledge competing arguments. Reasoning is not clear; examples or explanations are weak or irrelevant. (L3) Connection is weak or not relevant. Provides an ineffective structure; composition does not address requirements of the prompt. Demonstrates a weak command of standard English conventions; lacks cohesion; language and tone are not appropriate to audience and purpose.

LDC Argumentation Module Template |© Literacy Design Collaborative, September 2011

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Teacher Work Section Here are added thoughts about teaching this module.

A. Teacher thoughts. Provide thoughts and ideas after teaching the module to different students in different classes.    B.

It is important to assess students' background knowledge of the traditional tale, Cinderella, because many students consider the Disney version the "original" story. We based our different cultural versions on the French version, commonly referred to as the original version of Cinderella It is also helpful to model and brainstorm what the term "values" means as it relates to cultures and how those values might be revealed in a story. We used a t-chart set up by the five categories of social studies to help students pull out and compare their cultural evidence. Examples were provided for the original version. This was helpful for the students.

Possible variations. Add ideas for spin-offs or extensions to the module.  This module could be used to compare/contrast any two cultures or regions where a familiar tale has been adapted/rewritten for another culture or region.

LDC Argumentation Module Template |© Literacy Design Collaborative, September 2011

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Name ___________________________

What is culture? ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________

Culture is ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________

Name ___________________________

What is culture? ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________

Culture is ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________

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Name ___________________________ Prompt: How are a culture’s values reflected in literature? After reading a version of Cinderella from a different culture, write an essay that discusses the similarities and differences between each story and evaluate how they reflect which values are most important in that culture. Be sure to support your position with evidence from the texts. IN YOUR OWN WORDS, briefly explain what the prompt is asking you to do.

______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ Name ___________________________ Prompt: How are a culture’s values reflected in literature? After reading a version of Cinderella from a different culture, write an essay that discusses the similarities and differences between each story and evaluate how they reflect which values are most important in that culture. Be sure to support your position with evidence from the texts. IN YOUR OWN WORDS, briefly explain what the prompt is asking you to do.

______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________

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Name ___________________________ What are three main differences between your assigned versions and the traditional version of Cinderella? Difference #1 __________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ Difference #2 __________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ Difference #3 __________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________

What do you think these differences tell you about your assigned culture? ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________

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Grade Seven Social Studies Lit Lab – Period Three

Name _______________________________ Date ________________________________

Comparing Cultures in Cinderella Cinderella by Perrault (Version you read/author) Geography  Takes place in France  Used horses/carriages for transportation  Rich and nobles lived in lavish homes, lower class lived simply  Great distance between homes  Kingdom was spread out

Culture/Customs        



Slept on a straw mattress Had a fireplace/cooked in the kitchen Had to carry water in a bucket Women wore only dresses; men dressed elaborately (coats, vests, stockings, etc.) Had own gardens for food Royalty celebrated with large parties called balls Some believed in magic (fairy godmother, magic spells) Proper behavior was important (ladies curtsied, men bowed) Old stories (fairy tales) to teach a lesson or a moral

Government/Economy  Had a rich monarchy (king, prince)  King lived in a palace and had a court (many servants)  There were nobles (royalty)  Kingdoms were guarded

Other

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Your Partner: _________________________________ Peer Checker (you): _________________________________

Cinderella Peer Revising Checklist Directions: 1. LISTEN to your partner read his/her letter ALOUD to you. As you listen, point out any words or phrases that are unclear, and help your partner FIX them. 2. READ your partner’s paper, QUIETLY to yourself. Place a YES or NO on the blank next to each FCA, according to whether or not it’s included in the paper.

Organization: ____ Is there a heading with a name, date, and section? ____ Is there a centered title? ____ Is there an introductory paragraph? ____ Are there three body paragraphs?

Content: Introductory paragraph: ____ Is there a clear topic sentence that addresses the prompt? ____ Does the paragraph contain at least four sentences? ____ Does the paragraph explain what culture is? ____ Does the paragraph explain what a fairy tale is? ____ Does the paragraph end with a clear thesis statement? Paragraph #2: ____ Is there a topic sentence that addresses similarities? ____ Are there at least five sentences? ____ Are there three similarities provided? ____ Does the paragraph end with a transition sentence? Paragraph #3: ____ Is there a topic sentence that addresses differences? ____ Are there at least five sentences? ____ Are there three differences provided? ____ Does the paragraph end with a transition sentence? Paragraph #4: LDC Argumentation Module Template |© Literacy Design Collaborative, September 2011

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____ Is there a topic sentence that addresses culture? ____ Are there at least five sentences? ____ Are there three examples of culture? ____ Are the examples supported with evidence from the text? ____ Is there a concluding sentence that sums up the essay? Concluding Paragraph: ____ Did they restate the thesis statement as the first sentences of the paragraph? ____ Does the paragraph contain at least four sentences? ____ Does the paragraph restate what culture is? ____ Does the paragraph restate what a fairy tale is? ____ Does the paragraph end with a concluding sentence that addresses the prompt?

Conventions: ____ Does each sentence have a capital letter and the correct end punctuation? ____ Are all the words spelled correctly? (If not, circle them.) ____ Is each paragraph indented? ____ Are there any sentences that begin with AND, OR, BUT, SO, or BECAUSE? What are at least two additional suggestions for improving the organization, content, or conventions of your partner’s paper: A. ________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ B. ________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________

3. Give this page to your partner so he/she can make revisions for the items you marked as NO.

LDC Argumentation Module Template |© Literacy Design Collaborative, September 2011

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