A report from the front lines of taxi rides

A report from the front lines of taxi rides

TAXICABS IN  TOKYO 2015 New Version A report from the front lines of taxi rides Tokyo Sightseeing Taxis Tokyo Sightseeing Taxis A new form of trav...

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TAXICABS IN  TOKYO

2015

New Version

A report from the front lines of taxi rides Tokyo Sightseeing Taxis

Tokyo Sightseeing Taxis A new form of travelling where certified drivers guide you through Tokyo with hospitality.

Maternity Taxis

CONTENTS 01

An overview of the taxi industry

02

The loosening of regulations regarding entry in the taxi industry and its repercussions ・・・・・・・・ 5

03

The current status and initiatives in management・・・ 7

04

Initiatives in efficiency and streamlining・・・・・・・・・・11

05

The working conditions of taxi drivers and future initiatives ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・ 13

06

Safety measures・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・17

07

The improvement of taxi services

08

The current status of the taxi industry in other countries ・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・ 27

09

Future initiatives concerning the hosting of the 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo ・・・33

10

Industrial, governmental, and social activities

DATA

Reference materials

・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・1

UNIVERSAL DESIGN TAXI

・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・ 19

・・・37

・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・・

39 

Fixed Fares from/to Haneda Airport

1

SECTION

01

An overview of the taxi industry

Assuming an essential role in city life, only made possible with door-to-door services. Number of carried passengers, classified by transportation facility Other public transport facilities share the responsibility of transporting passengers only within specific time frames (from first departures until last stops) from one designated location to another, but taxis are available twenty-four hours a day, with door-to-door services that meet the needs of individual passengers and play an essential role in city life.

Nationwide

14,460

million people

1,594 million people (4.4 million people per day) (5.8%)

4,510

(400 million people per day) (48.1%)

9,147

million people (120 million people per day) (15.4%)

million people

Taxis

(25 million people per day) (30.7%)

JR

Private railways

Busses

Total number of carried passengers nationwide:

29,711 million people (100%) Source:“Transportation-related statistics”by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (2014)

Tokyo

1,400

330

million people

1,334

(3.8 million people million people (3.7 million people million people per day) per day) (29.9%) (1 million people (28.5%) per day) (8.0%)

Taxis

JR

Subway

457 1,096 million people (3 million people per day) (23.4%)

Private railways

million people (1.3 million people per day) (9.8%)

2 million people (50 thousand people per day) (0.4%)

Busses

Streetcars

Total number of non-periodic carried passengers in the special wards of Tokyo:

4,637 million people (100%) Source:“Trends in Carried Passengers”in the Annual Report on Urban Transportation (2014), Hired Taxi Almanac of 2015

1

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

TA X I C A B S I N TO K YO 2 015

Total number of taxis nationwide (2014)

Total number of taxis in Tokyo (2014)

240,853

30,907

48,885 (20.3% of total nationwide)

01

An overview of the taxi industry

14,430

20.3%

SECTION

3,548

Corporate taxis

Private taxis

Hired taxis

Transitions in the total number of taxis nationwide (by ten thousand)

28 273,181 273,740 273,529 270,703 271,327

27

26

267,141

256,875

256,403

255,984

263,282

257,780

256,403

265,431

259,033 257,088 256,343

251,466

25

246,322 243,247

24

240,853

1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 As of March 31, 2015, according to the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism

Transitions in the number of corporate taxis in Tokyo (by thousand)

40 36,743 35,619

35

35,271

33,288 31,384

30

37,671 37,095

28,632 28,434

30,371 31,243

29,192

32,189

31,806

32,596

34,444 31,314 30,924 31,092

30,907

25 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 As of March 31, 2015, according to the Kanto District Transport Bureau

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

2

SECTION

01

An overview of the taxi industry

Meeting regional transportation needs in five zones. Taxi zones and number of vehicles

Nishitama transportation area

Kitatama transportation area

Special zones / Busan transportation area

8 companies

39 companies

346 companies

Corporate taxis

209

Corporate taxis Private taxis

1,748 170

Corporate taxis

27,646 3,548 31,194

Hired taxis Total

13,982

Private taxis

●Hikawa ●Ome

●Ikebukuro

●Itsukaichi ●Tachikawa

●Shinjuku ●Tokyo

●Hachioji

●Shinagawa

●Machida

Oshima Niijima

Minamitama transportation area 24 companies Corporate taxis Private taxis

Miyakejima

Islands District

1,231 278

Hachijojima

38 companies Corporate taxis

73

As of March 31, 2015, according to the Kanto District Transport Bureau

3

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

TA X I CAB S I N TO K YO 2 015

A systematic 24-hour service system of about 2.5 people per vehicle. The scale of corporate taxi companies SECTION

Taxi companies, which are mostly small and mid-sized, do not receive monetary aid from the government like other public transportation companies do.

By scale in number of employees 301 - 1,000 people

5 companies

32 companies

(1.0%)

(1.3%)

(8.3%)

100 people or less

10 million yen or less

50 million yen or less

115 companies Number of employees

More than 100 million yen

100 million yen or less

4 companies

(16.1%)

An overview of the taxi industry

By scale in capital

1,001 people or more

62 companies

01

171 companies

40 companies

(29.8%)

(44.2%)

(10.4%)

Capital

Number of companies by scale

Number of companies by scale

386companies

386companies

(100.0%)

(100.0%) 30 million yen or less

101 - 300 people

138 companies

205 companies

(35.8%)

(53.1%)

As of April 1, 2014, according to the Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association

The service system of corporate taxis PM12:00 PM

0 0:0

2:0

1

AM

8:

0 8:0

0

AM

AM

9:

00

AM 10 :0 0

Shift Shift D D

Shift Shift C C

PM

12

AM

Shift Shift F F

:0

0

1:

AM 7 :0 0

AM 6

PM6:00

24 hours

Dispatch

00

Shift Shift A A

AM6:00 0

Shift Shift E E

Shift Shift B B

0

7:0

0

4:0 PM

00

AM

PM

Corporate taxis use a service system that meets the demands of each and every passenger from early in the morning to late at night all throughout the year primarily with the vehicles driven by about 2.5 drivers each, and divided into six shifts, namely A, B, C, D, E, and F.

:0 0 A M

4: 8:0

3:

00

AM

AM

Ret

2:0

0

PM

0

4:0

AM

0

00

AM

*1. In addition to Shifts A to F on the right, there are also a few vehicles that operate in additional shift systems including Shift G (2 p.m. to 8 a.m.), Shift H (3 p.m. to 9 a.m.), and Shift I (4 p.m. to 10 a.m.).

2:0

urn

0 AM 1: 0 0

:00

10

PM

AM0:00 As of 31.03.15, according to the Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

4

SECTION

02

The loosening of regulations regarding entry

*1

The increased number of vehicles after the loosening of regulations Restrictions on the number of taxi were eliminated on February 1, 2002 and the terms and conditions that were put in place until then were substantially loosened as shown below. (1) From a system of approval to a system of prior notification (2) The minimum number of vehicles that had to be kept dropping from 60 to 10 (3) From the need to own a business office and garage to having rights to lease (4) From the need to purchase new vehicles to the right to purchase used vehicles

■Entry has become extremely easy and the expenses required per vehicle have dramatically dropped as a result of the substantial loosening of the conditions for entry. Because it has become a business that anyone can enter at reasonable fees, the number of taxis has grown significantly in a short period of time to reach 6,087 vehicles. There is also a significant number of companies that started off with ten vehicles but increased their number of vehicles due to increased management efficiency. ■Taxis are regulated in some form or another in terms of comprehensive metropolitan transport policies in most major cities throughout the world. However, metropolitan transport policies were ignored in Japan and principles of competition were forced in. This led to opposite effects such as the wages of drivers decreasing and traffic disturbances.

*2

Initiatives related to the recent decrease in number of vehicles

The supply-side control measures (the designation, etc. of specified special regions for monitoring) enacted by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism through notification on July 11, 2008 ■ New entry → The minimum number of vehicles is to be increased from 10 to 40(special zones / Busan area) ■ Increased number of vehicles → upgraded inspections, etc. ■ Decreased number of vehicles → exempt from inspections ■ Initiatives related to the autonomous decrease of vehicles within the industry

This has led to a significant decrease in the number of vehicles as of 2010.

Revisions in the“Act on Special Measures Concerning Taxis”

*3

The Act on the Partial Revision of Acts on Special Measures, etc. Concerning the Standardization and Revitalization of General Passenger Vehicle Transportation Business in Specific Regions was enacted on January 27, 2014 (designation, etc. of specific and semi-specific regions). General rules

■ New entry: by permission  ■ Increasing vehicle count: by notification ■ Automatically approved fares (strict examinations for fares that fall below the minimum)

Specific regions (designated by the Minister and advisory committee of the governing council) ■ New entry / increasing vehicle count: prohibited ■ Enforceable supply reduction measures ■ Authorized unregulated fares (orders for changes are given if fares fall below the minimum) Council Antitrust law exemption Approval

Regional planning Business operator

Approval

Business operator plans

Period: 3 years

Proposals for decreases through business methods It is necessary for all inside operators to get approval for plans from business operators.

(The implementation of autonomous demand-activated plans and supply reduction measures) Recommendations and orders concerning decreases through business methods

Outside operator

The government

*Cancelled regardless of the designation period if it has been confirmed that there is no other reason for designation.

Semi-specific regions (designated by the Minister) ■ New entry: by approval ■ Increasing vehicle count: by permission ■ Authorized unregulated fares (orders for changes are given if fares fall below the minimum) Council Antitrust law applied Regional planning Business operator

Period: 3 years

Opinions on new entry and increasing vehicle count

Authorization

Revitalization project plans

Gathering opinions

(The implementation of autonomous demand-activated plans along with supply reduction measures) Permission for new entry / approval for increased vehicle count

Business operator

The government

*Cancelled regardless of the designated institution if it has been confirmed that there is no other reason for designation.

Designated regions Specific designated regions ◆ Mandatory measures to prevent overworked driving Stipulations concerning the prevention of overworked driving have been (designated by notification) (designated by notification) upgraded from being ministerial ordinances to being legal obligations. By registration By registration By registration ◆ Implementing revitalization projects for business operators [training] [examination] [examination] Providing stipulations that are of the same intentions as those of the Trucking Business Act. Nationwide

5

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

TA X I C A B S

in the taxi industry and its repercussions

I N TO K YO 2 015

Comparing frameworks that involve taxi business regulations Relationship with P5



*1

*2

*3

Enforcement of law on special measures Acts for the promotion of improved services and safe usage of After October 2009 taxis Loosening of regulations Before 2002

Entry

Loosening of regulations After 2002

Specific regions (specified in accordance with factors such as excess supply)

General rules

By licensing

By permission

By permission

(licensed only within the range needed to meet demands)

(permitted if criteria such as safety standards are met)

(permitted if criteria such as safety standards are met)

By permission (permitted only when there is new demand)

General rules

Semi-specific regions (specified regions that may have excess supply)

By permission

By permission

(permitted if criteria such as safety standards are met)

(permitted within the range where there is no excess supply)

Specific regions (specified regions that have excess supply)

Permission not granted

SECTION

02

The loosening of regulations regarding entry in the taxi industry and its repercussions

By approval Increasing vehicle count

Fares

(- approved within the range where there is no By approval By prior notification By prior notification By approval By prior notification excess supply (approved only within - approved with (unregulated as a (unregulated as a (approved only when (unregulated as a the range needed to compliance with general rule) general rule) there is new demand) general rule) meet demand) laws, managerial efforts, etc. taken into consideration)

By approval

(1) Controlling increased vehicle counts

̶

By approval

By approval

By approval

Emergency adjustment measures

Emergency adjustment measures

(new entry and (new entry and increased number of vehicles increased numbers of are prohibited for a specified period in regions vehicles are prohibited where excess supplies are found) for a specified period in regions where excess supply is found)

Authorized unregulated fare system

Authorized unregulated fare system

By approval

(- notifications on the range stipulated by the government / orders to change fares outside the range)

(- notifications on the range stipulated by the government / orders to change fares outside the range)

̶

̶

̶

(2) Promotion of decreased vehicle counts

Measures against excess supply

Participation in the Council Participation in the Efforts by business Council operators Initiatives by business operators (- mandatory decrease

Participation in the Council Efforts by business operators ̶

̶

̶

(autonomously developing demand, for instance by decreasing the number of vehicles based on plans developed by the Council)

̶

No antitrust law exemption

̶

̶

̶

Measures for business operators not participating in the Council → none

Approval not granted

of the number of (autonomously vehicles based on developing demand, plans developed by the for instance by Council decreasing the number - autonomously of vehicles based on developing demand plans developed by the based on plans Council) developed by the Council) No antitrust law

exemption

̶

With antitrust law exemption

Measures for business operators Measures for not participating in business operators the Council not participating in (orders to decrease the Council supply transportation capacity through → none

restrictions on business methods)

Source: The Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (2014)

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

6

SECTION

03

The current status and initiatives

Labor costs amount to 72% of all costs. The taxi business is a labor-intensive business. The cost structure of corporate taxis Special zones / Busan district (31 standard companies) in 2013

Total labor costs

72.3%

Other

Fuel and oil costs

7.3%

Vehicle repair costs

1.3%

Vehicle amortization costs

1.8%

Non-operating expenses

0.9%

16.4% - Insurance premiums - Vehicle lease fees - Imposed facility tax - Facility charges - Accident compensation fees - Road usage fees, etc.

Cost structure transitions %

Year

1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Total labor 80.8 79.9 79.3 79.0 78.4 78.5 78.4 77.1 76.7 76.1 75.8 74.9 73.5 73.8 73.8 72.6 72.6 72.3 costs Fuel and oil costs

4.5 4.6 4.4 4.7

4.9

5.0 5.0 5.2 5.5 5.9 6.2 6.8 6.9 6.1 6.9

7.1

6.8

7.3

Vehicle 1.3 repair costs

1.2 1.3 1.3

1.4

1.4 1.5 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.7 1.5

1.6

1.4

1.3

Vehicle 1.9 amortization costs

2.0 2.0 2.0

1.8

1.8 1.8 1.9 1.7 1.6 1.5 1.5 1.7 1.5 1.0

1.2

1.6

1.8

Non-operating 0.8 expenses

0.9 1.2 1.3

1.5

1.1 1.0 1.1 0.9 0.8 0.8 0.8 1.0 0.9 0.8

1.0

0.8

0.9

Other

10.7 11.4 11.8 11.7 12.0 12.2 12.3 13.2 13.6 13.9 14.2 14.5 15.4 16.0 16.0 16.5 16.8 16.4 As of March 31, 2014, according to the Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association

7

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

TA X I C A B S

in management

I N TO K YO 2 015

Consumer price index (special wards of Tokyo) Index uses 1975 as 100

400

Education 350

300

Taxi 250

SECTION

Healthcare 200

General

03

The current status and initiatives in management

Utilities 150

100

2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 1983 1982 1981 1980 1979 1978 1977 1976 1975 Source:“Costs in Tokyo”by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government (2014)

The rise of taxi fares compared with the rising fares of other forms of public transportation Index uses 1955 as 100

2,000

16.0times

1,500

1,000

8.8times

8.0times

Taxis

JR

12.7times

13.3times

Subway

Busses

9.5times

500

100

Private railways

Streetcars

Source: Annual Report on Urban Transportation (2014)

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

8

SECTION

03

The current status and initiatives

Active efforts are being made in dealing with fluctuating fuel prices and environmental measures. The prices of fuel for taxis LP gas prices are always unstable due to large fluctuations in FOB prices and currency exchange rates, and because half of the imports are from Saudi Arabia and other Middle Eastern countries. ■ Shifting LPG prices ■

(yen / liter)

85

83.66

82.96 80

78.78

Fair prices included in the fairs

75

71.23

70.44

70

68.0

71.85

66.71

66.30

65 60 55 50

54.80 52.09

53.75 51.50 50.76

53.97 52.99 53.51 52.53

59.11

57.27 54.04

1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 As of March 31, 2015, according to the Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association

Environmental measures As of 1962, corporate taxis in Tokyo have been running on the environmentallyfriendly LP gas, which emits low amounts of substances such as Nox (nitrogen oxide), SPM (suspended particulate matter), and Sox (sulfur oxide). The drivers also do their best to control air pollution by practicing eco-driving (fuel-efficient driving) as well as idling stop driving , which are required under Tokyo s ordinance on environmental preservation. Active efforts in business operations that cause less environmental burden (under the Green Management certification system) have been promoted since 2004 along with the incorporation of fuel-efficient and low-emission vehicles such as hybrid and electric vehicles. An EV/HV taxi stand was set up in front of the Shin-Marunouchi Building at JR Tokyo Station in October 2011. ■ Number of taxis by fuel type ■ By fuel type

Tama district Total

Electric vehicles (EV)

Clean diesel vehicles

Gasolinepowered vehicles

Total

0

11

3

243

26,100

4

4

2

0

30

3,084

358

4

13

3

273

29,184

LPG

24,667

1,176

354

2,959

89

27,626

1,265

By district

Special zones / Busan district

Plugin hybrid LPG converted vehicles vehicles(*1) (PHV)

Hybrid (HV)

(Note) *1. So-called triple hybrid vehicles, where hybrid vehicles such as the Prius have been modifi ed so that they can run on LPG.

9

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

As of April 1, 2014, according to the Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association

TA X I CAB S I N TO K YO 2 015

in management

Yearly amount of tax paid per vehicle Amount of tax paid for an LPG taxi vehicle: (standard-sized vehicle) 579,133 yen, previous year (440,848 yen) [National tax] [Local tax] Classification

● Liquefied petroleum gas tax: 149,803 yen ● Petroleum and coal tax: 11,471 yen ● Consumption tax: 390,311 yen ● Automobile weight tax: 7,800 yen ● Automobile acquisition tax: 10,248 yen ● Automobile tax: 9,500 yen

Tax type

Amount

Liquefied petroleum gas tax

149,803 yen

Petroleum and coal tax

11,471 yen

Vehicle type

National tax

Consumption tax

Standardsized vehicle 40,992 yen

Basis for calculation Amount of tax: 9.8 yen per liter Annual distance: 88,812km (246.7km per day) Retained amount: 5.81km per liter Amount of tax: 1,340 yen per ton Annual usage: 15,286 liters

7.3/100 of 46,186 in 2013 transportation income = 3,372 yen 365 days 8/100

Vehicle repair cost 17,520 yen

1.3/100 of 46,186 in 2013 transportation income = 600 yen 365 days 8/100

Non-operating cost 12,147 yen

0.9/100 of 46,186 in 2013 transportation income = 416 yen 365 days 8/100

Other expenses 221,190 yen

16.4/100 of 46,186 in 2013 transportation income = 7,575 yen 365 days 8/100

Local tax

7,800 yen

Automobile acquisition tax

Standard-sized vehicles: 10,248 yen

Automobile tax

9,500 yen

Gaseous hydrocarbon *1,340 yen per ton as of October 1, 2012

8/100 of 2,562,000 as the cost of a vehicle = 204,960 yen 5 years

Fuel and oil cost 98,462 yen

Automobile weight tax

Remarks

SECTION

03

The current status and initiatives in management

8% taxed as of April 1, 2014

2,600 yen per 0.5 tons

2/100 of 2,562,000 as the cost of a vehicle = 51,240 yen 5 years Those (for business) that exceed 1,500cc

(Note) 1. Subject to consumption tax of 8% as of April 1, 2014 (3% increase)

Taxed as of April 1, 1984

As of March 31, 2015, according to the Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

10

04

SECTION

Initiatives in efficiency and

Promoting digitalization and active IT use to provide better services. Efficiency in vehicles dispatched by radio Effects brought upon by the introduction of digital systems Shortened average reception time for dispatch (example by Wireless Group A)

70 seconds to 27 seconds by switching from analog radio to digital radio *time shortened by about 60%

Number of analog radio units Number of digital radio units

■ The spread of digital radio ■

(Units)

40,000 35,000 30,000

9,710

25,000 20,000 15,000

33,138

33,487

31,938

24,853

10,000 5,000 0

1,861

2001

2002

2003

17,335

18,486

14,028

8,089

2004

2005

2006

5,890

2,728

24,515

24,467

2008

2009

6,367

13,922

23,598

2007

813

565

259

179

23,992

21,675

21,827

23,391

23.897

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

As of March 31, 2015, according to the Kanto Wireless Association

■ Number of radio dispatches ■

(Number of dispatches)

14,000,000 13,500,000 13,000,000

13,573,530

Number of dispatches

12,500,000

12,593,558

12,000,000 11,500,000

11,648,746

11,000,000 10,500,000

10,175,534 9,901,723

10,000,000

10,530,385

9,555,058

9,500,000 9,000,000

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

As of March 31, 2015, according to the Kanto Wireless Association

Acceptance of credit cards, electronic money, etc. In addition to accepting conventional forms of payment such as cash, tickets, or coupons; the acceptance of credit cards, IC cards, electronic money, etc. to conform to the diversification in methods of payment is making payment cashless and fast. The cost of installing systems for this is about thirty-thousand yen per vehicle but the number of vehicles that have them is rising each year.

Credit card system installed: 89% Electronic money system installed: 63% (from a survey of corporate taxis, as of March 31, 2014)

11

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

TA X I C A B S

streamlining

I N TO K YO 2 015

Use Tokyo’s most widely-used smartphone-based taxi dispatch system that allows you to reach roughly 11,000 taxis. Dispatching a taxi with a smartphone app (Tokyo Taxi Association-TAKKUN)

Please be sure to install it!

It is now possible to quickly and easily call a cab with a smartphone app. The number of users is increasing as it has many functions that eliminate the need to explain to an operator where you need to be picked up or where your destination is. The Tokyo Taxi Association-TAKKUN app, which is the first of its kind in the world - exceeding the boundaries of taxi companies and allowing you to call the nearest taxi vehicle to you in special zones / the Busan district, began its full-scale services in January 22, 2014. This app currently allows you to reach roughly 10,963 taxis. (The total number of taxis in Tokyo is about 40,000, which accounts for about 23% of all taxis nationwide.) (The total number of corporate taxis in Tokyo is about 30,000, which accounts for about 34% of all corporate taxis nationwide.) Plans for further enhancements such as those in collaboration with multilingual and sightseeing apps are underway for the Olympic and Paralympic Games.

SECTION

04

Initiatives in efficiency and streamlining

Official Tokyo Taxi Association-TAKKUN website http://takkun.taxi-tokyo.or.jp/en/ (Units)

■ Shifts in number of vehicles that can be dispatched ■

12,000 10,963 11,000 10,000 9,000 8,000 7,000 6,000

About 22 % of corporate taxis 6,500

January 2014 (starting point)

9,200

About 34% of corporate taxis

About 31% of corporate taxis July 2014

March 2015

As of March 31, 2015, according to the Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

12

SECTION

05

The working conditions of taxi drivers

There is a roughly 2.9 million yen difference in average yearly income when compared with other industries. We must make efforts to improve the situation. Comparison of income between taxi drivers and workers in other industries

by ten thousand yen

688

700

669

678

661

652

647

634

600

643

579

Male workers of all industries in Tokyo - average yearly income 500

496

500

496

436

428

401

400

403

379

365

392

348

300 259

Taxi drivers in Tokyo - average yearly income 223

200

100

77 82

88 85

0 Year Male workers of all industries in Tokyo

1967 1968

1975

-

1985

-

1989

-

1998

-

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

77

88

-

259

-

496

-

579

-

688

-

669

661

634

652

647

643

678

82

85

-

223

-

428

-

500

-

496

-

436

365

348

379

401

403

392

(by ten thousand yen)

Taxi drivers in Tokyo

-

(by ten thousand yen)

Source: Basic Survey on Wage Structure, by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (2014)

13

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

TA X I C A B S

and future initiatives

I N TO K YO 2 015

Comparison of the estimated yearly income of automobile drivers (males, in Tokyo)

The same income as bus drivers due to a (by a thousand yen)

Truck (large)

7,000

5,501

Truck (medium / small)

6,000

4,752

Taxi 5,000

37% increase

All industries

6,780

Bus

5,363

3,919

4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0 Source: Basic Survey on Wage Structure, by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (2014)

SECTION

05

The working conditions of taxi drivers and future initiatives

Comparison of yearly income between taxi drivers in various countries (Estimated: Adjusted to labor hours on a Japanese level)

about

6 million yen

(British citizens) (by ten thousand yen)

600

The same income as N.Y. taxi drivers due to a 20% increase

500

about 400

3.5 million yen

about

about

5

million yen

(immigrants)

4 million yen

(immigrants)

300

200

100

0

Singapore (1 Singapore dollar = about 90 yen)

Tokyo (yen)

New York London (1 dollar = about 110 yen) (1 pound = about 170 yen) March 2012, inspection of Singapore by Nihon Kotsu Co., Ltd. April 2013, inspection of New York by the Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association November 2014, inspection of London by the Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

14

SECTION

05

The working conditions of taxi

Promoting the employment of new-graduate and female drivers. Securing new labor power through the employment of new-graduate drivers. The employment of new-graduate drivers New graduates are welcome in the industry, as the average age of taxi drivers is now very high at 58.4 years old. They can flexibly respond to diversifying needs such as sightseeing taxis and nursing care / maternity taxis, and enhance the image of the industry as well. Transition in the average age of corporate taxi drivers (age)

59 58 57 56 55

53.9

54 53 52 51 50.1 50 49

50.8

51.2 51.1

51.7

54.5

55.0

55.5

56.0

56.4

57.9 57.9 58.2

56.7 56.8

58.4

57.2

52.1 52.3

1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 As of March 31, 2015, according to the Tokyo Taxi Center

Benefits for new graduates

- Low turnover rate (about 10% of new graduates who become taxi drivers leave the profession, while the rate is 30% in other industries)

- The income is higher than others in the same age range The average monthly income in the taxi industry in 2014: about 327,000 yen The average starting salary for new graduates in Tokyo: 212,100 yen The average starting salary for new graduates: 200,400 yen (Source: Results of the Basic Survey on Wage Structure, by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (2014))

- Easy to have a work-life balance (Those with alternate-day shifts can make time for themselves with 11 to 13 working days per month.)

Number of new-graduate drivers recruited (people)

172

250

220

200 150 100

10

14

2010

2011

31

68

50 0

2012

2013

2014

2015

Survey by the Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association

15

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

TA X I CAB S I N TO K YO 2 015

drivers and future initiatives

Orientation sessions for hiring new-graduate drivers

(Held on December 9 and 15, 2014)

Explanation on the employment of new graduates by business operators with experience in this area were given to about a hundred recruitment officers and related parties of taxi companies.

Comparison of monthly work hours between taxi drivers and workers in other industries Taxi drivers in Tokyo

(hours)

Male workers of all industries in Tokyo

230

220

219

217

217

221

212

210

203

202

204

205

202

200

198

200

210

209

208

198

200

193 190

190

186

181

180

170

176

178

177

177

177

178

178

177

178

177

178

177

174

SECTION 175

176

174

173

173

174

05

The working conditions of taxi drivers and future initiatives

1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Source: Survey on Wage Structure, by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (2014)

Transition in the number of taxi drivers (number of driver’ s certificates issued) [Men / Women] Numbers of taxi drivers

Numbers of female drivers

1,000

76,000

900

74,000 820 72,000

800 Numbers of taxi drivers Numbers of female drivers

70,000

700

68,000

600

66,000

500

64,000

400

62,000

62,961 300

60,000

200

58,000

100

56,000

0 2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

1999

1998

1997

1996

1995

1994

1993

1992

1991

1990

1989

1988

1987

1986

1985

1984

1983

1982

1981

1980

1979

1978

1977

1976

1975

As of March 31, 2015, according to the Tokyo Taxi Center

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

16

06

SECTION

Safety measures

Initiatives in safety and security are the pillar of the taxi business. Transition in the number of accidents causing injury or death Taxis Accidents causing injury or death / cases

(cases)

8,000 6,000 4,000

4,088 4,265 8

2,000 0

3

4,813 5,068

5,222

7,226 6,741

6

5

3

(people)

6,330 6,303 6,085 6,072 6,080 5,885 5,917 5,604 5,381 5,467

9

9 7

Deaths / people

9 3

4

6

8 4

7

20 4,764 4,157

15 3,637

8 4

4

4

6

10 5 0

1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 As of March 31, 2015, according to the Tokyo Metropolitan Police Department

On the introduction of drive recorders Drive recorders, like flight recorders for automobiles, equipped with CCD cameras and G sensors. They are used for efficiency in dealing with automobile accidents as well as for education and training on safety.

96% of corporate taxis have external cameras and 85% have internal cameras. Measures for preventing automobile accidents Measures taken by taxis for preventing automobile accidents In addition to holding spring & autumn traffic safety campaigns, safe driver contests, automobile transportation safety checks and overhaul inspections during the summer and year-end / New Year holiday seasons, Zero Accident Day activities, and summer campaigns for ending all traffic accidents, corporate taxi companies actively participate in the prevention of traffic accidents by promoting activities such as This city and streets where kindness runs through , Great campaign to prevent traffic accidents with all our might , and Proper seat belt fastening , as well as spring & autumn workshops for accident prevention officers, by labeling the fifth of every month Zero Taxi Accident Day , and distributing posters and stickers.

Tokyo Hire - Taxi Mutual Insurance Cooperative (established in April 1972) As of March 31, 2015, business offices with 169 union members, 156 offices in bodily injury mutual aid associations, 122 offices with 9,028 vehicles in property damage mutual aid associations, and 7,748 other vehicles are affiliated. Safety education for the prevention of traffic accidents and a mutual aid system for traffic accidents (where up to 200 million yen per person and 200 million yen per accident in benefits are provided in cases where maximum insurance coverage is exceeded) are established. Furthermore, an umbrella policy with a Cooperative package that provides 5 billion yen (200 million yen exemption) per accident in coverage was incorporated in April 2000. There is also an add-on security system of workers' accident compensation insurance for occupational and nonoccupational deaths of employees as well as occupational residual disabilities in place (138 offices with 22,401 people in public welfare and mutual aid businesses affiliated).

17

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

TA X I C A B S I N TO K YO 2 015

Automobile accident prevention and victim support National Agency for Automotive Safety and Victims' Aid

(reorganized in 2003)

Courses on how to prevent automobile accidents are given to dispatchers and aptitude tests for drivers are given through institutions that are involved in the same measures. Victims of automobile accidents are also provided with psychological and economic support.

Courses for dispatchers, etc. Measures to ensure the prevention of accidents are taken through courses on dispatching duties and the laws involved to maintain the safe operation of automobiles.

Aptitude tests and counseling for drivers Measures are taken to prevent accidents through various diagnoses from a psychological and physiological aspect of the drivers personalities, attitudes toward safe driving, cognitive and processing functioning, and visual functioning, as well as guidance and advice on safe driving that take into account their personal traits.

Automobile accident victim support Victims of automobile accidents are given both psychological and economic support such as through payments of nursing care fees for those suffering from serious residual disabilities, loans for orphans from automobile accidents, the establishment of medical centers, and the opening of hotlines for consultations on accidents.

SECTION

06

Safety measures

(toll-free: 0570-000738) Transition in taking aptitude tests by drivers (people)

35,000 30,000 Taxis (excluding private taxis)

25,000

Trucks Busses

25,711

20,000 15,000

15,287

10,000 5,000

6,636

0 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 As of March 31, 2015, according to the National Agency for Automotive Safety and Victims' Aid

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

18

SECTION

07

The improvement in taxi services

Available 24 hours a day when it is time to rush off to the maternity hospital. Maternity Taxis Simply by registering once, customers can be immediately taken to the hospital when needed, 24 hours a day, 365 days a week, without the need to give the driver directions. Within two years after this service began in 2012, about one-third of the fifteen hundred taxis in Tokyo became available for the service. About half of the pregnant women in Tokyo have registered and roughly 10 to 20% have used a Maternity Taxi when going into labor.

Number of Maternity Taxi registrations / number of dispatches during labor (people / cases)

8,000

:Number of registrations :Number of dispatches during labor

*Number of deliveries in Tokyo in 2014 (per month) :9,165 people

5,293 people

5,269 people 6,000

4,769 people (52.0%)

4,773 people

(57.4%)

4,343 people

(57.7%)

(52.0%)

(47.3%)

4,000

1,446

1,394 2,000

0

1,423

registrations

registrations

registrations

(15.2%)

(15.7%)

(15.5%)

November 2014

December 2014

January 2015

1,286 registrations (14.0%)

February 2105

1,502 registrations (16.3%)

March 2015

Reference: Table of radio taxi dispatches, by the Kanto Automobile Wireless Association Outline of the annual population survey report of 2015 (determined number)

19

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

TA X I C A B S I N TO K YO 2 015

Feel safe when your child is being transported because you know the driver. Kids’taxis Your child, even if alone, can take a taxi with a deferred payment system driven by an elite driver in charge of kids whom they are familiar with. It is a popular service that is mostly used for travelling to and from home and school / cram school. Passengers with newborns or infants can also relax without having the need to worry about their surroundings. Prefectures with registered Child Raising Taxis services

Unregistered

43%

Registered

57% 27 prefectures

Source: The National Child Raising Taxi Association (2014)

Number of registered Child Raising Taxi drivers in Japan (people)

1,800 1,600 1,400 1,200 1,000 800 600 400 200 0

24 2005

215 2006

407

2007

675

2008

915

2009

1,101

2010

1,274

1,450

1,643 people

SECTION

07

The improvement in taxi services

2011

2012

2013

Source: The National Child Raising Taxi Association (2014)

Number of registered Child Raising Taxi companies in Japan (companies)

160 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0

127

146

142

companies

2012

2013

97 40

48

55

2007

2008

68

8 2005

2006

2009

2010

2011

Source: The National Child Raising Taxi Association (2014)

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

20

SECTION

07

The improvement in taxi services

Also popular with elderly passengers, passengers in wheelchairs, and passengers carrying a lot of baggage. UD (Universal Design) taxis On the introduction of UD taxis UD taxis are being introduced and promoted for uncovering demands by individuals and revitalizing services. Number of vehicles introduced (auxiliary base)

Tokyo

Kanagawa Prefecture

Saitama Prefecture

Chiba Prefecture

2011

2 vehicles

15 vehicles

̶

6 vehicles

2012

13 vehicles

71 vehicles

10 vehicles

6 vehicles

2013

13 vehicles

34 vehicles

4 vehicles

1 vehicles

2014

17 vehicles

18 vehicles

3 vehicles

5 vehicles

*The figures for 2014 represent the number of applications submitted by the end of December 2014. According to the Kanto District Transport Bureau

Training for Universal Drivers Training on subjects such as how to communicate with elderly and disabled passengers, how to handle wheelchairs, and how to assist with boarding is provided by the National Welfare Transportation Service Association. Courses that offer the necessary training for drivers is also provided by the Tokyo Taxi Center as of April 1, 2014 and half of the drivers in Tokyo are scheduled to be qualified by 2020. ■ Transitions in the number of drivers who have completed UD training (Tokyo) ■ (people) (total sum)

11,000

8,989 9,000 7,000 4,970

5,000 3,000 1,000 0 -1,000

1,616 431

Total in

2011

Total in

2012

Total in

2013

Total in

2014 (April to December)

*The figures for 2014 represent the number of drivers by the end of December 2014. Source: The National Welfare Transportation Service Association

21

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

TA X I CAB S I N TO K YO 2 015

Certified drivers can take you on a sightseeing course through Tokyo. Tokyo Sightseeing Taxi Certification for Tokyo sightseeing taxi drivers As part of the measures to revitalize taxi services, the Tokyo Sightseeing Taxi Promotion Association, which consists of experts on tourism, administrative agencies, related organizations, and others in the taxi industry, was established in 2012 along with a certification system. Drivers who have completed three examinations and a course become certified Tokyo sightseeing taxi drivers. Tokyo Sightseeing Taxi webpage Tokyo city guide screening Implementing organization: the Tokyo Convention & Visitors Bureau Universal Driver training Researching organization: Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association, etc.

http://www.taxi-tokyo.or.jp/english/kanko_taxi/

Pass

Course taken

Tokyo sightseeing taxi driver certification training Implementing organization: Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association

Training complete

Certified as a Tokyo

sightseeing taxi driver

Transition in the number of certified Tokyo sightseeing taxi drivers The number of certified drivers is growing and is scheduled to reach three thousand by 2020.

(people) (total sum)

2,000

1,141

1,600 1,200 800 400 0

1,610

468

99 2012

2013

SECTION

2014

2015

As of March 31, 2015, according to the Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association

07

The improvement in taxi services

Benefits for Tokyo sightseeing taxi drivers Drivers who have logo magnets and present their certificate can enjoy the benefits below concerning parking areas, which is an issue when driving a Tokyo sightseeing taxi. Tokyo Tower Free access to parking areas (drivers only) Tokyo Skytree 1 hour of free parking (except on special holidays such as back-to-back holidays of three days or more) The Imperial Palace Parking at the first exclusive parking area for sightseeing taxis at the Imperial Palace for 300 yen (limited to sightseeing busses until recently) The Metropolitan Government Building Access to a priority parking area. 1 hour of free parking. The Edo-Tokyo Museum Free access to regular exhibitions (drivers only). Discounted parking fees for Tokyo sightseeing taxis (500 yen) (prior notice required).

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

22

SECTION

07

The improvement in taxi services

For active communication with passengers. Public relations activities Website

TOP >

723!



http://www.taxi-tokyo.or.jp









For the general public with the latest information on issues such as the current state of the taxi industry and recent taxi services, as well as CSR activities.



 

8' 

GH



GH











03 3648-0300





 

102-0074 

GH  

TEL 03 3264-8080 FAX 03 3221-7665

Top page in Japanese



Association outline & Access page





Taxi services, CSR activities, etc. page

Questionnaire surveys Questionnaire surveys are conducted every year to see how the general public views taxis and to receive feedback and comments. Ten thousand surveys were distributed to radio taxi users at major taxi stands in Tokyo from July 28 to August 1 in 2014 and the results are being used to improve services.

Q1

Q2 No answer

No answer

0%

0% More than 10 times

16.8%

How many times a month do you take a taxi?

About 4 to 10 times

About 1 to 3 times

52.5%

30.7%

Q3

New services

1.9%

No answer

0%

Freedom of choice

11.6% What do you think taxi companies should focus on?

Manners Safety

34.3%

26.6% Geographical knowledge

The vehicles

2.3%

23

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

They are inexpensive

23.3%

They are expensive

How do you see current taxi fares when considering that the service is door-to-door?

Q4

5.0%

22.5% They are reasonable

72.5%

0.3% 5.2%

No answer Childcare support

Support for

Sightseeing taxis

14.6%

pregnant Taxi business women operators are 10.0% implementing new Services by UD taxis smartphone ways to improve 11.8% 18.0% the offering of safe, EV/HV Fixed secure, and hightaxis fares 19.4% 20.7% quality services. Are there any services that you know of or have used?

TA X I CAB S I N TO K YO 2 015

Please take advantage of the various discount systems and available services. Discount system for the disabled There are discounts for the handicapped as well as 10% discounts on fares shown on the meters for people with intellectual disabilities.

The use of Braille stickers Braille stickers including company names and vehicle numbers are stuck inside taxis as a service for the visually impaired.

Discounts for long-distance rides Discounts are available for passengers who take long-distance rides.

Non-smoking taxis Smoking is prohibited in all taxis in order to prevent health hazards and offer pleasant rides.

SECTION

07

The improvement in taxi services

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

24

SECTION

07

The improvement in taxi services

Increased efforts in improving services, together with the Tokyo Taxi Center. Implementation of the taxi driver registration system Examinations on geographical knowledge, and education and guidance on customer service are given to drivers. Those who succeed are issued driver s certificates. There are certificates for private taxi drivers as well. ■ Transitions in the number of registered taxi drivers ■ Corporate

(people)

120,000 100,000

Private

102,929 105,087 103,251 99,112 99,383 98,834 98,973 100,058 100,720 100,404 100,721 101,481 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 98,870 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 94,046 100.0% 90,216 87,838 100.0% 100.0%

80,000 60,000

80,138 80,605 79,992 80,253 81,431 82,186 82,136 82,634 83,686 85,425 88,106 86,893 83,155 78,907 75,638 73,822 80.9% 81.1% 80.9% 81.1% 81.4% 81.6% 81.8% 82.0% 82.5% 83.0% 83.8% 84.2% 84.1% 83.9% 83.8% 84.0%

40,000 20,000 18,974 18,778 18,842 18,720 18,627 18,534 18,268 18,087 17,795 17,504 16,981 16,358 15,715 15,139 14,578 14,016 19.1% 18.9% 19.1% 18.9% 18.6% 18.4% 18.2% 18.0% 17.5% 17.0% 16.2% 15.8% 15.9% 16.1% 16.2% 16.0%

0 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 As of March 31, 2015, according to the Tokyo Taxi Center

■ Transition in passing rate of examinations on geographical knowledge ■ (%)

70 60.3

62.1

60.0

60 52.3

48.3

40

51.5

51.6

53.1

48.0

49.5

50

54.1

45.5 42.0

41.5 35.9

43.6

38.0

30 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 As of March 31, 2015, according to the Tokyo Taxi Center

Guidance and training for taxi drivers Instructions for the prevention of and taking corrective measures against taxi drivers who violate the Road Transportation Act such as through unjust refusal of passengers, the overcharging of fares, and the unauthorized tampering of meters are given, as well as training for new drivers based on Article 36, Part 2 of the transportation regulations.

25

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

Training for Universal Drivers in progress

TA X I CAB S I N TO K YO 2 015

Taking and responding to complaints about taxi services Complaints about taxi services can be properly handled by the taxi company (stated on the receipt) the passenger is riding with, through a 24-hour Center phone line at 03-3648-0300, or through the Center s website.

Efficient taxi stand operations There are currently 314 taxi stands in Tokyo. There are "Excellent Service Taxi" stands at the North and South Marunouchi Exits of Tokyo Station, the East Exit of Shinbashi Station, the West Underground Exit of Shinjuku Station, the West Exit of Shibuya Station, the Front Exit of Ueno Station, the West Exit of Ikebukuro Station, the prohibited zone in Ginza, in front of the West Exit of Shinagawa Station (Takanawa Exit) and at the International Terminal of Haneda Airport as well as an EV/HV taxi stand in front of the Shin-Marunouchi Building as of October 2011. Year

1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

General stand

481

396

352

246

239

232

227

226

235

232

231

235

232

236

236

228

Roofed stand

97

94

93

89

87

85

87

84

86

86

85

85

85

84

83

86

As of March 31, 2015, according to the Tokyo Taxi Center

Taxi evaluation system

Sign of excellence

How the signs of excellence are presented

The taxi evaluation system started on April 1, 2013 in order to contribute to enhancing taxi convenience and services by offering finer taxi services upon reviewing evaluation standards in 2011, which was ten years after the rank evaluation system was introduced in 2001. The cases of guidance and complaints handled by the Center, information concerning service to customers and safety, managerial aspects, and driver quality are evaluated from the viewpoint of customer service, safety and operational control, and business attitude. Upon evaluations in 2012, the indications on taxi vehicles have become simple and easy to understand for passengers, with stickers indicating AA and A ranked taxis being unified as Excellent Service Taxis . These signs of excellence are stuck on the windshields above the dashboards so that they can easily be seen from the fronts of the vehicles.

SECTION

07

The improvement in taxi services

Commendation system Excellent drivers have been commended every year since 1977, with 26,864 people having received awards over the past 38 years. There are currently 9,574 drivers operating who possess an excellent driver award. Those who are commended are veteran drivers with ten or more years of experience, no violations, and who serve their passengers well. Excellent corporate business operators and business managers have also been commended since 1984.

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

26

08

SECTION

The current status of the taxi

Taxi services in Tokyo can be enjoyed at internationally reasonable fares and the industry here is fairly easy to take part in. International comparison of taxi fares (Tokyo, New York, London) It is said that taxi fares in Tokyo are reasonable when compared with those of New York and London, with the current low value of the yen and because there is no tipping.

Tokyo

New York

London

Base distances

Initial fares

Added distance

Added fares

Remarks

2km

¥730

280m

¥90



1/5miles

$2.5 (¥301)

1/5miles

$0.5 (¥60)

(320m)

259.8m

£2.4 (¥451)

(320m)

129.9m (under 17 pounds) 91.1m

20% tips 0.5-dollar tax per ride

£0.2 (¥38)

10% tips

(17 pounds or more) 1 dollar = 120.27 yen  1 pound = 187.95 yen (as of February 27, 2015) (yen)

1,400

1,200

1,000

800

600

400 Japan New York (no tips) New York (with tips) London (no tips) London (with tips)

200

0

0

500

1,000

1,500

2,000

2,500(m)

*Figures are from the internal and external survey on utility costs of 2012 by the Consumer Affairs Agency.

27

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

TA X I C A B S

industry in other countries

I N TO K YO 2 015

Taxi business regulations in other countries There are also regulations on the taxi business in other countries, but entry is relatively easy in Tokyo.

Regulatory authority

London

New York

Singapore

Tokyo

London TfL

New York TLC

Department of Motor Vehicles LTA

(Transport for London)

(Taxi and Limousine Commission)

(Land Transport Authority)

Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism Too much diversity in the targeted areas.

Regulations on entry

No regulations Some regulations No regulations Entry is difficult because of the However, 800 vehicles and 6,000 However, the Knowledge Medallion business licenses, million yen or more in capital in license, which takes 44 months three years are required. which cost about 100 million yen to acquire, is needed. (including rights to 6 million yen COE per vehicle. vehicles)

Fare regulations

Some (unified fares)

Some (unified fares)

Some (unified fares)

Some regulations (Specific / semi-specific regions)

However, entry is easy as only a minimum of 10 vehicles is required. Business licenses are about 6 million yen per vehicle. Some (unregulated fares)

Japan (law on special measures) United States (New York)

Supply and demand adjustments

Some

England

France

(London)

(Paris)

None

Some

Germany

Some

Sweden

None

South Korea

Some

General rules

None

Semi-specific regions

Specific regions

(Period: 3 years)

(Period: 3 years)

None

None

Regulations on entry

By permission By permission By licensing

(with a driver s license system that requires three years to obtain)

By licensing

By licensing

By permission

By licensing

(- Not permitted as a general rule. - However, Permission not By permission permission is granted granted within the range where there is no excess supply.)

Regulations on vehicle count (increasing vehicle count)

SECTION

Regulations on total count

By approval

(Limits are set ̶ on total number (However, there of vehicles and are regulations when there is on total count new demand depending on the and auctions in city.) equivalence to the new demand are held.)

Fare regulations

Authorized unified fare system (Determined by the New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission.)

Authorized unified fare system

By licensing (Set limits on total vehicle counts.)

By licensing

Authorized unified fare system

Authorized unified fare system

(Fares by local municipality (Determined by are determined Transport for upon the setting London.) of limits by the government.)

(- Not approved as a general rule. By prior (Approved only - However, Approval not notification within the range approval is granted (Unregulated as needed to meet granted within a general rule.) demand.) the range where there is no excess supply.)

By approval

(Fares are set in accordance with laws and regulations by state governments.)

̶

Authorized unregulated fare system (- Notifications on the range (Fares must be stipulated by local indicated on municipalities vehicles.) - orders to change fares outside the range or the imposition of fines)

Authorized unregulated fare system

Unregulated

By approval

08

The current status of the taxi industry in other countries

Authorized unregulated fare system

(- Notifications (- Notifications on the range on the range stipulated by the stipulated by the government government - orders to - orders to change fares change fares outside the outside the range) range)

Sources: Research report on transportation in major countries, etc. by the International Policy Planning Unit of the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

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08

The current status of the taxi

Taxis in New York

Inspection report ❶

Number of vehicles and the market The taxis in New York, often called yellow cabs , are different from the taxis in Tokyo in that business is limited to street hails. They cannot be dispatched by radio, they are limited to central Manhattan, and the size of that zone is about the same as Minato Ward, Chuo Ward, yellow cabs and Chiyoda Ward s areas combined. In addition to yellow cabs, there are for-hire taxis such as black cars , luxury limousines , and livery cabs . It is a comparatively dispersed market as there are many private business operators and the largest companies in both Tokyo and New York have only 10% market shares. New York City 100% = 57,252 vehicles Taxis : 13,237 vehicles

Tokyo (special zones / Busan transportation area)  100% = 48,154 vehicles Taxis : 44,305 vehicles Hired taxis:3,849 vehicles

Daiwa Motor Transportation_5%

(street hails only / central Manhattan only) Black : 9,020 vehicles (street hails prohibited / mainly corporate) Luxury: 6,021 vehicles (street hails prohibited / special uses such as for hotels) Livery : 26,021 vehicles (street hails prohibited / northern & suburban Manhattan) Other : 2,953 vehicles (December 2012, TLC Annual Report)

Teito Motor Transportation_2%

Other_5%

(March 2011) Kokusai Motorcars G_6% Nihon Kotsu G_7% Hired_8% Private taxis _34%

Tokyo Musen Cooperative_9%

Taxis (corporate) _8% Livery _45%

Taxis (agents)_8%

Other companies _13%

Checker Cab G_9% Toto Motors G_3%

Black_16%

Green Cab_2%

Hinomaru G_2%

Luxury_11%

Taxis (private)_8%

Source: Inspection report of taxis in New York by the Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association (2013)

About regulations The hired taxi regulations in New York are different from those in Tokyo in that they are enforced on a municipal level while the regulations in Tokyo are enforced on a national level. The regulations are determined in two steps. The first is through city council meetings (based on recommendations from the committee of public transportation). The other is through decisions by the TLC (New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission), which is the regulatory authority. The TLC is the dominant regulatory authority in the United States as it is the largest and most powerful one, and it has control over every party involved in the taxi business. The TLC s stance on regulations is more about active control and the tightening of regulations rather than on the loosening of regulations. It tries to meet the needs of the city s residents and take active control of detailed regulations while enforcing measures such as tightening regulations on street hail taxis (livery) of the five outer boroughs, the common dispatching of wheelchair-accessible vehicles, on-board credit card transaction systems and GPS driving control systems, and joint purchases of next-generation vehicles. Supply and demand adjustments are regulated through the issuing of Medallion business licenses, which cost about 100 million yen (as of April 2013) per vehicle. Each vehicle can be strictly regulated with the number of these medallions that are issued to yellow cabs, livery cabs, etc. Medallion graph (transitions in value)

29

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

TA X I CAB S I N TO K YO 2 015

industry in other countries

On fares When riding a yellow cab, you will see that the differences in New York s fares and Tokyo s fares are not that great when factoring in the weakening of the yen and tips. Tokyo s fares seeming high may be due largely in part to how they are perceived by tourists because the initial fares are high, taxi zones are large, and Narita Airport is far. The fare from JFK Airport to Manhattan is Rate Code 2, which is a fixed fare of 5,200 yen (in April 2013) plus a highway toll and additional state tax, and not Rate Code 1, which is a New York City taxi fare. Factors such as subway fares, inflation rates, drivers costs, insurance and gasoline costs, and corporate earning rates are taken into consideration when the standards for increasing taxi rates are examined by the TLC. Taxi rate comparison chart

(where 1 dollar equals 100 yen)

(*as of April 2013)

Special zones in Tokyo / Busan transportation area

Initial fare

250 yen (320m)

730 yen (2,000m)

Added fares

50 yen for each extra 320m

90 yen for each extra 280m

Time and distancebased fares

50 yen for every 1 minute and 45 seconds on rides travelling at 10 kilometers per hour or slower

90 yen for every 1 minute and 45 seconds on rides travelling at 10 kilometers per hour or slower

Late night and early morning premiums

50 yen extra between 8 p.m. and 6 a.m.

20% extra between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m.

Rate Code 1 within New York City

Weekday rush hour 100 yen extra between 4 p.m. and premiums 8 p.m. from Monday to Friday State tax

50 yen per ride

(*as of July 2015)

̶

̶

Source: Inspection report of taxis in New York by the Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association (2013)

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08

The current status of the taxi industry in other countries

All yellow cab vehicles now have credit card processing machines due to TLC’s TPEP program. These processing machines are integrated with a monitor that passengers can see and the taxi companies are able to obtain the machines for free due to revenues from the video ads that are shown on the monitors.

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

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The current status of the taxi

Inspection report ❷

Taxis in London

Number of vehicles and the market The city of London has black cabs (London Taxi) and minicabs black cabs (Private Hire). Only black cabs can transport passengers through street hails and minicabs can only transport passengers with reservations. Black cabs are all privately-owned so they do not belong to any taxi companies. However, the drivers belong to radio unions and can therefore operate with radio dispatches in addition to street hails. There were 22,810 black cabs and 52,811 minicabs in operation in 2013, with the black cabs operating within a 6-mile (about 10 kilometers) radius from the central location of Charing Cross and minicabs mostly in other areas. Also, the number of black cab drivers and vehicles hadn t changed much during the ten years preceding 2013 due to the virtual supply and demand adjustments made by TfL (Transport for London), which is the transport bureau of London (there were 25,538 drivers in 2013). Transition in the number of black cab drivers and vehicles

Almost no changes after over ten years (people / vehicles)

Drivers

30,000

Vehicles

25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Source: Inspection report of London by the Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association (2015)

On regulations Restrictions are governed in a London City-level administrative unit (equivalent to that of Tokyo). They are implemented by the TfL (the traffic bureau of London), which has full authority over all matters concerning taxis, and the mayor is the chief in charge. Drivers are required to obtain the Knowledge license, which is issued by TfL and is difficult to obtain (requiring an average of forty-four months, or about four years), so although there is no limit to the number of drivers there are, it is as if there is a limit because of this license. The Taxi Trade Promotions Ltd cram school holds activities involving educational curriculums to help with the obtainment of this license.

Taxi Trade Promotions Ltd (cram school): from the left - (1) maps of various areas in London, (2) classmates preparing for interviews, (3) learning the shortest routes, (4) mopeds running through the streets of London, (5) lists of routes attached to a moped

The Knowledge license

There are also strict regulations that limit vehicle supply, stipulating that (1) drivers and passengers must be separated, (2) height must be at least 1.35m / length including leg room must be at least 1.2m / seat width must be at least 0.7m, (3) vehicles must be equipped with boarding stairs for wheelchairs, and (4) rotation diameters must be within 28 feet (about 8.535m).

31

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industry in other countries

On fares It may be thought that black cabs seem inexpensive because their initial fares are relatively cheap (Tokyo: 730 yen, London: 408 yen (as of November2014)), but normal rides (1km or more) based on the fare table prescribed by TfL are more expensive than those in Tokyo. The fares from Heathrow Airport to urban London are 1.5 to 2 times higher than fares in Tokyo (Haneda Airport), and they do not even have fixed fares. In other words, their initial fares are low, but their total fares are higher. Fares are distinguished between Tariff 1, Tariff 2, and Tariff 3 fares, which depend on the day and time. Travel time and distance are counted simultaneously so the highest one that is reached is added. Comparison of taxi fares

(with 1 pound converted to 170 yen)

●Tariff 1 - 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. from Monday to Friday

Initial fare

With/without time factored in

London Tariff 1

Special zones in Tokyo / Busan transportation area

(*as of November 2014)

(*as of July 2015 - when based on the tax type on the left)

With time not factored in

408 yen (252.4m)

730 yen (2,000m)

With time factored in 408 yen (54.2 seconds)

730 yen (1 minute and 45 seconds)

With time not factored in 34 yen for each extra 126.2m

90 yen for each extra 280m Added fares With time factored in 34 yen for every 27.1 seconds 90 yen for every 1 minute and 45 seconds on rides travelling at 10 kilometers per hour or slower

●Tariff 3 - 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. every day and on national holidays

Initial fare

With/without time factored in

London Tariff 3

Special zones in Tokyo / Busan transportation area

(*as of November 2014)

(*as of July 2015 - when based on the tax type on the left)

With time not factored in

408 yen (165.4m)

With time factored in 408 yen (35.6 seconds)

730 yen (1,600m) 730 yen (1 minute and 45 seconds)

With time not factored in 34 yen for each extra 82.7m 90 yen for each extra 224m Added 90 yen for every 1 minute and 45 seconds on rides fares With time factored in 34 yen for every 17.8 seconds travelling at 10 kilometers per hour or slower Source: Inspection report of London by the Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association (2015)

The revision of fares The revision of fares is discussed in the same official areas and with the same official fares every year on April 1 but the discussions are becoming shorter with the introduction of a quantified taxi cost index. A fuel surcharge system has also been established five years ago and is programmed in taxi meters. However, it has not been implemented yet. The index of the black cab cost structure Initial 2015 weights

22,000

08

The current status of the taxi industry in other countries

Final 2015 weights

Cost p per mile Proportion of Cost p per mile Proportion of Component of index in 2014 costs in 2014 in 2015 costs in 2015 Vehicle Cost 21.25 9.0% 21.47 9.1% Parts 9.67 4.1% 9.82 4.2% Tyres 1.43 0.6% 1.45 0.6% Garage & Servicing - Premises 1.31 0.6% 1.33 0.6% Garage & Servicing - Labour 4.63 2.0% 4.71 2.0% Fuel 27.11 11.5% 26.65 11.3% Insurance 10.41 4.4% 10.62 4.5% Miscellaneous 2.43 1.0% 2.49 1.1% The Knowledge 12.52 5.3% 12.58 5.3% Social Costs 6.42 2.7% 6.45 2.7% Total operating costs 97.19 41.4% 97.57 41.3% Average national earnings 137.78 58.6% 138.45 58.7% Grand Total 234.96 100.0% 236.02 100.0% Annual Mileage:

SECTION

Increase in costs 2015 1.0% 1.6% 1.6% 1.6% 1.6% -1.7% 2.0% 2.4% 0.5% 0.5% 0.4% 0.5% 0.5%

Contribution to total increase 0.1% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% -0.2% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.2% 0.3% 0.5%

Source: Inspection report of London by the Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association (2015)

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

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Future efforts concerning the hosting of the

Access to the airport at reasonable fares. Operation of fixed-fare taxis Implementation of the Haneda Airport fixed fare system A fixed fare system for rides between Haneda Airport and various locations in Tokyo was introduced with the collaboration of the International Terminal as of October 21, 2010. This system allows the offering of services with fares 10 to 30% lower than those indicated on the meters and without the need to worry about fares going up due to conditions such as traffic congestions. There are also fixed fares to Haneda Airport and Tokyo Disney Resort. Each vehicle also has a point-and-speak phrase guide in English, Korean, and Chinese to help smoothening communication with visitors from abroad.

羽田空港定額運賃

Fixed Fares from / to Haneda Airport ዻ஫ఋલጃႜྵဪၭ 㲘㝥⫒⒉⤨⛊➱㱫

羽田空港⇔下記ゾーンは、 定額運賃+有料道路利用料でタクシ−をご利用いただけます。 英

Taxi fares for the routes between Haneda Airport and the zones below are fixed fares + fees for toll roads.



ዻ஫ఋલጃȀྤ೭ხ࿦ၔႜྵဪၭ˃၉ഭ౅ചၦဧഭചሳགྷ൐ၦဧዻཇ༘ၰཀఁఋ



㲘㝥⫒⒉㲓㥲⼜㎸㲚㺐⭺ᱨ⒳㾘ⓞ㾂⒝㩖㮔⡔⤨⛊➱㱫⭩㗏➱⤇⿁㖳㱫➱ᮣ

国際線ターミナル/国内線ターミナル International Terminal / Domestic Terminal  ૑႞໓ሽු஢ˇ૑ஏ໓ሽු஢  ⥖⭠㦏⧗㷢⾯ᱫ⥖ㅠ㦏⧗㷢⾯

定額運賃表   Fixed Fare Chart  ႜྵဪၭዑ  ⤨⛊➱㱫⍙ 適用ゾーン  Service Zone ႕ဧხ࿦ 㗄㱫㎸㲚 日本語

English(英語)

江戸川区

ዽ૑࿌(韓国語)

㺲⥖㲗(中国語)

Edogawa-ku ࿝౅ਜ਼ဉૐ

Ⰱ⩿╎㎸

台東区

Taito-ku

ఋၦቔૐ

㜞⛍㎸

墨田区

Sumida-ku

༺ුఋૐ

ㄱ㝥㎸

文京区

Bunkyo-ku

ึᇾૐ

㢶ⲻ㎸

千代田区

Chiyoda-ku

ხဠఋૐ

㍧■㝥㎸

新宿区

Shinjuku-ku

ཅ჎ᇿૐ

㨰㚖㎸

渋谷区

Shibuya-ku

གྷิ྽ૐ

㓨⤤㎸

足立区

Adachi-ku

ྤఋᆳૐ

㾃⻮㎸

葛飾区

Katsushika-ku ਜ਼ᆫགྷᆽૐ

⢎㗈㎸

荒川区

Arakawa-ku ྤೡᆽဉૐ

⪜╎㎸

北区

Kita-ku

ૺረૐ

⌝㎸

豊島区

Toshima-ku

౅གྷൠૐ

⟁☞㎸

Nakano-ku

୾ᆽிૐ

㺲㮚㎸

中野区 杉並区

Suginami-ku ༺ૺ୾ුૐ

㓸⏌㎸

世田谷区

Setagaya-ku ໞረਜ਼྽ૐ

㖺㝥⤤㎸

板橋区

Itabashi-ku

ၦረ෡གྷૐ

練馬区

Nerima-ku

஫൘ൠૐ

武蔵野市 三鷹市

Musashino-shi ඳຫགྷிགྷ Mitaka-shi

ුረᆽགྷ

⊓㎅㎸ ⼃⿷㎸ 㣖␂㮚㗊 㑻㱍㗊

* 深夜早朝割増及び障害者割引適用定額運賃*

定額運賃

深夜早朝割増適用定額運賃

障害者割引適用定額運賃

Fixed Fare ႜྵဪၭ ⤨⛊➱㱫

Fixed fare applicable to late night and early morning premiums ྽੝ႮႮዾჭ႕ဧႜྵဪၭ 㗄㱫㲂㔪㮣ᮢ㵍⒧➱㱫⭩㗏☨⤨⛊➱㱫

Fixed fare applicable to discounts for the disabled ၿྴၨዾၨ႕ဧႜྵဪၭ 㗄㱫㲂⏺⭈㑉㱭⪵☨⤨⛊➱㱫

Fixed fare applicable to late night / early morning premiums and discounts for the disabled ྽੝ႮႮዾჭෟၿྴၨዾၨ႕ဧႜྵဪၭ 㗄㱫㲂㔪㮣ᮢ㵍⒧➱㱫⭩㗏⭆⏺⭈㑉㱭⪵☨⤨⛊➱㱫

¥6,700 ¥6,900 ¥6,800 ¥7,000 ¥5,600 ¥6,800 ¥6,400 ¥8,500 ¥8,700 ¥7,900 ¥8,400 ¥8,500 ¥7,500 ¥8,200 ¥6,600 ¥9,400 ¥9,800 ¥10,700 ¥10,200

¥8,000 ¥8,200 ¥8,200 ¥8,300 ¥6,800 ¥8,200 ¥7,600 ¥10,000 ¥10,200 ¥9,400 ¥9,900 ¥10,100 ¥9,000 ¥9,700 ¥8,000 ¥11,100 ¥11,600 ¥12,600 ¥12,000

¥6,000 ¥6,200 ¥6,100 ¥6,300 ¥5,000 ¥6,100 ¥5,700 ¥7,600 ¥7,800 ¥7,100 ¥7,500 ¥7,600 ¥6,700 ¥7,300 ¥5,900 ¥8,400 ¥8,800 ¥9,600 ¥9,100

¥7,200 ¥7,300 ¥7,300 ¥7,400 ¥6,100 ¥7,300 ¥6,800 ¥9,000 ¥9,100 ¥8,400 ¥8,900 ¥9,000 ¥8,100 ¥8,700 ¥7,200 ¥9,900 ¥10,400 ¥11,300 ¥10,800

午後10時∼午前5時にご利用いただいた場合は、深夜早朝割増適用定額運賃となります。

*障害者手帳 (身体・知的・精神) の交付を受けている方がご利用の場合は、 障害者手帳のご提示により障害者割引制度が適用されます。 *Persons with physical, intellectual, or mental disability certificates are eligible for discounts for the disabled upon presentation of their certificates.



Fixed fares applicable to late night and early morning premiums are charged for rides between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m.





࿼ፎགྷfྤᆹགྷຫၦ࿝ၦဧዻཇઠဨ྽੝ႮႮዾჭ႕ဧႜྵဪၭၦ႕ဧ౛ఁఋ



*ၿྴၨ༘ᅬˀཅᅰხ႕ႜཅˁຫဧၴਜ਼ၦဧዻཇઠဨၿྴၨ༘ᅬၕ႞གྷዻඓၿྴၨዾၨ႞౅ਜ਼႕ဧ౛ఁఋ



╹㮣⹽♇☡㵍⒧♇⒳㾘㖫ᱨ㗄㱫㲂㔪㮣ᮢ㵍⒧➱㱫⭩㗏☨⤨⛊➱㱫ᮣ



*⏺⭈㑉㺆⮔ᱤ㔩㝛ᮢ㺩⻲ᮢⲽ㔭ᱥⒾ㱸㸃⒳㾘㖫ᱨⓞ㖸⏺⭈㑉㺆⮔⨍⶙㦝㗖⏺⭈㑉㱭⪵㺨⛪ᮣ

特別区・武三版 使用開始日:平成27年3月8日

The fixed fares to and from the airport are low even on an international scale. There are no such fare settings in London (with fares being 1.5 to 2 times higher on the meters than those in Tokyo), making them about equal to the fares in New York.

羽田空港 定額運賃 要ご予約

33

羽田空港までご利用の場合は、ご利用1時間前 までにお申し込みください。 【 ご予約は 各タクシー会社 または 無線配車センター へ。】

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

The Fixed Fares to Haneda Airport page on the Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association website

http://www.taxi-tokyo.or.jp/english/teigaku/

TA X I C A B S

2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo

I N TO K YO 2 015

Creating a pleasant environment for visitors from abroad. Operation of multilingual taxis (Hospitality Taxis)

▲ Indicated with this sign

Training on serving visitors from abroad The training that is offered by the Tokyo Taxi Center, which involves role-playing, is aimed at improving customer service by teaching customs practiced by foreign nationals, basic communication skills needed in operating a taxi, and more.

Exclusive lanes for drivers who have completed training on serving visitors from abroad As of December 15, 2014, drivers who have completed the abovementioned training are granted access to exclusive lanes. This is to increase the level of hospitality by allowing visitors from abroad to choose taxis with drivers who can communicate in English.

Excellent Service Taxis

International Terminal Building

Number of taxis standing by: 135 (15 rows, 9 lanes)

Kanagawa vehicles

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Transition in the number of hospitality taxi drivers

Future efforts concerning the hosting of the 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo

8,000

Goal:

(p eopl e)

10,000

09

8,000

3,775

6,000 4,000 2,000 0

1,024 October 2014

March 2015

December 2015

As of March 31, 2015, according to the Tokyo Taxi Center

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

34

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09

Future efforts concerning the hosting of the

Initiatives are being made toward foreign language training for drivers Training in foreign languages for Tokyo sightseeing taxi drivers The Tokyo Sightseeing Taxi Course in Foreign Languages (provisional appellation) fosters drivers with official TOEIC scores of 600 or above or with equivalent work experience into professionals who can guide passengers through tourist sites in foreign languages. [Term]: Summer to Autumn, 2015 Transition in the targeted number of drivers who can serve as tour guides in foreign languages (people)

350

300 300

250 250

Goal

200

200

150 150

100 100

50 50

0

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Guide to national strategic special zones 【Expansion of paid tour guide services in foreign languages】 〔Proposal (new)〕 *Drivers who show that they have reached a certain level of quality upon undergoing examinations and training can offer paid tour guide services even without certification as interpreters or guides. The appeal of sightseeing in Tokyo is enhanced as tourists from abroad can easily receive guided tours in English.

35

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

Attending interpreter required Increased cost burden

Attending interpreter not required Lessened cost burden

2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo

TA X I CAB S I N TO K YO 2 015

Services evaluated highly on an international level. The taxi services in Tokyo are the best in the world The Tokyo Olympics / Paralympics bid speech When giving a presentation to the IOC bidding to host the Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo, Christel Takigawa stated that the taxi services in Japan are ranked the highest in the world.

【Partial extract of the original document】 A recent study on seventy-five thousand people who travel around the world showed that Tokyo is the safest city in the world. The same study showed that Tokyo ranked No. 1 in its public transportation system, cleanliness of the streets, and kindness of its taxi drivers as well. ●How kind were the taxi drivers?

●What is your overall assessment of the taxi services there?

Tokyo (Japan)

7.71

Tokyo (Japan)

8.18

Cancun (Mexico)

7.69

Singapore

8.12

Singapore

7.58

Dubai (United Arab Emirates)

7.84

Punta Cana (Dominican Republic)

7.46

Dublin (Ireland)

7.70

Dublin (Ireland)

7.45

London (England)

7.61

Source: Results of the 2012 TripAdvisor survey on cities of the world by tourists

Sending messages out to the world http://www.taxi-tokyo.or.jp/english/ PR activities are being carried out such as through websites in English for sending out information overseas and throughout the world, and through the English version of Tokyo s Taxis in PDF files available on the Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association website.

TOP > :HOFRPHWR7RN\R

SECTION

7RN\RZKLFKZLOOKRVWWKH2O\PSLFVIRUWKHVHFRQGWLPH Tokyo has been selected to host the 2020 summer Olympics and Paralympics. As one of the public transportation agencies serving the city, we at the Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association sincerely welcome everyone who visits Tokyo. Thank you for using Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association.

09

Future efforts concerning the hosting of the 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo

Christel Takigawa, the bid ambassador who gave the final presentation to the International Olympic Committee, which selected Tokyo to host the 2020 Summer Games, cited the attentive hospitality of the Japanese people. As one example, she said that the kindness of Tokyo taxi drivers had been rated No.1 in the world. This estimation is due to the high scores visitors from around the world gave to Tokyo's taxis compared with those of other cities in countries around the world.

In 2012, taxis reached their 100th anniversary in Japan. The first taxi company in the country began operations in 1912 in Yurakucho, Tokyo, equipping six Model T Fords with fare meters.

In 1964, when hosting the Tokyo Olympics (for the first time), Tokyo received the feedback, "Japanese taxi drivers are completely dedicated", as well as a letter of thanks from the International Olympic Committee to this association.

During this 100-year period there were many problems, including an oil crisis, a drawn-out recession and deregulation, but we overcame these obstacles and reached this milestone is thanks to all of you who patronized taxis over the years. Again, thank you.

2IIHULQJEHWWHUVHUYLFHWRFXVWRPHUVIURPDURXQGWKHZRUOG

And in April 2013, it was decided that we, the Corporation Tokyo Taxicab Association, as part of public-service corporation reform, would become a general incorporated association, change our name to the Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association (THTA), and get a fresh start. The situation the industry finds itself in remains severe, but Tokyo's taxis, as a form of public transportation, will continue working to be safe and secure, serve our customers and earn their appreciation. We humbly ask your understanding and support.

Ichiro Kawanabe President Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association

English page

The Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association will continue promoting and strengthening policies including the following as the Olympics and Paralympics approach. The Haneda Airport Fixed Fare System and the Narita Airport Fixed Fare System, which offer easy-to-understand fares between airports and various parts of Tokyo. The introduction of universal design taxis, which are easy for the elderly and people in wheelchairs to board, and driver training to further improve customer service. Tokyo sightseeing taxis, whose certified drivers guide passengers around the city, the development of a multilingual guidance system that uses IT, and more. Every driver is endeavoring to improve his hospitality and provide even better service to visitors to Tokyo from around the world, not to mention to everyone in Japan. By all means, please use Tokyo taxis.

“Welcome to Tokyo!”page

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

36

SECTION

10

Industrial

< 2014 > April 4 | UD (Universal Driver) training offered for the first time by the Tokyo Taxi Center. Fifty trainees get firsthand experience in handling elderly passengers, the visually impaired, and wheelchairs.

April 9

May 7

May 27

June 3

June 4

June 18

July 1

37

Industrial, governmental, and

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

| President Tomita announces his retirement and that he will continue serving as President of the Japan Federation of Hire-Taxi Associations until the expiration of his term at the general Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association meeting on May 27 during the conference of the president and vice-presidents of the Japan Federation of Hire-Taxi Associations. | A candidate president for the following term is selected at the board meeting of the Tokyo HireTaxi Association. There were no other candidates other than VicePresident Kawanabe or nominations for anyone else so it was decided that Vice-President Kawanabe would be the next president at the board meeting following the ordinary general meeting of May 27. | The Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association holds an ordinary general meeting and board meeting, and VicePresident Kawanabe becomes the new president. Five new vicepresidents are also elected.

| The Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association and its new leadership under President Kawanabe hold an inaugural press conference with the Japan Hired Taxi Press Club. President Kawanabe pronounces the New-Graduate Recruitment Project, which follows the sightseeing taxi project by the revitalization project team. | An informal decision by the former director-general of the Kanto District Transportation Bureau, Toshihiro Kamiya, is announced to be the new director of the Japan Federation of Hire-Taxi Associations during the conference of the president and vice-presidents of the Japan Federation of Hire-Taxi Associations. | President Kawanabe describes at the board meeting of the Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association the new directionality of the Association, which includes expressing the need for regulations to domestic public opinion upon placing significance on data, and making comparisons with other cities throughout the world. | The Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association begins the Taxi Day campaign (until August 5) with the main theme being August 5 is Taxi Day - Tokyo s Taxis are Getting Closer to Your Side -.

August 5

| The Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association holds PR events for Taxi Day at locations such as Excellent Service Taxi stands at Tokyo Station, Shinjuku Station, Shibuya Station, Ikebukuro Station, and Shinbashi Station.

August 6

| The Tokyo Taxi Center holds a ceremony presenting the completion of the roof of the first advertising taxi stand in Japan in front of the Mita Kokusai Building in Minato Ward. August 20 | President Kawanabe describes at the management committee meeting of the Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association the global-standard fare system of a shortened initial charging distance that he proposed himself and is doing research on for its materialization, and asks for understanding and support. October 30 | The Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association holds a meeting to exchange opinions on topics such as measures to use taxis for regional public transportation. December 2 | The Tokyo Taxi Center begins an experimental inclusion of exclusive lanes for those who have completed training on serving visitors from abroad, which is to begin at 9 a.m. on the 15th at the Excellent Service Taxi stand at Haneda Airport s International Terminal. < 2015 > January 28 | The Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association gives a press release on the upgraded version and new English version of the Tokyo Taxi Association-TAKKUN common dispatching smartphone application.

February 24| The Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association holds the second Semi-Specific Taxi Region Conference to discuss the special zones, the Busan transportation area, and the Tama district. March 8 | New fixed fares from and to Haneda Airport applied with the opening of the Chuo Expressway on the Inner Circular Route. April 6 | The Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association holds a celebration of the new exclusive taxi stand for rides with fixed fares from and to Haneda Airport at the Haneda Airport International Terminal taxi stand.

TA X I C A B S

social activities

I N TO K YO 2 015

< 2014 > April 1 | Consumption tax rises from 5% to 8%.

< 2014 > | Minister Ota of the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism expresses his intentions to resolve Niigata s taxi fare cartel issues at the Upper House Land, Infrastructure, Transportation and Tourism Committee. April 17 | The bill to revise the method of regenerating and revitalizing regional public transport, where the public transportation network of the entire region including railways, busses, and taxis is formed and restructured mainly by local municipalities, is passed at the Lower House plenary session. June 9 | Written opinions by working groups stating that widespread restrictions limit freedom in business and are detrimental to the convenience of the customers were gathered at the Council for Regulatory Reform in response to the standards for designating specific regions being developed by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism, and requests for the Ministry to proceed carefully were made. June 17 | The Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism organizes comprehensive plans directed at young people and women for recruiting and fostering human resources in an effort to eliminate labor shortages in the bus, taxi, truck and maintenance industries, and presents them to the Land, Infrastructure and Transport Task Force of the LDP. October 16 | Intentions on verifying the effects on the special measures law on taxis revised by Internal Affairs and Communications Minister Takaichi every three years and discussing the pros and cons at the Diet are expressed at the Lower House General Committee. < 2015 > January 28 | The first meeting on how new taxis should operate is held by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism. Discussions on prompting the verifications of the effects of the revised special measures law on taxis, the revitalization of taxi services, and other issues begin. A twokeyword group, consisting of the redesigning of the fare system of a shortened initial charging distance and measures on rising gasoline prices, is established.

Social

Governmental

April 3

May 23

| The designation of August 11 as "Mountain Day" is approved following the enactment of the revised Act on National Holidays at the Upper House. June 11 | The bill for liberalizing electric power sales to households by 2016 is approved following the enactment of the revised Electric Business Act at the Upper House. July 17 | A Malaysia Airlines plane travelling from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur crashes in east Ukraine near the Russian border, killing all 298 passengers and crew members. August 29 | Landslides due to heavy rain in northern Hiroshima City. 74 people dead/missing. September 3 | Prime Minister Abe reshuffles the cabinet and installs the Second Abe Cabinet. October 14 | The government approves of transportation standards and orders under the State Secrecy Law in a Cabinet meeting. November 21 | The Lower House is dissolved. The Lower House election is scheduled for December 14. December 24 | The 3rd Abe Cabinet is launched following the LDP and Komei Party s landslide victory. < 2015 > January 23 | Yokozuna Hakuho wins his 33rd championship at the first Grand Sumo Tournament of the year, setting a new record for highest number of victories. March 24 | A German passenger plane travelling from Barcelona Spain to Dusseldorf Germany crashes into a mountain in southern France.

SECTION

10

Industrial, governmental, and social activities

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

38

Number of taxi companies and vehicles by year Item

Special zones / Busan district

Tama district

Kanto District Transport Bureau

Islands District

Companies Private

Inclusive sum

33,086

19,656

52,742

383

31,303

19,656

50,959

157

385

33,709

19,592

53,301

56

158

366

35,759

19,478

55,237

3‚119

55

154

362

35,787

19,479

55,266

70

3‚137

55

148

359

34,644

19,312

53,956

30‚733

71

3‚130

55

141

359

34,004

19,009

53,013

5‚376

30‚722

72

3‚151

55

135

358

34,008

18,818

52,826

25‚878

5‚404

31‚282

72

3‚176

56

138

359

34,596

18,700

53,296

240

26‚961

5‚204

32‚165

74

3‚272

56

138

370

35,575

19,354

54,929

1999

252

27‚734

4‚719

32‚453

75

3‚378

55

131

381

35,962

19,305

55,267

2000

254

27‚851

4‚540

32‚391

79

3‚408

55

125

385

35,924

19,369

55,293

2001

252

28‚262

4‚395

32‚657

81

3‚423

55

121

388

36,201

19,077

55,278

2002

257

28‚539

4‚180

32‚719

85

3‚539

53

111

395

36,369

19,141

55,510

2003

258

29‚045

3‚894

32‚939

68

3‚446

53

105

407

36,490

19,056

55,546

2004

271

29‚663

3‚880

33‚543

71

3‚519

54

106

396

37,168

18,989

56,157

2005

291

30‚819

3‚883

34‚702

71

3‚520

53

105

415

38,327

18,990

57,317

2006

317

31‚948

3‚931

35‚879

71

3‚572

48

99

436

39,550

18,676

58,226

2007

334

32,958

4,090

37,048

72

3,687

46

98

452

40,833

18,478

59,311

2008

352

33,866

4,125

37,991

73

3,711

45

94

470

41,796

18,213

60,009

2009

366

33,473

4,069

37,542

74

3,530

45

92

485

41,164

17,944

59,108

2010

362

31,799

3,977

35,776

74

3,389

45

83

481

39,248

17,420

56,668

2011

359

27,998

3,849

31,847

74

3,232

43

84

476

35,163

16,787

51,950

2012

356

27,794

3,636

31,430

73

3,215

42

83

471

34,728

16,144

50,872

2013

347

27,659

3,471

31,130

73

3,188

39

77

459

34,395

15,052

49,447

2014

346

27,646

3,548

31,194

71

3,188

38

73

455

34,455

14,430

48,885

Number of Business operators

Taxi

Hired taxi

Total

1989

253

24‚143

5‚883

30‚026

73

2‚902

57

158

363

1990

253

22‚360

5‚883

28‚243

73

2‚902

57

158

1991

254

24‚172

6‚426

30‚598

75

2‚954

56

1992

238

26‚148

6‚352

32‚500

72

3‚101

1993

237

26‚113

6‚401

32‚514

70

1994

234

25‚394

5‚965

31‚359

1995

233

25‚163

5‚570

1996

231

25‚346

1997

231

1998

Year

Number of vehicles

Number Number Number Number Number Number of of of of of of Business Business Business operators vehicles operators vehicles operators vehicles

(Notes) 1. According to adjustments in the total number of business operators and vehicles in general passenger vehicle transportation businesses by the Kanto District Transport Bureau. 2. The number of business operators represents the total number of business operators that have offices in the said zones.

39

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

Record of taxi operations in special zones and the Busan transportation area by year Item

Fleet vehicles

Distance in kilometers

Rate of Rate of Number Gross number of Gross number of actual Kilometers Distance in actual of operations vehicles actual vehicles actual vehicles of actual kilometers (%) transports (%)

in operation (per day)

Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association T

By operating Number Transportation vehicles per day of income Distance Number Transportation People (by in being 1 thousand of income kilometers transports transported yen) (by 1 yen) (km)

Number of kilometers by actual vehicles per company

Year

in existence (per day)

1989

8‚426‚262

7,730,051

91.7

1,427,558,757 2,564,024,706 55.7 282,314,465 415,364,553 419,907,041 331.7

36.5

54,321

5.1

1990

8‚857‚327

7,812,347

88.2

1,397,770,377 2,524,166,069 55.4 266,400,889 392,404,349 441,798,431 323.1

34.1

56,551

5.2

1991

9‚083‚937

7,847,021

86.4

1,399,846,914 2,537,363,228 55.2 264,270,081 387,679,693 445,910,050 323.4

33.7

56,825

5.3

1992

9‚127‚661

7,987,404

87.5

1,287,130,399 2,470,973,018 52.1 254,163,873 368,950,019 452,092,763 309.4

31.8

56,601

5.1

1993

9‚055‚295

8,104,168

89.5

1,232,125,620 2,466,561,197 50.0 255,652,169 370,176,078 442,113,343 304.4

31.5

54,554

4.8

1994

8‚927‚540

8,123,244

90.9

1,240,553,150 2,509,505,632 49.4 262,646,882 379,287,432 447,245,027 308.9

32.3

55,057

4.7

1995

8‚964‚633

8,133,357

90.7

1,206,470,891 2,490,349,812 48.4 258,991,511 368,429,981 471,327,446 306.2

31.8

57,950

4.7

1996

9‚046‚319

8,139,378

90.0

1,196,703,626 2,496,389,251 47.9 258,949,480 366,869,849 469,161,118 306.7

31.8

57,641

4.6

1997

9‚246‚297

8,046,792

87.0

1,162,436,904 2,456,907,127 47.3 255,984,010 361,814,495 464,240,900 305.3

31.8

57,693

4.5

1998

9‚585‚425

8,326,792

86.9

1,102,334,554 2,444,418,587 45.1 251,991,333 354,470,676 442,266,836 293.6

30.3

53,114

4.4

1999

9‚562‚907

8,353,057

87.3

1,070,224,997 2,412,308,594 44.4 248,005,034 347,820,185 430,880,885 288.8

29.7

51,584

4.3

2000

9‚586‚756

8,289,227

86.5

1,073,601,680 2,398,446,596 44.8 251,116,110 350,889,906 433,310,901 289.3

30.3

52,274

4.3

2001

9‚668‚192

8,277,267

85.6

1,050,961,648 2,370,403,636 44.3 248,335,480 346,787,017 425,020,816 286.4

30.0

51,348

4.2

2002

9‚936‚898

8,417,116

84.7

1,029,033,363 2,348,170,763 43.8 247,264,463 346,509,071 416,434,152 279.0

29.4

49,475

4.2

2003 10‚151‚720

8,575,308

84.5

1,022,572,710 2,354,626,865 43.4 247,780,917 345,361,913 414,247,268 274.6

28.9

48,307

4.1

2004 10‚345‚062

8,633,930

83.5

1,031,226,264 2,352,279,931 43.8 251,113,449 348,391,811 416,921,678 272.4

29.1

48,289

4.1

2005 10‚708‚138

8,720,334

81.4

1,067,522,820 2,381,228,831 44.8 259,360,608 357,687,144 431,634,517 273.1

29.7

49,497

4.1

2006 10‚951‚340

8,701,031

79.5

1,095,822,275 2,403,097,429 45.6 264,927,434 365,325,242 440,306,598 276.2

30.4

50,604

4.1

2007 11,222,247

8,775,795

78.2

1,086,795,352 2,389,381,358 45.5 260,863,751 354,730,299 445,304,907 272.3

29.4

50,742

4.2

2008 11,349,261

8,915,959

78.6

963,240,597 2,291,823,411 42.0 235,502,805 312,318,115 413,103,093 257.0

26.4

46,333

4.1

2009 10,950,290

8,936,482

81.6

853,074,660 2,176,380,311 39.2 214,577,810 283,796,557 367,719,550 243.5

24.0

41,148

4.0

2010

9,818,499

8,369,311

85.2

812,971,689 2,045,818,104 39.7 206,021,917 272,080,128 350,798,592 244.4

24.6

41,915

4.0

2011

9,345,517

7,956,865

85.1

802,520,241 1,972,136,438 40.7 202,140,408 265,876,386 346,234,599 247.9

25.4

43,514

4.0

2012

9,300,451

7,730,381

83.1

802,996,357 1,915,211,746 41.9 202,837,586 267,785,904 348,665,083 247.8

26.2

45,103

4.0

2013

9,505,100

7,729,619

81.3

821,389,895 1,907,272,876 43.1 205,493,957 270,668,509 357,001,972 246.7

26.6

46,186

4.0

2014

9,567,378

7,683,726

80.3

828,861,258 1,901,519,559 43.6 204,331,388 269,020,775 366,540,169 247.5

26.6

47,703

4.1

Apr. 2014

781,667

642,134

82.1

68,355,018

159,430,616 42.9

16,730,437

22,029,308

30,119,709 248.3

26.1

46,906

4.1

May 2014

810,526

646,437

79.8

66,677,080

158,402,817 42.1

16,402,214

21,639,645

29,289,163 245.0

25.4

45,309

4.1

Jun. 2014

784,380

633,156

80.7

68,973,396

157,316,625 43.8

17,153,635

22,412,323

30,509,849 248.5

27.1

48,187

4.0

vehicles

(km)

810,650

662,940

81.8

72,557,577

165,384,644 43.9

18,023,811

23,633,003

32,143,309 249.5

27.2

48,486

4.0

811,728

632,575

77.9

67,143,306

154,705,390 43.4

16,909,589

22,419,490

29,725,442 244.6

25.6

46,991

4.0

Sep. 2014

787,946

637,657

80.9

66,242,851

154,978,019 42.7

16,340,561

21,593,264

29,282,171 243.0

25.6

45,922

4.1

Oct. 2014

814,217

664,729

81.6

71,361,904

163,741,773 43.6

17,449,754

22,874,266

31,532,503 246.3

26.3

47,437

4.1

Nov. 2014

788,043

626,280

79.5

67,421,519

153,638,766 43.9

16,609,090

21,953,202

29,864,686 245.3

26.5

47,686

4.1

Dec. 2014

814,277

669,629

82.2

78,059,915

171,163,717 45.6

18,758,551

24,734,130

34,735,102 255.6

28.0

51,872

4.2

Jan. 2015

814,311

624,254

76.7

66,253,880

153,634,699 43.1

16,437,514

21,676,609

29,232,491 246.1

26.3

46,828

4.0

Feb. 2015

735,403

592,726

80.6

63,248,367

146,091,671 43.3

15,877,536

20,763,082

27,997,704 246.5

26.8

47,236

4.0

Mar. 2015

814,220

651,209

80.0

72,566,445

163,030,822 44.5

17,638,696

23,292,453

32,108,040 250.4

27.1

49,305

4.1

(Notes) The transportation income as of 1989 includes consumption tax. Gross number of actual vehicles in existence = number of days in existence × number of commercial vehicles Rate of actual operations = gross number of actual vehicles in operation / gross number of actual vehicles in existence × 100 Gross number of actual vehicles in operation = number of days in operation × number of commercial vehicles Rate of actual vehicles = actual vehicles in kilometers / distance in kilometers × 100 Rate of operations of 1 vehicle per day Distance in kilometers = distance in kilometers / gross number of actual vehicles in operation Number of transports = number of transports / gross number of actual vehicles in operation Transportation income = transportation income / gross number of actual vehicles in operation Number of kilometers by actual vehicles per vehicle = actual vehicles in kilometers / number of transports T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

Reference materials

Jul. 2014 Aug. 2014

40

Record of taxi operations in the Tama district by year Item

Fleet vehicles

Distance in kilometers

Rate of Rate of Number Gross number of Gross number of actual Kilometers Distance in actual of operations vehicles actual vehicles actual vehicles of actual kilometers (%) transports (%)

in operation (per day)

Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association

By operating Number Transportation vehicles per day of income Distance Number Transportation People (by in being 1 thousand of income kilometers transports transported yen) (by 1 yen) (km)

Number of kilometers by actual vehicles per company

Year

in existence (per day)

1989

1,038,149

959,145 92.4

163,439,658 291,205,586 56.1

37,675,107 51,419,891 46,739,050

303.6

39.3

48,730

4.3

1990

1,072,868

953,894 88.9

158,509,082 283,768,815 55.9

36,035,178 49,122,911 49,093,825

297.5

37.8

51,467

4.4

1991

1,102,252

953,190 86.5

156,226,056 279,988,017 55.8

35,725,413 48,446,415 49,445,068

293.7

37.5

51,873

4.4

1992

1,113,442

976,732 87.7

145,657,237 267,507,741 54.4 34,604,307 46,693,550 50,447,177

273.9

35.4

51,649

4.2

1993

1,119,698

1,005,592 89.8

142,014,694 265,333,089 53.5

35,288,373 47,256,548 50,040,461

263.9

35.1

49,762

4.0

1994

1,120,668

1,020,081 91.0

142,657,066 268,442,111 53.1

36,143,228 48,209,600 50,580,871

263.2

35.4

49,580

3.9

1995

1,126,768

1,026,304 91.1

138,908,197 264,396,833 52.5

35,671,662 47,348,276 52,970,190

257.6

34.8

51,613

3.9

1996

1,128,452

1,028,144 91.1

137,632,812 263,693,062 52.2

35,885,267 47,401,612 52,530,803

256.5

34.9

51,093

3.8

1997

1,139,558

1,024,989 89.9

133,582,273 258,333,449 51.7

35,652,123 47,078,936 52,030,427

252.0

34.8

50,762

3.8

1998

1,174,968

1,066,007 90.7

127,790,614 252,328,764 50.6

35,265,918 46,250,257 50,010,367

236.7

33.1

46,914

3.6

1999

1,213,042

1,100,980 90.8

125,181,896 251,324,956 49.8 34,974,066 45,854,638 49,086,576

228.3

31.8

44,584

3.6

2000

1,215,074

1,089,014 89.6

125,469,650 251,178,426 50.0

35,622,324 46,519,138 49,372,324

230.6

32.7

45,337

3.5

2001

1,223,165

1,088,006 89.0

122,885,940 247,841,012 49.6

35,361,979 46,245,100 48,522,201

227.8

32.5

44,597

3.5

2002

1,276,276

1,115,354 87.4

123,469,343 250,268,325 49.3

35,930,381 47,212,788 48,743,189

224.4

32.2

43,702

3.4

2003

1,301,238

1,139,506 87.6

123,853,912 252,848,198 49.0

36,115,328 47,789,889 48,985,279

221.9

31.7

42,988

3.4

2004

1,312,468

1,148,611 87.5

124,350,985 254,406,730 48.9 36,471,124 48,211,932 49,080,382

221.5

31.8

42,730

3.4

2005

1,330,723

1,147,060 86.2

126,919,347 258,744,376 49.1

37,287,492 49,312,077 50,069,857

225.6

32.5

43,651

3.4

2006

1,332,425

1,134,530 85.1

128,042,345 259,827,490 49.3

37,471,613 49,133,727 50,395,953

229.0

33.0

44,420

3.4

2007

1,336,803

1,120,235 83.8

124,863,955 253,126,293 49.3

36,525,637 47,618,200 50,108,249

226.0

32.6

44,730

3.4

vehicles

(km)

2008

1,330,215

1,113,895 83.7

112,746,999 232,702,800 48.5

33,279,762 42,946,529 47,173,933

208.9

29.9

42,350

3.4

2009

1,284,871

1,108,782 86.3

102,783,907 215,768,230 47.6

30,780,737 39,750,149 43,246,614

194.6

27.8

39,004

3.3

2010

1,223,420

1,070,652 87.5

100,334,947 210,587,758 47.6

30,137,001 38,846,535 42,187,813

196.7

28.1

39,404

3.3

2011

1,201,246

1,041,321 86.7

98,070,069 205,598,785 47.7

29,468,325 38,008,209 41,226,569

197.4

28.3

39,591

3.3

2012

1,187,026

1,004,731 84.6

96,660,173 201,548,110 48.0

29,180,873 37,642,130 40,614,167

200.6

29.0

40,423

3.3

2013

1,182,677

978,272 82.7

95,548,004 198,232,977 48.2

28,746,276 37,134,088 40,169,730

202.6

29.4

41,062

3.3

2014

1,182,940

957,060

80.9

92,419,170 192,116,002 48.1 27,603,695 35,713,044 39,979,139 200.7

28.8

41,773

3.3

Apr. 2014

96,826

79,982

82.6

7,619,765

15,916,819 47.9

2,277,820

2,939,846

3,297,822 199.0

28.5

41,232

3.4

May 2014

100,421

81,357

81.0

7,457,321

15,691,835 47.5

2,214,390

2,859,686

3,219,508 192.9

27.2

39,573

3.4

Jun. 2014

97,222

79,116

81.4

7,713,230

15,989,755 48.2

2,319,211

2,975,701

3,343,751 202.1

29.3

42,264

3.3

Jul. 2014

100,471

82,333

81.9

8,078,760

16,757,835 48.2

2,434,481

3,149,411

3,504,287 203.5

29.6

42,562

3.3

Aug. 2014

100,455

80,048

79.7

7,815,510

16,245,894 48.1

2,373,121

3,129,544

3,382,748 203.0

29.6

42,259

3.3

Sep. 2014

97,200

79,041

81.3

7,241,831

15,207,289 47.6

2,174,489

2,803,107

3,133,138 192.4

27.5

39,639

3.3

Oct. 2014

100,464

82,235

81.9

7,723,877

16,163,953 47.8

2,304,427

2,955,492

3,334,611 196.6

28.0

40,550

3.4

Nov. 2014

97,230

77,938

80.2

7,439,568

15,508,370 48.0

2,218,405

2,874,961

3,224,855 199.0

28.5

41,377

3.4

Dec. 2014

100,471

82,158

81.8

8,873,186

17,964,054 49.4

2,572,992

3,313,860

3,834,036 218.7

31.3

46,667

3.5

Jan. 2015

100,440

78,188

77.8

7,646,632

15,820,985 48.3

2,284,341

3,009,789

3,280,333 202.3

29.2

41,954

3.4

Feb. 2015

90,709

73,466

81.0

6,900,920

14,440,549 47.8

2,068,128

2,642,686

2,990,909 196.6

28.2

40,712

3.3

Mar. 2015

101,031

81,198

80.4

7,908,570

16,408,664 48.2

2,361,890

3,058,961

3,433,141 202.1

29.1

42,281

3.3

(Notes) The transportation income as of 1989 includes consumption tax. The geisha (taxi on its way) / deadhead distance is calculated in kilometers by actual vehicle and the standards for the rates of actual vehicles are different due to the revisions in the geisha / deadhead system as of November 1981. Gross number of actual vehicles in existence = number of days in existence × number of commercial vehicles Rate of actual operations = gross number of actual vehicles in operation / gross number of actual vehicles in existence × 100 Gross number of actual vehicles in operation = number of days in operation × number of commercial vehicles Rate of actual vehicles = actual vehicles in kilometers / distance in kilometers × 100 Rate of operations of 1 vehicle per day Distance in kilometers = distance in kilometers / gross number of actual vehicles in operation Number of transports = number of transports / gross number of actual vehicles in operation Transportation income = transportation income / gross number of actual vehicles in operation Number of kilometers by actual vehicles per vehicle = actual vehicles in kilometers / number of transports

41

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

Record of hired taxi operations in special zones and the Busan transportation area by year Item

Fleet vehicles

Distance in kilometers

Rate of Rate of Number Gross number of Gross number of actual Kilometers Distance in actual of operations vehicles actual vehicles actual vehicles of actual kilometers (%) transports (%)

Year

in existence (per day)

in operation (per day)

vehicles

(km)

Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association

By operating Number Transportation vehicles per day of income Distance Number Transportation People (by in being 1 thousand of income kilometers transports transported yen) (by 1 yen) (km)

Number of kilometers by actual vehicles per company

1989

2,067,226

1,658,212 80.2

286,974,143 298,852,756 96.0

4,713,156

8,850,967 110,845,807 180.2

2.8

66,847 60.9

1990

2,200,489

1,715,770 78.0

288,022,310 300,108,382 96.0

4,642,470

8,262,218 123,026,349 174.9

2.7

71,703 62.0

1991

2,323,225

1,760,088 75.8

280,790,403 293,854,403 95.6

4,510,993

7,816,372 129,240,559 167.0

2.6

73,428 62.2

1992

2,323,764

1,725,728 74.3

244,831,954 257,331,845 95.1

3,937,846

6,834,051 116,418,937 149.1

2.3

67,461 62.2

1993

2,259,159

1,626,445 72.0

218,760,495 229,794,219 95.2

3,499,795

6,068,621 103,152,217 141.3

2.2

63,422 62.5

1994

2,059,797

1,470,061 71.4

207,240,045 213,506,796 97.1

3,219,936

5,593,893 96,061,556 145.2

2.2

65,345 64.4

1995

2,002,145

1,409,261 70.4

209,518,718 215,389,484 97.3

3,169,824

5,507,705 95,631,255 152.8

2.2

67,859 66.1

1996

1,966,869

1,378,487 70.1

130,976,867 203,854,904 64.3

2,992,900

5,257,358 89,989,786 147.9

2.2

65,282 43.8

1997

1,930,859

1,345,862 69.7

127,393,440 197,985,958 64.3

2,884,103

5,266,334 88,097,173 147.1

2.1

65,458 44.2

1998

1,807,936

1,266,152 70.0

113,389,692 177,012,576 64.1

2,616,547

4,823,018 77,768,866 139.8

2.1

61,421 43.3

1999

1,684,385

1,156,084 68.6

102,263,303 165,084,948 61.9

2,467,874

4,573,047 70,505,009 142.8

2.1

60,986 41.4

2000

1,602,740

1,087,568 67.9

97,881,220 157,065,552 62.3

2,330,040

3,891,848 61,179,661 144.4

2.1

56,254 42.0

2001

1,535,249

1,050,009 68.4

93,129,888 147,281,511 63.2

2,212,964

3,460,684 54,859,046 140.3

2.1

52,246 42.1

2002

1,442,591

977,150 67.7

89,256,638 140,263,897 63.6

2,126,274

3,260,429 50,389,184 143.5

2.2

51,568 42.0

2003

1,396,030

932,726 66.8

85,767,544 134,115,815 64.0

2,018,464

3,188,206 47,526,372 143.8

2.2

50,954 42.5

2004

1,390,531

920,801 66.2

85,382,009 133,569,514 63.9

1,980,999

3,175,354 47,552,634 145.1

2.2

51,643 43.1

2005

1,392,699

919,312 66.0

86,223,061 135,209,983 63.8

1,990,391

3,218,015 47,627,561 147.1

2.2

51,808 43.3

2006

1,408,455

935,732 66.4

88,002,877 138,727,214 63.4

2,031,837

3,268,619 48,656,317 148.3

2.2

51,998 43.3

2007

1,424,074

939,742 66.0

89,290,385 141,197,290 63.2

2,047,556

3,234,024 49,432,991 150.3

2.2

52,603 43.6

2008

1,405,360

918,879 65.4

82,530,569 131,085,488 63.0

1,879,029

2,883,084 45,890,121 142.7

2.0

49,941 43.9

2009

1,322,851

829,279 62.7

71,430,343 113,220,185 63.1

1,678,834

2,543,122 38,804,554 136.5

2.0

46,793 42.5

2010

1,283,375

788,680 61.5

69,040,591 107,100,159 64.5

1,596,922

2,476,849 36,926,175 135.8

2.0

46,820 43.2

2011

1,245,570

735,840 59.0

67,041,967 102,424,830 65.4

1,567,436

2,454,005 35,329,168 139.2

2.1

48,012 42.8

2012

1,180,801

710,696 60.2

63,174,173

98,641,167 64.0

1,540,262

2,482,308 33,243,571 138.8

2.2

46,776 41.0

2013

1,160,934

721,122 62.1

60,495,006

97,979,187 61.7

1,531,704

2,677,284 32,920,958 135.8

2.1

45,638 39.5

2014

1,196,017

720,427

60.2

63,499,581

99,574,768 63.8

1,550,949

2,571,033 34,171,067 138.1

2.2

47,395 41.0

Apr. 2014

96,684

60,798

62.9

5,236,149

8,640,480 60.6

130,844

229,622

2,961,127 142.1

2.2

48,704 40.0

May 2014

99,122

58,899

59.4

5,491,681

8,425,268 65.2

128,100

222,936

2,878,504 143.0

2.2

48,871 42.9

Jun. 2014

98,103

60,372

61.5

5,326,035

8,317,003 64.0

127,305

214,993

2,863,658 137.8

2.1

47,434 41.8

101,139

61,992

61.3

5,368,388

8,396,237 63.9

129,626

222,595

2,878,485 135.4

2.1

46,433 41.4

101,243

54,438

53.8

4,536,691

7,147,711 63.5

112,665

188,156

2,372,376 131.3

2.1

43,579 40.1

Sep. 2014

97,962

59,374

60.6

5,274,189

8,277,903 63.7

126,959

226,326

2,804,509 139.4

2.1

47,235 41.5

Oct. 2014

101,660

64,905

63.8

5,995,074

9,313,375 64.4

138,983

234,080

3,128,767 143.5

2.1

48,205 43.1

Nov. 2014

98,560

59,018

59.9

5,569,950

8,644,049 64.4

127,160

218,486

2,934,783 146.5

2.2

49,727 43.8

Dec. 2014

101,903

60,916

59.8

5,344,113

8,341,400 64.1

128,762

205,682

2,885,565 136.9

2.1

47,370 41.5

Jan. 2015

101,991

58,186

57.1

4,965,970

7,826,118 63.5

124,174

206,921

2,748,469 134.5

2.1

47,236 40.0

Feb. 2015

92,080

55,291

60.0

4,712,284

7,378,742 63.9

118,521

185,578

2,604,635 133.5

2.1

47,108 39.8

Mar. 2015

103,154

64,199

62.2

5,675,497

8,866,482 64.0

157,850

215,655

3,110,189 138.1

2.5

48,446 36.0

(Notes) The transportation income as of 1989 includes consumption tax. The standards for the rates of actual vehicles are different because the actual vehicles in kilometers were calculated as the zones from dispatch to return from between 1981 and 1995. Gross number of actual vehicles in existence = number of days in existence × number of commercial vehicles Rate of actual operations = gross number of actual vehicles in operation / gross number of actual vehicles in existence × 100 Gross number of actual vehicles in operation = number of days in operation × number of commercial vehicles Rate of actual vehicles = actual vehicles in kilometers / distance in kilometers × 100 Rate of operations of 1 vehicle per day Distance in kilometers = distance in kilometers / gross number of actual vehicles in operation Number of transports = number of transports / gross number of actual vehicles in operation Transportation income = transportation income / gross number of actual vehicles in operation Number of kilometers by actual vehicles per vehicle = actual vehicles in kilometers / number of transports T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

Reference materials

Jul. 2014 Aug. 2014

42

Changes in taxi fares in Tokyo A p p l i c a t i o n D a t e

10/30/52

F a r e I n i t i a l  

S y s t e m ,

A d d e d  

e t c .





2/20/62

(56.25) 10:8.3 contrast with Vehicle classification: 4m in length, 1.5m in 1.6km - 90 yen initial (46.51) width, 1,000cc engine 430m - 20 yen Waiting: 20 yen / 2 min. (600 yen / hr.)

25.0%

3/18/66

(70.00) 2km - 140 yen

10:7.1 contrast with Vehicle classification: capacity of 6 passengers initial (50.00) Late night / early morning: 20% extra 400m - 20 yen between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. With time factored in: 20 yen / 3 min. (400 yen / hr.)

35.7%

2/19/71

(100.00) 2km - 200 yen

10:10 contrast with Vehicle classification: compact vehicle under initial (100.00) the Road Trucking Vehicle Act 300m - 30 yen Late night / early morning: 20% extra between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. With time factored in: 30 yen / 1 min. 30 sec. (1,200 yen / hr.)

83.7%

12/8/73

(133.33) 1.8km - 240 yen

10:10 contrast with Vehicle classification: 4.1m in length, 1.5m in width initial (133.33) Late night / early morning: 30% extra 300m - 40 yen between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. With time factored in: 40 yen / 1 min. 48 sec. (1,333 yen / hr.)

77.3% (additional application) 49.7.31

Plus 64.7% of the Vehicle classification: 4.1m in length, 1.5m fare on the meter in width

64.7%

12/26/73

7/31/74

(144.44) 1.8km - 260 yen

10:9 contrast with Vehicle classification: 4.2m in length initial (129.87) Late night / early morning: 20% extra as a standard 385m - 50 yen between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. With time factored in: 50 yen / 2 min. (1,500 yen / hr.)

77.3%

9/29/76

(175.00) 2km - 350 yen

10:8.9 contrast with Vehicle classification: 4.2m in length, 1.6m in width initial (155.84) Late night / early morning: 20% extra between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. 385m - 60 yen With time factored in: 60 yen / 2 min. 19 sec. (1,522 yen / hr.)

26.5%

1/24/79 to 2/1/79 (separate application)

(190.00) 2km - 380 yen to (200.00) 2km - 400 yen

10:9.2-9.3 contrast with initial (175.00) 400m - 70 yen to (186.67) 357m - 70 yen

Vehicle classification: 4.3m in length, 1.6m in width Late night / early morning: 20% extra between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. With time factored in:  70 yen / 2 min. 30 sec. (1,680 yen / hr.) to 70 yen / 2 min. 15 sec. (1,867 yen / hr.)

16.4% to 24.3%

10/2/80 to 10/17/80 (separate application)

(220.00) 2km - 440 yen to (230.00) 2km - 460 yen

10:9.0-9.4 contrast with initial (197.53) 405m - 80 yen to (216.22) 370m - 80 yen

Vehicle classification: 4.6m in length, 1.6m in width Late night / early morning: 20% extra between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. With time factored in:  80 yen / 2 min. 26 sec. (1,973 yen / hr.) to 80 yen / 2 min. 13 sec. (2,165 yen / hr.)

16.0% to 25.9%

(Note) 1. The figure in the ( ) of the date of approval indicates the date of implementation. 2. The figure in the ( ) of the fare indicates the distance in kilometers.

43

Increase rate

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association

A p p r o v a l D a t e

F a r e I n i t i a l

A d d e d

S y s t e m ,

Increase rate

e t c .

11/16/52

(40.00) 2km - 80 yen

10:10 contrast with Waiting: 20 yen / 5 min. (240 yen / hr.) initial (40.00) 500m - 20 yen

12/25/63 (1/1/64)

(50.00) 2km - 100 yen

10:8.9 contrast with Vehicle classification: capacity of 6 passeninitial (44.44) gers, 1.5m in width 450m - 20 yen Waiting: 20 yen / 4 min. (300 yen / hr.)

15.0%

1/9/70 (3/1-15/70)

(65.00) 2km - 130 yen

10:6.9 contrast with Vehicle classification: capacity of 6 passengers initial (44.94) Late night / early morning: 20% extra between 11 445m - 20 yen p.m. and 5 a.m. With time factored in: 20 yen / 3 min. (400 yen / hr.)

22.5%

1/26/72 (2/5/72)

(85.00) 2km - 170 yen

10:8.1 contrast with Vehicle classification: 4.3m in length, 1.6m in width initial (68.97) Late night / early morning: 20% extra between 11 p.m. and 5 435m - 30 yen a.m. With time factored in: 30 yen / 2 min. 30 sec. (720 yen / hr.)

43.7%





1/22/74 (1/29/74)

(110.00) 2km - 220 yen

10:8.1 contrast with   initial (88.97) 1.29 times the fare on the meter

29.0%

9/28/74 (11/1/74)

(140.00) 2km - 280 yen

10:8.7 contrast with Vehicle classification: 4.3m in length, 1.6m in width initial Late night / early morning: 20% extra between 11 p.m. and 5 (121.95) a.m. 410m - 50 yen With time factored in: 50 yen / 2 min. 25 sec. (1,240 yen / hr.)

33.9%

4/26/77 (5/6/77)

(165.00) 2km - 330 yen

10:9 contrast with Vehicle classification: 4.3m in length, 1.6m in width initial Late night / early morning: 20% extra between 11 (148.15) p.m. and 5 a.m. 405m - 60 yen With time factored in: 60 yen / 2 min. 30 sec. (1,440 yen / hr.)

20.1%

8/24/79 (9/1/79)

(190.00) 2km - 380 yen

10:8.9 contrast with Vehicle classification: 4.6m in length, 1.6m in width initial Late night / early morning: 20% extra (168.67) between 11 p.m. and 5 a.m. 415m - 70 yen With time factored in: 70 yen / 2 min. 30 sec. (1,680 yen / hr.)

14.3%

8/25/81 (9/2/81)

(215.00) 2km - 430 yen

10:9.2 contrast with Vehicle classification: 4.6m or more in length Late night / early morning: 20% extra initial between 11 p.m. and 5 a.m. (197.53) With time factored in: 80 yen / 2 min. 30 sec. 405m - 80 yen (1,920 yen / hr.)

15.7%









Reference materials

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

44

A p p l i c a t i o n D a t e

9/10/83 to 10/18/83 (separate application)

F a r e I n i t i a l

A d d e d

(240.00) 2km - 480 yen to (255.00) 2km - 510 yen

10:9.1-9.3 contrast with initial (219.51) 410m - 90 yen to (236.84) 380m - 90 yen

S y s t e m ,

e t c .

Vehicle classification: 4.6m or more in length, capacity of 6 passengers or less Late night / early morning: 20% extra between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. With time factored in:  90 yen / 2 min. 20 sec. (2,160 yen / hr.) to 90 yen / 2 min. 15 sec. (2,400 yen / hr.)

42.0% to 20.8%

2/13/89 to 2/15/89

The amounts where the fares and fees calculated below are multiplied by 103 percent and rounded off to the nearest unit of 10 yen.

3/12/90 to 3/27/90

The amounts where the fares and fees calculated below are multiplied by 103 percent and rounded off to the nearest unit of 10 yen.

12/10/91 to 12/18/91

The amounts where the fares and fees calculated below are multiplied by 103 percent and rounded off to the nearest unit of 10 yen.

3/28/94 to 6/7/94

2km - 470 yen

(260.00) 2km - 520 yen to (270.00) 2km - 540 yen

370m - 80 yen

10:8.9-9.0 contrast with initial (231.88) 345m - 80 yen to (242.42) 330m - 80 yen

Vehicle classification: 4.6m or more in length Late night / early morning: 20% extra between 11 p.m. and 5 a.m. With time factored in: 80 yen / 2 min. 15 sec.

Vehicle classification: 4.6m or more in length Late night / early morning: 30% extra between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. With time factored in:  80 yen / 2 min. 5 sec. (2,304 yen / hr.) to 80 yen / 2 min. 0 sec. (2,400 yen / hr.)

11.0% to 16.9%

(310.00) 2km - 620 yen to (315.00) 2km - 630 yen

10:8.4-8.8 contrast with initial (260.87) 345m - 90 yen to (276.92) 325m - 90 yen

Vehicle classification: 4.6m or more in length Late night / early morning: 30% extra between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. With time factored in: 90 yen / 2 min. (2,700 yen / hr.) to 90 yen / 1 min. 55 sec. (2,817 yen / hr.) Waiting fees for wireless vehicles: 90 yen / 50 sec. (6,480 yen / hr.) to 90 yen / 45 sec. (7,200 yen / hr.)

17.0% to 22.9%

(350.00) 2km - 700 yen to (370.00) 2km - 740 yen

10:8.7-8.8 contrast with initial (304.05) 296m - 90 yen to (324.91) 277m - 90 yen

Vehicle classification: 4.6m or more in length Late night / early morning: 30% extra between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. With time factored in: 90 yen / 2 min. 5 sec. (2,592 yen / hr.) to 90 yen / 1 min. 40 sec. (3,240 yen / hr.) Waiting fees for wireless vehicles: 90 yen / 1 min. 10 sec. (4,629 yen / hr.) to 90 yen / 55 sec. (5,891 yen / hr.) Fees for time-specified reservations:     General reservations: 700 yen - 900 yen each time     Early-morning reservations: 1,000 yen - 1,200 yen each time Fees for wagon dispatching services: 300 yen to 400 yen each time Discounts for long-distance rides: 5% to 15% for fares exceeding ten thousand yen Discounts for high-speed rides: 3% to 5% for rides exceeding 30kph or 30kph

11.5% to 23.7%

(Note) 1. The figure in the ( ) of the date of approval indicates the date of implementation. 2. The figure in the ( ) of the fare indicates the distance in kilometers.

45

Increase rate

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association

A p p r o v a l D a t e

2/10/84 (2/18/84)

F a r e I n i t i a l (235.00) 2km - 470 yen

A d d e d

S y s t e m ,

Increase rate

e t c .

10:9.2 contrast with Vehicle classification: 4.6m or more in length Late night / early morning: 20% extra initial between 11 p.m. and 5 a.m. (216.22) With time factored in: 80 yen / 2 min. 15 sec. 370m - 80 yen (2,133 yen / hr.)

9.5%

3/17/89 (4/1/89)

As applied

5/18/90 (5/26/90)

The amounts where the fares and fees calculated below are multiplied by 103 percent and rounded off to the nearest units of 10 yen. (260.00) 2km - 520 yen

10:8.7 contrast with Vehicle classification: 4.6m or more in length Late night / early morning: 30% extra initial between 11 p.m. and 5 a.m. (233.35) With time factored in: 80 yen / 2 min. 10 sec. 355m - 80 yen (2,215 yen / hr.)

9.6%

4/25/92 (5/26/92)

(300.00) 2km - 600 yen

10:8.6 contrast with Vehicle classification: 4.6m or more in length Late night / early morning: 30% extra initial between 11 p.m. and 5 a.m. (259.37) With time factored in: 90 yen / 2 min. 5 sec. 347m - 90 yen (2,592 yen / hr.) Waiting fees for wireless vehicles:      90 yen / 1 min. 10 sec. (4,629 yen / hr.)

12.3%

2/21/95 (3/18/95)

(325.00) 2km - 650 yen

10:8.8 contrast with Vehicle classification: 4.6m or more in length Late night / early morning: 30% extra initial between 11 p.m. and 5 a.m. (285.71) With time factored in: 80 yen / 1 min. 40 sec. 280m - 80 yen (2,880 yen / hr.) Waiting fees for wireless vehicles:      80 yen / 55 sec. (5,760 yen / hr.) Fees for service-specified reservations: Fees for time-specified reservations (general, early-morning):  Fees for wagon-specified reservations: 400 yen each time Discounts for long-distance rides:      10% discount for fares exceeding 9,000 yen

9.4%

Reference materials T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

46

A p p l i c a t i o n D a t e 2/3/97 to 3/3/97

2/24/97 to 3/14/97

8/31/06 to (11/30/06)

F a r e I n i t i a l

A d d e d

S y s t e m ,

e t c .

Increase rate

Changed to the amounts where the fares and fees calculated below are multiplied by 105/103 percent and rounded off to the nearest unit of 10 yen. However, added fares in distance-based fares are calculated with a distance-reduction system, and time and distance-based fares with a time-reduction system. (325.00) 2km - 650 yen

10:8.8 contrast with Vehicle classification: 4.6m or more in length initial Late night / early morning: 30% extra between 11 p.m. and 5 (285.71) a.m. 280m - 80 yen With time factored in: 80 yen / 1 min. 40 sec. (2,880 yen / hr.) Waiting fees for wireless vehicles:      80 yen / 50 sec. (5,760 yen / hr.) Fees for service-specified reservations: Fees for time-specified reservations (general, early-morning):  Fees for wagon-specified reservations: 400 yen each time  Discounts for long-distance rides:      10% discount for fares exceeding 9,000 yen

1.94%

1km - 340 yen

(1) Under 2km  250m - 80 yen 10:8.6 contrast with initial (291.97) (2) As of 2km  274m - 80 yen

Vehicle classification: 4.6m or more in length Late night / early morning: 30% extra between 11 p.m. and 5 a.m. With time factored in:   (1) Under 2km: 80 yen / 1 min. 29 sec.  (2) 2km or more: 80 yen / 1 min. 38 sec. (2,939 yen / hr.) Waiting fees for wireless vehicles:      80 yen / 49 sec. (5,878 yen / hr.) Fees for service-specified reservations: Fees for time-specified reservations (general, early-morning):  Fees for wagon-specified reservations: 400 yen each time  Discounts for long-distance rides:      10% discount for fares exceeding 9,000 yen

1.94%

2km - 750 yen 238m to 276m - 90 Vehicle classification: 2-liter displacement or below (standardsized vehicles) to 810 yen yen Late night / early morning: 20% extra between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. With time factored in: 90 yen / 1 min. 30 sec. to 1 min. 40 sec. Discounts for long-distance rides:      10% discount for fares exceeding 9,000 yen

7.2% to 28.6%

(Note) 1. The figure in the ( ) of the date of approval indicates the date of implementation. 2. The figure in the ( ) of the fare indicates the distance in kilometers.

S u b m i t t e d

47

D a t e

Authorized unregulated fare

2/28/14 (publicly announced) to 3/31/14

The amounts where the initial fares of the current automatic approved fares are multiplied by 108/105 percent and rounded off to the nearest unit of 10 yen become the revised initial fares, and adjustments are made so that increased revenues due to these revisions become the total income of standard business operators and the consumption tax rates being within the range of the increased consumption tax rates, along with the setting of revised added distances.

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

S y s t e m ,

e t c .

Vehicle classification: 2-liter displacement or below (standard-sized vehicles) Late night / early morning: 20% extra between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. With time factored in: 90 yen / 1 min. 45 sec.      (limited to standard-sized vehicles) Discounts for long-distance rides:      10% discount for fares exceeding 9,000 yen

Increase rate Consumption tax shifts

Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association

A p p r o v a l D a t e

F a r e I n i t i a l

A d d e d

S y s t e m ,

Increase rate

e t c .

3/10/97 (4/1/97)

(330.00) 2km - 660 yen

10:8.8 contrast with Vehicle classification: 4.6m or more in length initial Late night / early morning: 30% extra between 11 p.m. (291.97) and 5 a.m. 274m - 80 yen With time factored in: 80 yen / 1 min. 40 sec. (2,880 yen / hr.) Waiting fees for wireless vehicles:      80 yen / 50 sec. (5,760 yen / hr.) Fees for service-specified reservations:      Fees for time-specified reservations:      (general, early-morning) 400 yen each time        Fees for wagon-specified reservations: Discounts for long-distance rides:      10% discount for fares exceeding 9,000 yen

1.94%

3/14/97 (4/1/97)

1km - 340 yen

(1) Under 2km  250m - 80 yen 10:8.6 contrast with initial (291.97) (2) As of 2km  274m - 80 yen

Vehicle classification: 4.6m or more in length Late night / early morning: 30% extra between 11 p.m. and 5 a.m. With time factored in:   (1) Under 2km: 80 yen / 1 min. 30 sec.  (2) 2km or more: 80 yen / 1 min. 40 sec. (2,880 yen / hr.) Waiting fees for wireless vehicles:      80 yen / 50 sec. (5,760 yen / hr.) Fees for service-specified reservations:      Fees for time-specified reservations:      (general, early-morning) 400 yen each time       Fees for wagon-specified reservations: Discounts for long-distance rides:      10% discount for fares exceeding 9,000 yen

1.94%

10/19/07 (publicly announced) 11/2/07 (12/3/07)

2km - 710 yen

288m - 90 yen (limited to standardsized vehicles)

Vehicle classification: 2-liter displacement or below (standard-sized vehicles) Late night / early morning: 20% extra between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. With time factored in: 90 yen / 1 min. 45 sec. (limited to standard-sized vehicles) Discounts for long-distance rides:      10% discount for fares exceeding 9,000 yen

7.22%

I m p l e m e n t a t i o n D a t e

4/1/14

Authorized unregulated fare A d d e d

2km - 730 yen (limited to standard-sized vehicles)

[Special zones / Busan district] 280m - 90 yen (limited to standardsized vehicles) [Tama district] 276m - 90 yen (limited to standardsized vehicles)

Increase rate

e t c .

Vehicle classification: 2-liter displacement or below (standard-sized vehicles) Late night / early morning: 20% extra between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. With time factored in: [Special zones / Busan district] 90 yen / 1 min. 45 sec. (limited to standard-sized vehicles) [Tama district] 90 yen / 1 min. 40 sec. (limited to standard-sized vehicles) Discounts for long-distance rides: 10% discount for fares exceeding 9,000 yen

Consumption tax shifts

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

Reference materials

I n i t i a l

S y s t e m ,

48

Authorized unregulated fares in Tokyo (special zones / Busan transportation area) 1. Taxis (1) Specific large-sized vehicles Distance-based fares Initial fares (2.0km) Added fares

Time-based fares

Time and distancebased fare system

Initial fares (1hr.)

Added fares

A (maximum fare)

810 yen

251m - 90 yen 1 min. 30 sec. - 90 yen

A (maximum fare)

5,050 yen

2,360 yen / 30 min.

Fare B

800 yen

254m - 90 yen 1 min. 35 sec. - 90 yen

Fare B

5,000 yen

2,330 yen / 30 min.

Fare C

790 yen

257m - 90 yen 1 min. 35 sec. - 90 yen

Fare C

4,950 yen

2,300 yen / 30 min.

Fare D

780 yen

261m - 90 yen 1 min. 35 sec. - 90 yen

Minimum fares

4,900 yen

2,270 yen / 30 min.

Minimum fares

770 yen

265m - 90 yen 1 min. 35 sec. - 90 yen

(2) Large-sized vehicles Distance-based fares Initial fares (2.0km) Added fares A (maximum fare)

770 yen

Time-based fares

Time and distancebased fare system

265m - 90 yen 1 min. 35 sec. - 90 yen

A (maximum fare)

Initial fares (1hr.)

Added fares

4,850 yen

2,230 yen / 30 min.

Fare B

760 yen

268m - 90 yen 1 min. 40 sec. - 90 yen

Fare B

4,800 yen

2,200 yen / 30 min.

Fare C

750 yen

272m - 90 yen 1 min. 40 sec. - 90 yen

Fare C

4,750 yen

2,170 yen / 30 min.

Fare D

740 yen

276m - 90 yen 1 min. 40 sec. - 90 yen

Fare D

4,700 yen

2,140 yen / 30 min.

Minimum fares

730 yen

280m - 90 yen 1 min. 45 sec. - 90 yen

Minimum fares

4,650 yen

2,110 yen / 30 min.

(3) Standard-sized vehicles Distance-based fares Initial fares (2.0km) Added fares A (maximum fare)

Time-based fares

Time and distancebased fare system

730 yen

280m - 90 yen 1 min. 45 sec. - 90 yen

A (maximum fare)

Added fares

4,650 yen

2,110 yen / 30 min.

Fare B

720 yen

284m - 90 yen 1 min. 45 sec. - 90 yen

Fare B

4,600 yen

2,080 yen / 30 min.

Fare C

710 yen

288m - 90 yen 1 min. 45 sec. - 90 yen

Fare C

4,550 yen

2,050 yen / 30 min.

Minimum fares

700 yen

292m - 90 yen 1 min. 45 sec. - 90 yen

Fare D

4,500 yen

2,020 yen / 30 min.

Minimum fares

4,450 yen

1,990 yen / 30 min.

2. Taxis (shortened base distances) (1) Specific large-sized vehicles Distance-based fares Initial fares A (maximum fare) 1.749㎞ - 720 yen

Added fares

Time and distancebased fare system

251m - 90 yen

1 min. 30 sec. - 90 yen

Fare B

1.746㎞ - 710 yen

254m - 90 yen

1 min. 35 sec. - 90 yen

Fare C

1.743㎞ - 700 yen

257m - 90 yen

1 min. 35 sec. - 90 yen

Fare D

1.739㎞ - 690 yen

261m - 90 yen

1 min. 35 sec. - 90 yen

Minimum fares 1.735㎞ - 680 yen

265m - 90 yen

1 min. 35 sec. - 90 yen

(2) Large-sized vehicles Distance-based fares Initial fares A (maximum fare) 1.735㎞ - 680 yen

Added fares

Time and distancebased fare system

265m - 90 yen

1 min. 35 sec. - 90 yen

Fare B

1.732㎞ - 670 yen

268m - 90 yen

1 min. 40 sec. - 90 yen

Fare C

1.728㎞ - 660 yen

272m - 90 yen

1 min. 40 sec. - 90 yen

Fare D

1.724㎞ - 650 yen

276m - 90 yen

1 min. 40 sec. - 90 yen

1.72㎞ - 640 yen

280m - 90 yen

1 min. 45 sec. - 90 yen

Minimum fares

(3) Standard-sized vehicles Distance-based fares Added fares

Time and distancebased fare system

1.72㎞ - 640 yen

280m - 90 yen

1 min. 45 sec. - 90 yen

Fare B

1.716㎞ - 630 yen

284m - 90 yen

1 min. 45 sec. - 90 yen

Fare C

1.712㎞ - 620 yen

288m - 90 yen

1 min. 45 sec. - 90 yen

Minimum fares 1.708㎞ - 610 yen

292m - 90 yen

1 min. 45 sec. - 90 yen

Initial fares A (maximum fare)

49

Initial fares (1hr.)

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

Authorized unregulated fares in Tokyo (Kita-tama, Minami-tama, and Nishi-tama transportation areas) 1. Taxis (1) Specific large-sized vehicles Distance-based fares Initial fares (2.0km) Added fares

Time-based fares

Time and distancebased fare system

Initial fares (30 min.)

Added fares

A (maximum fare)

810 yen

248m - 90 yen 1 min. 30 sec. - 90 yen

A (maximum fare)

3,210 yen

3,210 yen / 30 min.

Fare B

800 yen

251m - 90 yen 1 min. 30 sec. - 90 yen

Fare B

3,170 yen

3,170 yen / 30 min.

Fare C

790 yen

254m - 90 yen 1 min. 35 sec. - 90 yen

Fare C

3,130 yen

3,130 yen / 30 min.

Fare D

780 yen

258m - 90 yen 1 min. 35 sec. - 90 yen

Fare D

3,090 yen

3,090 yen / 30 min.

Minimum fares

770 yen

261m - 90 yen 1 min. 35 sec. - 90 yen

Minimum fares

3,050 yen

3,050 yen / 30 min.

(2) Large-sized vehicles Distance-based fares Initial fares (2.0km) Added fares A (maximum fare)

Time-based fares

Time and distancebased fare system

770 yen

261m - 90 yen 1 min. 35 sec. - 90 yen

A (maximum fare)

Initial fares (30 min.)

Added fares

3,040 yen

3,040 yen / 30 min.

Fare B

760 yen

264m - 90 yen 1 min. 35 sec. - 90 yen

Fare B

3,000 yen

3,000 yen / 30 min.

Fare C

750 yen

268m - 90 yen 1 min. 40 sec. - 90 yen

Fare C

2,960 yen

2,960 yen / 30 min.

Fare D

740 yen

272m - 90 yen 1 min. 40 sec. - 90 yen

Fare D

2,920 yen

2,920 yen / 30 min.

Minimum fares

730 yen

276m - 90 yen 1 min. 40 sec. - 90 yen

Minimum fares

2,880 yen

2,880 yen / 30 min.

(3) Standard-sized vehicles Distance-based fares Initial fares (2.0km) Added fares A (maximum fare)

730 yen

Time-based fares

Time and distancebased fare system

276m - 90 yen 1 min. 40 sec. - 90 yen

Initial fares (30 min.)

Added fares

A (maximum fare)

2,880 yen

2,880 yen / 30 min.

Fare B

720 yen

280m - 90 yen 1 min. 45 sec. - 90 yen

Fare B

2,840 yen

2,840 yen / 30 min.

Fare C

710 yen

284m - 90 yen 1 min. 45 sec. - 90 yen

Fare C

2,800 yen

2,800 yen / 30 min.

Minimum fares

700 yen

288m - 90 yen 1 min. 45 sec. - 90 yen

Minimum fares

2,760 yen

2,760 yen / 30 min.

2. Taxis (shortened base distances) (1) Specific large-sized vehicles Distance-based fares Initial fares A (maximum fare) 1.752㎞ - 720 yen

Added fares

Time and distancebased fare system

248m - 90 yen

1 min. 30 sec. - 90 yen

Fare B

1.749㎞ - 710 yen

251m - 90 yen

1 min. 30 sec. - 90 yen

Fare C

1.746㎞ - 700 yen

254m - 90 yen

1 min. 35 sec. - 90 yen

Fare D

1.742㎞ - 690 yen

258m - 90 yen

1 min. 35 sec. - 90 yen

Minimum fares 1.739㎞ - 680 yen

261m - 90 yen

1 min. 35 sec. - 90 yen

(2) Large-sized vehicles Distance-based fares Initial fares A (maximum fare) 1.739㎞ - 680 yen

Added fares

Time and distancebased fare system

261m - 90 yen

1 min. 35 sec. - 90 yen

Fare B

1.736㎞ - 670 yen

264m - 90 yen

1 min. 35 sec. - 90 yen

Fare C

1.732㎞ - 660 yen

268m - 90 yen

1 min. 40 sec. - 90 yen

Fare D

1.728㎞ - 650 yen

272m - 90 yen

1 min. 40 sec. - 90 yen

Minimum fares 1.724㎞ - 640 yen

276m - 90 yen

1 min. 40 sec. - 90 yen

(3) Standard-sized vehicles Distance-based fares A (maximum fare) 1.724㎞ - 640 yen

Added fares

Time and distancebased fare system

276m - 90 yen

1 min. 40 sec. - 90 yen

Fare B

1.72㎞ - 630 yen

280m - 90 yen

1 min. 45 sec. - 90 yen

Fare C

1.716㎞ - 620 yen

284m - 90 yen

1 min. 45 sec. - 90 yen

Minimum fares 1.712㎞ - 610 yen

288m - 90 yen

1 min. 45 sec. - 90 yen

Reference materials

Initial fares

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

50

Fixed taxi fares in Tokyo ○Special zones / Busan district - Narita Airport

Zones

A

B

C

D

Regions

Vehicle classification

Specific largeKatsushika-ku, Edogawa-ku, sized vehicles Sumida-ku, Koto-ku, Large-sized vehicles Daiba Minato-ku, Higashi StandardYashio Shinagawa-ku sized vehicle Specific largesized vehicles Adachi-ku, Arakawa-ku, Large-sized Taito-ku, Bunkyo-ku, vehicles Chiyoda-ku, Chuo-ku Standardsized vehicle Kita-ku, Toshima-ku, Specific largesized vehicles Shinjuku-ku, ShibuyaLarge-sized ku, Minato-ku (excluding vehicles Daiba), Meguro-ku,

(effective as of April 18, 2014)

Fixed fares (yen)

Fares applicable to late night and early morning premiums (yen)

17,000

21,100

15,300

18,900

16,000

19,000

14,400

17,100

16,000

19,000

14,400

17,100

21,000

25,900

18,900

23,300

19,000

23,300

17,100

20,900

19,000

23,300

17,100

20,900

23,000

28,100

20,700

25,200

21,000

25,200

18,900

22,600

Fares applicable Fares to late night and applicable to early morning premiums for premiums and the disabled premiums for the (yen) disabled (yen)

Shinagawa-ku (excluding Higashi Yashio), Ota-ku

Standardsized vehicle

21,000

25,200

18,900

22,600

Itabashi-ku, Nerima-ku, Nakano-ku, Suginami-ku, Setagaya-ku, Musashinoshi, Mitaka-shi

Specific largesized vehicles Large-sized vehicles Standardsized vehicle

25,000

30,200

22,500

27,100

22,000

27,200

19,800

24,400

22,000

27,200

19,800

24,400

(Note) 1. Late-night and early-morning fares are charged between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. 2. Extra fees such as highway tolls are paid for by the passenger. 3. People with physical, intellectual, or mental disability certificates are eligible for discounts for the disabled upon presentation of their certificates.

○Special zones / Busan district - Tokyo Disney Resort

Zones

1

2

3

Regions

Kita-ku, Toshima-ku, Shinjuku-ku, Shibuya-ku, Meguro-ku

Itabashi-ku, Nerima-ku, Nakano-ku, Suginami-ku, Setagaya-ku

Musashino-shi, Mitaka-shi

(effective as of April 18, 2014)

Vehicle classification

Fixed fares (yen)

Fares applicable to late night and early morning premiums (yen)

Specific largesized vehicles Large-sized vehicles Standardsized vehicle Specific largesized vehicles Large-sized vehicles Standardsized vehicle Specific largesized vehicles Large-sized vehicles Standardsized vehicle

7,500

9,000

6,700

8,100

6,500

8,000

5,800

7,200

6,500

8,000

5,800

7,200

8,500

10,100

7,600

9,000

7,500

9,100

6,700

8,100

7,500

9,100

6,700

8,100

11,500

13,600

10,300

12,200

10,000

12,400

9,000

11,100

10,000

12,400

9,000

11,100

Fares applicable Fares to late night and applicable to early morning premiums for premiums and the disabled premiums for the (yen) disabled (yen)

(Note) 1. Late-night and early-morning fares are charged between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. 2. Extra fees such as highway tolls are paid for by the passenger. 3. People with physical, intellectual, or mental disability certificates are eligible for discounts for the disabled upon presentation of their certificates.

51

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

○Special zones / Busan district - Haneda Airport Service Zone

Fixed fares (yen)

Edogawa-ku Taito-ku Sumida-ku Bunkyo-ku Chiyoda-ku Shinjuku-ku Shibuya-ku Adachi-ku Katsushika-ku Arakawa-ku Kita-ku Toshima-ku Nakano-ku Suginami-ku Setagaya-ku Itabashi-ku Nerima-ku Musashino-shi Mitaka-shi

6,700 6,900 6,800 7,000 5,600 6,800 6,400 8,500 8,700 7,900 8,400 8,500 7,500 8,200 6,600 9,400 9,800 10,700 10,200

Fares applicable to premiums for the disabled (yen) 6,000 6,200 6,100 6,300 5,000 6,100 5,700 7,600 7,800 7,100 7,500 7,600 6,700 7,300 5,900 8,400 8,800 9,600 9,100

Fares applicable to late night and early morning premiums (yen) 12,500 14,900 14,500 14,500 15,800 15,600 17,000 17,800 17,100 17,100 18,800 21,000 19,800 21,300 22,700 23,300 23,500 24,400 24,400 24,700 25,400 13,300 19,700 19,700 20,700 24,700 15,400 17,100 18,400

Fares applicable to premiums for the disabled (yen) 9,500 11,200 11,000 10,900 11,900 11,800 12,800 13,500 12,900 13,000 14,200 15,800 15,000 16,100 17,100 17,600 17,700 18,400 18,400 18,600 19,100 10,100 14,900 14,800 15,600 18,600 11,600 12,900 13,900

○Santama Zone - Haneda Airport Fixed fares (yen)

Chofu-shi Fuchu-shi Koganei-shi Nishitokyo-shi Higashikurume-shi Kodaira-shi Kokubunji-shi Kunitachi-shi Kiyose-shi Higashimurayama-shi Tachikawa-shi Higashiyamato-shi Akishima-shi Musashimurayama-shi Fussa-shi Akiruno-shi (Eastern) Akiruno-shi (Western) Mizuho-machi Hamura-shi Hinode-machi Ome-shi Machida-shi (Eastern) Machida-shi (Western) Hachioji-shi (Eastern) Hachioji-shi (Central) Hachioji-shi (Western) Inagi-shi Tama-shi Hino-shi

10,600 12,500 12,300 12,200 13,300 13,200 14,300 15,000 14,400 14,500 15,800 17,600 16,700 17,900 19,100 19,600 19,700 20,500 20,500 20,700 21,300 11,300 16,600 16,500 17,400 20,700 12,900 14,400 15,500

Fares applicable to late night and early morning premiums and premiums for the disabled (yen) 7,200 7,300 7,300 7,400 6,100 7,300 6,800 9,000 9,100 8,400 8,900 9,000 8,100 8,700 7,200 9,900 10,400 11,300 10,800

(effective as of March 8, 2015)

Fares applicable to late night and early morning premiums and premiums for the disabled (yen) 11,200 13,400 13,000 13,000 14,200 14,000 15,300 16,000 15,300 15,300 16,900 18,900 17,800 19,100 20,400 20,900 21,100 21,900 21,900 22,200 22,800 11,900 17,700 17,700 18,600 22,200 13,800 15,300 16,500

(Note) 1. Late-night and early-morning fares are charged between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. 2. Extra fees such as highway tolls are paid for by the passenger. 3. People with physical, intellectual, or mental disability certificates are eligible for discounts for the disabled upon presentation of their certificates. T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

Reference materials

Service Zone

(effective as of March 8, 2015)

Fares applicable to late night and early morning premiums (yen) 8,000 8,200 8,200 8,300 6,800 8,200 7,600 10,000 10,200 9,400 9,900 10,100 9,000 9,700 8,000 11,100 11,600 12,600 12,000

52

Hired taxi fares in Tokyo (large-sized vehicles)

(effective as of April 1, 2014)

Time-based fare A

Time-based fare B

Initial fares

Added fares

Initial fares

Added fares

Initial fares

Added fares

1 hr. or 15 ㎞

30 min. or 7.5 ㎞

4 hr. or 60 ㎞

30 min. or 7.5 ㎞

8 hr. or 120 ㎞

30 min. or 7.5 ㎞

A (maximum fare)

6,450 yen

2,930 yen

21,130 yen

2,670 yen

37,120 yen

2,410 yen

Fare B

6,350 yen

2,890 yen

20,780 yen

2,630 yen

36,500 yen

2,380 yen

Fare C

6,240 yen

2,840 yen

20,430 yen

2,590 yen

35,890 yen

2,330 yen

Fare D

6,130 yen

2,790 yen

20,080 yen

2,540 yen

35,270 yen

2,290 yen

Fare E

6,030 yen

2,740 yen

19,720 yen

2,500 yen

34,650 yen

2,250 yen

Fare F

5,910 yen

2,690 yen

19,370 yen

2,460 yen

34,040 yen

2,210 yen

Fare G

5,810 yen

2,640 yen

19,020 yen

2,410 yen

33,420 yen

2,170 yen

Minimum fares

5,700 yen

2,590 yen

18,660 yen

2,370 yen

32,770 yen

2,130 yen

Long-term contract fare A

Long-term contract fare B

Initial fares

Added fares

Initial fares

Added fares

1 hr. or 15 ㎞

30 min. or 7.5 ㎞

8 hr. or 120 ㎞

30 min. or 7.5 ㎞

A (maximum fare)

5,250 yen

2,620 yen

29,620 yen

2,360 yen

Fare B

5,160 yen

2,580 yen

29,130 yen

2,320 yen

Fare C

5,080 yen

2,540 yen

28,650 yen

2,280 yen

Fare D

4,990 yen

2,500 yen

28,140 yen

2,240 yen

Fare E

4,900 yen

2,450 yen

27,650 yen

2,200 yen

Fare F

4,810 yen

2,410 yen

27,160 yen

2,160 yen

Fare G

4,720 yen

2,370 yen

26,660 yen

2,130 yen

Minimum fares

4,630 yen

2,310 yen

26,160 yen

2,090 yen

Distance-based fares Initial fares 7.5㎞

53

Time-based fare C

Wait fares Added fares

A (maximum fare)

4,250 yen

472m - 230 yen

2 min. 40 sec. - 230 yen

Fare B

4,190 yen

480m - 230 yen

2 min. 45 sec. - 230 yen

Fare C

4,110 yen

488m - 230 yen

2 min. 50 sec. - 230 yen

Fare D

4,040 yen

497m - 230 yen

2 min. 50 sec. - 230 yen

Fare E

3,970 yen

506m - 230 yen

2 min. 55 sec. - 230 yen

Fare F

3,900 yen

515m - 230 yen

2 min. 55 sec. - 230 yen

Fare G

3,830 yen

524m - 230 yen

2 min. 55 sec. - 230 yen

Minimum fares

3,750 yen

535m - 230 yen

2 min. 55 sec. - 230 yen

T A X I C A B S I N T O K Y O 2 015

Interactions with taxi industries of other countries.

5/31

1991

9/12

A team that inspects the condition of hired t a x i s i n E u r o p e ( t e a m l e a d e r : M r. K u n i o Fujimoto) inspects condition in London, Paris, and Frankfurt, and attends the central conference of the ITLA (International Taxi and Livery Association).

6/12

Vice-President Yasuoka visits the United States to inspect the condition of taxis in the city of Atlanta.

1998

Mr. Gong Park of the Seoul Special City Taxi Transportation Business Partnership in South Korea and others visit the Association to inspect the condition of taxis in Tokyo.

2000

4/3

2003

11/5

President Niikura visits South Korea to sign an agreement to extend the coalition with the Seoul Special City Taxi Transportation Business Partnership. Director Lee of the Seoul Special City Taxi Transportation Business Partnership in South Korea and others visit the Association to inspect the local condition of the industry.

The Korea Local Authorities Foundation for International Relations visits the Association to inspect the industry in Tokyo.

7/19

The Beijing Traffic Management Bureau and a research team for urban development observation overseas visit the Association to inspect the industry in Tokyo.

8/16

The Seoul Special City Taxi Transportation Business Partnership visits the Association to observe the industry in Tokyo.

4/6

An observation team (team leader: VicePresident Kawanabe) of the Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association consisting of the Vice-President and expert chairpersons make an official visit to the New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission (TLC) on April 8 and New York City s Metropolitan Taxicab Board of Trade on April 9 to observe the condition of the taxi industry in New York City, United States.

to

4/12

2014

2001

5/15

An observation team from the South Korean Federation of Taxi Workers' Unions visits the Association to inspect local issues related to labor, issues concerning the loosening of labor regulations, etc.

6/10

2013

1999

Mr. Peilian Wang of the Dalian Television Network in the Republic of China and others visit the Association to inspect the condition of taxis in Tokyo.

The Seoul Special City Taxi Transportation Business Partnership in South Korea visits Japan to sign an agreement for the extension of the coalition.

12/21 An observation team representing the taxi industry in China s Wuhan City visits the Association to inspect the industry in Tokyo.

Mr. Chao-tung Wang of the Volunteer Traffic Guard Division, Taipei Municipal Government P o l i c e i n Ta i w a n a n d o t h e r s v i s i t t h e Association to inspect the condition of taxis in Tokyo.

5/20

5/26

2012

1995 8/7

The Seoul Special City Taxi Transportation Business Partnership in South Korea visits Japan to sign an agreement to extend the coalition.

Professor Walter Cock of Kingston University in England visits the Association to inspect the local condition of the industry.

11/6

2009

1992 8/5

European taxi business operators (Mr. Peter from Germany, Mr. Kavan from Switzerland, Mr. Schlecht from Austria, Mr. Rude from France, etc.) come to Japan to inspect the industry in Tokyo.

6/29

2007

4/6

Director Lee of the Seoul Special City Taxi Transportation Business Partnership in South Korea and others visit the Association to inspect the condition of the industry in Tokyo.

10/26 A survey team from the Beijing City Transport Committee in China visits the Association to inspect the local industry.

President Niikura and others visit South Korea to sign an agreement to extend the coalition with the Seoul Special City Taxi Transportation Business Partnership.

11/20 President Niikura and others visit Taiwan to sign an agreement to extend the coalition with the Taipei City Taxi Transportation Federation.

3/8

2006

to 7/27

2005

1990 7/23

A world taxi conference with representatives from various countries is held (Director Kuang-Lieh Lee and two others from South Korea, Executive Director Betty Lawrence from the United States, Executive VicePresident Alfred B. LaGasse III from the ITA, Chairman Geoffrey W. Trotter from England, and Chairman Phillip Kabin from Germany).

5/18

T h e S i n g a p o r e Ta x i A c a d e m y v i s i t s t h e Association to inspect the industry in Tokyo.

8/11

T h e Ko r e a Tr a n s p o r t I n s t i t u t e v i s i t s t h e Association to inspect the industry in Tokyo.

11/15 An observation team (team leader: VicePresident Kawanabe) consisting of business to 11/20 operators registered in the Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association make official visits to organizations such as the TfL (traffic bureau of London), the LTDA (Licensed Taxi Drivers Association), and Taxi Trade Promotions Ltd to observe the condition of the taxi industry in London, England.

Tokyo’ s taxis in 2015 Issued in July 2015

4-8-13 Kudanminami, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0074, Japan Phone: +81-3-3264-8080 URL: http://www.taxi-tokyo.or.jp/english/

Reference materials

Ichiro Kawanabe Editor : Hirohiko Fujiwara Publishing office: Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association Issuer :

o ure t Be s this! l l insta

The ultimate Tokyo taxi app! “Tokyo Taxi Association-TAKKUN”is an official Tokyo Hire-Taxi Association app. It exceeds the boundaries of taxi companies and allows you to easily call taxis that run through Tokyo. *It can be used in Tokyo’ s 23 wards, Musashino, and Mitaka.

Point

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Specify where you want your taxi dispatched.

Enter the service you need.

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4-8-13 Kudanminami, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0074, Japan Phone: +81-3-3264-8080 URL: http://www.taxi-tokyo.or.jp/english/