A Typology of Genres of Fiction Crime and Horror Fiction

A Typology of Genres of Fiction Crime and Horror Fiction

University Press Scholarship Online You are looking at 1-10 of 10 items for: keywords : horror fictions A Typology of Genres of Fiction Torben Groda...

44KB Sizes 0 Downloads 8 Views

University Press Scholarship Online

You are looking at 1-10 of 10 items for: keywords : horror fictions

A Typology of Genres of Fiction Torben Grodal

in Moving Pictures: A New Theory of Film Genres, Feelings, and Cognition Published in print: 1999 Published Online: Publisher: Oxford University Press October 2011 DOI: 10.1093/ ISBN: 9780198159834 eISBN: 9780191673719 acprof:oso/9780198159834.003.0008 Item type: chapter

This chapter summarizes some of the characteristic dimensions that produce emotions in visual fiction, and uses these dimensions to formulate a typology of prototypical emotion-producing genres. The eight prototypical genre-patterns in visual fiction, based on their emotional effect on the viewer, are: lyricism, canonical narratives, obsessional fictions, melodramas, horror fictions, schizoid fictions, comic fictions, and metafictions.

Crime and Horror Fiction Torben Grodal

in Moving Pictures: A New Theory of Film Genres, Feelings, and Cognition Published in print: 1999 Published Online: Publisher: Oxford University Press October 2011 DOI: 10.1093/ ISBN: 9780198159834 eISBN: 9780191673719 acprof:oso/9780198159834.003.0011 Item type: chapter

Crime fiction is a subgenre of canonical narratives. As a result of its narrative structure, it has a characteristic strong emphasis on cognitive control, compared with the typical canonical narrative in which cognitive control is more closely integrated with physical acts. This chapter considers the way in which crime fiction relates to canonical narratives, metanarratives, and horror fiction, the means by which it modifies empathic relations, and that by which thrillers and horror fiction furthermore rely on cognitive dissonance for creating effect.

Page 1 of 6

. Biography and Overview S.T. Joshi

in Ramsey Campbell and Modern Horror Fiction Published in print: 2001 Published Online: May Publisher: Liverpool University Press 2014 DOI: 10.5949/ ISBN: 9780853237655 eISBN: 9781781380697 liverpool/9780853237655.003.0002 Item type: chapter

This chapter presents a biography of Ramsey Campbell who was born on January 4, 1946 in Liverpool, England. It is said that Ramsey Campbell's upbringing in an estranged family may have contributed to his horror fiction writing style which focused on abnormal psychological states with uncomfortable intensity. It notes that Ramsey Campbell's mother played an important role in nurturing his literary pursuits, accompanying him to watch classic horror films in the 1950s.

Sizing Up the Beast Mathias Clasen

in Why Horror Seduces Published in print: 2017 Published Online: Publisher: Oxford University Press October 2017 DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190666507.003.0002 ISBN: 9780190666507 eISBN: 9780190666545 Item type: chapter

Horror fiction has been a legitimate object of academic study for several decades now. There are many competing theoretical approaches to horror and the Gothic, but the most prevalent approaches are seriously flawed. Constructivist approaches, which see horror as a product of historical circumstance, ignore the genre’s psychological and biological underpinnings and its deep history. Horror stretches back in time beyond the Gothic novel through folk tales to earlier oral narratives. Psychoanalytical approaches, which build on Freud’s theories of psychology, are scientifically obsolete and have a distorting effect on the subject matter, reducing horror to representations of psychosexual complexes. The chapter critically discusses existing approaches to horror, as well as horror as an affectively defined genre, and it argues for a consilient, biocultural approach which integrates other viable approaches within a framework based on biology and which builds on current social science.

Page 2 of 6

Jungle Lords, Haunting Horrors, and the Big City Aldo J. Regalado

in Bending Steel: Modernity and the American Superhero Published in print: 2015 Published Online: Publisher: University Press of Mississippi January 2017 DOI: 10.14325/ ISBN: 9781628462210 eISBN: 9781626746183 mississippi/9781628462210.003.0003 Item type: chapter

This chapter discusses how earlier heroic fiction developed in the immediate post-Civil War era and into the early twentieth century as republican modernity gave way to the industrial modernity. Responding to new heights of immigration, industrialization, urbanization, mechanization, and modernization, the next generation of American authors to write heroic fiction updated earlier heroic archetypes as creative and personal responses to industrial modernity. Generally speaking, their fiction involved imaginative withdrawals from modern society that affirmed white middle-class masculinity in the face of those forces they perceived as threatening to its viability. Edgar Rice Burroughs's Tarzan of the Apes, for instance, allowed him and his readers an imaginative escape from modern urban society. Central to this escape was a rejection of cities, technology, bureaucracy, and business culture, as well as the celebration of white, male Anglo-Saxonism over “others” defined by gender, class, race, and ethnicity. The chapter also considers the horror fiction work of H. P. Lovecraft.

Introduction Mathias Clasen

in Why Horror Seduces Published in print: 2017 Published Online: Publisher: Oxford University Press October 2017 DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190666507.003.0001 ISBN: 9780190666507 eISBN: 9780190666545 Item type: chapter

Horror entertainment is paradoxically popular. It is one of the most consistently popular genres across media, yet it is designed to make audiences feel bad. An evolutionary perspective, one that builds on recent developments in cognitive and evolutionary psychology, can help explain the genre’s popularity as well as its form and function. This chapter argues that horror fiction is crucially dependent on evolved properties of the human central nervous system and that a nuanced and scientifically valid understanding of horror requires that we take human evolutionary history seriously. Horror targets ancient defense mechanisms in the brain. At the same time, horror changes in response to sociocultural context. Hence, the chapter argues for a biocultural Page 3 of 6

critical approach to horror, one that is sensitive to cultural context as well as evolved psychological underpinnings. The chapter explains the rationale of the book and outlines its structure.

. The Lovecraftian Fiction S.T. Joshi

in Ramsey Campbell and Modern Horror Fiction Published in print: 2001 Published Online: May Publisher: Liverpool University Press 2014 DOI: 10.5949/ ISBN: 9780853237655 eISBN: 9781781380697 liverpool/9780853237655.003.0003 Item type: chapter

This chapter explores the influence of H.P. Lovecraft on Ramsey Campbell's horror fiction. It explains that some of Campbell's works were faithful to the cosmic perspective of Lovecraft's works. In some of his works, Campbell has also used Lovecraftian allusions that actually owe little to details provided in the Lovecraftian lore, suggesting that he may have never read H.P. Lovecraft's works, but only his imitators.

How Horror Works, I Mathias Clasen

in Why Horror Seduces Published in print: 2017 Published Online: Publisher: Oxford University Press October 2017 DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190666507.003.0003 ISBN: 9780190666507 eISBN: 9780190666545 Item type: chapter

Horror fiction exploits deep-seated psychological mechanisms that evolved over millions of years in response to threats in the environment. As Charles Darwin documented, our species, like all other organisms, evolved in an adaptive relation to our environment. Archaeological and anthropological evidence suggests that human prehistoric existence was more dangerous than life in modern industrialized nations. That dangerous existence has given rise, as studied in evolutionary psychology, to an evolved fear system—since fear is, as H.P. Lovecraft stated, the oldest and strongest emotion—a watchful, hypersensitive set of mechanisms that prompt us to respond strongly to even ambiguous cues of danger. Horror fiction exploits this system by immersing us in fictional worlds that teem with danger, aligning us with characters that face monstrous threats, and evoking in us negative emotions such as fear and anxiety.

Page 4 of 6

How Horror Works, II Mathias Clasen

in Why Horror Seduces Published in print: 2017 Published Online: Publisher: Oxford University Press October 2017 DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190666507.003.0004 ISBN: 9780190666507 eISBN: 9780190666545 Item type: chapter

The most effective monsters of horror fiction mirror ancestral dangers to exploit evolved fears. For most of human evolutionary history, we have faced threats in the domains of predation, conspecific violence, contagion, status loss, and dangerous nonliving environmental features. We thus very easily acquire fears directed toward threats from these domains. This chapter argues that the nonrandom distribution of human fears is reflected in horror, which features stimuli that mirror evolved fears, often in incarnations that are exaggerated and/or counterintuitive for increased salience, including giant spiders, supernormal monsters such as evil clowns, and physics-violating ghosts. Many monsters are also equipped with contagion cues, thus exploiting an evolved disgust mechanism. Some monsters evoke moral disgust through their violation of norms. To strengthen audiences’ emotional responses to such monsters, horror artists often provide descriptions of characters’ reactions which are mirrored by the audience through an adaptive mechanism enabling emotional contagion.

Invisible Corporate Bodies Stefan Andriopoulos

in Possessed: Hypnotic Crimes, Corporate Fiction, and the Invention of Cinema Published in print: 2008 Published Online: Publisher: University of Chicago Press February 2013 DOI: 10.7208/ ISBN: 9780226020549 eISBN: 9780226020570 chicago/9780226020570.003.0003 Item type: chapter

This chapter analyzes the late nineteenth-century juridical debate about the demonic power of invisible corporate bodies. The strain of continental legal theory based on a modernization of Roman law expressly relied on fictional modes of representation, thereby compensating for the “theoretical deficiency” of juridical discourse in conceptualizing legal persons. But a merely “fictional person” was not considered capable of committing crimes. In diametrical contrast, other legal theorists such as von Gierke and von Liszt regarded the corporation as an invisible yet real organism that could compel its possessed members to commit criminal acts. This connection between theories of corporate agency and hypnotism was not, however, one of monocausal determination. Instead, Page 5 of 6

the legal representations of intangible corporate organisms participated in a discursive network of the fantastic that also included contemporary literary texts such as Guy de Maupassant's Le Horla and Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness. Juridical invocations of invisible corporate bodies and their seemingly preternatural demonic power thus testified to a precarious proximity of legal theory and horror fiction.

Page 6 of 6