about scc - Southwestern Community College

about scc - Southwestern Community College

447 College Drive • Sylva, North Carolina 28779 www.southwesterncc.edu 828.339.4000 • 800.447.4091 Southwestern Community College is accredited by th...

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447 College Drive • Sylva, North Carolina 28779 www.southwesterncc.edu 828.339.4000 • 800.447.4091 Southwestern Community College is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award associate degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404.679.4500 for questions about the accreditation of Southwestern Community College. Southwestern Community College issues this catalog to furnish prospective students and other interested people with information about the College and its programs. Announcements contained herein are subject to change without notice and may not be regarded as binding obligations to the College or the State of North Carolina. Class offerings are subject to sufficient enrollment, and not all courses listed in this catalog are offered each semester. Throughout the year, course schedules are available on the College’s website. This catalog should not be considered a contract between Southwestern Community College and any prospective student. All charges for tuition and fees are subject to change as required by the North Carolina General Assembly and the Southwestern Community College Board of Trustees. Course listings within specific academic programs may be altered to meet the needs of the individual program or academic division. Policy and procedural changes approved by the Board of Trustees during the inclusive dates of the catalog will be considered as official addenda to the publication. An Equal Opportunity Institution Printed March 2013. Six thousand copies of this public document were printed at a cost of $1.76 each.

Cashiers Center 217 Frank Allen Road • Cashiers, NC 28717 828.339.4272 Jackson Campus 447 College Drive • Sylva, NC 28779 828.339.4000, 800.447.4091 Macon Annex 23 Macon Avenue • Franklin, NC 28734 828.306.7034 Macon Campus 44 Siler Farm Road • Franklin, NC 28734 828.306.7001 Jerry Sutton Public Safety Training Center 225 Industrial Park Loop • Franklin, NC 28734 828.306.7041 Swain Center 60 Almond School Road • Bryson City, NC 28713 828.366.2000

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ABOUT SCC

• College Vision • Compliance • Governance • Institutional Goals • Institutional Profile • Mission Statement • Service Excellence • Southwestern Community College Foundation, Inc. • Accreditation and Approval • Specialized Programmatic Accrediting and Approving Agencies • Jackson Campus Map • Macon Campus

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ABOUT SCC COLLEGE VISION Southwestern Community College will be: • A Gateway for enriching lives and broadening horizons • A Guiding Force in growing and caring for our mountain community • A Creative Partner in collaborative solutions COMPLIANCE It is the policy of Southwestern Community College that no qualified person shall be excluded from participation in, declined the benefits of, or subjected to discrimination under any college program or activity on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. Southwestern Community College complies with Titles VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. GOVERNANCE Southwestern Community College is one of 58 institutions operating in the North Carolina Community College System, a statewide organization of public, two-year, postsecondary educational institutions. The college is governed by a local Board of Trustees within the framework of the Community Colleges Act, Chapter 115D of the General Statutes of North Carolina. The board consists of 13 Trustees—five appointed by the county commissioners, four appointed by the Board of Education, four appointed by the Governor of North Carolina—and one Ex-officio Student Trustee. The objective of the Board of Trustees is to assure that Southwestern Community College achieves its mission within the guidelines established by the State Board of Community Colleges and the State of North Carolina. INSTITUTIONAL GOALS The College will... 1. Seek excellence in learning and teaching for transfer, vocational and technical education, literacy development, business and industry training and life-long learning in an accessible format to serve a diverse population. 2. Maintain a nurturing learning environment by providing comprehensive support and intervention services for every individual. 3. Proactively identify, acquire and maintain college resources to support the vision, mission and goals of the College. 4. Attract and retain quality employees and provide for their personal and intellectual growth. 5. Develop cooperative community-based relationships which contribute to the cultural, economic, educational and social betterment of the region. 6. Assess institutional effectiveness as part of the planning and renewal process based on continuous improvement principles. 7. Effectively promote the College to the community.



ABOUT SCC INSTITUTIONAL PROFILE Southwestern Community College was established in Sylva on Dec. 1, 1964 as the Jackson County Industrial Education Center, a satellite unit of Asheville-Buncombe Technical Institute. Since achieving independent status in the fall of 1967, the College (then known as Southwestern Technical Institute) has greatly expanded its educational and training services to the residents of Jackson, Macon and Swain counties. Initially, the Jackson County Industrial Education Center was approved to offer four programs of study: automotive mechanics; carpentry and cabinetmaking; block and brick masonry; and radio, television and small-appliance repair. When the center opened its doors in 1964, a total of 133 students were enrolled in short-term courses. An additional 60 were enrolled in full-day classes. Currently, including all diploma, certificate and associate’s degree curricula as well as concentrations, instruction is provided in more than 74 programs. In addition to the Jackson Campus, the College opened a Macon Campus in 2007 and also operates centers in Bryson City, and Franklin. SCC also offers classes in Cashiers and Cherokee. More than 2,600 students enroll annually in credit courses, and more than 5,500 (unduplicated) participate in a wide variety of courses, workshops and seminars offered through Continuing Education. Located on a 57-acre tract of land on North Carolina Highway 116 between Webster and Sylva, the Southwestern Community College Jackson Campus consists of eight buildings, totaling 232,728 square feet, including a Library. Centrally located to serve southwestern North Carolina, the College is 50 miles southwest of Asheville, NC, and 90 miles southeast of Knoxville, TN. Southwestern Community College’s three-county service area totals 1,534 square miles (30 percent larger than the state of Rhode Island) and has a population of approximately 78,000. The area is noted for the beautiful Smoky Mountains and the variety of recreational opportunities available. MISSION STATEMENT Southwestern Community College is a learning and teaching institution offering highquality, innovative instruction and support which promotes student achievement, academic excellence and economic development

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ABOUT SCC SERVICE EXCELLENCE Service is how we relate to people we interact with every day. At Southwestern Community College, the needs of our students will remain our highest priority. We serve an internal and external clientele including current and prospective students, employees, and community members. Our student-centered service philosophy forms the very basis for how we do our jobs. • Greet people with courtesy. • Demonstrate professionalism. • Communicate with accurate information. • Demonstrate a welcoming and helpful manner. • Respect the needs of others. • Take positive action on behalf of others. SOUTHWESTERN COMMUNITY COLLEGE FOUNDATION, INC. Southwestern Community College Foundation, Inc. was established in 1973 to provide additional financial support for the College through private donations. The Foundation supports student scholarships and other specific projects to improve the educational programs and development of Southwestern Community College. Gifts to the Foundation are deductible on federal and state income tax reports, both individual and corporate, up to the limitations of applicable laws. All gifts, large or small, are appreciated and may be designated for specific projects supported by the Foundation. ACCREDITATION AND APPROVAL Southwestern Community College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award Associate Degrees. SCC is one of 58 colleges operating in the North Carolina Community College System, a statewide organization of public two-year postsecondary educational institutions. SPECIALIZED PROGRAMMATIC ACCREDITING AND APPROVAL AGENCIES • Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) - Advanced Level Respiratory Therapy Program • Com. on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Info. Management Ed. (CAHIIM) • Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (COARC) • Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) • Joint Review Committee on Education in Diagnostic Medical Sonography ( JRC-DMS) • Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology ( JRCERT) • National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS) • National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) • North Carolina Bar Board of Paralegal Certification • North Carolina Board of Cosmetic Arts • North Carolina Board of Massage and Bodywork Therapy • North Carolina Board of Nursing • North Carolina Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission • North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Facility Services, Office of Emergency Medical Science • North Carolina Real Estate Commission • North Carolina Sheriff ’s Standards and Training Commission • North Carolina State Approving Agency for Veterans & Military Education Programs • United States Department of the Interior National Park Service

ABOUT SCC

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JACKSON CAMPUS MAP BALSAM CENTER Admissions Office (1st Floor) Auditorium (1st Floor) Business Office (1st Floor) Career Counseling (1st Floor) College Access (1st Floor) Financial Aid (1st Floor) Health Sciences Division (2nd Floor) Registrar (1st Floor) Technology Services (3rd Floor) Student Services (1st Floor)

BURRELL BUILDING Bookstore (1st Floor) Conference Center (1st Floor) Classrooms (2nd & 3rd Floor) Faculty Offices (2nd Floor) Institutional Research (1st Floor) Public Information (1st Floor) President’s Office (1st Floor) Slagle Board Room (1st Floor) Resource & Community Development (1st Floor)

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Holt Library

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Jackson County Early College

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F Oaks Hall

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Burrell Building

The Summit

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Bradford Hall

Founders Hall

C C Balsam Center

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Maintenance Building

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OAKS HALL Arts & Sciences Division Office (1st Floor) Student Support Services (1st Floor) Disability Services Office (1st Floor) Learning Assistance Center (2nd Floor) Student Success Office (1st Floor) HOLT LIBRARY (The Pines)

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BRADFORD HALL Conference Center (1st Floor) Gymnasium (2nd Floor) Instruction & Student Services Office (3rd Floor) FOUNDERS HALL Career Technologies Division Office (2nd Floor) Continuing Education (1st Floor) Cosmetology (1st Floor) THE SUMMIT Classrooms

JACKSON COUNTY EARLY COLLEGE

ABOUT SCC

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MACON CAMPUS The Macon Campus is located at 815 Siler Rd in Franklin, NC in a high-tech, state of the art facility. This is the beginning of a resource-rich campus, offering technology-enhanced learning with computer laboratories, virtual and interactive classrooms, and access to major research institutions. The Macon Campus Groves Center houses administration, computer labs, a learning assistance center, general classrooms, and Macon Early College. SCC at Macon also maintains classrooms at the Macon Campus Annex located downtown Franklin at 23 Macon Avenue behind the Macon County Courthouse. The Annex houses administrative staff, GED and other literacy programming, as well as continuing education classes.

Current curriculum based programs offered at the Macon Campus include: College Transfer- AA Degree Pre-major in Arts (may include some online coursework) • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Business Administration, Accounting, Economics, Finance & Marketing Criminal Justice Elementary Education English Education History Middle Grades Education Nursing (please note this is not the RN AAS degree) Physical Education Political Science Psychology Social Science Secondary Education Sociology Special Education

General Education Diploma Real Estate- Certificate

Additional course offerings (not full degree programs): Emergency Medical Science—EMS 110 Course Health Information Technology—First Year General Education and Medical Terminology Human Services Technology—Some Substance Abuse Certificate classes available Pre-Health Science Track

ABOUT SCC In addition to the curriculum offerings there will be a variety of continuing education classes available: • Business and Industry Training • Basic Skills and Literacy Classes • Occupational/Certification/Licensure Courses • Nursing Assistant • Small Business Center Courses Macon Early College The Macon Campus is also home to the Macon Early College high school program. This high school is housed in the Ledford Building on the SCC Macon Campus and is designed for students who seek a different public school experience that allows them to earn college and high school credit simultaneously. Students have the potential to graduate in five years with both a high school diploma and Associates Degree. For additional information about the program, please call the MEC office at 828.306.7006. For additional information about the Macon Campus, please call 828.306.7001. VIRTUAL CAMPUS TOURS Videos of SCC Campuses and Centers are available on the College’s YouTube channel at http://www.youtube.com/user/1sccnc

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ABOUT SCC IMPORTANT NUMBERS—JACKSON CAMPUS

800.447.4091 • 828.339.4000 Arts & Sciences - Oaks Hall, 1st Floor ...................................................................................Ext. 4300 Barbara Putman, Dean of Arts & Sciences Career Technologies - Founders Hall, 2nd Floor....................................................................Ext. 4204 Scott Baker, Dean of Career Technologies Claudia Buchanan, Administrative Assistant College Access - Balsam Center, 1st Floor Cindy Thompson, College Access Coordinator..............................................................Ext. 4610 Matthew C. Kirby, College Liaison....................................................................................Ext. 4433 Continuing Education - Founders Hall, 1st Floor.................................................................Ext. 4426 Sonja Haynes, Dean of Workforce and Economic Development Latresa Downs, Administrative Assistant Educational Opportunities - Founders Hall, 1st Floor.........................................................Ext. 4361 Darlene Anderson, Educational Opportunities Director Mindy Conner, Administrative Assistant Health Sciences - Balsam Center, 2nd Floor............................................................................Ext. 4305 Mitch Fischer, Dean of Health Sciences Amanda Pressley, Administrative Assistant Holt Library Dianne Lindgren, Director...................................................................................................Ext. 4269 Vickie Lepore, Librarian........................................................................................................Ext. 4268 Instruction & Student Services - Bradford Hall, 3rd Floor..................................................Ext. 4377 Thom Brooks, Vice President for Instruction and Student Services Betsy Clayton, Administrative Assistant Learning Assistance Center - Oaks Hall, 2nd Floor...............................................................Ext. 4325 Toni Knott, Coordinator Student Services - Balsam Center, 1st Floor Philip Weast, Dean of Student Services.............................................................................Ext. 4431 Dominique Benson, Admissions Officer...........................................................................Ext. 4217 Jody Woodring, Administrative Assistant: Admissions ................................................Ext. 4253 Kathy Owens, Administrative Assistant: Enrollment Services.....................................Ext. 4352 Patty Kirkley, Career Planning & Placement Coordinator............................................Ext. 4212 Christy Deaver, Registrar......................................................................................................Ext. 4406 Clyanne Hyde, Records Technician....................................................................................Ext. 4219 Jay Sain, Testing Coordinator/Enrollment Counselor...................................................Ext. 4332 Melody Lawrence, Financial Aid Director........................................................................Ext. 4224 Krystal Hernandez-Ditmore, Assistant Financial Aid Director...................................Ext. 4315 Andrea McCoy-Garrett, Financial Aid Counselor..........................................................Ex.t 4207 Cathy Setser, Financial Aid Technician..............................................................................Ext. 4338 Brittany McConnell, Administrative Assistant - Financial Aid....................................Ext. 4438 Suzanne Vincent, College Readiness Coordinator (Swain Center)............................ 366.2001 Jennie Ashlock, Administrative Assistant - Enrollment Services (Swain Center).... 366.2000 Student Support Services - Oaks Hall, 1st Floor Cheryl Contino-Conner, Director.....................................................................................Ext. 4245 Peter Buck, Counselor...........................................................................................................Ext. 4243 Laurie Butler, Advisor/Tutor Coordinator.......................................................................Ext. 4231 Administrative Assistant.......................................................................................................Ext. 4420 Wesley Satterwhite, Student Disability Coordinator.....................................................Ext. 4229

ABOUT SCC IMPORTANT NUMBERS— MACON CAMPUS

800.447.4091 • 828.369.7331 Macon Campus Administration Cheryl Davids, Dean of Macon Campus...........................................................................Ext. 7018 Nancy Dills, Administrative Assistant...............................................................................Ext. 7001 Business Services Coordinator.............................................................................................................................Ext. 7013 Educational Opportunities Rita Gregory, Coordinator................................................................................................. .Ext. 7020 Learning Assistance Center Art Buesch, Coordinator.......................................................................................................Ext. 7028 Student Services Fairley Pollock, Coordinator................................................................................................Ext. 7017 Early College Angie Noland, College Liaison............................................................................................Ext. 7016

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ABOUT SCC CENTERS/CAMPUSES Jackson Campus Housed in the Founders Hall on the Jackson Campus, extension facilities include a computer lab and many classrooms shared with curriculum programs. The office coordinates the Extension Education division. For additional information, call 828.339.4426 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4426, or visit www.southwesterncc.edu/about-us/campus-tour Jerry Sutton Public Safety Training Center The Jerry Sutton Public Safety Training Center is located in the Macon County Industrial Park, Highway 64 West. The facility is primarily dedicated to coordinating the College’s Public Safety Training Programs and has general classrooms, a computer lab, a weight training room, multipurpose room and ITV classroom. The Fire and Rescue Training Facility and the driver training range is also located in the Industrial Park. For information about any Public Safety Training program, call 828.306.7041 or visit www.southwesterncc.edu/content/jerry-sutton-public-safety-training-center Macon Annex The Macon Annex is located in downtown Franklin at 23 Macon Avenue behind the Macon County Courthouse Annex. The Macon Annex facility houses administration, computer labs, and general classrooms with GED Prep courses, English As A Second Language classes, Human Resources Development classes, curriculum and continuing education offerings. The Macon Annex Center coordinates the Professional Licensure and Certification courses for the service area, as well as managing six trade programs at the Lyndon B. Johnson Job Corp Center, two programs at the Oconaluftee Job Corps and providing facilitation for special online extension education programs. For additional information, call 828.306.7034 or 828.306.7033 or visit www.southwesterncc.edu/content/macon-annex Macon Campus The Macon Campus is located at 815 Siler Rd in Franklin, NC in a high-tech, state of the art facility. See page 6 for additional details or call 828.306.7001. Swain Center Located 5 ½ miles west of Bryson City on Highway 74 in the Luada Community, the Swain Center occupies the old Almond School. This charming old school building houses the Nantahala School for the Arts, the Outdoor Leadership program, adult secondary and literacy classes, Human Resources Development, GED Prep and Human Resources Development classes, computer labs, and general classrooms. Phone 828.366.2000 or visit www.southwesterncc.edu/content/swaincenter

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ADMISSIONS/ENROLLMENT • Admissions/Enrollment • Steps to Enroll • Application for Admission • Application to Selective Admissions Health Science Programs • Testing • Orientation • mySCC/Web Mail/Information Technology • Attendance Requirements • College Access • Other Enrollment Policies • Registration • Other Enrollment Procedures

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ADMISSIONS/ENROLLMENT ADMISSIONS/ENROLLMENT Policy Southwestern Community College operates under the Open-Door Policy of the North Carolina Community College System. Students are admitted without regard to race, religion, sex, color, creed, national origin, age or disability. Admission to the College Any person who is at least 18 years of age or a high school graduate or its equivalent may be admitted by the College. Verification of high school graduation or equivalency shall be in the form of an official high school transcript or documentation of GED scores. Upon admission to a curriculum program, an applicant must attain the designated scores on the SAT, ACT or the College placement test. Students failing to attain the designated scores will be required to successfully complete appropriate developmental course work (see Testing section on page 15). Admission to the College does not imply immediate admission to the curriculum desired by the applicant, and admission to certain Health Science programs may have additional specific entrance requirements. High school age students may be admit­ted into curriculum courses based upon the requirements established in the Career and College Promise program adopted by the State of North Carolina and the College. For more information about the Career and College Promise program, please see page 19 or contact Cindy Thompson, College Access Coordinator at 828.339.4610 or [email protected] Admission Refusal The college reserves the right to refuse admission to any applicant during any period of time that the student is suspended or expelled from another college or educational entity for non-academic disciplinary reasons. The college reserves the right to refuse admission to any applicant if it is necessary to protect the safety of the applicant or other individuals. The Dean of Student Services administers the admissions process and the appeals procedure. False Information Applicants are expected to demonstrate honesty in the completion of all necessary forms. False information will be grounds for rejection or dismissal. Registered Sex Offenders All newly admitted students who are classified as registered sex offenders must identify themselves by meeting with the Dean of Student Services PRIOR to registering for classes. Use of Social Security Numbers The college collects social security numbers from all applicants for admission to ensure accurate records for required federal and state reporting. The college protects and restricts access to this information and assigns an ID# to each applicant.

ADMISSIONS/ENROLLMENT

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Admission to a Program of Study Admission to a degree, diploma or selected certificate program requires a high school diploma or the equivalent. An official transcript from a valid high school is required. Students who interrupt their course of study must reapply. The Dean of Student Services coordinates and administers all admission requirements, policies and procedures. If you have a … • A High School Diploma • A GED • No high school diploma or GED



You may be eligible to enroll in… • All programs ** • All programs ** • Specific courses as Special Credit • GED Program • Adult High School Diploma Program • The following program: • Nursing Assistant I (see program description) • The following Certificate programs: • Air Conditioning, Heating, Refrig. Tech. • Automotive Systems Technology • Culinary Arts • Electrical/Electronics Technology • Trades - Welding • Other certificate programs may be available contact Admissions at 828.339.4352.

** See selective admission health science programs on the following pages. How to Contact the Admissions Office Location: Jackson Campus, Balsam Center, 1st Floor Telephone: 800.447.4091 • 828.339.4352 or 828.339.4253 Address: 447 College Drive, Sylva, North Carolina 28779 Web page: www.southwesterncc.edu • E-mail Address: [email protected] STEPS TO ENROLL 1. Application for Admission must be submitted in accordance with the admission policy. • To be considered for admission to degree, diploma, or selected certificate programs, official transcripts must be sent by the student’s high school and other institutions attended. 2. Placement Testing requirement must be met. 3. Attend New Student Orientation—Required of all new students. 4. Log into mySCC and assigned web mail address. 5. Meet with an assigned advisor to register for classes. 6. ACA 111 is required of all new students. 7. Attend class on the first day. APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION All Students—High School Graduates, GED Recipients, Transfers from other Institutions All Applicants to the College are required to: 1. Submit a completed Application for Admission, written or online, to the Admissions Office. The online Application for Admission is located at www.southwesterncc.edu • Applicants must prove they are 18 years of age or a high school graduate. 2. High School Age Students (enrolled in high school or home school) submit a one-page application available through the College Access office.

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All Applicants to Degree, Diploma, or Selected Certificate Programs are required to: 1. Submit an application for admission. 2. Submit an official transcript from a valid high school or a copy of GED scores to the Registrar’s Office. • High school transcript MUST include the type of diploma awarded and the date awarded. Official transcripts MUST have the official seal of the school and arrive at SCC, unopened, from the issuing schools or agencies. 3. Submit official transcripts from ALL postsecondary institutions attended to the Registrar’s Office. • Institutions MUST be accredited by at least one of the “Regional Accrediting Agencies”. Official transcripts MUST have the official seal of the institution and arrive at SCC, unopened, from the issuing institutions. • All transcripts from other institutions become the property of Southwestern Community College and cannot be returned or reissued. 4. ALL transfer students, regardless of whether they are degree seeking, must submit official transcripts to certify eligibility to take courses with prerequisites. All transcripts from other institutions become the property of Southwestern Community College and cannot be returned or reissued. APPLICATION TO SELECTIVE ADMISSIONS HEALTH SCIENCE PROGRAMS Applicants to selective SCC Health Science programs are required to: 1. Submit all documents described in the section “Application for Admission to Degree, Diploma, or Selected Certificate Programs.” 2. Applicants MUST meet the Placement Test requirements as described in the Testing section and complete all required developmental courses. 3. Applicants MUST meet all of the additional requirements outlined by the deadline indicated in the particular Health Science program description—see the appropriate program listing in this catalog. 4. Additional transcripts are not necessary UNLESS the applicant has taken coursework since the last submission of transcripts. 5. Applicants for more than one selective admission program must notify the Admissions Office by submitting a Change of Program/Application Update form. Deadlines for Selective Admission Applications:

Health Program Application Deadline Emergency Medical Science May 5 Health Information Technology None Human Services & Substance Abuse None Occupational Therapy Assistant October 31 Medical Assisting April 1 Medical Laboratory Technology January 31 Medical Sonography March 15 Nursing Associate Degree(RN) January 31 Phlebotomy April 15 Physical Therapist Assistant March 31 Radiography March 1 Respiratory Therapy March 1 Therapeutic Massage April 25 (see program descriptions for details) Applicants should meet with assigned advisor prior to deadline.

Beginning Fall 2014 Fall 2014 Fall 2014 Spring 2014 Fall 2014 Fall 2014 Fall 2014 Fall 2014 Fall 2014 Fall 2014 Fall 2014 Fall 2014 Fall 2014

TEAS Required Yes No No Yes Yes No Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No (see Testing section)

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TESTING Applicants to all degree, diploma and selected certificate programs of study are required to demonstrate competence in Reading, English, Math and Computer Skills. The following information related to placement testing and/or the TEAS Exam is subject to change. Please verify information via the SCC Testing webpage (http://www.southwesterncc.edu/admissions/placement-testing) for up to date information. 1. Accuplacer Placement Test a) Taking the Test • Free to all SCC applicants. • Placement testing can take up to three hours. • Schedule to take the test by contacting the Testing Office. • A valid photo I.D. is required at the time of testing. • Test Regulations - Cell phones, calculators, notebooks, earphones, dictionaries and textbooks are not allowed in the testing room. The testing center will provide scratch paper and a pencil for test takers. • Talking to other students is not permitted. • Distance Learning students (those who do not live in the Jackson, Macon and Swain County area) may contact the SCC Testing office for assistance in securing a test site near them.

b) Subject Areas • Reading Comprehension: Score of ≥ 80 is required to meet developmental educational requirements. Students with college transfer credit of 100 level English course with a grade of ≥ C are considered to have met this requirement and be exempt from the test. SAT or ACT scores may also be submitted to meet this guideline. See subject area 2 or 3 below. • Sentence Skills: Score of ≥ 86 is required to meet developmental educational requirements. Students with college transfer credit of 100 level English course with a grade of ≥ C are considered to have met this requirement and be exempt from the test. SAT or ACT scores may also be submitted to meet this guideline. See subject area 2 or 3 below. • Arithmetic: Score of ≥ 55 is required to meet developmental educational requirements. Students with college transfer credit of 100 level Math course with a grade of ≥ C are considered to have met this requirement and be exempt from the test. SAT or ACT scores may also be submitted to meet this guideline. See subject area 2 or 3 below. Students may also take the subject area diagnostic assessment(s) to determine placement. For diagnostic assessment guidelines please contact the Testing Department. • Elementary Algebra: Minimum score of ≥ 55 is required to meet developmental educational requirements. The college requires higher Accuplacer math scores to take upper level math courses. Students with college transfer credit of 100 level Math course with a grade of ≥ C are considered to have met this requirement and be exempt from the test. SAT or ACT scores may also be submitted to meet this guideline. See subject area 2 or 3 below. Students may also take the subject area diagnostic assessment(s) to determine course placement. For diagnostic assessment guidelines please contact the Testing Department. • Basic Computer Skills: Score of ≥ 50% is required for High school graduates with diplomas awarded more than six years prior to the date of intended enrollment. GED students and high school graduates with General Prep or Occupational Prep diplomas must also take this test. Students may also be waived from this test if they were high school graduates within six years with College Prep or Tech Prep diplomas awarded. Students with college transfer credit of 100 level computer course with a grade of ≥ C are considered to have met this requirement and be exempt from the test.

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c) Test Results • Score Report: Upon completion of the test, the student will receive a printed score report. The test administrator and your advisor will help you interpret the scores. • Time Limit on Use of Scores: Test scores are considered valid for initial placement for a period of three years from the date the assessment was completed. • Score Interpretation: For test scores that fall below the established minimums, the College requires Developmental Education courses to improve basic skills. d) Retest Policy: • If a student places into a Developmental Education course and feels that t he placement test did not adequately reflect skill level, the student may request a retest. • A student may retest no more than one time per academic year. • If after the retest, the student continues to feel that the test did not adequately reflect skill level and places in the borderline range of 47-50 percentile in Sentence Skills or Reading Comprehension, the student may be permitted to demonstrate proficiency by taking an alternative assessment under the direction of the Dean of Arts & Sciences.

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e) Other Placement Tests • The college accepts ASSET and COMPASS scores. Scores must be sent from the institution administering the test. Test scores are considered valued for initial placement for a period of three years from the date of the assessment. • Contact the SCC Testing Office for details.

SAT a) Scores: SAT scores of ≥ 500 in Verbal (Critical Reading) OR ≥ 500 in Writing AND ≥ 500 in Math are required for tests taken after April 1, 1995. b) For test scores that fall below the established minimums, the College requires Developmental Education courses to improve basic skills or a student may elect to take the appropriate Accuplacer test. c) The college may require additional math testing prior to being permitted to take upper level math courses. A SAT Math score of ≥ 600 is required to be considered eligible to register for MAT courses at or above 175. 3. ACT a) Scores: ACT scores of ≥ 20 in Reading, ≥ 18 in English AND ≥ 22 in Math are required for tests taken after April 1, 1995. (The composite score is not accepted.) b) For test scores that fall below the established minimums, the College requires Developmental Education courses to improve basic skills or a student may elect to take the appropriate Accuplacer test. 4. College Transfer Credit a) Submit official transcripts demonstrating successful completion of college-level Algebra, English and computer courses at a regionally accredited college or university. b) Courses must be at the 100 level or higher, must have a grade of “C” or higher, and must have been completed within the past 10 years. There is no time limit for courses taken by a student at an institution where a degree was received. c) Courses classified as developmental or remedial will not transfer to SCC but may be used to meet the Placement Test requirements. d) Official transcripts must be received from the issuing institutions before transfer credit is awarded. 5. TEAS (Test of Essential Academic Skills) Examination a) Applicants seeking admission into the following Selective Admission Health Science programs must take the TEAS Examination: Medical Assisting, Medical Sonography, Nursing Associate Degree, Occupational Therapy Assistant, Physical Therapist Assistant, Radiography, Respiratory Therapy and RIBN Nursing Program. b) The TEAS measures a student’s ability in Reading, Mathematics, Science and English and Language Usage. The adjusted individual total score will be used as one component in the highly competitive health science selection process. This score will range from 0% to 100%. Health Science programs use this score differently based on specific program selection criteria. (See Health Science adviser for details.)

ADMISSIONS/ENROLLMENT c) d) e) f)

Scores will be considered valid for a term of three years from the date of the exam. Applicants may test once per academic year (Defined as August 1 through July 31) A $40 fee is charged for test administration and scoring. For exam registration information, please contact the SCC testing office or your Health Science advisor.

How to Contact the Testing Office Location: Jackson Campus, Balsam Center • Hours: By Appointment Telephone: 800.447.4091 • 828.339.4332 or 4352 • Address: 447 College Drive, Sylva, North Carolina 28779 • Web page: www.southwesterncc.edu ORIENTATION All students enrolling for the first time at Southwestern Community College are required to participate in an Orientation Program. The program is designed to acquaint new students with the important polices, resources and services available at Southwestern and provide valuable information needed to facilitate student academic success. Prior to the start of fall and spring semesters, live orientation sessions are conducted at the Jackson Campus. Students are not permitted to register for the next semester of study until they have completed the Orientation Program. mySCC/WEB MAIL/INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Every student accepted into a curriculum program is automatically assigned an SCC account that will allow them to access mySCC, email and WebAdvisor. In addition, you will use this account to access Blackboard and other services once your classes have started. The SCC account will be your official e-mail account when contacting anyone here at the College and will be used by the College and your instructors to correspond with you. If you experience any problems with your account please contact the helpdesk at [email protected] or call 828.339.4409 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4409. ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS Students are expected to attend and be on time for all scheduled classes and labs. Students should refer to the course syllabus for individual course attendance requirements. At the discretion of instructors, students may make up work missed. When students must be absent, it is vital that they remain in contact with their instructors. Any student who has not attended at least one face-to-face class meeting or completed one assignment/activity for an online class by the 10 percent date of the class will be reported by the instructor as “never attended.” A student who has never attended a class by the 10 percent date is no longer enrolled in the class and will not earn credit or receive a tuition refund for the course. Under extenuating circumstances, a student who has never attended may follow the late registration procedure to petition for reinstatement in the class and earn course credit. The student should notify the instructor of the extenuating circumstances prior to the 10 percent date of the class and provide compelling documentation to support the request for reinstatement. Reinstatement will only be considered when the absence was due to unforeseeable and uncontrollable circumstances. Students reported as never attended may request to have their status changed to “audit.” A student may have two excused absences each academic year for religious observances. To qualify for this observance, the student must make a written request to the instructor five (5) days prior to the absence. Any test or other work missed due to an excused absence for religious observance may be made up without penalty.

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ADMISSIONS/ENROLLMENT COLLEGE ACCESS College Access, a partnership between SCC and area public schools, supports a collection of programs, services and resources designed to enhance education and improve access to college for area young people. College Access is comprised of integrated initiatives that together present a continuum of services responsive to the community’s needs. Career & College Promise Beginning January 1, 2012, new legislation combined Learn & Earn Online, Dual and Concurrent Enrollment as well as Huskins- ACE programs into “Career & College Pathways.” Qualified juniors and seniors may begin their two- or four-year college work, tuition free, while they are in high school. These pathways allow highly motivated students to get a head start on their workplace and college preparation. For more information about these opportunities, please visit our website: www.southwesterncc.edu, Programs, Career & College Promise or contact Cindy Thompson, College Access Coordinator at 828.339.4610 or [email protected] College Tech Prep (Articulated Credit from High School to Community College) The College Tech Prep program allows students, upon graduation from high school, to receive advanced placement or college credit for successfully completing selected high school courses. To earn articulated credit, students must score a minimum of 93% on the standardized CTE post assessment; have a minimum grade of “B” in the high school course; and enroll in SCC within two years of high school graduation. Early College High School An Early College High School is a small, autonomous high school usually located on a campus of Southwestern Community College. Early College High Schools are a part of the NC New Schools project and provide students, who enroll in the ninth grade, the opportunity to earn both their high school diploma and an associate’s degree (or two years of college credit) within their five years of enrollment in Early College. The Early College High School provides a safe, caring school where each child is well-known, intellectually challenged, and celebrated by every adult in the building. It is an innovative educational environment accepting students of diverse ability levels through an application process conducted each spring. For more information regarding Early College opportunities, please contact your nearest Early College directly: Blue Ridge Virtual Early College 828.339.4499; Jackson County Early College 828.339.4499; or Macon Early College 828.306.7006. New Century Scholars New Century Scholars is a locally-funded initiative that provides guaranteed last-dollar tuition support to attend Southwestern Community College with the option of continuing to WCU. Rising seventh graders in Jackson, Macon and Swain counties are selected by public school personnel. Students take part in college preparatory activities and enrichment opportunities throughout middle and high school that prepare them to succeed in college. Scholars are given additional support throughout their college experiences and assistance with transitions to SCC and WCU.

ADMISSIONS/ENROLLMENT Upward Bound The Upward Bound program helps first-generation and income eligible high school students in Swain, Macon and Jackson counties and the Qualla Boundary develop the skills and motivation needed to succeed in high school and college. Students take part in weekly tutoring, academic advising and support, college tours, service learning opportunities, monthly campus experiences, outdoor adventures, cultural enrichment activities and a summer institute experience. For more information about these programs/services for high school students, visit our website at: www.southwesterncc.edu. OTHER ENROLLMENT POLICIES Gainful Employment Compliance Information For more information about SCC’s graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed a designated program, and other important information, please visit www.southwesterncc.edu, then click on the specific program’s webpage for the latest information. Home Schooled Students Students home schooled will be considered for admission on the same basis as NC public school students provided that: 1. Evidence that the Home School is registered with the appropriate state agency. 2. A transcript is provided that includes: Name of the Home School and address • Name of the principal • Name of the student • Student’s social security number and birth date • Curriculum and courses taken each year with grades and a grade-point average • Cumulative grade-point average for total progress • Standardized performance test scores • Diploma awarded with graduation date Seriously Under-Prepared Students Any student who takes the College Board’s ACCUPLACER (CPT) and scores below the tenth percentile level on one or more of the basic reading, writing or elementary math sections will be limited to enrolling in specific programs recommended by their assigned advisor. Any program recommended by the advisor is designed to assist in the student’s progress toward a career objective. Residency for Tuition Determination To qualify for in-state tuition, students must have maintained domicile in North Carolina for at least 12 months immediately prior to enrollment. Individuals must establish that their presence in the state during the designated 12-month period was for the purpose of maintaining a bona-fide domicile and not to simply establish temporary residence. Special situations involving marriage to a North Carolina resident or out-of-state military assignment should be brought to the attention of the Registrar. Regulations concerning classification for tuition purposes are set forth in “The State Residence Classification Manual.” A copy of the manual is available for review in Student Services, Office of the Registrar. Application for residency must be submitted prior to registration and payment of fees of the semester in which the student wishes to have residency status changed to in-state. If the application is received after the registration day for the semester, the application, if approved, will be effective for the next semester. If a student’s residency classification changes, it is his obligation to apply for reclassification with the Registrar. A student who provides false residency information or knowingly withholds residency information shall be deemed to have submitted a fraudulent application. A student making a fraudulent application is subject to reclassification and, if appropriate, payment of the difference between non-resident and resident tuition for the enrolled semester(s) intervening between the fraudulent application and its discovery.

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ADMISSIONS/ENROLLMENT If a student is not satisfied with his initial residency classification or reclassification, he may appeal to the Dean of Student Services. After review by the Dean, the student may appeal to the Vice President for Instruction and Student Services. After review by the VP, the student may file notice of appeal to the State Residency Committee through the Dean of Student Services. NC Senior Citizens Tuition shall be waived for up to six credit hours per academic semester for senior citizens age 65 or older who are qualified as legal residents of North Carolina. Applicable fees will be charged. If an eligible senior citizen enrolls in more than six credit hours, he/she shall be charged tuition and fees above six credit hours. International Students Southwestern Community College is authorized under federal law to enroll nonimmigrant alien students with F-1 visas. Students on F-1 visa status must pay out-of-state tuition and cannot be considered a resident of the state. Proficiency in the English language and satisfactory academic records are important factors in the admission decision for all applicants from outside the United States. International students must have graduated from a secondary school that is equivalent to secondary schools in the United States. Holders of B, C, D, F, H, J and M visas may not be considered residents for tuition purposes, and their dependent relatives may not be eligible for a tuition rate less than the out-ofstate rate. Alien Registration Card holders are admitted in the same manner as U.S. citizens. The college cannot provide federal financial aid to most international students; therefore, students must have sufficient funds to cover all living expenses, tuition and fees for the duration of the student’s course of study. A notarized financial resource statement is required of all international applicants. Student housing is not available on campus, and international students are expected to make their own housing arrangements. International students must be enrolled full time for each semester. An official Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score report is required of all international applicants, at the student’s expense, except those from countries where English is the native language or unless the applicant is a transfer student from another accredited United States institution with English transfer credit. The minimum acceptable TOEFL score is 500 for the paper-based test, 173 for the computer-based test and 61 for the Internet-based test. A certified copy of the international student’s original educational record, to include all previous academic experiences, is required of all degree, diploma or certificate-seeking students. If the original record is written in a language other than English, then a certified copy of an English translation and evaluation by an approved outside source is required at the student’s expense. A record of certain immunizations may also be required. Application packets for international student enrollment are available from the Registrar’s Office. Undocumented Alien Students Undocumented aliens are eligible for admission. Special rules apply. Contact the Admissions Office for the most up-to-date information regarding admission. Transcript Evaluations Official transcripts from valid high schools will be processed by the Registrar’s Office and evaluated if the student has AP scores and VoCATS scores along with corresponding coursework. The information will be noted in the student’s SCC record. Transcripts from postsecondary institutions will be processed and evaluated by the Registrar’s Office. See the section “Transfer of Earned Credit”.

ADMISSIONS/ENROLLMENT Readmission A student who has NOT been enrolled at the College for the previous two semesters must complete an Application for Admission and update residency classification prior to registration. Students applying for readmission will be required to meet the curriculum requirements in effect at the time of readmission, unless waived by the Vice President for Instruction and Student Services. The college reserves the right to refuse readmission to a former student who has unpaid financial obligations at the College or who has not complied with previous disciplinary requirements. REGISTRATION Priority Registration Priority registration dates are published in the academic calendar and procedures are printed in the student handbook. All currently enrolled students are strongly encouraged to register during early registration to get the courses they need to progress in their programs. Final Registration Day Final registration is held each semester on the day published in the academic calendar. Students not enrolled for two or more consecutive semesters must complete an Application for Admission before meeting with their assigned academic advisors to initiate the registration process. Late Registration and Drop/Add Late registration occurs during the five day drop/add period that begins with the first day of classes for the semester or term. Registrations and drops or adds after the end of the late registration and drop/add period must be approved by the appropriate dean. A $5 late registration fee will be charged to returning students enrolled in full-time curriculum programs who register after registration day, except those students who are enrolled in open laboratory programs. Transfer of Earned Credit Applicants to degree, diploma or certificate programs who want credit for coursework completed at other post-secondary institutions are responsible for having an official transcript from each institution submitted directly to the Registrar’s Office. Courses with a grade of “C” or higher may be accepted if the courses are applicable to the program selected at this college and were earned at a regionally accredited college, university, community college or technical institute. Credits transferred to Southwestern Community College from another institution will be recognized as hours toward the appropriate degree, diploma or certificate but will not be calculated toward the cumulative grade point average (GPA) for that program. All official transcripts submitted to the Registrar’s Office prior to a student’s enrollment will be evaluated for transfer credit before registration, if possible, and no later than the end of the first semester of enrollment. All transcripts from other institutions become the property of Southwestern Community College and can not be returned or reissued. Transfer of “Credit by Exam” will not exceed more than one-half of degree requirements and must be approved by the dean or coordinator of the appropriate program.

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ADMISSIONS/ENROLLMENT Previously Earned Credit Coursework completed in technical areas more than six years prior to beginning of a degree, diploma, or certificate may be credited only with the approval of the respective dean. General education credit twenty years old or older may be subject to dean and/or departmental review. In some cases, credit may be awarded if the student passes a competency test. The age of course work is reviewed for both previously earned credit at SCC and course work being transferred into the College. How to Contact the Registrar’s Office Location: Jackson Campus, Balsam Center Telephone: 800.447.4091 • 828.339.4219 Address: 447 College Drive, Sylva, North Carolina 28779 Web page: www.southwesterncc.edu/registrar/index.htm OTHER ENROLLMENT PROCEDURES Change of Curriculum Students who wish to change to a different academic program or add a second major should discuss the proposed change with their academic advisors and submit a “Change of Program & Application Update” form to the Registrar’s Office. Change of Name/Address If a student’s name or address changes while enrolled, the student should complete a “Change of Name/Address Form”, available in Student Services, and return it to the Admission’s Office. The student must provide a Social Security Card as proof of the name change. Transfer Agreements Parallel coursework completed at Southwestern Community College will transfer into other institutions in the NC Community College System and to most senior institutions in the region. The college has formal transfer agreements and specific curriculum articulation agreements with many senior institutions in and beyond western North Carolina. For a complete list of institutions and transfer agreements, go to the following page on the College’s website: http://www.southwesterncc.edu/content/transfer-agreements-0 Coursework in the College Transfer Associate in Arts curriculum will satisfy general education and liberal arts requirements at all NC community colleges, NC public universities and most NC private universities and colleges, as well as most out-of-state four-year colleges and universities. The North Carolina Comprehensive Articulation Agreement among the postsecondary institutions lists all courses designated for transfer. For a complete list, go to the Associate in Arts – College Transfer section of this catalog. All courses in this section are approved for transfer under the agreement. The course descriptions in the rear of the catalog carry the transfer designation. Veterans Recipients of veterans’ benefits must submit official transcripts of all postsecondary coursework attempted before they can receive VA benefits. They are also urged to submit official transcripts of any educational work completed through the armed services. Veterans are not eligible to receive VA benefits until all postsecondary transcripts are submitted. A VA application must be submitted by the student before a student can be certified for benefits by the Registrar. For more details, contact the Office of the Registrar located in Student Services, Balsam Center.

ADMISSIONS/ENROLLMENT Credit for AP & CLEP Southwestern Community College awards Advanced Placement credit as follows: AP EXAMINATION

SCORE REQUIRED

HOURS GRANTED

SCC COURSE(S) SATISFIED

3

3

ART 114

4 or 5

6

ART 114, 115

3

4

BIO 111

4 or 5

8

BIO 111, 112

Calculus AB

3

4

MAT 271

Calculus BC

3

8

MAT 271, 272

3

4

CHM 151

4 or 5

8

CHM 151, 152

Computer Science A

3

3

CIS 115

Computer Science AB

3

3

CIS 115

English Language and Composition or English Literature and Composition

3

3

ENG 111

4 or 5

6

ENG 111, 113

Environmental Science

3

4

BIO 140, 140A

3

3

HIS 121

4 or 5

6

HIS 121, 122

French Language or French Literature

3

6

FRE 111, 112

4 or 5

6

FRE 211, 212

German Language or German Literature

3

6

GER 111, 112

4 or 5

6

GER 211, 212

Human Geography

3

3

GEO 111

US Government & Politics

3

3

POL 120

Comparative Government & Politics

3

3

POL 230

Macroeconomics

3

3

ECO 252

Microeconomics

3

3

ECO 251

Music Theory

3

3

MUS 110

Physics B

3

8

PHY 151, 152

Physics C: Mechanics

3

4

PHY 251

Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism

4 or 5

8

PHY 251, 252

Psychology

3

3

PSY 150

Spanish Language or Spanish Literature

3

6

SPA 111, 112

4 or 5

6

SPA 211, 212

3

3

MAT 151

4 or 5

4

MAT 155

3

3

ART 131

3

3

HIS 131

3

3

HIS 131

4 or 5

6

HIS 131, 132

3

3

HIS 111

4 or 5

6

HIS 111, 112

Art History Biology

Chemistry

European History

Statistics Studio Art: Drawing

US History World History

This list of Advanced Placement credit will be amended periodically as new courses are added to the Southwestern Community College curriculum and as new Advanced Placement examinations are developed.

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ADMISSIONS/ENROLLMENT

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College Level Examination Program credit will be awarded as follows: CLEP EXAMINATION

SCORE REQUIRED

HOURS GRANTED

SCC COURSE(S) SATISFIED

American Government

50

3

POL 120

50

3

ENG 231

58

6

ENG 231, 232

50

3

ENG 131

50

4

BIO 111

57

8

BIO 111, 112

50

4

MAT 271

64

8

MAT 271, 272

50

4

CHM 151

65

8

CHM 151, 152

College Algebra

50

3

MAT 161

College Composition or College Composition Modular

50

3

ENG 111

59

6

ENG 111, 113

College Math

50

3

MAT 140

50

3

ENG 241

62

6

ENG 241, 242

50

4

ACC 120

65

8

ACC 120, 121

French Language I

64

3

FRE 111

French Language II

69

6

FRE 111,112

German Language I

59

3

GER 111

German Language II

67

6

GER 111,112

History of the United States I

50

3

HIS 131

History of the United States II

50

3

HIS 132

Human Growth and Development

50

3

PSY 241

50

3

HUM 211

56

6

HUM 211, 212

Information Systems and Computer Applications

50

3

CIS 110

59

6

CIS 110, 115

Introductory Business Law

50

3

BUS 115

Introductory Psychology

50

3

PSY 150

Introductory Sociology

50

3

SOC 210

Pre-calculus

50

3

MAT 175

Principles of Macroeconomics

50

3

ECO 252

Principles of Management

50

3

BUS 137

Principles of Marketing

50

3

MKT 120

Principles of Microeconomics

50

3

ECO 251

56

3

SPA 111

68

6

SPA 111,112

Western Civilization I

50

3

HIS 121

Western Civilization II

50

3

HIS 122

American Literature Analyzing and Interpreting Literature Biology Calculus Chemistry

English Literature Financial Accounting

Humanities

Spanish Language

The list of College Level Examination Program credit will be amended periodically as new courses are added to the Southwestern Community College curriculum and as College Level Examination Program examinations are developed or revised.

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ACADEMIC INFORMATION • Academic Advising • Attendance Requirements • Change of Schedule • Commencement Application • Degrees • Distance Learning • Grades • Honors/Academic Organizations • Licensing of Graduates • Policies/Procedures • Weather Policy

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ACADEMIC INFORMATION ACADEMIC ADVISING Each student will be assigned an academic advisor as part of the application process. Advisors are staff and faculty members who guide students in making wise selections of course offerings with careful attention to institution policies, procedures and degree requirements. In addition, academic advisors offer students opportunities to enhance their education by making them aware of the various internal and external resources available to them throughout the College and community. Academic advisors also play an important role in the educational progress of their advisees by continually monitoring and evaluating their progression, as well as helping them to clarify their educational goals and values. Academic Advising at SCC follows the developmental education success model. Advisors are committed to student success and so academic advising for many students may begin at the developmental level. In cases where students score below the tenth percent on the College placement test in reading, writing or arithmetic, an intensive ABE academic foundation program will be advised before developmental or curriculum classes will be assigned. Regardless of class placement, students are encouraged to have frequent contacts with their advisor while they attend SCC. ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS Students are expected to attend and be on time for all scheduled classes and labs. Students should refer to the course syllabus for individual course attendance requirements. At the discretion of instructors, students may make up work missed. When students must be absent, it is vital that they remain in contact with their instructors. Any student who has not attended at least one face-to-face class meeting or completed one assignment/activity for an online class by the 10 percent date of the class will be reported by the instructor as “never attended.” A student who has never attended a class by the 10 percent date is no longer enrolled in the class and will not earn credit or receive a tuition refund for the course. Under extenuating circumstances, a student who has never attended may follow the late registration procedure to petition for reinstatement in the class and earn course credit. The student should notify the instructor of the extenuating circumstances prior to the 10 percent date of the class and provide compelling documentation to support the request for reinstatement. Reinstatement will only be considered when the absence was due to unforeseeable and uncontrollable circumstances. Students reported as never attended may request to have their status changed to “audit.” CHANGE OF SCHEDULE Add/Drop The add/drop period is defined in the academic calendar. Schedule changes are permitted during this time without grade penalty and are made on the “Add/Drop/ Withdrawal Form.” Courses dropped after this period will result in a grade of “W.” Withdrawal Procedures To withdraw from a course(s) or the College, a student should contact his advisor and initiate the “Add/Drop/Withdrawal Form”. This form must be signed by the advisor and the appropriate instructor(s) and returned to the Registrar’s Office. If a student withdraws by the official withdrawal date for the semester (published in the academic calendar), the grade received will be a “W.”

ACADEMIC INFORMATION If a student seeks to withdraw from a course(s) after the official withdrawal date, this may be granted under extenuating circumstances such as serious illness or job transfer and will be considered on an individual basis by the instructor. It is the student’s responsibility to provide compelling documentation for this request and to attach the documentation to the withdrawal form. The withdrawal form requires the signature of the advisor, appropriate instructor(s), and the dean and then is processed in the Registrar’s Office. It is the responsibility of the student to initiate the withdrawal process. If a student stops attending class and does not complete an official withdrawal, the student’s final grade will be an “F.” An exception will be made for Developmental Education coursework. The “W” will not influence the quality point ratio for the semester. However, withdrawing from courses could affect a student’s eligibility for financial aid. Students who receive financial aid should always consult the Financial Aid Officer before withdrawing from a course. COMMENCEMENT APPLICATION At the end of each academic term, a commencement ceremony is held for students to celebrate their achievement of completing degree, diploma, or certificate requirements for programs approved by the North Carolina State Board of Community Colleges. Students should apply between the first and 50th class day of the semester in which they expect to complete their program (published in the Academic Calendar). Applications received after the announced deadline will be reviewed for special consideration. All applicants must have completed all course requirements by the end of the semester in which they plan to participate in commencement. If the student is qualified, the Registrar’s Office will order credentials and mail to the student at the address indicated on the commencement application. Students who apply and do not qualify must reapply after deficiencies are completed. Credentials will not be ordered and held for students to complete requirements in a subsequent semester. A student must maintain an overall average of C (2.00 GPA) to graduate. Some health science programs have additional graduation requirements as defined by those programs. In order to be awarded a degree, diploma and/or certificate, the Registrar’s Office must receive an Application for Commencement. This is the only way our office is notified that you are ready to complete your program. Students Application steps are as follows: 1. Apply: Meet with your advisor to complete the Application for Commencement. Submit the application to the Registrar’s Office for final approval by the announced deadline. Check the Academic Calendar for term deadlines. 2. Clear Debts: a. Students must pay all debts owed to the College at the Business Office or Library. b. Complete Financial Aid Exit Counseling for student loans at www.studentloans.gov and click on Exit Counseling under Tools and Resources. Contact the Financial Aid Office at [email protected] for further information. If you plan to re-enroll, please notify the financial aid office so they can notify the Registrar’s Office to release your diploma hold. 3. Order: If you plan to participate in the commencement ceremony, you will need to contact the bookstore to see if they have a graduation kit with your size. You may not need to order online. If the bookstore does not have your size, you will need to visit the Herff-Jones website (herffjones.com/college/southwesterncc) to order your cap, gown & tassel. You do not pay for the kit online, only place your order. Herff-Jones will ship your order to the bookstore, where you may pick up and pay after the announced date. Students will receive an email a few months into the term with website activation details. It does not remain active at all times.

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ACADEMIC INFORMATION This is the only fee associated with graduation (approximately $45). From this website you may also order announcements and class rings (at an additional cost). If you have any questions, please contact the bookstore at 828.339.4222. If you do not plan to participate in the ceremony, you may visit the Registrar’s Office during the week of graduation to pick up a diploma cover. 4. Celebrate: Attend the Commencement Ceremony in the Norman K. Myers Auditorium of the Balsam Center. This building is located on the Jackson Campus in Sylva. Information about the ceremony dos and don’ts are found at www.southwesterncc.edu/content/ commencement-faqs. The Graduate Rehearsal is always held the preceding business day before the ceremony in the auditorium at 3:00 p.m., with a reception to follow. Refer to the Academic Calendar for dates and times, as well as informational emails sent by the Registrar’s Office. 5. Wait—Be Patient: Diplomas will be mailed within 6 – 8 weeks following graduation. The Registrar’s Office will email student accounts, and will post an announcement on our website once they have been mailed. Refer to the website for the status of diplomas. Should you need proof of graduation for an employer or another school before you receive your diploma, we must receive a written transcript request. Transcript release forms are located in the Registrar’s Office or on our website at http://www.southwesterncc.edu/advisor/forms/ transcript-release.pdf. These can be submitted at any time for the end of term, or after graduation. Need Special Assistance? Graduation is a physical activity. Due to injuries or disabilities sometimes it is a challenge. If you will be needing special assistance to walk into the auditorium, climb the stairs to the stage, walk across the stage, descend the stairs, hear or see the ceremony, or any other activity related to graduation—please contact the Disability Services Coordinator at 828.339.4229. DEGREES Associate Degrees Academic programs for which an Associate of Applied Science degree is awarded require the successful completion of 64 - 76 semester hour credits and are designed to provide entry-level employment training. An Associate of Arts degree requires the successful completion of 64 semester hour credits and is designed to facilitate transfer to one of the 16 public universities in North Carolina. Diploma A diploma is awarded after successful completion of 36 - 48 semester hours credits in an approved diploma-granting program. For a full-time student, it generally takes three semesters to finish a typical diploma program. Certificate A certificate is awarded after successful completion of 12 -18 semester hour credits in a particular certificate-granting program. Certificate programs are designed for specific skill development. Completion of General Core Requirements College transfer students who choose to transfer after completion of the 44-hour general education core must contact their advisor, who will then notify the Registrar’s office if the

ACADEMIC INFORMATION student has met the core requirements. Upon certification of completion, a notation appears on the student’s transcript. Minimum Course Work Requirements (Credit in Residence) In order for an Associate’s Degree to be awarded, a minimum of 25 percent of required major courses in the degree program must be completed at Southwestern Community College. Certain diploma and certificate programs require less credit to meet residency requirements. These programs will be determined on an individual basis by the Vice President for Instruction and Student Services. Multiple Degrees/Diplomas/Certificates A student may pursue multiple degrees, diplomas, and certificates concurrently or consecutively. Courses which apply appropriately to more than one degree, diploma or certificate may be counted toward the completion of each credential, but the specific requirements of each must be met. DISTANCE LEARNING Opportunities to Earn College Credit via Distance Learning Distance education is most commonly characterized as teaching and learning that takes place between students and teachers who are in different geographical locations. Southwestern Community College (SCC) offers several modes of delivery for distance education courses: Telecourse, Web-based courses, TeleWeb and Community Link - Interactive Television (ITV). Students enrolling in distance learning courses pay regular tuition and fees, have access to all student services, study under the College’s rules and regulations and receive academic credit. While allowing for flexibility in course scheduling, distance learning often requires less time on campus. Successful distance learners are highly motivated, self-disciplined individuals, who are confident in their academic abilities. They have access to the Internet (SCC Computer labs are also available to students) and are comfortable with conventional Web technologies such as e-mail, word processing, browsers, and more. Even when working at a distance, students are expected to be actively engaged in the learning environment. During the spring and fall semesters, two methods of Blackboard training are available to students: Jackson Campus-based hands-on training and self-pace online training. While distance learning students are not expected to be computer experts, they should feel comfortable when working with Web technologies. Students needing to improve their computer skills should consider enrolling in an introductory computer course. Web-centered (WC) • Instruction will be delivered using your computer over the World Wide Web. • A web-centered course is actively led and monitored by the instructor via the Internet. • Because of the interactive nature of a web-centered course, access to a computer with Internet capability and active student participation are requirements for satisfactory course completion. • Web-centered courses require no in-class lecture time. Hybrid (HY) • A hybrid course is one in which a substantial amount of the course requirements will be completed online via the class website and e-mail. • Students may be required to come to campus on designated dates and times. These dates will be communicated to the student by the instructor.

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ACADEMIC INFORMATION Web-enhanced • These courses use websites to enhance traditional face-to-face classes. • While most of the instruction is accomplished in the classroom, the web enhancement allows instructors and students to extend their discussions and exchange information throughout the week. • When appropriate for the course content and goals, a reduction of face-to-face class time may be permitted at the discretion of the instructor. • It is most convenient for students if they have a working computer with Internet access at home, but this is not required. Many students choose to work on their web- enhanced coursework on campus in open computer labs or the library. Teleweb (TW) Teleweb course is a telecourse with a web-enhancement. Students enrolled in a teleweb course work independently, view televised programs and read printed materials at home with guidance from course instructors who use a variety of communication tools and instructional techniques. Lecture materials and course assignments may be accessed over the Internet. Additional materials (which may include professionally produced telecourses, or video materials produced “in-house” by the instructor and college media department) may be provided to the student by UNC-TV, local educational cable access, or videocassette. If students are unable to view the regularly scheduled telecourse broadcasts, SCC may provide a complete set of videotapes that can be used throughout the semester and returned to the College at the end of the term. Students may be required to report to the campus for tests and/or review sessions as determined by the instructor. Community Link – Interactive Television (ITV) Community Link - Interactive Television (ITV) is an interactive television network that links 12 educational sites in western North Carolina through fiber-optic cable and broadband T1. Community Link provides fully interactive audio and video communication in real time using video cameras, monitors and microphones. The benefits of Community link include increased course offerings while reducing drive time for students and instructors. Though Community Link is primarily used for course offerings, community groups and organizations may also use the network. Community Link sites include: SCC Jackson Campus, Cherokee, Swain and Macon County Centers, Smoky Mountain High School, Cherokee High School, Swain County High School, Blue Ridge School, Highlands School and Nantahala School. Auditing Courses Students who wish to audit a course must register through the regular registration procedures. Tuition and fees for auditing are the same as the cost of courses taken for credit. Audits are reported on grade reports and transcripts as “AU” and do not affect earned credits or influence the grade point average for the semester. However, audited courses do not count as successful completions for financial aid purposes. Therefore, students who receive financial aid should consult the financial aid officer before electing to audit a course. To audit a course, a student should state his intent to audit no later than the first week of the course. An “AU” will be entered as the student’s grade for that course. A student may not switch from a credit to an audit status, or from an audit to a credit status after the add/drop period. However, in consultation with the student, an instructor may switch student status from a credit to an audit through the withdrawal period. This is done utilizing add/drop procedures.



ACADEMIC INFORMATION Cooperative Education In keeping with its policy of offering new and enriching opportunities for students, the College awards academic credit for cooperative work experience in many of its curricula. Cooperative Education (Co-op) is an educational program of practical, supervised, paid work experience that is directly related to the student’s curriculum. The on-the-job training is a meaningful way for students to learn, to gain valuable work experience, to make educated career choices and to earn money while going to college. Interested students should contact their program advisor. Students are expected to have accident/medical insurance. Course Credit by Examination Credit by examination is offered to those students who, because of their demonstrated abilities, are qualified to accelerate their studies. To obtain credit, a student may take a proficiency examination in certain subjects when the student believes he already has mastery of the course material. Permission for such an examination must be obtained from the appropriate dean. The student must register for the course and pay tuition and fees. The examination may be written, oral, performance or all of these. Students failing such an examination may not request a second examination until evidence of further study in the subject is presented. The decision of the examining instructor is final. Grades in Developmental Courses Grades in all courses below the 100 level should be one of the following: A, B, C, CS or W and will not count as hours attempted or hours earned for the purpose of calculating a Grade Point Average (GPA). Exception: Courses below the 100 level are counted as hours attempted for financial aid purposes. Student Grade Appeal The grade appeal process applies only to final course grades. In the event a student appeals a grade that prevents progression in a program, the student will be allowed to enroll and attend the following semester pending the outcome of the appeal. If the grade is upheld, the student will be withdrawn and refunded the tuition. 1. Student must appeal the grade to the instructor of record within the following semester. If not resolved; 2. Student may then appeal the grade to the appropriate dean. If not resolved; 3. (Final Step) Student may then appeal the grade to the Vice President for Instruction and Student Services. The decision of the vice president is final.

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GRADES Grading System Official grades are available online at the end of each semester. The college does not mail grades to students. Students enrolled in curriculum courses will be graded by the letter grade system and assigned a grade point average (GPA) for each semester. Instructors inform students about their specific grading scales. The college does not have a uniform grading scale. The GPA is determined by dividing the total number of quality points by the number of credit hours attempted. A GPA of 2.00 is required for graduation. Transfer credits are not included in the GPA computation. Grade Definition A B C D F I CS NA AU W S P AP SP

Grade Points per Semester Hour

The student has, in a superior way, met the objectives established for the course. The student has more than adequately met the objectives established for the course. The student has adequately met the objectives established for the course. The student has minimally met the objectives established for the course. The student failed to meet the objectives established for the course. Incomplete: Indicates that a student has been doing acceptable work in the course but has not completed all required work. A minimum of 80 percent of course requirements must have been completed for the student to be eligible for an “I” contract. It is the student’s responsibility to have this deficiency removed during the first two weeks of the following semester or the grade will be automatically changed to an “F.” An “I” does not count as hours attempted or as hours earned. Continued Study: Indicates that a student must continue study at his current level of Developmental Education coursework. This symbol does not count as hours attempted or as hours earned for purposes of calculating GPA. For financial aid purposes, these hours count as attempted but not completed. Never Attended: Indicates the student registered but never attended. Audit: This grade does not count as hours attempted or as hours earned. Withdraw: Indicates the student withdrew before the published withdrawal date that can be found in the College calendar. This symbol does not count as hours attempted or as hours earned for purposes of calculating GPA. For financial aid purposes, these hours count as attempted but not completed. Credit by Exam: The student received credit for the course through a proficiency examination. This symbol counts as hours earned but not as hours attempted. No more than one-half of the required credit for a degree, a diploma, or a certificate may be earned through “Credit by Exam” unless otherwise approved by the Vice President for Instruction and Student Services. Passing: Awarded upon successful completion of certain continuing education courses. Eighty percent attendance is required. Advanced Placement: This symbol counts as credit hours earned but does not count in GPA calculations. Secondary Placement: This symbol counts as credit hours earned for certain eligible high school courses but does not count for purposes of calculating GPA.

The asterisk (*) symbol immediately following the letter grade prior to fall 2007 indicates the course is not included in the GPA. The pound (#) symbol immediately following the letter grade after summer 2007 indicates the course was academically forgiven and is not included in the GPA.

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ACADEMIC INFORMATION HONORS/ACADEMIC ORGANIZATIONS President’s List 1. Only students who have completed a minimum of 12 credit hours at the end of the semester are considered. 2. The student is to have a minimum 3.85 Grade Point Average (GPA) to qualify for the semester under consideration. 3. Unresolved “I” and “F” grades will automatically eliminate a student from this list for that particular semester. Credit for a course by examination or transfer does not affect eligibility. 4. Developmental courses do not count toward the 12 hours or the GPA.     Dean’s List 1. Only students who have completed a minimum of 12 credit hours at the end of the semester are considered. 2. The student is to have a 3.500 - 3.849 GPA to qualify for the semester under consideration. 3. Unresolved “I” and “F” grades will automatically eliminate a student from this list for that particular semester. Credit for a course by examination or transfer does not affect eligibility. 4. Developmental courses do not count toward the 12 hours or the GPA. Annual Academic Awards Ceremony Students will be eligible to participate in the Academic Awards Ceremony to be held during the spring semester if they meet the following criteria: 1. The student must have earned a minimum of 30 semester hours credit within the last four (4) years by the end of fall semester before the ceremony. The minimum hours must have been earned at SCC. 2. The student must be enrolled during the term in which the ceremony is held. 3. The student must have a cumulative average of 3.5 or above. 4. All eligible students will be honored at the Awards Ceremony during the spring semester. Students who maintain a perfect 4.0 cumulative shall receive “high honors” recognition.     Graduating with Honors 1. During the final week of the semester, the Registrar will rank the candidates for associate’s degrees or diplomas according to their cumulative GPA from the previous semesters of work. Each cumulative GPA will be rounded to two decimal places. 2. Each candidate with a cumulative GPA from 3.95 to 4.00 will graduate summa cum laude. 3. Each candidate with a cumulative GPA from 3.90 to 3.94 will graduate magna cum laude. 4. Each candidate with a cumulative GPA from 3.85 to 3.89 will graduate cum laude. 5. When the selections have been determined by the Registrar, the instructors of those selected will be contacted to determine whether the candidate is maintaining the same quality of work during the final semester as during the previous semesters. 6. Candidates who are failing or doing poor work in the final semester will be excluded from the list when the Registrar receives written notice from the instructors.

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ACADEMIC INFORMATION Alpha Beta Gamma International Business Honor Society – Alpha Omega Chapter Alpha Beta Gamma International Business Honor Society is the sole business honor society for accredited junior, community and technical two year colleges. The society exists to recognize and reward academic excellence among business honor students and to recognize the contribution to learning and business of professionals in the local communities. Members of Alpha Beta Gamma are challenged to subscribe to the society’s high ideals of scholarship, leadership and cooperation. To be considered for membership, students must: • Be currently enrolled as a full or part-time student in a qualifying business-related associate in applied science program • Have completed at least 15 hours of college-level academic credit during the previous three semesters • Have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher • Demonstrate the ideals of scholarship, leadership, and cooperation • Be nominated by program faculty. SCC Honors Program The Honors Program at Southwestern Community College is designed to: • Challenge high achieving and highly motivated students to purposefully engage in Honors coursework. Honors coursework is designed to enrich and expand the expectations of the traditional college course. • Intentionally focus on academic excellence including critical thinking, communication skills, and academic inquiry. Honors coursework generally will be more writing, research and/or project intensive. • Engage students and faculty across all disciplines. • Encourage and support Honors students in leadership and service to the College and the community. Honors Program Eligibility – Must meet one of the following criteria: • A 3.5 or higher cumulative GPA with at least 12 semester hours of college coursework • A high school weighted GPA of 4.00 or higher • A high school class rank in the top 10 percent • An SAT of 1875 or an ACT of 30 or higher Benefits to Honors Students • Honors designation on the degree/diploma. • Transferability of SCC honor credit to several North Carolina senior institutions. • Recognition at graduation as an “Honors Program” graduate after the successful completion of 12 credit hours worth of honors work. Honors Credit Appeal In the event a student wishes to appeal an unsatisfactory honors project outcome, the student must appeal the decision to the chair of the honors program within three weeks of learning the honors project was not awarded credit. Upon notification to the honors program chair, the honors appeals committee will convene to review the appeal. To participate, contact Cheryl Contino-Conner at 828.339.4245 or via email at [email protected]



ACADEMIC INFORMATION National Technical Honor Society The National Technical Honor Society (NTHS) is an acknowledged leader in the recognition of outstanding student achievement in workforce education. Over 1,500 schools and colleges throughout the United States and foreign countries are affiliated with NTHS. The Southwestern Community College Chapter of the NTHS was chartered to recognize the achievement of full and part-time students. Members are nominated by program faculty from the student population with a 3.5 or greater grade point average and who have completed 12 hours of academic course work above the 100 level. To be eligible for membership, a nominee must be enrolled as an active student in a degree, diploma or certificate program. Nominees must: • Maintain the highest standard of personal and professional conduct • Strive for excellence in all aspects of education and employment • Refuse to engage in or condone activities for personal gain at the expense of their fellow students, school or employer • Support the mission and purpose of NTHS while working to achieve the objectives and goals of the society and • Fulfill their obligations as a citizen of their community and country. Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society - Alpha Eta Nu Chapter The purpose of Phi Theta Kappa is the recognition and encouragement of scholarship and leadership among community and junior college students. To achieve this purpose, Phi Theta Kappa provides opportunities for the development of leadership and service, an intellectual climate for exchange of ideas and ideals, lively fellowship of scholars and stimulation of interest in continuing academic excellence. To be considered for membership, a student must: • Be enrolled full-time at Southwestern Community College (12 credit hours), and have completed 24 hours on a full-time basis toward an associate’s degree at Southwestern Community College • Have a cumulative GPA at Southwestern Community College of 3.50 or better for the last two semesters enrolled • Possess both ethical standards and qualities of citizenship and leadership • Complete membership formalities as prescribed by the national organization • Pay national, regional and chapter dues. LICENSING OF GRADUATES Southwestern Community College is an educational institution, which assumes no responsibility for the licensing of its graduates. Students convicted of a felony or any other crime involving moral turpitude may not be recognized by the desired licensing agency. POLICIES/PROCEDURES Academic Forgiveness Procedure Any student who meets the following criteria may submit, in writing to the Office of the Vice President for Instruction and Student Services, a request for academic forgiveness. • The student should have experienced a lapse in enrollment at SCC for a minimum of 24 months or two academic years. • Upon returning, at least twelve semester hours of curriculum courses should have been completed with a GPA of 3.00 or greater. • The request for forgiveness should be submitted during the subsequent semester (excluding summer) after the 12 semester hours have been completed. If the request is approved, all grades of D and F within the requested review period/ consecutive terms will be forgiven and will not be used for GPA (Grade Point Average) computation for credits earned toward graduation requirements. Any forgiven work, if needed for completion of a certificate, degree, or diploma must be retaken. All grades will remain on the student’s transcript.

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ACADEMIC INFORMATION If you have questions about how a Request for Academic Forgiveness may impact your financial aid, please contact the Financial Aid Office. If approved, a notation indicating academic forgiveness will appear on the official transcript. Students may submit only one academic grade forgiveness request. Academic Probation Level 1 Probation (Warning): Degree, diploma and certificate seeking students performing below a 2.0 grade point average in the previous semester will be placed on academic probation. A student on academic probation will work with his/her advisor to develop an academic plan and/or will be directed into specialized coursework. (A “Warning” does not appear on the student’s transcript.) Level 2 Probation: Degree, diploma and certificate seeking students who have not attained a 2.0 grade point average for the two most recently enrolled terms within the past three years will be required to review and modify their academic plans with their advisor and to meet with the Student Success Coordinator. Additionally, they may be required to limit their semester course load and will be advised to register for ACA 118 if they have not already done so. (A “Probation” notation appears on the student’s transcript.) Academic Suspension Probationary students who have not attained a 2.0 grade point average for the three most recently enrolled terms within the last three years and have a cumulative GPA below 2.0 will be suspended for one semester. (A “Suspension” notation appears on the student’s transcript.) Disciplinary Suspension Students who are suspended from the College for violating the Student Code of Conduct (see Student Handbook) will have this suspension noted on the transcript. Course Substitution When it is determined to be in the best interest of the student’s declared educational objective, appropriate courses may be substituted for other courses for graduation purposes. Necessary course substitutions within the major field (courses reflecting the prefix of the student’s major curriculum) require the approval of the student’s program coordinator or advisor. Course substitutions from curricula outside the student’s major area, which have been made for the purpose of addressing the general education or related course requirements, must also be approved by the Dean of Arts and Sciences. The advisor must notify the Registrar in writing of all applicable course substitutions on an individual student basis. Curriculum Course Prerequisites Students may not take a course until a course prerequisite has been met. There are occasions when exceptions may be deemed desirable and appropriate. The instructor and/or program coordinator and the dean/director must approve such exceptions. The documentation will be maintained on file in the dean’s office. ACA 111 College Student Success (or its equivalent) is required for all new degree-seeking students. Students who transfer in 12 or more hours of college credit are exempt form this requirement. Repeating Courses Curriculum courses with earned grades of “D” or “F” may be repeated. Courses with earned grades of “C” or higher may be repeated only by special permission from the appropriate dean. When courses are repeated, the grade and hours of the last course will be computed in the cumulative grade point average. The first course (grade and hours) is shown on the transcript but is not included in the cumulative grade point calculations. If a student receives three “F” grades for the same course, the student must wait at least two academic terms before repeating the course. Exceptions may be made by the instructor or dean.

ACADEMIC INFORMATION Student Records Student records are maintained in accordance with the Family Educational Rights of Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974 and the College’s “Student Record” Policy found in the SCC Student Handbook. Questions concerning student records and requests for record inspection should be directed to the Registrar. Current or former students may secure a transcript of their grades by completing a “Transcript Release Form” and submitting it to the Registrar’s Office along with a photo ID. In compliance with the Privacy Act, student transcripts will not be released to a third party without the signature of the student. Information deemed public or directory information may be released without student consent. Directory information is defined in the College’s Student Records Policy. SCC complies with the USA Patriot’s Act of 2001. Students have the right to give or restrict access to their student records. To exercise this right, students should read the “Student Records” policy (found in the Student Handbook) and make a written request to the Registrar’s Office. WEATHER POLICY The following procedure will be observed for adverse/inclement weather; however, regardless of college announcements, commuters should exercise personal judgment concerning highway road conditions, particularly those from other counties or remote areas. If the College is open, no announcement will be made. Announcements concerning college operation will be made by 6:30 a.m. on the local TV and radio stations listed below. However, if weather conditions worsen after the 6:30 a.m. announcement, an additional announcement closing the College for the day will be made no later than 8:30 a.m. Announcements concerning evening classes will be made no later than 3:00 p.m. The following types of announcements may be made: 1. Delayed Start: If the College is on delayed start, the campus will open at 10:00 a.m. Students should report to the class/lab/clinic they would be in at 10:00 .a.m. on a regular day. All instructional time missed in a delayed start will be made up. 2. Classes Canceled: This indicates that the College remains open and staff should report to work at 10:00 a.m. and use extreme caution. 3. College Closed: This means there are extremely hazardous conditions and no one should report to work or class. 4. Early Dismissal: Early Dismissal will be announced when weather conditions dictate the early dismissal of day or evening classes. This type of announcement will be made by telephone to a designee in each building on campus, who will communicate the early dismissal information to the occupants of the building. Radio Stations: 99.9 FM - WKSF, Asheville 95.3 FM - WCQS, Asheville 104.5 FM - WHLC, Highlands 1590 AM - WBHN, Bryson City 1320 AM - WKRK, Murphy 1370 AM - WGHC, Clayton, GA 95.9 FM - WCVP, Robbinsville 104.1 FM - WRBN, Clayton, GA 680 AM - WRGC, Sylva 1050 AM - WFSC, Franklin 104.9 FM - WQNS, Waynesville 96.7 FM - WRFR, Franklin .

Television Stations: ABC - WLOS, Asheville NBC - WYFF, Greenville, SC CBS - WSPA, Spartanburg, SC SCC Web Page: www.southwesterncc.edu Sign up for SCC Twitter notification through the SCC Web Page

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FINANCIAL INFORMATION • Expenses • Tuition and Fees • Other Fees • Payment of Tuition and Fees • Refund Policy • Financial Aid

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FINANCIAL INFORMATION EXPENSES Student tuition and fees are set by the North Carolina Legislature and the SCC Board of Trustees and are subject to change. Some programs require additional expenses for uniforms, equipment, medical and other miscellaneous expenses. Contact the program advisor for more information. No fee is charged to verify student identity. TUITION AND FEES* *Tuition for 2011-12. Tuition for 2012-13 will be available after July 1, 2012 Per Semester Full-Time, 16 hours or more ..................................................................................... $1064.00 Non-Resident Full-Time, 16 hours or more .......................................................... $4136.00 Part-Time Student (per credit hour) ............................................................................$66.50 Non-Resident Part-Time Student (per credit hour) .............................................. $258.50 OTHER FEES* *Tuition for 2011-12. Tuition for 2012-13 will be available after July 1, 2012 Activity Fee (per semester).........................................................................$2 per credit hour. Maximum $32 per semester. Collected fall and spring only. Computer Use and Technology Fee (per semester)..............................$1 per credit hour. Maximum $16 per semester. Exception: Curriculum students at Job Corps sites will not be assessed Student Activity or Computer Use and Technology Fees. Student ID/Library Card........................................................................................................$1 Replacement Student ID Card (Lost or Stolen)....................................................................$5 Automobile Registration .................................................................................................... N/C Accident Insurance (per year - optional, subject to change) .................................................$15 TEAS Exam (if applicable) . ....................................................................................................$40 Malpractice Insurance (subject to change) Required for following programs - per year Cosmetology...................................................................................................................$17 Emergency Medical Services (per semester).........................................................$35.50 Health Information Technology.................................................................................$17 Human Services Technology.......................................................................................$17 Human Services Technology Substance Abuse.......................................................$17 Medical Laboratory Technology................................................................................$17 Nursing Assistant...........................................................................................................$17 Nursing (Associate Degree).........................................................................................$17 Physical Therapist Assistant.........................................................................................$17 Phlebotomy.....................................................................................................................$17 Practical Nursing............................................................................................................$17 Radiography....................................................................................................................$17 Respiratory Therapy......................................................................................................$17 Therapeutic Massage......................................................................................................$17 Late Registration Fee.................................................................................................................$5 (Full-time returning students registering after registration day) Commencement Fee (Cap & Gown - subject to change). ....................................................$45 Textbooks/Supplies...........................Cost varies depending on the student’s curriculum. Check with the College Bookstore for prices.

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NC Senior Citizens Tuition shall be waived for up to six credit hours per academic semester for senior citizens age 65 or older who are qualified as legal resident of North Carolina. Applicable Fees will be charged. If an eligible senior citizen enrolls in more than six credit hours, he/she shall be charged tuition and fees above six credit hours. PAYMENT OF TUITION AND FEES Tuition and fees are due and payable at the time of registration. To complete the registration process, tuition and fees must be paid during the registration period. The college does not provide for installment payments of fees, tuition, books, etc. Methods of Payment: Pay online with Mastercard, Visa, Discover or American Express using mySCC access OR Cash or Personal Check Students receiving third-party sponsor funding for their tuition (WIA, BIA, Vocational Rehabilitation, etc.) must provide a sponsor authorization letter for billing from the sponsor before the registration period ends. If this authorization letter is not provided by this time, the student forfeits their sponsorship funding, and the sponsor will not be billed on their behalf. It is the responsibility of the student to verify that the sponsor authorization letter has been received by the business office. Students unable to pay tuition and fees in full at registration can make a one-time request to the Business Services Office for a 10 calendar day deferment. This request must be made on registration day and is a one-time only privilege. Even if a deferment is granted, students will be required to pay 25% of the tuition and fees at the time of the request. .Students must clear any unpaid balance due on account from any previous semester in order to register for a new semester or receive an official transcript. How to Contact Business Services and Cashiers Office Location: Jackson Campus, Balsam Center Telephone: 828.339.4290 • Toll-free: 800.447.4091, ext. 4290 Address: 447 College Drive, Sylva, North Carolina 28779 Web page: www.southwesterncc.edu REFUND POLICY If a student withdraws from class(es) prior to the 10% point of the semester, SCC will calculate the student’s refund amount using the state refund policy as stated below. 1. A refund shall not be made except under the following circumstances: A) A 100% refund shall be made if the student officially withdraws prior to the first day of class(es) of the academic semester or term as noted in the College calendar. Also, a student is eligible for a 100% refund if the class in which the student is officially registered is cancelled due to insufficient enrollment. B) A 75% refund shall be made if the student officially withdraws from the class(es) prior to or on the official 10% point of the semester. C) For classes beginning at times other than the first week (seven calendar days) of the semester a 100% refund shall be made if the student officially withdraws from the class prior to the first class meeting. A 75% refund shall be made if the student officially withdraws from the class prior to or on the 10% point of . the class.

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D) A 100% refund shall be made if the student officially withdraws from a contact hour class prior to the first day of class of the academic semester or term or if the College cancels the class. A 75% refund shall be made if the student officially withdraws from a contact-hour class on or before the tenth calendar day of the class. To comply with applicable federal regulations regarding refunds, federal regulations supersede the state refund regulations stated in this rule. Where a student, having paid the required tuition for a semester or term, dies during the semester (prior to or on the last day of examinations of the College the student was attending), all tuition and fees for that semester or term may be refunded to the estate of the deceased.

State Refund Policy Southwestern Community College does not have an approved Accrediting Agency Refund Policy. Non-Title IV Recipients The refund policy for students not receiving Title IV financial aid is the same as the State Refund Policy statement above.





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FINANCIAL AID Purpose The purpose of the financial aid programs at SCC is to provide financial assistance, based on need, to students who normally could not attend college without aid. Financial aid is awarded without regard to age, race, creed, sex or disability. The programs are based on the guiding principle that the student or family of the student has the primary responsibility for educational costs, and the purpose of the financial aid programs is to supplement the student or family contributions. For further information about Expected Family Contribu­tion, see “Financial Need” section below. Prospective students are encouraged to gather information about the current costs to attend their program of interest. In addition to tuition, fees and books, some programs require special equipment, supplies, or clothing. Students should also discuss all options for paying for education costs with their family. Students applying for financial aid should apply as soon as possible but well in advance of the semester they plan to attend. Students should adhere to the deadlines and follow the steps outlined in the “How to Apply for Financial Aid” instructions found later in this section. Eligibility Requirements To receive aid from any of the federal and state student aid programs at SCC, students must meet all of the following general criteria: • Have financial need, except for some loans (Financial need is documented through the submission of a Free Application for Federal Student Aid [FAFSA] and the receipt of a valid Student Aid Report [SAR].) • Have a high school/adult high school diploma or a GED Certificate • Be accepted for enrollment in an eligible program at SCC • Be a U.S. citizen or an eligible non-citizen • Have a valid Social Security Number • Meet Satisfactory Academic Progress standards set by SCC • Certify that he is not in default on a federal student loan and does not owe money on a federal student grant • Register with the Selective Service, if required • Meet federal eligibility requirements regarding drug-related convictions. Financial Need Aid from most of the financial aid programs is awarded on the basis of financial need. When applying for federal student aid, the information reported on the application is used to calculate each student’s Expected Family Contribution (EFC). The formula used to calculate the EFC is established by federal law and is used to measure the financial strength of a student’s family on the basis of the family’s income and assets. The EFC is used to determine a student’s eligibility for student aid. The EFC is used in the following equation to determine a student’s financial need: Cost of Attendance - Expected Family Contribution Financial Need The Financial Aid Office at SCC will calculate all students’ cost of attendance and subtract each student’s EFC. If there is any amount remaining, that student is considered to have financial need. The Financial Aid Office will work with students toward meeting their need. Because funds are limited, the amount awarded to an individual student will likely fall short of meeting his total need.





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FINANCIAL INFORMATION Financial Aid Programs at SCC In general, there are four types of financial aid. Grants and scholarships are gift money that does not need to be repaid. Work-study is money that is earned by working, and student loans are borrowed funds that must be repaid. The following need-based grants are available to eligible students at SCC: • The Federal Pell Grant is generally awarded to undergraduate students with financial need who have not earned a bachelor’s degree. Pell Grants for the 2011- 2012 school year ranged from $555 to $5,550 per year. A student’s EFC will determine whether or not he is eligible and how much he will receive. If a student is eligible, he will be notified of the full-time award amount, but the amount actually paid will depend on whether he is enrolled full-time or part-time, and whether he attends for a full academic year or less. • The Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) is a smaller grant that is awarded to students with the greatest financial need (lowest EFC). Limited funds are provided by the Federal Government and are awarded by the SCC Financial Aid Office to both full-time and part-time students. • The North Carolina Community College Grant is a program established by the North Carolina General Assembly to help meet the educational costs of attending a community college. To be considered for this grant, a student must be a North Carolina resident for tuition purposes and enrolled at least half-time (6 credit hours per semester). A student’s EFC will determine whether or not he is eligible and how much he will receive. • The North Carolina Education Lottery Scholarship (ELS) is a need-based scholarship, and the student’s EFC will determine whether or not he is eligible and how much he will receive. The student must be a North Carolina resident for tuition purposes, and be enrolled at least half-time (6 credit hours per semester). Filing the FAFSA will submit the student’s name for consideration for this scholarship.



Each grant above has several specific eligibility criteria which must be met. Please contact the SCC Financial Aid Office for additional details. Federal Work-Study provides part-time jobs for students with financial need, allowing them to earn money to help pay education expenses. Most of the jobs are on campus and clerical in nature, but the program also encourages jobs in community service and literacy support. Student Loans are borrowed money that must be repaid with interest. Both need-based and non need-based loans are available. SCC currently offers Federal Direct Loans to students and PLUS loans to parents. Students must be enrolled at least half-time to receive a student loan. The amount a student may borrow will be determined by a number of factors, including whether he is a first-year or second-year student, whether he is a dependent or independent student, and the amount of other educational assistance. Scholarships are funds that do not have to be repaid and may be awarded based on financial need or some type of merit (such as academic) or a combination of the two. Students are encouraged to pursue scholarship opportunities throughout their communities such as civic organizations and churches, and to research other national scholarships through reputable organizations and web sites. A limited number of scholarships are offered through the SCC Foundation and other private donors each year. The most current list of scholarships administered through SCC and the filing instructions and deadlines can be found in the Financial Aid Office or by going to the Scholarship page of the SCC web site. Other Programs SCC works with governmental agencies that provide educational benefits to students who are eligible for their programs. Information and applications are available upon request from the individual agency. Students receiving third-party sponsor funding for their tuition must provide

FINANCIAL INFORMATION a sponsor authorization letter for billing from the sponsor before the registration period ends. If this authorization letter is not provided by this time, the student forfeits their sponsorship funding, and the sponsor will not be billed on their behalf. It is the responsibility of the student to verify that the sponsor authorization letter has been received by the business office. • The Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998 provides financial assistance to income- eligible persons enrolled in an approved curriculum. The program is usually administered through the North Carolina Job Link Career Centers in the student’s county of residence. • The North Carolina Division of Vocational Rehabilitation provides services to persons with disabilities in order to help them obtain employment. SCC is approved to provide training and education for individuals who qualify under the provisions of the North Carolina Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Department of Health and Human Services. • The Cherokee Education and Training Adult Education Program administers educational assistance programs for the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. • The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs provides educational benefits to eligible veterans and to eligible dependents and survivors of certain veterans. Students who believe they are eligible for veterans’ benefits should contact the VA Certifying Official in the SCC Student Services Office to receive an application for benefits and a list of requirements that they must meet. How to Apply for Financial Aid In order to receive federal grants, state grants, loans, work-study, and most scholarships, you have to file the FAFSA. You only need to submit the FAFSA once per academic year. 1. File the FAFSA • Get personal identification number (PIN) at http://www.pin.ed.gov • Complete a FAFSA at www.fafsa.ed.gov and be sure to use the IRS Data Retrieval, if eligible, to import tax data. • SCC’s federal School Code is 008466. FAFSA Deadlines: Our priority deadline is May 1 of each year for students starting in the following Fall semester. However, FAFSAs received after this date will still be processed. It can take up to 2-3 weeks for SCC to receive your FAFSA results, so apply as early as you can after January 1 (non-tax filers) or February 1 (tax filers) of each year. Students starting in the Spring or Summer semester should file their FAFSA at least 3 months in advance. 2. Apply to an eligible program at SCC • The Financial Aid Office cannot view your Student Aid Report (SAR) until an Admissions application to the College is on file. • SCC Admission’s Office will send you an acceptance letter with your SCC student ID number. 3. Review your Student Aid Report (SAR) • Read email from the Department of Education, and follow link to view SAR. Read comments at the end of the report. • Check information on SAR for accuracy. • If you are eligible but did not use the IRS Data Retrieval, please go back and correct your FAFSA using the IRS Data Retrieval.

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FINANCIAL INFORMATION 4. Send Requested Documents to the SCC Financial Aid Office • Read SCC email from Financial Aid Office. Go to MySCC/Webadvisor to see requested documents. • Download any requested Financial Aid Forms complete, and submit to SCC Financial Aid Office. Satisfactory Academic Progress To receive financial aid, the Federal Government requires students to make Satisfac­tory Academic Progress towards completing a degree or approved program. Progress will be monitored at the end of each semester at SCC. Results are measured cumulatively, so if a student has attended SCC in the past, his transcript will be evaluated for Satisfactory Academic Progress if he returns to SCC and applies for financial aid, even if he has not received aid in the past. Satisfactory Academic Progress is measured in two ways: 1. Students must earn a 2.0 cumulative Grade Point Average, which is consistent with the requirements for graduation or completion of a program. 2. Students are limited to the number of credit hours they may attempt before finishing a program of study. That limit is measured as 150% of the credit hours required for the student’s current program. Therefore, in order to be on track to complete a program before financial aid ends, SCC requires students to complete 70% of the courses they have attempted on a cumulative basis. If a student is not making Satisfactory Academic Progress, he will be notified and placed on Financial Aid Warning for the next semester he is in attendance so that he will have an opportunity to regain Satisfactory Academic Progress. He will receive any financial aid for which he is eligible during this Financial Aid Warning term. Students have the right to file an appeal if it is determined that they are not making Satisfactory Academic Progress. The appeal must be made in writing to the SCC Financial Aid Committee and the appeal form is available from the Financial Aid Office. Appeals should be based on mitigating circumstances such as severe illness of the student, death of an immediate family member or a change of academic program. Additional details of the Satisfactory Academic Progress policy are available in a publication from the SCC Financial Aid Office. Withdrawals If a student completely withdraws from all classes or stops attending all classes and has received a Pell Grant, a Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, or a Federal Direct Loan for that semester, the Financial Aid Office must determine if those funds were earned. Students earn their aid once they have attended beyond the 60% date of the semester. If more funds were disbursed than earned, the student must repay a portion of the difference. The Financial Aid Office will determine the amount the student must repay the US Department of Education (DOE) and the amount SCC must repay the DOE. If SCC is required to repay funds because of a student’s full withdrawal, the student will be expected to repay SCC. The student will receive written notification from the SCC Financial Aid Office of any funds owed due to a full withdrawal. Students are encouraged to visit the Financial Aid Office prior to withdrawing to obtain an estimate of the amount that may be owed. If a student owes funds to the DOE, he will be given 45 days to repay the funds or make satisfactory repayment arrangements with the DOE. After that time, the student will lose federal financial aid eligibility. In addition, if the student owes funds to SCC, he will not be permitted to reenroll at SCC or request a transcript until those funds have been repaid.



FINANCIAL INFORMATION According to the SCC Withdrawal Procedure described elsewhere in this catalog, in order to withdraw a student should contact his advisor to initiate the Drop/Add form. The form must be signed by the advisor and appropriate instructor(s) and returned to the Registrar’s Office for processing. Special Circumstances The formulas used to determine eligibility for federal student aid are applied consis­tently to all applicants. Students should contact the SCC Financial Aid Office if they feel they have special circumstances that might affect their dependency status or the amount they and their family are expected to contribute. These circumstances could include a family’s unusual medical expenses, or recent unemployment of either themselves, a spouse or either parent (if applicable). There must be very good reasons to make any adjustment, and students will have to provide adequate documentation to support this request. The Financial Aid Director’s decision is final and it cannot be appealed to the U.S. Department of Education. How to Contact the Financial Aid Office Location: Jackson Campus, Balsam Center Telephone: 800.447.4091 • 828.339.4438 Fax: 828.339.4613 • Attn: Financial Aid Address: 447 College Drive, Sylva, North Carolina 28779 Web page: www.southwesterncc.edu/finaid/index.htm E-mail: [email protected]

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STUDENT LIFE • Ambassadors • Bookstore • Career Center • Clubs and Organizations • Conduct Standards • Holt Library • Learning Assistance Center • Student Identifications/Library Cards • Student Life • Student Information • Student Policies and Procedures • Student Right-to-Know Information • Student Support Services • Support Services for Students with Disabilities • Tobacco Use • Tutoring

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STUDENT LIFE AMBASSADORS This prestigious student organization was established to serve the SCC Foundation, President’s Office and the College in an exciting way as student hosts and representatives of SCC at social, alumni and recruitment events. Members help in student recruitment through activities on and off campus; meet and greet campus and community leaders at college events; make contact with alumni leaders; and hone leadership skills. Members go through an application and interview process. Membership drive begins early in spring semester. BOOKSTORE New and used textbooks and school supplies are available in the College Bookstore located on the third floor of the Balsam Center. SCC maintains a contract with College Bookstores of America to operate the bookstore. Hours of operation typically are 8 a.m. until 4 p.m., Monday through Thursday and 8 a.m. until noon on Friday. CAREER CENTER Your Key to the Real World… The mission of the Career Center is to educate students and alumni to prepare them for successful job searches and to develop and maintain rewarding relationships with a diversity of employers and SCC faculty and staff. Career Services offers a broad range of resources. With so many career possibilities available and a lifetime of work ahead, the Career Center encourages students to invest time in planning to achieve academic and career success. We encourage students to take advantage of the Career Center early in their college careers so they are prepared for job search or transferring to another college. Services include: • Career Assessment and Advising • Career Assessments • Help Researching and Exploring Careers • Workshops and Seminars • On-Line Career Library • Interviewing Software • Job Search and Placement Services How to Contact the Career Center Location: Balsam Center, 1st Floor Telephone: 828.339.4212 Web page: www.southwesterncc.edu/news/career-center-services

STUDENT LIFE CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS Students are encouraged to form clubs and organizations focusing on special interests or curriculum programs. Although clubs have membership requirements, no organization at SCC discriminates on the basis of race, color, sex, age, disability, religion, nationality or political preference. The Club Council, under the direction of the Student Life Committee and the Dean of Student Services, has established requirements for forming and operating student clubs and organizations. These regulations are outlined in the Student Handbook. Student organizations must have official college recognition to use SCC’s facilities or to conduct activities on campus. Active clubs at the time of this catalog’s printing include: • Alpha Beta Gamma International Business Honor Society • Campus Crusade for Christ • Culinary Arts Club • Dumbledore’s Army • Electronics Club • Environmental Club • Epsilon Sigma Pi EMS Professional Society • Gay-Straight Alliance • Health Information Technology Club • Journalism Club • Latent Image • Medical Assisting Club • Native American Society • National Technical Honor Society • Nursing Club • Outdoor Leadership Club • Paralegal Club • PTA Club • Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society • Respiratory Therapy Technology Club • Sonography Club • Macon Campus Spanish Club • Jackson Campus Spanish Club • Sports & Gaming Club • The STEM Club CONDUCT STANDARDS Southwestern Community College is committed to maintaining a safe and orderly educational environment for students and staff. Therefore, when in the judgment of college officials, a student’s conduct disrupts or threatens to disrupt the college community, appropriate disciplinary action will be taken to restore and protect the sanctity of the community. Students are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with generally accepted standards of behavior, scholarship and morality. The purpose of these standards is not to restrict student rights, but to protect the rights of individuals in their academic pursuits. Students are responsible for knowledge of college rules and regulations. The Standards of Student Conduct are published in the Southwestern Community College Student Handbook and are available in Student Services.

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STUDENT LIFE

HOLT LIBRARY Holt Library offers 24 computer lab workstations with Internet access and the Microsoft Office suite. There is also a snack bar, instruction/conference room, two study rooms, photocopier, chess table, & free printing from computer workstations. Seating spaces are designated into Collaborative, Quiet, and Silent study areas. • Online Access: The “My SCC” portal (Library tab) gives online access, instruction, and information about Holt Library services and resources for students, staff and faculty. Community users access this information via the Library’s website. • Circulating Collection: 31,000 books & 140 hard-copy journals, magazines, and newspapers directly support academic programs. • Reserve Collection: Items in high demand are added at the suggestion of faculty and made available on request at the Information desk. • Reference Collection offers specialized sources, for example, legal research volumes for inhouse use. • Special Collections: DVDs, Fiction, North Carolina, Children’s, NC-NET (for professional development), and Small Business Resource Center. • Online Catalog: Search for books by title, author, subject or keyword, and manage your library account online. Catalog includes SCC + 46 community colleges in NC. • NC-LIVE: To guarantee access to scholarly resources for students’ assignments, NC-LIVE provides a searchable, online index to full-text articles from 16,000 print publications, including magazine articles, national and local newspapers, e-books, streaming video, academic journals, and reference sources. • Live Chat 24/7: This chat service connects you with a NC librarian who can help you locate resources, or answer research questions. • Interlibrary Loan services: Patrons may borrow books in other NC community college libraries by placing a hold in the CCLINC online catalog. Students and faculty can borrow books from libraries nationwide by contacting Holt Library staff. • Laptops are available for use inside the library. Users must present SCC photo ID. • Research Instruction: Instruction Librarian creates workshops to demonstrate NC-LIVE resources and teach information literacy and online research skills. Faculty may request a basic or customized workshop for their classes. Research assistance for individual students or faculty members is always available. • Returning Materials: All library materials must be returned by the end of each semester, and accounts cleared, before students are allowed to register, graduate or receive a transcript. • Library Hours: Monday – Thursday (8 a.m. until 9 p.m.); Friday (8 a.m. until 5 p.m.); Closed Saturday and Sunday. • Video Gaming Events: Popular spring & fall program where students bring in video games and consoles, organize tournaments, and play traditional board games. Library provides monitors, projectors, large screens, and free food. • Distance Learners have access to library services, instruction and online resources. • Macon Campus: The instruction librarian teaches library workshops in Macon Campus classes, and SCC courier delivers Holt Library materials to the Campus.

STUDENT LIFE LEARNING ASSISTANCE CENTER Jackson Campus LAC The Learning Assistance Center (LAC) is a professionally staffed facility offering tutoring and exam proctoring. Students are encouraged to take advantage of over 50 hours per week of individualized instruction from professional learning consultants and specialized instructors. The LAC also provides a modern facility for the nationally certified peer tutoring program provided by Student Support Services (SSS). The LAC area features a 16-station computer lab, six enclosed study carrels (four with computers) for individual study and tutoring, a Testing Room with 12 computers, an SSS Tutoring Room, a lounge, and a small library. The library includes resources available for checkout in the areas of reading, writing, literature, business and law, history, math, sciences, and “life skills,” focusing on vocabulary and spelling, study skills, test preparation, and career choices. Novels also are available for checkout. Instructors are invited to use and recommend resources. They also are welcome to use the LAC’s exam proctoring service for the occasional makeup exam; our proctoring service fully supports online classes. LAC services are available to all SCC students, instructors, and community members free of charge. Most services are provided on a walk-in basis to ensure that customers are able to obtain the help they need at the times that are most convenient for them. However, appointments may be made by calling the LAC coordinator at 339.4325. A Writing Consultant always is on duty; oftentimes an Advanced Math Consultant is on duty as well. Schedules for all types of assistance, including sciences and computer, are posted on campus and to the LAC web page each semester. Tours of the LAC are available on a drop-in basis for individuals, and the coordinator is happy to present in-class workshops on the LAC and the online tutoring service; instructors should call 339.4325 a week ahead to set an appointment. The LAC is open from 8 a.m. until 7 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and 8 a.m. until noon on Friday. It is closed during fall and spring breaks, as well as for holidays. Any unusual closings are posted at the LAC entrance and to the LAC web page. Summer hours vary according to enrollment and staffing. For additional information, contact the LAC Coordinator at 828.339.4325, stop by Oaks Hall 101, or see the LAC website (http://www.southwesterncc. edu/lac-learning-assistance-center). Free online tutoring is available through Blackboard. For more information, contact the online tutoring coordinator at 828.339.4325. Macon Campus LAC The Cecil L. Groves Center houses the Macon Campus LAC. Located upstairs in room 230, the Macon LAC is based around a 12 station computer lab. Adjacent classrooms are also utilized by the LAC when classes are not in session, further expanding the space available for students to work and get assistance. The LAC is normally staffed from 8 am to 6 pm, Monday through Thursday, and 8 am to noon on Friday for fall and spring semesters, with varying summer hours. Typically the LAC is staffed with at least two learning consultants, one specializing in reading & writing and the other in math & science. These consultants are available for walk-in assistance, utilizing a minimalist tutoring approach with the focus on learning the material, not just getting an answer. Additionally the Macon LAC supports SCC’s tutoring program by providing a space for tutors and students to meet. The Macon LAC strives to offer comparable services to students and faculty on our growing campus. In addition to walk-in tutoring, one of our popular services is test proctoring, and to this end, one of the offices has been dedicated for testing to provide a quiet testing environment. We are continually updating our resource library as well. For additional information, please contact the Macon LAC Coordinator at 828.389.7331, ext. 7028 or stop by room 230. STUDENT IDENTIFICATION/LIBRARY CARDS A student identification/library card is available to all students for a $1.00 charge for new cards and a $5.00 charge for replacement cards. The ID card displays the student’s major and assigned ID number and is used as for campus identification and as a library card and may be used for various student life events. The ID card photo is taken and the card issued during orientation programs and during all campus registration periods. The card should be carried at all times while on-campus.

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STUDENT LIFE Student Life is coordinated by the College’s Student Life Committee. The committee, whose members include students, faculty, and staff, is responsible for (1) planning, coordi­nating and sponsoring campus-wide student activities, educational and cultural events; (2) assisting student clubs and organizations with resources and training; (3) coordinating events and programs of student clubs through the Club Council; and (4) allocating the student activity fee funds for programs and services that benefit students and student club activities. Student Life events include Welcome Back, Constitution Day, Veteran’s Day, guest speakers, spelling bee, contests, special events throughout the year and Spring Fling. Student Life sponsored programs and services include (1) support for the campus literary magazine – Milestone, (2) diploma covers for graduates, (3) refreshments for student orientation events and career workshops and (4) student club support. The Student Club Council elects representatives to serve on the Student Life Committee and a chairperson who serves as the student representative to the SCC Board of Trustees. The council coordinates club activities and events and sponsors educational and leadership development workshops for club leaders. Contact Student Services for more information. STUDENT INFORMATION Southwestern Community College respects the privacy and confidentiality of student information consistent with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), which regulates the release of student information. Therefore, the primary communication regarding student information occurs with students. However, the College recognizes and appreciates that family and others have a role in supporting students and may have an interest in a student issue. With the student’s permission, academic information may be released to a third party, or a support advocate may be present with the student and participate in a productive conversation related to an issue in question. STUDENT POLICIES AND PROCEDURES The following policies and procedures affect all students and are published in the SCC Student Handbook and Planner. Students are responsible for obtaining a copy of the Handbook and becoming familiar with these policies.



POLICY

REFERS TO

Drug-Free Policy

Establishes SCC as a Drug-Free Environment and the penalties for violating the policy.

Student Clubs

Guidelines and requirements governing student clubs.

Student Record and Privacy Policy

Defines the right of access to students’ records.

Student Rights, Standards of Conduct, Discipline, Appeal and Grievance Procedures

Defines students’ rights and standards of conduct and outlines disciplinary procedures and sanctions. Defines grievance procedures — Academic and Non-Academic.

Traffic Code

Traffic and parking regulations for the SCC campus.





STUDENT LIFE

STUDENT RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION Southwestern Community College is committed to informing enrolled and prospective students about the probabilities of success in each program as well as current job market information. The United States Department of Education requires that each institution of higher education publish completion rates for individuals who entered as full-time students and who completed their curriculum programs within one-and-one-half times the time allowed for the program in the academic catalog. The average rate of persistence toward degree completion of students in each curriculum at SCC is available from the Registrar. The Career Center can provide current job market information and job-placement data for each academic program. Human Resources can provide campus crime statistics. All information is available at www.southwesterncc.edu. STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES The College is funded with a Title IV education grant. This grant assists students in need of academic support so they may achieve their academic goal of graduation and/or transfer. To qualify for services, students must: 1. Have a need for academic support and a willingness to use program services; 2. Be a first-generation college student OR meet income guidelines OR have a documented ADA disability; 3. Be a first time post-secondary student; 4. Place at the 25% or higher on the English, Reading and arithmetic portions of the College placement test. Program services include: academic co-advising, financial literacy/scholarship information, tutoring, supplemental grant aid support, career counseling, academic and personal counseling, volunteer enrichment, referral to community services and cultural enrichment programs. The program also includes an initiative to assist students who want to transfer to a four-year institution. Also available to students is a large resource area equipped with two open, Internet-connected computers and a wide variety of course ready, job ready and resource ready materials in video, text and software mediums. Students wishing to participate in the Student Support Services program must complete an SSS application and have an intake interview. For additional services and information, visit the SSS web page or contact the Student Support Services office at 828.339.4245 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4245 or stop by the offices located on the lower level of Oaks Hall. SUPPORT SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES Southwestern Community College is committed to providing full and equal access for all qualified students. The Disability Services Coordinator offers appropriate supports to reduce physical, situational, and attitudinal barriers while promoting independence and self-advocacy for students with disabilities. Services are designed to level the playing field, promote retention, and support academic success. Accommodations are provided when deemed necessary and reasonable for a particular student and are determined on a case-by-case basis through an Educational Support Plan (or ESP). An ESP is a comprehensive plan which specifies appropriate classroom accommodations and may include: alternative testing arrangements (such as extended time or reduced distraction testing room, or oral exams); note-taker; reader; scribe; recorders; magnifier screens; ergonomic chairs/ tools; video captioning; room relocation; sign-language interpreters; or assistive technology.

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It all begins with a conversation. The student must self-identify to Disability Services Coordinator, participate in an intake interview, and work collaboratively with the Coordinator to create the ESP. Additional support documentation may be requested to augment understanding of the disability, functional limitations, and requested accommodations. Information obtained through this process is regarded in a confidential manner as outlined in the Family Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. Accommodations can be requested at any time in the semester. However, some accommodations may take up to six weeks to put in place, so early contact is important.

How to Contact the Disability Services Office Student Disability & Academic Engagement Coordinator G-15, Oaks Hall (lower level) Phone: 828.339.4229 Toll-free: 800.447.4091 ext. 4229 Web page: http://www.southwesterncc.edu/disability_services/disability-services

TOBACCO USE The Jackson Campus is a tobacco-free environment. The use of tobacco related products is strictly prohibited in any college buildings, facilities, vehicles or property owned, leased or operated by Southwestern Community College, including all outside areas. Tobacco related products include, but are not limited to, cigarettes, cigars, pipe tobacco, smokeless tobacco, and simulated tobacco products such as e-cigarettes. The sale or free distribution of tobacco products, including merchandise, is also prohibited. This policy applies to all college and early college employees, students, vendors, contractors, and visitors. TUTORING Certified at Level I and Level II through the College Reading and Learning Association/ International Tutor Program Certification, SCC’s Tutor Program offers tutorial assistance to students enrolled in curriculum classes. Tutoring is available at no cost to SCC students and is provided in one-on-one or small group sessions. This program offers valuable academic assistance through competent, qualified peer and non-peer tutors who strive to encourage student motivation and achievement, and promote academic excellence. Applications to obtain a tutor or to serve as a tutor are available in the Student Support Services Office on the first floor of the Oaks Hall or online at: http://www.southwesterncc.edu/tutor-program. For additional information, contact SCC’s Tutor Coordinator at 828.339.4231.

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EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES • General Information • Admission Eligibility • Cost • Course Repetition • Adult Basic Skills, High School Equivalency (HSE), GED Preparation and Adult High School • Compensatory Education (CED) • English as a Second Language (ESL) • General Education Development (GED) Testing • Human Resources Development

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EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES GENERAL INFORMATION The purpose of Educational Opportunities programs is to assist adults in obtaining the knowledge and skills necessary for work, further education, family self-sufficiency, and community involvement. Due to the varying levels of motivation, ability, individual schedules, and work habits, classes are flexible and are offered in a variety of formats. Instructional methods and materials appropriate for adults are used to help promote more meaningful learning experiences. Individualized instruction, small classes, multiple class locations and times make these classes student friendly. Enrollment is maintained throughout the year and there is at least one literacy class in each county to ensure that students can begin at any time. Specialized classes are established at various locations in the service area. There is no fee for registration or for instructional materials. To enroll, call 800.447.4091, ext. 4272 or for class information in Swain County and Cherokee call 828.366.2002, for Jackson County call 828.339.4262, and for Macon County call 828.306.7020. ADMISSION ELIGIBILITY Admission is open to individuals who are 18 years or older and who are not enrolled in public school. Sixteen- and seventeen-year-old students who are no longer in the public school are eligible but must have an Underage Release Form signed by school officials and parent/ guardian. This form may be obtained from the SCC website: www.southwesterncc.edu/ educational-opportunities. COST There is no registration fee for classes in the following program areas: Adult Basic Education (ABE), High School Equivalency (HSE) including Adult High School (AHS) and General Education Development (GED®), English as a Second Language (ESL), and Compensatory Education (CED). The Human Resources Development (HRD) classes are offered at no cost to unemployed or underemployed students and community members. COURSE REPETITION Students may enroll in most Educational Opportunities courses as many times as necessary to accomplish their individual educational/training goals, provided they continue to show progress, do not prohibit others from participation, and do not violate policies of the North Carolina Community College System. ADULT BASIC SKILLS, HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENCY (GED® and ADULT HIGH SCHOOL) Classes are offered on all levels from beginning reading to preparation for the GED® and College Placement test. Adult Basic Skills (ABE) classes are for adults who need remedial instruction in reading, language, and/or math skills. The High School Equivalency (HSE) classes are for adults who are preparing for the GED® test or are completing high school credits to earn an Adult High School Diploma from Southwestern Community College. The Pathways to Success program allows eligible High School Equivalency (GED® and Adult High School) students to concurrently enroll in selected curriculum classes. Pathways to Success is designed to provide students with tools and resources necessary to persist and succeed in earning not only a high school credential but also in developing academic and employability skills as they transition to career or college. The Student Transitions Education Program is a collaborative effort of SCC and Jackson County Schools that encourages students who may have otherwise dropped out to finish high school. Students in this program may concurrently enroll in college-curriculum courses while fin-

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES ishing high school. They may be eligible to earn an SCC High School Diploma and a Jackson County Schools Alternative High School Diploma. Students in STEPs are eligible to enroll in college curriculum courses through the Pathways to Success and College and Career Promise programs. COMPENSATORY EDUCATION (CED) This program is designed for adults with intellectual disabilities. The program is highly individualized and fosters a maximum level of independent living commensurate with personal ability. Instruction is offered in math, language, health, community living, consumer education and vocational education. ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL) The ESL instruction is designed for individuals from foreign countries to learn how to speak, read, and write English. The program’s focus is for adults who want to learn English language skills to function effectively in an English speaking environment. Civics related curricula enable students to be more successful in their work and their daily lives, as parents and citizens of our community. Citizenship classes are available to any adult who is eligible to be naturalized. Classes are small, individual instruction is provided, language-learning software is available, and students work at their own pace. Classes are offered throughout the service area. GENERAL EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT (GED®) TESTING Southwestern Community College is an official General Education Development Testing Center. Currently, these tests cover five broad areas: writing, reading, math, social studies and science. Individuals receiving a total passing score of 2250, with no single test score below 410, are awarded a High School Equivalency Certificate by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. This certificate is generally accepted on the same basis as a high school diploma when making application for employment, seeking a job promotion or applying for admission into a college or university. On January 2, 2014, the current series of the GED®, the 2002 series, will be replaced with a computerized and more intense series, developed by Pearson-VUE. These changes will substantially change the price of testing. The new assessment will continue to provide adults the opportunity to earn a high school credential, but it goes further by measuring career-and college-readiness skills that are the focus of today’s curriculum and tomorrow’s success. Four content areas—literacy, mathematics, science, and social studies—will measure a foundational core of knowledge and skills that are essential for career and college readiness. Preparation: An individual wishing to take the GED® Examination should come to SCC for an initial interview. He may select one of three ways to complete his preparation. Depending on the level of preparation necessary, he may choose to enroll in the Adult Basic Education program, High School Equivalency program, or Developmental Studies. Testing: In the event that any single test score or the total score is unsatisfactory, a retest may be taken after further study. Test Sites: At the time of application, a testing schedule will be given to the applicant. Test Sites are located in Swain, Jackson and Macon counties. For additional information call 828.339.4486 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4486, or visit www.southwesterncc.edu.

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EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT SCC is committed to increasing employment of the citizens of our community. The purpose of the Human Resources Development (HRD) program is to educate and train people in transition and the emerging workforce for success in the workplace. HRD provides assessment services, employability training, and career development counseling to the unemployed, underemployed, individuals in transition, and the emerging workforce. It not only provides the instruction, but also provides the much needed support for unemployed and dislocated workers within the college service area. HRD Services for individuals: • Instructional Training • Skill/Self-Assessment • Career Development Activities including job searching assistance, résumé preparation, job interview preparation, communication for the workplace, wellness for career success, and much more. HRD Services for agencies: • Provide a pool of applicants for hire who have completed employability skills training courses. North Carolina Career Readiness Certification The HRD program offers preparation classes for the North Carolina Career Readiness Certification examination. The CRC is designed to meet the needs of both employers and job seekers in this transitioning economy. For employers, the CRC offers a reliable means of determining whether a potential employee has the necessary literacy, numeracy and problem solving skills to be “job ready.” The CRC is based upon WorkKeys, a nationally recognized, skills assessment tool developed by ACT Inc. For more information on this program and how to get started contact: Rita Gregory, Coordinator of Educational Opportunities 828.306.7020.

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 CONTINUING

EDUCATION

• General Information • Admission Eligibility • Cost • Course Repetition • Computer Training • Community Service • Healthcare Professions Training • Heritage Arts • Online Programs • Professional Licensure and Certification • Public Safety Training • Teacher Certificate Renewal • Refund Policy • Pre-Registration/Enrollment

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CONTINUING EDUCATION GENERAL INFORMATION Continuing Education is committed to the concept of life-long learning. It is the purpose of Southwestern Community College to provide an opportunity for citizens to develop their fullest potential in whatever vocational, intellectual or cultural areas they desire. It is also the purpose of Southwestern Community College to offer low-cost educational opportunities to any adult regardless of educational background. Continuing education courses are offered at various locations throughout Jackson, Macon and Swain counties and the Qualla Boundary. Continuing Education welcomes requests for courses and suggestions for providing improved services to the three-county area. Extension courses offered through Continuing Education are designed to prepare students for entry into an occupation, to upgrade the occupational competency of already employed individuals or to work toward self-improvement. These extension courses do not earn academic credits that are recognized in a degree or diploma program; however, a certificate is sometimes awarded upon successful completion of a course or series of courses. For some courses, Continuing Education Units (CEUs) are awarded. One CEU may be given for each ten contact hours of participation in an organized Continuing Education class. ADMISSION ELIGIBILITY Admission is open to individuals who are at least 18 years-old and who are not enrolled in public school. Sixteen- to 18-year-olds may enroll in some courses, when space is available and pending proper permission. Students under 18 years of age may enroll in summer classes designed specifically for the younger student. Only individuals officially enrolled may attend class. COST The registration fee for continuing education classes is based on the length of the course. Fees are as follows: 0-24 hours.................................................$65 25-50 hours..............................................$120 Over 51 hours..........................................$175 Some classes are contracted on a self-supporting basis and are not fee exempt for any group of individuals. Tuition shall also be waived for up to 96 contact hours of non-credit instruction, occupational, per academic semester for senior citizens age 65 or older who are qualified as legal residents of North Carolina. Academic semesters are defined consistent with the academic periods defined by 23 NCAC 02D.0327(a)(1): Spring period: January 1- May 15; Summer period: May 16-August 15; Fall period: August 15-December 31. For the purposed of calculating the wavier, contact hours are categorized into academic semesters based on the date the course starts. (Note: This may differ from the academic semester for which the contact hours are reported.) Other Fees: Computer Use and Technology Fee (per Occupational computer class) $5 per class. Public Safety classes are fee exempt. COURSE REPETITION Effective Sept. 1, 1993, the North Carolina Community College System established a Course Repetition Policy requiring students, including senior citizens, who take occupational extension courses more than twice within a five-year period, to pay the full cost of the course. This provision is waived if course repetition is required by standards governing the certification or licensing program in which the student is enrolled; therefore, EMS, fire, law enforcement and

 CONTINUING EDUCATION rescue personnel are exempt from the repetition policy as long as classes taken are job-related and subject to the certification or licensing provisions. Students may enroll in community service courses as many times as necessary to accomplish their individual educational/training goals, provided they continue to show progress, do not prohibit others from participating, are willing to pay fees and do not violate policies of the North Carolina Community College System. COMPUTER TRAINING A variety of prescheduled and customized computer courses are available in both basic computer literacy and advanced topics. For additional information, visit www.southwesterncc.edu. COMMUNITY SERVICE Through this program, SCC conducts single courses, each complete in itself, that focus on an individual’s personal or leisure needs rather than occupational or professional employment. Topics for these non-credit courses include arts and crafts, personal enrichment, dance, language, wellness, patient education, plus many more. Many courses are developed after requests from the community. HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONS TRAINING The College provides training for Nurse Aide I, Nurse Aide II, Nurse Aide I Refresher and for Medication Aide. Upon successful completion of the Nurse Aide I program, graduates are eligible to sit for the State Competency exams. Upon successfully passing the exam, they can work under the direction of a licensed RN performing basic nursing techniques for clients who are sick or who have chronic health problems. The Medication Aide program covers the six rights of medication administration of nonlicensed personnel. Upon completion, students should be able to take the competency exam and demonstrate skills necessary to qualify for listing on the North Carolina Medication Aide Registry. Students entering this program must be on the Nurse Aide Registry and have a current CPR certification. HERITAGE ARTS In response to the vision created by the Swain County Blue Ridge National Heritage Committee, Southwestern Community College partnered with the Swain County Economic Development Committee to develop a multi-phase implementation plan for a “crafts education center.” The Master Potter Certificate program is currently available at the SCC Swain Center. Courses: • Clay – Beginning Wheel, Intermediate Wheel, Handbuilding, Lidded Vessels, Joined Vessels, Distorted Vessel, Special Topics • Ceramic Surfaces – Altering, Liquid Clays, Glaze Fabrication, Brushing, Trailing and Soft Stamps, Spraying • Firing – Beginning Raku, Advanced Raku, Horsehair & Pit Firing, Wood Firing, Salt/Soda Firing • Pottery Tool Making • Clay Design – Special Studies • Clay Business – Festival Planning, Execution and Participation, REAL, The Business of Art Seminars.

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CONTINUING EDUCATION ONLINE PROGRAMS Over 300 online continuing education courses are offered monthly. These include internet, webpage design, web graphics and multi-media, web and computer programming, basic computer literacy, computer applications, graphic design, computer troubleshooting and networking, database management, languages, writing and publishing, grant writing and non-profit management, start your own business, sales and marketing, accounting, business administration, and much more. For additional information or to register for a class, visit the website at www.ed2go.com/scc or visit www.southwesterncc.edu. PROFESSIONAL LICENSURE AND CERTIFICATION Training offered in this area serves individuals preparing to take state licensing exams and professionals seeking to renew their current North Carolina license or certification. Groups served by this training include Real Estate Brokers, Real Estate Appraisers, Code Enforcement Officials, General Contractors, Electrical Contractors, Plumbing Contractors, Cosmetologists, Independent Auto Dealers, NC Auto Safety Inspection Mechanics, Tanning Bed Operators, Licensed Structural Pest Control Operators and Notary Public. PUBLIC SAFETY TRAINING Emergency Medical Services Training The EMS Continuing Education Department program currently offers classes that introduce new students to the world of emergency medical care through Basic Life Support Education. Completion of the Medical Responder and Emergency Medical Technician - Basic class will prepare the student for examination by the State of North Carolina for official certification. Once certified by the state, students will be prepared to fill the role of a basic medical responder on a Transport Unit or in a Fire Department as a first responder. This department also offers a wide variety of classes geared to the Advanced Life Support Programs in the area. From initial introduction to Advanced Life Support in an Intermediate EMT class to developing classes for the ever-changing profession of Emergency Medical Science, Southwestern Community College has what you need to enhance your performance in the field. Classes are offered at all SCC locations and at various times throughout the year. Please refer to the Continuing Education handout for a list of classes currently being offered. In order to ensure a place in class, you must preregister. Fire and Rescue Services Training Various courses are offered in cooperation with individual fire and rescue departments in the service area. Specific courses are designed to increase the firefighter’s and rescuer’s technical knowledge and improve his or her skills in fire ground operation. Classes may be offered according to the needs of each department. In addition, SCC offers the nationally-recognized firefighter certification program and the rescue certification program. The training curriculum is based on the 1992 edition of NFPA 1001 which was adopted by the North Carolina Fire and Rescue Commission in July 1993 and implemented in January 1994. The College also offers training to prepare individuals to work as a Wildland Firefigher. The Fire and Rescue Training Facility is located adjacent to the Public Safety Training Complex. This 4,100 square-foot, three-story live burn building is designated for a variety of training exercises. Both fire and smoke exercises can be conducted in and on the structure and rescue operations can be simulated throughout the building. SCC will coordinate training for firefighters and rescue personnel in the region and will be responsible for the scheduling of this facility.

 CONTINUING EDUCATION Law Enforcement Training Southwestern Community College provides the North Carolina Basic Law Enforcement Training program mandated by the NC Criminal Justice Education and Training Standards Commission and by the NC Sheriff ’s Education and Training Standards Commission. This program will provide the student with the knowledge and minimum requirements needed for certification by the Criminal Justice Commission and/or the Sheriff ’s Commission. The college also offers in-service and advanced speciality training to law enforcement agencies. In addition, a basic training program designed to prepare Seasonal Park Rangers to perform law enforcement in areas administered by the National Park Service is offered. Classes meet for a ten-week period from 8 a.m. until 6 p.m. Monday through Friday with some evening and Saturday sessions. Graduates of the program are eligible to receive a type II law enforcement commission as a Seasonal Ranger with the National Park Service at one of the more than 300 parks, monuments and other facilities of the Park Service in the contiguous 48 states, Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and Guam. The college offers the N.C. Detention Officer Certification program mandated by the North Carolina Sheriff ’s Education and Training Standards Commission. Other state certification programs offered include: General Instructor Training, Telecommunicator Training, Radar Training, Standardized Field Sobriety and others. Also offered are training programs which lead to the following professional certification programs: Law Enforcement Officers’ Professional Certification Program: • Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Certification Criminal Justice Officers’ Professional Certification Program: • Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Certification Professional Certificate Program for Sheriffs and Deputy Sheriffs: • Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Certification Professional Certificate Program for Detention Officers: • Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Certification To be eligible for one or more of the above programs, entry level qualifications must first be met. Awards are based on a formula, combining formal education, training and actual experience as an officer/professional in the field. Certification is awarded by the N.C. Criminal Justice Education and Training Standards Commission or the N.C. Sheriff ’s Education and Training Standards Commission. Various specialized law enforcement courses are conducted in the area served by Southwestern Community College including: communications, courtroom procedures, criminal investigation, criminal law and procedure, defensive tactics, firearms training, first aid, detention and narcotics and dangerous drugs. See the SCC, Education Programs, PSTC, website for additional information and schedules of training at www.southwesterncc.edu/pubsafety/index.htm. TEACHER CERTIFICATE RENEWAL In addition to effective teacher training, mentor training and performance evaluation, a number of courses are offered for public education teachers to meet their continuing education needs.

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CONTINUING EDUCATION REFUND POLICY Registration fee refunds are granted only under the following circumstances: • For classes that are scheduled to meet four times or less, a 75 percent refund shall be made upon the request of the student if the student officially withdraws from the class(es) prior to or on the first day of class(es). • For classes that are scheduled to meet five or more times, a 75 percent refund shall be made upon the request of the student if the student officially withdraws from the class(es) prior to or on the official 10 percent point of the class(es). Requests for refunds will not be considered after the 10 percent point. For contact hour classes, refunds must be requested within 10 calendar days from the first day of class. Self-supporting classes are not eligible for refunds.



PRE-REGISTRATION/ENROLLMENT Pre-registration is essential on or before the date designated on course announcements or quarterly schedules. Students may preregister by calling the closest continuing education office: Jackson Campus....................................................................................................................... 828.339.4426 800.447.4091, ext. 4426 FAX: 828.339.4495 Macon Annex............................................................................................................................828.306.7034 FAX: 828.349.2603 Jerry Sutton Public Safety Training Center.........................................................................828.306.7041 FAX: 828.369.2428 Swain Center ........................................................................................................................... 828.366.2000 FAX: 828.488.2982

BUSINESS & INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT CUSTOMIZED TRAINING & THE SMALL BUSINESS CENTER Customized Training The Customized Training Program of the Southwestern Community College supports the economic development efforts of Jackson, Macon and Swain Counties and the Qualla Boundary by providing education and training opportunities for eligible industries. Amended in 2008, this new program integrates the New and Expanding Industry Training Program, the former Focused Industry Training Program, and the Customized Industry Training Program to more effectively respond to business and industry needs. The Customized Training Program offers programs and training services to assist new and existing business and industry to remain productive, profitable, and within the State. The program was developed in recognition of the fact that one of the most important factors for a business or industry considering locating, expanding, or remaining in North Carolina is the ability of the State to ensure the presence of a well-trained workforce. The program is designed to react quickly to the needs of businesses and to respect the confidential nature of proprietary processes and information within those businesses. Small Business Center The Small Business Center Network, comprised of 58 Small Business Centers throughout North Carolina, supports the development of new businesses and the growth of existing businesses by being a community-based provider of training, counseling, and resource information. Confidential counseling services and access to resource libraries are free of charge. Services provided by the Small Business Center Network can be customized to suit your specific business needs. The Small Business Center also offer FREE seminars in the spring and fall and can be accessed here; www.southwesterncc.edu/economic-development/small-business-center

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VALUES FOR TEACHING EXCELLENCE

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“Learning comes first at Southwestern Community College. Our ranking as one of the Top 10 Community Colleges in the nation is based on our students’ engagement in activities that lead to learning and success in college. Those activities include active and collaborative learning, the effort students put into their classes, the level of challenge of the academic work, the interactions between students and instructors, and the support we provide for learners. The quality of those experiences reflects the dedication of our faculty and staff to the pursuit of excellence in teaching and learning. You will find a unique connection between instructors and students at SCC; they care about your success. So it comes as no surprise that our instructors have described what they value in excellent teaching. These values underscore our commitment to students and serve as reminders of what you can expect in your classes at SCC.” Thom Brooks SCC Vice President for Instruction and Student Services

Values for Teaching Excellence •

Inspires students to become independent learners



Promotes the development of critical‑thinking skills



Respects each student as an individual



Fosters a sense of cooperation and community in and out of the classroom







Recognizes the use of technology to enhance the teaching‑learning process











• Engages students in learning for practical use and personal growth •

Provides an innovative and accessible educational experience



Demonstrates an excitement about teaching and learning



Maintains high standards in a caring, supportive environment

“A teacher affects eternity; he can never tell where his influence stops.” Henry Brooks Adams

KEYS FOR CLASSROOM SUCCESS

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KEYS FOR CLASSROOM SUCCESS Students demonstrate engagement in the learning process. To demonstrate engagement in the learning process, students should: • Take personal responsibility for and be actively involved in the learning process • Be present and prepared for class • Bring appropriate materials to class • Complete assignments on time • Be attentive and participate in all class activities • Engage and collaborate with peers through study groups and the sharing of personal contact information • Ask questions when appropriate • Ask for help when needed Students demonstrate appropriate attendance and punctuality. To demonstrate appropriate attendance and punctuality, students should: • Attend all meetings of each class • Be on time and ready to work • Remain in class for the duration of the period, except in cases of emergency or approved class breaks • Know and adhere to instructors’ attendance policies Students demonstrate respect for self and others in the learning environment. To demonstrate respect for self and others, students should: • Demonstrate respect for instructors and classmates by talking when appropriate • Keep discussions relevant to class material • Demonstrate appropriate classroom etiquette • Observe college and classroom policies regarding cell phone use, smoking, parking, eating, etc. • Turn off all personal communication devices, unless appropriate to the class activities or approved by the instructor • Respect classroom equipment

















Students demonstrate responsibility, accountability, and professionalism. To demonstrate responsibility, accountability, and professionalism, students should: • Focus on learning • Demonstrate ethical behavior • Demonstrate self-motivation • Treat the classroom like a job • Not obsess about grades • Know and follow the SCC student • Do their own work code of conduct • Keep an open mind • Use good personal hygiene • Meet class deadlines • Dress appropriately Students demonstrate effective use of learning resources. To demonstrate effective use of learning resources, students should access the following as needed: • Class Instructor • Learning Assistance Center (LAC) • Smarthinking.com • Tutoring • Library • Workshops • Advisor • Peers • Web Resources

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WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM Goal of the Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) QEP: To improve and reinforce student writing skills across the curriculum through a two-fold approach: support of student writing using in-class workshops and support of faculty development through training sessions. The WAC Coordinator offers student workshops on effective writing strategies including: • Gathering, organizing, and evaluating materials for research-based papers and projects • Paraphrasing, summarizing, and using direct quotations • Citing sources in MLA, APA, and Chicago Style formats • Plagiarism prevention • Grammar and mechanics • Editing and proofreading • Vocabulary building and spelling • College writing for ESL students • Effectively using the LAC and/or Smarthinking Our faculty members are the heart of the culture of writing at SCC. Each fall, the WAC program welcomes a new cohort of faculty members in a one-day seminar on the effective use of writing in the classroom. For more information visit www.southwesterncc.edu/WAC or call 828.339.4264.

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ACADEMIC PROGRAMS OF STUDY • Program Titles • Programs of Study • Program/Course Key • Performance Measures and Standards

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PROGRAM TITLES Accounting - A25100, C25100, C25100CP*-------------------------------------------- AAS, Certificate Advertising & Graphic Design - A30100---------------------------------------------------------------- AAS Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration Technology - C35100, C35100CP*------- Certificate Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration Technology - D35100-------------------------- Diploma Associate in Arts - College Transfer - A10100, A10100EC*, D10100----------------- AA, Diploma Associate in Fine Arts - A10200----------------------------------------------------------------------------AFA Associate in General Education - A10300--------------------------------------------------------------- AGE Associate in Science - A10400, A10400EC----------------------------------------------------------------AS Automotive Systems Technology - A60160, C60160, C60160CP*---------------- AAS, Certificate Automotive Systems Technology - D60160-------------------------------------------------------- Diploma Business Administration - A25120, C25120, C25120CP*--------------------------- AAS, Certificate Business Administration - Electronic Commerce - A2512I, C2512I, C2512ICP*--- AAS, Certificate Business Administration - Entrepreneurship - A25120ET------------------------------------------- AAS Business Administration - Office Administration - A25120OA, C25370, C25370CP*----AAS, Certificate Civil Engineering Technology - A40140----------------------------------------------------------------- AAS College Transfer Pathway - Business & Economics - P1012B*---------------------------------- Pathway College Transfer Pathway - Engineering & Mathematics - P1042B*--------------------------- Pathway College Transfer Pathway - Humanities & Social Sciences - P1012A*------------------------ Pathway College Transfer Pathway - Life & Health Sciences - P1042A*--------------------------------- Pathway Computer Engineering Technology - A40160---------------------------------------------------------- AAS Computer Information Technology - A25260, C25260, C25260CP*------------- AAS, Certificate Computer Information Technology - Networking - A25260N ------------------------------------ AAS Cosmetology - A55140, D55140, C55140, C55140CP*---------------- AAS, Diploma, Certificate Criminal Justice Technology - A55180------------------------------------------------------------------- AAS Criminal Justice Technology/Latent Evidence - A5518A, C5518A---------------- AAS, Certificate Culinary Arts - A55150, C55150, C55150CP*----------------------------------------- AAS, Certificate Cyber Crime Technology - A55210----------------------------------------------------------------------- AAS Early Childhood Education - A55220, C55220, C55220CP*----------------------- AAS, Certificate Electrical/Electronics Technology - D35220, C35220, C35220CP*---------- Diploma, Certificate Electronics Engineering Technology - A40200--------------------------------------------------------- AAS Emergency Medical Science - A45340, D45340, C45340, C45340CP*-------------AAS, Diploma Environmental Science Technology - A20140---------------------------------------------------------- AAS General Occupational Technology - A55280----------------------------------------------------------- AAS Health Informatics - C453601---------------------------------------------------------------------- Certificate Health Information Technology - A45360-------------------------------------------------------------- AAS Health Information Technology/Medical Coding - D45360---------------------------------- Diploma Human Services Technology - A45380------------------------------------------------------------------- AAS Human Services Technology/Substance Abuse Concentration - A4538E --------------------------------- AAS Human Services Technology/Substance Abuse Concentration - C4538E, C4538E1 -----------Certificate Infant/Toddler Care - C55290---------------------------------------------------------------------- Certificate Manicuring/Nail Technology - C55400---------------------------------------------------------- Certificate Medical Assisting - A45400, C45400, C45400CP*--------------------------------------------------- AAS Medical Laboratory Technology - A45420-------------------------------------------------------------- AAS Medical Office Administration - A25310---------------------------------------------------------------- AAS

PROGRAM TITLES Medical Sonography - A45440----------------------------------------------------------------------------- AAS Networking Technology/CISCO Certificate - C25340C, C25340CP*------------------ Certificate Nursing - Associate Degree - A45110--------------------------------------------------------------------- AAS Nursing Assistant - C45480, C45480CP*-------------------------------------------------------- Certificate Occupational Education Associate - A55320, D55320 , C55320------ AAS, Diploma, Certificate Occupational Therapy Assistant - A45500-------------------------------------------------------------- AAS Outdoor Leadership - A55330, C55330-------------------------------------------------- AAS, Certificate Outdoor Leadership - Wilderness Emergency Medicine - C553302----------------------- Certificate Outdoor Leadership - Wilderness Therapy - C553301--------------------------------------- Certificate Paralegal Technology - A25380---------------------------------------------------------------------------- AAS Phlebotomy - C45600--------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Certificate Physical Therapist Assistant - A45620-------------------------------------------------------------------- AAS Pre-Major Business Administration, Accounting, Economics, Finance & Marketing - A1010B---------------------------------------------------------------------------- AA Pre-Major Criminal Justice - A1010D---------------------------------------------------------------------- AA Pre-Major Elementary Education - A1010R-------------------------------------------------------------- AA Pre-Major English Education - A1010F-------------------------------------------------------------------- AA Pre-Major History - A1010H-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- AA Pre-Major Middle Grades Education - A1011A--------------------------------------------------------- AA Pre-Major Nursing - A1010I---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- AA Pre-Major Physical Education - A1010J-------------------------------------------------------------------- AA Pre-Major Political Science - A1010K---------------------------------------------------------------------- AA Pre-Major Psychology - A1010L----------------------------------------------------------------------------- AA Pre-Major Social Science Secondary Education - A1010M-------------------------------------------- AA Pre-Major Sociology - A1010N------------------------------------------------------------------------------ AA Pre-Major Special Education - A1010Z-------------------------------------------------------------------- AA Radiography - A45700--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- AAS Real Estate Licensing - C25480--------------------------------------------------------------------- Certificate Respiratory Therapy - A45720----------------------------------------------------------------------------- AAS School Age Education - A55440, C55440, C55440CP*------------------------------ AAS, Certificate Therapeutic Massage - D45750----------------------------------------------------------------------- Diploma Trades: Carpentry - D35180, C35180*------------------------------------------------------ Diploma, Certificate Welding Technology - C50420, C50420CP*------------------------------------------------- Certificate Web Technologies - A25290-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- AAS Web Technologies/Web Design - C25290D, C25290DP*----------------------------------- Certificate Web Technologies/Mobile Development - C25290M----------------------------------------- Certificate * This certificate or pathway is offered to high school students through the Career & College Promise initiative. Please refer to page 19 for additional information. These programs are offered at various times during the day, evening, online and/or weekend. Check with your advisor about scheduling options. NOTE: SCC reserves the right to revise programs of study as necessary. All changes will be updated on our website.

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ACCOUNTING

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The Accounting curriculum is designed to provide students with the knowledge and the skills necessary for employment and growth in the accounting profession. Using the “language of business,” accountants assemble and analyze, process, and communicate essential information about financial operations. In addition to course work in accounting principles, theories, and practice, students will study business law, finance, management, and economics. Related skills are developed through the study of communications, computer applications, financial analysis, critical thinking skills, and ethics. Graduates should qualify for entry-level accounting positions in many types of organizations including accounting firms, small businesses, manufacturing firms, banks, hospitals, school systems, and governmental agencies. With work experience and additional education, an individual may advance in the accounting profession. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A25100 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 ACC 120 Principles of Financial Accounting 3 2 0 4 BUS 110 Introduction to Business 3 0 0 3 CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 Choose one of the following: MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics 3 0 0 3 MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab 0 2 0 1 or MAT 151 Statistics MAT 151A Statistics Lab Totals

3 0 0 3 0 2 0 1 15 6 0 18

SPRING SEMESTER 1 ACC 121 Principles of Managerial Accounting 3 2 0 4 ACC 150 Accounting Software Applications 1 2 0 2 CTS 130 Spreadsheet 2 2 0 3 ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting 3 0 0 3 Choose one of the following: ECO 151 Survey of Economics 3 0 0 3 ECO 251 Principles of Microeconomics 3 0 0 3 ECO 252 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 0 0 3 Totals 12 6 0 15 SUMMER SEMESTER *** *** Humanities Elective *** *** Social Science Elective BUS 230 Small Business Management Totals FALL SEMESTER 2 ACC 129 Individual Income Taxes ACC 220 Intermediate Accounting I ACC 240 Gov. & Not-for-Profit Accounting BUS 115 Business Law I BUS 260 Business Communication Totals

3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 9 0 0 9 2 2 0 3 3 2 0 4 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 14 4 0 16

ACCOUNTING SPRING SEMESTER 2 ACC 225 Cost Accounting ACC 227 Practices in Accounting BUS 270 Professional Development MKT 120 Principles of Marketing Totals

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3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 12 0 0 12

Total Semester Hour Credits: 70 CERTIFICATE C25100 & C25100CP* Gainful Employment Compliance Information - For more information about SCC’s graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this program, and other important information, please visit the program’s webpage for the latest information at: http://www.southwesterncc.edu/program/accounting-certificate Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACC 120 Principles of Financial Accounting 3 2 0 4 ACC 121 Principles of Managerial Accounting 3 2 0 4 ACC 129 Individual Income Taxes 2 2 0 3 ACC 150 Accounting Software Applications 1 2 0 2 CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 Totals 11 10 0 16 Total Semester Hour Credits: 16 * This certificate or pathway is offered to high school students through the Career & College Promise initiative. Please refer to page 19 for additional information. FACULTY Diania McRae, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4275 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4275

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ADVERTISING & GRAPHIC DESIGN The Advertising and Graphic Design curriculum is designed to provide students with knowledge and skills necessary for employment in the graphic design profession which emphasizes design, advertising, illustration, and digital and multimedia preparation of printed and electronic promotional materials. Students will be trained in the development of concept and design for promotional materials such as newspaper and magazine advertisements, posters, folders, letterheads, corporate symbols, brochures, booklets, preparation of art for printing, lettering and typography, photography, and electronic media. Graduates should qualify for employment opportunities with graphic design studios, advertising agencies, printing companies, department stores, a wide variety of manufacturing industries, newspapers, and businesses with in-house graphics operations. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A30100 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit HRD 3003 College Student Success 0 0 0 0 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 GRD 121 Drawing Fundamentals I 1 3 0 2 GRD 141 Graphic Design I 2 4 0 4 GRD 145 Design Applications I 0 3 0 1 GRD 151 Computer Design Basics 1 4 0 3 *** *** Humanities Elective 3 0 0 3 Totals 10 14 0 16 SPRING SEMESTER 1 ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting GRD 110 Typography I GRD 142 Graphic Design II GRD 152 Computer Design Tech I GRD 230 Technical Illustration Totals SUMMER SEMESTER GRD 167 Photographic Imaging I PSY 150 General Psychology Choose one of the following: MAT 115 Mathematical Models or MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab Totals

3 0 0 3 2 2 0 3 2 4 0 4 1 4 0 3 1 3 0 2 9 13 0 15 1 4 0 3 3 0 0 3 2 2 0 3 0 2 0 1 3 0 0 3 6-8 6 0 9-10

ADVERTISING & GRAPHIC DESIGN FALL SEMESTER 2 GRA 121 Graphic Arts I GRD 131 Illustration I GRD 153 Computer Design Tech II GRD 241 Graphic Design III GRD 281 Design of Advertising Choose one of the following: ART 264 Digital Photography I GRD 168 Photographic Imaging II Totals

2 4 0 4 1 3 0 2 1 4 0 3 2 4 0 4 2 0 0 2 1 4 0 3 1 4 0 3 9 19 0 18

SPRING SEMESTER 2 GRA 220 Industry Survey 1 2 0 2 GRD 210 Airbrush I 1 2 0 2 GRD 242 Graphic Design IV 2 4 0 4 GRD 247 Design Applications IV 0 3 0 1 GRD 280 Portfolio Design 2 4 0 4 Choose one of the following: MKT 123 Fundamentals of Selling 3 0 0 3 WEB 120 Introduction to Internet Multimedia 2 2 0 3 Choose one of the following: COE 111 Co-op Work Experience 1 0 0 10 1 GRD 146 Design Applications II 0 3 0 1 Totals 8-9 15-20 0-10 17 Total Semester Hour Credits: 75 FACULTY Robert Keeling, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4317 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4317 Scott Clontz [email protected] 828.339.4233 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4233

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AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIG. TECHNOLOGY The Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Technology curriculum provides the basic knowledge to develop skills necessary to work with residential and light commercial systems. Topics include mechanical refrigeration, heating and cooling theory, electricity, controls, and safety. The diploma program covers air conditioning, furnaces, heat pumps, tools and instruments. In addition, the AAS degree covers residential building codes, residential system sizing, and advanced comfort systems. Diploma graduates should be able to assist in the start up, preventive maintenance, service, repair, and/or installation of residential and light commercial systems. AAS degree graduates should be able to demonstrate an understanding of system selection and balance and advanced systems. DIPLOMA D35100 Gainful Employment Compliance Information - For more information about SCC’s graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this program, and other important information, please visit the program’s webpage for the latest information at: http://www.southwesterncc.edu/program/air-conditioning-heating-refrigeration-diploma REQUIRED COURSES: Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit AHR 110 Intro to Refrigeration 2 6 0 5 AHR 112 Heating Technology 2 4 0 4 AHR 113 Comfort Cooling 2 4 0 4 AHR 114 Heat Pump Technology 2 4 0 4 AHR 120 HVACR Maintenance 1 0 3 2 AHR 210 Residential Building Code 1 2 0 2 AHR 211 Residential System Design 2 2 0 3 ELC 111 Intro to Electricity 2 2 0 3 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 MAT 101 Applied Mathematics I 2 2 0 3 Totals 19 26 3 33 CHOOSE 6 CREDITS FROM THE FOLLOWING COURSES: AHR 212 Advanced Comfort Systems 2 6 0 4 CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 CIS 111 Basic PC Literacy 1 2 0 2 COE 111 Co-op Work Experience I 0 0 10 1 COE 112 Co-op Work Experience I 0 0 20 2 COE 114 Co-op Work Experience I 0 0 40 4 ELC 112 DC/AC Electricity 3 6 0 5 MAT 115 Mathematical Models 2 2 0 3 WLD 110 Cutting Processes 1 3 0 2 WLD 111 Oxy-Fuel Welding 1 3 0 2 Total Semester Hour Credits: 39

AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIG. TECHNOLOGY CERTIFICATE C35100 & C35100CP* FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title AHR 110 Intro to Refrigeration AHR 120 HVACR Maintenance ELC 111 Intro to Electricity Totals SPRING SEMESTER 1 AHR 112 Heating Technology AHR 113 Comfort Cooling Totals

Class Lab Clinical Credit 2 6 0 5 1 0 3 2 2 2 0 3 5 8 3 10 2 4 0 4 2 4 0 4 4 8 0 8

Total Semester Hour Credits: 18 * This certificate or pathway is offered to high school students through the Career & College Promise initiative. Please refer to page 19 for additional information. ADVISOR Scott Baker [email protected] 828.339.4249 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4249

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ASSOCIATE IN ARTS - COLLEGE TRANSFER Through an agreement with the University of North Carolina system, SCC students can earn up to 65 hours worth of credit that will transfer to any public university and 50 private colleges in the state. There are two structured transfer options: completion of the Associate in Arts degree ensures students’ transfer with junior status into most majors; completion of the 44-hour general education core ensures transfer with sophomore status at the university. Students should become familiar with the entrance and program requirements at the university they plan to transfer to in order to guide their course selections at SCC. Students who wish to transfer before completing the AA degree or the 44-hour core should consult closely with the receiving institutions for course-by-course equivalencies. ASSOCIATE IN ARTS (AA) A10100 & A10100EC* COURSE AND HOUR REQUIREMENTS English/Composition............................................................................................. 6 Humanities/Fine Arts...........................................................................................12 Social/Behavioral Science.....................................................................................12 Natural Science......................................................................................................... 8 Mathematics.............................................................................................................. 6 Physical Education/Health.................................................................................... 3 Other Required Hours..........................................................................................18 TOTAL....................................................................................................................65 * This degree is offered to high school students through the Career & College Promise initiative. Please refer to page 19 for additional information. ENGLISH/COMPOSITION - Six Semester Hour Credits required Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 Choose one of the following: ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 0 0 3 ENG 113 Literature-Based Research 3 0 0 3 ENG 114 Professional Research & Reporting 3 0 0 3 HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS - Twelve Semester Hour Credits required Choose at least one Literature course ENG 131 Introduction to Literature 3 0 0 3 ENG 231 American Literature I 3 0 0 3 ENG 232 American Literature II 3 0 0 3 ENG 241 British Literature I 3 0 0 3 ENG 242 British Literature II 3 0 0 3 ENG 251 Western World Literature I 3 0 0 3 ENG 252 Western World Literature II 3 0 0 3 Choose from at least two different discipline areas - 9 hours ART 111 Art Appreciation 3 0 0 3 ART 114 Art History Survey I 3 0 0 3 ART 115 Art History Survey II 3 0 0 3 COM 110* Introduction to Communication 3 0 0 3 COM 140 Intro. to Intercultural Communication 3 0 0 3 COM 231* Public Speaking 3 0 0 3 FRE 111 Elementary French I 3 0 0 3 FRE 112 Elementary French II 3 0 0 3 HUM 110 Technology and Society 3 0 0 3 HUM 115 Critical Thinking 3 0 0 3 HUM 120 Cultural Studies 3 0 0 3 HUM 121 The Nature of America 3 0 0 3

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Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit HUM 122 Southern Culture 3 0 0 3 HUM 130 Myth in Human Culture 3 0 0 3 HUM 150 American Women Studies 3 0 0 3 HUM 160 Introduction to Film 2 2 0 3 MUS 110 Music Appreciation 3 0 0 3 PHI 210 History of Philosophy 3 0 0 3 REL 111 Eastern Religions 3 0 0 3 REL 112 Western Religions 3 0 0 3 REL 211 Introduction to Old Testament 3 0 0 3 REL 212 Introduction to New Testament 3 0 0 3 SPA 111 Elementary Spanish I 3 0 0 3 SPA 112 Elementary Spanish II 3 0 0 3 SPA 211 Intermediate Spanish I 3 0 0 3 SPA 212 Intermediate Spanish II 3 0 0 3 * Students may not apply both COM 110 and COM 231 toward completion of Arts & Sciences requirements.

SOCIAL/BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE - Twelve Semester Hour Credits required Choose at least one History course HIS 111 World Civilizations I 3 0 0 3 HIS 112 World Civilizations II 3 0 0 3 HIS 115 Introduction to Global History 3 0 0 3 HIS 121 Western Civilization I 3 0 0 3 HIS 122 Western Civilization II 3 0 0 3 HIS 131 American History I 3 0 0 3 HIS 132 American History II 3 0 0 3 Choose from at least two different discipline areas - 9 hours ANT 210 General Anthropology ANT 220 Cultural Anthropology ANT 221 Comparative Cultures ECO 151 Survey of Economics ECO 251 Prin. of Microeconomics ECO 252 Prin. of Macroeconomics GEO 111 World Regional Geography GEO 112 Cultural Geography POL 120 American Government PSY 150 General Psychology PSY 237 Social Psychology PSY 241 Developmental Psych PSY 281 Abnormal Psychology SOC 210 Introduction to Sociology SOC 213 Sociology of the Family SOC 220 Social Problems SOC 225 Social Diversity

3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3

NATURAL SCIENCE - Eight Semester Hour Credits required BIO 110* Principles of Biology 3 3 0 4 BIO 111* General Biology I 3 3 0 4 BIO 112 General Biology II 3 3 0 4 BIO 120 Introductory Botany 3 3 0 4 BIO 130 Introductory Zoology 3 3 0 4 BIO 140 Environmental Biology 3 0 0 3 BIO 140A Environ. Biology Lab 0 3 0 1 CHM 131 Intro. to Chemistry 3 0 0 3 CHM 131A Intro. to Chemistry Lab 0 3 0 1 CHM 132 Organic & Biochemistry 3 3 0 4 CHM 151 General Chemistry I 3 3 0 4 CHM 152 General Chemistry II 3 3 0 4

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ASSOCIATE IN ARTS - COLLEGE TRANSFER Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical PHY 110 Conceptual Physics 3 0 0 PHY 110A Conceptual Physics Lab 0 2 0 PHY 151 College Physics I 3 2 0 PHY 152 College Physics II 3 2 0 PHY 251 General Physics I 3 3 0 PHY 252 General Physics II 3 3 0 *Students may not apply both BIO 110 and BIO 111 toward completion of Arts and Sciences requirements. MATHEMATICS - Six Semester Hour Credits required MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics MAT 141 Mathematical Concepts I MAT 142 Mathematical Concepts II MAT 151 Statistics I MAT 161 College Algebra MAT 162 College Trigonometry MAT 165 Finite Mathematics MAT 171 Precalculus Algebra MAT 172 Precalculus Trigonometry MAT 175 Precalculus MAT 271 Calculus I MAT 272 Calculus II MAT 273 Calculus III

Credit 3 1 4 4 4 4

3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 4 0 0 4 3 2 0 4 3 2 0 4 3 2 0 4

PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH - Choose Three Semester Hour Credits HEA 110 Personal Health/Wellness 3 0 0 3 PED 110 Fit and Well for Life 1 2 0 2 PED 111 Physical Fitness I 0 3 0 1 PED 117 Weight Training I 0 3 0 1 PED 118 Weight Training II 0 3 0 1 PED 120 Walking for Fitness 0 3 0 1 PED 121 Walk, Jog, Run 0 3 0 1 PED 122 Yoga I 0 2 0 1 PED 123 Yoga II 0 2 0 1 PED 125 Self-Defense-Beginning 0 2 0 1 PED 128 Golf-Beginning 0 2 0 1 PED 130 Tennis-Beginning 0 2 0 1 PED 137 Badminton 0 2 0 1 PED 139 Bowling 0 2 0 1 PED 142 Lifetime Sports 0 2 0 1 PED 143 Volleyball-Beginning 0 2 0 1 PED 145 Basketball-Beginning 0 2 0 1 PED 162 Angling 0 2 0 1 PED 163 Kayaking - Basic 0 2 0 1 PED 169 Orienteering 0 2 0 1 PED 170 Backpacking 0 2 0 1 PED 171 Nature Hiking 0 2 0 1 PED 172 Outdoor Living 1 2 0 2 PED 174 Wilderness Pursuits 0 2 0 1 PED 186 Dancing for Fitness 0 2 0 1 PED 210 Team Sports 0 3 0 1 PED 211 New Games 0 2 0 1

ASSOCIATE IN ARTS - COLLEGE TRANSFER REQUIRED Prefix Number Title ACA 111 College Student Success

Class 1

Lab Clinical Credit 0 0 1

Choose Seventeen Additional SHC Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 115 Success & Study Skills 0 2 0 1 ACA 122 College Transfer Success 1 0 0 1 ACC 120 Principles of Financial Accounting 3 2 0 4 ACC 121 Principles of Managerial Accounting 3 2 0 4 ANT 210 General Anthropology 3 0 0 3 ANT 220 Cultural Anthropology 3 0 0 3 ANT 221 Comparative Cultures 3 0 0 3 ART 111 Art Appreciation 3 0 0 3 ART 114 Art History Survey I 3 0 0 3 ART 115 Art History Survey II 3 0 0 3 ART 121 Two-Dimensional Design 0 6 0 3 ART 122 Three-Dimensional Design 0 6 0 3 ART 131 Drawing I 0 6 0 3 ART 132 Drawing II 0 6 0 3 ART 231 Printmaking I 0 6 0 3 ART 232 Printmaking II 0 6 0 3 ART 240 Painting I 0 6 0 3 ART 241 Painting II 0 6 0 3 ART 251 Weaving I 0 6 0 3 ART 252 Weaving II 0 6 0 3 ART 261 Photography I 0 6 0 3 ART 264 Digital Photography I 1 4 0 3 ART 281 Sculpture I 0 6 0 3 ART 282 Sculpture II 0 6 0 3 ART 283 Ceramics I 0 6 0 3 ART 284 Ceramics II 0 6 0 3 ART 288 Studio 0 6 0 3 BIO 110 Principles of Biology 3 3 0 4 BIO 111 General Biology I 3 3 0 4 BIO 112 General Biology II 3 3 0 4 BIO 120 Introductory Botany 3 3 0 4 BIO 130 Introductory Zoology 3 3 0 4 BIO 140 Environmental Biology 3 0 0 3 BIO 140A Environmental Biology Lab 0 3 0 1 BIO 163 Basic Anatomy & Physiology 4 2 0 5 BIO 168 Anatomy & Physiology I 3 3 0 4 BIO 169 Anatomy & Physiology II 3 3 0 4 BIO 175 General Microbiology 2 2 0 3 BIO 271 Pathophysiology 3 0 0 3 BUS 110 Introduction to Business 3 0 0 3 BUS 115 Business Law I 3 0 0 3 BUS 137 Principles of Management 3 0 0 3 CHI 111 Elementary Chinese I 3 0 0 3 CHI 112 Elementary Chinese II 3 0 0 3 CHI 181 Chinese Lab I 0 2 0 1 CHI 182 Chinese Lab II 0 2 0 1

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ASSOCIATE IN ARTS - COLLEGE TRANSFER Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit CHM 131 Introduction to Chemistry 3 0 0 3 CHM 131A Intro. to Chemistry Lab 0 3 0 1 CHM 132 Organic and Biochemistry 3 3 0 4 CHM 151 General Chemistry I 3 3 0 4 CHM 152 General Chemistry II 3 3 0 4 CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 CIS 115 Introduction to Prog. & Logic 2 3 0 3 CJC 111 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 0 0 3 CJC 121 Law Enforcements Operations 3 0 0 3 CJC 141 Corrections 3 0 0 3 COM 110 Introduction to Communication 3 0 0 3 COM 140 Intro. to Intercultural Communication 3 0 0 3 COM 231 Public Speaking 3 0 0 3 CSC 134 C++ Programming 2 3 0 3 CSC 139 Visual BASIC Programming 2 3 0 3 ECO 151 Survey of Economics 3 0 0 3 ECO 251 Principles of Microeconomics 3 0 0 3 ECO 252 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 0 0 3 EDU 216 Foundations of Education 3 2 0 4 ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 0 0 3 ENG 113 Literature-Based Research 3 0 0 3 ENG 114 Prof. Research & Reporting 3 0 0 3 ENG 125 Creative Writing I 3 0 0 3 ENG 126 Creative Writing II 3 0 0 3 ENG 131 Introduction to Literature 3 0 0 3 ENG 231 American Literature I 3 0 0 3 ENG 232 American Literature II 3 0 0 3 ENG 241 British Literature I 3 0 0 3 ENG 242 British Literature II 3 0 0 3 ENG 251 Western World Lit. I 3 0 0 3 ENG 252 Western World Lit. II 3 0 0 3 ENG 272 Southern Literature 3 0 0 3 FRE 111 Elementary French I 3 0 0 3 FRE 112 Elementary French II 3 0 0 3 FRE 211 Intermediate French I 3 0 0 3 FRE 212 Intermediate French II 3 0 0 3 GEO 111 World Regional Geography 3 0 0 3 GEO 112 Cultural Geography 3 0 0 3 HEA 110 Personal Health/Wellness 3 0 0 3 HIS 111 World Civilizations I 3 0 0 3 HIS 112 World Civilizations II 3 0 0 3 HIS 115 Introduction to Global History 3 0 0 3 HIS 121 Western Civilization I 3 0 0 3 HIS 122 Western Civilization II 3 0 0 3 HIS 131 American History I 3 0 0 3 HIS 132 American History II 3 0 0 3 HIS 145 The Second World War 3 0 0 3 HIS 233 History of Appalachia 3 0 0 3 HIS 237 The American Revolution 3 0 0 3 HIS 275 History of Terrorism 3 0 0 3 HUM 110 Technology and Society 3 0 0 3 HUM 115 Critical Thinking 3 0 0 3 HUM 120 Cultural Studies 3 0 0 3 HUM 121 The Nature of America 3 0 0 3 HUM 122 Southern Culture 3 0 0 3 HUM 130 Myth in Human Culture 3 0 0 3 HUM 150 American Women Studies 3 0 0 3 HUM 160 Introduction to Film 2 2 0 3

ASSOCIATE IN ARTS - COLLEGE TRANSFER Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit HUM 170 The Holocaust 3 0 0 3 HUM 230 Leadership Development 3 0 0 3 MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics 3 0 0 3 MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab 0 2 0 1 MAT 141 Mathematical Concepts I 3 0 0 3 MAT 142 Mathematical Concepts II 3 0 0 3 MAT 151 Statistics I 3 0 0 3 MAT 151A Statistics I Lab 0 2 0 1 MAT 161 College Algebra 3 0 0 3 MAT 161A College Algebra Lab 0 2 0 1 MAT 162 College Trigonometry 3 0 0 3 MAT 162A College Trigonometry Lab 0 2 0 1 MAT 165 Finite Mathematics 3 0 0 3 MAT 165A Finite Mathematics Lab 0 2 0 1 MAT 171 Precalculus Algebra 3 0 0 3 MAT 171A Precalculus Algebra Lab 0 2 0 1 MAT 172 Precalculus Trigonometry 3 0 0 3 MAT 172A Precalculus Trigonometry Lab 0 2 0 1 MAT 175 Precalculus 4 0 0 4 MAT 175A Precalculus Lab 0 2 0 1 MAT 271 Calculus I 3 2 0 4 MAT 272 Calculus II 3 2 0 4 MAT 273 Calculus III 3 2 0 4 MAT 280 Linear Algebra 3 0 0 3 MUS 110 Music Appreciation 3 0 0 3 PED 110* Fit and Well for Life 1 2 0 2 PED 111* Physical Fitness I 0 3 0 1 PED 117* Weight Training I 0 3 0 1 PED 118* Weight Training II 0 3 0 1 PED 120* Walking for Fitness 0 3 0 1 PED 121* Walk, Jog, Run 0 3 0 1 PED 122* Yoga I 0 2 0 1 PED 123* Yoga II 0 2 0 1 PED 125* Self-Defense-Beginning 0 2 0 1 PED 128* Golf-Beginning 0 2 0 1 PED 130* Tennis-Beginning 0 2 0 1 PED 137* Badminton 0 2 0 1 PED 139 Bowling 0 2 0 1 PED 142* Lifetime Sports 0 2 0 1 PED 143* Volleyball-Beginning 0 2 0 1 PED 145* Basketball-Beginning 0 2 0 1 PED 162* Angling 0 2 0 1 PED 163* Kayaking - Basic 0 2 0 1 PED 169* Orienteering 0 2 0 1 PED 170* Backpacking 0 2 0 1 PED 171* Nature Hiking 0 2 0 1 PED 172* Outdoor Living 1 2 0 2 PED 174* Wilderness Pursuits 0 2 0 1 PED 186* Dancing for Fitness 0 2 0 1 PED 210* Team Sports 0 3 0 1 PED 211* New Games 0 2 0 1 PHI 210 History of Philosophy 3 0 0 3 PHY 110 Conceptual Physics 3 0 0 3 PHY 110A Conceptual Physics Lab 0 2 0 1 PHY 151 College Physics I 3 2 0 4 PHY 152 College Physics II 3 2 0 4 PHY 251 General Physics I 3 3 0 4 PHY 252 General Physics II 3 3 0 4

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ASSOCIATE IN ARTS - COLLEGE TRANSFER Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit POL 120 American Government 3 0 0 3 PSY 150 General Psychology 3 0 0 3 PSY 215 Positive Psychology 3 0 0 3 PSY 237 Social Psychology 3 0 0 3 PSY 241 Developmental Psychology 3 0 0 3 PSY 259 Human Sexuality 3 0 0 3 PSY 275 Health Psychology 3 0 0 3 PSY 281 Abnormal Psychology 3 0 0 3 REL 111 Eastern Religions 3 0 0 3 REL 112 Western Religions 3 0 0 3 REL 211 Introduction to Old Testament 3 0 0 3 REL 212 Introduction to New Testament 3 0 0 3 SOC 210 Introduction to Sociology 3 0 0 3 SOC 213 Sociology of the Family 3 0 0 3 SOC 220 Social Problems 3 0 0 3 SOC 225 Social Diversity 3 0 0 3 SPA 111 Elementary Spanish I 3 0 0 3 SPA 112 Elementary Spanish II 3 0 0 3 SPA 181 Spanish Lab I 0 2 0 1 SPA 182 Spanish Lab II 0 2 0 1 SPA 211 Intermediate Spanish I 3 0 0 3 SPA 212 Intermediate Spanish II 3 0 0 3 * Limited to 2 elective credit hours The following courses can be used as electives only. They cannot be used toward the 44-hour core requirements: BIO 163, BIO 168, BIO 169, ENG 125, ENG 126, ENG 272, HIS 145, HIS 233, HIS 237, HIS 275, HUM 170, HUM 230, MAT 151A, MAT 171A, MAT 172A, MAT 175A, PSY 215, PSY 259, PSY 275, SPA 181 and SPA 182. Students can apply a maximum of two credit hours of ACA courses toward the completion of their degree. TOTAL SEMESTER HOURS: 65 NOTES If all requirements excluding electives, for the A.A. degree are met, the student has satisfied general education requirements for in-state public universities through the North Carolina Comprehensive Articulation Agreement. Consult with your advisor about courses directly applicable to your future major as you choose electives to complete the Associate in Arts degree. Be sure to consult the various pre-major degree options available through SCC. Due to similarities in program requirements, students may not earn both the AA degree and an AA pre-major. Students who can document a specific reason for earning both degrees may appeal in writing to the Dean of Arts and Sciences.

ASSOCIATE IN ARTS - COLLEGE TRANSFER TRANSFER CORE DIPLOMA D10100 Gainful Employment Compliance Information - For more information about SCC’s graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this program, and other important information, please visit the program’s webpage for the latest information at: http://www.southwesterncc.edu/program/associate-arts-college-transfer-diploma Upon completion of the 44-hour general education core, students are eligible for the Transfer Core Diploma. The diploma may assist with university transfer since it signifies that the student has completed the general education core requirements per the North Carolina Comprehensive Articulation Agreement. Some students benefit from transferring upon completion of the core diploma, while others benefit from finishing the Associate in Arts (AA) degree by adding 17 hours of transferable electives and Health/PE to the core. Consult with your SCC advisor and the university which you plan to attend regarding the best option for you. English/Composition..............................................................6 credit hours Humanities/Fine Arts........................................................... 12 credit hours (Including at least one literature course) Social/Behavioral Science..................................................... 12 credit hours (Including at least one history course) Natural Science..........................................................................8 credit hours Mathematics/Computer Science*..........................................6 credit hours Total.......................................................................................... 44 credit hours *CIS 110 is an option toward requirements in the transfer core diploma, but in the AA degree it counts as an elective. Students who pursue the AA degree are required to take two transferable math courses. FACULTY: To contact the following instructors, call 828.339.4000 in Sylva or 800.447.4091 outside the area then dial their respective extensions. Barbara Putman, Program Coordinator, ext. 4496 [email protected]

James Hippensteel, ext. 4297 [email protected]

Kenet Adamson, ext. 4322 [email protected]

B. Edward Lunsford, ext. 4351 [email protected]

Susan Cain, ext. 4226 [email protected]

Gene Norton, ext. 4215 [email protected]

Matt Cass, ext. 4384 [email protected]

Deanne Oppermann, ext. 4298 [email protected]

Tracy Chapple, ext. 4310 [email protected]

Trevor Rundle, ext. 4383 [email protected]

Chris Cox, ext. 4345 [email protected]

Hilary Seagle, ext. 4363 [email protected]

Bucky Dann, ext. 4475 [email protected]

Terry Tolle, ext. 4311 [email protected]

Owen Gibby, ext. 4314 [email protected]

J. Vance Waggener, ext. 4205 [email protected]

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ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS The Associate in Fine Arts Degree is designed for students who intend to pursue a Bachelor of Arts in an art major or a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree at a senior institution. The Associate of Fine Arts Degree Program at Southwestern Community College provides students an opportunity to experience a variety of studio topics with an emphasis on Native American art and cultural traditions. Through an agreement with the University of North Carolina system, our students can earn up to 65 hours of course credit that will transfer to any public university in the state. Therefore, students will have the option to complete the AFA degree and transfer into a Bachelor of Fine Arts or Bachelor of Arts program. Coursework in the AFA program is aligned with the general education requirements of the state system. It is advised that all students in the program become familiar with the entrance and program requirements at the college or university they plan to transfer to before completing the AFA degree. Students should consult with their advisor to assure course equivalencies and track their academic progress. ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS DEGREE (AFA) A10200 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 ANT 220 Cultural Anthropology 3 0 0 3 ART 114 Art History Survey I 3 0 0 3 ART 121 Two-Dimensional Design 0 6 0 3 ART 131 Drawing I 0 6 0 3 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 Totals 10 12 0 16 SPRING SEMESTER 1 ART 115 Art History Survey II ART 122 Three-Dimensional Design ART 251 Weaving I CIS 110 Introduction to Computers ENG 113 Literature-Based Research Totals

3 0 0 3 0 6 0 3 0 6 0 3 2 2 0 3 3 0 0 3 8 14 0 15

SUMMER SEMESTER ART 288 Studio MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics PSY 150 General Psychology Totals

0 6 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 6 6 0 9

FALL SEMESTER 2 ART 283 Ceramics I 0 6 0 3 BIO 111 General Biology I 3 3 0 4 ENG 131 Introduction to Literature 3 0 0 3 Choose one of the following: ART 231 Printmaking I 0 6 0 3 ART 240 Painting I 0 6 0 3 ART 281 Sculpture I 0 6 0 3 Totals 6 15 0 13

ASSOCIATE IN FINE ARTS SPRING SEMESTER 2 ART 252 Weaving II COM 231 Public Speaking HIS 112 World Civilizations II Choose one of the following: ART 132 Drawing II ART 232 Printmaking II ART 241 Painting II ART 282 Sculpture II ART 284 Ceramics II Totals

0 6 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 0 6 0 3 0 6 0 3 0 6 0 3 0 6 0 3 0 6 0 3 6 12 0 12

Total Semester Hour Credits: 65 FACULTY Jeffrey Marley, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.366.2005 or 800.447.4091, ext. 2005

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Brian Kane, Lead Instructor [email protected] 828.366.2006 or 800.447.4091, ext. 2006

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ASSOCIATE IN GENERAL EDUCATION The Associate in General Education curriculum is designed for the academic enrichment of students who wish to broaden their education, with emphasis on personal interest, growth and development. Course work includes study in the areas of humanities and fine arts, social and behavioral sciences, natural sciences and mathematics, and English composition. Opportunities for the achievement of competence in reading, writing, oral communication, fundamental mathematical skills, and the basic use of computers will be provided. Through these skills, students will have a sound base for lifelong learning. Graduates are prepared for advancements within their field of interest and become better qualified for a wide range of employment opportunities. ASSOCIATE IN GENERAL EDUCATION (AGE) A10300 I. GENERAL EDUCATION English – Six SHC required for AGE degree. Prefix Number Title Class Lab Credit ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 3 ENG 113 Literature-Based Research 3 0 3 ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting 3 0 3 Humanities/Fine Arts – Three SHC required for AGE degree. *** *** Humanities Elective 3 0 3 Social/Behavioral Sciences – Three SHC required for AGE degree. *** *** Social Science Elective 3

0

3

Natural Sciences/Mathematics – Three SHC required for AGE degree. Mathematics Select courses from the following discipline areas: college algebra, trigonometry, calculus, computer science, and statistics. or Natural Sciences Select courses from the following discipline areas: astronomy, biology, chemistry, earth sciences, physics, and/or general science. Total General Education Hour Credits: 15 II. OTHER REQUIRED COURSES (49-50 SHC) Other required hours include additional general education and professional courses. A maximum of 7 SHC in health, physical education, college orientation, and/or study skills may be included as other required hours. Choose one of the following: ACA 111 College Student Success ACA 120 Career Assessment Total Curriculum Major Hour Credits: 49-50 Total Semester Hour Credits: 64-65 ADVISOR Mitch Fischer, Dean of Health Sciences [email protected] 828.339.4331 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4331

1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE

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The Associate in Science degree is designed for students who plan to transfer to a university to pursue science, technology, engineering, or mathematics majors. Through the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement, the credits in the AS program will transfer to all 16 of the public universities and to 50 of the private colleges/universities in North Carolina. Students should become familiar with the admission and program requirements of the universities they plan to attend in order to guide their course selections at SCC. Students who wish to transfer before completing the AS degree should consult closely with the receiving institution for course-bycourse equivalencies. ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE (AS) A10400 English/Composition (6 SHC) Prefix Number Title ENG 111 Expository Writing ENG 113 Literature Based Research

Class 3 3

Lab Clinical 0 0 0 0

Credit 3 3

Humanities/Fine Arts (9 SHC) Choose one literature course: ENG 131 Introduction to Literature ENG 231 American Literature I ENG 232 American Literature II ENG 241 British Literature I ENG 242 British Literature II ENG 251 Western World Literature I ENG 252 Western World Literature II

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Choose two courses from two different discipline areas: ART 111 Art Appreciation ART 114 Art History Survey I ART 115 Art History Survey II COM 110* Intro to Communication COM 140 Intro to Interpersonal Comm. COM 231* Public Speaking FRE 111 Elementary French I FRE 112 Elementary French II HUM 110 Technology and Society HUM 115 Critical Thinking HUM 120 Cultural Studies HUM 121 Nature of America HUM 122 Southern Culture HUM 130 Myth in Human Culture HUM 150 American Womens Studies HUM 160 Introduction to Film PHI 210 History of Philosophy MUS 110 Music Appreciation REL 111 Eastern Religions REL 112 Western Religions REL 211 Intro to Old Testament REL 212 Intro to New Testament SPA 111 Elementary Spanish I SPA 112 Elementary Spanish II

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

*Students may not apply both COM 110 and COM 231 toward completion of Arts & Sciences requirements.

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ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE Social/Behavioral Sciences (9 SHC) Choose one history course: HIS 111 World Civilizations I HIS 112 World Civilizations II HIS 115 Intro to Global History HIS 121 Western Civilization I HIS 122 Western Civilization II HIS 131 American History I HIS 132 American History II

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Choose two courses from two different disciplines: ANT 210 General Anthropology ANT 220 Cultural Anthropology ANT 221 Comparative Cultures ECO 151 Survey of Economics ECO 251 Prin. of Microeconomics ECO 252 Prin. of Macroeconomics GEO 111 World Regional Geography GEO 112 Cultural Geography POL 120 American Government PSY 150 General Psychology PSY 237 Social Psychology PSY 241 Developmental Psychology PSY 281 Abnormal Psychology SOC 210 Introduction to Sociology SOC 213 Sociology of the Family SOC 220 Social Problems SOC 225 Social Diversity

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Natural Sciences/Mathematics (20 SHC) Natural Sciences (8 SHC minimum) Choose a two course sequence: BIO 111 General Biology I (3-3-0- 4) AND BIO 112 General Biology II (3-3-0- 4 SHC) or CHM 151 General Chemistry I (3-3- 4) AND CHM 152 General Chemistry II (3-3-4) or PHY 151 College Physics I (3-2- 4) AND PHY 152 College Physics II (3-2-4) or PHY 251 General Physics II (3-3- 4) AND PHY 252 General Physics II (3-3-4) Mathematics (6 SHC minimum) One course in mathematics at the precalculus algebra level or above is required; the other course may be higher level mathematics or may be selected from among other quantitative subjects, such as computer science and statistics. Select two: MAT 151 Statistics I 3 0 0 3 MAT 171 Precalculus Algebra 3 0 0 3 MAT 172 Precalculus Trigonometry 3 0 0 3 MAT 175 Precalculus 4 0 0 4 MAT 271 Calculus I 3 2 0 4 MAT 272 Calculus II 3 2 0 4 MAT 273 Calculus III 3 2 0 4 CIS 115 Intro to Prog & Logic 2 3 0 3

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE

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Six additional SHC must be selected from courses designated as Natural Sciences/Mathematics general education transfer courses. BIO 111 General Biology I 3 3 0 4 BIO 112 General Biology II 3 3 0 4 BIO 120 Introductory Botany 3 3 0 4 BIO 130 Introductory Zoology 3 3 0 4 BIO 140 Environmental Biology 3 0 0 3 BIO 140A Environmental Biology Lab 0 3 0 1 CHM 131 Introduction to Chemistry 3 0 0 3 CHM 131A Introduction to Chemistry Lab 0 3 0 1 CHM 132 Organic and Biochemistry 3 3 0 4 CHM 151 General Chemistry I 3 3 0 4 CHM 152 General Chemistry II 3 3 0 4 PHY 110 Conceptual Physics 3 0 0 3 PHY 110A Conceptual Physics Lab 0 2 0 1 PHY 151 College Physics I 3 2 0 4 PHY 152 College Physics II 3 2 0 4 PHY 251 General Physics I 3 3 0 4 PHY 252 General Physics II 3 3 0 4 MAT 151 Statistics I 3 0 0 3 MAT 171 Precalculus Algebra 3 0 0 3 MAT 172 Precalculus Trigonometry 3 0 0 3 MAT 175 Precalculus 4 0 0 4 MAT 271 Calculus I 3 2 0 4 MAT 272 Calculus II 3 2 0 4 MAT 273 Calculus III 3 2 0 4 Required course: ACA 111

College Student Success

1

0

0

1

Additional Electives: 20 SHC A minimum of 14 SHC of college transfer courses in mathematics, natural sciences, or computer science is required. The remaining courses may be selected from general education, pre-major or elective courses. ACC 120 Principles of Financial Accounting 3 2 0 4 ACC 121 Principles of Managerial Accounting 3 2 0 4 ANT 210 General Anthropology 3 0 0 3 ANT 220 Cultural Anthropology 3 0 0 3 ANT 221 Comparative Cultures 3 0 0 3 ART 111 Art Appreciation 3 0 0 3 ART 114 Art History Survey I 3 0 0 3 ART 115 Art History Survey II 3 0 0 3 ART 121 Two-Dimensional Design 0 6 0 3 ART 122 Three-Dimensional Design 0 6 0 3 ART 131 Drawing I 0 6 0 3 ART 132 Drawing II 0 6 0 3 ART 231 Printmaking I 0 6 0 3 ART 232 Printmaking II 0 6 0 3 ART 240 Painting I 0 6 0 3 ART 241 Painting II 0 6 0 3 ART 251 Weaving I 0 6 0 3

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ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE ART 252 Weaving II ART 261 Photography I ART 264 Digital Photography I ART 281 Sculpture I ART 282 Sculpture II ART 283 Ceramics I ART 284 Ceramics II ART 288 Studio BIO 110 Principles of Biology BIO 111 General Biology I BIO 112 General Biology II BIO 120 Introductory Botany BIO 130 Introductory Zoology BIO 140 Environmental Biology BIO 140A Environmental Biology Lab BIO 163 Basic Anatomy & Physiology BIO 168 Anatomy & Physiology I BIO 169 Anatomy & Physiology II BIO 175 General Microbiology BIO 271 Pathophysiology BUS 110 Introduction to Business BUS 115 Business Law BUS 137 Principles of Management CHI 111 Elementary Chinese I CHI 112 Elementary Chinese II CHI 181 Chinese Lab I CHI 182 Chinese Lab II CHM 131 Introduction to Chemistry CHM 131A Introduction to Chemistry Lab CHM 132 Organic and Biochemistry CHM 151 General Chemistry I CHM 152 General Chemistry II CIS 110 Introduction to Computers CIS 115 Introduction to Prog. & Logic CJC 111 Introduction to Criminal Justice CJC 121 Law Enforcement Operations CJC 141 Corrections COM 110 Introduction to Communication COM 140 Intro. to Intercultural Communication COM 231 Public Speaking CSC 134 C++ Programming CSC 139 Visual BASIC Programming ECO 151 Survey of Economics ECO 251 Principles of Microeconomics ECO 252 Principles of Macroeconomics EDU 216 Foundations of Education ENG 112 Argument Based Research ENG 114 Prof. Research & Reporting ENG 125 Creative Writing I ENG 126 Creative Writing II ENG 131 Introduction to Literature ENG 231 American Literature I ENG 232 American Literature II ENG 241 British Literature I

0 6 0 3 0 6 0 3 1 4 0 3 0 6 0 3 0 6 0 3 0 6 0 3 0 6 0 3 0 6 0 3 3 3 0 4 3 3 0 4 3 3 0 4 3 3 0 4 3 3 0 4 3 0 0 3 0 3 0 1 4 2 0 5 3 3 0 4 3 3 0 4 2 2 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 0 2 0 1 0 2 0 1 3 0 0 3 0 3 0 1 3 3 0 4 3 3 0 4 3 3 0 4 2 2 0 3 2 3 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 2 3 0 3 2 3 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 2 0 4 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE ENG ENG ENG ENG FRE FRE GEO GEO HEA HIS HIS HIS HIS HIS HIS HIS HIS HIS HIS HIS HUM HUM HUM HUM HUM HUM HUM HUM HUM MAT MAT MAT MAT MAT MAT MAT MAT MAT MAT MAT MAT MAT MAT MAT MAT MAT MAT MAT MAT MAT MAT MUS PED PED

242 251 252 272 111 112 111 112 110 111 112 115 121 122 131 132 145 233 237 275 110 115 120 121 130 150 160 170 230 140 140A 141 142 151 151A 161 161A 162 162A 165 165A 171 171A 172 172A 175 175A 271 272 273 280 110 110* 111*

British Literature II Western World Lit. I Western World Lit. II Southern Literature Elementary French I Elementary French II World Regional Geography Cultural Geography Personal Health/Wellness World Civilization I World Civilization II Introduction to Global History Western Civilization I Western Civilization II American History American History II The Second World War History of Appalachia The American Revolution History of Terrorism Technology and Society Critical Thinking Cultural Studies Southern Culture Myth in Human Culture American Women Studies Introduction to Film The Holocaust Leadership Development Survey of Mathematics Survey of Mathematics Lab Mathematical Concepts I Mathematical Concepts II Statistics I Statistics I Lab College Algebra College Algebra Lab College Trigonometry College Trigonometry Lab Finite Mathematics Finite Mathematics Lab Precalculus Algebra Precalculus Algebra Lab Precalculus Trigonometry Precalculus Trigonometry Lab Precalculus Precalculus Lab Calculus I Calculus II Calculus III Linear Algebra Music Appreciation Fit and Well for Life Physical Fitness I

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 0 3 3 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 3 0 4 0 3 3 3 3 3 1 0

95 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 2 0 2 0 2 0 2 0 2 2 2 2 0 0 2 3

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 1 4 1 4 4 4 3 3 2 1

96

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE PED 117* Weight Training PED 118* Weight Training II PED 120* Walking for Fitness PED 121* Walk, Jog, Run PED 122* Yoga I PED 123* Yoga II PED 125* Self Defense Beginning PED 128* Golf Beginning PED 130* Tennis Beginning PED 137* Badminton PED 142* Lifetime sports PED 143* Volleyball Beginning PED 145* Basketball Beginning PED 162* Angling PED 163* Kayaking Basic PED 169* Orienteering PED 170* Backpacking PED 171* Nature Hiking PED 172* Outdoor Living PED 174* Wilderness Pursuits PED 186* Dancing for Fitness PED 210* Team Sports PED 211* New Games PHI 210 History of Philosophy PHY 110 Conceptual Physics PHY 110A Conceptual Physics Lab PHY 151 College Physics I PHY 152 College Physics II PHY 251 General Physics I PHY 252 General Physics II POL 120 American Government PSY 150 General Psychology PSY 215 Positive Psychology PSY 237 Social Psychology PSY 241 Developmental Psychology PSY 259 Human Sexuality PSY 275 Health Psychology PSY 281 Abnormal Psychology REL 111 Eastern Religions REL 112 Western Religions REL 211 Introduction to Old Testament REL 212 Introduction to New Testament SOC 210 Introduction to Sociology SOC 213 Sociology of the Family SOC 220 Social Problems SOC 225 Social Diversity SPA 111 Elementary Spanish I SPA 112 Elementary Spanish II SPA 181 Spanish Lab I SPA 182 Spanish Lab II SPA 211 Intermediate Spanish I SPA 212 Intermediate Spanish II *Limited to 2 elective credit hours Total Semester Hours credit in program: 65

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 0 0 3 3

3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 2 0 0 2 2 2 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 3 3 1 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 3 3

AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY

97

Curriculums in the Mobile Equipment Maintenance and Repair pathway prepare individuals for employment as entry-level transportation service technicians. The program provides an introduction to transportation industry careers and increases student awareness of the diverse technologies associated with this dynamic and challenging field. Course work may include transportation systems theory, braking systems, climate control, design parameters, drive trains, electrical/electronic systems, engine repair, engine performance, environmental regulations, materials, product finish, safety, steering/suspension, transmission/ transaxles, and sustainable transportation, depending on the program major area chosen. Graduates of this pathway should be prepared to take professional licensure exams, which correspond to certain programs of study, and to enter careers as entry-level technicians in the transportation industry. The Automotive Systems Technology program prepares individuals to apply technical knowledge and skills to repair, service, and maintain all types of automobiles. The program includes instruction in brake systems, electrical systems, engine performance, engine repair, suspension and steering, automatic and manual transmissions and drive trains, and heating and air condition systems. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A60160 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 AUT 151 Brake Systems 2 3 0 3 AUT 151A Brake Systems Lab 0 3 0 1 TRN 110 Introduction to Automotive 1 2 0 2 TRN 120 Basic Transportation Electricity 4 3 0 5 TRN 120A Basic Transportation Electricity Lab 0 3 0 1 Totals 8 14 0 13 SPRING SEMESTER 1 AUT 141 Suspension & Steering Systems 2 3 0 3 AUT 141A Suspension & Steering Lab 0 3 0 1 CIS 111 Basic PC Literacy 1 2 0 2 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 TRN 145 Advanced Transportation Electronics 2 3 0 3 *** *** Social Science Elective 3 0 0 3 Totals 11 11 0 15 SUMMER SEMESTER AUT 181 Engine Performance I 2 3 0 3 TRN 140 Transportation Climate Control 1 2 0 2 TRN 140A Transportation Climate Control Lab 1 2 0 2 Totals 4 7 0 7 FALL SEMESTER 2 AUT 116 Engine Repair 2 3 0 3 AUT 183 Engine Performance II 2 6 0 4 AUT 231 Manual Transmissions/Axles/Drtrains 2 3 0 3 LDD 112 Introduction to Light-Duty Diesel 2 2 0 3 *** *** Humanities Elective 3 0 0 3 Totals 11 14 0 16 SPRING SEMESTER 2 AUT 212 Auto Shop Management 3 0 0 3 AUT 221 Automatic Transmissions/Transaxle 2 3 0 3 AUT 221A Automatic Transmissions/Transaxle Lab 0 3 0 1 ENG 114 Professional Research & Reporting 3 0 0 3 MAT 115 Mathematical Models 2 2 0 3 TRN 130 Intro. to Sustainable Transportation 2 2 0 3 Totals 12 10 0 16 Total Semester Hour Credits: 67

98

AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY DIPLOMA (D60160) Gainful Employment Compliance Information - For more information about SCC’s graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this program, and other important information, please visit the program’s webpage for the latest information at: http://www.southwesterncc.edu/program/automotive-systems-technology-diploma FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 AUT 151 Brake Systems 2 3 0 3 AUT 151A Brake Systems Lab 0 3 0 1 TRN 110 Introduction to Automotive 1 2 0 2 TRN 120 Basic Transportation Electricity 4 3 0 5 TRN 120A Basic Transportation Electricity Lab 0 3 0 1 Totals 8 14 0 13 SPRING SEMESTER 1 AUT 141 Suspension & Steering Systems 2 3 0 3 AUT 141A Suspension & Steering Lab 0 3 0 1 CIS 111 Basic PC Literacy 1 2 0 2 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 TRN 145 Advanced Transportation Electronics 2 3 0 3 Totals 8 11 0 12 SUMMER SEMESTER AUT 181 Engine Performance I 2 3 0 3 TRN 140 Transportation Climate Control 1 2 0 2 TRN 140A Transportation Climate Control Lab 1 2 0 2 Totals 4 7 0 7 FALL SEMESTER 2 AUT 116 Engine Repair LDD 112 Introduction to Light-Duty Diesel MAT 115 Mathematical Models Totals Total Semester Hour Credits: 41

2 3 0 3 2 2 0 3 2 2 0 3 6 7 0 9

AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY

99

CERTIFICATE C60160 Gainful Employment Compliance Information - For more information about SCC’s graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this program, and other important information, please visit the program’s webpage for the latest information at: http://www.southwesterncc.edu/program/automotive-systems-technology-certificate Prefix Number Title Class Lab Shop Credit AUT 141 Suspension & Steering Systems 2 3 0 3 AUT 151 Brake Systems 2 3 0 3 AUT 151A Brake Systems Lab 0 3 0 1 TRN 110 Introduction to Automotive 1 2 0 2 TRN 120 Basic Transportation Electricity 4 3 0 5 Choose one of the following: TRN 140 Transportation Climate Control 1 2 0 2 TRN 145 Advanced Transportation Electronics 2 3 0 3 Totals 10-11 16-17 0 16-17 Total Semester Hour Credits: 16-17 CERTIFICATE C60160CP* FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit TRN 110 Introduction to Automotive 1 2 0 2 TRN 120 Basic Transportation Electricity 4 3 0 5 TRN 120A Basic Transportation Electricity Lab 0 3 0 1 Totals 5 8 0 8 SPRING SEMESTER 1 AUT 141 Suspension & Steering Systems AUT 151 Brake Systems AUT 151A Brake Systems Lab Totals

2 3 0 3 2 3 0 3 0 3 0 1 4 9 0 7

FALL SEMESTER 2 AUT 181 Engine Performance I Totals

2 3 0 3 2 3 0 3

Total Semester Hour Credits: 18 * This certificate or pathway is offered to high school students through the Career & College Promise initiative. Please refer to page 19 for additional information. FACULTY David Myers, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4237 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4237 Bobby Price Franklin High School [email protected]

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

100

The Business Administration curriculum is designed to introduce students to the various aspects of the free enterprise system. Students will be provided with a fundamental knowledge of business functions, processes, and an understanding of business organizations in today’s global economy. Course work includes business concepts such as accounting, business law, economics, management, and marketing. Skills related to the application of these concepts are developed through the study of computer applications, communication, team building, and decision making. Through these skills, students will have a sound business education base for lifelong learning. Graduates are prepared for employment opportunities in government agencies, financial institutions, and large to small business or industry. Students can complete the courses required for this degree and certificate as online courses. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A25120 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 BUS 110 Introduction to Business 3 0 0 3 CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 Choose one of the following: MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics 3 0 0 3 MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab 0 2 0 1 OR MAT 151 Statistics 3 0 0 3 MAT 151A Statistics Lab 0 2 0 1 Totals 12 4 0 14 SPRING SEMESTER 1 BUS 139 Entrepreneurship I 3 0 0 3 CTS 130 Spreadsheet 2 2 0 3 ECM 210 Intro to Electronic Commerce 2 2 0 3 ENG 114 Professional Research & Reporting 3 0 0 3 Choose one of the following: ACC 115 College Accounting 3 2 0 4 ACC 120 Principles of Financial Accounting 3 2 0 4 Totals 13 6 0 16 SUMMER SEMESTER BUS 137 Principles of Management 3 0 0 3 *** *** Humanities Elective 3 0 0 3 *** *** Social Science Elective 3 0 0 3 Totals 9 0 0 9 FALL SEMESTER 2 BUS 115 Business Law I 3 0 0 3 BUS 260 Business Communication 3 0 0 3 MKT 120 Principles of Marketing 3 0 0 3 Choose one of the following: ACC 121 Principles of Managerial Acct 3 2 0 4 BUS 240 Business Ethics 3 0 0 3 Totals 12 0-2 0 12-13

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SPRING SEMESTER 2 BUS 125 Personal Finance 3 0 0 3 BUS 135 Principles of Supervision 3 0 0 3 BUS 230 Small Business Management 3 0 0 3 MKT 223 Customer Service 3 0 0 3 Choose one of the following: ECO 151 Survey of Economics 3 0 0 3 ECO 251 Principles of Microeconomics 3 0 0 3 ECO 252 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 0 0 3 Totals 15 0 0 15 Total Semester Hour Credits: 66-67 CERTIFICATE - C25120 & C25120CP* There are many employment opportunities for people with basic business skills. When you complete this certificate, you will have the basic knowledge and business awareness to help you get started in the business world. SCC offers the five courses for this certificate online, a convenient option for many students. Further, the certificate course requirements earn credit toward an Associate’s Degree in the program. Gainful Employment Compliance Information - For more information about SCC’s graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this program, and other important information, please visit the program’s webpage for the latest information at: http://www.southwesterncc.edu/program/business-administration-certificate Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit BUS 110 Introduction to Business 3 0 0 3 BUS 137 Principles of Management 3 0 0 3 CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 MKT 120 Principles of Marketing 3 0 0 3 Choose one of the following: ACC 115 College Accounting 3 2 0 4 ACC 120 Principles of Financial Accounting*** 3 2 0 4 Totals 14 4 0 16 Total Semester Hour Credits: 16 *This certificate or pathway is offered to high school students through the Career & College Promise initiative. Please refer to page 19 for additional information. ***Career & College Promise students MUST take ACC 120. FACULTY Carolyn Porter, Department Chair / Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4232 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4232 William Brothers [email protected] 828.339.4366 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4366

Bob Holt [email protected] 828.339.4274 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4274 Danell Moses [email protected] 828.339.4341 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4341

101

102

BUS. ADMIN. - ELECTRONIC COMMERCE Electronic Commerce is a concentration under the title of Business Administration. This curriculum is designed to prepare individuals for a career in the Internet economy. Course work includes topics related to electronic business, Internet strategy in business, basic business principles in the world of E-Commerce. Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to identify and analyze such functional issues as planning, technical systems, marketing, security, finance, law, design, implementation, assessment and policy issues at an entry level. Graduates from this program will have a sound business educational base for life long learning. Graduates are prepared for employment opportunities in government agencies, financial institutions, and small to medium size businesses or industry. Students can complete the courses required for this degree and certificate as online courses. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A2512I FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 BUS 110 Introduction to Business 3 0 0 3 CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 Choose one of the following: MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics 3 0 0 3 MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab 0 2 0 1 OR MAT 151 Statistics 3 0 0 3 MAT 151A Statistics Lab 0 2 0 1 Totals 12 4 0 14 SPRING SEMESTER 1 ECM 210 Introduction to Electronic Commerce 2 2 0 3 ENG 114 Professional Research & Reporting 3 0 0 3 WEB 110 Internet/Web Fundamentals 2 2 0 3 WEB 140 Web Development Tools 2 2 0 3 Choose one of the following: ACC 115 College Accounting 3 2 0 4 ACC 120 Principles of Financial Accounting 3 2 0 4 Totals 12 8 0 16 SUMMER SEMESTER BUS 137 Principles of Management ECM 220 Electronic Commerce Planning & Implementation *** *** Humanities Elective Totals FALL SEMESTER 2 BUS 115 Business Law I BUS 260 Business Communication ECM 168 Electronic Business MKT 120 Principles of Marketing WEB 111 Introduction to Web Graphics Totals

3 0 0 3 2 2 0 3 3 0 0 3 8 2 0 9 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 2 2 0 3 3 0 0 3 2 2 0 3 13 4 0 15

BUS. ADMIN. - ELECTRONIC COMMERCE

103

SPRING SEMESTER 2 ECM 230 Capstone Project 1 6 0 3 MKT 223 Customer Service 3 0 0 3 WEB 120 Introduction to Internet Multimedia 2 2 0 3 *** *** Social Science Elective 3 0 0 3 Choose one of the following: ECO 151 Survey of Economics 3 0 0 3 ECO 251 Principles of Microeconomics 3 0 0 3 ECO 252 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 0 0 3 Totals 12 10 10 15 Total Semester Hour Credits: 69 CERTIFICATE - C2512I & C2512ICP* If you already have a college degree or business skills, you may choose to pursue a Business Administration - Electronic Commerce certificate. SCC offers the six courses required for the certificate online, a convenient format for many students. Further, the certificate course requirements earn credit toward an associate’s degree in the program. Gainful Employment Compliance Information - For more information about SCC’s graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this program, and other important information, please visit the program’s webpage for the latest information at: http://www.southwesterncc.edu/program/business-administration-electronic-commerce-certificate Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ECM 168 Electronic Business 2 2 0 3 ECM 210 Introduction to Electronic Commerce 2 2 0 3 ECM 220 Electronic Commerce Planning & Implementation 2 2 0 3 WEB 110 Internet/Web Fundamentals 2 2 0 3 WEB 111 Introduction to Web Graphics 2 2 0 3 WEB 140 Web Development Tools 2 2 0 3 Totals 12 12 0 18 Total Semester Hours Credit: 18 * This certificate or pathway is offered to high school students through the Career & College Promise initiative. Please refer to page 19 for additional information. FACULTY Carolyn Porter, Department Chair / Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4232 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4232 William Brothers [email protected] 828.339.4366 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4366

Bob Holt [email protected] 828.339.4274 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4274 Danell Moses [email protected] 828.339.4341 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4341

BUS. ADMIN. - ENTREPRENEURSHIP

104

The Entrepreneurship track in Business Administration is designed to provide students with the fundamental knowledge of business functions, processes, and an understanding of business organizations in today’s global economy. In addition, students choose electives that give them the knowledge and skills necessary for employment and growth as self-employed business owners. Courses include entrepreneurial concepts learned in innovation and creativity, business funding, and marketing. Through these skills, students will have a sound education base in entrepreneurship for lifelong learning. Graduates are prepared to be self-employed and open their own businesses. Students can complete the courses required for this degree and certificate as online courses. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A25120ET FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 BUS 110 Introduction to Business 3 0 0 3 CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 Choose one of the following: MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics 3 0 0 3 MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab 0 2 0 1 OR MAT 151 Statistics 3 0 0 3 MAT 151A Statistics Lab 0 2 0 1 Totals 12 4 0 14 SPRING SEMESTER 1 BUS 139 Entrepreneurship I 3 0 0 3 CTS 130 Spreadsheet 2 2 0 3 ECM 210 Intro to Electronic Commerce 2 2 0 3 ENG 114 Professional Research & Reporting 3 0 0 3 Choose one of the following: ACC 115 College Accounting 3 2 0 4 ACC 120 Principles of Financial Accounting 3 2 0 4 Totals 13 6 0 16 SUMMER SEMESTER BUS 137 Principles of Management 3 0 0 3 *** *** Humanities Elective 3 0 0 3 *** *** Social Science Elective 3 0 0 3 Totals 9 0 0 9

BUS. ADMIN. - ENTREPRENEURSHIP FALL SEMESTER 2 BUS 115 Business Law I 3 0 0 3 BUS 260 Business Communication 3 0 0 3 ETR 220 Innovation and Creativity 3 0 0 3 MKT 120 Principles of Marketing 3 0 0 3 Choose one of the following: ACC 121 Principles of Managerial Acct 3 2 0 4 MKT 223 Customer Service 3 0 0 3 Totals 15 0-2 0 15-16 SPRING SEMESTER 2 BUS 125 Personal Finance 3 0 0 3 BUS 230 Small Business Management 3 0 0 3 ETR 240 Funding for Entrepreneurs 3 0 0 3 Choose one of the following: ECO 151 Survey of Economics 3 0 0 3 ECO 251 Principles of Microeconomics 3 0 0 3 ECO 252 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 0 0 3 Totals 12 0 0 12 Total Semester Hour Credits: 66-67 FACULTY William Brothers, Lead Instructor [email protected] 828.339.4366 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4366 Bob Holt [email protected] 828.339.4274 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4274 Carolyn Porter, Department Chair [email protected] 828.339.4232 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4232 Danell Moses [email protected] 828.339.4341 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4341

105

BUS. ADMIN. - OFFICE ADMINISTRATION

106

The Office Administration track in Business Administration is designed to provide students with the fundamental knowledge of business functions, processes, and an understanding of business organizations in today’s global economy. In addition, students choose electives that prepare individuals for positions in administrative support careers in the computerized workplace. Students will complete courses designed to develop proficiency in the use of integrated software, oral and written communication, analysis and coordination of office duties and systems, and other support topics. Emphasis is placed on non-technical as well as technical skills. Graduates should qualify for employment in a variety of positions in business, government, and industry. Students can complete the courses required for this degree as online courses. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A25120OA FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 BUS 110 Introduction to Business 3 0 0 3 CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 OST 136 Word Processing 2 2 0 3 OST 164 Text Editing Applications 3 0 0 3 Totals 14 4 0 16 SPRING SEMESTER 1 CTS 130 Spreadsheet I 2 2 0 3 ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting 3 0 0 3 Choose one of the following: MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics 3 0 0 3 MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab 0 2 0 1 OR MAT 151 Statistics 3 0 0 3 MAT 151A Statistics Lab 0 2 0 1 Choose one of the following: ACC 115 College Accounting 3 2 0 4 ACC 120 Principles of Financial Accounting 3 2 0 4 Totals 11 6 0 14 SUMMER SEMESTER BUS 137 Principles of Management *** *** Humanities Elective *** *** Social Science Elective Totals

3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 9 0 0 9

FALL SEMESTER 2 BUS 115 Business Law I 3 0 0 3 BUS 260 Business Communication 3 0 0 3 MKT 120 Principles of Marketing 3 0 0 3 OST 184 Records Management 2 2 0 3 Choose one of the following: ACC 121 Principles of Managerial Accounting 3 2 0 4 BUS 125 Personal Finance 3 0 0 3 Totals 14 2-4 0 15-16

BUS. ADMIN. - OFFICE ADMINISTRATION SPRING SEMESTER 2 BUS 135 Principles of Supervision 3 0 0 3 MKT 223 Customer Service 3 0 0 3 OST 289 Administrative Office Management 2 2 0 3 Choose one of the following: ECO 151 Survey of Economics 3 0 0 3 ECO 251 Principles of Microeconomics 3 0 0 3 ECO 252 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 0 0 3 Totals 11 2 0 12 Total Semester Hour Credits: 66-67 CERTIFICATE C25370 & C25370CP* Western North Carolina has a need for skilled administrative assistants now. Update your office skills and increase your marketability with an Office Administration Certificate. Students can complete the courses required for this certificate as online courses. Gainful Employment Compliance Information - For more information about SCC’s graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this program, and other important information, please visit the program’s webpage for the latest information at: http://www.southwesterncc.edu/program/office-administration-certificate FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 OST 136 Word Processing 2 2 0 3 OST 164 Text Editing Applications 3 0 0 3 OST 184 Records Management 2 2 0 3 Totals 9 6 0 12 SPRING SEMESTER 1 CTS 130 Spreadsheet 2 2 0 3 OST 289 Administrative Office Management 2 2 0 3 Totals 4 4 0 6 Total Semester Hour Credits: 18 * This certificate or pathway is offered to high school students through the Career & College Promise initiative. Please refer to page 19 for additional information. FACULTY William Brothers [email protected] 828.339.4366 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4366

Danell Moses, Lead Instructor [email protected] 828.339.4341 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4341

Bob Holt [email protected] 828.339.4274 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4274

Carolyn Porter, Department Chair [email protected] 828.339.4232 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4232

107

CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

108

The Engineering & Technology programs are designed to prepare students through the study and application of principles from mathematics, natural sciences, and technology and applied processes based on these subjects. Course work includes mathematics, natural sciences, engineering sciences and technology. Graduates should qualify to obtain occupations such as technical service providers, materials and technologies testing services, engineering technicians, construction technicians and managers, industrial and technology managers, or research technicians. Civil Engineering Technology prepares students to use basic engineering principles and technical skills to carry out planning, documenting and supervising tasks in sustainable land development and public works and facilities projects. The program includes instruction in the communication and computational skills required for materials testing, structural testing, field and laboratory testing, site analysis, estimating, project management, plan preparation, hydraulics, environmental technology, and surveying. Graduates should qualify for technician-level jobs with both public and private engineering, construction, and surveying agencies.

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A40140 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 CEG 115 Intro to Technology & Sustainability 2 3 0 3 CEG 151 CAD for Engineering Technology 2 3 0 3 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 Choose one of the following: MAT 171 Precalculus Algebra ... with 3 0 0 3 MAT 171A Precalculus Algebra Lab 0 2 0 1 (Requires MAT 172/172A in Spring Semester 1) OR MAT 175 MAT 175A

Precalculus ... with Precalculus Lab Totals

4 0 13-14

0 2 10

0 0 0

4 1 17-18

SPRING SEMESTER 1 CIV 125 Civil/Surveying CAD 1 6 0 3 EGR 251 Statics 2 2 0 3 PHY 151 College Physics I 3 2 0 4 SRV 110 Surveying I 2 6 0 4 If MAT 171 is chosen, take the following: MAT 172 Precalculus Trigonometry ... with 3 0 0 3 MAT 172A Precalculus Trigonometry Lab 0 2 0 1 Totals 8-11 16-18 0 14-18 SUMMER SEMESTER ENG 114 Professional Research & Reporting *** *** Humanities/Fine Arts Elective *** *** Social/Behavioral Sciences Elective Totals

3 3 3 9

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

3 3 3 9

CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

109

FALL SEMESTER 2 CEG 111 Introduction to GIS & GNSS 2 CEG 212 Introduction to Environmental Tech. 2 CIV 111 Soils and Foundations 2 **EGR 252 Strength of Materials 2 SRV 111 Surveying II 2 Totals 10

4 3 4 2 6 19

0 4 0 3 0 4 0 3 0 4 0 18

SPRING SEMESTER 2 CEG 210 Construction Materials & Methods CEG 211 Hydrology & Erosion Control CEG 230 Subdivision Planning & Design CEG 235 Project Management & Estimating **CIV 215 Highway Technology Totals

3 3 6 3 3 18

0 0 0 0 0 0

Total Semester Hours Credit: 71-74 **Choose EGR 252 or CIV 215 FACULTY Jeanette White, E.I., Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4427 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4427

2 2 1 2 2 9

3 3 3 3 3 15

110

COLLEGE TRANSFER PATHWAY - BUSINESS & ECONOMICS The Core 44 College Transfer Pathway is designed for high school juniors and seniors who wish to begin the pathway towards a 4-year university baccalaureate degree. The Core 44 Pathway is a structured set of general education courses leading to completion of the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science diploma (44 hours) or degree (64 hours). After completing this pathway, students may pursue completion of the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science diploma or degree. By itself, this pathway is not equivalent to the general education core requirements at a North Carolina community college or university. Upon completion of the diploma or degree and admission to a North Carolina public university or a participating independent college or university, students will receive credit for the undergraduate, lower division general education core as established in the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement between the University of North Carolina and the North Carolina Community College System. COLLEGE TRANSFER BUSINESS & ECONOMICS PATHWAY – P1012B Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 122 College Transfer Success 1 0 0 1 BIO 111 General Biology I 3 3 0 4 CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 COM 140 Intro. to Intercultural Communication 3 0 0 3 ECO 251 Principles of Microeconomics 3 0 0 3 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 ENG 113 Literature-Based Research 3 0 0 3 ENG 241 British Literature I 3 0 0 3 HIS 121 Western Civilization I 3 0 0 3 MAT 161 College Algebra 3 0 0 3 SOC 210 Introduction to Sociology 3 0 0 3 Totals 30 5 0 32 * This certificate or pathway is offered to high school students through the Career & College Promise initiative. Please refer to the Career & College Promise page in this catalog for additional information. ADVISOR Cindy Thompson, College Access Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4610 or 828.447.4091, ext. 4610

COLLEGE TRANSFER PATHWAY - ENGINEERING & MATHEMATICS The Core 44 College Transfer Pathway is designed for high school juniors and seniors who wish to begin the pathway towards a 4-year university baccalaureate degree. The Core 44 Pathway is a structured set of general education courses leading to completion of the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science diploma (44 hours) or degree (64 hours). After completing this pathway, students may pursue completion of the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science diploma or degree. By itself, this pathway is not equivalent to the general education core requirements at a North Carolina community college or university. Upon completion of the diploma or degree and admission to a North Carolina public university or a participating independent college or university, students will receive credit for the undergraduate, lower division general education core as established in the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement between the University of North Carolina and the North Carolina Community College System. COLLEGE TRANSFER ENGINEERING & MATHEMATICS PATHWAY – P1042B Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 122 College Transfer Success 1 0 0 1 CHM 151 General Chemistry I 3 3 0 4 ECO 251 Principles of Microeconomics 3 0 0 3 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 ENG 113 Literature-Based Research 3 0 0 3 ENG 241 British Literature I 3 0 0 3 HIS 121 Western Civilization I 3 0 0 3 MAT 171 Precalculus Algebra 3 0 0 3 MAT 171A Precalculus Algebra Lab 0 2 0 1 MAT 172 Precalculus Trigonometry 3 0 0 3 MAT 172A Precalculus Trigonometry Lab 0 2 0 1 MAT 271 Calculus I 3 2 0 4 Totals 28 9 0 32 * This certificate or pathway is offered to high school students through the Career & College Promise initiative. Please refer to the Career & College Promise page in this catalog for additional information. ADVISOR Cindy Thompson, College Access Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4610 or 828.447.4091, ext. 4610

111

112

COLLEGE TRANSFER PATHWAY - HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE The Core 44 College Transfer Pathway is designed for high school juniors and seniors who wish to begin the pathway towards a 4-year university baccalaureate degree. The Core 44 Pathway is a structured set of general education courses leading to completion of the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science diploma (44 hours) or degree (64 hours). After completing this pathway, students may pursue completion of the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science diploma or degree. By itself, this pathway is not equivalent to the general education core requirements at a North Carolina community college or university. Upon completion of the diploma or degree and admission to a North Carolina public university or a participating independent college or university, students will receive credit for the undergraduate, lower division general education core as established in the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement between the University of North Carolina and the North Carolina Community College System. COLLEGE TRANSFER HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE PATHWAY – P1012A Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 122 College Transfer Success 1 0 0 1 ART 111 Art Appreciation 3 0 0 3 BIO 111 General Biology I 3 3 0 4 COM 140 Intro. to Intercultural Communication 3 0 0 3 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 ENG 113 Literature-Based Research 3 0 0 3 ENG 241 British Literature I 3 0 0 3 HIS 121 Western Civilization I 3 0 0 3 MAT 161 College Algebra 3 0 0 3 PSY 150 General Psychology 3 0 0 3 SPA 111 Elementary Spanish I 3 0 0 3 Totals 31 3 0 32 * This certificate or pathway is offered to high school students through the Career & College Promise initiative. Please refer to the Career & College Promise page in this catalog for additional information. ADVISOR Cindy Thompson, College Access Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4610 or 828.447.4091, ext. 4610

COLLEGE TRANSFER PATHWAY LIFE & HEALTH SCIENCES The Core 44 College Transfer Pathway is designed for high school juniors and seniors who wish to begin the pathway towards 4-year university a baccalaureate degree. The Core 44 Pathway is a structured set of general education courses leading to completion of the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science diploma (44 hours) or degree (64 hours). After completing this pathway, students may pursue completion of the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science diploma or degree. By itself, this pathway is not equivalent to the general education core requirements at a North Carolina community college or university. Upon completion of the diploma or degree and admission to a North Carolina public university or a participating independent college or university, students will receive credit for the undergraduate, lower division general education core as established in the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement between the University of North Carolina and the North Carolina Community College System. COLLEGE TRANSFER LIFE & HEALTH SCIENCES PATHWAY – P1042A Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 122 College Transfer Success 1 0 0 1 BIO 111 General Biology I 3 3 0 4 BIO 112 General Biology II 3 3 0 4 CHM 151 General Chemistry I 3 3 0 4 CHM 152 General Chemistry II 3 3 0 4 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 ENG 113 Literature-Based Research 3 0 0 3 ENG 241 British Literature I 3 0 0 3 HIS 121 Western Civilization I 3 0 0 3 MAT 175 Precalculus 4 0 0 4 MAT 175A Precalculus Lab 0 2 0 1 Totals 29 14 0 34 * This certificate or pathway is offered to high school students through the Career & College Promise initiative. Please refer to the Career & College Promise page in this catalog for additional information. ADVISOR Cindy Thompson, College Access Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4610 or 828.447.4091, ext. 4610

113

114

COMPUTER ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY The Computer Engineering Technology curriculum provides the skills required to install, service, and maintain computers, peripherals, networks, microprocessors and computer controlled equipment. It includes training in both hardware and software, emphasizing operating systems concepts to provide a unified view of computer systems. Coursework includes mathematics, physics, electronics, digital circuits, and programming, with emphasis on the operation, use, and interfacing of memory and devices to the CPU. Additional topics may include communications, networks, operating systems, programming languages, Internet configuration and design, and industrial applications. Graduates should qualify for employment opportunities in electronics technology, computer service, computer networks, server maintenance, programming, and other areas requiring a knowledge of electronic and computer systems. Graduates may also qualify for certification in electronics, computers, or networks. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A40160 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit CET 110 Introduction to CET 0 3 0 1 DFT 117 Technical Drafting 1 2 0 2 ELC 131 DC/AC Circuit Analysis 4 3 0 5 HRD 3003 Career & College Student Success 0 0 0 0 MAT 121 Algebra/Trigonometry I 2 2 0 3 *** *** Social Science Elective 3 0 0 3 Totals 10 10 0 14 SPRING SEMESTER 1 CET 222 Computer Architecture 2 0 0 2 CET 225 Digital Signal Processing 2 2 0 3 ELN 131 Semiconductor Applications 3 3 0 4 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 MAT 122 Algebra/Trigonometry II 2 2 0 3 Totals 12 7 0 15 SUMMER SEMESTER CSC 134 C++ Programming ELN 133 Digital Electronics ENG 114 Professional Research & Reporting Choose one of the following: ELN 215 Semiconductor Physics PHY 131 Physics-Mechanics Totals

2 3 0 3 3 3 0 4 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 2 0 4 11 6-8 0 13-14

FALL SEMESTER 2 CET 111 Computer Upgrade/Repair I 2 3 0 3 CET 251 Software Engineering Principles 3 3 0 4 ELN 232 Introduction to Microprocessors 3 3 0 4 ELN 235 Data Communication System 3 3 0 4 Totals 11 12 0 15

COMPUTER ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY SPRING SEMESTER 2 CET 211 Computer Upgrade/Repair II 2 3 0 3 CET 245 Internet Servers 2 3 0 3 ELN 233 Microprocessor Systems 3 3 0 4 ELN 257 Telecom Software 2 3 0 3 *** *** Humanities Elective 3 0 0 3 Choose one of the following: COE 112 Co-Op Work Experience I 0 0 20 2 EGR 285 Design Project 0 4 0 2 Totals 12 12-16 0-20 18 Total Semester Hour Credits: 75-76 FACULTY Ron Poor, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4214 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4214 Mike Deaver [email protected] 828.339.4337 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4337

115

116

COMPUTER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY The Computer Information Technology curriculum is designed to prepare graduates for employment with organizations that use computers to process, manage, and communicate information. This is a flexible curriculum that can be customized to meet community information systems needs. Course work will develop a student’s ability to communicate complex technical issues related to computer hardware, software, and networks in a manner that computer users can understand. Classes cover computer operations and terminology, operating systems, database, networking, security, and technical support. Graduates should qualify for employment in entry-level positions with businesses, educational systems, and governmental agencies which rely on computer systems to manage information. Graduates should be prepared to sit for industry-recognized certification exams. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A25260 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 NET 110 Networking Concepts 2 2 0 3 NOS 110 Operating System Concepts 2 3 0 3 WEB 110 Internet/Web Fundamentals 2 2 0 3 Totals 12 9 0 16 SPRING SEMESTER 1 CIS 115 Introduction to Programming & Logic 2 3 0 3 DBA 110 Database Concepts 2 3 0 3 ENG 114 Professional Research & Reporting 3 0 0 3 NOS 130 Windows Single User 2 2 0 3 SEC 110 Security Concepts 3 0 0 3 Totals 12 8 0 15 SUMMER SEMESTER BUS 110 Introduction to Business MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab *** *** Social Science Elective *** *** Humanities Elective Totals

3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 0 2 0 1 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 12 2 0 13

FALL SEMESTER 2 CSC 139 Visual BASIC Programming 2 3 0 3 CSC 151 JAVA Programming 2 3 0 3 CTS 120 Hardware/Software Support 2 3 0 3 CTS 285 Systems Analysis & Design 3 0 0 3 NOS 230 Windows Admin I 2 2 0 3 Totals 11 11 0 15

COMPUTER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

SPRING SEMESTER 2 COE 111 Co-op Work Experience I CSC 284 Emerging Computer Program Tech. CTS 250 User Support & Software Evaluation CTS 287 Emerging Technologies CTS 289 System Support Project NOS 120 Linux/UNIX Single User Totals

117

0 0 10 1 2 3 0 3 2 2 0 3 3 0 0 3 1 4 0 3 2 2 0 3 10 11 10 16

Total Semester Hour Credits: 75

CERTIFICATE C25260 & C25260CP* Gainful Employment Compliance Information - For more information about SCC’s graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this program, and other important information, please visit the program’s webpage for the latest information at: http://www.southwesterncc.edu/program/computer-information-technology-certificate FALL SEMESTER Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 NET 110 Networking Concepts 2 2 0 3 NOS 110 Operating System Concepts 2 3 0 3 Totals 6 7 0 9 SPRING SEMESTER CIS 115 Introduction to Programming & Logic 2 3 0 3 DBA 110 Database Concepts 2 3 0 3 SEC 110 Security Concepts 3 0 0 3 Totals 7 6 0 9 Total Semester Hour Credits: 18 * This certificate or pathway is offered to high school students through the Career & College Promise initiative. Please refer to page 19 for additional information. FACULTY Scott Cline, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4494 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4494

Kirk Stephens [email protected] 828.339.4376 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4376

Kurt Berger [email protected] 828.339.4503 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4503

Dawn Wick [email protected] 828.339.4208 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4208

118

COMPUTER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY - NETWORKING The Networking Concentration curriculum prepares individuals for employment supporting network infrastructure environments. Students will learn how to use technologies to provide reliable transmission and delivery of data, voice, image, and video communications in business, industry, and education. Course work includes design, installation, configuration, and management of network infrastructure technologies and network operating systems. Emphasis is placed on the implementation and management of network software and the implementation and management of hardware such as switches and routers. Graduates may find employment in entry-level jobs as local area network managers, network operators, network analysts, and network technicians. Graduates may also be qualified to take certification examinations for various network industry certifications, depending on their local program. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A25260 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 NET 110 Networking Concepts 2 2 0 3 NOS 110 Operating System Concepts 2 3 0 3 WEB 110 Internet/Web Fundamentals 2 2 0 3 Totals 12 9 0 16 SPRING SEMESTER 1 CIS 115 Introduction to Programming & Logic 2 3 0 3 DBA 110 Database Concepts 2 3 0 3 ENG 114 Professional Research & Reporting 3 0 0 3 NOS 130 Windows Single User 2 2 0 3 SEC 110 Security Concepts 3 0 0 3 Totals 12 8 0 15 SUMMER SEMESTER BUS 110 Introduction to Business MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab *** *** Social Science Elective *** *** Humanities Elective Totals

3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 0 2 0 1 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 12 2 0 13

FALL SEMESTER 2 CTS 120 Hardware/Software Support CTS 285 Systems Analysis & Design NET 125 Networking Basics NET 126 Routing Basics NOS 230 Windows Admin I Totals

2 3 0 3 3 0 0 3 1 4 0 3 1 4 0 3 2 2 0 3 9 13 0 15

SPRING SEMESTER 2 COE 111 Co-op Work Experience I CTS 289 System Support Project NET 225 Routing and Switching I NET 226 Routing and Switching II NOS 120 Linux/UNIX Single User NOS 231 Windows Administration II Totals

0 0 10 1 1 4 0 3 1 4 0 3 1 4 0 3 2 2 0 3 2 2 0 3 7 16 10 16

Total Semester Hour Credits: 75 FACULTY Scott Cline, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4494 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4494

Dawn Wick [email protected] 828.339.4208 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4208

Kurt Berger [email protected] 828.339.4503 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4503

Cyndi Slocumb [email protected] 828.339.4396 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4396

Kirk Stephens [email protected] 828.339.4376 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4376

COSMETOLOGY

119

The Cosmetology curriculum is designed to provide competency-based knowledge, scientific/artistic principles, and hands-on fundamentals associated with the cosmetology industry. The curriculum provides a simulated salon environment which enables students to develop manipulative skills. Course work includes instruction in all phases of professional imaging, hair design, chemical processes, skin care, nail care, multi-cultural practices, business/computer principles, product knowledge, and other selected topics. Graduates should qualify to sit for the State Board of Cosmetic Arts examination. Upon successfully passing the State Board exam, graduates will be issued a license. Employment is available in beauty salons and related businesses. Enrollment is limited to “first-come, first-served” basis and will be closed when capacity is reached. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A55140 (1500 Hours) FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 COS 111 Cosmetology Concepts I 4 0 0 4 COS 112 Salon I 0 24 0 8 Totals 5 24 0 13 SPRING SEMESTER 1 COS 113 Cosmetology Concepts II COS 114 Salon II ENG 111 Expository Writing *** *** Elective Totals

4 0 0 4 0 24 0 8 3 0 0 3 1 2 0 2 8 26 0 17

SUMMER SEMESTER COS 115 Cosmetology Concepts III COS 116 Salon III *** *** Elective Totals

4 0 0 4 0 12 0 4 3 0 0 3 7 12 0 11

FALL SEMESTER 2 COS 117 Cosmetology Concepts IV COS 118 Salon IV MAT 115 Mathematical Models *** *** Elective Totals

2 0 0 2 0 21 0 7 2 2 0 3 2 2 0 3 6 25 0 15

SPRING SEMESTER 2 ENG 114 Professional Research & Reporting 3 0 0 3 PSY 150 General Psychology 3 0 0 3 *** *** Humanities Elective 3 0 0 3 Choose one of the following: BUS 230 Small Business Management 3 0 0 3 BUS 280 REAL Small Business 4 0 0 4 Totals 12-13 0 0 12-13 Total Semester Hour Credits: 68-69

COSMETOLOGY

120

DIPLOMA D55140 (1500 Hours) Gainful Employment Compliance Information - For more information about SCC’s graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this program, and other important information, please visit the program’s webpage for the latest information at: http://www.southwesterncc.edu/program/cosmetology-diploma FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title COS 111 Cosmetology Concepts I COS 112 Salon I Totals

Class Lab Clinical Credit 4 0 0 4 0 24 0 8 4 24 0 12

SPRING SEMESTER 1 COS 113 Cosmetology Concepts II COS 114 Salon II Totals

4 0 0 4 0 24 0 8 4 24 0 12

SUMMER SEMESTER COS 115 Cosmetology Concepts III COS 116 Salon III PSY 150 General Psychology Totals

4 0 0 12 3 0 7 12

FALL SEMESTER 2 COS 117 Cosmetology Concepts IV COS 118 Salon IV ENG 111 Expository Writing Totals

2 0 0 2 0 21 0 7 3 0 0 3 5 21 0 12

Total Semester Hour Credits: 47 FACULTY K. Randall McCall, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4238 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4238 Pam Ensley [email protected] 828.339.4401 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4401 Debra Ray [email protected] 828.339.4422 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4422

0 4 0 4 0 3 0 11

COSMETOLOGY

121

CERTIFICATE C55140 (1500 Hours) Gainful Employment Compliance Information - For more information about SCC’s graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this program, and other important information, please visit the program’s webpage for the latest information at: http://www.southwesterncc.edu/program/cosmetology-certificate-1500-hours FALL SEMESTER 1 COS 111 Cosmetology Concepts I COS 112 Salon I Totals

4 0 0 4 0 24 0 8 4 24 0 12

SPRING SEMESTER 1 COS 113 Cosmetology Concepts II COS 114 Salon II Totals

4 0 0 4 0 24 0 8 4 24 0 12

SUMMER SEMESTER COS 115 Cosmetology Concepts III COS 116 Salon III Totals

4 0 0 4 0 12 0 4 4 12 0 8

FALL SEMESTER 2 COS 117 Cosmetology Concepts IV COS 118 Salon IV Totals

2 0 0 2 0 21 0 7 2 21 0 9

Total Semester Hour Credits: 41 CERTIFICATE - C55140CP* This certificate does not meet the 1500 hour licensure requirement. Students must complete additional classes before taking state exam. COS 111 Cosmetology Concepts I 4 0 0 4 COS 112 Salon I 0 24 0 8 COS 113 Cosmetology Concepts II 4 0 0 4 COS 114 Salon II 0 24 0 8 COS 115 Cosmetology Concepts III 4 0 0 4 COS 116 Salon III 0 12 0 4 COS 117 Cosmetology Concepts IV 2 0 0 2 Totals 14 60 0 32 Total Semester Hour Credits: 32 * This certificate or pathway is offered to high school students through the Career & College Promise initiative. Please refer to page 19 for additional information.

122

COSMETOLOGY - MANICURING/NAIL TECHNOLOGY The Manicuring/Nail Technology curriculum provides competency-based knowledge, scientific/artistic principles, and hands-on fundamentals associated with the nail technology industry. The curriculum provides a simulated salon environment which enables students to develop manipulative skills. Course work includes instruction in all phases of professional nail technology, business/ computer principles, product knowledge, and other related topics. Graduates should be prepared to take the North Carolina Cosmetology State Board Licensing Exam and upon passing be licensed and qualify for employment in beauty and nail salons, as a platform artist, and in related businesses. CERTIFICATE - C55400 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit COS 121 Manicure/Nail Technology I 4 6 0 6 SPRING SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit COS 222 Manicure/Nail Technology II 4 6 0 6 Total Semester Hour Credits: 12 FACULTY K. Randall McCall, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4238 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4238 Pam Ensley [email protected] 828.339.4401 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4401 Debra Ray [email protected] 828.339.4422 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4422

CRIMINAL JUSTICE TECHNOLOGY The Criminal Justice Technology curriculum is designed to provide knowledge of criminal justice systems and operations. Study will focus on local, state, and federal law enforcement, judicial processes, corrections, and security services. The criminal justice system’s role within society will be explored. Emphasis is on criminal justice systems, criminology, juvenile justice, criminal and constitutional law, investigative principles, ethics, and community relations. Additional study may include issues and concepts of government, counseling, communications, computers, and technology. Employment opportunities exist in a variety of local, state, and federal law enforcement, corrections, and security fields. Examples include police officer, deputy sheriff, county detention officer, state trooper, intensive probation/parole surveillance officer, correctional officer, and loss prevention specialist. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) - A55180 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 CJC 111 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 0 0 3 CJC 112 Criminology 3 0 0 3 CJC 120 Interviews/Interrogations 1 2 0 2 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 PSY 150 General Psychology 3 0 0 3 Totals 16 4 0 18 SPRING SEMESTER 1 CJC 113 Juvenile Justice 3 0 0 3 CJC 131 Criminal Law 3 0 0 3 CJC 221 Investigative Principles 3 2 0 4 ENG 114 Professional Research & Reporting 3 0 0 3 *** *** CJ Elective 1-3 0-2 0 2-3 Choose one of the following: MAT 115 Mathematical Models 2 2 0 3 OR MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics 3 0 0 3 MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab 0 2 0 1 Totals 15-18 4-6 0 18-20 SUMMER SEMESTER COE 111 Co-op Work Experience I Totals

0 0 10 1 0 0 10 1

FALL SEMESTER 2 CJC 132 Court Procedure & Evidence 3 0 0 3 CJC 223 Organized Crime 3 0 0 3 CJC 231 Constitutional Law 3 0 0 3 COM 110 Introduction to Communication 3 0 0 3 SOC 210 Introduction to Sociology 3 0 0 3 *** *** Humanities Elective 3 0 0 3 Totals 18 0 0 18

123

124

CRIMINAL JUSTICE TECHNOLOGY

SPRING SEMESTER 2 CJC 212 Ethics & Community Relations CJC 213 Substance Abuse CJC 255 Issues in Criminal Justice Applications POL 120 American Government *** *** Criminal Justice Elective Totals

3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 15 0 0 15

Total Semester Hour Credits: 70-71 Criminal Justice Electives CJC 114 Investigative Photography 1 2 0 2 CJC 121 Law Enforcement Operations 3 0 0 3 CJC 122 Community Policing 3 0 0 3 CJC 141 Corrections 3 0 0 3 CJC 214 Victimology 3 0 0 3 CJC 222 Criminalistics 3 0 0 3 CJC 225 Crisis Intervention 3 0 0 3 CJC 232 Civil Liability 3 0 0 3 CJC 241 Community-Based Corrections 3 0 0 3 CJC 256 Forensic Surveying 2 3 0 3 Students who successfully complete a Basic Law Enforcement Training (BLET) program accredited by the North Carolina Criminal Justice Education and Training Standards Commission and/or the North Carolina Sheriff ’s Education and Training Standards Commission will receive credit for CJC 120, CJC 121, CJC 131, CJC 132, CJC 221, and CJC 231 (19 credit hours total) toward the Criminal Justice Technology associate of applied science degree program. FACULTY Tim Coffey, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4276 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4276 Ashley Cunningham [email protected] 828.339.4358 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4358

CRIMINAL JUSTICE TECHNOLOGY - LATENT EVIDENCE

125

Latent Evidence is a concentration under the curriculum of Criminal Justice Technology. This curriculum is designed to provide knowledge of latent evidence systems and operations. Study will focus on local, state, and federal law enforcement, evidence processing and procedures. Students will learn both theory and hands-on analysis of latent evidence. They will learn fingerprint classification, identification, and chemical development. Students will record, cast, and recognize footwear and tire-tracks; and process crime scenes. Issues and concepts of communications and the use of computers and computer assisted design programs in crime scene technology will be discussed. Graduates should qualify for employment in a variety of criminal justice organizations especially in local, state, and federal law enforcement, and correctional agencies. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) - A5518A FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 CIS 111 Basic PC Literacy 1 2 0 2 CJC 111 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 0 0 3 CJC 112 Criminology 3 0 0 3 CJC 144 Crime Scene Processing 2 3 0 3 CJC 250 Forensic Biology I 2 2 0 3 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 Totals 15 7 0 18 SPRING SEMESTER 1 CJC 113 Juvenile Justice CJC 114 Investigative Photography CJC 131 Criminal Law CJC 221 Investigative Principles ENG 114 Professional Research & Reporting *** *** Humanities Elective Totals

3 0 0 3 1 2 0 2 3 0 0 3 3 2 0 4 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 16 4 0 18

SUMMER SEMESTER PSY 150 General Psychology Choose one of the following: MAT 115 Mathematical Models OR MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab Totals

3 0 0 3 0 2 0 1 5-6 2 0 6-7

FALL SEMESTER 2 CJC 132 Court Procedure and Evidence CJC 222 Criminalistics CJC 231 Constitutional Law CJC 245 Friction Ridge Analysis CJC 251 Forensic Chemistry I Totals

3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 2 3 0 3 3 2 0 4 14 5 0 16

3 0 0 3 2 2 0 3

126

CRIMINAL JUSTICE TECHNOLOGY - LATENT EVIDENCE SPRING SEMESTER 2 CJC 120 Interviews/Interrogations CJC 146 Trace Evidence CJC 212 Ethics and Community Relations CJC 246 Advanced Friction Ridge Analysis CJC 252 Forensic Chemistry II Totals

1 2 0 2 2 3 0 3 3 0 0 3 2 3 0 3 3 2 0 4 11 10 0 15

Total Semester Hour Credits: 73-74 Students who successfully complete a Basic Law Enforcement Training (BLET) program accredited by the North Carolina Criminal Justice Education and Training Standards Commission and/or the North Carolina Sheriff ’s Education and Training Standards Commission will receive credit for CJC 120, CJC 131, CJC 132, CJC 221, and CJC 231 (16 credit hours total) toward the Criminal Justice Technology - Latent Evidence associate of applied science degree program. CERTIFICATE C5518A REQUIRED COURSES Prefix Number Title CJC 144 Crime Scene Processing CJC 222 Criminalistics CJC 251 Forensic Chemistry I

Class Lab Clinical Credit 2 3 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 2 0 4

Choose one of the following: CJC 114 Investigative Photography CJC 250 Forensic Biology I

1 2 0 2 2 2 0 3

Choose one of the following: CJC 146 Trace Evidence CJC 245 Friction Ridge Analysis CJC 252 Forensic Chemistry II

2 3 0 3 2 3 0 3 3 2 0 4

Semester Hour Credits: 15-17 FACULTY Tim Coffey, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4276 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4276 Ashley Cunningham [email protected] 828.339.4358 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4358 Dale Hall [email protected] 828.339.4285 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4285

CULINARY ARTS

127

This curriculum provides specific training required to prepare students to assume positions as trained culinary professionals in a variety of foodservice settings including full service restaurants, hotels, resorts, clubs, catering operations, contract foodservice and health care facilities. Students will be provided theoretical knowledge/practical applications that provide critical competencies to meet industry demands, including environmental stewardship, operational efficiencies and professionalism. Courses include sanitation/safety, baking, garde manger, culinary fundamentals/production skills, nutrition, customer service, purchasing/cost control, and human resource management. Graduates should qualify for entry-level opportunities including prep cook, line cook, and station chef. American Culinary Federation certification may be available to graduates. With experience, graduates may advance to positions including sous chef, pastry chef, executive chef, or foodservice manager. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A55150 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 CIS 111 Basic PC Literacy 1 2 0 2 CUL 110 Sanitation & Safety 2 0 0 2 CUL 110A Sanitation & Safety Lab 0 2 0 1 CUL 112 Nutrition for Foodservice 3 0 0 3 CUL 140 Culinary Skills I 2 6 0 5 CUL 160 Baking I 1 4 0 3 Totals 10 14 0 17 SPRING SEMESTER 1 CUL 170 Garde Manger CUL 240 Culinary Skills II CUL 260 Baking II ENG 111 Expository Writing MAT 115 Mathematical Models Totals

1 4 0 3 1 8 0 5 1 4 0 3 3 0 0 3 2 2 0 3 8 18 0 17

SUMMER SEMESTER COE 112 Co-op Work Experience I Totals

0 0 20 2 0 0 20 2

FALL SEMESTER 2 ACC 120 Principles of Financial Accounting CUL 135 Food & Beverage Service CUL 135A Food & Beverage Service Lab CUL 230 Global Cuisines ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting HRM 245 Human Resource Mgmt – Hosp Totals

3 2 0 4 2 0 0 2 0 2 0 1 1 8 0 5 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 12 12 0 18

CULINARY ARTS

128

SPRING SEMESTER 2 BUS 230 Small Business Management 3 0 0 3 CUL 120 Purchasing 2 0 0 2 CUL 250 Classical Cuisine 1 8 0 5 *** *** Humanities Elective 3 0 0 3 *** *** Social Science Elective 3 0 0 3 Totals 11 8 0 16 Total Semester Hour Credits: 70 CERTIFICATE - C55150 & C55150CP* Gainful Employment Compliance Information - For more information about SCC’s graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this program, and other important information, please visit the program’s webpage for the latest information at: http://www.southwesterncc.edu/program/culinary-arts-certificate FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit CUL 110 Sanitation & Safety 2 0 0 2 CUL 110A Sanitation & Safety Lab 0 2 0 1 CUL 112 Nutrition for Foodservice 3 0 0 3 CUL 135 Food & Beverage Service 2 0 0 2 CUL 135A Food & Beverage Service Lab 0 2 0 1 CUL 140 Culinary Skills I 2 6 0 5 CUL 160 Baking I 1 4 0 3 Totals 10 14 0 17 Total Semester hour Credits: 17 * This certificate or pathway is offered to high school students through the Career & College Promise initiative. Please refer to page 19 for additional information. FACULTY Ceretta Davis, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4256 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4256

CYBER CRIME TECHNOLOGY

129

This curriculum will prepare students to enter the field of computer crime investigations and private security. Students completing this curriculum will be capable of investigating computer crimes, properly seize and recover computer evidence and aid in the prosecution of cyber criminals. Course work in this curriculum will include a division of work in the disciplines of criminal justice and computer information systems. Additionally, students will be required to take specific cyber crime classes. Graduates should qualify to become computer crime investigators for local or state criminal justice agencies. Also these graduates should be competent to serve as computer security specialists or consultants with private businesses. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A55210 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 CCT 110 Introduction to Cyber Crime 3 0 0 3 CCT 112 Ethics and High Technology 3 0 0 3 MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab 0 2 0 1 MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics 3 0 0 3 NET 110 Networking Concepts 2 2 0 3 NOS 110 Operating System Concepts 2 3 0 3 Totals 14 7 0 17 SPRING SEMESTER 1 CCT 121 Computer Crime Investigation 3 2 0 4 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 NET 175 Wireless Technology 2 2 0 3 NOS 120 Linux/UNIX Single User 2 2 0 3 NOS 130 Windows Single User 2 2 0 3 SEC 110 Security Concepts 3 0 0 3 Totals 15 8 0 19 SUMMER SEMESTER ENG 114 Professional Research & Reporting PSY 150 General Psychology *** *** Humanities Elective Totals

3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 9 0 0 9

FALL SEMESTER 2 CCT 231 Technology Crimes & Law CCT 240 Data Recovery Techniques CCT 250 Network Vulnerabilities I CCT 272 Forensic Password Recovery NOS 230 Windows Administration I Totals

3 0 0 3 2 3 0 3 2 2 0 3 1 4 0 3 2 2 0 3 10 11 0 15

130

CYBER CRIME TECHNOLOGY SPRING SEMESTER 2 CCT 241 Advanced Data Recovery CCT 251 Network Vulnerabilities II CCT 285 Trends in Cyber Crime CCT 289 Capstone Project *** *** Approved Elective Totals

2 3 0 3 2 2 0 3 2 2 0 3 1 6 0 3 1-2 2-4 0 2-3 8-9 15-17 0 14-15

Total Semester Hour Credits: 74-75 *Cyber Crime Electives CCT 260 Mobile Phone Examination CCT 271 Mac Digital Forensics CJC 114 Investigative Photography CJC 120 Interviews/Interrogations NET 125 Networking Basics NOS 220 Linux/UNIX Admin I SEC 170 SOHO Security FACULTY Kirk Stephens, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4376 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4376

1 4 0 3 1 4 0 3 1 2 0 2 1 2 0 2 1 4 0 3 2 2 0 3 2 2 0 3

DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES The purpose of the Developmental Studies program is to provide an educational opportunity for students to increase their foundation skills in preparation for regular curriculum courses. Pre‑curriculum courses are designed to provide individualized and group instruction in the areas of reading, standard written English, and mathematics. These courses are required of students who do not achieve minimum scores on one or more sections of the college placement test and recommended to students on probation or suspension. Also, curriculum students who made a sufficient score on the college placement test but who desire to sharpen their skills for regular curriculum composition or math courses may choose to take developmental course work. The college placement test results determine the pre‑curriculum course areas and levels appropriate for students. Preferably, course work should be taken prior to, or concurrently with, first‑year curriculum studies to avoid extending the total time for graduation. Prefix Number Title Class Lab Credit BIO 090 Foundations of Biology 3 2 4 CHM 090 Chemistry Concepts 4 0 4 CIS 070 Fundamentals of Computing 0 2 1 DMA 010 Operations with Integers .75 .5 1 DMA 020 Fractions and Decimals .75 .5 1 DMA 030 Propor/Ratio/Rate/Percent .75 .5 1 DMA 040 Express/Lin Equat/Inequal .75 .5 1 DMA 050 Graphs/Equations of Lines .75 .5 1 DMA 060 Polynomial/Quadratic Appl .75 .5 1 DMA 070 Rational Express/Equation .75 .5 1 DMA 080 Radical Express/Equation .75 .5 1 DRE 096 Integrated Reading & Writing 2.5 1 3 DRE 097 Integrated Reading & Writing II 2.5 1 3 DRE 098 Integrated Reading & Writing III 2.5 1 3 DRE 099 Integrated Reading & Writing 2 0 3 ENG 060 Speaking English Well 2 0 2 ENG 075 Reading & Language Essentials 5 0 5 ENG 085 Reading & Writing Foundations 5 0 5 ENG 090 Composition Strategies 3 0 3 ENG 090A Composition Strategies Lab 0 2 1 ENG 091 Fast Track Composition Strategies 1 0 1 ENG 095 Reading & Comprehension Strategies 5 0 5 RED 080 Introduction to College Reading 3 2 4 RED 090 Improved College Reading 3 2 4 RED 091 Fast Track Improved College Reading 1 0 1 The Developmental Studies program is open to students on a year‑round basis. Upon course completion, students will have developed: 1. Academic skills in the content areas of reading, standard written English, and/or mathematics 2. Expanded vocabulary and higher‑level thinking skills 3. Responsibility for effective time management, learning styles, and study s trategies 4. Enhanced self‑confidence, positive attitude, motivation, and commitment to learning 5. Basic computer and keyboarding skills.

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ACADEMIC RELATED AND ORIENTATION CLASSES Prefix Number Title Class Lab Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 1 ACA 120 Career Assessment 1 0 1 ACA 115 Success & Study Skills 0 2 1 ACA 122 College Transfer Success 1 0 1

FACULTY Darlene Anderson, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4361 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4361 Mary Bradley [email protected] 828.339.4335 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4335 Toni Knott [email protected] 828.339.4325 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4325 Amy Russ [email protected] 828.339.4460 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4460



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The Early Childhood Education curriculum prepares individuals to work with children from infancy through middle childhood in diverse learning environments. Students will combine learned theories with practice in actual settings with young children under the supervision of qualified teachers. Course work includes child growth and development; physical/nutritional needs of children; care and guidance of children; and communication skills with parents and children. Students will foster the cognitive/language, physical/motor, social/emotional, and creative development of young children. Graduates are prepared to plan and implement developmentally appropriate programs in early childhood settings. Employment opportunities include child development and child care programs, preschools, public and private schools, recreational centers, Head Start Programs, and school-age programs. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A55220 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 EDU 119 Introduction to Early Childhood Education 4 0 0 4 EDU 131 Child, Family, & Community 3 0 0 3 EDU 144 Child Development I 3 0 0 3 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 Choose one of the following: CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 CIS 111 Basic PC Literacy 1 2 0 2 Totals 15-16 2 0 16-17 SPRING SEMESTER 1 EDU 145 Child Development II 3 0 0 3 EDU 146 Child Guidance 3 0 0 3 EDU 151 Creative Activities 3 0 0 3 ENG 114 Professional Research & Reporting 3 0 0 3 Choose one of the following: MAT 115 Mathematical Models 2 2 0 3 OR MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics 3 0 0 3 MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab 0 2 0 1 Totals 14-15 2 0 15-16 SUMMER SEMESTER EDU 162 Observation and Assessment in ECE EDU 184 Early Childhood Introductory Practicum *** *** Humanities Elective Totals FALL SEMESTER 2 EDU 153 Health, Safety, & Nutrition EDU 234 Infants, Toddlers, & Twos EDU 280 Language & Literacy Experiences EDU *** Education Elective PSY 150 General Psychology Totals

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EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION SPRING SEMESTER 2 EDU 221 Children with Exceptionalities 3 0 0 3 EDU 259 Curriculum Planning 3 0 0 3 EDU 271 Educational Technology 2 2 0 3 EDU 284 Early Child Capstone Practicum 1 9 0 4 EDU *** Education Elective 3 0 0 3 Totals 12 11 0 16 Education Electives Choose two: EDU 154 Social/Emotional/Behavioral Devel. 3 0 0 3 EDU 161 Introduction to Exceptional Children 3 0 0 3 EDU 251 Exploration Activities 3 0 0 3 EDU 261 Early Childhood Administration I 3 0 0 3 EDU 262 Early Childhood Administration II 3 0 0 3 Total Semester Hour Credits: 70-72 CERTIFICATE - C55220 Gainful Employment Compliance Information - For more information about SCC’s graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this program, and other important information, please visit the program’s webpage for the latest information at: http://www.southwesterncc.edu/program/early-childhood-education-certificate Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit EDU 119 Intro to Early Childhood Education 4 0 0 4 EDU 144 Child Development I 3 0 0 3 EDU 145 Child Development II 3 0 0 3 EDU 146 Child Guidance 3 0 0 3 Choose one of the following: EDU 151 Creative Activities 3 0 0 3 EDU 259 Curriculum Planning 3 0 0 3 Totals 16 0 0 16 Total Semester Hour Credits: 16 CERTIFICATE - C55220CP* Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit EDU 119 Intro to Early Childhood Education 4 0 0 4 EDU 144 Child Development I 3 0 0 3 EDU 145 Child Development II 3 0 0 3 EDU 146 Child Guidance 3 0 0 3 EDU 151 Creative Activities 3 0 0 3 Totals 16 0 0 16 Total Semester Hour Credits: 16 * This certificate or pathway is offered to high school students through the Career & College Promise initiative. Please refer to page 19 for additional information. FACULTY Linda Aiken, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4220 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4220

Sheri Turk [email protected] 828.339.4210 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4210

ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY The Electrical/Electronics Technology curriculum is designed to provide training for persons interested in the installation and maintenance of electrical/electronic systems found in residential, commercial, and industrial facilities. Training, most of which is hands-on, will include such topics as AC/DC theory, basic wiring practices, digital electronics, programmable logic controllers, industrial motor controls, the National Electric Code, and other subjects as local needs require. Graduates should qualify for a variety of jobs in the electrical/electronics field as an onthe-job trainee or apprentice assisting in the layout, installation, and maintenance of electrical/ electronic systems. DIPLOMA D35220 Gainful Employment Compliance Information - For more information about SCC’s graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this program, and other important information, please visit the program’s webpage for the latest information at: http://www.southwesterncc.edu/program/electricalelectronics-technology-diploma Prefix Number Title CIS 111 Basic PC Literacy COE 112 Co-op Work Experience I DFT 117 Technical Drafting ELC 112 DC/AC Electricity ELC 113 Basic Wiring I ELC 114 Basic Wiring II ELC 116 Telecom Cabling ELC 117 Motors and Controls ELC 128 Introduction to PLC ELN 131 Electronic Devices ENG 111 Expository Writing MAT 101 Applied Mathematics I Totals

Class Lab Clinical Credit 1 2 0 2 0 0 20 2 1 2 0 2 3 6 0 5 2 6 0 4 2 6 0 4 1 2 0 2 2 6 0 4 2 3 0 3 3 3 0 4 3 0 0 3 2 2 0 3 22 38 20 38

Total Semester Hour Credits: 38 CERTIFICATE - C35220 & C35220CP* FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title ELC 112 DC/AC Electricity ELC 113 Basic Wiring I Totals SPRING SEMESTER 1 ELC 114 Basic Wiring II ELC 117 Motors and Controls Totals

Class Lab Clinical Credit 3 6 0 5 2 6 0 4 5 12 0 9 2 6 0 4 2 6 0 4 4 12 0 8

Total Semester Hour Credits: 17 * This certificate or pathway is offered to high school students through the Career & College Promise initiative. Please refer to page 19 for additional information. FACULTY Ron Poor, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4214 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4214

Kevin Cope 828.339.4204 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4204 [email protected]

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ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY The Electronics Engineering Technology curriculum prepares individuals to become technicians who design, build, install, test, troubleshoot, repair, and modify developmental and production electronic components, equipment, and systems such as industrial/computer controls, manufacturing systems, communication systems, and power electronic systems. A broad-based core of courses, including basic electricity, solid-state fundamentals, digital concepts, and microprocessors, ensures the student will develop the skills necessary to perform entry-level tasks. Emphasis is placed on developing the student’s ability to analyze and troubleshoot electronic systems. Graduates should qualify for employment as engineering assistants or electronic technicians with job titles such as electronics engineering technician, field service technician, maintenance technician, electronic tester, electronic systems integrator, bench technician, and production control technician. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A40200 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit DFT 117 Technical Drafting 1 2 0 2 ELC 131 DC/AC Circuit Analysis 4 3 0 5 HRD 3003 College Student Success 0 0 0 0 MAT 121 Algebra/Trigonometry I 2 2 0 3 *** *** Social Science Elective 3 0 0 3 Totals 10 7 0 13 SPRING SEMESTER 1 ELC 128 Introduction to PLC 2 3 0 3 ELN 131 Semi Conductor Applications 3 3 0 4 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 MAT 122 Algebra/Trigonometry II 2 2 0 3 Totals 10 8 0 13 SUMMER SEMESTER ELN 132 Linear IC Applications ELN 133 Digital Electronics ENG 114 Professional Research & Reporting Choose one of the following: ELN 215 Semiconductor Physics PHY 131 Physics-Mechanics Totals

3 3 0 4 3 3 0 4 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 2 0 4 12 6-8 0 14-15

FALL SEMESTER 2 CET 111 Computer Upgrade/Repair I 2 3 0 3 ELN 229 Industrial Electronics 2 4 0 4 ELN 232 Introduction to Microprocessors 3 3 0 4 ELN 234 Communication Systems 3 3 0 4 ELN 275 Troubleshooting 1 3 0 2 Totals 11 16 0 17

ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY SPRING SEMESTER 2 ELN 152 Fabrication Techniques ELN 231 Industrial Controls ELN 258 FCC Commercial License Prep ELN 264 Advanced Communication *** *** Humanities Elective Choose one of the following: COE 112 Co-op Work Experience I EGR 285 Design Project Totals Total Semester Hour Credits: 75-76 FACULTY Ron Poor, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4214 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4214 Mike Deaver [email protected] 828.339.4337 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4337

1 3 0 2 2 3 0 3 3 0 0 3 4 3 0 5 3 0 0 3 0 0 20 2 0 4 0 2 13 9-13 0-20 18

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EMERGENCY MEDICAL SCIENCE The Emergency Medical Science curriculum is designed to prepare graduates to enter the workforce as paramedics. Additionally, the program can provide an Associate Degree for individuals desiring an opportunity for career enhancement. The course of study provides the student an opportunity to acquire basic and advanced life support knowledge and skills by utilizing classroom instruction, practical laboratory sessions, hospital clinical experience, and field internships with emergency medical service agencies. Students progressing through the program may be eligible to apply for both state and national certification exams. Employment opportunities include ambulance services, fire and rescue agencies, air medical services, specialty areas of hospitals, industries, educational institutions, and government agencies. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A45340 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 BIO 168 Anatomy and Physiology I 3 3 0 4 EMS 110 EMT-Basic 5 6 0 7 EMS 150 Emergency Vehicles & EMS Communication 1 3 0 2 MAT 110 Mathematical Measurement 2 2 0 3 Totals 12 14 0 17 SPRING SEMESTER 1 BIO 169 Anatomy and Physiology II 3 3 0 4 EMS 120 Intermediate Interventions 2 3 0 3 EMS 121 EMS Clinical Practicum I 0 0 6 2 EMS 130 Pharmacology I for EMS 1 3 0 2 EMS 131 Advanced Airway Management 1 2 0 2 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 Totals 10 11 6 16 SUMMER SEMESTER EMS 220 Cardiology EMS 221 EMS Clinical Practicum II ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting Choose one of the following: EMS 115 Defense Tactics for EMS EMS 230 Pharmacology II for EMS Totals

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6 0 0

0 9 0

4 3 3

1 3 0 2 1 3 0 2 6 9 9 12

FALL SEMESTER 2 EMS 140 Rescue Scene Management 1 3 0 2 EMS 210 Advanced Patient Assessment 1 3 0 2 EMS 231 EMS Clinical Practicum III 0 0 9 3 EMS 250 Advanced Medical Emergencies 2 3 0 3 EMS 260 Advanced Trauma Emergencies 1 3 0 2 PSY 150 General Psychology 3 0 0 3 Totals 8 12 9 15 SPRING SEMESTER 2 EMS 235 EMS Management EMS 240 Special Needs Patients EMS 241 EMS Clinical Practicum IV EMS 270 Life Span Emergencies EMS 285 EMS Capstone *** *** Humanities Elective Totals Total Semester Hour Credits: 75

2 0 0 2 1 2 0 2 0 0 9 3 2 2 0 3 1 3 0 2 3 0 0 3 9 7 9 15

EMERGENCY MEDICAL SCIENCE CERTIFICATE C45340 & C45340CP* Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit EMS 110 EMT Basic 5 6 0 7 EMS 115 Defense Tactics for EMS 1 3 0 2 EMS 140 Rescue Scene Management 1 3 0 2 EMS 150 Emergency Vehicles & EMS Comm. 1 3 0 2 Totals 8 15 0 13 Total Semester Hour Credits: 13 * This certificate or pathway is offered to high school students through the Career & College Promise initiative. Please refer to page 19 for additional information. ADMISSIONS CRITERIA The admission requirements for the Emergency Medical Science program are as follows: PHASE I - To be completed by May 5 The applicant must: 1. Complete an application for admission to the Program. 2. Be a high school graduate or have earned a high school equivalency diploma (GED). Exception: current high school students 3. Submit official copies of all transcripts (high school and college). Transcripts must be sent directly from the institution. It is the responsibility of the applicant to assure that all necessary records are sent to the College Admissions Office. 4. Have a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale on the most recent academic transcript with ten semester hours completed excluding developmental courses. 5. Meet the Southwestern Community College Placement Test requirement. This may be met by one of the following methods: a) Take and pass the basic components of the Computerized Placement Test. These consist of algebra, arithmetic, reading comprehension, grammar and basic computer skills. The test is administered several times each week on the Jackson and Macon Campuses and is free of charge. To schedule a test session, contact Testing Services at 828.339.4332. If you do not pass the basic components of the placement test, you must enroll in and successfully complete the appropriate develop mental coursework prior to the program deadline. If you are unsuccessful in achieving the appropriate cut-off scores in any component of the test, please see the academic retest policy. b) Appropriate SAT or ACT scores and successful completion of high school or college computer literacy course within the past six years. See admissions section for additional details. c) Successful completion of a college-level math, algebra, English and computer literacy course. 6. Must take TEAS Exam. Refer to the website for cut-off scores. 7. Submit a copy of a current/valid North Carolina drivers license. 8. Be 18 years of age by the end of the first semester of the program. Exception: current high school students must turn 18 within one year of completion of EMS 110 9. Special legal requirements exist which may limit the ability of an individual to obtain clinical experience, employment, or certification in this field. Prospective students should obtain additional information from a program faculty member prior to seeking admission.

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EMERGENCY MEDICAL SCIENCE PHASE II Those individuals who have completed all the components of Phase I requirements are notified of provisional acceptance status and will be provided with SCC health forms to be completed by the appropriate medical personnel. The completed medical forms must indicate that you are capable of meeting the physical requirements for the program. These forms should be sent to the program director. Once satisfactory health forms have been received, the Admissions Office will send a letter of acceptance. Notes: 1. The EMS program has a limited enrollment and only admits a class in the fall of each year. Applications must be completed and supporting documents submitted by May 5 of the year in which the student wishes to enroll in the program. If all slots have not been filled after the above deadline, there may be extensions to the deadline. Please check with the Admissions Office about the status of the program. Further more, if the number of prospective students who complete Phase I requirements exceeds the number of available slots, the college may use a competitive admission/ selection process to include a personal interview. 2. Selected learning experiences (clinical education) will be provided at cooperating emergency medical care providers. Students are responsible for providing their own transportation to these sites. 3. The program requires that students maintain a high level of academic and clinical performance. Failure to meet these standards will prevent normal progression through the program. 4. Applicants are responsible for submitting all the necessary records to the Admissions Office. 5. Applications must be updated annually by applicants who were not accepted the previous year. 6. Applicants may take non-EMS, general education and related course work prior to being accepted into the program. 7. All students accepted into the program must successfully obtain EMT-Basic certification upon completion of the first semester. Failure to do so will prevent progression through the program. 8. Students who already hold current EMT-Basic or EMT Intermediate (state or national) may be eligible for advanced placement credit. 9. Current high school students meeting program requirements may only be accepted into EMS certificate program BRIDGING PROGRAM COURSE WORK The Emergency Medical Science Bridging program is designed to allow a currently certified, non-degreed EMT paramedic to earn a two-year associate of applied science degree in Emergency Medical Science. Bridging students have attained a Paramedic certification through a continuing education certificate program and passed the North Carolina National Registry, or another state certification examination. To be eligible for the program, students must: 1. Meet SCC’s institutional requirements for admission as an EMS student. 2. Hold current certification as an EMT-Paramedic. 3. Hold current certificate in the following: a) Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) b) Basic Trauma Life Support or Prehospital Trauma Life Support (BTLS-PHTLS) c) Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) (The certifications above are core competency skills in EMS that are the equivalent of 45 semester hours of EMS credit.)

EMERGENCY MEDICAL SCIENCE 4. 5.

Two letters of reference will be required: one from an immediate supervisor and one from the service’s Medical Director attesting to the individual’s competence. Minimum 1,000 hours as field medic completed at time of application.

GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES Prefix Number Title BIO 168 Anatomy and Physiology I BIO 169 Anatomy and Physiology II CIS 110 Introduction to Computers ENG 111 Expository Writing ENG 114 Professional Research & Reporting PSY 150 General Psychology *** *** Humanities Elective Totals EMERGENCY MEDICAL SCIENCE COURSES EMS 140 Rescue Scene Management EMS 235 EMS Management EMS 280 EMS Bridging Course Totals

Class Lab Clinical Credit 3 3 0 4 3 3 0 4 2 2 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 20 8 0 23

1 3 0 2 2 0 0 2 2 2 0 3 5 5 0 7

Total Semester Hour Credits: 30 NOTES 1. A student who holds an active, basic or intermediate level of state certification may be eligible for advance placement credit. Student must provide an official copy of current/ active licensure or certification and proof of training completed to the Admissions Office. A grade of “S” will be awarded for all courses that cover subject matter demonstrated mastered by the attainment and proof of current/active licensure or certification. 2. All students admitted into a health science program may be required, by clinical or Co-op site, to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug testing, prior to, or during clinical education coursework. The results of these tests could affect the student’s ability to progress in the program. 3. All students completing a health science program may be required, by an external testing agency, to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug test prior to a state or national licensing/certification board approving the graduate to sit for licensure/certification exams. FACULTY Eric Hester, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4277 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4277 Tony Belcher, Clinical Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4309 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4309

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ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY The Environmental Science Technology curriculum is designed to prepare individuals for employment in environmental testing/consulting and related industries. Major emphasis is placed on biological and chemical evaluation of man’s impact on his environment. Course work includes general education, computer applications, biology, chemistry, industrial safety, and an extensive array of detailed environmentally specific classes. Graduates should qualify for numerous positions within the industry. Employment opportunities include, but are not limited to, the following: Chemical Analysis, Biological Analysis, Water/Wastewater Treatment, EPA Compliance Inspection, Hazardous Material Handling, Waste Abatement/Removal, and Contaminated Site Assessment/Remediation. This program is offered in conjunction with Blue Ridge Community College. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A20140 FALL SEMESTER 1 - Southwestern Community College Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit BIO 140 Environmental Biology 3 0 0 3 BIO 140A Environmental Biology Lab 0 0 3 1 CHM 131 Introduction to Chemistry 3 0 0 3 CHM 131A Introduction to Chemistry Lab 0 3 0 1 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 Choose one of the following: ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 ACA 115 Success & Study Skills 0 2 0 1 Choose one of the following: MAT 121 Algebra/Trigonometry I 2 2 0 3 MAT 161 College Algebra 3 0 0 3 Totals 11-13 3-7 3 15 SPRING SEMESTER 1 - Southwestern Community College BIO 111 General Biology I 3 3 0 4 CHM 132 Organic and Biochemistry 3 3 0 4 ENG 114 Professional Research & Reporting 3 0 0 3 *** *** Humanities Elective 3 0 0 3 *** *** Social Science Elective 3 0 0 3 Totals 15 6 0 17 SUMMER SEMESTER - Blue Ridge Community College CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 *** *** Major Course Elective 2-5 0-3 0-30 6 Totals 4-7 2-5 0-30 9 FALL SEMESTER 2 - Blue Ridge Community College BIO 240 Waste Management 3 0 0 3 EHS 114 OSHA Regulations 4 0 0 4 ENV 218 Environmental Health 3 0 0 3 PHS 130 Earth Science 3 2 0 4 *** *** Major Course Elective 3 0 0 3 Totals 16 2 0 17

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY SPRING SEMESTER 2 - Blue Ridge Community College ENV 214 Water Quality 3 2 0 4 ENV 222 Air Quality 3 2 0 4 ENV 228 Environmental Issues 1 0 0 1 ENV 226 Environmental Law 3 0 0 3 Totals 10 4 0 12 Total Semester Hour Credits: 70 CHOOSE ELECTIVE HOURS FROM THE FOLLOWING COURSES (Advisor approval required) BIO 112 General Biology II 3 3 0 4 BIO 120 Introduction to Botany 3 3 0 4 BIO 130 Introduction to Zoology 3 3 0 4 BIO 145 Ecology 3 3 0 4 BIO 170 Introduction to Microbiology 3 3 0 4 COE 111 Co-op Work Experience I 0 0 10 1 COE 112 Co-op Work Experience I 0 0 20 2 COE 113 Co-op Work Experience II 0 0 30 3 EHS 112 Industrial Hygiene 5 0 0 5 EHS 215 Incident Management 3 2 0 4 ENV 224 Land Resource Management 3 2 0 4 ENV 236 Wetlands Science 2 2 0 3 FOR 171 Introduction to Forest Resources 3 0 0 3 GIS 111 Introduction to GIS 2 2 0 3 MAT 161A College Algebra Lab 0 2 0 1 Degree awarded by Blue Ridge Community College ADVISOR Deanne Oppermann [email protected] 828.339.4298 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4298

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GENERAL OCCUPATIONAL TECHNOLOGY The General Occupational Technology curriculum provides individuals with an opportunity to upgrade their skills and to earn an associate degree by taking courses suited for their occupational interests and/or needs. The curriculum content will be individualized for students according to their occupational interests and needs. A program of study for each student will be designed from associate degree level courses offered by the College on an approved program of study. Graduates will become effective workers, better qualified for advancements within their field of employment, and qualified for a wide range of entry-level and advanced employment opportunities. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A55280 I. GENERAL EDUCATION Prefix Number Title Class Lab Credit ENGLISH - Six SHC required for AAS degree. ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 3 ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting 3 0 3 Humanities/Fine Arts - Three Semester Hour Credits required for AAS degree. *** *** Humanities Elective 3 0 3 Social/Behavioral Science - Three Semester Hour Credits required for AAS degree. *** *** Social Science Elective 3 0 3 Natural Science/Mathematics -Three Semester Hour Credits required for AAS degree. MAT 110 Mathematical Measurement 2 2 3 (A higher level Math course may substitute for MAT 110) General Education Totals: 15/16 II. CURRICULUM MAJOR HOURS The student must complete a minimum of 49 semester hour credits from a combination of major courses for curricula approved to be offered by the college. Total Curriculum Major Hour Credits: 49 III. OTHER MAJOR REQUIRED COURSES (FOR THE AAS DEGREE) ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 1 or ACA 115 Success & Study Skills 0 2 1 CIS 111 Basic PC Literacy 1 2 2 or CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 3 Total Other Major Hours: 3-4 Total Semester Hour Credits: 67-68 ADVISOR Mitch Fischer, Dean of Health Sciences [email protected] 828.339.4331 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4331

HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY The Health Information Technology curriculum provides individuals with the knowledge and skills to process, analyze, abstract, compile, maintain, manage, and report health information. Students will supervise departmental functions; classify, code, and index diagnoses and procedures; coordinate information for cost control, quality management, statistics, marketing, and planning; monitor governmental and non-governmental standards; facilitate research; and design system controls to monitor patient information security. Graduates of this program may be eligible to write the national certification examination to become a Registered Health Information Technician (RHIT)*. Employment opportunities include hospitals, rehabilitation facilities, nursing homes, health insurance organizations, outpatient clinics, physicians’ offices, hospice, and mental health facilities. SCC student pass rate for 2011 RHIT exam was 100%. Graduates with the coding diploma may choose to take a national coding certification examination to become a Certified Coding Specialist (CCS). The HIT program is accredited by Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management (CAHIIM). ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A45360 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 BIO 168 Anatomy and Physiology I 3 3 0 4 CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 HIT 110 Fundamentals of HIM 3 0 0 3 MED 121 Medical Terminology I 3 0 0 3 Totals 15 5 0 17 SPRING SEMESTER 1 BIO 169 Anatomy and Physiology II 3 3 0 4 ENG 114 Professional Research & Reporting 3 0 0 3 HIT 114 Health Data Systems/Standards 2 3 0 3 MAT 110 Mathematical Measurement 2 2 0 3 MED 122 Medical Terminology II 3 0 0 3 Totals 13 8 0 16 SUMMER SEMESTER HIT 112 Health Law & Ethics HIT 216 Quality Management HIT 226 Principles of Disease PSY 150 General Psychology Totals

3 0 0 3 1 3 0 2 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 10 3 0 11

FALL SEMESTER 2 HIT 122 Professional Practice Experience I HIT 211 ICD Coding HIT 218 Management Principles in HIT HIT 220 Health Informatics and EHR’s HIT 221 Life Cycle of EHR *** *** Humanities Elective Totals

0 0 3 1 2 6 0 4 3 0 0 3 1 2 0 2 2 2 0 3 3 0 0 3 11 10 3 16

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HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SPRING SEMESTER 2 HIT 124 Professional Practice Experience II HIT 210 Healthcare Statistics HIT 214 CPT/Other Coding Systems HIT 215 Reimbursement Methodology HIT 222 Professional Practice Experience III HIT 280 Professional Issues Totals

0 0 3 1 2 2 0 3 1 3 0 2 1 2 0 2 0 0 6 2 2 0 0 2 6 7 9 12

Total Semester Credit Hours: 72

ADMISSIONS CRITERIA

The applicant must: 1. Complete an application for admission to the College. 2. Be a high school graduate or have earned a high school equivalency diploma (GED). 3. Submit official copies of all transcripts (high school and college). Transcripts must be sent directly from the institution. It is the responsibility of the applicant to assure that all necessary records are sent to the College’s Admissions Office. 4. Have a grade point average of 2.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale of the most recent academic transcript (high school or postsecondary). 5. Meet the Southwestern Community College Placement Test requirement. This may be met by one of the following methods: a) Take and pass the basic components of the Computerized Placement Test. These consist of algebra, arithmetic, reading comprehension, grammar and basic computer skills. The test is administered several times each week on the Jackson and Macon Campuses and is free of charge. To schedule a test session, contact Testing Services at 828.339.4332. If you do not pass the basic components of the placement test, it is recommended that you enroll in and successfully complete the appropriate developmental coursework. If you are unsuccessful in achieving the appropriate cut-off scores in any component of the test, please see the academic retest policy. b) Appropriate SAT or ACT scores and successful completion of high school or college computer literacy course within the past six years. See admissions section for additional details. c) Successful completion of a college-level math, algebra, English and computer literacy course. NOTES 1. Applicants should be able to demonstrate typing competence. 2. Applicants are responsible for submitting all the necessary records to the College Registrar’s Office. 3. Applications must be updated annually by applicants who were not accepted the previous year. 4. Applicants may take non Health Information Technology general education and related coursework prior to being accepted into the program. 5. All students admitted into a health science program may be required, by clinical or Co-op site, to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug testing, prior to, or during clinical education coursework. The results of these tests could affect the student’s ability to progress in the program. 6. All students completing a health science program may be required, by an external testing agency, to submit to a criminal background check and/ or drug test prior to a state or national licensing/certification board approving the graduate to sit for licensure/certification exams.

HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE PREREQUISITES A student must earn a final grade of “C” or better in the HIT and related courses to progress in the program. Also, prior to Professional Practice, the student must have completed SCC’s health forms by the appropriate medical personnel. These completed forms must indicate that the student is capable of meeting the health requirements of the program. Students must also purchase liability insurance through SCC’s Business Office. Due to limited Professional Practice slots, the program is limited on the number of students that can participate in these courses. If there are more students ready to enter Professional Practice than there are clinical slots, then selection will be based on objective criteria, including GPA and progression in the program. FACULTY Penny Wells, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4362 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4362 Kimberly Rice [email protected] 828.339.4263 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4263

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HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATICS The Health Informatics certificate will provide individuals with the knowledge and skills to assess the environment of clinical practice, make recommendations for adoption of related technology, and lead the implementation of IT projects related to the collection, storage, and management of patient data within electronic health record systems. Course work includes data collection, data sets and reporting for compliance, workflow analysis, the system development lifecycle with emphasis on impact within the clinical setting, vendor selection process, training of end users, and skills/tools used to manage IT projects. Upon completion, the student will be able to explain data needs, capture methodology and retention of patient clinical data, perform an environmental assessment of data needs, prioritize clinical needs to determine vendor product selection, develop a plan for end user education/ training, and create supporting end user training documentation. Opportunities would exist within large healthcare organizations, physician practices, clinics and vendor sales.

CERTIFICATE - C453601 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title HIT 221 Lifecycle of EHR HIT 220 Health Informatics & EHR’s HIT 225 Healthcare Informatics Totals

Class Lab Clinical Credit 2 2 0 3 1 2 0 2 3 2 0 4 5 4 0 7

SPRING SEMESTER 1 HIT 114 Health Data Systems/Standards 2 3 0 3 HIT 227 Informatics Project Mgt 2 2 0 3 Totals 4 5 0 6 SUMMER SEMESTER 1 HIT 112 Health Law & Ethics 3 0 0 3 Totals 4 2 0 5 Total Semester Hour Credits: 18 ADMISSIONS CRITERIA The applicant must: 1. Complete an application for admission to the College. 2. Be a high school graduate or have earned a high school equivalency diploma (GED). 3. Submit official copies of all transcripts (high school and college). Transcripts must be sent directly from the institution. It is the responsibility of the applicant to assure that all necessary records are sent to the College’s Admissions Office. 4. Have a grade point average of 2.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale of the most recent academic transcript (high school or postsecondary). 5. Meet the Southwestern Community College Placement Test requirement. This may be met by one of the following methods: a) Take and pass the basic components of the Computerized Placement Test. These consist of algebra, arithmetic, reading comprehension, grammar and basic computer skills. The test is administered several times each week on the Jackson and Macon Campuses and is free of charge. To schedule a test session, contact Testing Services at 828.339.4332. If you do not pass the basic components of the placement test, it is recommended that you enroll in and successfully

HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATICS complete the appropriate developmental coursework. If you are unsuccessful in achieving the appropriate cut-off scores in any component of the test, please see the academic retest policy. b) Appropriate SAT or ACT scores and successful completion of high school or college computer literacy course within the past six years. See Admissions section for additional details c) Successful completion of a college-level math, algebra, English and computer literacy course. NOTES 1. Applicants are responsible for submitting all the necessary records to the College Registrar’s Office. 2. Applications must be updated annually by applicants who were not accepted the previous year. 3. Health Professionals may be able to advance place out of some courses. Coursework required will be program specific. A grade of “S” will be awarded for all courses that cover subject matter demonstrated mastered by the attainment and proof of current/ active licensure or certification or degree. FACULTY Penny Wells, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4362 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4362 Kimberly Rice [email protected] 828.339.4263 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4263



149

150

HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MEDICAL CODING The program requires that students maintain a high level of academic and clinical performance. Failure to meet these standards will prevent normal progression through the program. DIPLOMA - D45360 Gainful Employment Compliance Information - For more information about SCC’s graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this program, and other important information, please visit the program’s webpage for the latest information at: http://www.southwesterncc.edu/program/hit-medical-coding-diploma FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title BIO 168 Anatomy and Physiology I ENG 111 Expository Writing HIT 110 Fundamentals of HIM HIT 211 ICD Coding MED 121 Medical Terminology I Totals

Class Lab Clinical Credit 3 3 0 4 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 2 6 0 4 3 0 0 3 14 9 0 17

SPRING SEMESTER 1 BIO 169 Anatomy and Physiology II 3 3 0 4 HIT 114 Health Data Systems/Standards 2 3 0 3 HIT 124 Professional Practice Experience II 0 0 3 1 HIT 214 CPT/Other Coding Systems 1 3 0 2 HIT 215 Reimbursement Methodology 1 2 0 2 HIT 222 Professional Practice Experience III 0 0 6 2 MED 122 Medical Terminology II 3 0 0 3 Totals 10 11 9 17 SUMMER SEMESTER 1 CIS 110 Introduction to Computers HIT 112 Health Law & Ethics HIT 226 Principles of Disease Totals Total Semester Hour Credits: 43 FACULTY Penny Wells, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4362 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4362

2 2 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 8 2 0 9

HUMAN SERVICES TECHNOLOGY The Human Services Technology curriculum prepares students for entry-level positions in institutions and agencies which provide social, community, and educational services. Along with core courses, students take courses which prepare them for specialization in specific human service areas. Students will take courses from a variety of disciplines. Emphasis in core courses is placed on development of relevant knowledge, skills, and attitudes in human services. Fieldwork experience will provide opportunities for application of knowledge and skills learned in the classroom. Graduates should qualify for positions in mental health, child care, family services, social services, rehabilitation, correction, and educational agencies. Graduates choosing to continue their education may select from a variety of transfer programs at senior public and private institutions. Graduates choosing to continue their education may transfer to Western Carolina University’s Social Work Program as a junior. A degree in Social Work increases opportunities for employment in Mental Health, Nursing homes, Veterans services, Hospitals, Elementary and High schools, child protective services, jails and prisons, and Vocational Rehabilitation. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A45380 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 CIS 111 Basic PC Literacy 1 2 0 2 HSE 110 Introduction to Human Services 2 2 0 3 HSE 123 Interviewing Techniques 2 2 0 3 PSY 150 General Psychology 3 0 0 3 SAB 110 Substance Abuse Overview 3 0 0 3 Totals 12 6 0 15 SPRING SEMESTER 1 ENG 111 Expository Writing HEA 110 Personal Health & Wellness HSE 210 Human Services Issues HSE 225 Crisis Intervention PSY 241 Developmental Psychology SOC 210 Introduction to Sociology Totals

3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 2 0 0 2 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 17 0 0 17

SUMMER SEMESTER ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting HUM 115 Critical Thinking MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab Totals

3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 0 2 0 1 9 2 0 10

FALL SEMESTER 2 COM 231 Public Speaking HSE 112 Group Process I HSE 125 Counseling HSE 240 Issues in Client Services SAB 137 Co-dependency SOC 213 Sociology of the Family Totals

3 0 0 3 1 2 0 2 2 2 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 15 4 0 17

151

152

HUMAN SERVICES TECHNOLOGY SPRING SEMESTER 2 BIO 163 Basic Anatomy & Physiology 4 2 0 5 COE 111 Co-op Work Experience I 0 0 10 1 COE 115 Work Experience Seminar I 1 0 0 1 HSE 242 Family Systems 3 0 0 3 SAB 210 Substance Abuse Counseling 2 2 0 3 SWK 110 Introduction to Social Work 3 0 0 3 Totals 13 4 10 16 Total Semester Hour Credits: 75 Admission Criteria for Human Services Technology and Human Services TechnologySubstance Abuse: It is important that all potential applicants for the Human Services and Substance Abuse Treatment Programs understand the admissions process. Please review carefully the information regarding minimum requirements and other pertinent information. The applicant must: 1. Complete an application for admission to the Program. 2. Be a high school graduate or have earned a high school equivalency diploma (GED). Exception: current high school students 3. Submit official copies of all transcripts (high school and college). Transcripts must be sent directly from the institution. It is the responsibility of the applicant to ensure that all necessary records are sent to the College Admissions Office. 4. Have a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale on the most recent academic transcript. 5. Meet the Southwestern Community College Placement Test requirement. This may be met by one of the following methods: a) Take and pass the basic components of the Computerized Placement Test. These consist of algebra, arithmetic, reading comprehension, grammar and basic computer skills. The test is administered several times each week on the Jackson and Macon Campuses and is free of charge. To schedule a test session, contact Testing Services at 828.339.4332. If you do not pass the basic components of the placement test, you must enroll in and successfully complete the appropriate developmental coursework prior to entering the program. If you are unsuccessful in achieving the appropriate cut-off scores in any component of the test, please see the academic retest policy. b) Appropriate SAT or ACT scores and successful completion of high school or college computer literacy course within the past six years. See admissions section for additional details. c) Successful completion of a college-level math, algebra, English and computer literacy course. 6. Complete interview with the program coordinator. Interviewed applicants who have not been assigned a space in the program will be placed on a waiting list. Should space become available, the next applicant on the list will be contacted for admission to the program.

HUMAN SERVICES TECHNOLOGY Notes: 1. Applicants are responsible for submitting all the necessary records to the Admissions Office. 2. All students admitted into a health science program may be required, by clinical or Co-op site, to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug testing, prior to, or during clinical education coursework. The results of these tests could affect the student’s ability to progress in the program. 3. All students completing a health science program may be required, by an external testing agency, to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug test prior to a state or national licensing/certification board approving the graduate to sit for licensure/certification exams. FACULTY Sarah Altman, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4319 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4319 Eric Sarratt, Clinical Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4397 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4397

153

154

HUMAN SERVICES TECHNOLOGY - SUBSTANCE ABUSE The Human Services Technology/Substance Abuse concentration prepares students to assist in drug and alcohol counseling, prevention-oriented educational activities, rehabilitation with recovering clients, managing community-based programs, counseling in residential facilities, and pursuit of four-year degrees. Course work includes classroom and experiential activities oriented toward an overview of chemical dependency, psychological/sociological process, the twelve Core Functions, intervention techniques with individuals in groups, and follow-up activities with recovering clients. Graduates should qualify for positions as substance abuse counselors, DUI counselors, halfway house workers, residential facility employees, and substance education specialists. With educational and clinical experiences, graduates can obtain certification by the North Carolina Substance Abuse Board. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A4538E FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 CIS 111 Basic PC Literacy 1 2 0 2 HSE 110 Introduction to Human Services 2 2 0 3 HSE 112 Group Process I 1 2 0 2 HSE 123 Interviewing Techniques 2 2 0 3 PSY 150 General Psychology 3 0 0 3 SAB 110 Substance Abuse Overview 3 0 0 3 Totals 13 8 0 17 SPRING SEMESTER 1 ENG 111 Expository Writing HSE 210 Human Services Issues HSE 225 Crisis Intervention SAB 135 Addictive Process SOC 210 Introduction to Sociology Choose one of the following: PSY 241 Developmental Psychology PSY 281 Abnormal Psychology Totals

3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 17 0 0 17

SUMMER SEMESTER ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting HUM 115 Critical Thinking MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab Totals

3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 0 2 0 1 9 2 0 10

FALL SEMESTER 2 COE 111 Co-op Work Experience I COE 115 Work Experience Seminar I HSE 125 Counseling SAB 125 SAB Case Management SAB 137 Co-dependency SAB 240 SAB Issues in Client Services Totals

3 0 0 3 2 0 0 2 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3

0 0 10 1 1 0 0 1 2 2 0 3 2 2 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 11 4 10 14

SPRING SEMESTER 2 COE 121 Co-op Work Experience II 0 0 10 1 COE 125 Work Experience Seminar II 1 0 0 1 HSE 242 Family Systems 3 0 0 3 SAB 120 Intake and Assessment 3 0 0 3 SAB 210 Substance Abuse Counseling 2 2 0 3 SOC 213 Sociology of the Family 3 0 0 3 Totals 12 2 10 14 Total Semester Hour Credits: 72

HUMAN SERVICES TECHNOLOGY - SUBSTANCE ABUSE Admission Criteria for Human Services Technology and Human Services TechnologySubstance Abuse: It is important that all potential applicants for the Human Services and Substance Abuse Treatment Programs understand the admissions process. Please review carefully the information regarding minimum requirements and other pertinent information. The applicant must: 1. Complete an application for admission to the Program. 2. Be a high school graduate or have earned a high school equivalency diploma (GED). Exception: current high school students 3. Submit official copies of all transcripts (high school and college). Transcripts must be sent directly from the institution. It is the responsibility of the applicant to ensure that all necessary records are sent to the College Admissions Office. 4. Have a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale on the most recent academic transcript. 5. Meet the Southwestern Community College Placement Test requirement. This may be met by one of the following methods: a) Take and pass the basic components of the Computerized Placement Test. These consist of algebra, arithmetic, reading comprehension, grammar and basic computer skills. The test is administered several times each week on the Jackson and Macon Campuses and is free of charge. To schedule a test session, contact Testing Services at (828) 339.4332. If you do not pass the basic components of the placement test, you must enroll in and successfully complete the appropriate developmental coursework prior to entering the program. If you are unsuccessful in achieving the appropriate cut-off scores in any component of the test, please see the academic retest policy. b) Appropriate SAT or ACT scores and successful completion of high school or college computer literacy course within the past six years. See admissions section for additional details. c) Successful completion of a college-level math, algebra, English and computer literacy course. 6. Complete interview with the program coordinator. Interviewed applicants who have not been assigned a space in the program will be placed on a waiting list. Should space become available, the next applicant on the list will be contacted for admission to the program. Notes: 1. Applicants are responsible for submitting all the necessary records to the Admissions Office. 2. All students admitted into a health science program may be required, by clinical or Co-op site, to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug testing, prior to, or during clinical education coursework. The results of these tests could affect the student’s ability to progress in the program. 3. All students completing a health science program may be required, by an external testing agency, to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug test prior to a state or national licensing/certification board approving the graduate to sit for licensure/certification exams.

155

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HUMAN SERVICES TECHNOLOGY - SUBSTANCE ABUSE CERTIFICATE C4538E This program is designed to appeal to students currently in the Human Services curriculum at Southwestern Community College or for those who are currently employed in Human Services with an associate’s degree in a comparative discipline and are interested in gaining specialized training in substance abuse. Gainful Employment Compliance Information - For more information about SCC’s graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this program, and other important information, please visit the program’s webpage for the latest information at: http://www.southwesterncc.edu/program/hst-substance-abuse-treatment-certificate Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit SAB 110 Substance Abuse Overview 3 0 0 3 SAB 125 SAB Case Management 2 2 0 3 SAB 135 Addictive Process 3 0 0 3 SAB 137 Co-dependency 3 0 0 3 SAB 210 Substance Abuse Counseling 2 2 0 3 SAB 240 SAB Issues & Client Services 3 0 0 3 Totals 16 4 0 18 Total Semester Hour Credits: 18 CERTIFICATE C4538E1 (CSAC & LCAS Certificate) This program is designed to appeal to currently employed Human Services professionals who have a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree in a related human services field and are interested in gaining substance abuse specific education hours required by the North Carolina Substance Abuse Professional Practice Board (NCSAPPB), that are needed for obtaining the Certified Substance Abuse Counselor credential (CSAC) for a bachelor’s level professional or the Licensed Clinical Addiction Specialist credential (LCAS) for the master’s level professional. Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit SAB 110 Substance Abuse Overview 3 0 0 3 SAB 125 SAB Case Management 2 2 0 3 SAB 210 Substance Abuse Counseling 2 2 0 3 SAB 240 SAB Issues & Client Services 3 0 0 3 Totals 10 4 0 12 Total Semester Hour Credits: 12 NOTES All students admitted into a health science program may be required, by clinical or Co-op site, to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug testing, prior to, or during clinical education coursework. The results of these tests could affect the student’s ability to progress in the program. All students completing a health science program may be required, by an external testing agency, to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug test prior to a state or national licensing/certification board approving the graduate to sit for licensure/certification exams. Applications and supporting documents must be completed and submitted to the Admissions Office by November 1 for enrollment in the fall semester and by February 10th for spring enrollment of the CSAC and LCAS certificate program of the year in which the student wishes to enroll in the program. FACULTY Sarah Altman, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4319 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4319

Eric Sarratt, Clinical Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4397 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4397

INFANT/TODDLER CARE

157

The curriculum prepares individuals to work with children from infancy to three years of age in diverse learning environments. Students will combine learned theories, competency-based knowledge, and practice in actual settings with infants and toddlers. Course work includes infant/toddler growth and development: physical/nutritional needs of infants and toddlers; safety issues in the care of infants and toddlers; care and guidance; communication skills with families and children; design an implementation of appropriate curriculum; and other related topics. Graduates should be prepared to plan and implement developmentally appropriate infant/ toddler programs in early childhood settings. Employment opportunities include child development and child care programs, preschools, public and private schools, recreational centers, Early Head Start Programs, and other infant/toddler programs. CERTIFICATE C55290 Gainful Employment Compliance Information - For more information about SCC’s graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this program, and other important information, please visit the program’s webpage for the latest information at: http://www.southwesterncc.edu/program/infanttoddler-care-certificate FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title EDU 119 Introduction to Early Childhood Education EDU 144 Child Development I Totals SPRING SEMESTER 1 EDU 131 Child, Family & Community EDU 153 Health, Safety & Nutrition EDU 234 Infant, Toddlers, & Twos Totals Total Semester Hour Credits: 16 FACULTY Linda Aiken, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4220 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4220

Class

Lab Clinical

Credit

4 0 0 4 3 0 0 3 7 0 0 7 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 9 0 0 9

158

MEDICAL ASSISTING The Medical Assisting curriculum prepares multi-skilled health care professionals qualified to perform administrative, clinical, and laboratory procedures. Course work includes instruction in scheduling appointments, coding and processing insurance accounts, billing, collections, medical transcription, computer operations; assisting with examinations/treatments, performing routine laboratory procedures, electrocardiography, supervised medication administration; and ethical/legal issues associated with patient care. Graduates of CAAHEP-accredited medical assisting programs may be eligible to sit for the American Association of Medical Assistants’ Certification Examination to become Certified Medical Assistants. Employment opportunities include physicians’ offices, health maintenance organizations, health departments, and hospitals. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A45400 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit BIO 163 Basic Anatomy and Physiology I 4 2 0 5 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 HRD 3003 Career & College Student Success 0 0 0 0 MED 110 Orientation to Medical Assisting 1 0 0 1 MED 118 Medical Law and Ethics 2 0 0 2 MED 121 Medical Terminology I 3 0 0 3 MED 130 Admin. Office Procedures I ~ 1st Session 1 2 0 2 MED 131 Admin. Office Procedures II ~ 2nd Session 1 2 0 2   Totals 15 6 0 18 SPRING SEMESTER 1         MAT 110 Mathematical Measurement 2 2 0 3 MED 122 Medical Terminology II 3 0 0 3 MED 140 Exam Room Procedures I 3 4 0 5 MED 150 Laboratory Procedures I 3 4 0 5 Totals 11 10 0 16 SUMMER SEMESTER ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting MED 250 Laboratory Procedures II MED 270 Symptomatology Totals

3 0 0 3 3 4 0 5 2 2 0 3 8 6 0 11

FALL SEMESTER 2         MED 232 Medical Insurance Coding 1 3 0 2 MED 240 Exam Room Procedures II 3 4 0 5 MED 272 Drug Therapy 3 0 0 3 NUT 110 Nutrition 3 0 0 3   Totals 10 7 0 13 SPRING SEMESTER 2         MED 114 Professional Interaction & Healthcare 1 0 0 1 MED 260 MED Clinical Practicum 0 0 15 5 MED 262 Clinical Perspectives 1 0 0 1 MED 264 Medical Assisting Overview 2 0 0 2 MED 276 Patient Education 1 2 0 2 PSY 150 General Psychology 3 0 0 3 *** *** Humanities Elective 3 0 0 3     Totals 11 2 15 17 Total Semester Hour Credits: 75

MEDICAL ASSISTING

159

MEDICAL ASSISTANT CERTIFICATE – C45400 & C45400CP*       Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit MED 110 Orientation to Medical Assisting 1 0 0 1 MED 118 Medical Law & Ethics 2 0 0 2 MED 121 Medical Terminology I 3 0 0 3 MED 122 Medical Terminology II 3 0 0 3 MED 130 Admin. Office Procedures I ~ 1st Session 1 2 0 2 MED 131 Admin. Office Procedures II ~ 2nd Session 1 2 0 2 Totals 11 4 0 13 Total Semester Hour Credits: 13 * This certificate or pathway is offered to high school students through the Career & College Promise initiative. Please refer to page 19 for additional information. Graduates of the Medical Assistant Certificate program are NOT eligible to sit for the American Association of Medical Assistants’ Certification Examination. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Admissions Criteria: The program has a limited enrollment and only admits a class in the fall of each year. Applications and supporting documents listed in Phase I below must be completed and submitted by April 1 of the calendar year in which the student wishes to enroll in the program. If all slots have not been filled after the above deadline, there may be extensions to the deadline. Please check with the Admissions Office about the status of the program. PHASE I – to be completed by April 1 The applicant must: 1. Complete an application for admission to the Program. 2. Be a high school graduate or have earned a high school equivalency diploma (GED). Exception: current high school students 3. Submit official copies of all transcripts (high school and college). Transcripts must be sent directly from the institution. It is the responsibility of the applicant to assure that all necessary records are sent to the College Admissions Office. 4. Have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale on the most recent academic transcript with ten semester hours completed excluding developmental courses. 5. Meet the Southwestern Community College Placement Test requirement. This may be met by one of the following methods: a) Take and pass the basic components of the Computerized Placement Test. These consist of algebra, arithmetic, reading comprehension, grammar and basic computer skills. The test is administered several times each week on the Jackson and Macon Campuses and is free of charge. To schedule a test session, contact Testing Services at 828.339.4332. If you do not pass the basic components of the placement test, you must enroll in and successfully complete the appropriate develop mental coursework prior to the program deadline. If you are unsuccessful in achieving the appropriate cut-off scores in any component of the test, please see the academic retest policy. b) Appropriate SAT or ACT scores and successful completion of high school or college computer literacy course within the past six years. See admissions section for additional details. c) Successful completion of a college-level math, algebra, English and computer literacy course.

MEDICAL ASSISTING

160 6. 7.

It is recommended that the applicant spend observation time in a medical assisting environment. Must take the TEAS Exam. The TEAS must have been taken within the past three years and may only be taken once per academic year. The cost of this test is $40.00. The applicant will be required to pay this fee when registering for the test. Details for cost, testing dates and times can be secured from the Advisor. This is not a pass or fail test. It is used to measure your potential to be successful in the program.

PHASE II Those individuals who have completed all parts of Phase I by the appropriate deadlines will be scheduled for a personal interview. Applicants will be notified of date and time. PHASE III Those individuals who are notified of acceptance status will be provided with SCC health forms to be completed by the appropriate medical personnel. The completed medical forms must indicate that you are capable of meeting the physical requirements for the program. The deadline for submitting the completed forms to the program director is August 1. NOTES 1. Applicants are responsible for submitting all the necessary records to the Registrar’s Office. 2. Applications must be updated annually by applicants who were not accepted the previous year. 3. Applicants may take non-medical assisting, general education and related coursework prior to being accepted into the program. 4. All students admitted into a health science program may be required, by clinical or Co-op site, to submit to a criminal background check and/ or drug testing, prior to, or during clinical education coursework. The results of these tests could affect the student’s ability to progress in the program. 5. All students completing a health science program may be required, by an external testing agency, to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug test prior to a state or national licensing/certification board approving the graduate to sit for licensure/certification exams. FACULTY Melissa Allison-Brooks, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4391 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4391 Jessica Moody, Clinical Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4305 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4305

MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY

161

The Medical Laboratory Technology curriculum prepares individuals to perform clinical laboratory procedures in chemistry, hematology, microbiology, and immunohematology that may be used in the maintenance of health and diagnosis/treatment of disease. Course work emphasizes mathematical and scientific concepts related to specimen collection, laboratory testing and procedures, quality assurance and reporting/recording and interpreting findings involving tissues, blood, and body fluids. Graduates may be eligible to take the examinations given by the Board of Certification of the American Society of Clinical Pathology. Employment opportunities include laboratories in hospitals, medical offices, industry, and research facilities. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A45420 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit BIO 111* General Biology I 3 3 0 4 HRD 3003 Career & College Student Success 0 0 0 0 MLT 110** Introduction to MLT 2 3 0 3 MLT 116 Anatomy & Medical Terminology 5 0 0 5 MLT 253** MLT Practicum I (Phlebotomy clinic) 0 0 9 3 PSY 150 General Psychology 3 0 0 3 Totals 13 6 9 18 Notes: 1. Students successfully completing the first semester MLT courses and PSY 150 are eligible to take the national certification exam for phlebotomy. 2. The weekly hours for class/lab/clinical are based on a 16 week semester. Weekly hour requirements will increase if course is offered over a period less than 16 weeks. 3. Students who can provide documentation of current national certification in Phlebotomy (e.g., ASCP BOC) may be waived from MLT 253. SPRING SEMESTER 1 MLT 118 Medical Lab Chemistry 3 0 0 3 MLT 120 Hematology/Hemostasis I 3 3 0 4 MLT 125 Immunohematology I 4 3 0 5 MLT 140 Introduction to Microbiology 2 3 0 3 Totals 12 9 0 15 SUMMER SEMESTER ENG 111 Expository Writing *** *** Humanities Elective Totals FALL SEMESTER 2 ENG 114 Professional Research & Reporting MLT 111 Urinalysis & Body Fluids MLT 130 Clinical Chemistry I MLT 220 Hematology/Hemostasis II MLT 240 Special Clinical Microbiology Totals SPRING SEMESTER 2*** MLT 215 Professional Issues MLT 263 MLT Practicum II (Hematology/Hemostasis) MLT 271 MLT Practicum III (Urinalysis/Serology) MLT 272 MLT Practicum III (Chemistry) MLT 273 MLT Practicum III (Immunohematology) MLT 274 MLT Practicum III (Microbiology) Totals Total Semester Hour Credits: 68

3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 6 0 0 6 3 0 0 3 1 3 0 2 3 3 0 4 2 3 0 3 2 3 0 3 11 12 0 15 1 0 0 1 0 0 9 3 0 0 3 1 0 0 6 2 0 0 9 3 0 0 12 4 1 0 39 14

162

MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY * BIO 111, General Biology (minimum 4 credits) is not available online through SCC. It may be taken on the Jackson Campus or through another local college or university. Credits earned at another college must be transferred to SCC. ** MLT 110 in Fall Semester 1 runs for first 8 weeks of the semester. MLT 253 in Fall Semester 1 runs for the latter 8 weeks of the Fall semester. ***Spring Semester 2, the student will spend the full 16 weeks (39 hours/week) in clinical rotations along with completing the MLT 215 course (1 hour/week) online. The clinical rotations will consist of the following: Hematology/Hemostasis, Urinalysis/Serology, Chemistry, Immunohematology and Microbiology. ADMISSIONS CRITERIA The program has a limited enrollment and only admits a class in the fall of each year. Acceptance into the program is based on the following objective criteria: • Completion of Phase I requirements. • Highest GPAs (grade point averages). • The completed medical forms must indicate that you are capable of meeting the physical requirements for the program. • Students must be 18 years of age or older by August 15, the year they plan to attend the program, in order to be accepted into the MLT program for Fall Semester. All Phase I requirements must be completed by Jan. 31 of the year in which the student wishes to enroll in the program. Students who complete Phase I requirements after Jan. 31 will be considered for acceptance if slots are available. Please check with the Admissions Office about the enrollment availability. PHASE I – To be completed by Jan. 31 The applicant must: 1. Complete an application for admission to the Program. 2. Be a high school graduate or have earned a high school equivalency diploma (GED). Exception: current high school students 3. Submit official copies of all transcripts (high school and college). Transcripts must be sent directly from the institution. It is the responsibility of the applicant to assure that all necessary records are sent to the College Admissions Office. 4. Have a cumulative grade point average of 2.8 or higher on a 4.0 scale on the most recent academic transcript with ten semester hours completed excluding developmental courses. 5. Meet the Southwestern Community College Placement Test requirement. This may be met by one of the following methods: a) Take and pass the basic components of the Computerized Placement Test. These consist of algebra, arithmetic, reading comprehension, grammar and basic computer skills. The test is administered several times each week on the Jackson and Macon Campuses and is free of charge. To schedule a test session, contact Testing Services at 828.339.4332. If you do not pass the basic components of the placement test, you must enroll in and successfully complete the appropriate develop mental coursework prior to the program deadline. If you are unsuccessful in achieving the appropriate cut-off scores in any component of the test, please see the academic retest policy. b) Appropriate SAT or ACT scores and successful completion of high school or college computer literacy course within the past six years. See admissions section for additional details. c) Successful completion of a college-level math, algebra, English and computer literacy course.

MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY 6. 7.

8.

9.

Completion of 8 hours of observation is recommended (not required). Have a computer or access to a computer that is up to date (it does not have to be new, but it needs to be updated) with a web browser. Compatible web browsers are (Internet Explorer and Mozilla Firefox) Google Chrome is functional, however, not fully compatible yet. Have access to a word processing application like Microsoft Office 2010, Open Office (freeware) or use Google Docs, included within the “Quick Launch Pad” in your “myscc” page. If you have any questions regarding your online access to our college services, please review the online learning technical requirements here, or contact our IT Help Desk at 828.339.4409. Have an approved laboratory site for performing the lab and clinical rotations if not able to attend on-campus labs.

PHASE II 1. Review of applicant GPAs (grade point averages) by program director. Individuals will be selected based on GPA, not to be below a 2.8. 2. Admissions will mail out an Acceptance Packet to selected individuals. In order to confirm their slot, the individual must complete and return all required forms by the s cheduled due dates noted in the Acceptance Packet. Students who fail to submit required paperwork by the stated due dates will not be able to register for curriculum courses. The Acceptance Packet includes: 1. Provisional Acceptance Letter 2. Acknowledgement of Acceptance form 3. MLT labsite information form 4. Medical and technical/academic standards form - Due July 1. 3. Students must sign the signature sheet at the end of the MLT Student Policy Manual and submit it to the program coordinator by July 1. See the Student Policy Manual section on the following page. 4. Accident and malpractice insurance must be purchased in the College Business Office at the time fall tuition is paid. NOTES 1. All components of Phase I must be completed before moving to the Phase II requirements. 2. Applicants are responsible for submitting all the necessary records to the College Business Office. 3. Applications must be updated annually by applicants who were not accepted the previous year. 4. Applicants may take non-Medical Laboratory, general education and related coursework prior to being accepted into the program. 5. All students admitted into a health science program may be required, by clinical or Co-op site, to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug testing, prior to, or during clinical education coursework. The results of these tests could affect the student’s ability to progress in the program. 6. All students completing a health science program may be required, by an external testing agency, to submit to a criminal background check and/ or drug test prior to a state or national licensing/certification board approving the graduate to sit for licensure/certification exams.

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164

MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM STRUCTURE The program offers its MLT courses online. All non-MLT prefixed courses may be taken online as well. Any courses not taken at SCC must be transferred in with a grade of “C” or better and approved by the registrar’s office. Labs are offered concurrently and can be completed on campus or in the student’s geographical area at a pre-approved clinical facility. Contact the program director for guidelines on selecting an off-campus clinical facility for performance of laboratory skills. Clinical rotations take place in the first and final semester of the program and may be completed in the student’s geographical area at an approved clinical facility/affiliate. The clinical education will be provided at cooperating hospitals or other healthcare facilities. In the MLT program, the clinical rotations are spent in one or more clinical facilities for practical experience in the clinical laboratory, under supervision. During clinical education, the student will rotate through all departments of the laboratory including: Hematology, Hemostasis, Urinalysis, Chemistry, Phlebotomy, Microbiology, Serology, and Blood Bank. Emphasis is placed on attaining competency and proficiency in the performance of laboratory procedures, correlating theory and practice and demonstrating prescribed professional behavior. ACADEMIC STANDARDS The program requires that students maintain a high level of academic and clinical performance. Students must maintain a semester and cumulative GPA of 2.8 on a 4.0 scale. Failure to meet these standards will prevent normal progression through the program. STUDENT POLICY MANUAL The student policy manual link is available online at http://www.southwesterncc.edu/program/medical-laboratory-technology-online. This manual outlines the policies and procedures to be followed over the course of the program. Students must sign the signature sheet at the end of the policy manual and submit it to the program director by July 1 of the year in which they plan to enroll. INSURANCE Accident and malpractice insurance must be purchased prior to beginning the program. The insurance can be purchased in the College Business Office at the time fall semester tuition is paid. ACCREDITATION The MLT program is accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS). The contact information is as follows: NAACLS, 5600 N. River Road, Suite 720, Rosemont, IL 60018-5119; Phone: 847.939.3597 or 773.714.8880, Fax: 773.714.8886; Website: www.naacls.org FACULTY Andrea Kennedy, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4312 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4312 Dale Hall, Clinical Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4285 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4285

Dr. Michael Rohlfing, Medical Director

MEDICAL OFFICE ADMINISTRATION

165

This curriculum prepares individuals for employment in medical and other health-care related offices. Course work will include medical terminology; information systems; office management; medical coding, billing and insurance; legal and ethical issues; and formatting and word processing. Students will learn administrative and support functions and develop skills applicable in medical environments. Employment opportunities are available in medical and dental offices, hospitals, insurance companies, laboratories, medical supply companies, and other health-care related organizations. Students can complete the courses required for this degree as online courses. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A25310 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 BUS 110 Introduction to Business 3 0 0 3 CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 OST 136 Word Processing 2 2 0 3 OST 164 Text Editing Applications 3 0 0 3 Totals 14 4 0 16 SPRING SEMESTER 1 CTS 130 Spreadsheet I 2 2 0 3 OST 131 Keyboarding 1 2 0 2 OST 149 Medical Legal Issues 3 0 0 3 Choose one of the following: MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics 3 0 0 3 MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab 0 2 0 1 OR MAT 151 Statistics 3 0 0 3 MAT 151A Statistics Lab 0 2 0 1 Choose one of the following: ACC 115 College Accounting 3 2 0 4 ACC 120 Principles of Financial Accounting 3 2 0 4 Totals 12 8 0 16 SUMMER SEMESTER MED 121 Medical Terminology I (1st half ) MED 122 Medical Terminology II (2nd half ) Totals FALL SEMESTER 2 BUS 125 Personal Finance ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting MKT 223 Customer Service OST 148 Medical Coding Billing and Insurance OST 184 Records Management Totals

3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 6 0 0 6 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 2 2 0 3 14 2 0 15

166

MEDICAL OFFICE ADMINISTRATION SPRING SEMESTER 2 BUS 260 Business Communication 3 0 0 3 OST 243 Medical Office Simulation 2 2 0 3 OST 289 Administrative Office Management 2 2 0 3 *** *** Humanities Elective 3 0 0 3 *** *** Social Science Elective 3 0 0 3 Totals 13 4 0 15 Total Semester Hours Credit: 68 FACULTY Danell Moses, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4341 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4341 Carolyn Porter, Department Chair [email protected] 828.339.4232 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4232 William Brothers [email protected] 828.339.4366 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4366 Bob Holt [email protected] 828.339.4274 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4274

MEDICAL SONOGRAPHY Diagnostic Medical Sonography or Ultrasound is a diagnostic medical procedure that uses high frequency sound waves to produce images of organs, tissue, or blood flow inside the body. This type of procedure is often referred to as a sonogram or ultrasound scan. Sonography is generally associated with obstetrics and the use of ultrasound imaging during pregnancy, but this technology has many other applications in the diagnosis and treatment of many medical conditions. This program of study is designed to provide academic and clinical training in the field of general diagnostic sonography. Coursework includes an introduction to sonography and patient care, sonographic physics, abdominal sonography, obstetrical/gynecological sonography, and an introduction to vascular sonography. Sonographers can choose to work in clinics, hospitals, private practice physician offices, public health facilities, mobile services, and other medical settings performing examinations in ultrasounds. The sonography program is currently accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Diagnostic Medical Sonography and the Commission on Accreditation of Allied health Education Programs. Upon graduation from the sonography program, you will be able to apply to take the national certification examinations offered by the ARDMS. By successfully completing the certification exams, you will be awarded the credential RDMS (Registered Diagnostic Medical Sonographer). The average starting salary is approximately $45,000/year. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A45440 PRE-REQUISITE COURSES - Courses must be completed with a minimum grade of C prior to admission to the Medical Sonography program. Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit BIO 163 Basic Anatomy and Physiology 4 2 0 5 COM 140 Intro to Intercultural Communication 3 0 0 3 MAT 115 Mathematical Models 2 2 0 3 PHY 110 Conceptual Physics 3 0 0 3 PHY 110A Conceptual Physics Lab 0 2 0 1 Totals 12 6 0 15 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 SON 110 Introduction to Sonography 1 3 3 3 SON 130 Abdominal Sonography I 2 3 0 3 SON 222 Selected SON Clinical Ed 0 0 6 2 Totals 7 6 9 12 SPRING SEMESTER 1 SON 111 Sonographic Physics SON 120 SON Clinical Education I SON 131 Abdominal Sonography II SON 140 Gynecological Sonography Totals

3 3 0 4 0 0 15 5 1 3 0 2 2 0 0 2 6 6 15 13

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168

MEDICAL SONOGRAPHY SUMMER SEMESTER ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting PSY 150 General Psychology SON 121 SON Clinical Education II Totals

3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 0 0 15 5 6 0 15 11

FALL SEMESTER 2 SON 220 SON Clinical Education III SON 225 Case Studies SON 241 Obstetrical Sonography I SON 250 Vascular Sonography Totals

0 0 24 8 0 3 0 1 2 0 0 2 1 3 0 2 3 6 24 13

SPRING SEMESTER 2 SON 221 SON Clinical Education IV SON 242 Obstetrical Sonography II SON 289 Sonographic Topics Totals

0 0 24 8 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 2 4 0 24 12

Total Semester Hour Credits: 76 MISSION STATEMENT The mission of the Southwestern Community College’s Sonography program is to meet the needs of the students by offering innovative instruction through comprehensive educational practices that promote student achievement and academic excellence, which will enable the student to graduate with the necessary skills to succeed as a sonographer and/or to continue with other educational goals. GOALS 1. To prepare competent entry level general sonographers in the cognitive (knowledge), psychomotor (skills), and affective (behavior) learning domains. 2. To prepare students to meet the requirements of and pass the national examination offered by the American Registry for Diagnostic Medical Sonographers. 3. To foster independent thinking and life-long learning. ADMISSION CRITERIA It is important that all potential applicants for the Sonography Program understand the selective admissions process. Please review carefully the information regarding minimum requirements and other pertinent information. The sonography program has a limited enrollment of ten candidates that are admitted into the program in the fall of each year. Applications and supporting documents must be completed and submitted to the Admissions Office by March 15 of the year in which the student wishes to enroll in the program. PHASE I - To be completed by March 15 The applicant must: 1. Complete an application for admission to the Program. 2. Be a high school graduate or have earned a high school equivalency diploma (GED). Exception: current high school students

MEDICAL SONOGRAPHY 3. Submit official copies of all transcripts (high school and college). Transcripts must be sent directly from the institution. It is the responsibility of the applicant to ensure that all necessary records are sent to the College Admissions Office. 4. Have a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale on the most recent academic transcript with ten semester hours completed excluding developmental courses. 5. Meet the Southwestern Community College Placement Test requirement. This may be met by one of the following methods: a) Take and pass the basic components of the Computerized Placement Test. These consist of algebra, arithmetic, reading comprehension, grammar and basic computer skills. The test is administered several times each week on the Jackson and Macon Campuses and is free of charge. To schedule a test session, contact Testing Services at 828.339.4332. If you do not pass the basic components of the placement test, you must enroll in and successfully complete the appropriate develop mental coursework prior to the program deadline. If you are unsuccessful in achieving the appropriate cut-off scores in any component of the test, please see the academic retest policy. b) Appropriate SAT or ACT scores and successful completion of high school or college computer literacy course within the past six years. See admissions section for additional details. c) Successful completion of a college-level math, algebra, English and computer literacy course. 6. Must take the TEAS Exam. The TEAS must have been taken within the past three years and may only be taken once per academic year. The cost of this test is $40.00. The applicant will be required to pay this fee when registering for the test. Details for testing dates and times can be secured from the Advisor. This is not a pass or fail test. It is used to measure your potential to be successful in the program. 7. Complete a minimum of 2 hours (6 hours maximum) of observation/lab time in the Southwestern Community College Scanning Lab. The applicant will be asked to be a volunteer to be scanned during the lab time by a current sonography student. The instructors will be available during the lab session and the applicants are encouraged to ask question about the program at this time. A sign up sheet with the dates and times will be available outside the Program Coordinator’s office. The observation hours will start in November and be available through March. 8. Applicants must be able to meet all Technical Standards required of the program. Those Standards are as follows: • Lift up to 50 pounds routinely • Able to reach, bend, and stoop often • Able to push and pull routinely • Have full use of both hands, wrists and shoulders • Distinguish audible sounds • Able to distinguish colors correctly • Work standing on the feet 80 percent of the time • Interact compassionately and effectively with the sick and injured • Communicate effectively with patients and other health care professionals • Organize and accurately perform the individual steps in a sonographic procedure in the proper sequence

169

MEDICAL SONOGRAPHY

170

PHASE II The top 20 candidates who have completed all parts of Phase I by March 15 will be scheduled for a personal interview. The selected applicants will be notified of the date and time. Interviews are usually scheduled for late April. Applicants are ranked for interview using the following point system: GPA X 10 = 40 points (maximum) TEAS score = 15 points (maximum) Total = 55 points (maximum) Interview Point System: The following criterion is used for ranking students during the interview process:



High School Health Occupations course with a “C” or higher within past 5 years Bachelor’s Degree or Associate Degree Allied Health Degree Imaging Degree

5 pts 5 pts 15 pts 20 pts

Medical Terminology college course A (15 pts) B (10 pts) C (5 pts) BIO 168 & BIO 169 or BIO 163 A (60 pts) B (40 pts) C (20 pts) PHY 110/110A 30 pts ENG 111 A (15 pts) B (10 pts) C (5 pts) ENG 114 A (15 pts) B (10 pts) C (5 pts) PSY 150 A (15 pts) B (10 pts) C (5 pts) MAT 115 or higher A (15 pts) B (10 pts) C (5 pts) COM 140 A (15 pts) B (10 pts) C (5 pts) Health Related Work Experience

15 pts

Interview

25 pts

After the interview process is completed and points have been totaled, the 10 applicants with the highest numerical scores will be accepted into the program. High school students selected for the program will be given provisional acceptance contingent upon graduation from high school. Interviewed applicants who have not been assigned a space in the program will be placed on a waiting list. Should space become available, the next applicant on the list will be contacted for admission to the program. PHASE III Selected applicants will be notified by the Admissions Office of provisional acceptance to the program. Once an applicant returns the signed Acknowledgement of Acceptance form to the Admissions Office, they will be fully accepted into the program. Accepted applicants will receive health forms in their provisional acceptance packet. The completed medical forms must indicate that you are capable of meeting the physical requirements for the program. These forms must be completed and returned to the Program Coordinator by August 1. Failure to complete the health packet may result in relinquishment of full acceptance status.

MEDICAL SONOGRAPHY

CLINICAL EDUCATION Clinical education will be provided at cooperating health care facilities and other related settings within the area served by the College. Transportation and associated expenses are the sole responsibility of the student. NOTES 1. Applicants are responsible for submitting all the necessary records to the Admissions Office. 2. Applications must be updated annually by applicants who were not accepted the previous year. 3. Applicants may take non-Medical Sonography, general education and related coursework prior to being accepted into the program. 4. All students admitted into a health science program may be required, by clinical or Co-op site, to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug testing, prior to, or during clinical education coursework. The results of these tests could affect the student’s ability to progress in the program. 5. All students completing a health science program may be required, by an external testing agency, to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug test prior to a state or national licensing/certification board approving the graduate to sit for licensure/certification exams. 6. A student who presents problems of physical or emotional health at any time throughout the program and has not responded to appropriate treatment within a reasonable period of time may be required to withdraw from the program. Any student whose behavior conflicts with safety may also be required to withdraw from the program. FACULTY Debbie Eavenson, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4323 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4323 Pamela Leslie, Clinical Coordinator, 2nd Year [email protected] 828.339.4605 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4605

171

NETWORKING TECHNOLOGY - CISCO

172

The Networking Technology certificate prepares individuals for employment supporting network infrastructure environments. Students will learn how to use technologies to provide reliable transmission and delivery of data, voice, image, and video communications in business, industry, and education. Course work includes design, installation, configuration, and management of network infrastructure technologies and network operating systems. Emphasis is placed on the implementation and management of network software and the implementation and management of hardware such as switches and routers. Graduates may find employment in entry-level jobs as local area network managers, network operators, network analysts, and network technicians. Graduates may also be qualified to take certification examinations for various network industry certifications, depending on their local program. CISCO CERTIFICATE C25340C & C25340CP* Prefix Number Title NET 125 Networking Basics NET 126 Routing Basics NET 225 Routing and Switching I NET 226 Routing and Switching II Totals

Class Lab Clinical Credit 1 4 0 3 1 4 0 3 1 4 0 3 1 4 0 3 4 16 0 12

Total Semester Hour Credits: 12 * This certificate or pathway is offered to high school students through the Career & College Promise initiative. Please refer to page 19 for additional information. FACULTY Cyndi Slocumb, Advisor [email protected] 828.339.4396 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4396 Scott Cline [email protected] 828.339.4494 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4494 Kirk Stephens [email protected] 828.339.4376 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4376

NURSING ASSOCIATE DEGREE The Associate Degree Nursing curriculum provides knowledge and strategies to integrate safety and quality into nursing care, to practice in a dynamic environment, and to meet individual needs which impact health, quality of life, and achievement of potential. Course work includes and builds upon the domains of healthcare, nursing practice, and the holistic individual. Content emphasizes the nurse as a member of the interdisciplinary team providing safe, individualized care while employing evidence-based practice, quality improvement, and informatics. Graduates of this program are eligible to apply to take the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-RN). Employment opportunities are vast within the global health care system and may include positions within acute, chronic, extended, industrial, and community health care facilities. NURSING PROGRAM INFORMATION The philosophy of the Associate Degree Nursing Program is derived from statements about the health, quality of life, achievement of potential, the individual, environment, health, nursing, the practice, and education of the Associate Degree Nurse. Within this mission, the goal of nursing faculty is to promote the highest quality of nursing care to the individual, families and significant persons, and the community. The aim is to facilitate optimum health, quality of life and achievement of potential for the individual. The Associate Degree Nursing program supports the mission of the North Carolina Community College System and the mission of Southwestern Community College. The faculty is committed to providing accessible high quality nursing education to meet the diverse and changing health-care needs of the service area and to promoting the development of qualified students prepared for the professional role of registered nurse at the entry level. Graduates of this program receive an Associate in Applied Science degree with a nursing major (ADN), and meet the education requirements to take the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-RN) for licensure as a registered nurse. Successful completion of the nursing program does not guarantee licensure. The Board of Nursing may not issue a license to an applicant who has been convicted of a felony. Persons interested in entering the nursing program are encouraged to apply. Due to enrollment limitations, interested individuals are urged to begin the process of application as early as possible. Information on nursing and the program requirements are available in the Nursing Department. Applications should be submitted online. THE SCHEDULE The schedule is designed for full-time study. Non-nursing courses in the curriculum may be completed at the college of enrollment or wherever is most convenient for the student. Students, however, are responsible for having their transcripts for non-nursing courses taken at other colleges sent to the college of enrollment. Clinical experiences are provided in a variety of settings throughout Western North Carolina. The structure of the nursing program permits individuals to make choices about their career in health care. After successful completion of one semester, a student is eligible to test for listing as a Nurse Aide I; after two semesters students may apply for Nurse Aide II listing. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A45110 Non-nursing classes may be taken prior to the time they are scheduled in the curriculum but if they are not, they must be taken at the times listed. All nursing courses must be taken in the order they appear in the curriculum.

173

174

NURSING ASSOCIATE DEGREE FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title ACA 111 College Student Success BIO 168 Anatomy and Physiology I ENG 111 Expository Writing NUR 111 Intro to Health Concepts Choose one of the following: MAT 110 Mathematical Measurements MAT 115 Mathematical Models Totals

Class 1 3 3 4

SPRING SEMESTER 1 BIO 169 Anatomy and Physiology II NUR 112 Health-Illness Concepts ~ 1st 8 weeks NUR 114 Holistic Health Concepts ~ 2nd 8 weeks PSY 150 General Psychology Totals SUMMER SEMESTER ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting NUR 113 Family Health Concepts Totals

2 2 13

2 2 11

0 0 6

3 3 19

3 3 0 4 3 0 6 5 3 0 6 5 3 0 0 3 12 3 12 17 3 0 3 0 6 0

FALL SEMESTER 2 BIO 175 General Microbiology 2 NUR 211 Health Care Concepts 3 NUR 212 Health System Concepts 3 Choose one of the following: CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 CIS 111 Basic PC Literacy 1 Totals 9-10 SPRING SEMESTER 2 NUR 213 Complex Health Concepts *** *** Humanities Elective Totals

Lab Clinical Credit 0 0 1 3 0 4 0 0 3 6 6 8

4 3 7

2 0 0

0 3 6 5 6 8 0 6 6

3 5 5

2 3 3 2 0 2 4 12-15 15-16 3 0 3

15 0 15

10 3 13

Total Semester Hour Credits: 72-73 ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS All applicants for admission to the Associate Degree Nursing program will follow a standard admission process, be given identical information regarding the nursing program and the criteria for admission, and assigned a nursing advisor who will follow the applicant through the pre-nursing period. It is highly recommended that interested applicants contact their advisor for assistance at their earliest opportunity. When the individual begins the process, whether it be through the Admissions Office or the Nursing Department, information and instructions are furnished to the applicant along with the explanation of the program’s structure and the next step in the admissions process. The applicant will also be referred from Admissions to Nursing or Nursing to Admissions for further information and processing. Any applicant not selected for entry into the nursing program must submit a new application by the next Jan. 31 deadline to be considered for entry in the Fall of that year.

NURSING ASSOCIATE DEGREE PHASE I – To be completed by January 31 The criteria for admission to the nursing program include: • A completed college Application for Admission. • Evidence of high school graduation or completion of GED certificate (High School Seniors must send an interim transcript by January 31). • Official copies of all high school and college course transcripts (High school seniors must have a final transcript sent within one month of graduation). • Satisfactory scores on the college placement test or completion of necessary remediation. (See SCC Placement Test Requirements in Admission/Enrollment section). • Must take the TEAS Exam. The TEAS must have been taken within the past three years and may only be taken once per academic year. See your assigned advisor to sign up. • Evidence of completion of an algebra, biology, and a general chemistry at the high school level or above with a grade of “C” or better. • Evidence of a cumulative GPA of 2.75 or greater on a 4-point scale on the most recent transcript with 10 semester hours completed excluding developmental courses. Once the program deadline has passed and records have been reviewed, applicants will receive a letter stating their eligibility status. PHASE II Applicants who complete Phase I by the January 31 deadline will be scored in accordance with the following selection system criteria: • Up to 15 points for points for TEAS Exam. • Grade point average is multiplied by 10: Up to 40 points • Up to 10 points for college courses completed with a grade of “C” or better 2 points – BIO 168 2 points – BIO 169 2 points – BIO 175 2 points – CHM 131 & 131A or an equivalent or higher course 2 points – MAT 110 or higher math course 2 points – Medical Terminology I and Medical Terminology II • Up to 3 points for other educational experience or current licensure ** 1 point – Health Occupations I or Allied Health Science I with current Nurse Aide Certificate 1 point – Health Occupations II or Allied Health Science II with current Nurse Aide Certificate 1 point – LPN 1 point – Nurse Aide I/Nurse Aide II 1 point - EMT 1 point – Paramedic 1 point – Certified Medical Assistant 1 point – Bachelor Degree or higher ** All candidates must hold a current certificate/license in a medically related field to apply to the nursing program. Other medical related certificates/licenses will be considered on an individual basis by admissions and the program director. Documentation of current certification/ Documentation of current licensure must be submitted to admissions prior to the January 31 deadline in order to receive points. • Up to 25 points for interview (39 highest ranking candidates will be interviewed) After the interview process is completed and points have been totaled, the applicants with the highest numerical scores will be accepted into the nursing program (up to 26 students). High school students selected for the program will be given provisional acceptance contingent upon graduation from high school.

175

176

NURSING ASSOCIATE DEGREE PHASE III Selected applicants will be notified by the Admissions Office of provisional acceptance to the program. Once an applicant returns the signed Acknowledgement of Acceptance form to the Admissions Office, they will be fully accepted into the nursing program. Accepted applicants will receive health forms in their provisional acceptance packet. These forms must be completed and returned to the Nursing Program Coordinator within 30 days. The Program Coordinator will contact the applicant if any problems are noted on the forms and will allow 30 days for resolution of these problems. Failure to complete the health packet may result in relinquishment of full acceptance status. Accepted applicants will also be required to purchase malpractice insurance and accident or personal health insurance in August. NOTES This information applies to all Nursing students. • All students admitted into a health science program may be required, by clinical or Co-op site, to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug testing, prior to, or during clinical education coursework. The results of these tests could affect the student’s ability to progress in the program. • All students completing a health science program may be required, by an external testing agency, to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug test prior to a state or national licensing/certification board approving the graduate to sit for licensure/certification exams. • At any time throughout the program, a student who presents physical or emotional health problems and has not responded to appropriate treatment within a reasonable period of time will be required to withdraw from the program. Any student whose behavior conflicts with safety essential to nursing practice may also be required to withdraw from the program. RE-ENTRY/ADVANCED PLACEMENT/TRANSFER PROCESS Due to the limited number of students who may be enrolled in the nursing program, re-entry, advanced placement and transfer into the program is possible only on a space-available basis. In the event the number of students applying for re-entry, advanced placement or transfer exceeds the number of spaces available, priority will be given as follows: 1. Re-entering SCC Associate Degree nursing students 2. Advanced Placement students 3. Transfer students ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS To be considered for re-entry, advanced placement or transfer applicants must complete the following requirements: • A completed college Application for Admission. • Evidence of high school graduation or completion of GED certificate. • Official copies of all high school and college course transcripts. • Satisfactory scores on the college placement test or completion of necessary remediation. (See SCC Placement Test Requirements in Admission/Enrollment section.) • A minimum score of 8 on the TEAS. The TEAS must have been taken within the past three years and may only be taken once per academic year. (See TEAS requirements in Admission/Enrollment section.) • Evidence of a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or greater on a 4-point scale on the most recent transcript with 10 semester hours completed excluding developmental courses.

NURSING ASSOCIATE DEGREE

177

• Have completed all prerequisites specific to their entry point with a grade of “C” or better. • Have a grade of “C” or better in all corequisites. Re-entering SCC students: Additional requirements: • Applicants must re-enroll within one year of leaving the program. • The applicant must declare his/her desire to re-enter the program in writing to the Nursing Program Coordinator at least three (3) months prior to the term in which the student is seeking admission. • The applicant must meet all admission criteria at least three (3) months prior to the semester he/she wishes to reenter. If all slots have not been filled after the deadline, there may be extensions to the deadline. • An applicant who must repeat a course must do so within one year of the date the original course was taken. • If health forms are greater than two (2) years old, new health forms must be completed and submitted. Prior to beginning classes, the student must show evidence of current (less than one year old) CPR card, a current TB test, tetanus immunizations, current malpractice insurance, and accident or personal health insurance. In the event the number of Southwestern Community College nursing students applying for re-entry exceeds the number of spaces available, the cumulative GPA and TEAS will be utilized and those students with the highest average will be accepted in the program. Advanced Placement Students: To be completed by January 31 Additional Requirements: • Possess a current, valid, North Carolina-eligible license • Have at least 1 year of experience as a LPN • Complete a nursing transitions course (NUR 214 or equivalent) • Submit evidence of completion of an algebra and chemistry at the high school level or above with a grade of “C” or better. • Complete the following prerequisite courses with a grade of “C” or better: BIO 168, BIO 169, BIO 175, ENG 111, ENG 114, MAT 110 or higher, PSY 150, CIS 110 and a Humanities course. In the event the number of qualified Advanced Placement applicants exceeds the number of spaces available, the slots will be filled based on GPA and TEAS score. SUMMER SEMESTER 1 NUR 214 Nursing Transition Concepts FALL SEMESTER 1 NUR 211 Health Care Concepts NUR 212 Health Systems Concepts SPRING SEMESTER 1 NUR 213 Complex Health Concepts

3

0

3

4

3 3

0 0

6 6

5 5

4

3

15

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NURSING ASSOCIATE DEGREE Transfer students: Additional requirements: • Applicants must have completed NUR 111 to be eligible for transfer. • The applicant must declare his/her desire to transfer into the program in writing to the Nursing Program Coordinator at least three (3) months prior to the term in which the student is seeking admission. • The applicant must meet all admission criteria at least three (3) months prior to the semester he/she wishes to enroll. If all slots have not been filled after the deadline, there may be extensions to the deadline. • An applicant who must repeat a course must do so within one year of the date the course was taken. • Applicants must provide official transcripts from a Board of Nursing approved Associate Degree Nursing Program for evaluation. • Applicants must provide copies of outline and syllabi of nursing courses for which transfer credit is requested. These documents will be reviewed by the Nursing Program Coordinator and nursing faculty for content compatibility with Southwestern Community College’s Associate Degree in nursing courses. As each transfer situation is unique, validation of skills and knowledge may be required. Students lacking documentation of completion of a majority of the content for a course will be required to take the course. The final decision for transfer credit for nursing courses will be made by the Nursing Program Coordinator. • Health forms must be completed and submitted. Prior to beginning classes, the student must show evidence of current (less than one year old) CPR card, a current TB test, tetanus immunizations, current malpractice insurance, and accident or personal health insurance. After available spaces are filled with returning SCC Associate Degree Students and/or Advanced Placement students, transfer students will be selected based on their GPA and TEAS score. The candidates with the highest numerical score will be admitted. FACULTY Barbara Connell, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4307 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4307 Wendy Buchanan, Clinical Coordinator, 2nd Year [email protected] 828.339.4258 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4258 Ellen Heim, Clinical Coordinator, 1st Year [email protected] 828.339.4505 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4505 Kimi Stevens [email protected] 828.339.4336 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4336 Carol Tucker [email protected] 828.339.4339 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4339

WNC REGIONALLY INCREASING BACCALAUREATE NURSES (WNC RIBN) WNC RIBN will dually admit and enroll you Southwestern Community College and Western Carolina University and provide you with a four year, seamless associate to baccalaureate nursing education. Unlike in a transitional BSN program, you will have the opportunity to begin working as an RN at the end of your third year in this option and pay mostly community college tuition rates. WNC RIBN makes an associate and bachelor’s degree in nursing both affordable and accessible. The first three years of WNC RIBN will be hosted on SCC”s campus with one class completed online through WCU each semester. Upon successful completion of the first three years, you will then finish your fourth year of classes through WCU. Students are required to: 1. Provide documentation of successful completion of a NC approved Certified Nurse Aide I program which includes theory, lab, and clinical components no later than the first day of fall semester year two. (A copy of a college transcript or a notarized course completion certificate will be acceptable documentation). 2. Hold a documented, current, unrestricted credential as a Nurse Aide I (NAI) from the North Carolina Nurse Aide Registry and the Division of Health Service Regulation. 3. Maintain dual admission and continued enrollment at both SCC and WCu by completing at least one WCU course each semester (Fall/Spring) during years 1 through 3. 4. Maintain a GPA of 2.5 or greater to progress in the RIBN option. 5. Maintain full-time enrollment each semester if a recipient of the NC Forgivable Education Loan Program. 6. Home school will be SCC years 1, 2, and 3. 7. Year 1: enroll in general education courses at SCC and WCU as advised by the RIBN Nursing Student Advisor 8. Year 2 and 3: enroll in Associate Degree Nursing courses at SCC and continue enrollment in WCU courses as advised by RIBN Nursing Student Advisor. 9. Year 4: home school will be WCU 10. Successfully pass NCLEX –RN to progress to year 4. 11. See the RIBN nursing advisor for the recommended course sequence. This program is approved by the North Carolina Board of Nursing PO Box 2129 Raleigh, NC 27602 919.782.3211, www.ncbon.com For more specific information about the RIBN nursing option, please read the Admission to WNC RIBN Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) pages. Admission to WNC RIBN Thank you for your interest in the WNC RIBN Nursing option. Students applying to WNC RIBN must meet dual admission requirements set forth collaboratively by SCC and WCU. WNC RIBN will accept applications through January 31, 2014 for the RIBN class that begins fall semester 2014. For more information about applying to RIBN, please contact the RIBN advisor.

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WNC REGIONALLY INCREASING BACCALAUREATE NURSES (WNC RIBN) Admission to WNC RIBN is highly competitive. All students must meet the following minimum requirements to be eligible to apply: • General acceptance to Western Carolina University • SAT Critical Reading – minimum 500 score required which is three years or less during the application period • Cumulative GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. If a student has less than 20 credit hours of college coursework, then this requirement will default to the high school unweighted GPA. • All applicants to WNC RIBN must take the TEAS Version V (Test of Essential Academic Skills). Students may take the TEAS after the WNC RIBN Advisor has determined eligibility to apply. For more information about the TEAS, please visit: https://www.atitesting.com/Solutions/PreNursingSchool/TEAS.aspx Students interested in WNC RIBN should contact: Barbara Connell Southwestern Community College [email protected] 828.339.4307

NURSING ASSISTANT The Nursing Assistant curriculum prepares individuals to work under the supervision of licensed health care professionals in performing nursing care and services for persons of all ages. Course work emphasizes growth and development throughout the life span, personal care, vital signs, communication, nutrition, medical asepsis, therapeutic activities, accident and fire safety, household environment and equipment management; family resources and services; and employment skills. Graduates of this curriculum may be eligible to be listed on the registry as a Nursing Assistant I, Medication Aid, and Nursing Assistant II. They may be employed in home health agencies, hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, extended care facilities, and doctors’ offices. NURSING ASSISTANT CERTIFICATE – C45480 & C45480CP* FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinic Credit NAS 101 Nursing Assistant I 3 4 3 6 NAS 103 Home Health Care 2 0 0 2 Totals 5 4 3 8 SPRING SEMESTER 1 HSC 110 Orientation to Health Careers 1 0 0 1 NAS 102 **Nursing Assistant II 3 2 6 6 Totals 4 2 6 7 Total Hour Credits: 15 * This certificate or pathway is offered to high school students through the Pathways to Success and Career & College Promise initiatives. Please refer to page 19 for additional information. **Students must have a GED or High School diploma before they complete the NAII course in order to register and take the State NAII certification exam and be listed by the North Carolina Board of Nursing. ADMISSIONS CRITERIA All applicants must: • Complete an application to the college and program • Meet the Southwestern Community College Placement Test requirement for reading comprehension with a passing score ≥ 55. • The test is administered on the Jackson and Macon Campuses free of charge. To schedule a test session, contact Testing Services at ext. 4332. If you are unsuccessful in achieving the appropriate cut-off scores, please see the academic retest policy. • All applicants must be able to meet all Technical Standards required of the program. Those Standards are as follows: - Lift up to 50 pounds routinely - Able to reach, bend, and stoop often - Able to push and pull routinely - Have full use of both hands, wrists and shoulders - Distinguish audible sounds - Able to distinguish colors correctly - Work standing on the feet 80 percent of the time - Interact compassionately and effectively with the sick and injured - Communicate effectively with patients and other health care professionals The Nursing Assistant Certificate has limited enrollment. Students will be accepted into the courses based on application submission date and meeting the college testing requirement. Any student interested in completing Nursing Assistant courses outside of the certificate program, please visit: www.southwesterncc.edu/continuing-education for availability. PROGRESSION CRITERIA

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NURSING ASSISTANT In order to progress to the Spring Semester, all students must: • Be currently licensed as a Certified Nursing Assistant I with the North Carolina Division of Health Service Regulation with no substantiated findings of abuse, neglect or misappropriation of resident property. • Must have a current American Heart Association CPR certification that must remain current through clinical rotation. CLINICAL EDUCATION Clinical education will be provided at cooperating hospitals or health care facilities within the area served by the College. Transportation and associated expenses are the sole responsibility of the student. NOTES 1. Applications must be updated annually by applicants who were not accepted the previous year. 2 All students admitted into a health sciences program may be required by a clinical site to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug testing, prior to or during clinical education coursework. The results of these tests could affect the student’s ability to progress in the program. 3. All students completing a health sciences program may be required, by an external testing agency, to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug test prior to a state or national licensing/certification board approving the graduate to sit for licensure/certification exams. FACULTY Tneshia Richards, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4459 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4459

OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATE The Occupational Education Associate curriculum is designed for individuals skilled and experienced in a trade or technical specialty who would like to receive an associate degree in preparation for teaching or other purposes. Course work is designed to supplement previous education, training, and/or experience the individual has already attained. Graduates of the program may find employment as instructors in the field of occupational education. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A55320 GENERAL EDUCATION English/Communication - Six SHC for AAS degree or three SHC for diploma are required. Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 ENG 114 Professional Research & Reporting 3 0 0 3 Humanities / Fine Arts - Three SHC required for AAS degree. *** *** Humanities Elective 3 0 0 3 Social / Behavioral Science - Three SHC required for AAS degree. PSY 150 General Psychology 3 0 0 3 Natural Science / Mathematics - Three SHC required for AAS degree. Choose one of the following: MAT 115 Mathematical Models 2 2 0 3 OR MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics 3 0 0 3 MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab 0 2 0 1 General Education Totals 14/15 2 0 15-16 MAJOR COURSES: Core - Required Courses EDU 175 Intro to Trade & Industrial Education 3 0 0 3 EDU 176 Occupation Analysis & Course Dev 3 0 0 3 EDU 177 Instructional Methods 2 2 0 3 EDU 179 Vocational Student Organizations 3 0 0 3 EDU 271 Educational Technology 2 2 0 3 EDU 281 Instruction Strat./Reading & Writing 3 0 0 3 ISC 121 Environmental Health and Safety 3 0 0 3 Totals 19 4 0 21 OTHER MAJOR COURSES: (For the AAS degree) CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 EDU 161 Introduction to Exceptional Children 3 3 0 3 EDU 178 Facilities Organization & Planning 2 2 0 3 EDU 240 Work-Based Learning Practices/Tech. 3 0 0 3 EDU 275 Effective Teacher Training 2 0 0 2 Totals 12 7 0 14 OTHER REQUIRED COURSES: ACA 111 College Student Success ~ 1st semester 1 0 0 1 BUS 137 Principles of Management 3 0 0 3 BUS 153 Human Resource Management 3 0 0 3 BUS 255 Organizational Behavior 3 0 0 3 COE 114 Co-op Work Experience I 0 0 40 4 OST 136 Word Processing 2 2 0 3 Totals 12 2 40 17 Major Courses Totals: 35

Total Semester Hour Credits: 67-68

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OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATE DIPLOMA - D55320 Gainful Employment Compliance Information - For more information about SCC’s graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this program, and other important information, please visit the program’s webpage for the latest information at: http://www.southwesterncc.edu/program/occupational-education-associate-diploma Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 EDU 161 Introduction to Exceptional Children 3 3 0 3 EDU 175 Intro to Trade & Industrial Education 3 0 0 3 EDU 176 Occupational Analysis/Course Dev. 3 0 0 3 EDU 177 Instructional Methods 2 2 0 3 EDU 178 Facilities Organization and Planning 2 2 0 3 EDU 179 Vocational Student Organizations 3 0 0 3 EDU 240 Work-Based Learning Practices/Tech. 3 0 0 3 EDU 271 Educational Technology 2 2 0 3 EDU 275 Effective Teacher Training 2 0 0 2 EDU 281 Instruction Strat./Reading & Writing 3 0 0 3 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 ISC 121 Environmental Health and Safety 3 0 0 3 PSY 150 General Psychology 3 0 0 3 Totals 37 11 0 41 Total Semester Hour Credits: 41 CERTIFICATE - C55320 Gainful Employment Compliance Information - For more information about SCC’s graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this program, and other important information, please visit the program’s webpage for the latest information at: http://www.southwesterncc.edu/program/occupational-education-associate-certificate Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit EDU 175 Intro to Trade & Industrial Education 3 0 0 3 EDU 177 Instructional Methods 2 2 0 3 EDU 179 Vocational Student Organizations 3 0 0 3 EDU 271 Educational Technology 2 2 0 3 EDU 281 Instruction Strat./Reading & Writing 3 0 0 3 ISC 121 Environmental Health and Safety 3 0 0 3 Totals 16 4 0 18 Total Semester Hour Credits: 18 ADVISOR Scott Baker [email protected] 828.339.4249 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4249

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT The Occupational Therapy Assistant curriculum prepares individuals to work under the supervision of a registered/licensed occupational therapist in screening, assessing, planning, and implementing treatment and documenting progress for clients receiving occupational therapy services. Course work includes human growth and development, conditions which interfere with activities of daily living, theory and process of occupational therapy, individual/group treatment activities, therapeutic use of self, activity analysis, and grading/adapting activities and environments. Graduates may be eligible to take the national certification examination for practice as a certified occupational therapy assistant. Employment opportunities include hospitals, rehabilitation facilities, long-term/extended care facilities, sheltered workshops, schools, home health programs, and community programs. *Pending NCCCS Approval OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT – A45500 SPRING SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinic Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 ENG 111 Composition Strategies 3 0 0 3 BIO 168 Anatomy and Physiology I 3 3 0 4 OTA 110 Fundamentals of OT 2 3 0 3 OTA 130 Assessment Skills 2 3 0 3 OTA 140 Professional Skills I 0 3 0 1 PSY 150 General Psychology 3 0 0 3 Totals 14 12 0 18 SUMMER SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinic Credit PSY 281 Abnormal Psych 3 0 0 3 *** *** Humanities Elective 3 0 0 3 OTA 120 OT Media I 1 3 0 2 Totals 7 3 0 8 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinic Credit ENG 114 Research & Reporting 3 0 0 3 BIO 169 Anatomy & Physiology II 3 3 0 4 PSY 241 Developmental Psych 3 0 0 3 OTA 150 Life Span Skills I 2 3 0 3 OTA 170 Physical Dysfunction 2 3 0 3 OTA 161 Field Placement I 0 0 3 1 OTA 240 Professional Skills II 0 3 0 1 Totals 13 12 3 18 SPRING SEMESTER 2 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinic Credit OTA 162 Field Placement II (8 weeks) 0 0 3 1 OTA 180 Psychosocial Dysfunction 2 3 0 3 OTA 163 Fieldwork I Placement III 0 0 3 1 OTA 260 Fieldwork II Placement 1 (8 weeks) 0 0 18 6 OTA 261 Fieldwork II Placement 2 (8 weeks) 0 0 18 6 Totals 2 3 42 17 SUMMER SEMESTER II Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinic Credit *** *** Professional Transitions 0 2 0 1 OTA 220 OT Media II 1 6 0 3 OTA 250 Lifespan Skills II 2 3 0 3 OTA 135 Kinesiology 0 3 0 1 Totals 3 11 0 8 Total Hour Credits: 69

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OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT ADMISSIONS CRITERIA—To be completed by Oct. 31 The program has a limited enrollment and only admits a class in the spring of each year. Applications and supporting documents listed in Phase I below must be completed and submitted by October 25 of the year before the student wishes to enroll in the program. If all slots have not been filled after the above deadline, there may be extensions to the deadline. Please check with Admissions Office about the status of the program. PHASE I: To be completed by October 25. The applicant must: 1. Have a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale on the most recent academic transcript with ten semester hours completed excluding developmental courses. 2. Take the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS). The TEAS must be taken within the past three years and may only be taken once per academic year, defined as August 1 to July 31, (See TEAS requirements in Admission/Enrollment section). The cost of the test is $40.00. The applicant will be required to pay this fee when registering for the test. This is not a pass or fail test. It is used to measure your potential to be successful in the program. 3. Be eighteen (18) years of age by admission into program. 4. Applicants must be able to meet all Technical Standards required of the program. Those Standards are as follows: • Lift up to 50 pounds routinely • Able to reach, bend, and stoop often • Able to push and pull routinely • Have full use of both hands, wrists and shoulders • Distinguish audible sounds • Able to distinguish colors correctly • Work standing on the feet for 80 percent of the time • Interact compassionately and effectively with the sick and injured • Communicate effectively with patients and other health care professionals PHASE II Those individuals who have completed all parts of Phase I by the appropriate deadlines will be scheduled for a personal interview. Applicants will be notified of date and time. NOTES: 1. All students admitted into a health science program may be required, by clinical or co-op site, to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug testing, prior to, or during clinical education coursework. The results of those tests could affect the student’s ability to progress in the program. 2. All students completing a health science program may be required, by an external testing agency, to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug test prior to a state or national licensing/certification board approving the graduate to sit for licensure/certification exams. FACULTY Mitch Fischer, Program Advisor [email protected] 828.339.4331 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4331

OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP This curriculum is designed to prepare individuals to be successful professionals in outdoor adventure, education and leadership. Course work includes technical training in the areas such as backpacking, canoeing, kayaking, and rock-climbing. These skills are taught through facilitation and experiential learning methodologies. This course of study includes interpersonal skills and leadership skills such as group process, conflict resolution, program planning, and management issues. Graduates from this program will have a sound background in outdoor leadership blended with a solid foundation of general education, business, and computer skills. Graduates are prepared for employment in the adventure tourism industry, therapeutic wilderness programs, specialized adventure/leadership programs, adventure programs for youth, challenge course industry, city, county, and state outdoor programs, public and private outdoor education centers, and private and public school outdoor programs. The Outdoor Leadership program prepares individuals to work as an educator, instructor or facilitator in parks, recreational facilities, camps and other outdoor settings. Potential course work includes instruction in leadership skills, wilderness survival skills, first aid, group processes, counseling techniques, environmental studies and instruction in recreational activities such as rock climbing, ropes courses, backpacking, kayaking and canoeing. PENDING NCCCS APPROVAL ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A55330 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 ODL 110 Introduction to Outdoor Leadership 2 2 0 3 ODL 120 Challenge Course Facilitation 1 4 0 3 ODL 130 Water-Based Activities I 1 6 0 3 Totals 10 14 0 16 SPRING SEMESTER 1 ENG 114 Professional Research & Reporting ODL 115 Methods of Experiential Education ODL 125 Wilderness First Responder ODL 135 Land-Based Activities I PSY 150 General Psychology Totals SUMMER SEMESTER COE 111 Co-op Work Experience I COE 121 Co-op Work Experience II Totals

3 0 0 3 2 2 0 3 3 3 0 4 1 6 0 3 3 0 0 3 12 11 0 16 0 0 10 1 0 0 10 1 0 0 20 2

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OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP FALL SEMESTER 2 BUS 139 Entrepreneurship I 3 0 0 3 ODL 210 Water-Based Activities II 1 6 0 3 ODL 215 Adm. & Policy of Public Lands 3 0 0 3 ODL 220 Climbing 1 4 0 3 *** *** Humanities Elective 3 0 0 3 *** *** Technical Elective 0-1 2-4 0 1-3 Totals 11-14 2-14 0 16-18 SPRING SEMESTER 2 MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab ODL 212 Land-Based Activities II ODL 228 ODL for Special Populations ODL 286 Issues in Outdoor Leadership *** *** Other Elective Totals

3 0 0 3 0 2 0 1 1 6 0 3 2 2 0 3 2 2 0 3 1-5 0-6 0-2 3-7 9-13 12-18 0-2 16-20

Total Semester Hour Credits: 66-72 TECHNICAL ELECTIVES EMS 243 Wilderness EMT 1 2 0 2 MED 182 CPR, First Aid & Emergency I 1 2 0 2 ODL 244 Caving 1 3 0 2 ODL 250 Biking 1 3 0 2 ODL 260 Challenge Course Management 1 4 0 3 ODL 265 Raft Guide Training 1 2 0 2 ODL 270 Swift Water Rescue 0 2 0 1 ODL 288 Current Trends in ODL 1 4 0 3 OTHER ELECTIVES EMS 110 EMT Basic 5 6 0 7 ODL 140 Intro to Wilderness Therapy 2 2 0 3 ODL 245 Wilderness Therapeutic Models 3 2 0 4 ODL 248 Field Techniques in WT 2 6 0 4 ODL 267 Primitive Living Skills 1 4 0 3 ODL 284 Principles of Ecotourism 2 2 0 3 CERTIFICATE C55330 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ODL 110 Introduction to Outdoor Leadership 2 2 0 3 ODL 115 Methods of Experiential Education 2 2 0 3 Choose one of the following: MED 182 CPR, First Aid & Emergency I 1 2 0 2 ODL 125 Wilderness First Responder 3 3 0 4 Choose two of the following: ODL 120 Challenge Course Facilitation 1 4 0 3 ODL 130 Water-Based Activities I 1 6 0 3 ODL 135 Land-Based Activities I 1 6 0 3 ODL 220 Climbing 1 4 0 3 Totals 7-9 14-19 0 14-16 Total Semester Hour Credits: 14-16

OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP WILDERNESS THERAPY CERTIFICATE C553301 This curriculum is designed to prepare individuals to be successful professionals in the wilderness therapy field. Course work includes technical training in the areas of backcountry travel, backpacking, and primitive living skills. These skills are taught through facilitation and experiential learning methodologies. This course of study includes interpersonal skills and leadership skills such as group process, conflict resolution, therapeutic interventions, and management issues. Graduates from this program will have a sound background in outdoor field skills blended with a solid foundation of theoretical skills and knowledge of wilderness therapeutic models. Graduates are prepared for employment as field instructors in wilderness therapy programs, in residential therapeutic schools and programs, and the adventure therapy industry. Gainful Employment Compliance Information - For more information about SCC’s graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this program, and other important information, please visit the program’s webpage for the latest information at: http://www.southwesterncc.edu/program/wilderness-therapy-certificate Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ODL 125 Wilderness First Responder 3 3 0 4 ODL 140 Intro to Wilderness Therapy 2 2 0 3 ODL 245 Wilderness Therapeutic Models 3 2 0 4 ODL 248 Field Techniques in WT 2 6 0 4 Choose one of the following: ODL 115 Methods of Experiential Education 2 2 0 3 ODL 130 Water-Based Activities I 1 6 0 3 ODL 135 Land-Based Activities I 1 6 0 3 ODL 267 Primitive Living Skills 1 4 0 3 Totals 11-12 15-19 0 18 Total Semester Hour Credits: 18

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OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP WILDERNESS EMERGENCY MEDICINE CERTIFICATE C553302 This curriculum is designed to prepare individuals to be successful outdoor professionals in Wilderness Emergency Medicine. Course work includes technical training in the areas such as wilderness patient assessment, improvised litters and splints, environmental emergencies and evacuation protocols. These skills are taught through facilitation and experiential learning methodologies. Graduates from this program will have a sound background in emergency management blended with a solid foundation of outdoor skills. Graduates are prepared for employment in agencies that require a higher level of training in medical and backcountry skills to handle difficult environments, and prolonged treatment of the patient with limited resources. Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit EMS 110 EMT Basic 5 6 0 7 Choose one of the following: EMS 243 Wilderness EMT 1 2 0 2 ODL 125 Wilderness First Responder 3 3 0 4 Choose one of the following: ODL 130 Water-Based Activities I 1 6 0 3 ODL 135 Land-Based Activities I 1 6 0 3 ODL 267 Primitive Living Skills 1 4 0 3 Totals 7-9 12-15 0 12-15 Total Semester Hour Credits: 12-15 FACULTY Paul Wolf, Program Coordinator [email protected] SCC Swain Center • 828.366.2003

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The Paralegal Technology curriculum prepares individuals to work under the supervision of attorneys by performing routine legal tasks and assisting with substantive legal work. A paralegal/legal assistant may not practice law, give legal advice, or represent clients in a court of law. Course work includes substantive and procedural legal knowledge in the areas of civil litigation, legal research and writing, real estate, family law, wills, estates, trusts, and commercial law. Required courses also include subjects such as English, mathematics, and computer utilization. Graduates are trained to assist attorneys in probate work, investigations, public records search, drafting and filing legal documents, research, and office management. Employment opportunities are available in private law firms, governmental agencies, banks, insurance agencies, and other business organizations. Graduates are eligible to take the paralegal certification exam administered by the North Carolina State Bar. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A25380 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 LEX 110 Introduction to Paralegal Study 2 0 0 2 LEX 120 Legal Research/Writing I 2 2 0 3 LEX 180 Case Analysis & Reasoning 1 2 0 2 MAT 115 Mathematical Models 2 2 0 3 *** *** Social Science Elective 3 0 0 3 Totals 14 6 0 17 SPRING SEMESTER 1 ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting LEX 121 Legal Research/Writing II LEX 140 Civil Litigation I LEX 260 Bankruptcy & Collections OST 136 Word Processing CIS 110 Introduction to Computers Totals SUMMER SEMESTER LEX 141 Civil Litigation II LEX 160 Criminal Law & Procedure Totals FALL SEMESTER 2 ACC 120 Principles of Financial Accounting LEX 130 Civil Injuries LEX 170 Administrative Law LEX 210 Real Property I LEX 250 Wills, Estates, & Trusts LEX 280 Ethics & Professionalism Totals

3 0 0 3 2 2 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 2 2 0 3 2 2 0 3 15 6 0 18 2 2 0 3 2 2 0 3 4 4 0 6 3 2 0 4 3 0 0 3 2 0 0 2 3 0 0 3 2 2 0 3 2 0 0 2 15 4 0 17

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PARALEGAL TECHNOLOGY SPRING SEMESTER 2 COE 111 Co-op Work Experience I LEX 150 Commercial Law I LEX 211 Real Property II LEX 240 Family Law *** *** Humanities Elective Totals Total Semester hour Credits: 71 FACULTY Kelly Burch, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4209 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4209

0 0 10 1 2 2 0 3 1 4 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 9 6 10 13

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The Phlebotomy curriculum prepares individuals to obtain blood and other specimens for the purpose of laboratory analysis. Course work includes proper specimen collection and handling, communication skills, and maintaining patient data. Graduates may qualify for employment in hospitals, clinics, physicians’ offices, and other health care settings and may be eligible for national certification as phlebotomy technicians. Graduates are eligible to take the Phlebotomy Certification Exam given by the American Society of Clinical Pathology Board of Certification. CERTIFICATE C45600 Prefix Number Title *PBT 100 Phlebotomy Technology *PBT 101 Phlebotomy Practicum PSY 150 General Psychology Totals

Class Lab Clinical Credit 5 2 0 6 0 0 9 3 3 0 0 3 8 2 9 12

Total Semester Hour Credits: 12 *Stated weekly hour requirements are based on a 16 week semester. Please note that PBT 100 runs the first 8 weeks of the 16 week semester. PBT 101 runs the latter 8 weeks. This will increase the weekly hour requirements for class, lab, and clinical. NOTE: Meeting the following criteria allows for transition into the second semester of the Medical Laboratory Technology program: 1. Successful completion of Phlebotomy curriculum courses 2. Successful completion of BIO 110 or BIO 111 and MLT 116 3. Cumulative GPA of 2.5 ADMISSIONS CRITERIA The program has a limited enrollment and only admits a class in the fall of each year. Applications and all of Phase I must be completed by April 15. All three phases must be completed by the first day of classes. Students must be 18 years of age or older by August 15, in order to be accepted into the Phlebotomy program for Fall Semester. Please check with the Admissions Office about the status of the program. PHASE I - To be completed by April 15 The applicant must: 1. Complete an application for admission to the Program. 2. Be a high school graduate or have earned a high school equivalency diploma (GED). Exception: current high school students 3. Submit official copies of all transcripts (high school and college). Transcripts must be sent directly from the institution. It is the responsibility of the applicant to assure that all necessary records are sent to the College Admissions Office. 4. Have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale on the most recent academic transcript with ten semester hours completed excluding developmental courses. 5. Meet the Southwestern Community College Placement Test requirement. This may be met by one of the following methods: a) Take and pass the basic components of the Computerized Placement Test. These consist of algebra, arithmetic, reading comprehension, grammar and basic computer skills. The test is administered several times each week on the Jackson

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PHLEBOTOMY and Macon Campuses and is free of charge. To schedule a test session, contact Testing Services at ext. 4332. If you do not pass the basic components of the placement test, you must enroll in and successfully complete the appropriate develop mental coursework prior to the program deadline. If you are unsuccessful in achieving the appropriate cut-off scores in any component of the test, please see the academic retest policy. b) Appropriate SAT or ACT scores and successful completion of high school or college computer literacy course within the past six years. See admissions section for additional details. c) Successful completion of a college-level math, algebra, English and computer literacy course. 6. Have a computer or access to a computer that is up to date (it does not have to be new, but it needs to be updated) with a web browser. Compatible web browsers are (Internet Explorer and Mozilla Firefox) Google Chrome is functional, however, not fully compatible yet. 7. Have access to a word processing application like Microsoft Office 2010, Open Office (freeware) or use Google Docs, included within the “Quick Launch Pad” in your “myscc” page. If you have any questions regarding your online access to our college services, please review the online learning technical requirements here, or contact our IT Help Desk at 828.339.4409. PHASE II Preliminary selection for 12 slots will be based on those students with the top 12 grade point averages (GPA) who have completed Phase I requirements. Student who have not completed Phase I requirements by April 15 will be considered for acceptance if slots are available. The identified individuals will receive provisional acceptance and move to Phase III of the admissions requirements. PHASE III Those individuals who are notified of provisional acceptance status will be provided with SCC health forms to be completed by the appropriate medical personnel. The completed medical forms must indicate that you are capable of meeting the physical requirements of the program. Also, the Phlebotomy Technical/Academic Standards self-appraisal form must be completed. These forms must be completed and submitted to the Phlebotomy program coordinator by August 1. Students who fail to submit the required forms will not be able to register for Phlebotomy coursework. Notes: 1. It is recommended that all components of Phase I be completed before moving to the Phase II requirement. 2. Applications must be updated annually by applicants who were not accepted the previous year. 3. Applicants may take non-phlebotomy, general education and related coursework prior to being accepted into the program. 4. The following items need to be turned in to the Phlebotomy program coordinator by July 1: a) Health forms including documentation of a physical, immunizations and administration of at least the first Hepatitis B vaccine. b) Receipt/proof of purchase for accident and malpractice insurance. This insurance can be purchased in the College Business Office at the time tuition is paid. c) Technical/Academic Standards self-appraisal form. d) Signed signature sheet at the end of the Phlebotomy Student Policy Manual. See Student Policy Manual section on the next page. PROGRAM STRUCTURE The program offers the Phlebotomy coursework online over the first eight weeks of the semester. In addition, the labs are offered on campus during the first eight weeks. Clinical rotations take place in the second eight weeks of the semester. Students must successfully complete

PHLEBOTOMY both PBT 100 and PBT 101 in the same semester in order to successfully complete the program. PSY 150 maybe taken prior to entering the Phlebotomy program or while in the program. The clinical education will be provided at cooperating hospitals or other healthcare facilities. CLINICAL EDUCATION The clinical education will be provided at cooperating hospitals or other health care facilities. The clinical experience and classroom work are taken within the same semester. Successful completion of the labs must be achieved prior to attending clinical rotations in the latter part of the semester. During clinical education, the student will rotate through the phlebotomy department. Emphasis is placed on attaining competency and proficiency in the performance of phlebotomy procedures, correlated theory and practice and demonstrating prescribed professional behavior. Clinical experience may be integrated with seminars on campus. Note: Students will receive information on clinical placement within the first few weeks of class (PBT 100). They are not expected to attend clinic (PBT 101) until the ninth week of the semester. ACADEMIC STANDARDS The program requires that students maintain a high level of academic and clinical performance. Failure to meet these standards will prevent normal progression through the program. STUDENT POLICY MANUAL The Student Policy Manual link may be found at http://www.southwesterncc.edu/program/phlebotomy-certificate. This manual outlines the policies and procedures to be followed over the course of the program. Students must sign the signature sheet at the end of the policy manual and submit it to the program coordinator by July 1 of the year in which they plan to enroll. INSURANCE Accident and malpractice insurance must be purchased upon entering the Phlebotomy program. The insurance can be purchased in the College Business Office at the time tuition is paid. ACCREDITATION / PROGRAM APPROVAL The Phlebotomy program is approved by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS). The contact information is as follows: NAACLS, 5600 N. River Road, Suite 720, Rosemont, IL 60018-5119; Phone: 847.939.3597 or 773.714.8880, Fax: 773.714.8886; website: www.naacls.org NOTES 1. All students admitted into a health science program may be required, by clinical or Co-op site, to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug testing, prior to, or during clinical education coursework. The results of these tests could affect the student’s ability to progress in the program. 2. All students completing a health science program may be required, by an external testing agency, to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug test prior to a state or national licensing/certification board approving the graduate to sit for licensure/certification exams. FACULTY Andrea Kennedy, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4312 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4312 Dale Hall, Clinical Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4285 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4285

Dr. Michael Rohlfing, Medical Director

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PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT The Physical Therapist Assistant curriculum prepares graduates to work in direct patient care settings under the supervision of physical therapists. Assistants work to improve or restore function by alleviation or prevention of physical impairment and perform other essential activities in a physical therapy department. Course work includes normal human anatomy and physiology, the consequences of disease or injury, and physical therapy treatment of a variety of patient conditions affecting humans throughout the life span. Graduates may be eligible to take the licensure examination administered by the NC Board of Physical Therapy Examiners. Employment is available in general hospitals, rehabilitation centers, extended care facilities, specialty hospitals, home health agencies, private clinics, and public school systems. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A45620 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit BIO 168 Anatomy and Physiology I 3 3 0 4 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 PHY 110 Conceptual Physics 3 0 0 3 PHY 110A Conceptual Physics Lab 0 2 0 1 PTA 110 Introduction to Physical Therapy 2 3 0 3 PTA 130 Physical Therapy Procedure I 1 6 0 3 Totals 12 14 0 17 SPRING SEMESTER 1 BIO 169 Anatomy and Physiology II ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting PTA 120 Functional Anatomy PTA 150 Physical Therapy Procedure II PTA 170 Pathophysiology PTA 212 Health Care/Resources Totals

3 3 0 4 3 0 0 3 1 6 0 3 1 6 0 3 3 0 0 3 2 0 0 2 13 15 0 18

SUMMER SEMESTER PTA 140 Therapeutic Exercise PTA 160 Physical Therapy Procedure III PTA 180 PTA Clinical Education Introduction Totals

2 6 0 4 2 3 0 3 0 0 9 3 4 9 9 10

FALL SEMESTER 2 PSY 150 General Psychology PTA 222 Professional Interactions PTA 240 Physical Therapy Procedure IV PTA 254 Pediatrics for the PTA PTA 280 PTA Issues I PTA 282 PTA Issues II *** *** Humanities Elective Totals SPRING SEMESTER 2 PTA 260 Advanced PTA Clinical Education PTA 270 PTA Topics PTA 252 Geriatrics for the PTA Totals Total Semester Hour Credits: 74

3 0 0 3 2 0 0 2 3 6 0 5 0 3 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 3 0 1 3 0 0 3 12 12 0 16 0 0 30 10 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 3 0 30 13

PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT

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ADMISSION CRITERIA Suggested preparatory courses for individuals desiring a career as a physical therapist assistant would include biology, medical terminology, or other courses recommended by the program advisor. Other specific recommendations may be made through individual advising with a program advisor. The program has a limited enrollment and only admits a class in the fall of each year. Applications and supporting documents must be completed and submitted by April 15 of the year in which the student wishes to enroll in the program. If all slots have not been filled after the above deadline, there may be extensions to the deadline. Please check with the Admissions Office about the status of the program. PHASE I - To be completed by March 31 The applicant must: 1. Complete an application for admission to the Program. 2. Be a high school graduate or have earned a high school equivalency diploma (GED). Exception: current high school students 3. Submit official copies of all transcripts (high school and college). Transcripts must be sent directly from the institution. It is the responsibility of the applicant to assure that all necessary records are sent to the Admissions Office. 4. Have a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale on the most recent academic transcript with ten semester hours completed excluding developmental courses. 5. Meet the Southwestern Community College Placement Test requirement. This may be met by one of the following methods: a) Take and pass the basic components of the Computerized Placement Test. These consist of algebra, arithmetic, reading comprehension, grammar and basic computer skills. The test is administered several times each week on the Jackson and Macon Campuses and is free of charge. To schedule a test session, contact Testing Services at ext. 4332. If you do not pass the basic components of the placement test, you must enroll in and successfully complete the appropriate develop mental coursework prior to the program deadline. If you are unsuccessful in achieving the appropriate cut-off scores in any component of the test, please see the academic retest policy. b) Appropriate SAT or ACT scores and successful completion of high school or college computer literacy course within the past six years. See admissions section for additional details. c) Successful completion of a college-level math, algebra, English and computer literacy course. 6. Complete a minimum of 16 hours (40 for maximum points) of observation time in Physical Therapy at a health care facility. A form for documenting attendance is available from the Program Advisor. It is the prospective student’s responsibility to obtain necessary documentation of attendance and return the form to the Admissions Office. It is your responsibility to schedule your visits, if you have questions about possible sites see your advisor. 7. Must take TEAS Exam. Details for testing dates and times can be secured from the Advisor. This is not a pass or fail test. It is used to measure your potential to be successful in the program. You may take the test one time per annual application period. 8. Complete ACA 111 (or equivalent course) and CIS 110 with a grade of “C” or better. 9. Contact the program advisor for information about the selective admissions process.

198

PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT PHASE II The top 40 candidates, based on a point scale which is available by request to the program faculty, who have completed all parts of Phase I by the appropriate deadlines will be scheduled for a personal interview. All interview candidates must review and sign the program standards form concerning essential functions. PHASE III Selected applicants will be notified by the Admissions Office of provisional acceptance to the program. The applicants must sign and return the Acknowledgement of Acceptance form to the Admissions office. Those individuals, who are notified of acceptance status, will also be provided with SCC health forms to be completed by the appropriate medical personnel. The completed medical forms must indicate that the candidate is capable of meeting the physical requirements for the program. All conditionally accepted candidates must return the health forms at a scheduled required informational session prior to the beginning of the fall semester I. As part of this session, candidates must successfully complete a physical demands activity which includes essential abilities for the field of physical therapy. NOTES 1. Applicants are responsible for submitting all the necessary records to the Admissions Office. 2. Applications must be updated annually by applicants who were not accepted the previous year. 3. Applicants may take non-Physical Therapist Assistant, general education and related coursework prior to being accepted into the program. 4. Contact your advisor for detailed information about the objective selection process. 5. All students admitted into a health science program may be required, by clinical or Co-op site, to submit to a criminal background check and/ or drug testing, prior to, or during clinical education coursework. The results of these tests could affect the student’s ability to progress in the program. 6. All students completing a health science program may be required, by an external testing agency, to submit to a criminal background check and/ or drug test prior to a state or national licensing/certification board approving the graduate to sit for licensure/certification exams. CLINICAL EDUCATION Clinical education will be provided at cooperating health care facilities and other related settings. Many of these sites may require the student to relocate or travel extensively for this part of the program. All expenses are the student’s responsibility. FACULTY Diane Page, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4306 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4306 Susan Kimel, Clinical Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4615 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4615

PRE-MAJOR IN ARTS The following Pre‑Major Associate in Arts programs at SCC are co‑operatively designed with state universities to achieve a seamless junior‑level transfer into one of several majors. Premajor programs of study are recommended for SCC transfer students who feel very sure of their eventual majors. Due to similarities in program requirements, students may not earn both the AA degree and an AA pre-major. Students who can document a specific reason for earning both degrees may appeal in writing to the Dean of Arts and Sciences. MATE Mountain Alliance for Transfer Education (MATE). MATE is a unique consortium agreement with Western Carolina University that allows Southwestern Community College students to dual enroll at both institutions. Students must complete 12 semester hours at the 100 level or above at SCC with at least a 2.0 grade average. Students who enroll in one of Southwestern’s pre-major programs should consult their advisors about this opportunity.

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PRE-MAJOR IN ARTS - BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, ACCOUNTING, ECONOMICS, FINANCE & MARKETING ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE (AA) A1010B Course and Hour Requirements English Composition........................................................6 Humanities/Fine Arts.................................................... 12 Social/Behavioral Sciences............................................ 12 Natural Sciences.................................................................8 Mathematics........................................................................8 Other Required............................................................... 19 TOTAL ......................................................................... 65 • Students must meet the receiving university’s foreign language and/or health and physical education requirements, if applicable, prior to or after transfer to the senior institution. • 3 SHC in Speech/Communication may be substituted for 3 SHC in Humanities/Fine Arts. Speech/Communication may not substitute for the literature requirement.



APPLICATION TO A UNIVERSITY Admission application deadlines vary; students must meet the deadline for the university to which they plan to transfer. Upon successful completion of the associate in arts degree, students who meet the requirements outlined in this pre-major articulation agreement for Business Administration will be eligible to be considered for admission as juniors to the universities offering the baccalaureate degree. ADMISSION TO THE MAJOR Grade Point Average (GPA) requirements vary, and admission is competitive across the several programs in Business Administration. ENGLISH/COMMUNICATION (6 SHC) Two English composition courses are required. Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit • Required course: ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 • The second composition course must be selected from the following: ENG 113 Literature-Based Research 3 0 0 3 ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting 3 0 0 3 HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • One course must be a literature course. • Three additional courses from the following discipline areas are required: music, art, drama, dance, foreign languages, interdisciplinary humanities, literature, philosophy, and religion. SOCIAL/BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • ECO 251 Principles of Microeconomics 3 0 0 3 • One course must be a history course. • Two additional courses from the following discipline areas are required: anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology and sociology. The following courses are recommended: POL 120 American Government 3 0 0 3 PSY 150 General Psychology 3 0 0 3 SOC 210 Introduction to Sociology 3 0 0 3

PRE-MAJOR IN ARTS - BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, ACCOUNTING, ECONOMICS, FINANCE & MARKETING

201

NATURAL SCIENCE/MATHEMATICS (16 SHC) Natural Sciences (8 SHC): Two courses from the biological and physical science disciplines, including accompanying laboratory work, are required. Mathematics (8 SHC): The following courses are required: Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit Choose one of the following: MAT 161 College Algebra 3 0 0 3 MAT 171 Precalculus Algebra 3 0 0 3 MAT 175 Precalculus 4 0 0 4 Choose one of the following: MAT 263 Brief Calculus 3 0 0 3 MAT 271 Calculus I 3 2 0 4 OTHER REQUIRED HOURS (19 SHC) The following courses are required: ACC 120 Principles of Financial Accounting 3 2 0 4 ACC 121 Principles of Managerial Accounting 3 2 0 4 CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 ECO 252 Prin. of Macroeconomics 3 0 0 3 MAT 151 Statistics I 3 0 0 3 MAT 151A Statistics I Lab 0 2 0 1 MAT 175A Precalculus Lab 0 2 0 1 One to three additional hours of approved college transfer credits may be required, depending on math course competencies. HRD 3003 Career & College Student Success (non-credit) is required in the first semester. Total Semester Hour Credits: 65

PRE-MAJOR IN ARTS - CRIMINAL JUSTICE

202

ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE (AA) A1010D Course and Hour Requirements English Composition........................................................6 Humanities/Fine Arts.................................................... 12 Social/Behavioral Sciences............................................ 12 Natural Sciences.................................................................8 Mathematics........................................................................6 Other Required............................................................... 21 TOTAL ............................................................................ 65 • •

Students must meet the receiving university’s foreign language and/or health and physical education requirements, if applicable, prior to or after transfer to the senior institution. 3 SHC in Speech/Communication may be substituted for 3 SHC in Humanities/ Fine Arts. Speech/Communication may not substitute for the literature requirement.

APPLICATION TO A UNIVERSITY Admission application deadlines vary; students must meet the deadline for the university to which they plan to transfer. Upon successful completion of the associate in arts degree, students who meet the requirements outlined in this pre-major articulation agreement for Criminal Justice will be eligible to be considered for admission as juniors to the universities offering the baccalaureate degree. ADMISSION TO THE MAJOR GPA requirements vary, and admission is competitive across the several programs in Criminal Justice. ENGLISH/COMMUNICATION (6 SHC) Two English composition courses are required. Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit • Required Course: ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 • The second composition course must be selected from the following: ENG 113 Literature-Based Research 3 0 0 3 ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting 3 0 0 3 HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • One course must be a literature course. • Three additional courses from the following discipline areas are required: music, art, drama, dance, foreign languages, interdisciplinary humanities, literature, philosophy and religion.

PRE-MAJOR IN ARTS - CRIMINAL JUSTICE SOCIAL/BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • One course must be a history course. • The following courses are required: POL 120 American Government PSY 150 General Psychology SOC 210 Introduction to Sociology

203

3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3

NATURAL SCIENCE/MATHEMATICS (14 SHC) Natural Sciences (8 SHC): Two courses from the biological and physical science disciplines, including accompanying laboratory work, are required. Mathematics (6 SHC): Two courses are required. • One course must be in introductory mathematics (college algebra, trigonometry, calculus, etc.) • The following course is recommended: MAT 151 Statistics I 3 0 0 3 OTHER REQUIRED HOURS (21 SHC) • The following courses are required (10 SHC): ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 CJC 111 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 0 0 3 CJC 121 Law Enforcement Operations 3 0 0 3 CJC 141 Corrections 3 0 0 3 • 11 additional hours of approved college transfer courses are required. One hour of ACA may be included in a 65-hour degree program. Total Semester Hour Credits: 65

204

PRE MAJOR IN ARTS - ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE (AA) A1010R COURSE AND HOUR REQUIREMENTS English Composition........................................................6 Humanities/Fine Arts.................................................... 12 Social/Behavioral Sciences............................................ 12 Natural Sciences.................................................................8 Mathematics........................................................................6 Other Required............................................................... 21 TOTAL............................................................................. 65 • Students must meet the receiving university’s foreign language and/or health and physical education requirements, if applicable, prior to or after transfer to the senior institution.



• 3 SHC in Speech/Communication may be substituted for 3 SHC in Humanities/Fine Arts. Speech/Communication may not substitute for the literature requirement.



APPLICATION TO A UNIVERSITY Admission application deadlines vary; students must meet the deadline for the university to which they plan to transfer. Upon successful completion of the associate in arts degree, students who meet the requirements outlined in the pre-major articulation agreement for Elementary Education will be eligible to be considered for admission as juniors to the universities offering the baccalaureate degree. ADMISSION TO THE MAJOR GPA requirements vary, and admission is competitive across the several programs in Elementary Education. Admission to teacher licensure programs requires satisfactory scores on PRAXIS I. Receiving institutions may have additional requirements, prerequisites, or proficiencies. Since these vary at receiving institutions, students should review the admission requirements for the institutions they plan to attend. ENGLISH COMPOSITION (6 SHC) Two English composition courses are required. Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit • Required course: ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 • The second composition course must be selected from the following: ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 0 0 3 ENG 113 Literature-Based Research 3 0 0 3 HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • One course must be a literature course. Select one course from the following (3 SHC): ENG 131 Introduction to Literature 3 0 0 ENG 231 American Literature I 3 0 0 ENG 232 American Literature II 3 0 0

3 3 3

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• The following course is required: COM 231 Public Speaking 3 0 0 3 • One of the following courses is required (3 SHC) ART 111 Art Appreciation 3 0 0 3 ART 114 Art History Survey I 3 0 0 3 ART 115 Art History Survey II 3 0 0 3 MUS 110 Music Appreciation 3 0 0 3 • One additional course from the following discipline areas is required: music, art, drama, dance, foreign languages, interdisciplinary humanities, literature, philosophy, and religion. SOCIAL/BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • Select one course from the following (3 SHC): HIS 111 World Civilizations I 3 0 0 3 HIS 112 World Civilizations II 3 0 0 3 HIS 115 Introduction to Global History 3 0 0 3 HIS 121 Western Civilization I 3 0 0 3 HIS 122 Western Civilization II 3 0 0 3 • The following courses are required (6 SHC): PSY 150 General Psychology 3 0 0 3 SOC 210 Introduction to Sociology 3 0 0 3 • One additional course from the following discipline areas is required: anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology, and sociology. NATURAL SCIENCES/MATHEMATICS Natural Sciences (8 SHC): • The following courses are required: Choose one of the following: BIO 110 Principles of Biology BIO 111 General Biology I Choose one of the following: CHM 131 Intro to Chemistry and CHM 131A Intro to Chemistry Lab or CHM 151 General Chemistry or PHY 110 Conceptual Physics and PHY 110A Conceptual Physics Lab or PHY 151 College Physics

3 3

3 3

0 0

4 4

3 0

0 3

0 0

3 1

3 3 0 4 3 0

0 2

0 0

3 1

3 2 0 4

Mathematics (6 SHC): • Two of the following courses are required: CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics 3 0 0 3 MAT 141 Mathematical Concepts I 3 0 0 3 MAT 142 Mathematical Concepts II 3 0 0 3 MAT 161 College Algebra 3 0 0 3 * A higher level math course may substitute for MAT 161. MAT 141 and MAT 142 is the preferred sequence for Elementary Education.

206

PRE MAJOR IN ARTS - ELEMENTARY EDUCATION OTHER REQUIRED HOURS (21 SHC) ACA 111 College Student Success • The following course is recommended (4 SHC): EDU 216 Foundations of Education

1 0 0 1 3

2

0

4

It is recommended that within the “Other Required Hours,” pre-education students in Elementary Education select courses that will help meet a corollary studies area. These courses should be selected in conjunction with the requirements at each university, since available corollary studies may not be offered on each university campus. Corollary Studies are comprised of a minimum of 18 hours of community college or UNC campuses’ coursework in a choice of four interdisciplinary areas: (1) diversity studies, (2) global issues, (3) the arts, or (4) math, science and technology. Satisfying the UNC Board of Governors’ requirement for an academic concentration, corollary studies are appropriate for expanding and deepening the pre-service elementary teacher’s knowledge, appreciation and skills in the areas appropriate to the elementary school classroom and curriculum. Total Semester Hour Credits: 65

PRE MAJOR IN ARTS - ENGLISH EDUCATION

207

ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE (AA) A1010F COURSE AND HOUR REQUIREMENTS English Composition........................................................6 Humanities/Fine Arts.................................................... 12 Social/Behavioral Sciences............................................ 12 Natural Sciences.................................................................8 Mathematics........................................................................6 Other Required............................................................... 21 TOTAL............................................................................. 65 • •

Students must meet the receiving university’s foreign language and/or health and physical education requirements, if applicable, prior to or after transfer to the senior institution. 3 SHC in Speech/Communication may be substituted for 3 SHC in Humanities/Fine Arts. Speech/Communication may not substitute for the literature requirement.



APPLICATION TO A UNIVERSITY Admission application deadlines vary; students must meet the deadline for the university to which they plan to transfer. Upon successful completion of the associate in arts degree, students who meet the requirements outlined in this pre-major articulation agreement for English Education will be eligible to be considered for admission as juniors to the universities offering the baccalaureate degree. ADMISSION TO THE MAJOR GPA requirements vary, and admission is competitive across the several programs in English Education. Admission to teacher licensure programs requires satisfactory scores on PRAXIS I. ENGLISH COMPOSITION (6 SHC) Two English composition courses are required. Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit • Required course: ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 • The second composition course must be selected from the following: ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 0 0 3 ENG 113 Literature-Based Research 3 0 0 3 HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • One course must be a literature course. • Three additional courses from the following discipline areas are required: music, art, drama, dance, foreign languages, interdisciplinary humanities, literature, philosophy, speech/communication, and religion. One of the following fine arts courses is recommended: ART 111 Art Appreciation HUM 160 Introduction to Film MUS 110 Music Appreciation

3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3

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PRE MAJOR IN ARTS - ENGLISH EDUCATION A foreign language sequence is recommended: FRE 111 Elementary French I FRE 112 Elementary French II SPA 111 Elementary Spanish I SPA 112 Elementary Spanish II

3 3 3 3

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

3 3 3 3

SOCIAL/BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • Select one course from the following (3 SHC): HIS 111 World Civilizations I 3 0 0 3 HIS 112 World Civilizations II 3 0 0 3 HIS 121 Western Civilization I 3 0 0 3 HIS 122 Western Civilization II 3 0 0 3 • The following course is required: PSY 150 General Psychology 3 0 0 3 • Two additional courses from the following discipline areas are required: anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology, and sociology. NATURAL SCIENCES/MATHEMATICS Natural Sciences (8 SHC): • Two courses from the biological and physical science disciplines, including accompanying laboratory work, are required.



Mathematics (6 SHC): • Two courses are required. MAT 161 College Algebra (or higher) 3 0 0 3 The second course may be a higher level mathematics course or may be selected from among other quantitative subjects, such as computer science (CIS) and statistics (MAT). OTHER REQUIRED HOURS (21 SHC) • The following courses are required (5 SHC): ACA 111 College Student Success EDU 216 Foundations of Education

1 0 0 1 3 2 0 4

• Sixteen additional hours (16 SHC) of approved college transfer courses are required. To prepare for transfer, pre-majors in English Education should select from these recommended courses: COM 231 Public Speaking 3 0 0 3 SPA 211 Intermediate Spanish I 3 0 0 3 SPA 212 Intermediate Spanish II 3 0 0 3 ENG 231 American Literature I 3 0 0 3 ENG 232 American Literature II 3 0 0 3 ENG 272 Southern Literature 3 0 0 3 HEA 110 Personal Health and Wellness 3 0 0 3 * If the intermediate foreign language sequence is not available, two additional 200-level literature courses are recommended. Total Semester Hour Credits: 65

PRE-MAJOR IN ARTS - HISTORY

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ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE (AA) A1010H COURSE AND HOUR REQUIREMENTS English Composition........................................................6 Humanities/Fine Arts.................................................... 12 Social/Behavioral Sciences............................................ 12 Natural Sciences.................................................................8 Mathematics........................................................................6 Other Required............................................................... 21 TOTAL ............................................................................ 65 • Students must meet the receiving university’s foreign language and/or health and physical education requirements, if applicable, prior to or after transfer to the senior institution. • 3 SHC in Speech/Communication may be substituted for 3 SHC in Humanities/ Fine Arts. Speech/Communication may not substitute for the literature requirement. APPLICATION TO A UNIVERSITY Admission application deadlines vary; students must meet the deadline for the university to which they plan to transfer. Upon successful completion of the associate in arts degree, students who meet the requirements outlined in this pre-major articulation agreement for History will be eligible to be considered for admission as juniors to the universities offering the baccalaureate degree. ADMISSION TO THE MAJOR GPA requirements vary, and admission is competitive across the several programs in History. ENGLISH/COMMUNICATION (6 SHC) Two English composition courses are required. Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit • Required Course: ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 • The second composition course must be selected from the following: ENG 113 Literature-Based Research 3 0 0 3 ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting 3 0 0 3 HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • One course must be a literature course. • Three additional courses from the following discipline areas are required: music, art, drama, dance, foreign languages, interdisciplinary humanities, literature, philosophy, and religion.

210

PRE-MAJOR IN ARTS - HISTORY SOCIAL/BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • One course must be a history course. One of the following history sequences is recommended: HIS 111 World Civilizations I 3 0 0 3 HIS 112 World Civilizations II 3 0 0 3 or HIS 121 Western Civilization I 3 0 0 3 HIS 122 Western Civilization II 3 0 0 3 • Three courses from the following discipline areas are required: anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology and sociology.



NATURAL SCIENCE/MATHEMATICS (14 SHC) Natural Sciences (8 SHC): Two courses from the biological and physical science disciplines, including accompanying laboratory work, are required. Mathematics (6 SHC): • Two courses are required. MAT 161 College Algebra 3 0 0 3 The second course may be a higher level mathematics course or may be selected from among other quantitative subjects, such as computer science (CIS) and statistics (MAT). OTHER REQUIRED HOURS (21 SHC) ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 • Twenty additional hours of approved college transfer courses are required. • The following courses are recommended: HIS 131 American History I 3 0 0 3 HIS 132 American History II 3 0 0 3 Total Semester Hour Credits: 65

PRE-MAJOR IN ARTS - MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION

211

ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE (AA) A1011A COURSE AND HOUR REQUIREMENTS English Composition........................................................6 Humanities/Fine Arts.................................................... 12 Social/Behavioral Sciences............................................ 12 Natural Sciences.................................................................8 Mathematics........................................................................6 Other Required............................................................... 21 TOTAL............................................................................. 65 • Students must meet the receiving university’s foreign language and/or health and physical education requirements, if applicable, prior to or after transfer to the senior institution.



• 3 SHC in Speech/Communication may be substituted for 3 SHC in Humanities/Fine Arts. Speech/Communication may not substitute for the literature requirement.



APPLICATION TO A UNIVERSITY Admission application deadlines vary; students must meet the deadline for the university to which they plan to transfer. Upon successful completion of the associate in arts degree, students who meet the requirements outlined in the pre-major articulation agreement for Middle Grades Education will be eligible to be considered for admission as juniors to the universities offering the baccalaureate degree. ADMISSION TO THE MAJOR GPA requirements vary, and admission is competitive across the several programs in Middle Grades Education. Admission to teacher licensure programs requires satisfactory scores on PRAXIS I. Receiving institutions may have additional requirements, prerequisites, or proficiencies Since these vary at receiving institutions, students should review the admission requirements for the institutions they plan to attend. ENGLISH COMPOSITION (6 SHC) Two English composition courses are required. Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit • Required course: ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 • The second composition course must be selected from the following: ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 0 0 3 ENG 113 Literature-Based Research 3 0 0 3 HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • One course must be a literature course. Select one course from the following (3 SHC): ENG 131 Introduction to Literature or 3 0 0 ENG 231 American Literature I 3 0 0 ENG 232 American Literature II 3 0 0

3 3 3

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PRE-MAJOR IN ARTS - MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION • The following course is required: COM 231 Public Speaking 3 0 0 3 • One of the following courses is required (3 SHC): ART 111 Art Appreciation 3 0 0 3 ART 114 Art History Survey I 3 0 0 3 ART 115 Art History Survey II 3 0 0 3 MUS 110 Music Appreciation 3 0 0 3 • One additional course from the following discipline areas is required: music, art, drama, dance, foreign languages, interdisciplinary humanities, literature, philosophy, and religion. SOCIAL/BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • Select one course from the following (3 SHC): HIS 111 World Civilizations I 3 0 0 3 HIS 112 World Civilizations II 3 0 0 3 HIS 115 Introduction to Global History 3 0 0 3 HIS 121 Western Civilization I 3 0 0 3 HIS 122 Western Civilization II 3 0 0 3 • The following courses are required (6 SHC): PSY 150 General Psychology 3 0 0 3 SOC 210 Introduction to Sociology 3 0 0 3 • One additional course from the following discipline areas is required: anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology, and sociology. NATURAL SCIENCES/MATHEMATICS Natural Sciences (8 SHC): • The following courses are required: Choose one of the following: BIO 110 Principles of Biology BIO 111 General Biology I Choose one of the following: CHM 131 Intro to Chemistry and CHM 131A Intro to Chemistry Lab or CHM 151 General Chemistry or PHY 110 Conceptual Physics and PHY 110A Conceptual Physics Lab or PHY 151 College Physics Mathematics (6 SHC): • Required course: CIS 110 Introduction to Computers • Choose one of the following: MAT 141 Mathematical Concepts I MAT 142 Mathematical Concepts II MAT 161 College Algebra * A higher level math course may substitute for MAT 161.

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PRE-MAJOR IN ARTS - MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION OTHER REQUIRED HOURS (21 SHC) ACA 111 College Student Success • The following course is recommended (4 SHC): EDU 216 Foundations of Education

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It is recommended that within the “Other Required Hours,” pre- education students in Middle Grades Education select courses that will help meet the mandated academic (second major) concentration. These courses should be selected in conjunction with the requirements at each university, since available academic (second major) concentrations and their specific requirements differ on each campus. In order to be consistent with NC licensure areas, Middle Grades Education students should select courses from up to two (2) of the following areas: Social Sciences, English, Mathematics, Sciences. (Note: UNC-Asheville students major in an academic area and the selected 21 hours should be in sync with their intended major/ program.) Typically offered academic concentrations are biology, English, history, mathematics, and psychology. Total Semester Hour Credits: 65

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PRE-MAJORS IN ARTS - NURSING ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE (AA) A1010I COURSE AND HOUR REQUIREMENTS English Composition........................................................6 Humanities/Fine Arts.................................................... 12 Social/Behavioral Sciences............................................ 12 Natural Sciences.................................................................8 Mathematics........................................................................6 Other Required............................................................... 21 TOTAL ............................................................................ 65 • Students must meet the receiving university’s foreign language and/or health and physical education requirements, if applicable, prior to or after transfer to the senior institution. • 3 SHC in Speech/Communication may be substituted for 3 SHC in Humanities/Fine Arts. Speech/Communication may not substitute for the literature requirement APPLICATION TO A UNIVERSITY Admission application deadlines vary; students must meet the deadline for the university to which they plan to transfer. Upon successful completion of the associate in arts degree, students who meet the requirements outlined in this pre-major articulation agreement for Nursing will be eligible to be considered for admission as juniors to the universities offering the baccalaureate degree. ADMISSION TO THE MAJOR Admission across the several programs in Nursing is competitive. Other professional admission requirements may be designated by individual programs. GPA requirements vary. ENGLISH/COMMUNICATION (6 SHC) Two English composition courses are required. Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit • Required Course: ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 • The second composition course must be selected from the following: ENG 113 Literature-Based Research 3 0 0 3 ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting 3 0 0 3 HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • One course must be a literature course. • Three additional courses from the following discipline areas are required: music, art, drama, dance, foreign languages, interdisciplinary humanities, literature, philosophy and religion.

PRE-MAJOR IN ARTS - NURSING SOCIAL/BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • One course must be a history course. • The following courses are required: PSY 150 General Psychology PSY 241 Developmental Psychology SOC 210 Introduction to Sociology

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3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3

NATURAL SCIENCE/MATHEMATICS (14 SHC) Natural Sciences (8 SHC): • One of the following chemistry sequences is required: CHM 131 Introduction to Chemistry 3 0 0 3 CHM 131A Introduction to Chemistry Lab 0 3 0 1 CHM 132 Organic and Biochemistry 3 3 0 4 or CHM 151 General Chemistry I 3 3 0 4 CHM 152 General Chemistry II 3 3 0 4 Mathematics (6 SHC): • The following math courses are required: MAT 151 Statistics I MAT 161 College Algebra (or higher)

3 0 0 3 3 0 0 3

OTHER REQUIRED HOURS (21 SHC) • The following courses are required: ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 BIO 168 Anatomy and Physiology I 3 3 0 4 BIO 169 Anatomy and Physiology II 3 3 0 4 BIO 175 General Microbiology 2 2 0 3 PSY 281 Abnormal Psychology 3 0 0 3 SOC 213 Sociology of the Family 3 0 0 3 • Three additional hours of approved college transfer courses are required. Total Semester Hour Credits: 65

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PRE-MAJOR IN ARTS - PHYSICAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE (AA) A1010J COURSE AND HOUR REQUIREMENTS English Composition........................................................6 Humanities/Fine Arts.................................................... 12 Social/Behavioral Sciences............................................ 12 Natural Sciences.................................................................8 Mathematics........................................................................6 Other Required............................................................... 21 TOTAL ............................................................................ 65 • Students must meet the receiving university’s foreign language and/or health and physical education requirements, if applicable, prior to or after transfer to the senior institution. • 3 SHC in Speech/Communication may be substituted for 3 SHC in Humanities/Fine Arts. Speech/Communication may not substitute for the literature requirement. APPLICATION TO A UNIVERSITY Admission application deadlines vary; students must meet the deadline for the university to which they plan to transfer. Upon successful completion of the associate in arts degree, students who meet the requirements outlined in this pre-major articulation agreement for Physical Education will be eligible to be considered for admission as juniors to the universities offering the baccalaureate degree. ADMISSION TO THE MAJOR Grade point average requirements vary, and admission is competitive across the several programs in Physical Education. Admission to teacher licensure programs requires satisfactory scores on PRAXIS I. ENGLISH/COMMUNICATION (6 SHC) Two English composition courses are required. Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit • Required Course: ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 • The second composition course must be selected from the following: ENG 113 Literature-Based Research 3 0 0 3 ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting 3 0 0 3 HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • One course must be a literature course. • Three additional courses from the following discipline areas are required: music, art, drama, dance, foreign languages, interdisciplinary humanities, literature, philosophy and religion. • The following course is recommended to substitute for 3 SHC of Humanities/Fine Arts: COM 231 Public Speaking 3 0 0 3

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SOCIAL/BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • One course must be a history course. • Three courses from the following discipline areas are required: anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology and sociology. • The following course is recommended: PSY 150 General Psychology 3 0 0 3 NATURAL SCIENCE/MATHEMATICS (14 SHC) Natural Sciences (8 SHC): • Two courses from the biological and physical science disciplines, including accompanying laboratory work, are required. • The following sequence of courses is recommended: BIO 111 General Biology I 3 3 0 4 BIO 112 General Biology II 3 3 0 4 Mathematics (6 SHC): Two courses required. • One course must be in introductory mathematics (college algebra, trigonometry, calculus, etc.). • One of the following courses is recommended as the second mathematics course: CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 MAT 151 Statistics I 3 0 0 3 OTHER REQUIRED HOURS (21 SHC) • The following courses are required: ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 PED 110 Fit and Well for Life 1 2 0 2 PED *** 2 SHC of electives • Sixteen additional hours of approved college transfer courses are required. Pre-education majors should select additional courses from Humanities/ Fine Arts, Social/ Behavioral Sciences, Natural Sciences/Mathematics and electives that meet the requirements of the academic concentration, based on the requirements of the receiving institution. • Foundations of Education (EDU 216) is a recommended course for all pre-majors in education. Total Semester Hour Credits: 65

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PRE-MAJORS IN ARTS - POLITICAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE (AA) A1010K COURSE AND HOUR REQUIREMENTS English Composition........................................................6 Humanities/Fine Arts.................................................... 12 Social/Behavioral Sciences............................................ 12 Natural Sciences.................................................................8 Mathematics........................................................................6 Other Required............................................................... 21 TOTAL ............................................................................ 65 • Students must meet the receiving university’s foreign language and/or health and physical education requirements, if applicable, prior to or after transfer to the senior institution.



• 3 SHC in Speech/Communication may be substituted for 3 SHC in Humanities/Fine Arts. Speech/Communication may not substitute for the literature requirement.



APPLICATION TO A UNIVERSITY Admission application deadlines vary; students must meet the deadline for the university to which they plan to transfer. Upon successful completion of the associate in arts degree, students who meet the requirements outlined in this pre-major articulation agreement for Political Science will be eligible to be considered for admission as juniors to the universities offering the baccalaureate degree. ADMISSION TO THE MAJOR GPA requirements vary, and admission is competitive across the several programs in Political Science. ENGLISH/COMMUNICATION (6 SHC) Two English composition courses are required. Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit • Required Course: ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 • The second composition course must be selected from the following: ENG 113 Literature-Based Research 3 0 0 3 ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting 3 0 0 3 HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • One course must be a literature course. • Three additional courses from the following discipline areas are required: music, art, drama, dance, foreign languages, interdisciplinary humanities, literature, philosophy and religion. • One of the following course sequences is recommended: FRE 111 and 112 Elementary French I & II 6 0 0 6 SPA 111 and 112 Elementary Spanish I & II 6 0 0 6

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• One of the following courses is recommended to substitute for 3 SHC of Humanities/ Fine Arts: COM 110 Introduction to Communication 3 0 0 3 COM 231 Public Speaking 3 0 0 3 SOCIAL/BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • One course must be a history course. • Three courses from the following discipline areas are required: anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology, and sociology. • The following courses are recommended: PSY 150 General Psychology 3 0 0 3 • Choose one of the following: SOC 210 Introduction to Sociology 3 0 0 3 SOC 220 Social Problems 3 0 0 3 • One of the following courses is recommended: GEO 111 World Regional Geography 3 0 0 3 GEO 112 Cultural Geography 3 0 0 3 NATURAL SCIENCE/MATHEMATICS (14 SHC) Natural Sciences (8 SHC): • Two courses from the biological and physical science disciplines, including accompanying laboratory work, are required. Mathematics (6 SHC): Two courses required. • One course must be in introductory mathematics (college algebra, trigonometry, calculus, etc.). • The following course is recommended as the second mathematics course: CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0

3

OTHER REQUIRED HOURS (21 SHC) • The following courses are required: ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 POL 120 American Government 3 0 0 3 • Seventeen additional hours of approved college transfer courses are required. • One of the following courses is recommended: ECO 151 Survey of Economics 3 0 0 3 ECO 251 Principles of Microeconomics 3 0 0 3 ECO 252 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 0 0 3 Total Semester Hour Credits: 65

220

PRE-MAJORS IN ART - PSYCHOLOGY ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE (AA) A1010L COURSE AND HOUR REQUIREMENTS English Composition........................................................6 Humanities/Fine Arts.................................................... 12 Social/Behavioral Sciences............................................ 12 Natural Sciences.................................................................8 Mathematics........................................................................6 Other Required............................................................... 21 TOTAL ............................................................................ 65 • Students must meet the receiving university’s foreign language and/or health and physical education requirements, if applicable, prior to or after transfer to the senior institution. • 3 SHC in Speech/Communication may be substituted for 3 SHC in Humanities/Fine Arts. Speech/Communication may not substitute for the literature requirement. APPLICATION TO A UNIVERSITY Admission application deadlines vary; students must meet the deadline for the university to which they plan to transfer. Upon successful completion of the associate in arts degree, students who meet the requirements outlined in this pre-major articulation agreement for Psychology will be eligible to be considered for admission as juniors to the universities offering the baccalaureate degree. ADMISSION TO THE MAJOR GPA requirements vary, and admission is competitive across the several programs in Psychology. ENGLISH/COMMUNICATION (6 SHC) Two English composition courses are required. Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit • Required Course: ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 • The second composition course must be selected from the following: ENG 113 Literature-Based Research 3 0 0 3 ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting 3 0 0 3 HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • One course must be a literature course. • Three additional courses from the following discipline areas are required: music, art, drama, dance, foreign languages, interdisciplinary humanities, literature, philosophy and religion.

PRE-MAJOR IN ARTS - PSYCHOLOGY

221

SOCIAL/BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • One course must be a history course. • The following course is required: PSY 150 General Psychology 3 0 0 3 • Two courses from the following discipline areas are required, to include at least one additional discipline: anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology and sociology. NATURAL SCIENCE/MATHEMATICS (14 SHC) Natural Sciences (8 SHC): • Two courses from the biological and physical science disciplines, including accompanying laboratory work, are required. • One of the following biology courses is required (4 SHC) BIO 110 Principles of Biology 3 3 0 4 BIO 111 General Biology I 3 3 0 4 Mathematics (6 SHC): • Two courses required. MAT 161 College Algebra (or higher) 3 0 0 • The second course may be a higher level mathematics course or may be selected from among other quantitative subjects, such as computer science (CIS) and statistics (MAT).

3



OTHER REQUIRED HOURS (21 SHC) ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 • Twenty additional hours of approved college transfer courses are required.

Total Semester Hour Credits: 65



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PRE-MAJOR IN ARTS - SOCIAL SCIENCE SECONDARY EDUCATION ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE (AA) A1010M COURSE AND HOUR REQUIREMENTS English Composition........................................................6 Humanities/Fine Arts.................................................... 12 Social/Behavioral Sciences............................................ 12 Natural Sciences.................................................................8 Mathematics........................................................................6 Other Required............................................................... 21 TOTAL ............................................................................ 65 • Students must meet the receiving university’s foreign language and/or health and physical education requirements, if applicable, prior to or after transfer to the senior institution. • 3 SHC in Speech/Communication may be substituted for 3 SHC in Humanities/Fine Arts. Speech/Communication may not substitute for the literature requirement. APPLICATION TO A UNIVERSITY Admission application deadlines vary; students must meet the deadline for the university to which they plan to transfer. Upon successful completion of the associate in arts degree, students who meet the requirements outlined in this pre-major articulation agreement for Social Science Secondary Education will be eligible to be considered for admission as juniors to the universities offering the baccalaureate degree. ADMISSION TO THE MAJOR GPA requirements vary, and admission is competitive across the several programs in Social Science Secondary Education. Admission to teacher licensure programs requires satisfactory scores on PRAXIS I. ENGLISH/COMMUNICATION (6 SHC) Two English composition courses are required. Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit • Required Course: ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 • The second composition course must be selected from the following: ENG 113 Literature-Based Research 3 0 0 3 ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting 3 0 0 3 HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • One course must be a literature course. • Three additional courses from the following discipline areas are required: music, art, drama, dance, foreign languages, interdisciplinary humanities, literature, philosophy and religion.

PRE-MAJOR IN ARTS - SOCIAL SCIENCE SECONDARY EDUCATION

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SOCIAL/BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • The following courses are required: (6 SHC) POL 120 American Government 3 0 0 3 SOC 210 Introduction to Sociology 3 0 0 3 • One of the following course sequences is required: (6 SHC) HIS 111 World Civilizations I 3 0 0 3 HIS 112 World Civilizations II 3 0 0 3 or HIS 121 Western Civilization I 3 0 0 3 HIS 122 Western Civilization II 3 0 0 3 NATURAL SCIENCE/MATHEMATICS (14 SHC) Natural Sciences (8 SHC): • Two courses from the biological and physical science disciplines, including accompanying laboratory work, are required. Mathematics (6 SHC): Two courses required. • One course must be an introductory mathematics (college algebra, trigonometry, calculus, etc.). • The second course may be a higher level mathematics course or may be selected from among other quantitative subjects, such as computer science (CIS) and statistics (MAT).





OTHER REQUIRED HOURS (21 SHC) • The following courses are required: (16 SHC) ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 GEO 111 World Regional Geography 3 0 0 3 HIS 131 American History I 3 0 0 3 HIS 132 American History II 3 0 0 3 • One of the following is required: (3 or 6 SHC) ECO 151 Survey of Economics 3 0 0 3 or both ECO 251 Principles of Microeconomics 3 0 0 3 ECO 252 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 0 0 3 • 5-8 additional hours of approved college transfer courses are required. Foundations of Education (EDU 216) is a recommended course for all pre-majors in education. Total Semester Hour Credits: 65

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PRE-MAJOR IN ARTS - SOCIOLOGY ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE (AA) A1010N COURSE AND HOUR REQUIREMENTS English Composition........................................................6 Humanities/Fine Arts.................................................... 12 Social/Behavioral Sciences............................................ 12 Natural Sciences.................................................................8 Mathematics........................................................................6 Other Required............................................................... 21 TOTAL ............................................................................ 65 • Students must meet the receiving university’s foreign language and/or health and physical education requirements, if applicable, prior to or after transfer to the senior institution. • 3 SHC in Speech/Communication may be substituted for 3 SHC in Humanities/Fine Arts. Speech/Communication may not substitute for the literature requirement. APPLICATION TO A UNIVERSITY Admission application deadlines vary; students must meet the deadline for the university to which they plan to transfer. Upon successful completion of the associate in arts degree, students who meet the requirements outlined in this pre-major articulation agreement for Sociology will be eligible to be considered for admission as juniors to the universities offering the baccalaureate degree. ADMISSION TO THE MAJOR GPA requirements vary, and admission is competitive across the several programs in Sociology. ENGLISH/COMMUNICATION (6 SHC) Two English composition courses are required. Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit • Required Course: ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 • The second composition course must be selected from the following: ENG 113 Literature-Based Research 3 0 0 3 ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting 3 0 0 3 HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • One course must be a literature course. • Three additional courses from the following discipline areas are required: music, art, drama, dance, foreign languages, interdisciplinary humanities, literature, philosophy and religion.

PRE-MAJOR IN ARTS - SOCIOLOGY

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SOCIAL/BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • One course must be a history course. • The following course is required: (3 SHC) SOC 210 Introduction to Sociology 3 0 0 3 • One of the following courses is required. SOC 213 Sociology of the Family 3 0 0 3 SOC 220 Social Problems 3 0 0 3 • One course from the following disciplines is required: Anthropology, Economics, Geography, Political Science, and Sociology NATURAL SCIENCE/MATHEMATICS (14 SHC) Natural Sciences (8 SHC): • Two courses from the biological and physical science disciplines, including accompanying laboratory work, are required.



Mathematics (6 SHC): Two courses required. • One course must be an introductory mathematics (college algebra, trigonometry, calculus, etc.). • The second course may be a higher level mathematics course or may be selected from among other quantitative subjects, such as computer science (CIS) and statistics (MAT). Statistics is highly recommended. OTHER REQUIRED HOURS (21 SHC) ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 • Twenty additional hours of approved college transfer courses are required Total Semester Hour Credits: 65

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PRE-MAJOR IN ARTS - SPECIAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE (AA) A1010Z COURSE AND HOUR REQUIREMENTS English Composition........................................................6 Humanities/Fine Arts.................................................... 12 Social/Behavioral Sciences............................................ 12 Natural Sciences.................................................................8 Mathematics........................................................................6 Other Required............................................................... 21 TOTAL............................................................................. 65 • Students must meet the receiving university’s foreign language and/or health and physical education requirements, if applicable, prior to or after transfer to the senior institution.



• 3 SHC in Speech/Communication may be substituted for 3 SHC in Humanities/Fine Arts. Speech/Communication may not substitute for the literature requirement.



APPLICATION TO A UNIVERSITY Admission application deadlines vary; students must meet the deadline for the university to which they plan to transfer. Upon successful completion of the associate in arts degree, students who meet the requirements outlined in the pre-major articulation agreement for Special Education will be eligible to be considered for admission as juniors to the universities offering the baccalaureate degree. ADMISSION TO THE MAJOR GPA requirements vary, and admission is competitive across the several programs in Special Education. Admission to teacher licensure programs requires satisfactory scores on PRAXIS I. Receiving institutions may have additional requirements, prerequisites, or proficiencies Since these vary at receiving institutions, students should review the admission requirements for the institutions they plan to attend. ENGLISH COMPOSITION (6 SHC) Two English composition courses are required. Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit • Required course: ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 • The second composition course must be selected from the following: ENG 112 Argument-Based Research 3 0 0 3 ENG 113 Literature-Based Research 3 0 0 3 ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting 3 0 0 3 HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • One course must be a literature course. Select one course from the following (3 SHC): ENG 131 Introduction to Literature or 3 0 0 ENG 231 American Literature I 3 0 0 ENG 232 American Literature II 3 0 0

3 3 3

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• The following course is required to substitute for 3 SHC of Humanities/Fine Arts: COM 231 Public Speaking 3 0 0 3 • One of the following courses is required (3 SHC): ART 111 Art Appreciation 3 0 0 3 ART 114 Art History Survey I 3 0 0 3 ART 115 Art History Survey II 3 0 0 3 MUS 110 Music Appreciation 3 0 0 3 • One additional course from the following discipline areas is required: music, art, drama, dance, foreign languages, interdisciplinary humanities, literature, philosophy, and religion. SOCIAL/BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES (12 SHC) Four courses from three discipline areas are required. • Select one course from the following (3 SHC): HIS 111 World Civilizations I 3 0 0 3 HIS 112 World Civilizations II 3 0 0 3 HIS 115 Introduction to Global History 3 0 0 3 HIS 121 Western Civilization I 3 0 0 3 HIS 122 Western Civilization II 3 0 0 3 • The following courses are required (6 SHC): PSY 150 General Psychology 3 0 0 3 SOC 210 Introduction to Sociology 3 0 0 3 • One additional course from the following discipline areas is required: anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology, and sociology. NATURAL SCIENCES/MATHEMATICS Natural Sciences (8 SHC): • The following courses are required: Choose one of the following: BIO 110 Principles of Biology BIO 111 General Biology I Choose one of the following: CHM 131 Intro to Chemistry AND CHM 131A Intro to Chemistry Lab or CHM 151 General Chemistry or PHY 110 Conceptual Physics AND PHY 110A Conceptual Physics Lab or PHY 151 College Physics Mathematics (6 SHC): • Choose two of the following: CIS 110 Introduction to Computers MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics MAT 141 Mathematical Concepts I MAT 142 Mathematical Concepts II MAT 161 College Algebra * A higher level math course may substitute for MAT 161.

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PRE-MAJOR IN ARTS - SPECIAL EDUCATION OTHER REQUIRED HOURS (21 SHC) ACA 111 College Student Success • The following course is recommended (4 SHC): EDU 216 Foundations of Education

1 0 0 1 3

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It is recommended that within the “Other Required Hours,” pre-education students in Special Education select courses that will help meet the mandated academic (second major) concentration. These courses should be selected in conjunction with the requirements at each university, since available academic (second major) concentrations and their specific requirements differ on each campus. Total Semester Hour Credits: 65

4

RADIOGRAPHY

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The Radiography curriculum prepares the graduate to be a radiographer, a skilled health care professional who uses radiation to produce images of the human body. Course work includes clinical rotations to area health care facilities, radiographic exposure, image processing, radiographic procedures, physics, pathology, patient care and management, radiation protection, quality assurance, anatomy and physiology, and radiobiology. Graduates of accredited programs are eligible to apply to take the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists’ national examination for certification and registration as medical radiographers. Graduates may be employed in hospitals, clinics, physicians’ offices, medical laboratories, government agencies, and industry. The SCC radiography program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology ( JRCERT). Accreditation of an educational program provides students, as graduates, assurance that the educational program will provide them with the requisite knowledge, skills, and values to competently perform the range of professional responsibilities expected by potential employers nationwide. It also assures they will be eligible for licensure in each of the 50 states. By requiring programs to teach the entire curriculum developed by the professional society, the American Society of Radiologic Technology, it also assures students they will have the foundation knowledge to continue to develop as professionals in the various fields of the radiation sciences. For more information, visit www. Jrcert.org. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A45700 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit BIO 163 Basic Anatomy & Physiology 4 2 0 5 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 HRD 3003 Career & College Student Success 0 0 0 0 RAD 110 Radiography Intro & Patient Care 2 3 0 3 RAD 111 RAD Procedures I 3 3 0 4 RAD 151 RAD Clinical Education I 0 0 6 2 RAD 181 RAD Clinical Elective 0 0 3 1 Totals 12 8 9 18 SPRING SEMESTER 1 ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting 3 0 0 3 MAT 110 Mathematical Measurement 2 2 0 3 RAD 112 RAD Procedures II 3 3 0 4 RAD 121 Radiographic Imaging I 2 3 0 3 RAD 161 RAD Clinical Education II 0 0 15 5 Totals 10 8 15 18 SUMMER SEMESTER CIS 111 Basic PC Literacy RAD 122 Radiographic Imaging II RAD 131 Radiographic Physics I RAD 171 RAD Clinical Education III Totals

1 2 0 2 1 3 0 2 1 3 0 2 0 0 12 4 3 8 12 10

FALL SEMESTER 2 PSY 150 General Psychology RAD 211 RAD Procedures III RAD 231 Radiographic Physics II RAD 241 Radiobiology/Protection RAD 251 RAD Clinical Education IV Totals

3 0 0 3 2 3 0 3 1 3 0 2 2 0 0 2 0 0 21 7 8 6 21 17

RADIOGRAPHY

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SPRING SEMESTER 2 RAD 245 Radiographic Quality Management 1 3 0 2 RAD 261 RAD Clinical Education V 0 0 21 7 RAD 271 Radiography Capstone 0 3 0 1 *** *** Humanities Elective 3 0 0 3 Totals 4 6 21 13 Total Semester Hour Credits: 76 MISSION STATEMENT The mission of Southwestern Community College’s Radiography Program is to meet the needs of the students by offering innovative instruction through comprehensive educational practices that promote student achievement and academic excellence, which will enable the student to graduate with the necessary skills to succeed as a radiographer or to continue with other educational goals. GOALS Program Effectiveness Goal: Students will be able to gain the knowledge and skills necessary for professional practice as a radiographer. Program data is available at www.jrcert.org Student Learning Outcomes: Students will complete the program. Benchmark: Retention of ≥75%. Students will pass the Registry Exam on the 1st attempt. Benchmark: 5 year average of ≥80% Graduates will find employment within 6 months of graduation. Graduates will be satisfied with their education. Employers will be satisfied with the graduate’s performance Goal: Students will think critically. Student Learning Outcomes: Students will perform non-routine procedures. Students will be able to perform image evaluation. Goal: Students will demonstrate professionalism. Student Learning Outcomes: Students will demonstrate professional behaviors. Students will understand ethics. Students will understand the importance of professional organizations. Goal: Students will communicate effectively. Student Learning Outcomes: Students will demonstrate effective written communication skills. Students will demonstrate effective oral and interpersonal skills Goal: Students will be clinically competent. Student Learning Outcomes: Students will set appropriate exposure factors. Students will correctly position patients for routine projections. Students will practice radiation protection. ADMISSIONS CRITERIA Individuals desiring a career in radiography should take courses in biology, algebra and the physical sciences prior to entering the program. The program has a limited enrollment and only admits a class in the fall of each year. Applications and supporting documents listed in Phase I below must be completed and submitted by

RADIOGRAPHY March 1 of the year in which the student wishes to enroll in the program. If all slots have not been filled after the above deadline, there may be extensions to the deadline. Please check with the Admissions Office about the status of the program. Students must also be able to pass a technical standards exam. This exam will be conducted by program faculty prior to entrance into the program. This exam demonstrates that a student has the ability to meet certain physical demands which he/she will likely face while in the clinical educational setting. Areas to be evaluated include: communication, cognitive skills, mobility skills, motor skills, physical stamina, and sensory skills (hearing, tactile, smell etc.). Students who cannot meet the technical stands will not be eligible for admission into the program. PHASE I - To be completed by March 1 The applicant must: 1. Complete an application for admission to the Program. 2. Be a high school graduate or have earned a high school equivalency diploma (GED). Exception: current high school students 3. Submit official copies of all transcripts (high school and college). Transcripts must be sent directly from the institution. It is the responsibility of the applicant to ensure that all necessary records are sent to the College Admissions Office. 4. Have a cumulative grade point average of 2.8 or higher on a 4.0 scale on the most recent academic transcript with ten semester hours completed excluding developmental courses. 5. Meet the Southwestern Community College Placement Test requirement. This may be met by one of the following methods: a) Take and pass the basic components of the Computerized Placement Test. These consist of algebra, arithmetic, reading comprehension, grammar and basic computer skills. The test is administered several times each week on the Jackson and Macon Campuses and is free of charge. To schedule a test session, contact Testing Services at 828.339.4332. If you do not pass the basic components of the placement test, you must enroll in and successfully complete the appropriate develop mental coursework prior to entrance into the program. If you are unsuccessful in achieving the appropriate cut-off scores in any component of the test, please see the academic retest policy. b) Appropriate SAT or ACT scores and successful completion of high school or college computer literacy course within the past six years. See admissions section for additional details. c) Successful completion by the end Spring semester of a all developmental college-level math, algebra, English and computer literacy course or satisfactory college placement scores. 6. Be eighteen (18) years of age by the midterm of first semester of the year admitted to the program. 7. Complete a minimum of 8 hours (24 hours to receive maximum points) of observation time in a Radiology Department. Applicants will be evaluated by facility staff during observation time. This evaluation will be used as part of the selection criteria. Applicants must meet with a member of the program faculty (Meg Petty or Kim Argo) to obtain Observation and Evaluation Forms prior to observing. 8. Must take the TEAS Exam. The TEAS must have been taken within the past three years and may only be taken once per academic year. Details for testing dates and times plus costs can be secured from the Advisor. This is not a pass or fail test. It is used to measure your potential to be successful in the program. Once the program deadline has passed and records have been reviewed, applicants will receive a letter stating their eligibility status.

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RADIOGRAPHY PHASE II All candidates who complete Phase I by the program deadline will be reviewed and the top candidates (up to 30), based on GPA and HOAE score, will be scheduled for a personal interview. Applicants will be notified of date and time. All interviewees will be scored using the following point system: • GPA – Up to 40 points (GPA multiplied by 10). • TEAS – Up to 15 points. • Observation/Evaluation – Up to 10 points. ­ • Observation Hours: 8 hours = 1 point 9-16 hours = 2 points 17-24 hours = 4 points ­ • Clinical Observation Evaluation – Up to 6 points. • Interview – Up to 35 points Students will receive points during the interview for General Education Courses, Educational Experience and Current Licensure. Points will be assigned on a sliding scale based on the following: ­ • BIO 163, ENG 111, ENG 114, MAT 110, CIS 111, PSY 150, HUM Elective completed with a grade of “C” or better. •­ Health Occupations/Allied Health courses completed with a grade of “C” or better in high school. •­ Currently licensed Nurse Aide I/Nurse Aide II, LPN or EMT. Documentation must be submitted to Admissions prior to the deadline to receive points. •­ Interview skills and professional presentation After the interview process is completed and points have been totaled, the applicants with the highest numerical scores will be accepted into the program (up to 19 students). High school students selected for the program will be given provisional acceptance contingent upon graduation from high school. Students enrolled in developmental courses will be given provisional acceptance contingent upon successful completion of those courses by spring, before the start of the program in fall. PHASE III Selected applicants will be notified by the Admissions Office of provisional acceptance to the program. Once an applicant returns the signed Acknowledgement of Acceptance form to the Admissions Office, they will be fully accepted into the program. Accepted applicants will receive health forms in their provisional acceptance packet. The completed medical forms must indicate that you are capable of meeting the physical requirements for the program. These forms must be completed and returned to the Program Coordinator within 30 days. Failure to complete the health packet may result in relinquishment of full acceptance status. Documentation of current CPR certification is required by September of the first Fall Semester and must be kept current throughout the length of the program. American Heart CPR Certification is highly recommended. ACADEMIC STANDARDS The program requires that students maintain a high level of academic and clinical performance. Failure to meet these standards will prevent normal progression through the program. Notice: Candidates for certification from the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) must comply with the “Rules of Ethics” contained in the ARRT Standards of Ethics. Any conviction of a crime, including a felony, a gross misdemeanor, or a misdemeanor with the sole exception of speeding and parking violations must be investigated by the ARRT in order to determine eligibility for the certification examination. Additional information may be obtained from the program director.

RADIOGRAPHY DECLARED PREGNANT STUDENT Federal and state regulations were modified in 1994 to introduce the term “declared pregnant worker.” Under these regulations, each student may declare her pregnancy in writing to the program director. However, it is the student’s option whether or not to declare the pregnancy. The student may decide to declare the pregnancy as soon as conception is confirmed, or at any time during the pregnancy. Once that pregnancy is declared, this institution is required to ensure that the unborn child does not receive more than 500 millirem during the term of the pregnancy, as determined by the radiation dosimeter which is worn at waist level under the apron. In the event that a student has already received 450 or greater millirem from the date of conception to the date of that the pregnancy is declared the regulations permit the unborn child to receive a maximum of 50 millirem during the remaining term of the pregnancy. It is up to each student to make her own decision regarding the declaration of the pregnancy. In all cases, this institution requires that radiation doses to the student and to the unborn child shall be maintained “As Low As Reasonably Achievable” (ALARA). Further information regarding student pregnancy may be found in the Radiography Student Policy Manual. STUDENT POLICY MANUAL Students entering the program will receive a Student Policy Manual. This manual outlines the policies and procedures to be followed over the course of the program. Upon request, this document is available to interested persons. These requests should be made directly to program officials. CLINICAL EDUCATION Selected learning experience (clinical education) will be provided at cooperating hospitals or other health care facilities within the area served by the College. Transportation and associated expenses are the sole responsibility of the student. NOTES 1. Applicants are responsible for submitting all the necessary records to the Admissions Office. 2. Applications must be updated annually by applicants who were not accepted the previous year. 3. Applicants may take non-radiography, general education and related coursework prior to being accepted into the program. 4. All students admitted into a health science program may be required, by clinical or Co-op site, to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug testing, prior to, or during clinical education coursework. The results of these tests could affect the student’s ability to progress in the program. 5. All students completing a health science program may be required, by an external testing agency, to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug test prior to a state or national licensing/certification board approving the graduate to sit for licensure/certification exams. 6. A student who presents problems of physical or emotional health at any time throughout the program and has not responded to appropriate treatment within a reasonable period of time may be required to withdraw from the program. Any student whose behavior conflicts with safety may also be required to withdraw from the program. FACULTY Meg Rollins Petty, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4320 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4320 Kim Argo, Clinical Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4359 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4359

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REAL ESTATE LICENSING The Real Estate Licensing curriculum provides licensing education required by the North Carolina Real Estate Commission for students preparing to take the real estate license examination and for provisional brokers that are seeking removal of the provisional status. Course work includes the practices and principles of real estate, broker relationships as they apply to customers, sellers and buyers, contract procedures, fair housing and real estate methodology. Course work also includes professional development opportunities. Graduates who have passed the real estate license examination and obtained a real estate provisional broker license should then qualify for removal of the provisional status and be able to provide basic, residential real estate services as a broker affiliated with a real estate brokerage firm. A student must secure his/her provisional broker license before proceeding into the postlicensure courses and must complete the three mandatory post-licensing courses within three years of licensure in order to avoid cancellation of his/her license. CERTIFICATE C25480 REQUIRED COURSES Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit RLS 112 Broker Prelicensing 5 0 0 5 RLS 121 Broker Relationships 2 0 0 2 RLS 122 Contracts and Closing 2 0 0 2 RLS 123 Select Real Estate Issues 2 0 0 2 Totals 11 0 0 11 Select a minimum of 2 credit hours: ACC 120 Principles of Financial Accounting 3 2 0 4 BUS 110 Introduction to Business 3 0 0 3 CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 CIS 111 Basic PC Literacy 1 2 0 2 RLS 113 Real Estate Mathematics 2 0 0 2 RLS 115 Real Estate Finance 2 0 0 2 RLS 116 Real Estate Law 2 0 0 2 RLS 117 Real Estate Brokerage 4 0 0 4 RLS 120 Real Estate Practice 2 0 0 2 Total Semester Hour Credits: 13-15 Real Estate Licensing Requirements North Carolina operates a “broker only” licensing system for real estate professionals. The North Carolina Real Estate Commission licenses individuals as Real Estate Brokers. Individuals must meet a prelicensing education requirement prior to becoming licensed and a postlicensing education requirement after becoming provisionally licensed. Broker Prelicensing Course: Individuals must complete a prescribed, 75 hour North Carolina broker prelicense course in order to take the North Carolina Real Estate License Examination. Students who meet all requirements for successful completion of RLS 112 (Broker Prelicensing) may qualify to take the state license examination. Candidates passing that exam and meeting other requirements specified by the North Carolina Real Estate Commission may be licensed as Provisional Brokers.

REAL ESTATE LICENSING Broker Postlicensing Courses: Provisionally licensed Brokers must complete 90 classroom hours of postlicensing education within three years of provisional licensure. At least one 30 hour course must be taken each year. This requirement may be met with the successful completion of RLS 121, 122, and 123. Students must hold an active Provisional Broker license to register for these postlicensing courses. FACULTY Bob Holt, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4274 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4274

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RESPIRATORY THERAPY The Respiratory Therapy curriculum prepares individuals to function as respiratory therapists. In these roles, individuals perform diagnostic testing, treatments and management of patients with heart and lung diseases. Students will master skills in patient assessment and treatment of cardiopulmonary diseases. These skills include life support, monitoring, drug administration, and treatment of patients of all ages in a variety of settings. Graduates of accredited programs are eligible to take entry-level examinations from the National Board of Respiratory Care. Graduates may also take the Advanced Practitioner examination, which is required to become a Registered Respiratory Therapist. Graduates may be employed in hospitals, clinics, doctor’s offices, nursing homes, education, industry and home care. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A45720 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit BIO 168 Anatomy & Physiology I 3 3 0 4 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics 3 0 0 3 MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab 0 2 0 1 RCP 110 Introduction to Respiratory Care 3 3 0 4 RCP 114 C-P Anatomy & Physiology 3 0 0 3 Totals 15 8 0 18 SPRING SEMESTER 1 BIO 169 Anatomy & Physiology II ENG 114 Professional Research & Reporting RCP 111 Therapeutics/Diagnostics RCP 113 RCP Pharmacology RCP 115 C-P Pathophysiology RCP 123 Special Practice Lab Totals

3 3 0 4 3 0 0 3 4 3 0 5 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 2 0 3 0 1 14 9 0 17

SUMMER SEMESTER RCP 112 Patient Management RCP 134 Clinical Practice I Totals

3 3 0 4 0 0 12 4 3 3 12 8

FALL SEMESTER 2 PSY 150 General Psychology RCP 146 Clinical Practice II RCP 210 Critical Care Concepts RCP 214 Neonatal/Pediatric RC RCP 222 Special Practice Lab Totals

3 0 0 3 0 0 18 6 3 3 0 4 1 3 0 2 0 2 0 1 7 8 18 16

SPRING SEMESTER 2 RCP 158 Clinical Practice III 0 0 24 8 RCP 211 Advanced Monitoring/Procedures 3 3 0 4 RCP 212 Home Care/Rehabilitation 2 0 0 2 *** *** Humanities Elective 3 0 0 3 Totals 8 3 24 17 Total Semester Credit Hours: 76

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ADMISSIONS CRITERIA The program has a limited enrollment and only admits a class in the fall of each year. Applications must be completed and submitted and supporting documents must be received no later than March 1 of the same year. If all slots have not been filled after the above deadline, there may be extensions to the deadline. Please check with the Admissions Office about the status of the program. PHASE I - To be completed by March 1 The applicant must: 1. Complete an application for admission to the Program. 2. Be a high school graduate or have earned a high school equivalency diploma (GED). Exception: current high school students 3. Submit official copies of all transcripts (high school and college). Transcripts must be sent directly from the institution. It is the responsibility of the applicant to assure that all necessary records are sent to the College Admissions Office. 4. Have a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale on the most recent academic transcript with ten semester hours completed excluding developmental courses. 5. Meet the Southwestern Community College Placement Test requirement. This may be met by one of the following methods: a) Take and pass the basic components of the Computerized Placement Test. These consist of algebra, arithmetic, reading comprehension, grammar and basic computer skills. The test is administered several times each week on the Jackson and Macon Campuses and is free of charge. To schedule a test session, contact Testing Services at (828) 339.4332. If you do not pass the basic components of the placement test, you must enroll in and successfully complete the appropriate develop mental coursework prior to the program deadline. If you are unsuccessful in achieving the appropriate cut-off scores in any component of the test, please see the academic retest policy. b) Appropriate SAT or ACT scores and successful completion of high school or college computer literacy course within the past six years. See admissions section for additional details. c) Successful completion of a college-level math, algebra, English, computer, and ACA 111 (or equivalent course) literacy course. 6. Must take the TEAS Exam. The TEAS must have been taken within the past three years and may only be taken once per academic year. Details for cost, testing dates and times can be secured from the Advisor. This is not a pass or fail test. It is used to measure your potential to be successful in the program. PHASE II Those individuals who have completed all parts of Phase I by the appropriate deadlines will be scheduled for a personal interview. Applicants will be notified of date and time.

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RESPIRATORY THERAPY PHASE III Those individuals who are notified of acceptance status will be provided with SCC health forms to be completed by the appropriate medical personnel. The completed medical forms must indicate that you are capable of meeting the physical requirements for the program. The deadline for submitting the completed forms to the program director is Aug. 1. NOTES 1. Applicants are responsible for submitting all the necessary records to the Registrar’s Office. 2. Applications must be updated annually by applicants who were not accepted the previous year. 3. Applicants may take non-respiratory therapy, general education and related coursework prior to being accepted into the program. 4. All students admitted into a health science program may be required, by clinical or Co-op site, to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug testing, prior to, or during clinical education coursework. The results of these tests could affect the student’s ability to progress in the program. 5. All students completing a health science program may be required, by an external testing agency, to submit to a criminal background check and/or drug test prior to a state or national licensing/certification board approving the graduate to sit for licensure/certification exams. ACADEMIC STANDARDS The program requires that students maintain a high level of academic and clinical performance in accordance with program policies. Failure to meet these standards will prevent normal progression through the program. Upon completion of the program graduates will be eligible to take the national exams and may apply for a state license to practice.

FACULTY Erin Sterling, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4336 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4336 Chris Cox [email protected] 828.339.4472 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4472 Mitch Fischer, Clinical Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4331 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4331

SCHOOL AGE EDUCATION This curriculum prepares individuals to work with children in elementary through middle grades in diverse learning environments. Students will combine learned theories with practice in actual settings with school-age children under the supervision of qualified teachers. Course work includes child growth/development; computer technology in education; physical/nutritional needs of school-age children; care and guidance of school-age children; and communication skills with families and children. Students will foster the cognitive/language, physical/motor, social/emotional, and creative development of school-age populations. Graduates are prepared to plan and implement developmentally appropriate programs in school-aged environments. Employment opportunities include school-age teachers in child care programs, before/after-school programs, paraprofessional positions in public/private schools, recreational centers, and other programs that work with school-age populations. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A55440 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 EDU 144 Child Development I 3 0 0 3 PSY 150 General Psychology 3 0 0 3 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics 3 0 0 3 MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab 0 2 0 1 Totals 15 4 0 17 SPRING SEMESTER 1 EDU 145 Child Development II 3 0 0 3 ENG 114 Professional Research and Reporting 3 0 0 3 *** *** Humanities 3 0 0 3 *** *** Social Science 3 0 0 3 *** *** Social Science 3 0 0 3 Totals 15 0 0 15 SUMMER SEMESTER *** *** Humanities 3 0 0 3 *** *** Social Science 3 0 0 3 *** *** Humanities 3 0 0 3 Totals 9 0 0 9 FALL SEMESTER 2 EDU 131 Child, Family, & Community 3 0 0 3 EDU 163 Classroom Management & Instruction 3 0 0 3 EDU 216 Foundations of Education 4 0 0 4 *** *** Humanities 3 0 0 3 *** *** Natural Science 3 2-3 0 4 Totals 16 2-3 0 17

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SCHOOL AGE EDUCATION SPRING SEMESTER 2 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit EDU 221 Children with Exceptionalities 3 0 0 3 EDU 271 Educational Technology 2 2 0 3 EDU 285 Internship Experience School-age 1 9 0 4 EDU 289 Adv. Issues/School Age Populations 2 0 0 2 *** *** Natural Science 3 2-3 0 4 Totals 11 13-14 0 16 Total Semester Credit Hours: 74 CERTIFICATE C55440, C55440CP* Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit EDU 131 Child, Family, & Community 3 0 0 3 EDU 144 Child Development I 3 0 0 3 EDU 145 Child Development II 3 0 0 3 EDU 163 Classroom Management & Instruction 3 0 0 3 EDU 221 Children with Exceptionalities 3 0 0 3 EDU 289 Adv. Issues/School Age Populations 2 0 0 2 Totals 17 0 0 17 * This certificate or pathway is offered to high school students through the Career & College Promise initiative. Please refer to page 19 for additional information. FACULTY Sheri Turk, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4210 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4210

THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE The Therapeutic Massage curriculum prepares graduates to work in direct client care settings to provide manipulation, methodical pressure, friction and kneading of the body for maintaining wellness or treating alterations in wellness throughout the lifespan. Courses will include content in normal human anatomy and physiology, therapeutic massage, ethical/legal issues, business practices, nutrition and psychology. Employment opportunities include hospitals/rehabilitation centers, health departments, home health, medical offices, nursing homes, spas/health/sports clubs, and private practice. Graduates may be eligible to take the Massage and Bodywork Licensing Exam or the National Certification for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork. DIPLOMA - D45750 Gainful Employment Compliance Information - For more information about SCC’s graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this program, and other important information, please visit the program’s webpage for the latest information at: http://www.southwesterncc.edu/program/therapeutic-massage-diploma FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title BIO 163 Basic Anatomy & Physiology I ENG 111 Expository Writing MTH 110 Fundamentals of Massage Totals SPRING SEMESTER 1 BUS 230 Small Business Management MTH 120 Therapeutic Massage Applications MTH 125 Ethics of Massage PSY 150 General Psychology Totals

Class Lab Clinical Credit 4 2 0 5 3 0 0 3 6 9 3 10 13 11 3 18 3 0 0 3 6 9 3 10 2 0 0 2 3 0 0 3 14 9 3 18

Total Semester Hour Credits: 36 ADMISSIONS CRITERIA The Therapeutic Massage program has a limited enrollment and only admits a class in the fall of each year. Applications and supporting documents must be complete and submitted by April 25 of the year in which the student wishes to enroll in the program. If all slots have not been filled after the above deadline, there may be extensions to the deadline. Please check with the Admissions office about the status of the program. PHASE I - To be completed by April 25 The applicant must: 1. Complete an application for admission to the Program. 2. Be a high school graduate or have earned a high school equivalency diploma (GED). 3. Submit official copies of all transcripts (high school and college). Transcripts must be sent directly from the institution. It is the responsibility of the applicant to assure that all necessary records are sent to the College Admissions Office.

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Have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale on the most recent academic transcript with ten semester hours completed excluding developmental courses. Meet the Southwestern Community College Placement Test requirement. This may be met by one of the following methods: a) Take and pass the following components of the Computerized Placement Test: reading comprehension and grammar. The test is administered several times each week on the Jackson and Macon Campuses and is free of charge. To schedule a test session, contact Testing Services at ext. 4332. If you do not pass the basic components of the placement test, you must enroll in and successfully complete the appropriate developmental coursework prior to the program deadline. If you are unsuccessful in achieving the appropriate cut-off scores in any component of the test, please see the academic retest policy. b) Submit acceptable SAT or ACT scores. See Admissions section of this catalog for additional details. c) Successful completion of college-level math and English courses. 6. Have all developmental coursework completed. PHASE II Applicants who have successfully completed Phase 1 by the appropriate deadlines will be notified by email to attend a mandatory information session and personal interview. Please ensure that the college has your current address on file. FACULTY Mitch Fischer, Program Advisor [email protected] 828.339.4331 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4331

TRADES - CARPENTRY

The Carpentry curriculum is designed to train students to construct residential structures using standard building materials and hand and power tools. Carpentry skills and a general knowledge of residential construction will also be taught. Course work includes footings and foundations, framing, interior and exterior trim, cabinetry, blueprint reading, residential planning and estimating, and other related topics. Students will develop skills through hands-on participation. Graduates should qualify for employment in the residential building construction field as rough carpenters, framing carpenters, roofers, maintenance carpenters, and other related job titles. DIPLOMA D35180 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit BPR 130 Blueprint Reading / Construction 1 2 0 2 CAR 110 Introduction to Carpentry 2 0 0 2 CAR 111 Carpentry I 3 15 0 8 CAR 112 Carpentry II 3 15 0 8 CAR 113 Carpentry III 3 0 9 6 CAR 115 Residential Planning / Estimating 3 0 0 3 CIS 111 Basic PC Literacy 1 2 0 2 COE 112 Co-op Work Experience I 0 0 20 2 CST 244 Sustainable Building Design 2 3 0 3 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 MAT 101 Applied Mathematics I 2 2 0 3 Totals 23 39 29 42 Total Semester Hour Credits: 42 CERTIFICATE C35180* Prefix Number Title CAR 111 Carpentry I CAR 112 Carpentry II Totals

Class Lab Clinical Credit 3 15 0 8 3 15 0 8 6 30 0 16

Total Semester Hour Credits: 16 * This certificate or pathway is offered to high school students through the Career & College Promise initiative. Please refer to page 19 for additional information. Available at these High Schools Jackson County School of Alternatives - Matthew Shirey Swain County High School - Derek Oetting CONTACT Cindy Thompson, College Access Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4610 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4610

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The Welding Technology curriculum provides students with a sound understanding of the science, technology, and applications essential for successful employment in the welding and metal industry. Instruction includes consumable and non-consumable electrode welding and cutting processes. Courses in math, blueprint reading, metallurgy, welding inspection, and destructive and non-destructive testing provides the student with industry-standard skills developed through classroom training and practical application. Successful graduates of the Welding Technology curriculum may be employed as entrylevel technicians in welding and metalworking industries. Career opportunities also exist in construction, manufacturing, fabrication, sales, quality control, supervision, and welding-related self-employment.

CERTIFICATE C50420 & C50420CP* Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit WLD 110 Cutting Processes 1 3 0 2 WLD 111 Oxy-Fuel Welding 1 3 0 2 WLD 115 SMAW (Stick) Plate 2 9 0 5 WLD 121 GMAW (MIG) FCAW/Plate 2 6 0 4 WLD 131 GTAW (TIG) Plate 2 6 0 4 Totals 8 27 0 17 Total Semester Hour Credits: 17 * This certificate or pathway is offered to high school students through the Career & College Promise initiative. Please refer to page 19 for additional information. This is a part-time program that will take 5 semesters (excluding summer term) to complete. ADVISOR Scott Baker, Program Advisor [email protected] 828.339.4249 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4249

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The Web Technologies curriculum prepares graduates for careers in the information technology arena using computers and distributed computing to disseminate and collect information via the web. Course work in this program covers the terminology and use of computers, network devices, networks, servers, databases, applications, programming languages, as well as web applications, site development and design. Studies will provide opportunity for students to learn related industry standards. Graduates should qualify for career opportunities as designers, administrators, or developers in the areas of web applications, websites, web services, and related areas of distributed computing. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE (AAS) A25290 FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit ACA 111 College Student Success 1 0 0 1 CIS 110 Introduction to Computers 2 2 0 3 ENG 111 Expository Writing 3 0 0 3 WEB 110 Internet/Web Fundamentals 2 2 0 3 Choose one of the following: NET 110 Networking Concepts 2 2 0 3 SEC 110 Security Concepts 3 0 0 3 Choose one of the following: BUS 110 Introduction to Business 3 0 0 3 ETR 210 Introduction to Entrepreneurship 3 0 0 3 Totals 13-14 4-6 0 16 SPRING SEMESTER 1 CIS 115 Introduction to Programming & Logic 2 3 0 3 DBA 110 Database Concepts 2 3 0 3 ENG 114 Professional Research & Reporting 3 0 0 3 WEB 115 Web Markup and Scripting 2 2 0 3 WEB 140 Web Development Tools 2 2 0 3 WEB 285 Emerging Web Technologies 2 2 0 3 Totals 13 12 0 18 SUMMER SEMESTER MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics 3 0 0 3 MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab 0 2 0 1 *** *** Social Science Elective 3 0 0 3 *** *** Humanities Elective 3 0 0 3 Totals 9 2 0 10 FALL SEMESTER 2 WEB 111 Introduction to Web Graphics 2 2 0 3 WEB 151 Mobile Application Development I 2 2 0 3 WEB 210 Web Design 2 2 0 3 WEB 250 Database Driven Websites 2 2 0 3 Choose one of the following: CSC 151 JAVA Programming 2 3 0 3 CSC 284 Emerging Comp. Prog. Tech. 2 3 0 3 Totals 10 11 0 15 SPRING SEMESTER 2 COE 111 Co-op Work Experience I 0 0 10 1 WEB 120 Introduction to Internet Multimedia 2 2 0 3 WEB 180 Active Server Pages 2 2 0 3 WEB 225 Content Management Systems 2 2 0 3 WEB 251 Mobile Application Development II 2 2 0 3 WEB 289 Internet Technologies Project 1 4 0 3 Totals 9 12 10 16 Total Semester Credit Hours: 75

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WEB TECHNOLOGIES SCC offers certificate programs in Web Technologies that can stand alone or be combined with other degree options. Southwestern is also a testing center for Adobe certification and offers courses that focus on each of the Adobe Web Development tools. WEB DESIGN CERTIFICATE C25290D & C25290DP* Gainful Employment Compliance Information - For more information about SCC’s graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed this program, and other important information, please visit the program’s webpage for the latest information at: http://www.southwesterncc.edu/program/web-design-certificate FALL SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title CIS 110 Introduction to Computers WEB 110 Internet/Web Fundamentals Totals

Class Lab Clinical Credit 2 2 0 3 2 2 0 3 4 4 0 6

SPRING SEMESTER 1 WEB 120 Introduction to Internet Multimedia WEB 140 Web Development Tools Totals

2 2 0 3 2 2 0 3 4 4 0 6

FALL SEMESTER 2 WEB 111 Introduction to Web Graphics WEB 210 Web Design Totals

2 2 0 3 2 2 0 3 4 4 0 6

Total Semester Hour Credits: 18 * This certificate or pathway is offered to high school students through the Career & College Promise initiative. Please refer to page 19 for additional information. MOBILE DEVELOPMENT CERTIFICATE C25290M SPRING SEMESTER 1 Prefix Number Title Class Lab Clinical Credit CIS 115 Introduction to Programming & Logic 2 3 0 3 WEB 285 Emerging Web Technologies 2 2 0 3 Totals 4 5 0 6 FALL SEMESTER 2 CSC 151 JAVA Programming WEB 151 Mobile Application Development I Totals

2 3 0 3 2 2 0 3 4 5 0 6

SPRING SEMESTER 2 CSC 284 Emerging Comp. Prog. Tech. WEB 251 Mobile Application Development II Totals

2 3 0 3 2 2 0 3 4 5 0 6

Total Semester Hour Credits: 18 FACULTY Scott Cline, Program Coordinator [email protected] 828.339.4494 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4494

Carolyn Porter [email protected] 828.339.4232 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4232

Kurt Berger [email protected] 828.339.4503 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4503

Dawn Wick [email protected] 828.339.4208 or 800.447.4091, ext. 4208

PROGRAM/COURSE KEY Prefix...............................................Field of Study ACA....................................... Academic Related ACC...................................................Accounting AHR.................A/C, Heating & Refrigeration ANT.............................................. Anthropology ART...................................................................Art AUT.................................................. Automotive BIO............................................................ Biology BPR.........................................Blueprint Reading BUS...........................................................Business CAR...................................................... Carpentry CCT................................................ Cyber Crime CEG................Civil Engineering & Geospatial CET........ Computer Engineering Technology CHM....................................................Chemistry CIS..........Computer Information Technology CIV.......................................... Civil Engineering CJC.............................................Criminal Justice COE................. Cooperative Work Experience COM....................................... Communications COS.................................................Cosmetology CSC....................................... Computer Science CST................................................ Construction CUL.........................................................Culinary DBA.........................................................Database DFT..........................................................Drafting DMA................................ Developmental Math ECM................................ Electronic Commerce ECO.................................................... Economics EDU.................... Education/Early Childhood ELC........................................................ Electrical ELN.......Electronics Engineering Technology EMS...................... Emergency Medical Science ENG...........................................................English ENV............................... Environmental Science ETR......................................... Entrepreneurship FRE..............................................................French GEO....................................................Geography GRA........................................................Graphics GRD........................................... Graphic Design GRO.................................................Gerontology HEA............................................................Health HIS............................................................ History

HIT............... Health Information Technology Prefix.............................................. Field of Study HRM...............Hotel Restaurant Management HSC..............................................Health Science HSE............................................Human Services HUM.................................................Humanities LEX.........................................................Paralegal MAT.............................................................. Math MED........................ Medical Assisting/Related MKT.................................................... Marketing MLT.............. Medical Laboratory Technology MTH........................................ Massage Therapy MUS............................................................. Music NAS.........................................Nursing Assistant NET............................ Networking Technology NOS................Networking Operating Systems NUR..........................................................Nursing NUT.......................................................Nutrition ODL...................................Outdoor Leadership OST................................ Office Administration PBT....................................................Phlebotomy PED.......................................Physical Education PHI......................................................Philosophy PHY............................................................ Physics POL............................................Political Science PSY......................................................Psychology PTA........................Physical Therapist Assistant RAD.................................................Radiography RCP.................................... Respiratory Therapy RED.......................................................... Reading REL...........................................................Religion RLS...................................................... Real Estate SAB............................................Substance Abuse SEC.................... Information Systems Security SOC....................................................... Sociology SON................................... Medical Sonography SPA.............................................................Spanish SRV........................................................ Surveying SST......................... Sustainability Technologies SUR.................................... Surgical Technology SWK..................................................Social Work TRN......................Transportation Technology WEB.......................................Web Technologies WLD........................................................Welding

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Standard

Results for SCC

67%

75% of Students Completing a Developmental Course Will Have a Grade of “C” or Higher

80% of Students Completing a Developmental Course Will Earn a Passing Grade in the Subsequent College Level Course

90% Will Report Being Satisfied With the Quality of the Programs & Services of the College

65% of Fall Semester Cohort Will Graduate, Transfer to Another Community College or University, or Will Still be Enrolled the Following Fall Semester

Passing Rates in Developmental Courses

Success Rate of Developmental Students in Subsequent College Level Courses

Satisfaction of Completers & Noncompleters With Programs and Services of the College Curriculum Student Retention, Graduation & Transfer

Business/Industry Satisfaction With 90% of Businesses/Industries Surveyed Will Report Satisfaction Customized Training With the Services Provided by the College *Note: The System Office did not include Basic Skills results in the 2012 Performance Measures due to reporting issues. http://www.nccommunitycolleges.edu/Publications/docs/Publications/csf2012.pdf

97%

The Standard is- 83% of College Transfer Students Will Achieve a GPA Greater Than or Equal to a 2.0 After Two Semesters at a UNC Institution. To Achieve Exceptional Performance, the Percentage of College Transfer Students With a GPA of 2.0 or Higher Will Be Equivalent to the % of Native Juniors & Sophomores With a GPA of 2.0 or Higher.

Performance of College Transfer Students

99%

80%

86%

SCC = 96% UNC = 88%

95% overall, 0 exams below 70%

80% Overall Passing Rate Plus No Exam Lower Than 70% to be Exceptional

Pass Rates on Licensure/Certification Exams by First Time Test Takers

NA*

75% Must Demonstrate Progress

Progress of Basic Skills Students



Performance Measures

Measure met

Measure met

Measure met

Measure met

Measure met

Measure met

Measure met

NA*



SCC Performance

Exceptional

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

NA*

Performance

248

2012 PERFORMANCE MEASURES & STANDARDS

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS • Course Descriptions

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

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EXAMPLE:

ACC 115 College Accounting (3-2-4) 3 = Class Hours Per Week 2 = Lab Hours Per Week 4 = Credit Hours Per Semester

NUR 125 Maternal-Child Nursing (5-3-6-8) 5 = Class Hours Per Week 3 = Lab Hours Per Week 6 = Clinical Hours Per Week 8 = Credit Hours Per Semester

Prerequisite: A course taken prior to another course. An underlined prerequisite indicates that it is a local prerequisite set by the academic administration at SCC. Corequisite: A course taken at the same time as another course or prior to the course to be taken.

ACADEMIC RELATED ACA 111 College Student Success (1-0-1) This course introduces the college’s physical, academic, and social environment and promotes the personal development essential for success. Topics include campus facilities and resources; policies, procedures, and programs; study skills; and life management issues such as health, self-esteem, motivation, goal-setting, diversity, and communication. Upon completion, students should be able to function effectively within the college environment to meet their educational objectives. ACA 115 Success & Study Skills (0-2-1) This course provides an orientation to the campus resources and academic skills necessary to achieve educational objectives. Emphasis is placed on an exploration of facilities and services, study skills, library skills, self-assessment, wellness, goal-setting , and critical thinking. Upon completion, students should be able to manage their learning experiences to successfully meet educational goals. ACA 118 College Study Skills (1-2-2) This course covers skills and strategies designed to improve study behaviors. Topics include time management, note taking, test taking, memory techniques, active reading strategies, critical thinking, communication skills, learning styles, and other strategies for effective learning. Upon completion, students should be able to apply appropriate study strategies and techniques to the development of an effective study plan. ACA 120 Career Assessment (1-0-1) This course provides the information and strategies necessary to develop clear personal, academic, and professional goals. Topics include personality styles, goal setting, various college curricula, career choices, and campus leadership development. Upon completion, students should be able to clearly state their personal, academic, and professional goals and have a feasible plan of action to achieve those goals. ACA 122 College Transfer Success (1-0-1) This course provides information and strategies necessary to develop clear academic and professional goals beyond the community college experience. Topics include the CAA, college culture, career exploration, gathering information on senior institutions, strategic planning, critical thinking, and communications skills for a successful academic transition. Upon completion, students should be able to develop an academic plan to transition successfully to senior institutions. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ACA 220 Professional Transition (1-0-1) This course provides preparation for meeting the demands of employment or education beyond the community college experience. Emphasis is placed on strategic planning, gathering information on workplaces or colleges, and developing human interaction skills for professional, academic, and/or community life. Upon completion, students should be able to successfully make the transition to appropriate workplaces or senior institutions. ACCOUNTING ACC 115 College Accounting (3-2-4) This course introduces basic accounting principles for a business. Topics include the complete accounting cycle with end-of-period statements, bank reconciliation, payrolls, and petty cash. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of accounting principles and apply those skills to a business organization. ACC 120 Principles of Financial Accounting (3-2-4) This course introduces business decision-making accounting information systems. Emphasis is placed on analyzing, summarizing, reporting, and interpreting financial information. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare financial statements, understand the role of financial information in decision-making and address ethical considerations. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre-major and/or elective course requirement. ACC 121 Principles of Managerial Accounting (3-2-4) Prerequisite: ACC 120 This course includes a greater emphasis on managerial and cost accounting skills. Emphasis is placed on managerial accounting concepts for external and internal analysis, reporting and decision-making. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze and interpret transactions relating to managerial concepts including product-costing systems. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre-major and/or elective course requirement. ACC 129 Individual Income Taxes (2-2-3) This course introduces the relevant laws governing individual income taxation. Topics include tax law, electronic research and methodologies, and the use of technolog y for preparation of individual tax returns. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze basic tax scenarios, research applicable tax law, and complete various individual tax forms. ACC 150 Accounting Software Applications (1-2-2) Prerequisites: ACC 115 or ACC 120 This course introduces microcomputer applications related to accounting systems. Topics include general ledger, accounts receivable, accounts payable, inventory, payroll, and correcting, adjusting, and closing entries. Upon completion, students should be able to use a computer accounting package to solve accounting problems. ACC 220 Intermediate Accounting I (3-2-4) Prerequisite: ACC 120 This course is a continuation of the study of accounting principles with in-depth coverage of theoretical concepts and financial statements. Topics include generally accepted accounting principles and an extensive analyses of financial statements. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in the conceptual framework underlying financial accounting, including the application of financial standards.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ACC 225 Cost Accounting (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ACC 121 This course introduces the nature and purposes of cost accounting as an information system for planning and control. Topics include direct materials, direct labor, factory overhead, process, job order, and standard cost systems. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display an analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. ACC 227 Practices in Accounting (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ACC 220 This course provides an advanced in-depth study of selected topics in accounting using case studies and individual and group problem solving. Topics include cash flow, financial statement analysis, individual and group problem solving, practical approaches to dealing with clients, ethics, and critical thinking. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competent analytical skills and effective communication of their analysis in written and/or oral presentations. ACC 240 Government & Not-for-Profit Accounting (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ACC 121 This course introduces principles and procedures applicable to governmental and not-for-profit organizations. Emphasis is placed on various budgetary accounting procedures and fund accounting. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display an analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING & REFRIGERATION AHR 110 Introduction to Refrigeration (2-6-5) This course introduces the basic refrigeration process used in mechanical refrigeration and air conditioning systems. Topics include terminology, safety, and identification and function of components; refrigeration cycle; and tools and instrumentation used in mechanical refrigeration systems. Upon completion, students should be able to identify refrigeration systems and components, explain the refrigeration process, and use the tools and instrumentation of the trade. AHR 112 Heating Technology (2-4-4) Prerequisite: AHR 110 This course covers the fundamentals of heating including oil, gas, and electric heating systems. Topics include safety, tools and instrumentation, system operating characteristics, installation techniques, efficiency testing, electrical power, and control systems. Upon completion, students should be able to explain the basic oil, gas, and electrical heating systems and describe the major components of a heating system. AHR 113 Comfort Cooling (2-4-4) Prerequisite: AHR 110 This course covers the installation procedures, system operations, and maintenance of residential and light commercial comfort cooling systems. Topics include terminology, component operation, and testing and repair of equipment used to control and produce assured comfort levels. Upon completion, students should be able to use psychometrics, manufacturer specifications, and test instruments to determine proper system operation.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS AHR 114 Heat Pump Technology (2-4-4) Prerequisites: AHR 110 or AHR 113 This course covers the principles of air source and water source heat pumps. Emphasis is placed on safety, modes of operation, defrost systems, refrigerant charging, and system performance. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and analyze system performance and perform routine service procedures. AHR 120 HVACR Maintenance (1-3-2) This course introduces the basic principles of industrial air conditioning and heating systems. Emphasis is placed on preventive maintenance procedures for heating and cooling equipment and related components. Upon completion, students should be able to perform routine preventive maintenance tasks, maintain records, and assist in routine equipment repairs. AHR 210 Residential Building Code (1-2-2) Prerequisite: AHR 110 and AHR 120 This course covers the residential building codes that are applicable to the design and installation of HVAC systems. Topics include current residential codes as applied to HVAC design, service, and installation. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the correct usage of residential building codes that apply to specific areas of the HVAC trade. AHR 211 Residential System Design (2-2-3) Prerequisite: AHR 110 and AHR 120 This course introduces the principles and concepts of conventional residential heating and cooling system design. Topics include heating and cooling load estimating, basic psychometrics, equipment selection, duct system selection, and system design. Upon completion, students should be able to design a basic residential heating and cooling system. AHR 212 Advanced Comfort Systems (2-6-4) Prerequisite: AHR 114, AHR 110 and AHR 120 This course covers water-cooled comfort systems, water-source/geothermal heat pumps, and high efficiency heat pump systems including variable speed drives and controls. Emphasis is placed on the application, installation, and servicing of water-source systems and the mechanical and electronic control components of advanced comfort systems. Upon completion, students should be able to test, analyze, and troubleshoot water-cooled comfort systems, water-source/geothermal heat pumps, and high efficiency heat pumps. ANTHROPOLOGY ANT 210 General Anthropology (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course introduces the physical, archaeological, linguistic, and ethnological fields of anthropology. Topics include human origins, genetic variations, archaeology, linguistics, primatology, and contemporary cultures. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the four major fields of anthropology. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ANT 220 Cultural Anthropology (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course introduces the nature of human culture. Emphasis is placed on cultural theory, methods of fieldwork, and cross-cultural comparisons in the areas of ethnology, language, and the cultural past. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of basic cultural processes and how cultural data are collected and analyzed. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences. ANT 221 Comparative Cultures (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course provides an ethnographic survey of societies around the world covering their distinctive cultural characteristics and how these relate to cultural change. Emphasis is placed on the similarities and differences in social institutions such as family, economics, politics, education, and religion. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of a variety of cultural adaptive strategies. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences. ART ART 111 Art Appreciation (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course introduces the origins and historical development of art. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of design principles to various art forms, including but not limited to, sculpture, painting, and architecture. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze a variety of artistic styles, periods, and media. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. ART 114 Art History Survey I (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course covers the development of art forms from ancient times to the Renaissance. Emphasis is placed on content, terminology, design, and style. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an historical understanding of art as a product reflective of human social development. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. ART 115 Art History Survey II (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course covers the development of art forms from the Renaissance to the present. Emphasis is placed on content, terminology, design, and style. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an historical understanding of art as a product reflective of human social development. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. ART 121 Two-Dimensional Design (0-6-3) This course introduces the elements and principles of design as applied to two-dimensional art. Emphasis is placed on the structural elements, the principles of visual organization, and the theories of color mixing and interaction. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and use critical and analytical approaches as they apply to two-dimensional visual art. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ART 122 Three-Dimensional Design (0-6-3) This course introduces basic studio problems in three-dimensional visual design. Emphasis is placed on the structural elements and organizational principles as applied to mass and space. Upon completion, students should be able to apply three-dimensional design concepts. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. ART 131 Drawing I (0-6-3) This course introduces the language of drawing and the use of various drawing materials. Emphasis is placed on drawing techniques, media, and graphic principles. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in the use of graphic form and various drawing processes. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. ART 132 Drawing II (0-6-3) Prerequisites: ART 131 This course continues instruction in the language of drawing and the use of various materials. Emphasis is placed on experimentation in the use of drawing techniques, media, and graphic materials. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate increased competence in the expressive use of graphic form and techniques. ART 231 Printmaking I (0-6-3) This course introduces printmaking: its history, development techniques, and processes. Emphasis is placed on basic applications with investigation into image source and development. Upon completion, students should be able to produce printed images utilizing a variety of methods. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. ART 232 Printmaking II (0-6-3) Prerequisites: ART 231 This course includes additional methods and printmaking processes. Emphasis is placed on the printed image as related to method, source, and concept. Upon completion, students should be able to produce expressive images utilizing both traditional and innovative methods. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. ART 240 Painting I (0-6-3) This course introduces the language of painting and the use of various painting materials. Emphasis is placed on the understanding and use of various painting techniques, media, and color principles. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in the use of creative processes directed toward the development of expressive form. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. ART 241 Painting II (0-6-3) Prerequisite: ART 240 This course provides a continuing investigation of the materials, processes, and techniques of painting. Emphasis is placed on the exploration of expressive content using a variety of creative processes. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in the expanded use of form and variety. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ART 251 Weaving I (0-6-3) This course provides a basic understanding of the design and production of constructed textiles. Emphasis is placed on traditional weaving techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to warp and dress the loom and use appropriate techniques for the creation of unique woven fabrics. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. ART 252 Weaving II (0-6-3) Prerequisite: ART 251 This course furthers an exploration of creative design as it relates to manipulated fiber construction. Emphasis is placed on traditional and experimental methods. Upon completion, students should be able to create fiber constructions that utilize appropriate techniques for individual expressive designs. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. ART 261 Photography I (0-6-3) This course introduces photographic equipment, theory, and processes. Emphasis is placed on camera operation, composition, darkroom technique, and creative expression. Upon completion, students should be able to successfully expose, develop, and print a well-conceived composition. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. ART 264 Digital Photography I (1-4-3) This course introduces digital photographic equipment, theory and processes. Emphasis is placed on camera operation, composition, computer photo manipulation and creative expression. Upon completion, students should be able to successfully expose, digitally manipulate, and print a wellconceived composition. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. ART 281 Sculpture I (0-6-3) This course provides an exploration of the creative and technical methods of sculpture with focus on the traditional processes. Emphasis is placed on developing basic skills as they pertain to three-dimensional expression in various media. Upon completion, students should be able to show competence in variety of sculptural approaches. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. ART 282 Sculpture II (0-6-3) Prerequisites: ART 281 This course builds on the visual and technical skills learned in ART 281. Emphasis is placed on developing original solutions to sculptural problems in a variety of media. Upon completion, students should be able to express individual ideas using the techniques and materials of sculpture. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. ART 283 Ceramics I (0-6-3) This course provides an introduction to three-dimensional design principles using the medium of clay. Emphasis is placed on fundamentals of forming, surface design, glaze application, and firing. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in slab and coil construction, simple wheel forms, glaze technique, and creative expression. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ART 284 Ceramics II (0-6-3) Prerequisite: ART 283 This course covers advanced hand building and wheel techniques. Emphasis is placed on creative expression, surface design, sculptural quality, and glaze effect. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a high level of technical competence in forming and glazing with a development of three-dimensional awareness. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. ART 288 Studio (0-6-3) This course provides the opportunity for advanced self-determined work beyond the limits of regular studio course sequences. Emphasis is placed on creative self-expression and in-depth exploration of techniques and materials. Upon completion, students should be able to create original projects specific to media, materials, and techniques. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. AUTOMOTIVE AUT 116 Engine Repair (2-3-3) This course covers the theory, construction, inspection, diagnosis, and repair of internal combustion engines and related systems. Topics include fundamental operating principles of engines and diagnosis, inspection, adjustment, and repair of automotive engines using appropriate service information. Upon completion, students should be able to perform basic diagnosis, measurement and repair of automotive engines using appropriate tools, equipment, procedures, and service information. AUT 141 Suspension & Steering Systems (2-3-3) This course covers principles of operation, types, and diagnosis/repair of suspension and steering systems to include steering geometry. Topics include manual and power steering systems and standard and electronically controlled suspension and steering systems. Upon completion, students should be able to service and repair steering and suspension components, check and adjust alignment angles, repair tires and balance wheels. AUT 141A Suspension & Steering Systems Lab (0-3-1) Corequisite: AUT 141 This course is an optional lab to be used as an alternative to co-op placement in meeting the NATEF standards for total hours. Topics include manual and power steering systems and standard and electronically controlled suspension and steering systems. Upon completion, students should be able to service and repair steering and suspension components, check and adjust alignment angles, repair tires, and balance wheels. AUT 151 Brake Systems (2-3-3) This course covers principles of operation and types, diagnosis, service, and repair of brake systems. Topics include drum and disc brakes involving hydraulic, vacuum boost, hydraboost, electrically powered boost, and anti-lock and parking brake systems. Upon completion, students should be able to diagnose, service, and repair various automotive braking systems. AUT 151A Brake Systems Lab (0-3-1) Corequisite: AUT 151 This course is an optional lab to be used as an alternative to co-op placement in meeting the NATEF standards for total hours. Topics include drum and disc brakes involving hydraulic, vacuum-boost, hydra-boost, electrically powered boost, and anti-lock, parking brake systems and emerging brake systems technologies. Upon completion, students should be able to diagnose, service, and repair various automotive braking systems.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS AUT 181 Engine Performance I (2-3-3) This course covers the introduction, theory of operation, and basic diagnostic procedures required to restore engine performance to vehicles equipped with complex engine control systems. Topics include an overview of engine operation, ignition components and systems, fuel delivery, injection components and systems and emission control devices. Upon completion, students should be able to describe operation and diagnose/repair basic ignition, fuel and emission related driveability problems using appropriate test equipment/service information. AUT 183 Engine Performance II (2-6-4) Prerequisite: AUT 181 This course covers study of the electronic engine control systems, the diagnostic process used to locate engine performance concerns, and procedures used to restore normal operation. Topics will include currently used fuels and fuel systems, exhaust gas analysis, emission control components and systems, OBD II (on-board diagnostics) and inter-related electrical/electronic systems. Upon completion, students should be able to diagnose and repair complex engine performance concerns using appropriate test equipment and service information. AUT 212 Auto Shop Management (3-0-3) This course covers principles of management essential to decision making, communication, authority, and leadership. Topics include shop supervision, customer relations, cost effectiveness, and workplace ethics. Upon completion, students should be able to describe basic automotive shop operation from a management standpoint. AUT 221 Automatic Transmissions/Transaxles (2-3-3) This course covers operation, diagnosis, service, and repair of automatic transmissions/transaxles. Topics include hydraulic, pneumatic, mechanical, and electrical/electronic operation of automatic drive trains and the use of appropriate service tools and equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to explain operational theory and diagnose and repair automatic drive trains. AUT 221A Automatic Transmissions/Transaxles Lab (0-3-1) Corequisite: AUT 221 This course is an optional lab to be used as an alternative to co-op placement in meeting the NATEF standards for total hours. Topics include hydraulic, pneumatic, mechanical, and electrical/ electronic operation of automatic drive trains and the use of appropriate service tools and equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to diagnose and repair automatic drive trains. AUT 231 Manual Transmissions/Axles/Drive Trains (2-3-3) This course covers the operation, diagnosis, and repair of manual transmissions/transaxles, clutches, driveshafts, axles, and final drives. Topics include theory of torque, power flow, and manual drive train service and repair using appropriate service information, tools, and equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to explain operational theory and diagnose and repair manual drive trains.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BIOLOGY BIO 090 Foundations of Biology (3-2-4) Corequisite: RED 090 This course introduces basic biological concepts. Topics include basic biochemistry, cell structure and function, interrelationships among organisms, scientific methodology, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate preparedness for college-level biology courses. BIO 110 Principles of Biology (3-3-4) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course provides a survey of fundamental biological principles for non-science majors. Emphasis is placed on basic chemistry, cell biology, metabolism, genetics, taxonomy, evolution, ecology, diversity, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate increased knowledge and better understanding of biology as it applies to everyday life. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics. Note: Students may not apply both BIO 110 and BIO 111 towards completion of Arts and Sciences Natural Science requirement. BIO 111 General Biology I (3-3-4) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course introduces the principles and concepts of biology. Emphasis is placed on basic biological chemistry, cell structure and function, metabolism and energy transformation, genetics, evolution, classification, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate understanding of life at the molecular and cellular levels. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics. Note: Students may not apply both BIO 110 and BIO 111 towards completion of Arts and Sciences Natural Science requirement. BIO 112 General Biology II (3-3-4) Prerequisite: BIO 111 This course is a continuation of BIO 111. Emphasis is placed on organisms, biodiversity, plant and animal systems, ecology, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of life at the organismal and ecological levels. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics. BIO 120 Introductory Botany (3-3-4) Prerequisites: BIO 110 or BIO 111 This course provides an introduction to the classification, relationships, structure, and function of plants. Topics include reproduction and development of seed and non-seed plants, levels of organization, form and function of systems, and a survey of major taxa. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of plant form and function, including selected taxa of both seed and non-seed plants. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BIO 130 Introductory Zoology (3-3-4) Prerequisites: BIO 110 or BIO 111 This course provides an introduction to the classification, relationships, structure, and function of major animal phyla. Emphasis is placed on levels of organization, reproduction and development, comparative systems, and a survey of selected phyla. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of animal form and function including comparative systems of selected groups. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics. BIO 140 Environmental Biology (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course introduces environmental processes and the influence of human activities upon them. Topics include ecological concepts, population growth, natural resources, and a focus on current environmental problems from scientific, social, political, and economic perspectives. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of environmental interrelationships and of contemporary environmental issues. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics. BIO 140A Environmental Biology Lab (0-3-1) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores Corequisite: BIO 140 This course provides a laboratory component to complement BIO 140. Emphasis is placed on laboratory and field experience. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a practical understanding of environmental interrelationships and of contemporary environmental issues. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics. BIO 163 Basic Anatomy & Physiology (4-2-5) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course provides a basic study of the structure and function of the human body. Topics include a basic study of the body systems as well as an introduction to homeostasis, cells, tissues, nutrition, acid-base balance, and electrolytes. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of the fundamental principles of anatomy and physiology and their interrelationships. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. BIO 168 Anatomy and Physiology I (3-3-4) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course provides a comprehensive study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include body organization, homeostasis, cytology, histology, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems and special senses. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of principles of anatomy and physiology and their interrelationships. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BIO 169 Anatomy and Physiology II (3-3-4) Prerequisite: BIO 168 This course provides a continuation of the comprehensive study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems as well as metabolism, nutrition, acid-base balance, and fluid and electrolyte balance. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of principles of anatomy and physiology and their interrelationships. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. BIO 175 General Microbiology (2-2-3) Prerequisites: BIO 110, BIO, 111, BIO 163, BIO 165 or BIO 168 This course covers principles of microbiology with emphasis on microorganisms and human disease. Topics include an overview of microbiolog y and aspects of medical microbiology, identification and control of pathogens, disease transmission, host resistance, and immunity. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of microorganisms and the disease process as well as aseptic and sterile techniques. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. BIO 271 Pathophysiology (3-0-3) Prerequisites: BIO 163, BIO 166, or BIO 169 This course provides an in-depth study of human pathological processes and their effects on homeostasis. Emphasis is placed on interrelationships among organ systems in deviations from homeostasis. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a detailed knowledge of pathophysiology. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. BLUEPRINT READING BPR 130 Blueprint Reading/Construction (1-2-2) This course covers the interpretation of blueprints and specifications that are associated with the construction trades. Emphasis is placed on interpretation of details for foundations, floor plans, elevations, and schedules. Upon completion, students should be able to read and interpret a set of construction blueprints. BUSINESS BUS 110 Introduction to Business (3-0-3) This course provides a survey of the business world. Topics include the basic principles and practices of contemporary business. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of business concepts as a foundation for studying other business subjects. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BUS 115 Business Law I (3-0-3) This course introduces the ethics and legal framework of business. Emphasis is placed on contracts, negotiable instruments, Uniform Commercial Code, and the working of the court systems. Upon completion, students should be able to apply ethical issues and laws covered to selected business decision-making situations. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. BUS 125 Personal Finance (3-0-3) This course provides a study of individual and family financial decisions. Emphasis is placed on building useful skills in buying, managing finances, increasing resources, and coping with current economic conditions. Upon completion, students should be able to develop a personal financial plan. BUS 135 Principles of Supervision (3-0-3) This course introduces the basic responsibilities and duties of the supervisor and his/her relationship to higher-level supervisors, subordinates, and associates. Emphasis is placed on effective utilization of the work force and understanding the role of the supervisor. Upon completion, students should be able to apply supervisory principles in the work place. BUS 137 Principles of Management (3-0-3) This course is designed to be an overview of the major functions of management. Emphasis is placed on planning, organizing, controlling, directing, and communicating. Upon completion, students should be able to work as contributing members of a team utilizing these functions of management. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. BUS 139 Entrepreneurship I (3-0-3) This course provides an introduction to the principles of entrepreneurship. Topics include self-analysis of entrepreneurship readiness, the role of entrepreneur in economic development, legal problems, organizational structure, sources of financing, budgeting, and cash flow. Upon completion, students should have an understanding of the entrepreneurial process and issues faced by entrepreneurs. BUS 153 Human Resource Management (3-0-3) This course introduces the functions of personnel/human resource management within an organization. Topics include equal opportunity and the legal environment, recruitment and selection, performance appraisal, employee development, compensation planning, and employee relations. Upon completion, students should be able to anticipate and resolve human resource concerns. BUS 230 Small Business Management (3-0-3) This course introduces the challenges of entrepreneurship including the startup and operation of a small business. Topics include market research techniques, feasibility studies, site analysis, financing alternatives, and managerial decision making. Upon completion, students should be able to develop a small business plan. BUS 240 Business Ethics (3-0-3) This course introduces contemporary and controversial ethical issues that face the business community. Topics include moral reasoning, moral dilemmas, law and morality, equity, justice and fairness, ethical standards, and moral development. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of their moral responsibilities and obligations as members of the workforce and society.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BUS 260 Business Communication (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ENG 111 This course is designed to develop skills in writing business communications. Emphasis is placed on business reports, correspondence, and professional presentations. Upon completion, students should be able to communicate effectively in the work place. BUS 270 Professional Development (3 -0-3) Prerequisite: ACC 220 This course provides basic knowledge of self-improvement techniques as related to success in the professional world. Topics include positive human relations, job-seeking skills, and projecting positive self-image. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competent personal and professional skills necessary to get and keep a job. BUS 280 REAL Small Business (4-0-4) This course introduces hands-on techniques and procedures for planning and opening a small business, including the personal qualities needed for entrepreneurship. Emphasis is placed on market research, finance, time management, and day-to-day activities of owning/operating a small business. Upon completion, students should be able to write and implement a viable business plan and seek funding. CARPENTRY (Huksins Students only) CAR 110 Introduction to Carpentry (2-0-2) This course introduces the student to the carpentry trade. Topics include duties of a carpenter, hand and power tools, building materials, construction methods, and safety. Upon completion, students should be able to identify hand and power tools, common building materials, and basic construction methods. CAR 111 Carpentry I (3-15-8) This course introduces the theory and construction methods associated with the building industry, including framing, materials, tools, and equipment. Topics include safety, hand/power tool use, site preparation, measurement and layout, footings and foundations, construction framing, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to safely lay out and perform basic framing skills with supervision. CAR 112 Carpentry II (3-15-8) Prerequisite: CAR 111 This course covers the advanced theory and construction methods associated with the building industry including framing and exterior finishes. Topics include safety, hand/power tool use, measurement and layout, construction framing, exterior trim and finish, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to safely frame and apply exterior finishes to a residential building with supervision. CAR 113 Carpentry III (3-9-6) Prerequisite: CAR 111 This course covers interior trim and finishes. Topics include safety, hand/power tool use, measurement and layout, specialty framing, interior trim and finishes, cabinetry, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to safely install various interior trim and finishes in a residential building with supervision.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS CAR 115 Residential Planning/Estimating (3-0-3) Prerequisite: BPR 130 This course covers project planning, management, and estimating for residential or light commercial buildings. Topics include planning and scheduling, interpretation of working drawings and specifications, estimating practices, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to perform quantity take-offs and cost estimates. CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY CEG 111 Introduction to GIS and GNSS (2-4-4) Prerequisite: SRV 110 and CIS 110 This course introduces the methods and techniques used in the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) professions. Emphasis is placed on data collection and mapping using GIS software. Upon completion, students should be able to use GNSS technologies to collect field data and create GIS maps. CEG 115 Introduction to Tech & Sustainability (2-3-3) Corequisite: MAT 080 or MAT 171 or MAT 175 This course introduces basic skills, sustainability concepts and career fields for technicians. Topics include career options, technical vocabulary, dimensional analysis, measurement systems, engineering graphics, professional ethics, and related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify drawing elements and create sketches, perform basic engineering computations and identify measures of sustainable development. CEG 151 CAD for Engineering Technology (2-3-3) Corequisite: CIS 110 This course introduces computer-aided drafting (CAD) software. Topics include file and data management, drawing, editing, dimensioning commands, plotting, and related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to create and plot basic drawings and maps using CAD software. CEG 210 Construction Materials & Methods (2-3-3) Prerequisite: EGR 251 This course covers the behavior and properties of Portland cement, asphaltic concretes, and other construction materials, including construction methods and equipment. Topics include cementing agents, aggregates, water and admixture materials with their proportions, production, placement, consolidation, curing; and their inspection. Upon completion, students should be able to proportion Portland concrete mixes to attain predetermined strengths, perform standard control tests on Portland cement concrete, identify inspection criteria for concretes, identify construction equipment and applications. CEG 211 Hydrology & Erosion Control (2-3-3) Prerequisite: MAT 171 and CEG 151 This course introduces basic engineering principles and characteristics of hydrology, erosion and sediment control. Topics include stormwater runoff, gravity pipe flow, open channel flow, low impact development (LID), erosion control devices and practices. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze and design gravitational drainage structures, identify LID and erosion control elements, and prepare a stormwater drainage plan.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS CEG 212 Introduction to Environmental Technology (2-3-3) Prerequisite: EGR 251 This course introduces basic engineering principles of hydraulics, and water and wastewater technologies. Topics include fluid statics, fluid dynamics, flow measurement, the collection, treatment, and distribution of water and wastewater. Upon completion, students should be able to identify water and wastewater system elements, describe water and wastewater system processes and perform basic hydraulics and treatment computations. CEG 230 Subdivision Planning & Design (1-6-3) Prerequisite: CEG 151 and CEG 211 and SRV 111 or CIV 215 This course covers the planning and design concepts related to subdivisions including analysis of development standards, engineering, and the creation of CAD drawings. Topics include applicable codes, lot creation, roadway system layout, stormwater drainage, low impact development (LID) concepts, and related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare a set of subdivision plans. CEG 235 Project Management & Estimating (2-3-3) Prerequisite: CIS 110 and CEG 115 Corequisite: CEG 211 This course covers planning and estimating practices which are applicable to the civil engineering and related construction industries. Emphasis is placed on construction project planning and management, material take-offs labor and equipment requirements in accordance with industry formats, and other economic topics. Upon completion, students should be able to accurately complete material take-offs, prepare cost estimates, and prepare construction schedules. CYBER CRIME CCT 110 Introduction to Cyber Crime (3-0-3) This course introduces and explains the various types of offenses that qualify as cyber crime activity. Emphasis is placed on identifying cyber crime activity and the response to these problems from both the private and public domains. Upon completion, students should be able to accurately describe and define cyber crime activities and select an appropriate response to deal with the problem. CCT 112 Ethics & High Technology (3-0-3) This course covers ethical considerations and accepted standard practices applicable to technological investigations and computer privacy issues relative to the cyber crime investigator. Topics include illegal and unethical investigative activities, end-justifying-the-means issues, and privacy issues of massive personal database information gathered by governmental sources. Upon completion, students should be able to examine their own value system and apply ethical considerations in identifiable cyber crime investigations. CCT 121 Computer Crime Investigation (3-2-4) This course introduces the fundamental principles of computer crime investigation processes. Topics include crime scene/incident processing, information gathering techniques, data retrieval, collection and preservation of evidence, preparation of reports and court presentations. Upon completion, students should be able to identify cyber crime activity and demonstrate proper investigative techniques to process the scene and assist in case prosecution.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS CCT 231 Technology Crimes & Law (3-0-3) This course covers the applicable technological laws dealing with the regulation of cyber security and criminal activity. Topics include an examination of state, federal and international laws regarding cyber crime with an emphasis on both general and North Carolina statutes. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the elements of cyber crime activity and discuss the trends of evolving laws. CCT 240 Data Recovery Techniques (2-3-3) This course introduces the unique skills and methodologies necessary to assist in the investigation and prosecution of cyber crimes. Topics include hardware and software issues, recovering erased files, overcoming encryption, advanced imaging, transient data, Internet issues and testimony considerations. Upon completion, students should be able to recover digital evidence, extract information for criminal investigation and legally seize criminal evidence. CCT 241 Advanced Data Recovery (2-3-3) Prerequisite: CCT 240 This course further explores the methodologies necessary to assist in the investigation and analysis of cyber crimes. Topics include commercial and open-source software tools for working with evidence acquisition, data recovery, and encryption. Upon completion, students should be able to perform the data recovery and analysis for a complete criminal or corporate investigation. CCT 250 Network Vulnerabilities I (2-2-3) Prerequisite: NET 110 This course introduces students to penetration testing, network vulnerabilities, and hacking. Topics include an overview of traditional network security, system hardening, and known weaknesses. Upon completion, students will be able to evaluate weaknesses related to traditional networks, wireless technologies, remote access, and network security devices such as firewalls and intrusion detection systems. CCT 251 Network Vulnerabilities II (2-2-3) Prerequisite: CCT 250 This course is a continuation of CCT 250 Network Vulnerabilities I. Topics include analyzing advanced techniques for circumventing network security hardware and software. Upon completion, students will be able to assemble a test kit for multiple operating systems, scan and footprint networks, and test all aspects of network vulnerability. CCT 260 Mobile Phone Examination (1-4-3) This course introduces the unique skills and methodologies necessary to assist in the investigation and prosecution of cyber crimes involving mobile phones. Topics include the basics of the cellular networks as well as data extraction from GSM, iDEN and CDMA handsets. Upon completion, students should be able to use the course processes and methodologies to obtain forensic evidence from GSM, iDEN and CDMA handsets. CCT 271 Mac Digital Forensics (1-4-3) This course provides students with the unique knowledge and skills necessary to analyze Macintosh operating system artifacts and file system mechanics. Topics include Macintosh architecture, HFS (+) based file systems, Macintosh decryption, address book and chat archives, Internet artifacts related to Safari and Firefox. Upon completion, students will be able to use the course processes and methodologies to forensically analyze a Mac computer.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS CCT 272 Forensic Password Recovery (1-4-3) This course introduces the unique skills and methodologies necessary to assist in the investigation and prosecution of cyber crimes involving decryption. Topics include decryption of PGP key rings, private keys, EFS hard drives, and encrypted containers. Upon completion, students will be able to use the course processes and methodologies to obtain forensic evidence from encrypted files, folders, and systems. CCT 285 Trends in Cyber Crime (2-2-3) Prerequisite: CCT 110 This course covers and explores advances and developments in cyber crime technologies. Emphasis is placed on computer forensics tools, information protection and security, threat response, and professional development. Upon completion, students should be able to articulate understanding of the current state of the industry as well as emerging technologies for cyber crime technology. CCT 289 Capstone Project (1-6-3) Prerequisite: CCT 231 This course provides experience in cyber crime investigations or technology security audits in either the public or private domain. Emphasis is placed on student involvement with businesses or agencies dealing with technology security issues or computer crime activities. Upon completion, students should be able to successfully analyze, retrieve erased evidence and testify in mock proceedings against these criminal entrepreneurs. COMPUTER ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY CET 110 Introduction to CET (0-3-1) This course introduces the basic skills required for computer technicians. Topics include career choices, safety practices, technical problem solving, scientific calculator usage, soldering/desoldering, keyboarding skills, engineering computer applications, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to safely solder/desolder and use a scientific calculator and computer applications to solve technical problems. CET 111 Computer Upgrade/Repair I (2-3-3) This course covers repairing, servicing, and upgrading computers and peripherals in preparation for industry certification. Topics include CPU/memory/bus identification, disk subsystems, hardware/software installation/configuration, common device drivers, data recovery, system maintenance, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to safely repair and/or upgrade computer systems to perform within specifications. CET 211 Computer Upgrade/Repair II (2-3-3) This course covers concepts of repair service, and upgrade of computers and peripherals in preparation for industry certification. Topics may include resolving resource conflicts and system bus specifications, configuration and troubleshooting peripherals, operating system configuration and optimization, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and resolve system conflicts and optimize system performance. CET 222 Computer Architecture (2-0-2) This course introduces the organization and design philosophy of computer systems with respect to resource management, throughput, and operating system interaction. Topics include instruction sets, registers, data types, memory management, virtual memory, cache, storage management, multi-processing, and pipelining. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate system hardware and resources for installation and configuration purposes.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS CET 225 Digital Signal Processing (2-2-3) This course covers the theory and use of digital signal processing techniques. Topics include Fourier analysis, digital filtering, Z transforms, IIR, FIR, convolution, pulse methods, and DSP programming. Upon completion, students should be able to implement and troubleshoot DSP systems in hardware and software. CET 245 Internet Servers (2-3-3) This course covers the setup and management of Internet server hardware and software. Topics include TCP/IP, FTP, SMTP, and HTTP; installation and configuration of server software for web, FTP, DNS, mail, and other services. Upon completion, students should be able to set up and maintain Internet servers. CET 251 Software Engineering Principles (3-3-4) This course introduces the methodology used to manage the development process for complex software systems. Topics include the software life cycle, resource allocation, team dynamics, design techniques, and tools that support these activities. Upon completion, students should be able to design and build robust software in a team setting. CHEMISTRY CHM 090 Chemistry Concepts (4-0-4) Prerequisites: RED 090, DMA 010, DMA 020, DMA 030, DMA 040, DMA 050, DMA 060, DMA 070, DMA 080, MAT 060 This course provides a non-laboratory based introduction to basic concepts of chemistry. Topics include measurements, matter, energy, atomic theory, bonding, molecular structure, nomenclature, balancing equations, stoichiometry, solutions, acids and bases, gases, and basic organic chemistry. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and apply basic chemical concepts necessary for success in college-level science courses. CHM 131 Introduction to Chemistry (3-0-3) Prerequisites: DMA 010, DMA 020, DMA 030, DMA 040, DMA 050, DMA 060, DMA 070, DMA 080, RED 090, and MAT 070 or satisfactory test scores This course introduces the fundamental concepts of inorganic chemistry. Topics include measurement, matter and energy, atomic and molecular structure, nuclear chemistry, stoichiometry, chemical formulas and reactions, chemical bonding, gas laws, solutions, and acids and bases. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of chemistry as it applies to other fields. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics. CHM 131A Introduction to Chemistry Lab (0-3-1) Prerequisites: DMA 010, DMA 020, DMA 030, DMA 040, DMA 050, DMA 060, DMA 070, DMA 080, RED 090, and MAT 070 or satisfactory test scores Corequisite: CHM 131 This course is a laboratory to accompany CHM 131. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in CHM 131. Upon completion, students should be able to utilize basic laboratory procedures and apply them to chemical principles presented in CHM 131. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS CHM 132 Organic and Biochemistry (3-3-4) Prerequisites: CHM 131 and CHM 131A or CHM 151 This course provides a survey of major functional classes of compounds in organic and biochemistry. Topics include structure, properties, and reactions of the major organic and biological molecules and basic principles of metabolism. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical concepts needed to pursue studies in related professional fields. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics. CHM 151 General Chemistry I (3-3-4) Prerequisites: RED 090, and MAT 161 or MAT 171, or satisfactory test scores This course covers fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include measurement, atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, chemical reactions, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, gas laws, and solutions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical laws and concepts as needed in CHM 152. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics. CHM 152 General Chemistry II (3-3-4) Prerequisite: CHM 151 This course provides a continuation of the study of the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include kinetics, equilibrium, ionic and redox equations, acid-base theory, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, introduction to nuclear and organic chemistry, and complex ions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of chemical concepts as needed to pursue further study in chemistry and related professional fields. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics. CHINESE CHI 111 Elementary Chinese I (3-0-3) This course introduces the fundamental elements of the Chinese language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written Chinese and demonstrate cultural awareness. CHI 112 Elementary Chinese II (3-0-3) Prerequisite: CHI 111 This course includes the basic fundamentals of the Chinese language within a cultural context of the Chinese people and its history. Emphasis is placed on the progressive development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with increasing proficiency to spoken and written Chinese and demonstrate further cultural awareness. CHI 181 Chinese Lab I (0-2-1) This course provides an opportunity to enhance acquisition of the fundamental elements of the Chinese language. Emphasis is placed on the progressive development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through the use of various supplementary learning media and materials. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written Chinese and demonstrate cultural awareness.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS CHI 182 Chinese Lab II (0-2-1) Prerequisite: CHI 181 This course provides an opportunity to enhance acquisition of the fundamental elements of the Chinese language. Emphasis is placed on the progressive development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through the use of various supplementary learning media and materials. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with increasing proficiency to spoken and written Chinese and demonstrate cultural awareness. COMPUTER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY CIS 070 Fundamentals of Computing (0-2-1) This course covers fundamentals functions and operations of the computer. Topics include identification of components, overview of operating systems, and other basic computer operations. Upon completion, students should be able to operate computers, access files, print documents and perform basic applications operations. CIS 110 Introduction to Computers (2-2-3) Prerequisite: CIS 070 This course introduces computer concepts, including fundamental functions and operations of the computer. Topics include identification of hardware components, basic computer operations, security issues, and use of software applications. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the role and function of computers and use the computer to solve problems. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural science/mathematics (Quantitative Option). CIS 111 Basic PC Literacy (1-2-2) Prerequisite: CIS 070 This course provides an overview of computer concepts. Emphasis is placed on the use of personal computers and software applications for personal and fundamental workplace use. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate basic personal computer skills. CIS 115 Introduction to Programming & Logic (2-3-3) Prerequisites: DMA 010, DMA 020, DMA 030, DMA 040, DMA 050, DMA 060, DMA 070, DMA 080, MAT 070, MAT 080, MAT 090, MAT 095, MAT 120, MAT 121, MAT 161, MAT 171, or MAT 175 This course introduces computer programming and problem solving in a structured program logic environment. Topics include language syntax, data types, program organization, problem solving methods, algorithm design, and logic control structures. Upon completion, students should be able to manage files with operating system commands, use top-down algorithm design, and implement algorithmic solutions in a programming language. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural science/ mathematics (Quantitative Option). CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY CIV 111 Soils and Foundations (2-4-4) Prerequisite: EGR 251 This course presents an overview of soil as a construction material using both analysis and testing procedures. Topics include index properties, classification, stress analysis, compressibility, compaction, dewatering, excavation, stabilization, settlement, and foundations. Upon completion, students should be able to perform basic soil tests and analyze engineering properties of soil.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS CIV 125 Civil/Surveying CAD (1-6-3) Prerequisite: CEG 151 This course introduces civil/surveying computer-aided drafting (CAD) software. Topics include drawing, editing, and dimensioning commands; plotting; and other related civil/surveying topics. Upon completion, students should be able to produce civil/surveying drawings using CAD software. CIV 215 Highway Technology (2-3-3) Prerequisite: CEG 115 and SRV 111 and MAT 171 or MAT 175 This course introduces the essential elements of roadway components and design. Topics include subgrade and pavement construction, roadway drawings and details, traffic analysis, geometric design and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret roadway details and specifications, and produce street and highway construction drawings. CRIMINAL JUSTICE CJC 111 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3-0-3) This course introduces the components and processes of the criminal justice system. Topics include history, structure, functions, and philosophy of the criminal justice system and their relationship to life in our society. Upon completion, students should be able to define and describe the major system components and their interrelationships and evaluate career options. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. CJC 112 Criminology (3-0-3) This course introduces deviant behavior as it relates to criminal activity. Topics include theories of crime causation; statistical analysis of criminal behavior; past, present, and future social control initiatives; and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to explain and discuss various theories of crime causation and societal response. CJC 113 Juvenile Justice (3-0-3) This course covers the juvenile justice system and related juvenile issues. Topics include an overview of the juvenile justice system, treatment and prevention programs, special areas and laws unique to juveniles, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify/discuss juvenile court structure/procedures, function and jurisdiction of juvenile agencies, processing/detention of juveniles, and case disposition. CJC 114 Investigative Photography (1-2-2) This course covers the operation of digital photographic equipment and its application to criminal justice. Topics include the use of digital cameras, storage of digital images, the retrieval of digital images and preparation of digital images as evidence. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate and explain the role and use of digital photography, image storage and retrieval in criminal investigations. CJC 120 Interviews/Interrogations (1-2-2) This course covers basic and special techniques employed in criminal justice interviews and interrogations. Emphasis is placed on the interview/interrogation process, including interpretation of verbal and physical behavior and legal perspectives. Upon completion, students should be able to conduct interviews/interrogations in a legal, efficient, and professional manner and obtain the truth from suspects, witnesses, and victims.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS CJC 121 Law Enforcement Operations (3-0-3) This course introduces fundamental law enforcement operations. Topics include the contemporary evolution of law enforcement operations and related issues. Upon completion, students should be able to explain theories, practices, and issues related to law enforcement operations. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. CJC 122 Community Policing (3-0-3) This course covers the historical, philosophical, and practical dimensions of community policing. Emphasis is placed on the empowerment of police and the community to find solutions to problems by forming partnerships. Upon completion, students should be able to define community policing, describe how community policing strategies solve problems, and compare community policing to traditional policing. CJC 131 Criminal Law (3-0-3) This course covers the history/evolution/principles and contemporary applications of criminal law. Topics include sources of substantive law, classification of crimes, parties to crime, elements of crimes, matters of criminal responsibility, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to discuss the sources of law and identify, interpret, and apply the appropriate statutes/elements. CJC 132 Court Procedure & Evidence (3-0-3) This course covers judicial structure/process/procedure from incident to disposition, kinds and degrees of evidence, and the rules governing admissibility of evidence in court. Topics include consideration of state and federal courts, arrest, search and seizure laws, exclusionary and statutory rules of evidence, and other related issues. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and discuss procedures necessary to establish a lawful arrest/search, proper judicial procedures, and the admissibility of evidence. CJC 141 Corrections (3-0-3) This course covers the history, major philosophies, components, and current practices and problems of the field of corrections. Topics include historical evolution, functions of the various components, alternatives to incarceration, treatment programs, inmate control, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to explain the various components, processes, and functions of the correctional system. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. CJC 144 Crime Scene Processing (2-3-3) This course introduces the theories and practices of crime scene processing and investigating. Topics include legal considerations at the crime scene, processing indoor and outdoor scenes, recording, note taking, collection and preservation of evidence and submission to the crime laboratory. Upon completion, the student should be able to evaluate and search various crime scenes and demonstrate the appropriate techniques. CJC 146 Trace Evidence (2-3-3) This course provides a study of trace evidence as it relates to forensic science. Topics include collection, packaging, and preservation of trace evidence from crime scenes such as bombings, fires and other scenes. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the fundamental concepts of trace evidence collection, preservation and submission to the crime laboratory.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS CJC 212 Ethics & Community Relations (3-0-3) This course covers ethical considerations and accepted standards applicable to criminal justice organizations and professionals. Topics include ethical systems; social change, values, and norms; cultural diversity; citizen involvement in criminal justice issues; and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to apply ethical considerations to the decision-making process in identifiable criminal justice situations. CJC 213 Substance Abuse (3-0-3) This course is a study of substance abuse in our society. Topics include the history and classifications of drug abuse and the social, physical, and psychological impact of drug abuse. Upon completion, students should be able to identify various types of drugs, their effects on human behavior and society, and treatment modalities. CJC 214 Victimology (3-0-3) This course introduces the study of victims. Emphasis is placed on roles/characteristics of victims, victim interaction with the criminal justice system and society, current victim assistance programs, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to discuss and identify victims, the uniqueness of victims’ roles, and current victim assistance programs. CJC 215 Organization & Administration (3-0-3) This course introduces the components and functions of organization and administration as it applies to the agencies of the criminal justice system. Topics include operations/functions of organizations; recruiting, training, and retention of personnel; funding and budgeting; communications; span of control and discretion; and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and discuss the basic components and functions of a criminal justice organization and its administrative operations. CJC 221 Investigative Principles (3-2-4) This course introduces the theories and fundamentals of the investigative process. Topics include crime scene/incident processing, information gathering techniques, collection/ preservation of evidence, preparation of appropriate reports, court presentations, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify, explain, and demonstrate the techniques of the investigative process, report preparation, and courtroom presentation. CJC 222 Criminalistics (3-0-3) This course covers the functions of the forensic laboratory and its relationship to successful criminal investigations and prosecutions. Topics include advanced crime scene processing, investigative techniques, current forensic technologies, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and collect relevant evidence at simulated crime scenes and request appropriate laboratory analysis of submitted evidence. Consideration will also be given to the psychological profiling of serial criminal offenders. CJC 223 Organized Crime (3-0-3) This course introduces the evolution of traditional and non-traditional organized crime and its effect on society and the criminal justice system. Topics include identifying individuals and groups involved in organized crime, areas of criminal activity, legal and political responses to organized crime, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the groups and activities involved in organized crime and the responses of the criminal justice system.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS CJC 225 Crisis Intervention (3-0-3) This course introduces critical incident intervention and management techniques as they apply to operational criminal justice practitioners. Emphasis is placed on the victim/offender situation as well as job-related high stress, dangerous, or problem-solving citizen contacts. Upon completion, students should be able to provide insightful analysis of emotional, violent, drug-induced, and other critical and/or stressful incidents that require field analysis and/or resolution. CJC 231 Constitutional Law (3-0-3) The course covers the impact of the Constitution of the United States and its amendments on the criminal justice system. Topics include the structure of the Constitution and its amendments, court decisions pertinent to contemporary criminal justice issues, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify/discuss the basic structure of the United States Constitution and the rights/procedures as interpreted by the courts. CJC 232 Civil Liability (3-0-3) This course covers liability issues for the criminal justice professional. Topics include civil rights violations, tort liability, employment issues, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to explain civil trial procedures and discuss contemporary liability issues. CJC 241 Community-Based Corrections (3-0-3) This course covers programs for convicted offenders that are used both as alternatives to incarceration and in post-incarceration situations. Topics include offenders, diversion, house arrest, restitution, community service, probation and parole, including both public and private participation, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify/discuss the various programs from the perspective of the criminal justice professional, the offender, and the community. CJC 245 Friction Ridge Analysis (2-3-3) This course introduces the basic elements of fingerprint technology and techniques applicable to the criminal justice field. Topics include the history and meaning of fingerprints, pattern types and classification, filing sequence, searching and referencing. Upon completion, students should be able to discuss and demonstrate the fundamental techniques of basic fingerprint technology. This course is a unique concentration requirement in the Latent Evidence concentration in the Criminal Justice Technology program. CJC 246 Advanced Friction Ridge Analysis (2-3-3) Prerequisite: CJC 245 This course introduces the theories and processes of advanced friction ridge analysis. Topics include evaluation of friction ridges, chart preparation, comparative analysis for valued determination rendering proper identification, chemical enhancement and AFIS preparation and usage. Upon completion, students must show an understanding of proper procedures for friction ridge analysis through written testing and practical exercises. This course is a unique concentration requirement in the Latent Evidence concentration in the Criminal Justice Technology program.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS CJC 250 Forensic Biology I (2-2-3) Corequisites: BIO 110 or BIO 111 This course covers important biological principles that are applied in the crime laboratory. Topics include forensic toxicology, forensic serology, microscopy, and DNA typing analysis, with an overview of organic and inorganic analysis. Upon completion, students should be able to articulate how a crime laboratory processes physical evidence submitted by law enforcement agencies. CJC 251 Forensic Chemistry I (3-2-4) This course provides a study of the fundamental concepts of chemistry as it relates to forensic science. Topics include physical and chemical properties of substances, metric measurements, chemical changes, elements, compounds, gases, and atomic structure. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental concepts of forensic chemistry. CJC 252 Forensic Chemistry II (3-2-4) Prerequisite: CJC 251 This course provides a study of specialized areas of chemistry specifically related to forensic science. Topics include properties of light, emission and absorption spectra, spectrophotometry, gas and liquid chromatography, and related topics in organic and biochemistry. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of specialized concepts in forensic chemistry. CJC 255 Issues in Criminal Justice Applications (3-0-3) Prerequisites: CJC 111, CJC 221 and CJC 231 This course provides an opportunity to exhibit interpersonal and technical skills required for application of criminal justice concepts in contemporary practical situations. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking and integration of theory and practical skills components. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the knowledge required of any entry-level law enforcement officer. CJC 256 Forensic Surveying (2-3-3) This course provides students with the requisite understanding and skills necessary to employ surveying equipment to position and map a crime or traffic homicide scene. Topics include triangulation and rectangular coordinate grids, polar coordinates, establishing datum points, Global Positioning Systems and total station positioning and mapping. Upon completion, students should be able to accurately use a total station system for the purpose of positioning and mapping crime or traffic homicide scenes. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION COE 111 Co-op Work Experience I (0-0-10-1) This course provides work experience with a college-approved employer in an area related to the student’s program of study. Emphasis is placed on integrating classroom learning with related work experience. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate career selection, demonstrate employability skills, and satisfactorily perform work-related competencies.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS COE 112 Co-op Work Experience I (0-0-20-2) This course provides work experience with a college approved employer in an area related to the student’s program of study. Emphasis is placed on integrating classroom learning with related work experience. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate career selection, demonstrate employability skills, and satisfactorily perform work-related competencies. COE 114 Co-op Work Experience I (0-0-40-4) This course provides work experience with a college-approved employer in an area related to the student’s program of study. Emphasis is placed on integrating classroom learning with related work experience. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate career selection, demonstrate employability skills, and satisfactorily perform work-related competencies. COE 115 Work Experience Seminar I (1-0-0-1) Corequisites: COE 111, COE 112, COE 113, or COE 114 This course provides an opportunity to discuss clinical experiences with peers and faculty. Emphasis is placed on discussing application of concepts and principles from related course content to clinical placement. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required in human services clinical experiences. COE 121 Co-op Work Experience II (0-0-10-1) This course provides work experience with a college-approved employer in an area related to the student’s program of study. Emphasis is placed on integrating classroom learning with related work experience. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate career selection, demonstrate employability skills, and satisfactorily perform work-related competencies. COE 125 Work Experience Seminar II (1-0-0-1) Corequisites: COE 121 or COE 122 This course provides an opportunity to discuss clinical experiences with peers and faculty. Emphasis is placed on discussing application of concepts and principles from related course content to clinical placement. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required in human services clinical experiences. COMMUNICATION COM 110 Introduction to Communication (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course provides an overview of the basic concepts of communication and the skills necessary to communicate in various contexts. Emphasis is placed on communication theories and techniques used in interpersonal group, public, intercultural, and mass communication situations. Upon completion, students should be able to explain and illustrate the forms and purposes of human communication in a variety of contexts. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts (substitute). This course is also available through the Virtual Learning Community (VLC). Students may not apply both COM 110 and COM 231 towards completion of AA degree or Transfer Core Diploma requirements.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS COM 140 Introduction to Intercultural Communication (3-0-3) This course introduces techniques of cultural research, definitions, functions, characteristics, and impacts of cultural differences in public address. Emphasis is placed on how diverse backgrounds influence the communication act and how cultural perceptions and experiences determine how one sends and receives messages. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles and skills needed to become effective in communicating outside one’s primary culture. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts (substitute). COM 231 Public Speaking (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of speeches within a public setting and group discussion. Emphasis is placed on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well-organized speeches and participate in group discussion with appropriate audiovisual support. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts (substitute). Students may not apply both COM 110 and COM 231 towards completion of AA degree or Transfer Core Diploma requirements. COSMETOLOGY COS 111 Cosmetology Concepts I (4-0-4) Corequisite: COS 112 This course introduces basic cosmetology concepts. Topics include safety, first aid, sanitation, bacteriology, anatomy, diseases and disorders, hygiene, product knowledge, chemistry, ethics, manicures, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to safely and competently apply cosmetology concepts in the salon setting. COS 112 Salon I (0-24-8) Corequisite: COS 111 This course introduces basic salon services. Topics include scalp treatments, shampooing, rinsing, hair color, design, haircutting, permanent waving, pressing, relaxing, wigs, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to safely and competently demonstrate salon services. COS 113 Cosmetology Concepts II (4-0-4) Prerequisite: COS 111 Corequisite: COS 114 This course covers more comprehensive cosmetology concepts. Topics include safety, product knowledge, chemistry, manicuring, chemical restructuring, and hair coloring. Upon completion, students should be able to safely and competently apply these cosmetology concepts in the salon setting. COS 114 Salon II (0-24-8) Prerequisite: COS 112 Corequisite: COS 113 This course provides experience in a simulated salon setting. Topics include basic skin care, manicuring, nail application, scalp treatments, shampooing, rinsing, hair color, design, haircutting, chemical restructuring, pressing, wigs, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to safely and competently demonstrate these salon services.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS COS 115 Cosmetology Concepts III (4-0-4) Prerequisite: COS 111 Corequisite: COS 116 This course covers more comprehensive cosmetology concepts. Topics include safety, product knowledge, salon management, salesmanship, skin care, electricity/light therapy, wigs, thermal hair styling, lash and brow tinting, superfluous hair removal, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to safely and competently apply these cosmetology concepts in the salon setting. COS 116 Salon III (0-12-4) Prerequisite: COS 112 Corequisite: COS 115 This course provides comprehensive experience in a simulated salon setting. Emphasis is placed on intermediate-level of skin care, manicuring, scalp treatments, shampooing, hair color, design, haircutting, chemical restructuring, pressing, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to safely and competently demonstrate these salon services. COS 117 Cosmetology Concepts IV (2-0-2) Prerequisite: COS 111 Corequisite: COS 118 This course covers advanced cosmetology concepts. Topics include chemistry and hair structure, advanced cutting and design, and an overview of all cosmetology concepts in preparation for the licensing examination. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of these cosmetology concepts and meet program completion requirements. COS 118 Salon IV (0-21-7) Prerequisite: COS 112 Corequisite: COS 117 This course provides advanced experience in a simulated salon setting. Emphasis is placed on efficient and competent delivery of all salon services in preparation for the licensing examination and employment. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in program requirements and the areas covered on the Cosmetology Licensing Examination and meet entry-level employment requirements. COS 121 Manicure/Nail Technology I (4-6-6) This course covers techniques of nail technology, hand and arm massage, and recognition of nail diseases and disorders. Topics include OSHA/safety, sanitation, bacteriology, product knowledge, salesmanship, manicures, artificial applications, pedicures, massage, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to safely and competently perform nail care, including manicures, pedicures, massage, decorating, and artificial applications in a salon setting. COS 222 Manicure/Nail Technology II (4-6-6) Prerequisite: COS 121 This course covers advanced techniques of nail technology and hand and arm massage. Topics include OSHA/safety, product knowledge, customer service, salesmanship, artificial applications, nail art, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence necessary for the licensing examination, including advanced nail care, artificial enhancements, and decorations.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS COMPUTER SCIENCE CSC 134 C++ Programming (2-3-3) This course introduces computer programming using the C++ programming language with object-oriented programming principles. Emphasis is placed on event-driven programming methods, including creating and manipulating objects, classes, and using object-oriented tools such as the class debugger. Upon completion, students should be able to design, code, test and debug at a beginning level. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. CSC 139 Visual BASIC Programming (2-3-3) Prerequisite: CIS 115 This course introduces computer programming using the Visual BASIC programming language with object-oriented programming principles. Emphasis is placed on event-driven programming methods, including creating and manipulating objects, classes, and using object-oriented tools such as the class debugger. Upon completion, students should be able to design, code, test and debug at a beginning level. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. CSC 151 JAVA Programming (2-3-3) Prerequisite: CIS 115 This course introduces computer programming using the JAVA programming language with object-oriented programming principles. Emphasis is placed on event-driven programming methods, including creating and manipulating objects, classes, and using object-oriented tools such as the class debugger. Upon completion students should be able to design, code, test, debug JAVA language programs. CSC 284 Emerging Comp Prog Tech (2-3-3) Prerequisite: CIS 115 and CSC 151 This course provides students with the latest technologies and strategies in the field of Computer Programming. Emphasis is placed on the evaluation of developing Computer Programming Technologies and presenting those findings to the class. Upon completion, students should be able to critically analyze emerging Computer Programming Technologies and establish informed opinions. COMPUTER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY CTS 120 Hardware/Software Support (2-3-3) Prerequisites: CIS 110 or CIS 111 This course covers the basic hardware of a personal computer, including installation, operations and interactions with software. Topics include component identification, memory-system, peripheral installation and configuration, preventive maintenance, hardware diagnostics/repair, installation and optimization of system software, commercial programs, system configuration, and device-drivers. Upon completion, students should be able to select appropriate computer equipment and software, upgrade/maintain existing equipment and software, and troubleshoot/repair non-functioning personal computers. CTS 130 Spreadsheet (2-2-3) Prerequisites: CIS 110 or CIS 111 or OST 137 This course introduces basic spreadsheet design and development. Topics include writing formulas, using functions, enhancing spreadsheets, creating charts, and printing. Upon completion, students should be able to design and print basic spreadsheets and charts.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS CTS 250 User Support & Software Evaluation (2-2-3) Prerequisites: CTS 120 and NOS 130 This course provides an opportunity to evaluate software and hardware and make recommendations to meet end-user needs. Emphasis is placed on software and hardware evaluation, installation, training, and support. Upon completion, students should be able to present proposals and make hardware and software recommendations based on their evaluations. CTS 285 Systems Analysis & Design (3-0-3) Prerequisite: CIS 115 This course introduces established and evolving methodologies for the analysis, design, and development of an information system. Emphasis is placed on system characteristics, managing projects, prototyping, CASE/OOM tools, and systems development life cycle phases. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze a problem and design an appropriate solution using a combination of tools and techniques. CTS 286 Network Support (2-2-3) Prerequisites: NOS 230 or NOS 231 This course provides experience using CD ROM and on-line research tools and hands-on experience for advanced hardware support and troubleshooting. Emphasis is placed on troubleshooting network adapter cards and cabling, network storage devices, the DOS workstation, and network printing. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze, diagnose, research, and fix network hardware problems. CTS 287 Emerging Technologies (3-0-3) This course introduces emerging information technologies. Emphasis is placed on evolving technologies and trends in business and industry. Upon completion, students should be able to articulate an understanding of the current trends and issues in emerging technologies for information systems. CTS 289 System Support Project (1-4-3) Prerequisite: CTS 285 This course provides an opportunity to complete a significant support project with minimal instructor assistance. Emphasis is placed on written and oral communication skills, project definition, documentation, installation, testing, presentation, and user training. Upon completion, students should be able to complete a project from the definition phase through implementation. CONSTRUCTION CST 244 Sustainable Bldg Design (2-3-3) This course is designed to increase student knowledge about integrating sustainable design principles and green building technologies into mainstream residential construction practices. Emphasis is placed on reducing negative environmental impact and improving building performance, indoor air quality and the comfort of a building’s occupants. Upon completion, students should be able to identify principles of green building, environmental efficiency and conservation of natural resources in relation to basic construction practices.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS CULINARY CUL 110 Sanitation & Safety (2-0-2) This course introduces the basic principles of sanitation and safety relative to the hospitality industry. Topics include personal hygiene, sanitation and safety regulations, use and care of equipment, the principles of food-borne illness, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the content necessary for successful completion of a nationally recognized food/safety/sanitation exam. CUL 110A Sanitation & Safety Lab (0-2-1) Corequisite: CUL 110 This course provides a laboratory experience for enhancing student skills in the basic principles of sanitation and safety. Emphasis is placed on personal hygiene, sanitation and safety regulations, use and care of equipment, the principles of food-borne illness, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate practical applications of sanitation and safety procedures in the hospitality industry. CUL 112 Nutrition for Foodservice (3-0-3) This course covers the principles of nutrition and its relationship to the foodservice industry. Topics include personal nutrition fundamentals, weight management, exercise, nutritional adaptation/analysis of recipes/menus, healthy cooking techniques and marketing nutrition in a foodservice operation. Upon completion, students should be able to apply basic nutritional concepts to food preparation and selection. CUL 120 Purchasing (2-0-2) This course covers purchasing for foodservice operations. Emphasis is placed on yield tests, procurement, negotiating, inventory control, product specification, purchasing ethics, vendor relationships, food product specifications and software applications. Upon completion, students should be able to apply effective purchasing techniques based on the end-use of the product. CUL 135 Food & Beverage Service (2-0-2) This course is designed to cover the practical skills and knowledge necessary for effective food and beverage service in a variety of settings. Topics include greeting/service of guests, dining room set-up, profitability, menu sales and merchandising, service styles and reservations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in human relations and the skills required in the service of foods and beverages. CUL 135A Food & Beverage Service Lab (0-2-1) Corequisite: CUL 135 This course provides a laboratory experience for enhancing student skills in effective food and beverage service. Emphasis is placed on practical experiences including greeting/service of guests, dining room set-up, profitability, menu sales and merchandising, service styles and reservations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate practical applications of human relations and the skills required in the service of foods and beverages.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS CUL 140 Culinary Skills I (2-6-5) Corequisite: CUL 110 This course introduces the fundamental concepts, skills and techniques in basic cookery, and moist, dry and combination heat. Emphasis is placed on recipe conversion, measurements, terminology, classical knife cuts, safe food/equipment handling, flavorings/seasonings, stocks/sauces/ soups, and related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to exhibit the basic cooking skills used in the foodservice industry. CUL 160 Baking I (1-4-3) Corequisite: CUL 110 This course covers basic ingredients, techniques, weights and measures, baking terminology and formula calculations. Topics include yeast/chemically leavened products, laminated doughs, pastry dough batter, pies/tarts, meringue, custard, cakes and cookies, icings, glazes and basic sauces. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate proper scaling and measurement techniques, and prepare and evaluate a variety of bakery products. CUL 170 Garde Manger I (1-4-3) Corequisites: CUL 110 This course introduces basic cold food preparation techniques and pantry production. Topics include salads, sandwiches, appetizers, dressings, basic garnishes, cheeses, cold sauces, and related food items. Upon completion, students should be able to present a cold food display and exhibit an understanding of the cold kitchen and its related terminology. CUL 230 Global Cuisines (1-8-5) Prerequisites: CUL 110 and CUL 140 This course provides practical experience in the planning, preparation, and presentation of representative foods from a variety of world cuisines. Emphasis is placed on indigenous ingredients and customs, nutritional concerns, and cooking techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to research and execute a variety of international and domestic menus. CUL 240 Culinary Skills II (1-8-5) Corequisites: CUL 110 and CUL 140 This course is designed to further students’ knowledge of the fundamental concepts, skills, and techniques involved in basic cookery. Emphasis is placed on meat identification/fabrication, butchery and cooking techniques/methods; appropriate vegetable/starch accompaniments; compound sauces; plate presentation; breakfast cookery; and quantity food preparation. Upon completion, students should be able to plan, execute, and successfully serve entrees with complementary side items. CUL 250 Classical Cuisine (1-8-5) Prerequisites: CUL 110, CUL 140, CUL 240 This course reinforces the classical culinary kitchen as established by Escoffier. Topics include the working Grand Brigade of the kitchen, table d’hote menus, signature dishes, and classical banquets. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in food preparation in a classical/upscale restaurant or banquet setting.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS CUL 260 Baking II (1-4-3) Prerequisites: CUL 110, CUL 160 This course is designed to further students’ knowledge in ingredients, weights and measures, baking terminology and formula calculation. Topics include classical desserts, frozen desserts, cake and torte production, decorating and icings/glazes, dessert plating and presentation. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate pastry preparation, plating, and dessert buffet production skills. DATABASE MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY DBA 110 Database Concepts (2-3-3) This course introduces database design and creation using a DBMS product. Emphasis is placed on data dictionaries, normalization, data integrity, data modeling, and creation of simple tables, queries, reports, and forms. Upon completion, students should be able to design and implement normalized database structures by creating simple database tables, queries, reports, and forms. DEVELOPMENTAL MATHEMATICS DMA 010 Operations with Integers (.75-.50-1) This course provides a conceptual study of integers and integer operations. Topics include integers, absolute value, exponents, square roots, perimeter and area of basic geometric figures, Pythagorean theorem, and use of the correct order of operations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of pertinent concepts and principles and apply this knowledge in the evaluation of expressions. DMA 020 Fractions & Decimals (.75-.50-1) Prerequisites: Take DMA 010 or satisfactory test scores This course provides a conceptual study of the relationship between fractions and decimals and covers related problems. Topics include application of operations and solving contextual application problems, including determining the circumference and area of circles with the concept of pi. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the connections between fractions and decimals. DMA 030 Propor/Ratio/Rate/Percent (.75-.50-1) Prerequisites: Take DMA 010 and DMA 020 or satisfactory test scores This course provides a conceptual study of the problems that are represented by rates, ratios, percent, and proportions. Topics include rates, ratios, percent, proportion, conversion of English and metric units, and applications of the geometry of similar triangles. Upon completion, students should be able to use their understanding to solve conceptual application problems. DMA 040 Express/Lin Equat/Inequal (.75-.50-1) Prerequisites: Take DMA 010, DMA 020 and DMA 030 or satisfactory test scores This course provides a conceptual study of problems involving linear expressions, equations, and inequalities. Emphasis is placed on solving contextual application problems. Upon completion, students should be able to distinguish between simplifying expressions and solving equations and apply this knowledge to problems involving linear expressions, equations, and inequalities.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS DMA 050 Graphs/Equations of Lines (.75-.50-1) Prerequisites: Take DMA 010, DMA 020, DMA 030 and DMA 040 or satisfactory test scores This course provides a conceptual study of problems involving graphic and algebraic representations of lines. Topics include slope, equations of lines, interpretation of basic graphs, and linear modeling. Upon completion, students should be able to solve contextual application problems and represent real-world situations as linear equations in two variables. DMA 060 Polynomial/Quadratic Appl (.75-.50-1) Prerequisites: Take DMA 010, DMA 020, DMA 030, DMA 040 and DMA 050 or satisfactory test scores This course provides a conceptual study of problems involving graphic and algebraic representations of quadratics. Topics include basic polynomial operations, factoring polynomials, and solving polynomial equations by means of factoring. Upon completion, students should be able to find algebraic solutions to contextual problems with quadratic applications. DMA 070 Rational Express/Equation (.75-.50-1) Prerequisites: Take DMA 010, DMA 020, DMA 030, DMA 040, DMA 050 and DMA 060 or satisfactory test scores This course provides a conceptual study of problems involving graphic and algebraic representations of rational equations. Topics include simplifying and performing operations with rational expressions and equations, understanding the domain, and determining the reasonableness of an answer. Upon completion, students should be able to find algebraic solutions to contextual problems with rational applications. DMA 080 Radical Express/Equation (.75-.50-1) Prerequisites: Take DMA 010, DMA 020, DMA 030, DMA 040, DMA 050, DMA 060 and DMA 070 or satisfactory test scores This course provides a conceptual study of the manipulation of radicals and the application of radical equations to real-world problems. Topics include simplifying and performing operations with radical expressions and rational exponents, solving equations, and determining the reasonableness of an answer. Upon completion, students should be able to find algebraic solutions to contextual problems with radical applications. DEVELOPMENTAL READING & ENGLISH DRE 096 Integrated Reading & Writing (2.5 - 1 - 3) This course is designed to develop proficiency in specific integrated and contextualized reading and writing skills and strategies. Topics include reading and writing processes, critical thinking strategies, and recognition and composition of well-developed, coherent, and unified texts; these topics are primarily taught at the introductory level using texts primarily in a Lexile range of 960 to 1115. Upon completion, students should be able to apply those skills toward understanding a variety of academic and career-related texts and composing effective paragraphs.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS DRE 097 Integrated Reading & Writing II (2.5 - 1 - 3) Prerequisite: DRE 096 This course is designed to develop proficiency in integrated and contextualized reading and writing skills and strategies. Topics include reading and writing processes, critical thinking strategies, and recognition and composition of well-developed, coherent, and unified texts; except where noted, these topics are taught at a reinforcement level using texts primarily in a Lexile range of 1070 to 1220. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate and apply those skills toward understanding a variety of complex academic and career texts and composing essays incorporating relevant, valid evidence. DRE 098 Integrated Reading & Writing III (2.5 - 1 - 3) Prerequisite: DRE 097 This course is designed to develop proficiency in integrated and contextualized reading and writing skills and strategies. Topics include reading and writing processes, critical thinking strategies, and recognition and composition of well-developed, coherent, and unified texts; these topics are taught using texts primarily in the Lexile® range of 1185 to 1385. Upon completion, students should be able to apply those skills toward understanding a variety of texts at the career and college ready level and toward composing a documented essay. DRE 099 Integrated Reading & Writing III (2 - 0 - 2) Prerequisite: DRE 097 Corequisite: ENG 111 This course is designed to develop proficiency in integrated and contextualized reading and writing skills and strategies by complementing, supporting and reinforcing material covered in ENG 111. Topics include reading and writing processes, critical thinking strategies, and recognition and composition of well-developed, coherent, and unified texts; except where noted, these topics are taught using texts primarily in the Lexile® range of 1185 to 1385. Upon completion, students should be able to apply those skills toward understanding a variety of texts at the career and college ready level and toward composing a documented essay. DRAFTING DFT 117 Technical Drafting (1-2-2) This course introduces basic drafting practices for non-drafting majors. Emphasis is placed on instrument use and care, shape and size description, sketching, and pictorials. Upon completion, students should be able to produce drawings of assigned parts. ELECTRONIC COMMERCE ECM 168 Electronic Business (2-2-3) This course provides a survey of the world of electronic business. Topics include the definition of electronic business, current practices as they evolve using Internet strategy in business, and application of basic business principles to the world of Electronic Commerce. Upon completion, students should be able to define electronic business and demonstrate an understanding of the benefits of Electronic Commerce as a foundation for developing plans leading to electronic business implementation.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ECM 210 Introduction to Electronic Commerce (2-2-3) This course introduces the concepts and tools to implement electronic commerce via the Internet. Topics include application and server software selection, securing transactions, use and verification of credit cards, publishing of catalogs, and site administration. Upon completion, students should be able to setup a working Electronic Commerce Internet web site. ECM 220 Electronic Commerce Planning & Implementation (2-2-3) This course builds on currently accepted business practices to develop a business plan and implementation model for Electronic Commerce. Topics include analysis and synthesis of the planning cycle, cost/benefit analysis, technical systems, marketing, security, financial support, Internet strategies, website design, customer support and feedback and assessment. Upon completion, students should be able to develop a plan for Electronic Commerce in a small to medium size business. ECM 230 Capstone Project (1-6-3) Prerequisite: ECM 220 This course provides experience in Electronic Commerce. Emphasis is placed on the implementation of an Electronic Commerce model for an existing business. Upon completion, students should be able to successfully develop and implement a plan for Electronic Commerce in a small to medium size business. ECONOMICS ECO 151 Survey of Economics (3-0-3) This course introduces basic concepts of micro- and macroeconomics. Topics include supply and demand, optimizing economic behavior, prices and wages, money, interest rates, banking system, unemployment, inflation, taxes, government spending, and international trade. Upon completion, students should be able to explain alternative solutions for economic problems faced by private and government sectors. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences. ECO 251 Principles of Microeconomics (3-0-3) This course introduces economic analysis of individual, business, and industry choices in the market economy. Topics include the price mechanism, supply and demand, optimizing economic behavior, costs and revenue, market structures, factor markets, income distribution, market failure, and government intervention. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and evaluate consumer and business alternatives in order to efficiently achieve economic objectives. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences. ECO 252 Principles of Macroeconomics (3-0-3) This course introduces economic analysis of aggregate employment, income, and prices. Topics include major schools of economic thought; aggregate supply and demand; economic measures, fluctuations, and growth; money and banking; stabilization techniques; and international trade. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate national economic components, conditions, and alternatives for achieving socioeconomic goals. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS EDUCATION EDU 119 Introduction to Early Child Education (4-0-4) This course covers the foundations of the education profession, the diverse educational settings for young children, professionalism and planning developmentally appropriate programs for all children. Topics include historical foundations, program types, career options, professionalism and creating inclusive environments and curriculum responsive to the needs of all children and families. Upon completion, students should be able to design career plans and develop schedules, environments and activity plans appropriate for all children. This course is also available through the Virtual Learning Community (VLC). EDU 131 Child, Family, & Community (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 080 and RED 080 Set 2: ENG 085 This course covers the development of partnerships between culturally and linguistically diverse families, children, schools and communities. Emphasis is placed on developing skills and identifying benefits for establishing, supporting, and maintaining respectful, collaborative relationships between diverse families, programs/schools, and community agencies/resources. Upon completion, students should be able to explain appropriate relationships between families, educators, and professionals that enhance development and educational experiences of all children. This course is also available through the Virtual Learning Community (VLC). EDU 144 Child Development I (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 080 and RED 080 Set 2: ENG 085 This course includes the theories of child development, needs, milestones, and factors that influence development, from conception through approximately 36 months. Emphasis is placed on developmental sequences in physical/motor, emotional/social, cognitive, and language domains and the impact of multiple influences on development and learning. Upon completion, students should be able to compare/contrast typical/atypical developmental characteristics, explain environmental factors that impact development, and identify strategies for enhancing development. This course is also available through the Virtual Learning Community (VLC). EDU 145 Child Development II (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 080 and RED 080 Set 2: ENG 085 This course includes the theories of child development, needs, milestones, and factors that influence development, from preschool through middle childhood. Emphasis is placed on developmental sequences in physical/motor, emotional/social, cognitive, and language domains and the impact of multiple influences on development and learning. Upon completion, students should be able to compare/contrast typical/atypical developmental characteristics, explain environmental factors that impact development, and identify strategies for enhancing development. This course is also available through the Virtual Learning Community (VLC).

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS EDU 146 Child Guidance (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 080 and RED 080 Set 2: ENG 085 This course introduces principles and practical techniques including the design of learning environments for providing developmentally appropriate guidance for all children, including those at risk. Emphasis is placed on observation skills, cultural influences, underlying causes of behavior, appropriate expectations, development of self control and the role of communication and guidance. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate direct/indirect strategies for preventing problem behaviors, teaching appropriate/acceptable behaviors, negotiation, setting limits and recognizing at risk behaviors. This course is also available through the Virtual Learning Community (VLC). EDU 151 Creative Activities (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 080 and RED 080 Set 2: ENG 085 This course covers planning, creation and adaptation of developmentally supportive learning environments with attention to curriculum, interactions, teaching practices and learning materials. Emphasis is placed on creating and adapting integrated, meaningful, challenging and engaging developmentally supportive learning experiences in art, music, movement and dramatics for all children. Upon completion, students should be able to create, adapt, implement and evaluate developmentally supportive learning materials, experiences and environments. This course is also available through the Virtual Learning Community (VLC). EDU 153 Health, Safety & Nutrition (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 080 and RED 080 Set 2: ENG 085 This course covers promoting and maintaining the health and well-being of all children. Topics include health and nutritional guidelines, common childhood illnesses, maintaining safe and healthy learning environments, recognition and reporting of abuse and neglect and state regulations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of health, safety, and nutritional needs, safe learning environments, and adhere to state regulations. This course is also available through the Virtual Learning Community (VLC). EDU 154 Social/Emotion/Behavioral Development (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 080, RED 080, EDU 144, EDU 145 Set 2: ENG 080, RED 080, PSY 244, PSY 245 Set 3: ENG 085, EDU 144, EDU 145 Set 4: ENG 085, PSY 244, PSY 245 This course covers the emotional/social development of children and the causes, expressions, prevention and management of challenging behaviors in all children. Emphasis is placed on caregiver/ family/child relationships, positive emotional/social environments, developmental concerns, risk factors, and intervention strategies. Upon completion, students should be able to identify factors influencing emotional/social development, utilizing screening measures, and designing positive behavioral supports.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS EDU 161 Introduction to Exceptional Children (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 080 and RED 080 Set 2: ENG 085 This course covers children with exceptionalities as life long learners within the context of the community, school and family. Emphasis is placed on inclusion, legal, social/political, environmental, and cultural issues relating to the teaching of children with exceptionalities. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of identification processes, inclusive techniques, and professional practices and attitudes. EDU 162 Observation & Assessment in ECE (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 080, RED 080 Set 2: ENG 085 This course introduces the research, benefits, goals, and ethical considerations associated with observation and assessment in Early Childhood environments. Emphasis is placed on the implementation of multiple observation/assessment strategies including anecdotal records, event samples, rating scales, and portfolios to create appropriate learning experiences. Upon completion, students should be able to practice responsible assessment and use assessments to enhance programming and collaboration for children and families. EDU 163 Classroom Management & Instruction (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 080 and RED 080 Set 2: ENG 085 This course covers management and instructional techniques with school-age populations. Topics include classroom management and organization, teaching strategies, individual student differences and learning styles, and developmentally appropriate classroom guidance techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to utilize developmentally appropriate behavior management and instructional strategies that enhance the teaching/learning process and promote students’ academic success. EDU 175 Introduction to Trade & Industry (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 080 and RED 080 Set 2: ENG 085 This course introduces the philosophy, scope, and objectives of industrial education. Topics include the development of industrial education, employment opportunities, current events, current practices, and emerging trends. Upon completion, students should be able to describe the history, identify current practices, and describe current trends in industrial education. EDU 176 Occupation Analysis & Course Development (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 080 and RED 080 Set 2: ENG 085 This course covers the principles and techniques of analyzing occupations to select suitable competencies and teaching methods for learning activities. Topics include occupational analysis, instructional methods, competency identification, and curriculum writing. Upon completion, students should be able to identify competencies, organize instructional materials, and select appropriate instructional methods.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS EDU 177 Instructional Methods (2-2-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 080 and RED 080 Set 2: ENG 085 This course covers instructional methods in technical education with emphasis on competencybased instruction. Topics include writing objectives, industrial methods, and determining learning styles. Upon completion, students should be able to select and demonstrate the use of a variety of instructional methods. EDU 178 Facilities Organization & Planning (2-2-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 080 and RED 080 Set 2: ENG 085 This course is a study of the problems related to educational facilities planning, layout, and management. Emphasis is placed on applying basic principles to actual projects relating to specific occupational areas. Upon completion, students should be able to lay out an educational facility for an occupational area and develop a plan for the facilities. EDU 179 Vocational Student Organization (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 080 and RED 080 Set 2: ENG 085 This course covers planning and organizing vocational youth clubs by understanding the structure and operating procedures to use club activities for personal and professional growth. Topics include self-assessment to set goals, club structure, election and installation of officers, club activities, function of committees, running meetings, contest preparation, and leadership skills. Upon completion students should be able to set personal goals, outline club structure, elect and install officers. EDU 184 Early Child Introductory Practicum (1-3-2) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 080, RED 080, EDU 119 Set 2: ENG 085, EDU 119 This course introduces students to early childhood settings and applying skills in a three star (minimum) or NAEYC accredited or equivalent, quality early childhood environment. Emphasis is placed on observing children and assisting in the implementation of developmentally appropriate activities/environments for all children; and modeling reflective/professional practices. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate developmentally appropriate interactions with children and ethical/professional behaviors as indicated by assignments and onsite faculty visits. EDU 216 Foundations of Education (4-0-4) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 090 and RED 090 Set 2: ENG 095 This course introduces the American educational system and the teaching profession. Topics include historical and philosophical foundations of education, contemporary educational, structural, legal, and financial issues, and experiences in public school classrooms. Upon completion, students should be able to relate classroom observations to the roles of teachers and schools and the process of teacher education. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement at WCU and other select institutions.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS EDU 221 Children with Exceptionalities (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 090, RED 090, EDU 144 and EDU 145 Set 2: ENG 090, RED 090, PSY 244 and PSY 245 Set 3: ENG 095, EDU 144 and EDU 145 Set 4: ENG 095, PSY 244 and PSY 245 This course introduces children with exceptionalities, their families, support services, inclusive/ diverse settings, and educational/family plans based on the foundations of child development. Emphasis is placed on the characteristics of exceptionalities, observation and assessment of children, strategies for adapting the learning environment, and identification of community resources. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize diverse abilities, describe the referral process, and depict collaboration with families/professionals to plan/implement, and promote best practice. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement at select institutions only. This course is also available through the Virtual Learning Community (VLC). EDU 234 Infants, Toddlers, & Twos (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 090, RED 090 and EDU 119 Set 2: ENG 095 and EDU 119 This course covers the unique needs and rapid changes that occur in the first three years of life and the inter-related factors that influence development. Emphasis is placed on recognizing and supporting developmental milestones through purposeful strategies, responsive care routines and identifying elements of quality, inclusive early care and education. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate respectful relationships that provide a foundation for healthy infant/ toddler/twos development, plan/select activities/materials, and partner with diverse families. EDU 240 Work-Based Learning Practice & Techniques (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 090 and RED 090 Set 2: ENG 095 This course covers definitions and implementation strategies for various work-place learning programs including apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, field trip, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning and shadowing. Topics include preparing vocational teachers to guide and involve students in work-based learning programs to help prepare for entry into the workforce. Upon completion, students should be able to work with students to assist with selection and involvement in work-based learning programs for career development. EDU 243 Learning Theory (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 090 and RED 090 Set 2: ENG 095 This course provides lateral entry teachers an introduction to learning theory, various styles of learning, and motivational factors involved in the learning process. Emphasis is placed on the development of cognitive skills using the eight types of intelligence and applying these to practical classroom situations. Upon completion, students should be able to describe theories and styles of learning and discuss the relationship between different types of intelligence to learning motivation.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS EDU 244 Human Growth/Development (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 090 and RED 090 Set 2: ENG 095 This course introduces lateral entry teachers to theories and ages and stages related to human growth and development from birth through adolescence. Emphasis is placed on development through the stages of a child’s life in the areas of physical, emotional, social, intellectual, and moral development. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and describe milestones of each stage in all areas of development and discuss factors that influence growth. EDU 245 Policies and Procedures (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 090 and RED 090 Set 2: ENG 095 This course is designed to introduce new lateral entry teachers to the policies and procedures established by the local education agency. Topics include emergency situation procedures, acceptable discipline, chain of command, role of mentors, evaluation procedures, employment requirements, dress codes, and other policies and procedures. Upon completion, students should be able to explain the policies and procedures to students, parents, or others and discuss the purpose of each policy category. EDU 251 Exploration Activities (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 090, RED 090 Set 2: ENG 095 This course covers discovery experiences in science, math, and social studies. Emphasis is placed on developing concepts for each area and encouraging young children to explore, discover, and construct concepts. Upon completion, students should be able to discuss the discovery approach to teaching, explain major concepts in each area, and plan appropriate experiences for children. EDU 259 Curriculum Planning (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 090, RED 090 and EDU 119 Set 2: ENG 095 and EDU 119 This course is designed to focus on curriculum planning for three to five year olds. Topics include philosophy, curriculum models, indoor and outdoor environments, scheduling, authentic assessment, and planning developmentally appropriate experiences. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate children’s development, critique curriculum, plan for individual and group needs, and assess and create quality environments. EDU 261 Early Childhood Administration I (3 -0 -3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 090 and RED 090 Set 2: ENG 095 Corequisites: EDU 119 This course introduces principles of basic programming and staffing, budgeting/financial management and marketing, and rules and regulations of diverse early childhood programs. Topics include program structure and philosophy, standards of NC child care programs, finance, funding resources, and staff and organizational management. Upon completion, students should be able to develop components of program/personnel handbooks, a program budget, and demonstrate knowledge of fundamental marketing strategies and NC standards. This course is also available through the Virtual Learning Community (VLC).

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS EDU 262 Early Childhood Administration II (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 090, RED 090 and EDU 261 Set 2: ENG 095 and EDU 261 Corequisites: EDU 119 This course focuses on advocacy/leadership, public relations/community outreach and program quality/evaluation for diverse early childhood programs. Topics include program evaluation/ accreditation, involvement in early childhood professional organizations, leadership/mentoring, family, volunteer and community involvement and early childhood advocacy. Upon completion, students should be able to define and evaluate all components of early childhood programs, develop strategies for advocacy and integrate community into programs. This course is also available through the Virtual Learning Community (VLC). EDU 271 Educational Technology (2-2-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 090 and RED 090 Set 2: ENG 095 This course introduces the use of technology to enhance teaching and learning in all educational settings. Topics include technology concepts, instructional strategies, materials and adaptive technology for children with exceptionalities, facilitation of assessment/evaluation, and ethical issues surrounding the use of technology. Upon completion, students should be able to apply technology enhanced instructional strategies, use a variety of technology resources and demonstrate appropriate technology skills in educational environments. This course is also available through the Virtual Learning Community (VLC). EDU 275 Effective Teacher Training (2-0-2) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 090 and RED 090 Set 2: ENG 095 This course provides specialized training using an experienced-based approach to learning. Topics include instructional preparation and presentation, student interaction, time management, learning expectations, evaluation, and curriculum principles and planning. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and present a six-step lesson plan and demonstrate ways to improve students’ time-on-task. EDU 280 Language & Literacy Experiences (3-0-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 090 and RED 090 Set 2: ENG 095 This course is designed to expand students’ understanding of children’s language and literacy development and provides strategies for enhancing language/literacy experiences in an enriched environment. Topics include selection of diverse literature and interactive media, the integration of literacy concepts throughout the curriculum, appropriate observations/assessments and inclusive practices. Upon completion, students should be able to select, plan, implement and evaluate developmentally appropriate and diverse language/literacy experiences. This course is also available through the Virtual Learning Community (VLC).

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS EDU 281 Instruction Strategies/Reading & Writing (2-2-3) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 090 and RED 090 Set 2: ENG 095 This course covers concepts, resources, and methods for teaching reading and writing to elementary through middle-grade children. Topics include the importance of literacy, learning styles, skills assessment, various reading and writing approaches and instructional strategies. Upon completion, students should be able to assess, plan, implement and evaluate school-age literacy experiences as related to the North Carolina Standard Course of Study. This course is also available through the Virtual Learning Community (VLC). EDU 284 Early Child Capstone Practicum (1-9-4) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 090, RED 090, EDU 119, EDU 144, EDU 145, EDU 146 and EDU 151 Set 2: ENG 095, EDU 119, EDU 144, EDU 145, EDU 146 and EDU 151 This course is designed to allow students to apply skills in a three star (minimum) or NAEYC accredited or equivalent, quality early childhood environment. Emphasis is placed on designing, implementing and evaluating developmentally appropriate activities and environments for all children; supporting/involving families; and modeling reflective and professional practices. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate developmentally appropriate plans/ assessments, appropriate guidance techniques and ethical/professional behaviors as indicated by assignments and onsite faculty visits. EDU 285 Internship Exp-School Age (1-9-4) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 090, RED 090, EDU 144, EDU 145, EDU 216, EDU 163 Set 2: ENG 095, EDU 144, EDU 145, EDU 216, EDU 163 This course is designed to allow students to apply skills in a quality public or private school environment. Emphasis is placed on designing, implementing and evaluating developmentally appropriate activities and environments for all children; supporting/involving families; and modeling reflective and professional practices. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate developmentally appropriate lesson plans/assessments, appropriate guidance techniques, ethical/ professional behaviors as indicated by assignments and onsite faculty visits. EDU 289 Adv. Issues/School Age Populations (2-0-2) Prerequisites: Take one set Set 1: ENG 090 and RED 090 Set 2: ENG 095 This course covers advanced topics and issues that relate to school-age programs. Emphasis is placed on current advocacy issues, emerging technology, professional growth, ethics, and organizations for providers/teachers working with school-age populations. Upon completion, students should be able to list, discuss, and explain advanced current topics and issues surrounding schoolaged populations.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ENGINEERING EGR 115 Introduction to Technology (2-3-3) This course introduces the basic skills and career fields for technicians. Topics include career options, technical vocabulary, dimensional analysis, measurement systems, engineering graphics, calculator applications, professional ethics, safety practices, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic technologies, prepare drawings and sketches, and perform computations using a scientific calculator. EGR 251 Statics (2-2-3) Prerequisite: MAT 171 or MAT 175 This course covers the concepts and principles of statics. Topics include systems of forces and moments on structures in two- and three-dimensions in equilibrium. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze forces and moments on structures. EGR 252 Strength of Materials (2-4-3) Prerequisite: EGR 251 This course covers the principles and concepts of stress analysis. Topics include centroids, moments of inertia, shear/moment diagrams, and stress and strain. Upon completion, students should be able to perform a stress and strain analysis on structural components. EGR 285 Design Project (0-4-2) This course provides the opportunity to design and construct an instructor-approved project using previously acquired skills. Emphasis is placed on selection, proposal, design, construction, testing, and documentation of the approved project. Upon completion, students should be able to present and demonstrate operational projects. ELECTRICITY ELC 111 Introduction to Electricity (2-2-3) This course introduces the fundamental concepts of electricity and test equipment to nonelectrical/electronic majors. Topics include basic DC and AC principles (voltage, resistance, current, impedance); components (resistors, inductors, and capacitors); power; and operation of test equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to construct and analyze simple DC and AC circuits using electrical test equipment. ELC 112 DC/AC Electricity (3-6-5) This course introduces the fundamental concepts of and computations related to DC/AC electricity. Emphasis is placed on DC/AC circuits, components, operation of test equipment; and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to construct, verify, and analyze simple DC/AC circuits. ELC 113 Basic Wiring I (2-6-4) This course introduces the care/usage of tools and materials used in electrical installations and the requirements of the National Electrical Code. Topics include NEC, electrical safety, and electrical blueprint reading; planning, layout; and installation of electrical distribution equipment; lighting; overcurrent protection; conductors; branch circuits; and conduits. Upon completion, students should be able to properly install conduits, wiring, and electrical distribution equipment associated with basic electrical installations.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ELC 114 Basic Wiring II (2-6-4) This course provides additional instruction in the application of electrical tools, materials, and test equipment associated with electrical installations. Topics include the NEC; safety; electrical blueprints; planning, layout, and installation of equipment and conduits; and wiring devices such as panels and overcurrent devices. Upon completion, students should be able to properly install equipment and conduit associated with electrical installations. ELC 116 Telecom Cabling (1-2-2) This course introduces the theory and practical application of both copper and fiber cabling for telecom systems. Topics include transmission theory, noise, standards, cable types and systems, connectors, physical layer components, installation, and ground/shielding techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to choose the correct cable, install, test, and troubleshoot cabling for telecom. ELC 117 Motors and Controls (2-6-4) This course introduces the fundamental concepts of motors and motor controls. Topics include ladder diagrams, pilot devices, contactors, motor starters, motors, and other control devices. Upon completion, students should be able to properly select, connect, and troubleshoot motors and control circuits. ELC 128 Introduction to PLC (2-3-3) This course introduces the programmable logic controller (PLC) and its associated applications. Topics include ladder logic diagrams, input/output modules, power supplies, surge protection, selection/installation of controllers, and interfacing of controllers with equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to install PLCs and create simple programs. ELC 131 DC/AC Circuit Analysis (4-3-5) This course introduces DC and AC electricity with an emphasis on circuit analysis, measurements, and operation of test equipment. Topics include DC and AC principles, circuit analysis laws and theorems, components, test equipment operation, circuit simulation software, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret circuit schematics; design, construct, verify, and analyze DC/AC circuits; and properly use test equipment. ELECTRONICS ELN 131 Semiconductor Applications (3-3-4) This course introduces the characteristics and applications of semiconductor devices and circuits. Emphasis is placed on analysis, selection, biasing, and applications. Upon completion, students should be able to construct, analyze, verify, and troubleshoot discrete component circuits using appropriate techniques and test equipment. ELN 132 Linear IC Applications (3-3-4) This course introduces the characteristics and applications of linear integrated circuits. Topics include op-amp circuits, differential amplifiers, instrumentation amplifiers, waveform generators, active filters, PLLs, and IC voltage regulators. Upon completion, students should be able to construct, analyze, verify, and troubleshoot linear integrated circuits using appropriate techniques and test equipment.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ELN 133 Digital Electronics (3-3-4) This course covers combinational and sequential logic circuits. Topics include number systems, Boolean algebra, logic families, MSI and LSI circuits, AD/DA conversion, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to construct, analyze, verify, and troubleshoot digital circuits using appropriate techniques and test equipment. ELN 152 Fabrication Techniques (1-3-2) This course covers the fabrication methods required to create a prototype product from the initial circuit design. Topics include CAD, layout, sheet metal working, component selection, wire wrapping, PC board layout and construction, reverse engineering, soldering, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to design and construct an electronic product with all its associated documentation. ELN 215 Semiconductor Physics (3-0-3) This course introduces solid state physics and emphasizes semiconductors. Topics include quantum physics, the atom, solid state devices, and semiconductor and integrated circuit fabrication techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to apply these principles of physics to basic semiconductor fabrication. ELN 229 Industrial Electronics (2-4-4) This course covers semiconductor devices used in industrial applications. Topics include the basic theory, application, and operating characteristics of semiconductor devices (filters, rectifiers, FET, SCR, Diac, Triac, Op-amps, etc). Upon completion, students should be able to install and/ or troubleshoot these devices for proper operation in an industrial electronic circuit. ELN 231 Industrial Controls (2-3-3) This course introduces the fundamental concepts of solid-state control of rotating machinery and associated peripheral devices. Topics include rotating machine theory, ladder logic, electromechanical and solid state relays, motor controls, pilot devices, three-phase power systems, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret ladder diagrams and demonstrate an understanding of electromechanical and electronic control of rotating machinery. ELN 232 Introduction to Microprocessors (3-3-4) This course introduces microprocessor architecture and microcomputer systems including memory and input/output interfacing. Topics include assembly language programming, bus architecture, bus cycle types, I/O systems, memory systems, interrupts, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, verify, and troubleshoot fundamental microprocessor circuits and programs using appropriate techniques and test equipment. ELN 233 Microprocessor Systems (3-3-4) This course covers the application and design of microprocessor control systems. Topics include control and interfacing of systems using AD/DA, serial/parallel I/O, communication protocols, and other related applications. Upon completion, students should be able to design, construct, program, verify, analyze, and troubleshoot fundamental microprocessor interface and control circuits using related equipment.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ELN 234 Communication Systems (3-3-4) This course introduces the fundamentals of electronic communication systems. Topics include the frequency spectrum, electrical noise, modulation techniques, characteristics of transmitters and receivers, and digital communications. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret analog and digital communication circuit diagrams, analyze transmitter and receiver circuits, and use appropriate communication test equipment. ELN 235 Data Communication System (3-3-4) This course covers data communication systems and the transmission of digital information from source to destination. Topics include data transmission systems, serial interfaces and modems, protocols, networks, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the concepts associated with data communication systems. ELN 257 Telecom Software (2-3-3) This course covers technical programming to solve telecommunication problems using, C, UNIX, or other application software. Emphasis is placed on modeling and analyzing selected communication circuits. Upon completion, students should be able to program, simulate, and emulate communication circuits. ELN 258 FCC Commercial License Preparation (3-0-3) This course provides a review of communications technology and federal regulation covered on the FCC General Radiotelephone License examination. Topics include transmitters, receivers, modulation types, antennas, transmission lines, wave propagation, troubleshooting, and FCC regulations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the materials covered and be prepared for the FCC General Radiotelephone License Examination. ELN 264 Advanced Communication (4-3-5) This course provides an in-depth study of high-frequency RF circuits. Topics include RF, microwave circuits, transmission media, radar and antenna systems, and energy sources. Upon completion, students should be able to explain operating units; safely test, adjust, and troubleshoot systems; and design and demonstrate a simple system. ELN 275 Troubleshooting (1-3-2) This course covers techniques of analyzing and repairing failures in electronic equipment. Topics include safety, signal tracing, use of service manuals, and specific troubleshooting methods for analog, digital, and other electronics-based circuits and systems. Upon completion, students should be able to logically diagnose and isolate faults and perform necessary repairs to meet manufacturers’ specifications. EMERGENCY MEDICAL CARE EMS 110 EMT-Basic (5-6-7) Corequisites: ACA 111, EMS 150 This course introduces basic emergency medical care. Topics include preparatory, airway, patient assessment, medical emergencies, trauma, infants and children, and operations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the knowledge and skills necessary to achieve North Carolina State or National Registry EMT-Basic certification.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS EMS 115 Defense Tactics for EMS (1-3-2) This course is designed to provide tactics that can be used for self-protection in dangerous and violent situations. Emphasis is placed on prediction, recognition, and response to dangerous and violent situations. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize potentially hostile situations and protect themselves during a confrontation. EMS 120 Intermediate Interventions (2-3-3) Prerequisites: EMS 110, current EMT-B certification Corequisites: EMS 121 or EMS 122 and EMS 130, and EMS 131 This course is designed to provide the necessary information for interventions appropriate to the EMT-Intermediate and is required for intermediate certification. Topics include automated external defibrillation, basic cardiac electrophysiology, intravenous therapy, venipuncture, acid-base balance, and fluids and electrolytes. Upon completion, students should be able to properly establish an IV line, obtain venous blood, utilize AEDs, and correctly interpret arterial blood gases. EMS 121 EMS Clinical Practicum I (0-6-2) Prerequisites: EMS 110, current EMT-B certification Corequisites: EMS 120, EMS 130, and EMS 131 This course is the initial hospital and field internship and is required for intermediate and paramedic certification. Emphasis is placed on intermediate-level care. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence with intermediate-level skills. EMS 130 Pharmacology I for EMS (1-3-2) Prerequisites: EMS 110 Corequisites: EMS 120 and EMS 131, MAT 110 This course introduces the fundamental principles of pharmacology and medication administration and is required for intermediate and paramedic certification. Topics include terminology, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, weights, measures, drug calculations, legislation, and administration routes. Upon completion, students should be able to accurately calculate drug dosages, properly administer medications, and demonstrate general knowledge of pharmacology. EMS 131 Advanced Airway Management (1-2-2) Prerequisite: EMS 110 Corequisites: EMS 120 and EMS 130 This course is designed to provide advanced airway management techniques and is required for intermediate and paramedic certification. Topics include respiratory anatomy and physiology, airway, ventilation, adjuncts, surgical intervention, and rapid sequence intubation. Upon completion, students should be able to properly utilize all airway adjuncts and pharmacology associated with airway control and maintenance. EMS 140 Rescue Scene Management (1-3-2) This course introduces rescue scene management and is required for paramedic certification. Topics include response to hazardous material conditions, medical incident command, and extrication of patients from a variety of situations. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize and manage rescue operations based upon initial and follow-up scene assessment.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS EMS 150 Emergency Vehicles & EMS Communication (1-3-2) This course examines the principles governing emergency vehicles, maintenance of emergency vehicles, and EMS communication equipment and is required for paramedic certification. Topics include applicable motor vehicle laws affecting emergency vehicle operation, defensive driving, collision avoidance techniques, communication systems, and information management systems. Upon completion, students should have a basic knowledge of emergency vehicles, maintenance, and communication needs. EMS 210 Advanced Patient Assessment (1-3-2) Prerequisites: EMS 120, EMS 121, EMS 130 and EMS 131 This course covers advanced patient assessment techniques and is required for paramedic certification. Topics include initial assessment, medical-trauma history, field impression, complete physical exam process, on-going assessment, and documentation skills. Upon completion, students should be able to utilize basic communication skills and record and report collected patient data. EMS 220 Cardiology (2-6-4) Prerequisites: EMS 120, EMS 130, and EMS 131 This course provides an in-depth study of cardiovascular emergencies and is required for paramedic certification. Topics include anatomy and physiology, pathophysiology, rhythm interpretation, cardiac pharmacology, and patient treatment. Upon completion, students should be able to certify at the Advanced Cardiac Life Support Provider level utilizing American Heart Association guidelines. EMS 221 EMS Clinical Practicum II (0-9-3) Prerequisites EMS 121 This course is a continuation of the hospital and field internship required for paramedic certification. Emphasis is placed on advanced-level care. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate continued progress in advanced-level patient care. EMS 230 Pharmacology II for EMS (1-3-2) Prerequisites: EMS 130 This course explores the fundamental classification and action of common pharmacologic agents. Emphasis is placed on the action and use of compounds most commonly encountered in the treatment of chronic and acutely ill patients. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate general knowledge of drugs covered during the course. EMS 231 EMS Clinical Practicum III (0-9-3) Prerequisite: EMS 221 This course is a continuation of the hospital and field internship required for paramedic certification. Emphasis is placed on advanced-level care. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate continued progress in advanced-level patient care. EMS 235 EMS Management (2-0-2) This course stresses the principles of managing a modern emergency medical service system. Topics include structure and function of municipal governments, EMS grantsmanship, finance, regulatory agencies, system management, legal issues, and other topics relevant to the EMS manager. Upon completion, students should be able to understand the principles of managing emergency medical service delivery systems.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS EMS 240 Special Needs Patients (1-2-2) Prerequisites: EMS 120, EMS 121, EMS 130, and EMS 131 This course includes concepts of crisis intervention and techniques of dealing with special needs patients and is required for paramedic certification. Topics include behavioral emergencies, abuse, assault, challenged patients, personal well-being, home care, and psychotherapeutic pharmacology. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize and manage frequently encountered special needs patients. EMS 241 EMS Clinical Practicum IV (0-9-3) Prerequisite: EMS 231 This course is a continuation of the hospital and field internship required for paramedic certification. Emphasis is placed on advanced-level care. Upon completion, students should be able to provide advanced-level patient care as an entry-level paramedic. EMS 243 Wilderness EMT (1-2-2) Prerequisite: EMS 110 This course provides an overview of emergency care when separated from definitive care by distance, time, or circumstance. Topics include principles of long-term patient care, wilderness patient assessment system, medical and environmental emergencies, medication administration, modified CPR, and spine management. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the knowledge and skills necessary to gain Wilderness EMT certification. EMS 250 Advanced Medical Emergencies (2-3-3) Prerequisites: EMS 120, EMS 121, EMS 130 and EMS 131 This course provides an in-depth study of medical conditions frequently encountered in the prehospital setting and is required for paramedic certification. Topics include pulmonology, neurology, endocrinology, anaphylaxis, gastroenterology, toxicology, and environmental emergencies integrating case presentation and emphasizing pharmacotherapeutics. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize and manage frequently encountered medical conditions based upon initial patient impression. EMS 260 Advanced Trauma Emergencies (1-3-2) Prerequisites: EMS 120, EMS 121, EMS 130 and EMS 131 Corequisite: EMS 140 This course provides in-depth study of trauma including pharmacological interventions for conditions frequently encountered in the prehospital setting and is required for paramedic certification. Topics include hemorrhage control, shock, burns, and trauma to head, spine, soft tissue, thoracic, abdominal, and musculoskeletal areas with case presentations utilized for special problems situations. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize and manage trauma situations based upon patient impressions and should meet requirements of BTLS or PHTLS courses. EMS 270 Life Span Emergencies (2-2-3) Prerequisites: EMS 120, EMS 130, and EMS 131 This course, required for paramedic certification, covers medical/ethical/legal issues and the spectrum of age-specific emergencies from conception through death. Topics include gynecological, obstetrical, neonatal, pediatric, and geriatric emergencies and pharmacological therapeutics. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize and treat age-specific emergencies and certify at the Pediatric Advanced Life Support Provider level.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS EMS 280 EMS Bridging Course (2-2-0-3) This course is designed to bridge the knowledge gained in a continuing education paramedic program with the knowledge gained in an EMS curriculum program. Topics include patient assessment, documentation, twelve-lead ECG analysis, thrombolytic agents, cardiac pacing, and advanced pharmacology. Upon completion, students should be able to perform advanced patient assessment documentation using the problem-oriented medical record format and manage complicated patients. EMS 285 EMS Capstone (1-3-2) Prerequisites: EMS 220, EMS 250, and EMS 260 This course provides an opportunity to demonstrate problem-solving skills as a team leader in simulated patient scenarios and is required for paramedic certification. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking, integration of didactic and psychomotor skills, and effective performance in simulated emergency situations. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize and appropriately respond to a variety of EMS-related events. ENGLISH ENG 060 Speaking English Well (2-0-2) This course is designed to improve oral communication skills. Emphasis is placed on practice using fluent standard spoken English. Upon completion, students should be able to speak appropriately in a variety of situations. This course does not satisfy the developmental reading and writing prerequisite for ENG 111 or ENG 111A. ENG 075 Reading & Language Essentials (5-0-5) This course uses whole language to develop proficiency in basic reading and writing. Emphasis is placed on increasing vocabulary, developing comprehension skills, and improving grammar. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and create grammatically and syntactically correct sentences. This course integrates ENG 070 and RED 070. This course does not satisfy the developmental reading and writing prerequisite for ENG 111 or ENG 111A. ENG 085 Reading & Writing Foundations (5-0-5) Prerequisites: ENG 075, or satisfactory test scores This course uses whole language to develop proficiency in reading and writing for college. Emphasis is placed on applying analytical and critical reading skills to a variety of texts and on introducing the writing process. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize and use various patterns of text organization and compose effective paragraphs. This course integrates ENG 080 and RED 080. This course does not satisfy the developmental reading and writing prerequisites for ENG 111 or ENG 111A. ENG 090 Composition Strategies (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ENG 085, or satisfactory test scores. Corequisite: ENG 090A This course provides practice in the writing process and stresses effective paragraphs. Emphasis is placed on learning and applying the conventions of standard written English in developing paragraphs within the essay. Upon completion, students should be able to compose a variety of paragraphs and a unified, coherent essay. This course satisfies the developmental writing requirement for ENG 111 and ENG 111A.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ENG 090A Composition Strategies Lab (0-2-1) Prerequisites: ENG 085, or satisfactory test scores Corequisite: ENG 090 This writing lab is designed to practice the skills introduced in ENG 090. Emphasis is placed on learning and applying the conventions of standard written English in developing paragraphs within the essay. Upon completion, students should be able to compose a variety of paragraphs and a unified, coherent essay. ENG 091 Fast Track Comp Strategies (1-0-1) Prerequisites: Take One: ENG-080 or ENG-085 This course provides an intensive review of selected ENG 090-level writing skills. Topics include the following writing skills: composing coherent paragraphs and writing effective essays. Upon completion, students should be able to write coherent paragraphs and effective essays. ENG 095 Reading & Composition Strategies (5-0-5) Prerequisites: ENG 085, or satisfactory test scores This course uses whole language to strengthen proficiency in reading and writing for college. Emphasis is placed on applying critical reading skills to narrative and expository texts and on using the writing process. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend, analyze, and evaluate college texts and to compose essays in preparation for college writing. This course integrates ENG 090 and RED 090. This course satisfies the developmental reading and writing prerequisites for ENG 111 and ENG 111A. ENG 111 Expository Writing (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ENG 090 and RED 090; ENG 095 or satisfactory test scores This course is the required first course in a series of two designed to develop the ability to produce clear expository prose. Emphasis is placed on the writing process including audience analysis, topic selection, thesis support and development, editing, and revision. Upon completion, students should be able to produce unified, coherent, well-developed essays using standard written English. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in English composition. ENG 111A Expository Writing Lab (0-2-1) Prerequisites: ENG 090 and RED 090; or ENG 095 or satisfactory test scores Corequisite: ENG 111 This writing laboratory is designed to apply the skills introduced in ENG 111. Emphasis is placed on the editing and revision components of the writing process. Upon completion, students should be able to apply those skills in the production of final drafts in ENG 111. ENG 112 Argument-Based Research (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ENG 111 This course, the second in a series of two, introduces research techniques, documentation styles, and argumentative strategies. Emphasis is placed on analyzing data and incorporating research findings into documented argumentative essays and research projects. Upon completion, students should be able to summarize, paraphrase, interpret, and synthesize information from primary and secondary sources using standard research format and style. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in English composition.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ENG 113 Literature-Based Research (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ENG 111 This course, the second in a series of two, expands the concepts developed in ENG 111 by focusing on writing that involves literature-based research and documentation. Emphasis is placed on critical reading and thinking and the analysis and interpretation of prose, poetry, and drama: plot, characterization, theme, cultural context, etc. Upon completion, students should be able to construct mechanically-sound, documented essays and research papers that analyze and respond to literary works. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in English composition. ENG 114 Professional Research & Reporting (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ENG 111 This course, the second in a series of two, is designed to teach professional communication skills. Emphasis is placed on research, listening, critical reading and thinking, analysis, interpretation, and design used in oral and written presentations. Upon completion, students should be able to work individually and collaboratively to produce well-designed business and professional written and oral presentations. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in English composition. ENG 125 Creative Writing I (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ENG 111 This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to practice the art of creative writing. Emphasis is placed on writing, fiction, poetry, and sketches. Upon completion, students should be able to craft and critique their own writing and critique the writing of others. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. ENG 126 Creative Writing II (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ENG 125 This course is designed as a workshop approach for advancing imaginative and literary skills. Emphasis is placed on the discussion of style, techniques, and challenges for first publications. Upon completion, students should be able to submit a piece of their writing for publication. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. ENG 131 Introduction to Literature (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ENG 111 Corequisite: ENG 112, ENG 113 or ENG 114 This course introduces the principal genres of literature. Emphasis is placed on literary terminology, devices, structure, and interpretation. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze and respond to literature. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. Note: Students who successfully complete ENG 113 are advised to take a 200-level literature course, while those who complete ENG 114 should opt for ENG 131. ENG 231 American Literature I (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ENG 113 or ENG 114 This course covers selected works in American literature from its beginnings to 1865. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ENG 232 American Literature II (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ENG 113 or ENG 114 This course covers selected works in American literature from 1865 to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. ENG 241 British Literature I (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ENG 113 or ENG 114 This course covers selected works in British literature from its beginnings to the Romantic Period. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/ fine arts. ENG 242 British Literature II (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ENG 113 or ENG 114 This course covers selected works in British literature from the Romantic Period to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. ENG 251 Western World Literature I (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ENG 113 or ENG 114 This course provides a survey of selected European works from the Classical period through the Renaissance. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to selected works. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. ENG 252 Western World Literature II (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ENG 113 or ENG 114 This course provides a survey of selected European works from the Neoclassical period to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to selected works. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. ENG 272 Southern Literature (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ENG 113 or ENG 114 This course provides an analytical study of the works of several Southern authors. Emphasis is placed on the historical and cultural contexts, themes, aesthetic features of individual works, and biographical backgrounds of the authors. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and discuss selected works. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ENTREPRENEURSHIP ETR 210 Introduction to Entrepreneurship (3-0-3) This course provides a survey of the starting and operating of an entrepreneurial venture. Topics include new venture creation, the business plan, economics of the business, determining resource needs and acquiring resources, marketing, technology, leadership skills, and business ethics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of entrepreneurship concepts and how to use the entrepreneurial mindset to succeed in their careers. ETR 220 Innovation and Creativity (3-0-3) This course provides a study of developing and enhancing individual and organizational creativity and innovation. Topics include that innovation needs to be applied to products, services, and processes to increase competitive advantages and add value to businesses. Upon completion, students should be able to apply innovation and creativity principles in the work place. ETR 230 Entrepreneur Marketing (3-0-3) This course covers the techniques to correctly research and define the target market to increase sales for start up businesses or to expand current businesses. Topics include how to target market and meet customers’ needs with a limited budget in the early stages of the life of a start up business. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of how to correctly target market for a start-up business with limited resources. ETR 240 Funding for Entrepreneurs (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ACC 120 This course provides a focus on the financial issues and needs confronting entrepreneurs attempting to grow their businesses by attracting startup and growth capital. Topics include sources of funding including: angel investors, venture capital, IPO’s, private placement, banks, suppliers, buyers, partners, and the government. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of how to effectively finance a business venture. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE ENV 110 Environmental Science (3-0-3) This course covers the environmental problems facing society today. Topics include population, natural resources, air and water pollution, and waste disposal problems. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate insight into the role the individual plays in shaping the environment. FRENCH FRE 111 Elementary French I (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course introduces the fundamental elements of the French language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written French and demonstrate cultural awareness. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. Note: Elementary foreign language courses are secondary humanities courses; they will not count as the sole humanities selection in an AAS degree program.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FRE 112 Elementary French II (3-0-3) Prerequisite: FRE 111 This course is a continuation of FRE 111 focusing on the fundamental elements of the French language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the progressive development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with increasing proficiency to spoken and written French and demonstrate further cultural awareness. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. Note: Elementary foreign language courses are secondary humanities courses; they will not count as the sole humanities selection in an AAS degree program. FRE 211 Intermediate French I (3-0-3) Prerequisites: FRE 112 This course provides a review and expansion of the essential skills of the French language. Emphasis is placed on the study of authentic and representative literary and cultural texts. Upon completion, students should be able to communicate effectively, accurately, and creatively about the past, present, and future. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. FRE 212 Intermediate French II (3-0-3) Prerequisites: FRE 211 This course is a continuation of FRE 211. Emphasis is placed on the continuing study of authentic and representative literary and cultural texts. Upon completion, students should be able to communicate spontaneously and accurately with increasing complexity and sophistication. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. GEOGRAPHY GEO 111 World Regional Geography (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course introduces the regional concept which emphasizes the spatial association of people and their environment. Emphasis is placed on the physical, cultural, and economic systems that interact to produce the distinct regions of the earth. Upon completion, students should be able to describe variations in physical and cultural features of a region and demonstrate an understanding of their functional relationships. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences. GEO 112 Cultural Geography (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course is designed to explore the diversity of human cultures and to describe their shared characteristics. Emphasis is placed on the characteristics, distribution, and complexity of earth’s cultural patterns. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the differences and similarities in human cultural groups. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/ behavioral sciences.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS GRAPHIC ARTS GRA 121 Graphic Arts I (2-4-4) This course introduces terminology, tools and materials, procedures, and equipment used in graphic arts production. Topics include copy preparation and pre-press production relative to printing. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of graphic arts production. GRA 220 Industry Survey (1-2-2) This course explores various graphic arts businesses and trade associations through tours, guest speakers, and research. Emphasis is placed on presenting a broad industry overview through research of a variety of industry activities and relationships. Upon completion, students should be able to describe local graphic arts businesses and local and national trade and professional associations. GRAPHIC DESIGN GRD 110 Typography I (2-2-3) This course introduces the history and mechanics of type and its application to layout and design. Topics include typographic fundamentals, anatomy, measurements, composition, identification, and terminology. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate proficiency in design application, analysis, specification, and creation of typographic elements. GRD 121 Drawing Fundamentals I (1-3-2) This course increases observation skills using basic drawing techniques and media in graphic design. Emphasis is placed on developing the use of graphic design principles, media applications, spatial considerations, drawing styles, and approaches. Upon completion, students should be able to show competence and proficiency in finished works. GRD 131 Illustration I (1-3-2) Prerequisites: ART 131, DES 125, or GRD 121 This course introduces the application of rendering techniques to create illustrations. Emphasis is placed on controlling various media, methods, surfaces, design problems, and the appropriate media selection process. Upon completion, students should be able to produce quality illustrations from conception through finished artwork. GRD 141 Graphic Design I (2-4-4) This course introduces the conceptualization process used in visual problem solving. Emphasis is placed on learning the principles of design and on the manipulation and organization of elements. Upon completion, students should be able to apply design principles and visual elements to projects. GRD 142 Graphic Design II (2-4-4) Prerequisites: ART 121, DES 135, or GRD 141 This course covers the application of visual elements and design principles in advertising and graphic design. Topics include creation of various designs, such as logos, advertisements, posters, outdoor advertising, and publication design. Upon completion, students should be able to effectively apply design principles and visual elements to projects. GRD 145 Design Applications I (0-3-1) Corequisite: GRD 141 This course introduces visual problem solving. Emphasis is placed on application of design principles. Upon completion, students should be able to produce projects utilizing basic design concepts.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS GRD 146 Design Applications II (0-3-1) Corequisite: GRD 142 This course is designed to provide additional hands-on training in graphic design. Emphasis is placed on producing comprehensive projects utilizing concepts and technologies covered in GRD 141 and GRD 142. Upon completion, students should be able to provide solutions to design problems. GRD 151 Computer Design Basics (1-4-3) This course covers designing and drawing with various types of software applications for advertising and graphic design. Emphasis is placed on creative and imaginative use of space, shapes, value, texture, color, and typography to provide effective solutions to advertising and graphic design problems. Upon completion, students should be able to use the computer as a creative tool. GRD 152 Computer Design Technology I (1-4-3) Prerequisite: GRD 151 This course covers complex design problems utilizing various design and drawing software applications. Topics include the expressive use of typography, image, and organization to communicate a message. Upon completion, students should be able to use appropriate computer software to professionally present their work. GRD 153 Computer Design Technology II (1-4-3) Prerequisite: GRD 152 This course covers advanced theories and practices in the field of computer design. Emphasis is placed on advanced use of color palettes, layers, and paths. Upon completion, students should be able to creatively produce designs and articulate their rationale. GRD 160 Photo Fundamentals I (1-4-3) This course introduces basic camera operations, roll film processing, and photographic print production. Topics include contrast, depth-of-field, subject composition, enlarger operation, and density control. Upon completion, students should be able to produce photographic prints with acceptable density values and quality. GRD 167 Photographic Imaging I (1-4-3) This course introduces basic camera operations and photographic production. Topics include subject composition, depth of field, shutter control, light control, color, photo-finishing, and digital imaging, correction and output. Upon completion, students should be able to produce traditional and/or digital photographic prints with acceptable technical and compositional quality. GRD 168 Photographic Imaging II (1-4-3) Prerequisites: GRD 167 This course introduces advanced camera operations and photographic production. Topics include lighting, specialized equipment, digital image correction and output, and other methods and materials. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate proficiency in producing high quality photographic prints. GRD 210 Airbrush I (1-2-2) This course covers the mechanics of airbrushing. Topics include care and maintenance of equipment, spraying techniques and surfaces, and selection of materials. Upon completion, students should be able to produce work demonstrating competent use of an airbrush. GRD 230 Technical Illustration (1-3-2) Prerequisite: GRD 121 This course introduces technical and industrial illustration techniques. Topics include orthographic, isometric, linear perspective, and exploded views. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in various technical rendering techniques.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS GRD 241 Graphic Design III (2-4-4) Prerequisites: DES 136 or GRD 142 This course is an advanced exploration of various techniques and media for advertising and graphic design. Emphasis is placed on advanced concepts and solutions to complex and challenging graphic design problems. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence and professionalism in visual problem solving. GRD 242 Graphic Design IV (2-4-4) Prerequisite: GRD 241 This course is a continuation of GRD 241. Emphasis is placed on using advanced media techniques, concepts, strategies, and professionalism in all aspects of design. Upon completion, students should be able to conceptualize, create, and produce designs for reproduction. GRD 247 Design Applications IV (0-3-1) Corequisite: GRD 242 This course is designed to provide additional hands-on training in graphic design. Emphasis is placed on producing sophisticated design projects utilizing concepts and techniques covered in GRD 242. Upon completion, students should be able to solve complex design problems by producing projects to meet client specifications for reproduction. GRD 280 Portfolio Design (2-4-4) Prerequisites: GRD 142 and GRD 152 or GRA 152 This course covers the organization and presentation of a design/advertising or graphic art portfolio and appropriate related materials. Emphasis is placed on development and evaluation of the portfolio, design and production of a résumé and self-promotional materials, and interview techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and professionally present an effective portfolio and related self-promotional materials. GRD 281 Design of Advertising (2-0-2) This course explores the origins, roles, scope, forms, and development of advertising. Emphasis is placed on advertising development from idea through production and the interrelationship of marketing to types of advertising, media, and organizational structure. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the complexities and relationships involved in advertising design. GERONTOLOGY GRO 120 Gerontology (3-0-0-3) This course covers the psychological, social, and physical aspects of aging. Emphasis is placed on the factors that promote mental and physical well-being. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize the aging process and its psychological, social, and physical aspects. HEALTH HEA 110 Personal Health/Wellness (3-0-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course provides an introduction to basic personal health and wellness. Emphasis is placed on current health issues such as nutrition, mental health, and fitness. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the factors necessary to the maintenance of health and wellness. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS HISTORY HIS 111 World Civilizations I (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course introduces world history from the dawn of civilization to the early modern era. Topics include Eurasian, African, American, and Greco-Roman civilizations and Christian, Islamic and Byzantine cultures. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in pre-modern world civilizations. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences. HIS 112 World Civilizations II (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course introduces world history from the early modern era to the present. Topics include the cultures of Africa, Europe, India, China, Japan, and the Americas. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in modern world civilizations. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences. HIS 115 Introduction to Global History (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course introduces the study of global history. Emphasis is placed on topics such as colonialism, industrialism, and nationalism. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant global historical issues. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences. HIS 121 Western Civilization I (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course introduces western civilization from pre-history to the early modern era. Topics include ancient Greece, Rome, and Christian institutions of the Middle Ages and the emergence of national monarchies in western Europe. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in early western civilization. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences. HIS 122 Western Civilization II (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course introduces western civilization from the early modern era to the present. Topics include the religious wars, the Industrial Revolution, World Wars I and II, and the Cold War. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in modern western civilization. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences. HIS 131 American History I (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course is a survey of American history from pre-history through the Civil War era. Topics include the migrations to the Americas, the colonial and revolutionary periods, the development of the Republic, and the Civil War. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in early American history. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS HIS 132 American History II (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course is a survey of American history from the Civil War era to the present. Topics include industrialization, immigration, the Great Depression, the major American wars, the Cold War, and social conflict. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in American history since the Civil War. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences. HIS 145 The Second World War (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course covers the period of the Second World War from 1919 to 1945. Topics include the Treaty of Versailles, the rise of totalitarian regimes, the origins of the war, the major military campaigns in Europe and the Pacific, and the aftermath. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, military, socioeconomic, and cultural developments that influenced the Second World War. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. HIS 233 History of Appalachia (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course introduces the Appalachian region and its relationship to mainstream American history. Topics include regional settlement patterns and a study of Appalachian culture. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in Appalachia. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. HIS 237 The American Revolution (3-0-3) This course introduces the political, socioeconomic, religious, and ideological forces that led to the American Revolution, and the courses and consequences of the conflict. Topics include the prewar situation, wartime internal dynamics, international diplomacy, military strategy, tactics, and campaigns, and the Revolution’s impact, aftermath, and consequences. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, religious, ideological, international, and military developments in the United States during the Revolutionary Era. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. HIS 275 History of Terrorism (3-0-3) This course introduces the study of modern terrorism, from the French Revolutionary Era to the 21st century. Topics include definitions and types of terrorism, theories regarding its causes, examples of modern terrorism, counterterrorism, and terrorism’s impact, consequences, and future. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant socioeconomic, psychological, ideological, religious, and political components of modern terrorism. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HIT 110 Fundamentals of HIM (3-0-3) This course introduces Health Information Management (HIM) and its role in healthcare delivery systems. Topics include standards, regulations and initiatives; payment and reimbursement systems, healthcare providers and disciplines; and electronic health records (EHRs). Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of health information management and healthcare organizations, professions and trends. HIT 112 Health Law and Ethics (3-0-3) This course covers legislative and regulatory processes, legal terminology, and professional-related and practice-related ethical issues. Topics include confidentiality; privacy and security policies, procedures and monitoring; release of information policies and procedures; and professional-related and practice-related ethical issues. Upon completion, students should be able to apply policies and procedures for access and disclosure of Protected Health Information and apply and promote ethical standards. HIT 114 Health Data Systems/Standards (2-3-3) This course covers concepts and techniques for managing and maintaining manual and electronic health records (EHR). Topics include structure and use of health information including data collection and analysis, data sources/sets, archival systems, and quality and integrity of healthcare data. Upon completion, students should be able to monitor and apply system-wide clinical documentation guidelines and comply with regulatory standards. HIT 122 Professional Practice Experience I (0-3-1) This course provides supervised clinical experience in healthcare settings. Emphasis is placed on practical application of curriculum concepts to the healthcare setting. Upon completion, students should be able to apply health information theory to healthcare facility practices. HIT 124 Professional Practice Experience II (0-3-1) This course provides supervised clinical experience in health care settings. Emphasis is placed on practical application of curriculum concepts to the health care setting. Upon completion, students should be able to apply health information theory to health care facility practices. This directed practice is in a nontraditional setting such as doctor’s office, nursing home, or clinic. HIT 210 Healthcare Statistics (2-2-3) Prerequisites: MAT 110, MAT 115 or MAT 140 This course covers maintenance, compilation, analysis, and presentation of healthcare statistics and research protocols and techniques. Topics include basic statistical principles, indices, databases, registries, vital statistics, descriptive statistics, research protocol monitoring, Institutional Review Board processes, and knowledge-based research techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to apply, interpret, and present healthcare statistics and utilize research techniques to gather and interpret healthcare data. HIT 211 ICD - Coding (2-6-4) This course covers ICD diagnostics and procedural coding conventions and guidelines for inpatient, outpatient and ambulatory care. Emphasis is placed on a comprehensive application of anatomy, physiology and interrelationships among organ systems. Upon completion, students should be able to accurately assign and sequence diagnostic and procedural codes for patient outcomes, statistical and reimbursement purposes.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS HIT 214 CPT/Other Coding Systems (1-3-2) Prerequisite: HIT 211 This course covers application of principles and guidelines of CPT/HCPCS coding. Topics include clinical classification/nomenclature systems such as SNOMED, DSM, ICD-O and the use of encoders. Upon completion, students should be able to apply coding principles to correctly assign CPT/HCPCS codes. HIT 215 Reimbursement Methodology (1-2-2) This course covers reimbursement methodologies used in all healthcare settings as they relate to national billing, compliance, and reporting requirements. Topics include prospective payment systems, billing process and procedures, chargemaster maintenance, regulatory guidelines, reimbursement monitoring, and compliance strategies and reporting. Upon completion, students should be able to perform data quality reviews to validate code assignment and comply with reimbursement and reporting requirements. HIT 216 Quality Management (1-3-2) Prerequisite: HIT 114 This course introduces principles of quality assessment and improvement, and utilization, risk, and case management, in healthcare. Topics include Continuous Quality Improvement, and case management processes, data analysis/reporting techniques, credentialing, regulatory quality monitoring requirements, and outcome measures and monitoring. Upon completion, students should be able to abstract, analyze, and report clinical data for facility-wide quality management/ performance improvement programs and monitor compliance measures. HIT 218 Management Principles in HIT (3-0-0-3) This course covers organizational management concepts as applied to healthcare settings. Topics include roles/functions of teams/committees, leadership, communication and interpersonal skills, designing and implementing orientation/training programs, monitoring workflow, performance standards, revenue cycles, and organizational resources. Upon completion, students should be able to apply management, leadership, and supervisory concepts to various healthcare settings. HIT 220 Health Informatics and EHR’s (1-2-0-2) Prerequisites: Take HIT 114 and CIS 110 or CIS 111 This course covers electronic health record (EHR) systems, design, implementation and application. Topics include EHR, Informatics, speech & imaging technology, information/network security & integrity, data dictionaries, modeling and warehousing. Upon completion, students should be able to facilitate usage of electronic health record systems and other technologies. HIT 221 Lifecycle of EHR (2-2-0-3) This course covers the system selection, design and implementation of an electronic health record (EHR) in integrated delivery networks. Topics include the system development life cycle, analysis of existing systems, required resources, and common resource constraints. Upon completion, students should be able to understand system development life cycles, analyze design and engineering, and make recommendations to improve efficiency of operations. HIT 222 Professional Practice III (0-0-6-2) This course provides supervised clinical experience in health care settings. Emphasis is placed on practical application of curriculum concepts to the health care setting. Upon completion, students should be able to apply health information theory to health care facility practices.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS HIT 225 Healthcare Informatics (3-2-0-4) This course covers data analysis to support decision making, patient care, and regulatory compliance. Topics include clinical terminology and vocabulary systems, data capture methodology, data presentation and reporting, and initiatives to improve the quality of patient care. Upon completion, students should be able to identify data elements and sets, analyze capture methodology in healthcare settings, analyze compliance issues and make improvement recommendations HIT 226 Principles of Disease (3-0-0-3) Prerequisite: BIO 169 This course covers disease etiology and organ system involvement, including physical signs and symptoms, prognoses, and common complications and their management. Topics include basic microbiology, basic pharmacology, and principles of disease. Upon completion, students should be able to relate disease processes to etiology, physical signs and symptoms, prognosis, and common complications and their management. HIT 227 Informatics Project Management (2-2-0-3) This course covers the required skills needed for implementing healthcare IT applications, with emphasis on electronic health records (EHR). Topics include leadership development skills, interdisciplinary collaboration, organizational change management, project management software, and the study of communication skills required across healthcare disciplines. Upon completion, students should be able to effectively collaborate and communicate with healthcare disciplines to implement informatics projects within the healthcare setting. HIT 280 Professional Issues (2-0-0-2) Prerequisite: HIT 211 This course provides a comprehensive discussion of topics common to the health information profession. Emphasis is placed on application of professional competencies, job search tools, and preparation for the certification examination. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in entry-level domains and subdomains for health information technologies. HEALTH SCIENCES HSC 110 Orientation to Health Careers (1-0-0-1) This course is a survey of health care professions. Topics include professional duties and responsibilities, working environments, and career choices. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the health care professions and be prepared to make informed career choices. HOTEL AND RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT HRM 245 Human Resource Management-Hospitality (3-0-3) This course introduces a systematic approach to human resource management in the hospitality industry. Topics include training/development, staffing, selection, hiring, recruitment, evaluation, benefit administration, employee relations, labor regulations/laws, discipline, motivation, productivity, shift management, contract employees and organizational culture. Upon completion, students should be able to apply human resource management skills for the hospitality industry.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS HUMAN SERVICES HSE 110 Introduction to Human Services (2-2-0-3) This course introduces the human services field, including the history, agencies, roles, and careers. Topics include personal/professional characteristics, diverse populations, community resources, disciplines in the field, systems, ethical standards, and major theoretical and treatment approaches. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the knowledge, skills, and roles of the human services worker. HSE 112 Group Process I (1-2-0-2) This course introduces interpersonal concepts and group dynamics. Emphasis is placed on selfawareness facilitated by experiential learning in small groups with analysis of personal experiences and the behavior of others. Upon completion, students should be able to show competence in identifying and explaining how people are influenced by their interactions in group settings. HSE 123 Interviewing Techniques (2-2-0-3) This course covers the purpose, structure, focus, and techniques employed in effective interviewing. Emphasis is placed on observing, attending, listening, responding, recording, and summarizing of personal histories with instructor supervision. Upon completion, students should be able to perform the basic interviewing skills needed to function in the helping relationship. HSE 125 Counseling (2-2-0-3) This course covers the major approaches to psychotherapy and counseling, including theory, characteristics, and techniques. Emphasis is placed on facilitation of self-exploration, problem solving, decision making, and personal growth. Upon completion, students should be able to understand various theories of counseling and demonstrate counseling techniques. HSE 210 Human Services Issues (2-0-0-2) This course covers current issues and trends in the field of human services. Emphasis is placed on contemporary topics with relevance to special issues in a multi-faceted field. Upon completion, students should be able to integrate the knowledge, skills, and experiences gained in classroom and clinical experiences with emerging trends in the field. HSE 220 Case Management (2-2-0-3) Prerequisite: HSE 110 This course covers the variety of tasks associated with professional case management. Topics include treatment planning, needs assessment, referral procedures, and follow-up and integration of services. Upon completion, students should be able to effectively manage the care of the whole person from initial contact through termination of services. HSE 225 Crisis Intervention (3-0-0-3) This course introduces the basic theories and principles of crisis intervention. Emphasis is placed on identifying and demonstrating appropriate and differential techniques for intervening in various crisis situations. Upon completion, students should be able to assess crisis situations and respond appropriately. HSE 240 Issues in Client Services (3-0-0-3) This course introduces systems of professional standards, values, and issues in the helping professions. Topics include confidentiality, assessment of personal values, professional responsibilities, competencies, and ethics relative to multicultural counseling and research. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and discuss multiple ethical issues applicable to counseling and apply various decision-making models to current issues.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS HSE 242 Family Systems (3-0-0-3) Prerequisites: PSY 150 or SOC 210 This course introduces the concepts of family structure as a system and includes the impact of contemporary society on the family. Topics include systems theory, family structure, blended families, divorce, adoption, and the elderly. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of families as a system and the impact of change on family structure. HUMANITIES HUM 110 Technology and Society (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course considers technological change from historical, artistic, and philosophical perspectives and its effect on human needs and concerns. Emphasis is placed on the causes and consequences of technological change. Upon completion, students should be able to critically evaluate the implications of technology. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. HUM 115 Critical Thinking (3-0-3) Prerequisites: ENG 095 or RED 090 and ENG 090 or satisfactory test scores This course introduces the use of critical thinking skills in the context of human conflict. Emphasis is placed on evaluating information, problem solving, approaching cross-cultural perspectives, and resolving controversies and dilemmas. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate orally and in writing the use of critical thinking skills in the analysis of appropriate texts. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for general education core requirement. This course may meet the SACS humanities requirement for AAS degree programs. HUM 120 Cultural Studies (3-0-3) This course introduces the distinctive features of a particular culture. Topics include art, history, music, literature, politics, philosophy, and religion. Upon completion, students should be able to appreciate the unique character of the study culture. HUM 121 The Nature of America (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course provides an interdisciplinary survey of the American cultural, social, and political experience. Emphasis is placed on the multicultural character of American society, distinctive qualities of various regions, and the American political system. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant cultural, social, and political aspects of American life. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. HUM 122 Southern Culture (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course explores the major qualities that make the South a distinct region. Topics include music, politics, literature, art, religion, race relations, and the role of social class in historical and contemporary contexts. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the characteristics that distinguish Southern culture. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS HUM 130 Myth in Human Culture (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course provides an in-depth study of myths and legends. Topics include the varied sources of myths and their influence on the individual and society within diverse cultural contexts. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a general familiarity with myths and a broadbased understanding of the influence of myths and legends on modern culture. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. HUM 150 American Women Studies (3-0-3) This course provides an inter-disciplinary study of the history, literature, and social roles of American women from Colonial times to the present. Emphasis is placed on women’s roles as reflected in American language usage, education, law, the workplace, and mainstream culture. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze the roles of women as reflected in various cultural forms. HUM 160 Introduction to Film (2-2-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course introduces the fundamental elements of film artistry and production. Topics include film styles, history, and production techniques, as well as the social values reflected in film art. Upon completion, students should be able to critically analyze the elements covered in relation to selected films. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. HUM 170 The Holocaust (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course provides a survey of the destruction of European Jewry by the Nazis during World War II. Topics include the anti-Semitic ideology, bureaucratic structures, and varying conditions of European occupation and domination under the Third Reich. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the historical, social, religious, political, and economic factors which cumulatively resulted in the Holocaust. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. HUM 230 Leadership Development (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ENG 111 This course explores the theories and techniques of leadership and group process. Emphasis is placed on leadership styles, theories of group dynamics, and the moral and ethical responsibilities of leadership. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze a personal philosophy and style of leadership and integrate these concepts in various practical situations. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. INDUSTRIAL SCIENCE ISC 121 Environmental Health & Safety (3-0-3) This course covers workplace environmental health and safety concepts. Emphasis is placed on managing the implementation and enforcement of environmental health and safety regulations and on preventing accidents, injuries, and illnesses. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of basic concepts of environmental health and safety.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS LEGAL EDUCATION LEX 110 Introduction to Paralegal Study (2-0-2) This course introduces the paralegal profession and the legal system, and an emphasis is placed on the role of professional and legal ethics. Topics include regulations, ethics, case analysis, legal reasoning, career opportunities, professional organizations, terminology and other related topics. Upon completion, the student should be able to explain the role of a paralegal and identify the skills, knowledge, and ethics required of paralegals. LEX 120 Legal Research/Writing I (2-2-3) This course introduces the techniques of legal research and writing. Emphasis is placed on locating, analyzing, applying, and updating sources of law; effective legal writing, including proper citation; and the use of electronic research methods. Upon completion, students should be able to perform legal research and writing assignments using techniques covered in the course. LEX 121 Legal Research/Writing II (2-2-3) Prerequisite: LEX 120 This course covers advanced topics in legal research and writing. Topics include more complex legal issues and assignments involving preparation of legal memos, briefs, and other documents and the advanced use of electronic research methods. Upon completion, students should be able to perform legal research and writing assignments using techniques covered in the course. LEX 130 Civil Injuries (3-0-3) This course covers traditional tort concepts and the evolving body of individual rights created by statute. Topics include intentional and non-intentional torts with emphasis on negligence, strict liability, civil rights, workplace and environmental liability, remedies, and damages. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize, explain, and evaluate elements of civil injuries and related defenses. LEX 140 Civil Litigation I (3-0-3) This course introduces the structure of the legal system and the rules governing civil litigation. Topics include jurisdiction, state and federal rules of civil procedure and evidence. Upon completion, students should be able to assist an attorney in the preparation of pleadings and motions. LEX 141 Civil Litigation II (2-2-3) Prerequisite: LEX 140 This course covers advanced topics in the civil litigation process. Topics include motions, discovery, and trial and appellate procedures. Upon completion, students should be able to assist an attorney in preparing and organizing documents for trial, settlement and post-trial practice. LEX 150 Commercial Law I (2-2-3) This course covers legally enforceable agreements, forms of organization, and selected portions of the Uniform Commercial Code. Topics include drafting and enforcement of contracts, leases, and related documents and selection and implementation of business organization forms, sales, and commercial papers. Upon completion, students should be able to apply the elements of a contract, prepare various business documents, and understand the role of commercial paper. LEX 160 Criminal Law & Procedure (2-2-3) This course introduces substantive criminal law and procedural rights of the accused. Topics include elements of state/federal crimes, defenses, constitutional issues, pre-trial and trial process, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to explain elements of specific crimes and assist an attorney in preparing a criminal case.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS LEX 170 Administrative Law (2-0-2) This course covers the scope, authority, and regulatory operations of various federal, state, and local administrative agencies. Topics include social security, worker’s compensation, unemployment, zoning, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to research sources of administrative law, investigate, and assist in representation of clients before administrative agencies. LEX 180 Case Analysis & Reasoning (1-2-2) Corequisite: LEX 120 This course covers the techniques of reading and applying legal opinions and the skills of case analysis. Emphasis is placed on the components of opinions and on types of legal writing. Upon completion, students should be able to read, analyze, and brief opinions and prepare legal memoranda, briefs, and other legal documents. LEX 210 Real Property I (3-0-3) This course introduces the study of real property law. Topics include the distinction between real and personal property, various estates, mechanics of conveyance and encumbrance, recordation, special proceedings, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify estates, forms of deeds, requirements for recording, and procedures to enforce rights to real property. LEX 211 Real Property II (1-4-3) Prerequisite: LEX 210 This course continues the study of real property law relating to title examination and preparation of closing documents. Topics include use of courthouse and other public records in title examination and preparation of documents required in real estate transactions and closings. Upon completion, students should be able to plot/draft a description, perform complete title examination, draft closing documents including title insurance forms, and prepare disbursement reconciliation. LEX 240 Family Law (3-0-3) This course covers laws governing domestic relations. Topics include marriage, separation, divorce, child custody, support, property division, adoption, domestic violence, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to interview clients, gather information, and draft documents related to family law. LEX 250 Wills, Estates, & Trusts (2-2-3) This course covers various types of wills, trusts, probate, estate administration, and intestacy. Topics include types of wills and execution requirements, caveats and dissents, intestate succession, inventories and accountings, distribution and settlement, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to draft simple wills, prepare estate forms, understand administration of estates including taxation, and explain terms regarding trusts. LEX 260 Bankruptcy & Collections (3-0-3) This course provides an overview of the laws of bankruptcy and the rights of creditors and debtors. Topics include bankruptcy procedures and estate management, attachment, claim and delivery, repossession, foreclosure, collection, garnishment, and post-judgment collection procedure. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and file bankruptcy forms, collection letters, statutory liens, and collection of judgments. LEX 280 Ethics & Professionalism (2-0-2) This course reinforces legal ethics and the role of the paralegal in a professional work environment. Topics include a review of ethics, employment opportunities, and search techniques; paralegal certification; and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to understand the paralegal’s role in the ethical practice of law.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS LIGHT-DUTY DIESEL LLD 112 Introduction to Light-Duty Diesel (2-2-3) This course covers the history, evolution, basic design and operational parameters for light-duty diesel (LDD) engines used in on-road applications. Topics include familiarization with the lightduty diesel, safety procedures, engine service and maintenance procedures, and introduction to combustion and emission chemistry. Upon completion, students should be able to describe the design and operation of the LDD, perform basic service operations, and demonstrate proper safety procedures. MATHEMATICS MAT 050 Basic Math Skills (3-2-4) This course is designed to strengthen basic math skills. Topics include properties, rounding, estimating, comparing, converting, and computing whole numbers, fractions, and decimals. Upon completion, students should be able to perform basic computations and solve relevant mathematical problems. MAT 060 Essential Mathematics (3-2-4) Prerequisite: MAT 050 This course is a comprehensive study of mathematical skills which should provide a strong mathematical foundation to pursue further study. Topics include principles and applications of decimals, fractions, percents, ratio and proportion, order of operations, geometry, measurement, and elements of algebra and statistics. Upon completion, students should be able to perform basic computations and solve relevant, multi-step mathematical problems using technology where appropriate. MAT 070 Introductory Algebra (3-2-4) Prerequisite: MAT 060 Corequisite: Take One: RED-080 or ENG-085 This course establishes a foundation in algebraic concepts and problem solving. Topics include signed numbers, exponents, order of operations, simplifying expressions, solving linear equations and inequalities, graphing, formulas, polynomials, factoring, and elements of geometry. Upon completion, students should be able to apply the above concepts in problem solving using appropriate technology. MAT 080 Intermediate Algebra (3-2-4) Prerequisite: MAT 060 and MAT 070 Corequisite: Take One: RED-080 or ENG-085 This course continues the study of algebraic concepts with emphasis on applications. Topics include factoring; rational expressions; rational exponents; rational, radical, and quadratic equations; systems of equations; inequalities; graphing; functions; variations; complex numbers; and elements of geometry. Upon completion, students should be able to apply the above concepts in problem solving using appropriate technology. MAT 110 Mathematical Measurement (2-2-3) Prerequisites: DMA 010, DMA 020, DMA 030, DMA 040, DMA 050 or MAT 060 & MAT 070, or higher This course provides an activity-based approach to utilizing, interpreting, and communicating data in a variety of measurement systems. Topics include accuracy, precision, conversion, and estimation within metric, apothecary, and avoirdupois systems; ratio and proportion; measures of central tendency and dispersion; and charting of data. Upon completion, students should be able to apply proper techniques to gathering, recording, manipulating, analyzing, and communicating data.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS MAT 115 Mathematical Models (2-2-3) Prerequisites: DMA 010, DMA 020, DMA 030, DMA 040, DMA 050, or MAT 060 & MAT 070, or higher This course develops the ability to utilize mathematical skills and technology to solve problems at a level found in non-mathematics-intensive programs. Topics include applications to percent, ratio and proportion, formulas, statistics, function notation, linear functions, probability, sampling techniques, scatter plots, and modeling. Upon completion, students should be able to solve practical problems, reason and communicate with mathematics, and work confidently, collaboratively, and independently. MAT 121 Algebra/Trigonometry I (2-2-3) Prerequisites: DMA 010, DMA 020, DMA 030, DMA 040, DMA 050, or MAT 060 & MAT 070, or higher This course provides an integrated approach to technology and the skills required to manipulate, display, and interpret mathematical functions and formulas used in problem solving. Topics include simplification, evaluation, and solving of algebraic and radical functions; complex numbers; right triangle trigonometry; systems of equations; and the use of technology. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the use of mathematics and technology to solve problems and analyze and communicate results. MAT 122 Algebra/Trigonometry II (2-2-3) Prerequisite: MAT 121, MAT 161, MAT 171 or MAT 175 This course extends the concepts covered in MAT 121 to include additional topics in algebra, function analysis, and trigonometry. Topics include exponential and logarithmic functions, translation and scaling of functions, Sine Law, Cosine Law, vectors, and statistics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the use of technology to solve problems and to analyze and communicate results. MAT 140 Survey of Mathematics (3-0-3) Prerequisites: RED 090, DMA 010, DMA 020, DMA 030, DMA 040, DMA 050, or MAT 060 & MAT 070, or higher, or satisfactory test scores Corequisite: MAT 140A This course provides an introduction in a non-technical setting to selected topics in mathematics. Topics may include, but are not limited to, sets, logic, probability, statistics, matrices, mathematical systems, geometry, topology, mathematics of finance, and modeling. Upon completion, students should be able to understand a variety of mathematical applications, think logically, and be able to work collaboratively and independently. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/ mathematics. MAT 140A Survey of Mathematics Lab (0-2-0-1) Prerequisite: Take a set of the following: DMA 010, DMA 020 DMA 030 AND DMA 040; MAT 060 and MAT 070, MAT 080 OR MAT 090; MAT 095; MAT 120; MAT 121; MAT 161; MAT 171; MAT 175; or satisfactory test scores Corequisite: Take MAT 140 This course is a laboratory for MAT 140. Emphasis is placed on experiences that enhance the materials presented in the class. Upon completion, students should be able to solve problems, apply critical thinking, work in teams, and communicate effectively. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA and ICAA as a premajor and/or elective course requirement.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS MAT 141 Mathematical Concepts I (3-0-3) Prerequisites: RED 090 and DMA 010, DMA 020, DMA 030, DMA 040, DMA 050, DMA 060; or RED 090 and MAT 080, MAT 121, MAT 161, MAT 171, or MAT 175; or satisfactory test scores This course is the first of a two-course sequence that develops a deeper understanding and appreciation of the basic concepts of mathematics. Emphasis is placed on sets, logic, number bases, elementary number theory, introductory algebra, measurement including metrics, and problem solving. Upon completion, students should be able to communicate orally and in writing these basic mathematical concepts. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics. MAT 142 Mathematical Concepts II (3-0-3) Prerequisite: MAT 141 This course is the second of a two-course sequence that develops a deeper understanding and appreciation of the basic concepts of mathematics. Emphasis is placed on probability, statistics, functions, introductory geometry, and mathematics of finance. Upon completion, students should be able to communicate orally and in writing these basic mathematical concepts and utilize technology as a mathematical tool. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirements in natural sciences/mathematics. MAT 151 Statistics I (3-0-3) Prerequisites: RED 090 and MAT 140; or RED 090 and DMA 010, DMA 020, DMA 030, DMA 040, DMA 050, or higher, or satisfactory test scores Corequisite: MAT 151A This course provides a project-based approach to the study of basic probability, descriptive and inferential statistics, and decision making. Emphasis is placed on measures of central tendency and dispersion, correlation, regression, discrete and continuous probability distributions, quality control, population parameter estimation, and hypothesis testing. Upon completion, students should be able to describe important characteristics of a set of data and draw inferences about a population from sample data. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics (Quantitative Option). MAT 151A Statistics I Lab (0-2-1) Prerequisites: RED 090 and MAT 140; or RED 090 and DMA 010, DMA 020, DMA 030, DMA 040, DMA 050, or higher, or satisfactory test scores Corequisite: MAT 151 This course is a laboratory for MAT 151. Emphasis is placed on experiences that enhance the materials presented in the class. Upon completion, students should be able to solve problems, apply critical thinking, work in teams, and communicate effectively. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. MAT 161 College Algebra (3-0-3) Prerequisites: RED 090 and DMA 010, DMA 020, DMA 030, DMA 040, DMA 050, DMA 060, DMA 070, DMA 080, MAT 080, or satisfactory test scores This course provides an integrated technological approach to algebraic topics used in problem solving. Emphasis is placed on applications involving equations and inequalities; polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions; and graphing and data analysis/ modeling. Upon completion, students should be able to choose an appropriate model to fit a data set and use the model for analysis and prediction. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics for the Associate in Arts Degree.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS MAT 161A College Algebra Lab (0-2-1) Prerequisites: DMA 010, DMA 020, DMA 030, DMA 040, DMA 050, DMA 060, DMA 070, DMA 080, MAT 060, MAT 080, or satisfactory test scores Corequisites: MAT 161 This course is a laboratory for MAT 161. Emphasis is placed on experiences that enhance the materials presented in the class. Upon completion, students should be able to solve problems, apply critical thinking, work in teams, and communicate effectively. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. MAT 162 College Trigonometry (3-0-3) Prerequisites: MAT 161 or satisfactory test scores This course provides an integrated technological approach to trigonometric applications used in problem solving. Emphasis is placed on applications involving trigonometric ratios, right triangles, oblique triangles, trigonometric functions, graphing, vectors, and complex numbers. Upon completion, students should be able to apply the above principles of trigonometry to problem solving and communication. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics for the Associate in Arts Degree. MAT 162A College Trig Lab (0-2-1) Prerequisites: MAT 161 Corequisites: MAT 162 This course is a laboratory for MAT 162. Emphasis is placed on experiences that enhance the materials presented in the class. Upon completion, students should be able to solve problems, apply critical thinking, work in teams, and communicate effectively. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. MAT 165 Finite Mathematics (3-0-3) Prerequisites: MAT 161, MAT 171, or MAT 175 Corequisites: MAT 165A This course provides topics used to formulate models and to solve and interpret solutions using an algorithmic approach. Topics include linear algebra, linear programming, simplex method, sets and counting, probability, mathematics of finance, and logic. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate both an understanding of the theoretical concepts of finite mathematics and the ability to solve related problems. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics. MAT 165A Finite Math Lab (0-2-1) Prerequisites: MAT 161, MAT 171, or MAT 175 Corequisites: MAT 165 This course is a laboratory for MAT 165. Emphasis is placed on experiences that enhance the materials presented in the class. Upon completion, students should be able to solve problems, apply critical thinking, work in teams, and communicate effectively. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS MAT 171 Precalculus Algebra (3-0-3) Prerequisites: RED 090 and DMA 010, DMA 020, DMA 030, DMA 040, DMA 050, DMA 060, DMA 070, DMA 080, MAT 080; or MAT 161, or satisfactory test scores Corequisites: MAT 171A This is the first of two courses designed to emphasize topics which are fundamental to the study of calculus. Emphasis is placed on equations and inequalities, functions (linear, polynomial, rational), systems of equations and inequalities, and parametric equations. Upon completion, students should be able to solve practical problems and use appropriate models for analysis and predictions. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics. MAT 171A Precalculus Algebra Lab (0-2-1) Prerequisites: DMA 010, DMA 020, DMA 030, DMA 040, DMA 050, DMA 060, DMA 070, DMA 080, MAT 060 and MAT 080, MAT 161 or satisfactory test scores Corequisite: MAT 171 This course is a laboratory for MAT 171. Emphasis is placed on experiences that enhance the materials presented in the class. Upon completion, students should be able to solve problems, apply critical thinking, work in teams, and communicate effectively. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. MAT 172 Precalculus Trigonometry (3-0-3) Prerequisites: MAT 171 or satisfactory test scores Corequisites: MAT 172A This is the second of two courses designed to emphasize topics which are fundamental to the study of calculus. Emphasis is placed on properties and applications of transcendental functions and their graphs, right and oblique triangle trigonometry, conic sections, vectors, and polar coordinates. Upon completion, students should be able to solve practical problems and use appropriate models for analysis and prediction. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics. MAT 172A Precalculus Trigonometry Lab (0-2-1) Prerequisites: MAT 171 or satisfactory test scores Corequisite: MAT 172 This course is a laboratory for MAT 172. Emphasis is placed on experiences that enhance the materials presented in the class. Upon completion, students should be able to solve problems, apply critical thinking, work in teams, and communicate effectively. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. MAT 175 Precalculus (4-0-4) Prerequisite: MAT 162 or satisfactory test scores Corequisites: MAT 175A This course provides an intense study of the topics which are fundamental to the study of calculus. Emphasis is placed on functions and their graphs with special attention to polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions, and analytic trigonometry. Upon completion, students should be able to solve practical problems and use appropriate models for analysis and prediction. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/ mathematics

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS MAT 175A Precalculus Lab (0-2-1) Prerequisite: MAT 162 or satisfactory test scores Corequisite: MAT 175 This course is a laboratory for MAT 175. Emphasis is placed on experiences that enhance the materials presented in the class. Upon completion, students should be able to solve problems, apply critical thinking, work in teams, and communicate effectively. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. MAT 271 Calculus I (3-2-4) Prerequisites: MAT 172 or MAT 175, or satisfactory test scores This course covers in depth the differential calculus portion of a three-course calculus sequence. Topics include limits, continuity, derivatives, and integrals of algebraic and transcendental functions of one variable, with applications. Upon completion, students should be able to apply differentiation and integration techniques to algebraic and transcendental functions. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics. MAT 272 Calculus II (3-2-4) Prerequisite Take MAT-271 This course provides a rigorous treatment of integration and is the second calculus course in a three-course sequence. Topics include applications of definite integrals, techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, infinite series, conic sections, parametric equations, polar coordinates, and differential equations. Upon completion, students should be able to use integration and approximation techniques to solve application problems. MAT 273 Calculus III (3-2-4) Prerequisite Take MAT-272 This course covers the calculus of several variables and is the third calculus course in a three-course sequence. Topics include functions of several variables, partial derivatives, multipleintegrals, solid analytical geometry, vector-valued functions, and line and surface integrals. Upon completion, students should be able to solve problems involving vectors and functions of several variables. MAT 280 Linear Algebra (3-0-3) Prerequisite Take MAT-271 This course provides a study of linear algebra topics with emphasis on the development of both abstract concepts and applications. Topics include vectors, systems of equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, linear transformations in two or three dimensions, eigenvectors, eigenvalues, diagonalization and orthogonality. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate both an understanding of the theoretical concepts and appropriate use of linear algebra models to solve application problems. MEDICAL ASSISTING/MEDICAL RELATED MED 110 Orientation to Medical Assisting (1-0-0-1) This course covers the history of medicine and the role of the medical assistant in the health care setting. Emphasis is placed on professionalism, communication, attitude, behaviors, and duties in the medical environment. Upon completion, students should be able to project a positive attitude and promote the profession of medical assisting.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS MED 114 Prof Interac in Health Care (1-0-0-1) This course is designed to identify various patient behaviors encountered in the medical setting. Emphasis is placed on stressors related to illness, cultural influences, death and dying, and needs specific to patients. Upon completion, students should be able to utilize appropriate methods of verbal and nonverbal communication with empathy and impartiality. MED 118 Medical Law and Ethics (2-0-0-2) This course covers legal relationships of physicians and patients, contractual agreements, professional liability, malpractice, medical practice acts, informed consent, and bioethical issues. Emphasis is placed on legal terms, professional attitudes, and the principles and basic concepts of ethics and laws involved in providing medical services. Upon completion, students should be able to meet the legal and ethical responsibilities of a multi-skilled health professional. MED 121 Medical Terminology I (3-0-0-3) This course introduces prefixes, suffixes, and word roots used in the language of medicine. Topics include medical vocabulary and the terms that relate to the anatomy, physiology, pathological conditions, and treatment of selected systems. Upon completion, students should be able to pronounce, spell, and define medical terms as related to selected body systems and their pathological disorders. MED 122 Medical Terminology II (3-0-0-3) Prerequisites: MED 121 This course is the second in a series of medical terminology courses. Topics include medical vocabulary and the terms that relate to the anatomy, physiology, pathological conditions, and treatment of selected systems. Upon completion, students should be able to pronounce, spell, and define medical terms as related to selected body systems and their pathological disorders. MED 130 Administrative Office Procedures I (1-2-0-2) This course introduces medical office administrative procedures. Topics include appointment processing, written and oral communications, medical records, patient orientation, and safety. Upon completion, students should be able to perform basic administrative skills within the medical environment. MED 131 Administrative Office Procedures II (1-2-0-2) This course provides medical office procedures in both economic and management skills. Topics include physical plant maintenance, equipment and supplies, liability coverage, medical economics, and introductory insurance procedures. Upon completion, students should be able to manage the economics of the medical office and supervise personnel. MED 134 Medical Transcription (2-2-0-3) Prerequisite: MED 121 This course provides the basic knowledge, understanding, and skills required to complete medical reports and transcribe medical dictation. Emphasis is placed on correct punctuation, capitalization, and spelling. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in medical transcription. MED 140 Exam Room Procedures I (3-4-0-5) This course provides instruction in clinical examining room procedures. Topics include asepsis, infection control, assisting with exams and treatment, patient education, preparation and administration of medications, EKG, vital signs, and medical emergencies. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in exam room procedures.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS MED 150 Laboratory Procedures I (3-4-0-5) This course provides instruction in basic lab techniques used by the medical assistant. Topics include lab safety, quality control, collecting and processing specimens, performing selective tests, phlebotomy, screening and follow-up of test results, and OSHA/CLIA regulations. Upon completion, students should be able to perform basic lab tests/skills based on course topics. MED 182 CPR First Aid & Emergency I (1-2-0-2) This course provides the basic knowledge and skills necessary to perform basic CPR, first aid, and medical emergency care related to the clinical, home, office, and recreational setting. Emphasis is placed on triage, assessment, and proper management of emergency care. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate basic CPR, first aid, and medical emergency care. Note: This course may prepare students to test for Wilderness Advanced First Aid certification. MED 232 Medical Insurance Coding (1-3-0-2) This course is designed to develop coding skills. Emphasis is placed on advanced diagnostic and procedural coding in the outpatient facility. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate proficiency in coding for reimbursement. MED 240 Exam Room Procedures II (3-4-0-5) Prerequisite: MED 140 This course is designed to expand and build upon skills presented in MED 140. Emphasis is placed on advanced exam room procedures. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate enhanced competence in selected exam room procedures. MED 250 Laboratory Procedures II (3-4-0-5) Prerequisite: MED 150 This course is designed to expand and build on skills presented in MED 150. Emphasis is placed on increasing proficiency in laboratory skills used in the medical setting. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate enhanced competence in selected medical laboratory procedures. MED 260 MED Clinical Practicum (0-0-15-5) This course provides the opportunity to apply clinical, laboratory, and administrative skills in a medical facility. Emphasis is placed on enhancing competence in clinical and administrative skills necessary for comprehensive patient care and strengthening professional communications and interactions. Upon completion, students should be able to function as an entry-level health care professional. MED 262 Clinical Perspectives (1-0-0-1) This course is designed to explore personal and occupational responsibilities of the practicing medical assistant. Emphasis is placed on problems encountered during externships and development of problem-solving skills. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate courteous and diplomatic behavior when solving problems in the medical facility. MED 264 Med Assisting Overview (2-0-0-2) This course provides an overview of the complete medical assisting curriculum. Emphasis is placed on all facets of medical assisting pertinent to administrative, laboratory, and clinical procedures performed in the medical environment. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in the areas covered on the national certification examination for medical assistants.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS MED 270 Symptomatology (2-2-0-3) This course covers the study of disease symptoms and the appropriate actions taken by medical assistants in a medical facility in relation to these symptoms. Emphasis is placed on interviewing skills and appropriate triage, preparing patients for procedures, and screening test results. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize how certain symptoms relate to specific diseases, recognize emergency situations, and take appropriate actions. MED 272 Drug Therapy (3-0-0-3) This course focuses on major drug groups, including their side effects, interactions, methods of administration, and proper documentation. Emphasis is placed on the theory of drug administration. Upon completion, students should be able to identify, spell, recognize side effects of, and document the most commonly used medications in a physician’s office. MED 276 Patient Education (1-2-0-2) This course is designed to provide communication skills, basic education principles, and knowledge of available community resources and to apply this knowledge to the clinical setting. Emphasis is placed on identifying appropriate community resources, developing patient education materials, and perfecting written and oral communication skills. Upon completion, students should be able to instruct, communicate effectively, and act as a liaison between the patient and community agencies. MARKETING AND RETAILING MKT 120 Principles of Marketing (3-0-3) This course introduces principles and problems of marketing goods and services. Topics include promotion, placement, and pricing strategies for products. Upon completion, students should be able to apply marketing principles in organizational decision making. MKT 123 Fundamentals of Selling (3-0-3) This course is designed to emphasize the necessity of selling skills in a modern business environment. Emphasis is placed on sales techniques involved in various types of selling situations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the techniques covered. MKT 223 Customer Service (3-0-3) This course stresses the importance of customer relations in the business world. Emphasis is placed on learning how to respond to complex customer requirements and to efficiently handle stressful situations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the ability to handle customer relations. MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY MLT 110 Introduction to MLT (2-3-0-3) This course introduces all aspects of the medical laboratory profession. Topics include health care/laboratory organization, professional ethics, basic laboratory techniques, safety, quality assurance, and specimen collection. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of laboratory operations and be able to perform basic laboratory skills. This course is the foundation for all of the MLT coursework and must be successfully completed as a pre- or co- requisite to the MLT courses. Note: This course also covers basic computer skills as needed within the program.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS MLT 111 Urinalysis & Body Fluids (1-3-0-2) This course introduces the laboratory analysis of urine and body fluids. Topics include physical, chemical, and microscopic examination of the urine and body fluids. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate theoretical comprehension in performing and interpreting urinalysis and body fluid tests. MLT 116 Anatomy & Medical Terminology (5-0-0-5) This course provides a basic study of the structure and function of the human body and medical terminology relevant to medical laboratory technology. Emphasis is placed on the structure and function of cells, tissues, human organ systems, and related terminology. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of fundamental anatomy and physiology principles and application of terminology. MLT 118 Medical Lab Chemistry (3-0-0-3) This course introduces the basic medical laboratory chemical principles. Emphasis is placed on selected topics from inorganic, organic, and biological chemistry. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between basic chemical principles and the medical laboratory function MLT 120 Hematology/Hemostasis I (3-3-0-4) This course introduces the theory and technology used in analyzing blood cells and the study of hemostasis. Topics include hematology, hemostasis, and related laboratory testing. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate theoretical comprehension of hematology/ hemostasis, perform diagnostic techniques, and correlate laboratory findings with disorders. MLT 125 Immunohematology I (4-3-0-5) This course introduces the immune system and response; basic concepts of antigens, antibodies, and their reactions; and applications in transfusion medicine and serodiagnostic testing. Emphasis is placed on immunological and blood banking techniques including concepts of cellular and humoral immunity and pretransfusion testing. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate theoretical comprehension in performing and interpreting routine immunological and blood bank procedures. MLT 130 Clinical Chemistry I (3-3-0-4) This course introduces the quantitative analysis of blood and body fluids and their variations in health and disease. Topics include clinical biochemistry, methodologies, instrumentation, and quality control. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate theoretical comprehension of clinical chemistry, perform diagnostic techniques, and correlate laboratory findings with disorders. MLT 140 Introduction to Microbiology (2-3-0-3) This course introduces basic techniques and safety procedures in clinical microbiology. Emphasis is placed on the morphology and identification of common pathogenic organisms, aseptic technique, staining techniques, and usage of common media. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate theoretical comprehension in performing and interpreting basic clinical microbiology procedures. MLT 215 Professional Issues (1-0-0-1) This course surveys professional issues in preparation for career entry. Emphasis is placed on work readiness and theoretical concepts in microbiology, immunohematology, hematology, and clinical chemistry. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in career entry-level areas and be prepared for the national certification examination.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS MLT 220 Hematology/Hemostasis II (2-3-0-3) Prerequisite: MLT 120 This course covers the theories and techniques used in the advanced analysis of human blood cells and hemostasis. Emphasis is placed on the study of hematologic disorders, abnormal cell development and morphology, and related testing. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a theoretical comprehension and application of abnormal hematology and normal and abnormal hemostasis. MLT 240 Special Clinical Microbiology (2-3-0-3) Prerequisite: MLT 140 This course is designed to introduce special techniques in clinical microbiology. Emphasis is placed on advanced areas in microbiology. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate theoretical comprehension in performing and interpreting specialized clinical microbiology procedures. MLT 253 MLT Practicum I (Phlebotomy Clinic) (0-0-9-3) Prerequisite: MLT 110 This course provides entry-level clinical laboratory experience. Emphasis is placed on technique, accuracy, and precision. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate entry-level competence on final clinical evaluations. MLT 263 MLT Practicum I (Hematology/Hemostatis Clinic) (0-0-9-3) Prerequisites: MLT 120 and MLT 220 This course provides entry-level clinical laboratory experience. Emphasis is placed on technique, accuracy, and precision. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate entry-level competence on final clinical evaluations. MLT 271 MLT Practicum III (Urinalysis/Serology Clinic) (0-0-3-1) Prerequisites: MLT 111 and MLT 125 This course provides entry-level clinical laboratory experience. Emphasis is placed on technique, accuracy, and precision. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate entry-level competence on final clinical evaluations. MLT 272 MLT Practicum III (Chemistry Clinic) (0-0-6-2) Prerequisites: MLT 118 and MLT 130 This course provides entry-level clinical laboratory experience. Emphasis is placed on technique, accuracy, and precision. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate entry-level competence on final clinical evaluations. MLT 273 MLT Practicum III (Immunohematology Clinic) (0-0-9-3) Prerequisite: MLT 125 This course provides entry-level clinical laboratory experience. Emphasis is placed on technique, accuracy, and precision. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate entry-level competence on final clinical evaluations. MLT 274 MLT Practicum III (Microbiology Clinic) (0-0-12-4) Prerequisites: MLT 140 and MLT 240 This course provides entry-level clinical laboratory experience. Emphasis is placed on technique, accuracy, and precision. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate entry-level competence on final clinical evaluations.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE MTH 110 Fundamentals of Massage (6-9-3-10) This course introduces concepts basic to the role of the massage therapist in a variety of clinical settings. Emphasis is placed on beginning theory and techniques of body work as well as skill in therapeutic touch. Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to apply basic practical massage therapy skills. MTH 120 Therapeutic Massage Applications (6-9-3-10) Prerequisite: MTH 110 This course provides an expanded knowledge and skill base for the massage therapist in a variety of clinical settings.. Emphasis is placed on selected therapeutic approaches throughout the lifespan. Upon completion, students should be able to perform entry level therapeutic massage on various populations. Note: This course also covers physical agents utilized with massage, introduces the student to the additional techniques of acupressure, Amma, Shiatsu, and Jin Shin Do and will focus on the business practices related to this industry. MTH 125 Ethics of Massage (2-0-0-2) This course is designed to explore issues related to the practice of massage therapy. Emphasis is placed on ethical, legal, professional, and political issues. Upon completion , students should be able to discuss issues relating to the practice of massage therapy, client/therapist relationships as well as ethical issues. Note: This course also focuses on the North Carolina Laws, Rules and Regulations specific to the practice of massage and bodywork. MUSIC MUS 110 Music Appreciation (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course is a basic survey of the music of the Western world. Emphasis is placed on the elements of music, terminology, composers, form, and style within a historical perspective. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in basic listening and understanding of the art of music. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. NURSING ASSISTANT NAS 101 Nursing Assistant I (3-4-3-6) This course introduces basic nursing skills required to provide personal care for patients, residents, or clients in a health care setting. Topics include communications, safety, patients’ rights, personal care, vital signs, elimination, nutrition, emergencies, rehabilitation, and mental health. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills necessary to qualify as Nursing Assistant I with the North Carolina Nurse Aide I Registry. NAS 102 Nursing Assistant II (3-2-6-6) This course provides training in selected advanced nursing assistant procedures. Emphasis is placed on sterile techniques, respiratory procedures, catheterizations, wound and trach care, irrigations, and ostomy care. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills necessary to qualify as a Nursing Assistant II with the North Carolina Board of Nursing.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

NAS 103 Home Health Care (2-0-0-2) This course covers basic health issues that affect clients in the home setting. Emphasis is placed on home safety, recognizing significant changes in the client’s condition, family dynamics, and use of home health care equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to identify care for clients at home. NAS 106 Geriatrics (2-0-3-3) This course is designed to cover health issues that affect the aging client. Emphasis is placed on social, physical, and psychological problems experienced by elderly people. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and provide care for the aging population. NAS 107 Medication Aide (0-2-0-1) This course will cover the six rights of medication administration for non-licensed personnel. Topics will include medication administration via the oral, topical and installation routes, medical asepsis, hand hygiene, terminology, and legal implications. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills necessary to qualify as a Medication Aide with the North Carolina Medication Aide Registry. NETWORKING TECHNOLOGY NET 110 Networking Concepts (2-2-3) This course introduces students to the networking field. Topics include network terminology and protocols, local-area networks, wide-area networks, OSI model, cabling, router programming, Ethernet, IP addressing, and network standards. Upon completion, students should be able to perform tasks related to networking mathematics, terminology, and models, media, Ethernet, subnetting, and TCP/IP Protocols. NET 113 Home Automation Systems (2-2-3) This course covers the design, installation, testing, troubleshooting, and customer service of a fully automated home. Emphasis is placed on a structured wiring system that integrates the home phone, TV, home theater, audio, video, computer network, lighting, security systems, and automation systems into a pre-wired, remote controlled system. Upon completion, students should be able to design, install, and maintain home automation systems. NET 125 Networking Basics (1-4-3) This course introduces the networking field. Emphasis is placed on network terminology and protocols, local-area networks, wide-area networks, OSI model, cabling, router programming, Ethernet, IP addressing, and network standards. Upon completion, students should be able to perform tasks related to networking mathematics, terminology, and models, media, Ethernet, subnetting, and TCP/IP Protocols. NET 126 Routing Basics (1-4-3) Prerequisite: NET 125 This course focuses on initial router configuration, router software management, routing protocol configuration, TCP/IP, and access control lists (ACLs). Emphasis will be placed on the fundamentals of router configuration, managing router software, routing protocol, and access lists. Upon completion, students should have an understanding of routers and their role in WANs, router configuration, routing protocols, TCP/IP, troubleshooting, and ACLs.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS NET 175 Wireless Technology (2-2-3) Prerequisites: NET 110 or NET 125 This course introduces the student to wireless technology and interoperability with different communication protocols. Topics include Wireless Application Protocol (WAP), Wireless Mark-up language (WML), link manager, service discovery protocol, transport layer and frequency band. Upon completion, students should be able to discuss in written and oral form protocols and procedures required for different wireless applications. NET 225 Routing and Switching I (1-4-3) Prerequisite: NET 126 This course focuses on advanced IP addressing techniques, intermediate routing protocols, command-line interface configuration of switches, Ethernet switching, VLANs, STP, and VTP. Emphasis will be placed on application and demonstration of skills acquired in pre-requisite courses. Upon completion, students should be able to perform tasks related to VLSM, routing protocols, switching concepts and configuration, STP, VLANs, and VTP. NET 226 Routing and Switching II (1-4-3) Prerequisite: NET 225 This course introduces WAN theory and design, WAN technology, PPP, Frame Relay, ISDN, and additional case studies. Topics include network congestion problems, TCP/IP transport and network layer protocols, advanced routing and switching configuration, ISDN protocols, PPP encapsulation operations on a router. Upon completion, students should be able to provide solutions for network routing problems, identify ISDN protocols, and describe the Spanning Tree protocol. NET 289 Networking Project (1-4-3) Corequisite: NET 226 This course provides an opportunity to complete a significant networking project from the design phase through implementation with minimal instructor support. Emphasis is placed on project definition, documentation, installation, testing, presentation, and training. Upon completion, students should be able to complete a project from the definition phase through implementation. NETWORKING OPERATING SYSTEMS NOS 110 Operating System Concepts (2-3-3) This course introduces students to a broad range of operating system concepts, including installation and maintenance. Emphasis is place on operating system concepts, management, maintenance, and resources required. Upon completion of this course, students will have an understanding of OS concepts, installation, management, maintenance, using a variety of operating systems. NOS 120 Linux/UNIX Single User (2-2-3) Prerequisite: NOS 110 or CET 211 This course develops the necessary skills for students to develop both GUI and command line skills for using and customizing a Linux workstation. Topics include Linux file system and access permissions, GNOME Interface, VI editor, X Window System expression pattern matching, I/O redirection, network and printing utilities. Upon completion, students should be able to customize and use Linux systems for command line requirements and desktop productivity roles.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS NOS 130 Windows Single User (2-2-3) Prerequisite: NOS 110 or CET 211 This course introduces operating system concepts for single-user systems. Topics include hardware management, file and memory management, system configuration/optimization, and utilities. Upon completion, students should be able to perform operating systems functions at the support level in a single-user environment. NOS 220 Linux/UNIX Administration I (2-2-3) Prerequisite: NOS 120 This course introduces the Linux file system, group administration, and system hardware controls. Topics include installation, creation and maintaining file systems, NIS client and DHCP client configuration, NFS, SMB/Samba, Configure X, Gnome, KDE, basic memory, processes, and security. Upon completion, students should be able to perform system administration tasks including installation, configuring and attaching a new Linux workstation to an existing network. NOS 230 Windows Administration I (2-2-3) Prerequisite: NOS 130 This course covers the installation and administration of a Windows Server network operating system. Topics include managing and maintaining physical and logical devices, access to resources, the server environment, managing users, computers, and groups, and Managing/Implementing Disaster Recovery. Upon completion, students should be able to manage and maintain a Windows Server environment. NOS 231 Windows Administration II (2-2-3) Prerequisite: NOS 230 This course covers implementing, managing, and maintaining a Windows Server network infrastructure. Topics include implementing, managing, and maintaining IP addressing, name resolution, network security, routing and remote access, and managing a network infrastructure. Upon completion, students should be able to manage and maintain a Windows Server environment. NURSING NUR 111 Intro to Health Concepts (4-6-6-8) This course introduces the concepts within the three domains of the individual, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts within each domain including medication administration, assessment, nutrition, ethics, interdisciplinary teams, informatics, evidence-based practice, individual-centered care, and quality improvement. Upon completion, students should be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts identified in this course. NUR 112 Health-Illness Concepts (3-0-6-5) Prerequisites: NUR 111 This course is designed to further develop the concepts within the three domains of the individual, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of acid-base, metabolism, cellular regulation, oxygenation, infection, stress/coping, health-wellness-illness, communication, caring interventions, managing care, safety, quality improvement, and informatics. Upon completion, students should be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts identified in this course.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS NUR 113 Family Health Concepts (3- 0-6-5) Prerequisites: NUR 111 This course is designed to further develop the concepts within the three domains of the individual, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of oxygenation, sexuality, reproduction, grief/loss, mood/affect, behaviors, development, family, health-wellness-illness, communication, caring interventions, managing care, safety, and advocacy. Upon completion, students should be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts identified in this course. NUR 114 Holistic Health Concepts (3-0-6-5) Prerequisites: NUR 111 This course is designed to further develop the concepts within the three domains of the individual, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of cellular regulation, perfusion, inflammation, sensory perception, stress/coping, mood/affect, cognition, self, violence, health-wellnessillness, professional behaviors, caring interventions, and safety. Upon completion, students should be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts identified in this course. NUR 211 Health Care Concepts (3-0-6-5) Prerequisites: NUR 111 This course is designed to further develop the concepts within the three domains of the individual, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of cellular regulation, perfusion, infection, immunity, mobility, comfort, behaviors, health-wellness-illness, clinical decision-making, caring interventions, managing care, and safety. Upon completion, students should be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts identified in this course. NUR 212 Health System Concepts (3-0-6-5) Prerequisites: NUR 111 This course is designed to further develop the concepts within the three domains of the individual, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of grief/loss, violence, healthwellness-illness, collaboration, managing care, safety, advocacy, legal issues, policy, healthcare systems, ethics, accountability, and evidence-based practice. Upon completion, students should be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts identified in this course. NUR 213 Complex Health Concepts (4- 3-15-10) Prerequisites: NUR 111 Corequisites: NUR 112, NUR 113, NUR 114, NUR 211, and NUR 212 This course is designed to assimilate the concepts within the three domains of the individual, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of fluid/electrolytes, metabolism, perfusion, mobility, stress/coping, violence, health-wellness-illness, professional behaviors, caring interventions, managing care, healthcare systems, and quality improvement. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to provide quality, individualized, entry level nursing care. NUR 214 Nursing Transition Concepts (3-0-3-4) Prerequisites: Valid unrestricted North Carolina LPN certificate This course is designed to introduce concepts within the three domains of the individual, healthcare, and nursing as the LPN transitions to the ADN role. Emphasis is placed on the concepts within each domain including evidenced-based practice, quality improvement, communication, safety, interdisciplinary team, clinical decision-making, informatics, assessment, caring and health-wellness-illness. Upon completion, students should be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts identified in this course.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS NUR 221 LPN to ADN Concepts I (6-0-9-9) Prerequisites: NUR 214 This course is designed for the LPN to ADN student to explore the concepts within the three domains of the individual, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of safety, perfusion inflammation, oxygenation, mood/affect, behavior, development, family, health-wellnessillness, sensory perception, stress/coping, cognition, self, violence, and professional behaviors. Upon completion, students should be able to provide safe nursing care incorporating the concepts identified in this course. NUR 223 LPN to ADN Concepts II (6-0-9-9) Prerequisites: NUR 221 This course is designed for the LPN to ADN student to assimilate the concepts within the three domains of the individual, healthcare, and nursing. Emphasis is placed on the concepts of fluid/ electrolytes, metabolism, thermoregulation, oxygenation, tissue integrity, infection, perfusion, mobility, reproduction, sexuality, health-wellness-illness, professional behaviors, accountability, advocacy, and collaboration. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to provide quality, individualized, entry-level nursing care. NUTRITION NUT 110 Nutrition (3-0-0-3) This course covers basic principles of nutrition and their relationship to human health. Topics include meeting nutritional needs of healthy people, menu modification based on special dietary needs, food habits, and contemporary problems associated with food selection. Upon completion, students should be able to apply basic nutritional concepts as they relate to health and well-being. OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP ODL 110 Introduction to Outdoor Leadership (2-2-0-3) Prerequisites: ENG 090 and RED 090; ENG 095 or satisfactory test scores This course is an introduction to the field of outdoor leadership, its theories, techniques and educational principles. Topics include the historical and philosophical foundations of leadership, the dynamics of group interaction and team building. Upon completion, students should be able to clearly articulate the evolution of the outdoor leader and build a personal outdoor leadership philosophy. ODL 115 Methods of Experiential Education (2-2-0-3) This course is designed to instruct the outdoor leader in the use of experiential educational tools to facilitate the wilderness experience. Emphasis is placed on classroom and lab techniques, including problem solving and communication skills, used in situations relevant to outdoor settings. Upon completion, students should be able to transfer the use of experiential educational skills to the outdoor experience. ODL 120 Challenge Course Facilitation (1-4-0-3) This course provides a focus on the approaches to challenge course technical facilitation. Emphasis is placed on the set-up, facilitation and rescue of participants on challenge course high events and climbing towers. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate correct risk management and safety techniques in facilitating a challenge course experience

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ODL 125 Wilderness First Responder (3-3-0-4) This course provides the individual with the skills necessary to handle medical emergencies in situations such as back country extended care and swift water rescue. Emphasis is placed on the safety and sound judgement in medical and life threatening emergencies through the use of lecture and hands-on simulations. Upon completion, students should be able to handle medical emergencies in the back country. ODL 130 Water-Based Activities I (1-6-0-3) This course introduces skills associated with all aspects of water activities, focusing on rafts, canoes, and kayaks in rivers, lakes and ocean environments. Emphasis is placed on skill acquisition and safety in all types of water environments and conditions. Upon completion of this course, the students should be proficient in basic boating skills and safety techniques. ODL 135 Land-Based Activities I (1-6-0-3) This course is designed to introduce skill development in land based activities including hiking, orienteering, backpacking, camping, etc. Emphasis is placed on skill acquisition, no trace impact, and rescue techniques in various environments and conditions. Upon completion of this course, the student should be proficient in land based technical skills. ODL 138 Field Experience I (1-9-0-4) This course is designed to be a broad based experience within the field of outdoor leadership. Emphasis is placed on employing the didactic and experiential skills the student has acquired in all previous course work. Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to demonstrate their ability to integrate academic preparation into the field setting. ODL 140 Intro to Wilderness Therapy (2-2-0-3) This Course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of Wilderness Therapy. Topics include the history, philosophy, ethics and risk management of Wilderness Therapy programs. Upon completion, students should be able to describe the process and the anticipated outcomes of Wilderness Therapy. ODL 210 Water-Based Activities II (1-6-0-3) Prerequisites: ODL 125 and ODL 130 This course is a continuation of ODL 130 and develops knowledge, techniques, approaches, and experiential methodology for teaching and leading safe water travel. Emphasis is placed on the students developing safe teaching and leading skills in all aspects of water travel using rafts, canoes and kayaks. Upon completion, the students should be able to lead and instruct groups in safe water activities. ODL 212 Land-Based Activities II (1-6-0-3) Prerequisites: ODL 125 and ODL 135 This course develops techniques, approaches, and experiential methodology for teaching and leadership skills in all aspects of land-based activities of orienteering, hiking, camping etc. Emphasis is placed on developing safe teaching and leadership skills in various environments and conditions. Upon completion, students should be able to lead and instruct groups in safe land based programs. ODL 215 Administration and Policy of Public Lands (3-0-0-3) This course is designed to introduce the student to agencies which manage public lands and the laws created to protect natural resources. Topics include the history of natural resource management, policies of the US government, and current agencies and laws governing our use or abuse of the environment. Upon completion, the students should be able to acknowledge the roles and policies associated with land management.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ODL 220 Climbing (1-4-0-3) This course is designed to develop the knowledge, skills and teaching methodology for the leadership of safe rock climbing activities. Emphasis is placed on the students developing safe teaching and leading skills in all aspects of rock climbing. Upon completion, the students should be able to demonstrate sound judgement in leading safe rock climbing programs. ODL 228 Outdoor Leadership for Special Populations (2-2-0-3) This course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to work with special populations. Emphasis is placed on the special skills necessary to work with such populations as age specific groups, and mentally, emotionally and physically challenged individuals. Upon completion, the students should be able to identify the knowledge, judgement, safety and experiential methodology skills appropriate to special populations. ODL 238 Field Experience II (1-9-0-4) This course is designed as a culminating field experience for the advanced student. Emphasis is placed on applying the knowledge and leadership skills developed to specific outdoor activities in a supervised setting. Upon completion, the students should be able to demonstrate the knowledge, judgement, safety and methodology skills appropriate for an entry level position in outdoor leadership. ODL 244 Caving (0-2-0-1) This course provides an introduction to spelunking. Emphasis is placed on developing the technical skills, safety techniques, and leadership abilities associated with caving. Upon completion of this course, the students should be able to safely perform and lead a group in this activity. ODL 245 Wilderness Therapeutic Models (3-2-0-4) This course provides an overview of Wilderness therapeutic models. Topics include psychological and educational theories, treatment models and methodology utilized by Wilderness Therapy organizations. Upon completion, students should be able to understand the different approaches and techniques used in Wilderness Therapy to facilitate personal growth and change. ODL 248 Field Techniques in WT (2-6-0-4) This course is designed to introduce the student to common field techniques used by wilderness therapy providers. Emphasis is placed on developing systems and structures used by Wilderness therapy organizations while in a field setting to implement the treatment model of the organization. Upon completion, students should be able to understand the role of the field instructor in wilderness therapy and the common techniques used to structure naturally occurring challenges and consequences. ODL 250 Biking (0-2-0-1) This course provides hands-on experience in skill development and leadership training in all aspects of bicycling. Emphasis is placed on developing the technical skills, safety techniques, and leadership abilities associated with bicycling. Upon completion of this course, the students should be able to safely perform and lead a group in this activity. ODL 260 Challenge Course Management (1-4-0-3) Prerequisite: ODL 120 This course provides students with the additional skills for the effective management of challenge courses. Emphasis is placed on group management, facility inspection, and advanced rescue techniques. Upon completion, the students should be able to demonstrate the skills necessary to lead and maintain challenge course events and facilities.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ODL 265 Raft Guide Training (1-2-0-2) This course provides a working knowledge of the responsibilities of a professional raft guide. Emphasis is placed on paddle skills, water hydrology, river rescue and trip leading techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to lead safe raft trips. ODL 267 Primitive Living Skills (1-4-0-3) This course introduces the student to the use of primitive living skills in outdoor environment. Topics include a primitive orientation to navigation, fire building, shelters, cooking and camping in the backcountry. Upon Completion, students should be able to travel and establish a campsite using primitive living skills. ODL 270 Swift Water Rescue (0-2-0-1) This course provides students with skills needed to perform rescues in a swift water environment. Emphasis is placed on river hydrology, rigging, swimming and rescue techniques focusing and intensive practice drills. Upon completion, students should be able to appropriately respond to a swift water emergency. ODL 284 Principles of Ecotourism (2-2-3) This course provides an overview of the key concepts of ecotourism and the relationship between nature and adventure tourism. Topics include the history, concepts, principles, marketing, planning and management of ecotourism activities which promote cultural and environmental awareness and local economic benefits. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the concepts, practical skills, and techniques used in developing appropriate ecotourism activities. ODL 286 Issues in Outdoor Leadership (2-2-3) This course is designed to provide a capstone experience in preparation for employment in the outdoor industry. Topics include an examination of professional issues, ethics, and current theoretical perspectives in outdoor leadership and preparation of an outdoor experience portfolio. Upon completion, students should be able to articulate the conceptual knowledge of ethics and professional issues of an emerging outdoor leader. ODL 288 Current Trends in ODL (1-4-0-3) This course is designed to expose the student to current and emerging trends in Outdoor Leadership. Emphasis in placed on evolving technologies and trends in the Outdoor Leadership Industry. Upon completion, students should be able to articulate the current state of the industry and the emerging trends and technologies employed in Outdoor Leadership. OFFICE ADMINISTRATION OST 131 Keyboarding (1-2-2) This course covers basic keyboarding skills. Emphasis is placed on the touch system, correct techniques, and development of speed and accuracy. Upon completion, students should be able to key at an acceptable speed and accuracy level using the touch system. This course is the entry level course for keyboarding. OST 136 Word Processing (2-2-3) This course is designed to introduce word processing concepts and applications. Topics include preparation of a variety of documents and mastery of specialized software functions. Upon completion, students should be able to work effectively in a computerized word processing environment. This course is also available through the Virtual Learning Community (VLC).

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS OST 148 Medical Coding Billing & Insurance (3-0-3) This course introduces fundamentals of medical coding, billing, and insurance. Emphasis is placed on the medical billing cycle to include third party payers, coding concepts, and form preparation. Upon completion, students should be able to explain the life cycle of and accurately complete a medical insurance claim. This course is also available through the Virtual Learning Community (VLC). OST 149 Medical Legal Issues (3-0-3) This course introduces the complex legal, moral, and ethical issues involved in providing health-care services. Emphasis is placed on the legal requirements of medical practices; the relationship of physician, patient, and office personnel; professional liabilities; and medical practice liability. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of current medical law and accepted ethical behavior. This course is also available through the Virtual Learning Community (VLC). OST 164 Text Editing Applications (3-0-3) This course provides a comprehensive study of editing skills needed in the workplace. Emphasis is placed on grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, proofreading, and editing. Upon completion, students should be able to use reference materials to compose and edit text. This course is also available through the Virtual Learning Community (VLC). OST 184 Records Management (2-2-3) This course includes the creation, maintenance, protection, security, and disposition of records stored in a variety of media forms. Topics include alphabetic, geographic, subject, and numeric filing methods. Upon completion, students should be able to set up and maintain a records management system. This course is also available through the Virtual Learning Community (VLC). OST 243 Medical Office Simulation (2-2-3) Prerequisites: OST 148 This course introduces medical systems used to process information in the automated office. Topics include traditional and electronic information resources, storing and retrieving information, and the billing cycle. Upon completion, students should be able to use the computer accurately to schedule, bill, update, and make corrections. OST 289 Administrative Office Management (2-2-3) Prerequisites: OST 164 and either OST 134 or OST 136 This course is designed to be a capstone course for the office professional and provides a working knowledge of modern office procedures. Emphasis is placed on scheduling, telephone procedures, travel arrangements, event planning, office design, and ergonomics. Upon completion, students should be able to adapt in an office environment. PHLEBOTOMY PBT 100 Phlebotomy Technology (5-2-0-6) Corequisite: PBT 101 This course provides instruction in the skills needed for the proper collection of blood and other specimens used for diagnostic testing. Emphasis is placed on ethics, legalities, medical terminology, safety and universal precautions, health care delivery systems, patient relations, anatomy and physiology, and specimen collection. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in the theoretical comprehension of phlebotomy techniques. This is a certificate-level course.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS PBT 101 Phlebotomy Practicum (0-0-9-3) Corequisite: PBT 100 This course provides supervised experience in the performance of venipuncture and microcollection techniques in a clinical facility. Emphasis is placed on patient interaction and application of universal precautions, proper collection techniques, special procedures, specimen handling, and data management. Upon completion, students should be able to safely perform procedures necessary for specimen collections on patients in various health care settings. This is a certificate-level course. PHYSICAL EDUCATION PED 110 Fit and Well for Life (1-2-2) This course is designed to investigate and apply the basic concepts and principles of lifetime physical fitness and other health-related factors. Emphasis is placed on wellness through the study of nutrition, weight control, stress management, and consumer facts on exercise and fitness. Upon completion, students should be able to plan a personal, lifelong fitness program based on individual needs, abilities, and interests. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. PED 111 Physical Fitness I (0-3-1) This course provides an individualized approach to physical fitness utilizing the five major components. Emphasis is placed on the scientific basis for setting up and engaging in personalized physical fitness programs. Upon completion, students should be able to set up and implement an individualized physical fitness program. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. PED 117 Weight Training I (0-3-1) This course introduces the basics of weight training. Emphasis is placed on developing muscular strength, muscular endurance, and muscle tone. Upon completion, students should be able to establish and implement a personal weight training program. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. PED 118 Weight Training II (0-3-1) Prerequisite: PED 117 This course covers advanced levels of weight training. Emphasis is placed on meeting individual training goals and addressing weight training needs and interests. Upon completion, students should be able to establish and implement an individualized advanced weight training program. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. PED 120 Walking for Fitness (0-3-1) This course introduces fitness through walking. Emphasis is placed on stretching, conditioning exercises, proper clothing, fluid needs, and injury prevention. Upon completion, students should be able to participate in a recreational walking program. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS PED 121 Walk, Jog, Run (0-3-1) This course covers the basic concepts involved in safely and effectively improving cardiovascular fitness. Emphasis is placed on walking, jogging, or running as a means of achieving fitness. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and appreciate the benefits derived from these activities. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. PED 122 Yoga I (0-2-1) This course introduces the basic discipline of yoga. Topics include proper breathing, relaxation techniques, and correct body positions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the procedures of yoga. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. PED 123 Yoga II (0-2-1) Prerequisite: PED 122 This course introduces more detailed aspects of the discipline of yoga. Topics include breathing and physical postures, relaxation, and mental concentration. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate advanced procedures of yoga. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. PED 125 Self-Defense-Beginning (0-2-1) This course is designed to aid students in developing rudimentary skills in self-defense. Emphasis is placed on stances, blocks, punches, and kicks as well as non-physical means of self-defense. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate basic self-defense techniques of a physical and non-physical nature. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. PED 128 Golf-Beginning (0-2-1) This course emphasizes the fundamentals of golf. Topics include the proper grips, stance, alignment, swings for the short and long game, putting, and the rules and etiquette of golf. Upon completion, students should be able to perform the basic golf shots and demonstrate a knowledge of the rules and etiquette of golf. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. PED 130 Tennis-Beginning (0-2-1) This course emphasizes the fundamentals of tennis. Topics include basic strokes, rules, etiquette, and court play. Upon completion, students should be able to play recreational tennis. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. PED 137 Badminton (0-2-1) This course covers the fundamentals of badminton. Emphasis is placed on the basics of serving, clears, drops, drives, smashes, and the rules and strategies of singles and doubles. Upon completion, students should be able to apply these skills in playing situations. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS PED 139 Bowling (0-2-0-1) This course introduces the fundamentals of bowling. Emphasis is placed on ball selection, grips, stance, and delivery along with rules and etiquette. Upon completion, students should be able to participate in recreational bowling. PED 142 Lifetime Sports (0-2-1) This course is designed to give an overview of a variety of sports activities. Emphasis is placed on the skills and rules necessary to participate in a variety of lifetime sports. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an awareness of the importance of participating in lifetime sports activities. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. PED 143 Volleyball-Beginning (0-2-1) This course covers the fundamentals of volleyball. Emphasis is placed on the basics of serving, passing, setting, spiking, blocking, and the rules and etiquette of volleyball. Upon completion, students should be able to participate in recreational volleyball. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. PED 145 Basketball-Beginning (0-2-1) This course covers the fundamentals of basketball. Emphasis is placed on skill development, knowledge of the rules, and basic game strategy. Upon completion, students should be able to participate in recreational basketball. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. PED 162 Angling (0-2-1) This course introduces the sport of angling. Emphasis is placed on fishing with the use of artificial lures. Upon completion, students should be able to cast and retrieve using baitcaster and spinning reels and identify the various types of artificial lures. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. PED 163 Kayaking-Basic (0-2-1) This course is designed to teach the basic skills of kayaking. Topics include forward and reverse strokes, sweeps, Eskimo roll, and self-rescue skills. Upon completion, students should be able to maneuver and demonstrate safe kayaking practices. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. PED 169 Orienteering (0-2-1) This course introduces the various types of orienteering and proper orienteering techniques. Emphasis is placed on defining various types of orienteering and recognizing and drawing topographic map symbols. Upon completion, students should be able to draw topographic map symbols and negotiate a 3-5 km cross-country orienteering course in a specified time period. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS PED 170 Backpacking (0-2-1) This course covers the proper techniques for establishing a campsite, navigating in the wilderness, and planning for an overnight trip. Topics include planning for meals, proper use of maps and compass, and packing and dressing for extended periods in the outdoors. Upon completion, students should be able to identify quality backpacking equipment, identify the principles of no-trace camping, and successfully complete a backpacking experience. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement pre-major and/or elective course requirement. PED 171 Nature Hiking (0-2-1) This course provides instruction on how to equip and care for oneself on the trail. Topics include clothing, hygiene, trail ethics, and necessary equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to successfully participate in nature trail hikes. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. PED 172 Outdoor Living (1-2-2) This course is designed to acquaint the beginning camper with outdoor skills. Topics include camping techniques such as cooking and preserving food, safety, and setting up camp. Upon completion, students should be able to set up camp sites in field experiences using proper procedures. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. PED 174 Wilderness Pursuits (0-2-1) This course covers the skills necessary to prepare for and participate in a wilderness trip. Emphasis is placed on planning, preparing, and participating in a wilderness pack trip. Upon completion, students should be able to safely participate in overnight wilderness pack trips. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. PED 186 Dancing for Fitness (0-2-1) This course is designed to develop movement and recreational dance skills, safety, fitness, coordination, and techniques used to teach various groups. Emphasis is placed on participation and practice with adapting dances for ages and ability levels. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of fitness through social, folk, and square dance participation and instruction. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. PED 210 Team Sports (0-3-1) This course introduces the fundamentals of popular American team sports. Emphasis is placed on rules, equipment, and motor skills used in various sports. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the sports covered. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. PED 211 New Games (0-2-1) This course includes explanation, demonstration, and participation in games that provide an alternative to traditional sports. Emphasis is placed on playing for pleasure rather than for competitive purposes. Upon completion, students should be able to participate and lead others in participating in non-competitive games. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS PHILOSOPHY PHI 210 History of Philosophy (3-0-3) Prerequisite: ENG 111 and RED 090 satisfactory test scores This course introduces fundamental philosophical issues through an historical perspective. Emphasis is placed on such figures as Plato, Aristotle, Lao-Tzu, Confucius, Augustine, Aquinas, Descartes, Locke, Kant, Wollstonecraft, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and distinguish among the key positions of the philosophers studied. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. PHYSICS PHY 110 Conceptual Physics (3-0-3) Prerequisite: DMA 010, DMA 020, DMA 030, DMA 040, DMA 050, DMA 060, DMA 070, DMA 080, MAT 060, MAT 070, RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course provides a conceptually-based exposure to the fundamental principles and processes of the physical world. Topics include basic concepts of motion, forces, energy, heat, electricity, magnetism, and the structure of matter and the universe. Upon completion, students should be able to describe examples and applications of the principles studied. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics. PHY 110A Conceptual Physics Lab (0-2-1) Corequisite: PHY 110, DMA 010, DMA 020, DMA 030, DMA 040, DMA 050, DMA 060, DMA 070, DMA 080, MAT 060, MAT 070 This course is a laboratory for PHY 110. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in PHY 110. Upon completion, students should be able to apply the laboratory experiences to the concepts presented in PHY 110. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics. PHY 131 Physics-Mechanics (3-2-4) Prerequisites: MAT 121 or MAT 161 This algebra/trigonometry-based course introduces fundamental physical concepts as applied to engineering technology fields. Topics include systems of units, problem-solving methods, graphical analysis, vectors, motion, forces, Newton’s laws of motion, work, energy, power, momentum, and properties of matter. Upon completion, students should be able to apply the principles studied to applications in engineering technology fields. PHY 151 College Physics I (3-2-4) Prerequisites: MAT 161, MAT 171, or MAT 175 This course uses algebra- and trigonometry-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include units and measurement, vectors, linear kinematics and dynamics, energy, power, momentum, fluid mechanics, and heat. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS PHY 152 College Physics II (3-2-4) Prerequisites: PHY 151 This course uses algebra- and trigonometry-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include electrostatic forces, electric fields, electric potentials, direct-current circuits, magnetostatic forces, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, alternating-current circuits, and light. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural sciences/mathematics. PHY 251 General Physics I (3-3-0-4) Prerequisite: MAT 271 Corequisite: MAT 272 This course uses calculus-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include units and measurement, vector operations, linear kinematics and dynamics, energy, power, momentum, rotational mechanics, periodic motion, fluid mechanics, and heat. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. PHY 252 General Physics II (3-3-0-4) Prerequisite: MAT-272 and PHY-251 This course uses calculus-based mathematical models to introduce the fundamental concepts that describe the physical world. Topics include electrostatic forces, electric fields, electric potentials, direct-current circuits, magnetostatic forces, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, alternating-current circuits, and light. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved and display analytical problem-solving ability for the topics covered. POLITICAL SCIENCE POL 120 American Government (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course is a study of the origins, development, structure, and functions of American national government. Topics include the constitutional framework, federalism, the three branches of government including the bureaucracy, civil rights and liberties, political participation and behavior, and policy formation. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts and participatory processes of the American political system. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences. PSYCHOLOGY PSY 118 Interpersonal Psychology (3-0-3) This course introduces the basic principles of psychology as they relate to personal and professional development. Emphasis is placed on personality traits, communication/leadership styles, effective problem solving, and cultural diversity as they apply to personal and work environments. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of these principles of psychology as they apply to personal and professional development.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS PSY 150 General Psychology (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology, biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the science of psychology. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences. PSY 215 Positive Psychology (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PSY 150 This course is an overview of the scientific study of human strengths. Topics include resilience, optimism, vital engagement (flow), positive relationships, creativity, wisdom, happiness, empathy, emotional intelligence, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the psychological factors relevant to enhancing well being. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. PSY 237 Social Psychology (3-0-3) Prerequisites: PSY 150 or SOC 210 This course introduces the study of individual behavior within social contexts. Topics include affiliation, attitude formation and change, conformity, altruism, aggression, attribution, interpersonal attraction, and group behavior. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of social influences on behavior. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences. PSY 241 Developmental Psychology (3-0-3) Prerequisite: PSY 150 This course is a study of human growth and development. Emphasis is placed on major theories and perspectives as they relate to the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects of development from conception to death. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of development across the life span. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences. PSY 259 Human Sexuality (3-0-3) Prerequisite: PSY 150 This course provides the biological, psychological, and sociocultural aspects of human sexuality and related research. Topics include reproductive biology, sexual and psychosexual development, sexual orientation, contraception, sexually transmitted diseases, sexual disorders, theories of sexuality, and related issues. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an overall knowledge and understanding of human sexuality. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS PSY 275 Health Psychology (3-0-3) Prerequisite: PSY 150 This course covers the biopsychosocial dynamics of stress and the maintenance of good health. Topics include enhancing health and well-being, stress management, lifestyle choices and attitudes, the mind-body relationship, nutrition, exercise, and fitness. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the psychological factors related to health and wellbeing. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. PSY 281 Abnormal Psychology (3-0-3) Prerequisite: PSY 150 This course provides an examination of the various psychological disorders, as well as theoretical, clinical, and experimental perspectives of the study of psychopathology. Emphasis is placed on terminology, classification, etiology, assessment, and treatment of the major disorders. Upon completion, students should be able to distinguish between normal and abnormal behavior patterns as well as demonstrate knowledge of etiology, symptoms, and therapeutic techniques. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences. PHYSICAL THERAPY PTA 110 Introduction to Physical Therapy (2-3-0-3) This course introduces the field of physical therapy including the history and standards of practice for the physical therapist assistant and basic treatment techniques. Emphasis is placed on ethical and legal considerations, universal precautions, vital signs, documentation, basic patient preparation and treatment skills, and architectural barrier screening. Upon completion, students should be able to explain the role of the physical therapist assistant and demonstrate competence in basic techniques of patient care. PTA 120 Functional Anatomy (1-6-0-3) Corequisite: PTA 140 This course provides an organized study of anatomy and kinesiology. Emphasis is placed on the integration of structure and function of the skeletal, articular, muscular, nervous, and circulatory systems to include gait analysis. Upon completion, students should be able to describe the components and demonstrate function of these systems as applied to physical therapy. PTA 130 Physical Therapy Procedure I (1-6-0-3) Corequisite: PTA 110 This course covers superficial thermal agents, massage, ultrasound, and documentation methods. Emphasis is placed on physiological effects, indications, contraindications, and skilled applications of heat, cold, ultrasound, massage, and documentation. Upon completion, students should be able to safely, correctly, and effectively apply these techniques and procedures. PTA 140 Therapeutic Exercise (2-6-0-4) Corequisite: PTA 120 This course covers muscle physiology, exercise concepts, testing, and applications to the spine and extremities. Topics include strength, endurance, flexibility, and exercise protocols and progressions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skill in applying therapeutic exercise principles for non-neurological conditions in a safe and appropriate manner.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS PTA 150 Physical Therapy Procedure II (1-6-0-3) Prerequisite: PTA 130 This course, a continuation of PTA 130, emphasizes the theory and practice of electrotherapy, ultraviolet, hydrotherapy, wound and burn care, and deep heating modalities. Topics include application of deep heating modalities, aquatic therapy, edema reduction, high and low frequency currents, and biofeedback. Upon completion, students should be able to apply these modalities and treatment techniques effectively and safely and demonstrate knowledge of physiological principles involved. PTA 160 Physical Therapy Procedure III (2-3-0-3) Prerequisite: PTA 150 This course introduces treatment and measurement techniques and discusses treatment programs for neuromusculoskeletal dysfunction and injury. Topics include soft tissue and joint dysfunction; assessment of girth, volume, length, sensation, pain, and muscle strength; and selected exercise programs. Upon completion, students should be able to measure strength and joint motion and identify methods to assess sensation, pain, volume, girth, length, and gait abnormalities. PTA 170 Pathophysiology (3-0-0-3) This course is a survey of basic pathology with emphasis on conditions most frequently observed and treated in physical therapy. Topics include etiology, pathology, manifestation, treatment, and prognosis. Upon completion, students should be able to explain repair processes, categorize diseases, define pathology, identify organ/body systems involved, and discuss treatment and prognosis. PTA 180 PTA Clinical Education Introduction (0-0-9-3) This course introduces the physical therapy clinic in planned learning experiences and practice under supervision. Emphasis is placed on reinforcement of learned skills in direct patient care and communication. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate satisfactory performance in learned patient care skills, communication activities, and professional behaviors. PTA 212 Health Care/Resources (2-0-0-2) This course provides an overview of various aspects of health care delivery systems and the interrelationships of health care team members. Topics include health agencies and their functions, health care team member roles, management, and other health care issues. Upon completion, students should be able to discuss the functions of health organizations and team members and aspects of health care affecting physical therapy delivery. PTA 222 Professional Interactions (2-0-0-2) This course is designed to assist in the development of effective interpersonal skills in the physical therapist assistant setting. Topics include reactions to disability, the grieving process, methods of communication, motivation, health promotion, disease prevention, and aging. Upon completion, students should be able to discuss and demonstrate methods for achieving effective interaction with patients, families, the public, and other health care providers. PTA 240 Physical Therapy Procedure IV (3-6-0-5) Prerequisite: PTA 160 This course covers normal development, adult and pediatric/CNS dysfunction, spinal cord injuries, amputee rehabilitation techniques, and cardiopulmonary rehabilitation. Topics include neurology review, selected rehabilitation techniques, ADL and functional training, prosthetic and orthotic training, and environmental access. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate safe and correct application of selected rehabilitation techniques for neurological dysfunction, cardiopulmonary conditions, and amputations.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS PTA 250 Advanced Massage for PTA (0-3-0-1) This course is a survey of advanced massage techniques. Topics include lymphatic drainage and selected soft tissue techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate safe and correct application of selected advanced massage techniques. PTA 252 Geriatrics for the PTA (2-0-0-2) This course is designed to provide more in-depth knowledge of physical therapy care for the geriatric individual. Topics include health promotion, wellness programs, and medical problems specific to the elderly. Upon completion, students should be able to discuss and describe special problems and programs for the elderly. PTA 254 Pediatrics for the PTA (0-3-0-1) This course provides an in-depth study of pediatric dysfunction and rehabilitation techniques. Topics include severe and profound attention deficit disorder, sensory integration, and rehabilitation in the school setting. Upon completion, students should be able to discuss selected pediatric dysfunctions and demonstrate specialized rehabilitation techniques. PTA 260 Advanced PTA Clinical Education (0-0-30-10) Prerequisites: PTA 180 or PTA 182 This course provides full-time clinical affiliations for planned learning experiences and practice under supervision. Emphasis is placed on reinforcement of learned skills in direct patient care, communications, and professional behaviors. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate satisfactory performance as an entry-level physical therapist assistant and as a member of the physical therapy team. PTA 270 PTA Topics (1-0-0-1) This course covers the physical therapist assistant profession in preparation for the state licensure exam. Topics include developing time management skills and practicing for the competence examinations. Upon completion, students should be able to identify individual academic strengths and weaknesses and utilize this information to continue self-study for the licensure exam. PTA 280 PTA Issues I (1-0-0-1) This course consists of reports, discussions, and guest lectures on the latest physical therapy techniques, equipment, and health sciences specialties. Topics include reports on extra-departmental experiences, case studies, and literature reviews. Upon completion, students should be able to discuss specialized physical therapy equipment and/or related fields and display competent writing skills. PTA 282 PTA Issues II (0-3-0-1) This course introduces the concept of extremity joint mobilization techniques and encourages attainment of basic competence. Topics include joint mobilization grades and techniques for all peripheral joints and general understanding of basic skill competencies. Upon completion, students should be able to perform safe and effective mobilization techniques. RADIOGRAPHY RAD 110 Radiography Introduction & Patient Care (2-3-0-3) Corequisites: RAD 111 and RAD 151 This course provides an overview of the radiography profession and student responsibilities. Emphasis is placed on basic principles of patient care, radiation protection, technical factors, and medical terminology. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate basic skills in these areas.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS RAD 111 RAD Procedures I (3-3-0-4) Corequisites: RAD 110 and RAD 151 This course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to perform standard radiographic procedures. Emphasis is placed on radiography of the chest, abdomen, extremities, spine, and pelvis. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in these areas. RAD 112 RAD Procedures II (3-3-0-4) Prerequisites: RAD 110, RAD 111, and RAD 151 Corequisites: RAD 121 and RAD 161 This course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to perform standard radiographic procedures. Emphasis is placed on radiography of the skull, bony thorax, and gastrointestinal, biliary, and urinary systems. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in these areas. RAD 121 Radiographic Imaging I (2-3-0-3) Prerequisites: RAD 110, RAD 111, and RAD 151 This course provides the principles of conventional film-screen radiography. Emphasis is placed on the factors that impact density, contrast, recorded detail, and distortion. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of conventional film-screen radiographic imaging. RAD 122 Radiographic Imaging II (1-3-0-2) Prerequisites: RAD 112, RAD 121, and RAD 161 Corequisites: RAD 131 and RAD 171 This course provides advanced principles of imaging including digital radiography. Emphasis is placed on the factors that impact brightness, contrast, recorded detail, and distortion. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of advanced principles of imaging. RAD 131 Radiographic Physics I (1-3-0-2) This course introduces the principles of radiation characteristics and production. Emphasis is placed on imaging equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of radiation characteristics and production. RAD 151 RAD Clinical Education I (0-0-6-2) Corequisites: RAD 110 and RAD 111 This course introduces patient management and basic radiographic procedures in the clinical setting. Emphasis is placed on mastering positioning of the chest and extremities, manipulating equipment, and applying principles of ALARA. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate successful completion of clinical objectives. RAD 161 RAD Clinical Education II (0-0-15-5) Prerequisites: RAD 110, RAD 111, and RAD 151 Corequisites: RAD 112 and RAD 121 This course provides additional experience in patient management and in more complex radiographic procedures. Emphasis is placed on mastering positioning of the spine, pelvis, head and neck, and thorax and adapting procedures to meet patient variations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate successful completion of clinical objectives.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS RAD 171 RAD Clinical Education III (0-0-12-4) Prerequisites: RAD 112, RAD 121, and RAD 161 Corequisites: RAD 122 and RAD 131 This course provides experience in patient management specific to fluoroscopic and advanced radiographic procedures. Emphasis is placed on applying appropriate technical factors to all studies and mastering positioning of gastrointestinal and urological studies. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate successful completion of clinical objectives. RAD 181 RAD Clinical Elective (0-0-3-1) This course provides advanced knowledge of clinical applications. Emphasis is placed on enhancing clinical skills. Upon completion, students should be able to successfully complete the clinical course objectives. RAD 211 RAD Procedures III (2-3-0-3) Prerequisites: RAD 122 Corequisites: RAD 231, RAD 241, and RAD 251 This course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to perform standard and specialty radiographic procedures. Emphasis is placed on radiographic specialty procedures, sectional anatomy, and advanced imaging. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of these areas. RAD 231 Radiographic Physics II (1-3-0-2) Prerequisites: RAD 171 or RAD 131 This course provides advanced principles of radiation characteristics and production including digital imaging and Computed Tomography (CT). Emphasis is placed on imaging equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of radiation characteristics and production. RAD 241 Radiobiology/Protection (2-0-0-2) Prerequisites: RAD 122, RAD 131, and RAD 171 Corequisites: RAD 211, RAD 231, and RAD 251 This course covers the principles of radiation protection and radiobiology. Topics include the effects of ionizing radiation on body tissues, protective measures for limiting exposure to the patient and personnel, and radiation monitoring devices. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the effects and uses of radiation in diagnostic radiology. RAD 245 Image Analysis (1-3-0-2) Prerequisites: RAD 211, RAD 231, RAD 241 and RAD 251 Corequisites: RAD 261 This course provides an overview of image analysis and introduces methods of quality management. Topics include image evaluation, pathology, quality control, and quality assurance. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of image analysis and quality management.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS RAD 251 RAD Clinical Education IV (0-0-21-7) Prerequisites: RAD 122, RAD 131, and RAD 171 Corequisites: RAD 211, RAD 231, and RAD 241 This course provides the opportunity to continue mastering all basic radiographic procedures and to attain experience in advanced areas. Emphasis is placed on equipment operation, pathological recognition, pediatric and geriatric variations, and a further awareness of radiation protection requirements. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate successful completion of clinical objectives. RAD 261 RAD Clinical Education V (0-0-21-7) Prerequisite: RAD 251 Corequisite: RAD 245 This course is designed to enhance expertise in all radiographic procedures, patient management, radiation protection, and image production and evaluation. Emphasis is placed on developing an autonomous approach to the diversity of clinical situations and successfully adapting to those procedures. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate successful completion of clinical objectives. RAD 271 Radiography Capstone (0-3-0-1) Prerequisites: RAD 211, RAD 231, RAD 241, RAD 251 Corequisites: RAD 245, RAD 261 This course provides an opportunity to exhibit problem-solving skills required for certification. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking and integration of didactic and clinical components. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the knowledge required of any entry-level radiographer. RESPIRATORY THERAPY RCP 110 Introduction to Respiratory Care (3-3-0-4) This course introduces the respiratory care profession. Topics include the role of the respiratory care practitioner, medical gas administration, basic patient assessment, infection control, and medical terminology. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in concepts and procedures through written and laboratory evaluations. RCP 111 Therapeutics/Diagnostics (4-3-0-5) Prerequisite: RCP 110 This course is a continuation of RCP 110. Emphasis is placed on entry-level therapeutic and diagnostic procedures used in respiratory care. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in concepts and procedures through written and laboratory evaluations. RCP 112 Patient Management (3-3-0-4) Prerequisite: RCP 111 This course provides entry-level skills in adult/pediatric mechanical ventilation and respiratory care procedures in traditional and alternative settings. Emphasis is placed on therapeutic modalities and physiological effects of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation, home care, mechanical ventilation, and monitoring. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in concepts and procedures through written and laboratory evaluations.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS RCP 113 RCP Pharmacology (2-0-0-2) This course covers the drugs used in the treatment of cardiopulmonary diseases. Emphasis is placed on the uses, actions, indications, administration, and hazards of pharmacological agents. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence though written evaluations. RCP 114 C-P Anatomy & Physiology (3-0-0-3) This course provides a concentrated study of cardiopulmonary anatomy and physiology essential to the practice of respiratory care. Emphasis is placed on cardiovascular and pulmonary physiology, acid/base balance, and blood gas interpretation. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in these concepts through written evaluation. RCP 115 C-P Pathophysiology (2-0-0-2) This course introduces the etiology, pathogenesis, and physiology of cardiopulmonary diseases and disorders. Emphasis is placed on clinical signs and symptoms along with diagnoses, complications, prognoses, and management. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in these concepts through written evaluations. RCP 122 Special Practice Lab (0-2-0-1) This course provides additional laboratory learning opportunities in respiratory care. Emphasis is placed on therapeutic procedures and equipment management. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in concepts and procedures through laboratory evaluations. RCP 123 Special Practice Lab (0-3-0-1) This course provides additional laboratory learning opportunities in respiratory care. Emphasis is placed on therapeutic procedures and equipment management. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in concepts and procedures through laboratory evaluations. RCP 134 RCP Clinical Practice I (0-0-12-4) Corequisites: RCP 110 This course provides entry-level clinical experience. Emphasis is placed on therapeutic and diagnostic patient care. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate clinical competence in required performance evaluations. RCP 146 RCP Clinical Practice II (0-0-18-6) Prerequisites: RCP 110 Corequisites: RCP 111 This course provides entry-level clinical experience. Emphasis is placed on therapeutic and diagnostic patient care. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate clinical competence in required performance evaluations. RCP 158 RCP Clinical Practice III (0-0-24-8) Prerequisites: RCP 111 This course provides entry-level clinical experience. Emphasis is placed on therapeutic and diagnostic patient care. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate clinical competence in required performance evaluations.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS RCP 210 Critical Care Concepts (3-3-0-4) This course provides further refinement of acute patient care and underlying pathophysiology. Topics include a continuation in the study of mechanical ventilation, underlying pathophysiology, and introduction of critical care monitoring. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in concepts and procedures through written and laboratory evaluations. RCP 211 Advanced Monitoring/Procedures (3-3-0-4) Prerequisite: RCP 210 This course includes advanced information gathering and decision making for the respiratory care professional. Topics include advanced cardiac monitoring and special procedures. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate, design, and recommend appropriate care plans through written and laboratory evaluations. RCP 212 Home Care/Rehabilitation (2-0-0-2) Prerequisites: RCP 111 This course provides an in-depth study of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation and alternatives to hospital care. Emphasis is placed on the procedures and technologies applied to these areas. Upon completion, students should be able to design appropriate respiratory care plans for the home and extended care environments. RCP 214 Neonatal/Ped’s RC (1-3-0-2) Prerequisite: RCP 111 This course provides in-depth coverage of the concepts of neonatal and pediatric respiratory care. Emphasis is placed on neonatal and pediatric pathophysiology and on the special therapeutic needs of neonates and children. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in these concepts through written and laboratory evaluations. RCP 222 Special Practice Lab (0-2-0-1) This course provides additional laboratory learning opportunities in respiratory care. Emphasis is placed on therapeutic procedures and equipment management. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate competence in concepts and procedures through laboratory evaluations. READING RED 080 Introduction to College Reading (3-2-4) Prerequisites: ENG 075, or satisfactory test scores This course introduces effective reading and inferential thinking skills in preparation for RED  090. Emphasis is placed on vocabulary, comprehension, and reading strategies. Upon completion, students should be able to determine main ideas and supporting details, recognize basic patterns of organization, draw conclusions, and understand vocabulary in context. This course does not satisfy the developmental reading prerequisite for ENG 111 or ENG 111A.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS RED 090 Improved College Reading (3-2-4) Prerequisites: RED 080 or ENG 085, or satisfactory test scores This course is designed to improve reading and critical thinking skills. Topics include vocabulary enhancement; extracting implied meaning; analyzing author’s purpose, tone, and style; and drawing conclusions and responding to written material. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and analyze college-level reading material. This course satisfies the developmental reading prerequisite for ENG 111 or ENG 111A. RED 091 Fast Track Improved College Reading (1-0-1) Prerequisites: Take One: RED-080 or ENG-085 This course provides an intensive review of selected RED 090-level reading strategies. Topics include the following reading strategies at the RED 090 level: critical thinking, major question types, main idea, patterns of organization, vocabulary, and inference. Upon completion, students should be able to apply selected RED 090 reading strategies to various texts. RED 111 Critical Reading for College (3-0-3) This course is designed to enhance critical reading skills. Topics include vocabulary enrichment, reading flexibility, metacognitive strategies, and advanced comprehension skills, including analysis and evaluation. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension and analysis and respond effectively to material across disciplines. RELIGION REL 111 Eastern Religions (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course introduces the major Asian religious traditions. Topics include Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and Shinto. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the origins, history, beliefs, and practices of the religions studied. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. REL 112 Western Religions (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course introduces the major western religious traditions. Topics include Zoroastrianism, Islam, Judaism, and Christianity. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the origins, history, beliefs, and practices of the religions studied. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. REL 211 Introduction to the Old Testament (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course is a survey of the literature of the Hebrews with readings from the law, prophets, and other writings. Emphasis is placed on the use of literary, historical, archeological, and cultural analysis. Upon completion, students should be able to use the tools of critical analysis to read and understand Old Testament literature. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS REL 212 Introduction to the New Testament (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course is a survey of the literature of first-century Christianity with readings from the gospels, Acts, and the Pauline and pastoral letters. Topics include the literary structure, audience, and religious perspective of the writings, as well as the historical and cultural context of the early Christian community. Upon completion, students should be able to use the tools of critical analysis to read and understand New Testament literature. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. REAL ESTATE RLS 112 Broker Prelicensing (5-0-5) This course provides basic instruction in real estate principles and practices. Topics include law, finance, brokerage, closing, valuation, management, taxation, mathematics, construction, land use, property insurance, and NC License Law and Commission Rules. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate basic knowledge and skills necessary for passing the state real estate license exam. RLS 113 Real Estate Mathematics (2-0-2) This course provides basic instruction in business mathematics applicable to real estate situations. Topics include area computations, percentage of profit/loss, closing statements, appreciation and depreciation, financial calculations and interest yields, property valuation, insurance, taxes, and commissions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate proficiency in applied real estate mathematics. RLS 115 Real Estate Finance (2-0-2) Prerequisites: RLS 112 This course provides advanced instruction in financing real estate transactions and real property valuation. Topics include sources of mortgage funds, financing instruments, mortgage types, loan underwriting, essential mathematics, and property valuation. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of real estate finance necessary to act as real estate brokers. RLS 116 Real Estate Law (2-0-2) Prerequisites: RLS 112 or current Real Estate license This course provides advanced instruction in legal aspects of real estate brokerage. Topics include property ownership and interests, brokerage relationships, agency law, contracts, settlement statements, and NC License Law and Commission Rules. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of laws relating to real estate brokerage necessary to act as real estate brokers. RLS 117 Real Estate Brokerage (4-0-4) Prerequisite: RLS 112 This course consists of advanced-level instruction on a variety of topics related to Real Estate law and brokerage practices. Topics include: Real Estate brokerage, finance and sales, RESPA, fair housing issues, selected N. C. Real Estate License Law and N. C. Real Estate Commission Rule issues. Upon completion students should be able to demonstrate a knowledge of real estate brokerage, law and finance.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS RLS 120 Real Estate Practice (2-0-2) Prerequisites: RLS 112 This course emphasized the knowledge and skills necessary for a successful real estate practice. Topics include land use controls, methods of measuring improvements, commercial real estate, property management, selling techniques, and other aspects of the real estate industry. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the actual operation of a real estate practice. RLS 121 Broker Relationships (2-0-2) Prerequisite: RLS 112 This course provides post-licensing instruction in broker relationships and responsibilities when working with residential sellers and buyers. Topics include agency relationships and duties, agency contracts and disclosure, and the practical aspects of working with residential buyers and sellers. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and skills necessary to effectively work with residential buyers/sellers according to law and prevailing practices. RLS 122 Contracts and Closing (2-0-2) Prerequisite: RLS 112 This course provides post-licensing instruction in broker responsibilities relating to real estate sales contracts, contract procedures, the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act and closings. Topics include contract law concepts, residential sales contract preparation and procedures, closing procedures and closing statement preparation. Upon completion, students should be able to handle sales contract negotiations, prepare residential sales contracts, assist sellers/buyers prepare for closing and verify closing statements. RLS 123 Real Estate Selected Topics (2-0-2) Prerequisite: RLS 112 This course provides post-licensing instruction in real estate on selected topics of special importance to licensees. Topics include commercial real estate brokerage, residential property management, land use controls, loan fraud, license law, fair housing, establishing a brokerage firm, and manufactured/modular homes. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of commercial real estate brokerage, residential property management, and the other topics addressed in this course. SUBSTANCE ABUSE SAB 110 Substance Abuse Overview (3-0-0-3) This course provides an overview of the core concepts in substance abuse and dependence. Topics include the history of drug use/abuse, effects on societal members, treatment of addiction, and preventive measures. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the etiology of drug abuse, addiction, prevention, and treatment. SAB 120 Intake and Assessment (3-0-0-3) This course develops processes for establishment of client rapport, elicitation of client information on which therapeutic activities are based, and stimulation of client introspection. Topics include diagnostic criteria, functions of counseling, nonverbal behavior, collaterals and significant others, dual diagnosis, client strengths and weakness, uncooperative clients, and crisis interventions. Upon completion, students should be able to establish communication with clients, recognize disorders, obtain information for counseling, and terminate the counseling process. This course is a unique concentration requirement of the Substance Abuse concentration in the Human Services Technology program.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS SAB 125 SAB Case Management (2-2-0-3) Prerequisite: SAB 120 This course provides case management activities, including record keeping, recovery issues, community resources, and continuum of care. Emphasis is placed on establishing a systematic approach to monitor the treatment plan and maintain quality of life. Upon completion, students should be able to assist clients in the continuum of care as an ongoing recovery process and develop agency networking. This course is a unique concentration requirement of the Substance Abuse concentration in the Human Services Technology program. SAB 135 Addictive Process (3-0-0-3) This course explores the physical, emotional, psychological, and cultural aspects of the addictive process. Emphasis is placed on addictions to food, sex, alcohol, drugs, work, gambling, and relationships. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the effects, prevention strategies, and treatment methods associated with addictive disorders. SAB 137 Codependency 3-0-3 This course introduces the adult child concept and co-dependency as syndromes of the addictive process. Emphasis is placed on treatment and recovery within the context of a paradigm shift which allows the individual to choose a healthy model of life. Upon completion, students should be able to assess levels of co-dependency and associated levels of physical and mental health and develop strategies to enhance health. SAB 210 Substance Abuse Counseling (2-2-0-3) This course provides theory and skills acquisition by utilizing intervention strategies designed to obtain therapeutic information, support recovery, and prevent relapse. Topics include counseling individuals and dysfunctional families, screening instruments, counseling techniques and approaches, recovery and relapse, and special populations. Upon completion, students should be able to discuss issues critical to recovery, identify intervention models, and initiate a procedure culminating in cognitive/behavioral change. Students will survey and practice various group techniques/therapy utilized in current substance abuse treatment programs. SAB 240 SAB Issues in Client Services (3-0-0-3) This course introduces systems of professional standards, values, and issues in substance abuse counseling. Topics include confidentiality, assessment of personal values, professional responsibilities, competencies, and ethics relative to multicultural counseling and research. Upon completion, students should be able to understand and discuss multiple ethical issues applicable to counseling and apply various decision-making models to current issues. This course is a unique concentration requirement of the Substance Abuse concentration in the Human Services Technology program. INFORMATION SYSTEMS SECURITY SEC 110 Security Concepts (3-0-3) This course introduces the concepts and issues related to securing information systems and the development of policies to implement information security controls. Topics include the historical view of networking and security, security issues, trends, security resources, and the role of policy, people, and processes in information security. Upon completion, students should be able to identify information security risks, create an information security policy, and identify processes to implement and enforce policy.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS SEC 170 SOHO Security (2-2-3) Prerequisites: SEC-110 This course introduces security principles and topics related to the small office/home office (SOHO) networking environment. Topics include network topologies, network protocols, security issues, and best practices for SOHO environments. Upon completion, students should be able to design, setup, secure, and manage a small office/home office network. SOCIOLOGY SOC 210 Introduction to Sociology (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course introduces the scientific study of human society, culture, and social interactions. Topics include socialization, research methods, diversity and inequality, cooperation and conflict, social change, social institutions, and organizations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of sociological concepts as they apply to the interplay among individuals, groups, and societies. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences. SOC 213 Sociology of the Family (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course covers the institution of the family and other intimate relationships. Emphasis is placed on mate selection, gender roles, sexuality, communication, power and conflict, parenthood, diverse lifestyles, divorce and remarriage, and economic issues. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze the family as a social institution and the social forces which influence its development and change. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences. SOC 220 Social Problems (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course provides an in-depth study of current social problems. Emphasis is placed on causes, consequences, and possible solutions to problems associated with families, schools, workplaces, communities, and the environment. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize, define, analyze, and propose solutions to these problems. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences. SOC 225 Social Diversity (3-0-0-3) This course provides a comparison of diverse roles, interests, opportunities, contributions, and experiences in social life. Topics include race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, class, and religion. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze how cultural and ethnic differences evolve and how they affect personality development, values, and tolerance. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral sciences.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS MEDICAL SONOGRAPHY SON 110 Introduction to Sonography (1-3-3-3) This course provides an introduction to medical sonography. Topics include applications, sonographic terminology, history, patient care, ethics, and basic skills. Upon completion, students should be able to define professionalism and sonographic applications and perform basic patient care skills and preliminary scanning techniques. SON 111 Sonographic Physics (3-3-0-4) This course introduces ultrasound physical principles, bioeffects, and sonographic instrumentation. Topics include sound wave mechanics, transducers, sonographic equipment, Doppler physics, bioeffects, and safety. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of sound wave mechanics, transducers, sonography equipment, the Doppler effect, bioeffects, and safety. SON 120 SON Clinical Education I (0-0-15-5) Prerequisite: SON 110 This course provides active participation in clinical sonography. Emphasis is placed on imaging, processing, and technically evaluating sonographic examinations. Upon completion, students should be able to image, process, and evaluate sonographic examinations. SON 121 SON Clinical Education II (0-0-15-5) Prerequisite: SON 120 This course provides continued active participation in clinical sonography. Emphasis is placed on imaging, processing, and technically evaluating sonographic examinations. Upon completion, students should be able to image, process, and evaluate sonographic examinations. SON 130 Abdominal Sonography I (2-3-0-3) This course introduces abdominal and small parts sonography. Emphasis is placed on the sonographic anatomy of the abdomen and small parts with correlated laboratory exercises. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize and acquire basic abdominal and small parts images. SON 131 Abdominal Sonography II (1-3-0-2) Prerequisite: SON 130 This course covers abdominal and small parts pathology recognizable on sonograms. Emphasis is placed on abnormal sonograms of the abdomen and small parts with correlated sonographic cases. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize abnormal pathological processes in the abdomen and on small parts sonographic examinations. SON 140 Gynecological Sonography (2-0-0-2) Prerequisite: SON 110 This course is designed to relate gynecological anatomy and pathology to sonography. Emphasis is placed on gynecological relational anatomy, endovaginal anatomy, and gynecological pathology. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize normal and abnormal gynecological sonograms. SON 220 SON Clinical Education III (0-0-24-8) Prerequisite: SON 121 This course provides continued active participation in clinical sonography. Emphasis is placed on imaging, processing, and technically evaluating sonographic examinations. Upon completion, students should be able to image, process, and evaluate sonographic examinations.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS SON 221 SON Clinical Education IV (0-0-24-8) Prerequisite: SON 220 This course provides continued active participation off campus in clinical sonography. Emphasis is placed on imaging, processing, and technically evaluating sonographic examinations. Upon completion, students should be able to image, process, and evaluate sonographic examinations. SON 222 Selected SON Clinical Education (0-0-6-2) This course provides active participation in clinical sonography. Emphasis is placed on imaging, processing, and technically evaluating selected sonographic examinations. Upon completion, students should be able to image, process, and evaluate selected sonographic examinations. SON 225 Case Studies (0-3-0-1) Prerequisite: SON 110 This course offers the opportunity to present interesting cases found during clinical education. Emphasis is placed on presentation methods which integrate patient history, laboratory results, and sonographic findings with reference to current literature. Upon completion, students should be able to correlate information necessary for complete presentation of case studies. SON 241 Obstetrical Sonography I (2-0-0-2) Prerequisite: SON 110 This course covers normal obstetrical sonography techniques, the normal fetal environment, and abnormal first trimester pregnancy states. Topics include gestational dating, fetal anatomy, uterine environment, and first trimester complications. Upon completion, students should be able to produce gestational sonograms which document age, evaluate the uterine environment, and recognize first trimester complications. SON 242 Obstetrical Sonography II (2-0-0-2) Prerequisite: SON 241 This course covers second and third trimester obstetrical complications and fetal anomalies. Topics include abnormal fetal anatomy and physiology and complications in the uterine environment. Upon completion, students should be able to identify fetal anomalies, fetal distress states, and uterine pathologies. SON 250 Vascular Sonography (1-3-0-2) This course provides an in-depth study of the anatomy and pathology of the vascular system. Topics include peripheral arterial, peripheral venous, and cerebrovascular disease testing. Upon completion, students should be able to identify normal vascular anatomy and recognize pathology of the vascular system. SON 289 Sonographic Topics (2-0-0-2) Prerequisite: SON 220 Corequisites: SON 221 This course provides an overview of sonographic topics in preparation for certification examinations. Emphasis is placed on registry preparation. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of sonography and be prepared for the registry examinations.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS SPANISH SPA 111 Elementary Spanish I (3-0-3) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course introduces the fundamental elements of the Spanish language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written Spanish and demonstrate cultural awareness. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. Note: Elementary foreign language courses are secondary humanities courses; they will not count as the sole humanities selection in an AAS degree program. SPA 112 Elementary Spanish II (3-0-3) Prerequisite: SPA 111 This course is a continuation of SPA 111 focusing on the fundamental elements of the Spanish language within a cultural context. Emphasis is placed on the progressive development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with increasing proficiency to spoken and written Spanish and demonstrate further cultural awareness. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. Note: Elementary foreign language courses are secondary humanities courses; they will not count as the sole humanities selection in an AAS degree program. SPA 181 Spanish Lab I (0-2-1) Prerequisite: RED 090 or satisfactory test scores This course provides an opportunity to enhance acquisition of the fundamental elements of the Spanish language. Emphasis is placed on the progressive development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through the use of various supplementary learning media and materials. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written Spanish and demonstrate cultural awareness. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. SPA 182 Spanish Lab II (0-2-1) Prerequisite: SPA 181 This course provides an opportunity to enhance acquisition of the fundamental elements of the Spanish language. Emphasis is placed on the progressive development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through the use of various supplementary learning media and materials. Upon completion, students should be able to comprehend and respond with increasing proficiency to spoken and written Spanish and demonstrate cultural awareness. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement for transferability as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. SPA 211 Intermediate Spanish I (3-0-3) Prerequisite: SPA 112 This course provides a review and expansion of the essential skills of the Spanish language. Emphasis is placed on the study of authentic and representative literary and cultural texts. Upon completion, students should be able to communicate effectively, accurately, and creatively about the past, present, and future. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS SPA 212 Intermediate Spanish II (3-0-3) Prerequisite: SPA 211 This course provides a continuation of SPA 211. Emphasis is placed on the continuing study of authentic and representative literary and cultural texts. Upon completion, students should be able to communicate spontaneously and accurately with increasing complexity and sophistication. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts. SURVEYING SRV 110 Surveying I (2-6-4) Prerequisites: CEG 115 and MAT 171 or MAT 175 This course introduces the theory and practice of plane surveying. Topics include the precise measurement of distances, angles, and elevations; bearing, azimuth and traverse computations; topography and mapping. Upon completion, students should be able to use/care for surveying equipment, collect field survey data, perform traverse computations and create a contour map. SRV 111 Surveying II (2-6-4) Prerequisites: SRV 110 This course introduces route surveying and roadway planning and layout. Topics include simple, compound, reverse, spiral, and vertical curves; geometric design and layout; planning of crosssection and grade line; drainage; earthwork calculations; and mass diagrams. Upon completion, students should be able to calculate and lay out highway curves; prepare roadway plans, profiles, and sections; and perform slope staking. SRV 210 Surveying III (2-6-4) Prerequisite: SRV 110 This course introduces boundary surveying, land partitioning, and calculations of areas. Topics include advanced traverses and adjustments, preparation of survey documents, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to research, survey, and map a boundary. SRV 220 Surveying Law (2-2-3) Prerequisite: SRV 110 This course introduces the law as related to the practice of surveying. Topics include surveyors’ responsibilities, deed descriptions, title searches, eminent domain, easements, weight of evidence, riparian rights, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and apply the basic legal aspects associated with the practice of land surveying SRV 240 Topographic/Site Surveying (2-6-4) Prerequisite: SRV 110 This course covers topographic, site, and construction surveying. Topics include topographic mapping, earthwork, site planning, construction staking, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare topographic maps and site plans and locate and stake out construction projects. SRV 250 Advanced Surveying (2-6-4) Prerequisite: SRV 111 This course covers advanced topics in surveying. Topics include photogrammetry, astronomical observations, coordinate systems, error theory, GPS, GIS, Public Land System, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to apply advanced techniques to the solution of complex surveying problems.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS SRV 260 Field & Office Practices (1-3-2) Prerequisites: Completion of three semesters of the SRV courses. This course covers surveying project management, estimating, and responsibilities of surveying personnel. Topics include record-keeping, starting and operating a surveying business, contracts, regulations, taxes, personnel management, and professional ethics. Upon completion, students should be able to understand the requirements of operating a professional land surveying business. SOCIAL WORK SWK 110 Introduction to Social Work (3-0-3) This course examines the historical development, values, orientation, and professional standards of social work and focuses on the terminology and broader systems of social welfare. Emphasis is placed on the various fields of practice including those agencies whose primary function is financial assistance, corrections, mental health, and protective services. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the knowledge, values, and skills of the social work professional. SUSTAINABILITY TECHNOLOGIES SST 210 Issues in Sustainability (3-0-3) Prerequisites: SST 110 This course introduces the long-term impacts and difficulties of applying sustainability concepts in an organization, business, or society. Topics include the application of sustainable technologies and the analysis of affordability, efficiencies, recycling, and small and large-scale design. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize the possible limitations of sustainable technologies and be prepared to reconcile such conflicts. TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGY TRN 110 Introduction to Automotive (1-2-2) This course covers workplace safety, hazardous materials, environmental regulations, hand tools, service information, basic concepts, vehicle systems, and common transportation industry terminology. Topics include familiarization with major vehicle systems, proper use of various hand and power tools, material safety data sheets, and personal protective equipment. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate appropriate safety procedures, identify and use basic shop tools, and describe government regulations regarding transportation repair facilities. TRN 120 Basic Transportation Electricity (4-3-5) This course covers basic electrical theory, wiring diagrams, test equipment, and diagnosis, repair and replacement of batteries, starters, and alternators. Topics include Ohm’s Law, circuit construction, wiring diagrams, circuit testing, and basic troubleshooting. Upon completion, students should be able to properly use wiring diagrams, diagnose, test, and repair basic wiring, battery, starting, charging, and electrical concerns. TRN 120A Basic Transportation Electrical Lab (0-3-1) Corequisite: TRN 120 This course provides a lab that allows students to enhance their understanding of electrical components and circuits used in the transportation industry. Topics include inspection, diagnosis, and repair of electrical components and circuits using appropriate service information for specific transportation systems. Upon completion, students should be able to diagnose and service electrical components and circuits used in transportation systems.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS TRN 130 Introduction to Sustainable Transportation (2-2-3) This course provides an overview of alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. Topics include composition and use of alternative fuels including compressed natural gas, biodiesel, ethanol, hydrogen, and synthetic fuels, hybrid/electric, and vehicles using alternative fuels. Upon completion, students should be able to identify alternative fuel vehicles, explain how each alternative fuel delivery system operates, and perform minor repairs. TRN 140 Transportation Climate Control (1-2-2) This course covers the theory of refrigeration and heating, electrical/electronic/pneumatic controls, and diagnosis and repair of climate control systems. Topics include diagnosis and repair of climate control components and systems, recovery/recycling of refrigerants, and safety and environmental regulations. Upon completion, students should be able to diagnose and repair vehicle climate control systems. TRN 140A Transportation Climate Control Lab (1-2-2) Corequisite: TRN 140 This course provides experiences for enhancing student skills in the diagnosis and repair of transportation climate control systems. Emphasis is placed on reclaiming, recovery, recharging, leak detection, climate control components, diagnosis, air conditioning equipment, tools and safety. Upon completion, students should be able to describe the operation, diagnose, and safely service climate control systems using appropriate tools, equipment, and service information. TRN 145 Advanced Transportation Electronics (2-3-3) Prerequisite: TRN 120 This course covers advanced transportation electronic systems including programmable logic controllers, on-board data networks, telematics, high voltage systems, navigation, collision avoidance systems and electronic accessories. Topics include interpretation of wiring schematics, reprogramming PLC’s, diagnosing and testing data networks and other electronic concerns. Upon completion, students should be able to reprogram PLC’s, diagnose and test data networks and other electronic concerns, and work safely with high voltage systems. WEB TECHNOLOGIES WEB 110 Internet/Web Fundamentals (2-2-3) This course introduces World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) standard markup language and services of the Internet. Topics include creating web pages, search engines, FTP, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to deploy a hand-coded website created with mark-up language, and effectively use and understand the function of search engines. WEB 111 Introduction to Web Graphics (2-2-3) This course introduces the creation of web graphics, and addressing problems peculiar to WWW display using appropriate software. Topics include web graphics file types, optimization, RGB color, web typography, elementary special effects, transparency, animation, slicing, basic photo manipulation, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to create graphics, such as animated banners, buttons, backgrounds, logos, and manipulate photographic images for Web delivery.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS WEB 115 Web Markup & Scripting (2-2-3) This course introduces Worldwide Web Consortium (W3C) standard client-side Internet programming using industry-established practices. Topics include JavaScript, markup elements, stylesheets, validation, accessibility, standards, and browsers. Upon completion, students should be able to develop hand-coded web pages using current markup standards. WEB 120 Introduction to Internet Multimedia (2-2-3) This is the first of two courses covering the creation of Internet Multimedia. Topics include Internet multimedia file types, file type conversion, acquisition of digital audio/video, streaming audio/video and graphics animation plug-in programs and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to create Internet multimedia presentations utilizing a variety of methods and applications. WEB 140 Web Development Tools (2-2-3) This course provides an introduction to web development software suites. Topics include the creation of web sites and applets using web development software. Upon completion, students should be able to create entire web sites and supporting applets. WEB 151 Mobile Application Development (2-2-0-3) This course introduces students to programming technologies, design and development related to mobile applications. Topics include accessing device capabilities, industry standards, operating systems, and programming for mobile applications using an OS Software Development Kit (SDK). Upon completion, students should be able to create basic applications for mobile devices. WEB 180 Active Server Pages (2-2-3) Prerequisite: CIS 115 This course introduces active server programming. Topics include HTML forms processing and other issues related to developing active web applications. Upon completion, students should be able to create and maintain a dynamic website. WEB 182 PHP Programming (2-2-3) Prerequisite: CIS 115 This course introduces students to the server-side, HTML-embedded scripting language PHP. Emphasis is placed on programming techniques required to create dynamic web pages using PHP scripting language features. Upon completion, students should be able to design, code, test, debug, and create a dynamic web site using the PHP scripting language. WEB 210 Web Design (2-2-3) This course introduces intermediate to advanced web design techniques. Topics include customer expectations, advanced markup language, multimedia technologies, usability and accessibility practices, and techniques for the evaluation of web design. Upon completion, students should be able to employ advanced design techniques to create high impact and highly functional web sites.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS WEB 225 Content Management Systems (2-2-0-3) Prerequisite: WEB 110 This course introduces students to Content Management Systems (CMS) designed for the publication of Web content to Web sites. Topics include individual user accounts, administration menus, RSS-feeds, customizable layout, flexible account privileges, logging, blogging systems, creating online forums, and modules. Upon completion, students should be able to register and maintain individual user accounts and create a business website and/ or an interactive community website. WEB 230 Implementing Web Servers (2-2-3) Prerequisites: NET 110 or NET 125 This course covers website and web server architecture. Topics include installation, configuration, administration, and security of web servers, services and sites. Upon completion, students should be able to effectively manage the web services deployment lifecycle according to industry standards. WEB 250 Database Driven Websites (2-2-3) Prerequisites: CIS 115 and DBA 110 This course introduces dynamic (database-driven) website development. Topics include the use of basic database CRUD statements (create, read, update and delete) incorporated into web applications, as well as in software architecture principles. Upon completion, students should be able to design and develop database driven web applications according to industry standards. WEB 251 Mobile Application Development II (2-2-0-3) Prerequisite: WEB 151 This course covers advanced applications and custom programming to develop applications for mobile devices. Topics include device capabilities, OS specific Software Development Kits (SDK), scripting for functionality and designing interactivity. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate effective programming techniques to develop advanced mobile applications. WEB 285 Emerging Web Technologies (2-2-0-3) This course will explore, discuss, and research emerging technologies in the web arena. Emphasis is placed on exposure to up-and-coming technologies relating to the web, providing hands-on experience, and discussion of practical implications of these emerging fields. Upon completion, students should be able to articulate issues relating to these technologies. WEB 289 Internet Technologies Project (1-4-3) Prerequisites: WEB 250 This course provides an opportunity to complete a significant Web technologies project from the design phase through implementation with minimal instructor support. Emphasis is placed on project definition, documentation, installation, testing, presentation, and training. Upon completion, students should be able to complete an Internet project from the definition phase through implementation.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS WELDING WLD 110 Cutting Processes (1-3-2) Corequisites: WLD 111 This course introduces oxy-fuel and plasma-arc cutting systems. Topics include safety, proper equipment setup, and operation of oxy-fuel and plasma-arc cutting equipment with emphasis on straight line, curve and bevel cutting. Upon completion, students should be able to oxy-fuel and plasma-arc cut metals of varying thickness. WLD 111 Oxy-Fuel Welding (1-3-2) Corequisites: WLD 110 This course introduces the oxy-fuel welding process. Topics include safety, proper equipment setup, and operation of oxy-fuel welding equipment with emphasis on bead application, profile, and discontinuities. Upon completion, students should be able to oxy-fuel weld fillets and grooves on plate and pipe in various positions. WLD 115 SMAW (Stick) Plate (2-9-5) Prerequisite: WLD 110 and WLD 111 This course introduces the shielded metal arc (stick) welding process. Emphasis is placed on padding, fillet, and groove welds in various positions with SMAW electrodes. Upon completion, students should be able to perform SMAW fillet and groove welds on carbon plate with prescribed electrodes. WLD 121 GMAW (MIG) FCAW/Plate (2-6-4) Prerequisite: WLD 115 This course introduces metal arc welding and flux core arc welding processes. Topics include equipment setup and fillet and groove welds with emphasis on application of GMAW and FCAW electrodes on carbon steel plate. Upon completion, students should be able to perform fillet welds on carbon steel with prescribed electrodes in the flat, horizontal, and overhead positions. WLD 131 GTAW (TIG) Plate (2-6-4) Prerequisite: WLD 121 This course introduces the gas tungsten arc (TIG) welding process. Topics include correct selection of tungsten, polarity, gas, and proper filler rod with emphasis placed on safety, equipment setup, and welding techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to perform GTAW fillet and groove welds with various electrodes and filler materials.

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PERSONNEL • Board of Trustees • Administration • Faculty • Staff • Part-time Employees

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

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Terry Bell Chairman

W. Paul Holt, Jr. Vice-Chairman

Conrad Burrell

Vance Davidson

Dewayne Elders

Elizabeth Knight

Melvin P. Penland

Tracie Rice

Brenda Oocumma

Gary Shields

C. Jerry Sutton

Kate Welch

Lambert Wilson

PERSONNEL - ADMINISTRATION Don Tomas President B.S., University of Wisconsin M.A., Texas Woman’s University Ed.D., Grambling State University [email protected]

Janet K. Burnette Executive Vice President and CFO B.S., M.B.A., Western Carolina University [email protected]

Thomas R. Brooks Vice President for Instruction and Student Services B.S.B.A., Western Carolina University M.Ed., Ed.S., The University of Georgia Ph.D., Capella University [email protected]

Ryan Schwiebert Vice President for Information Technology B.S., Northern Illinois University M.S., Ed.D., Western Carolina University [email protected]

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PERSONNEL - ADMINISTRATION

Scott Baker Dean of Career Technologies B.S., University of North Carolina Charlotte M.S., East Carolina University

Cheryl Davids Dean of Macon Campus B.A., B.A.Ed., University of South Carolina M.A.Ed., Francis Marion University Ph.D., Clemson University

Mitchell Fischer Dean of Health Sciences A.A.S., Brookdale Community College B.A., Thomas Edison State College J.D., Widener University School of Law

Sonja Haynes Dean of Workforce and Economic Development B.S.B.A., M.B.A., Western Carolina University

Barbara Putman Dean of Arts and Sciences B.A., Davidson College M.A., Ph.D., University of Connecticut

Philip G. Weast Dean of Student Services B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University Ed.D., The University of Georgia

PERSONNEL - FACULTY

Kennet Adamson English B.A., Georgia State University B.S., University of Florida M.A., Western Carolina University

Linda Aiken

Early Childhood B.S., M.A.Ed., Western Carolina University

Sarah Altman

Human Services B.S., M.A.Ed., Western Carolina University

Craig Allen

Culinary/Hospitality Program - LBJ Job Corps

James K. Allen Buildings and Grounds - LBJ Job Corps

Melissa AllisonBrooks

Medical Assisting A.A.S., Haywood Community College

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Kim Argo

Radiography A.A.S., Southwestern Community College B.S.R.S. Midwestern State University

Keith Ashe

Cement Mason - LBJ Job Corps



Michael Belcher

Emergency Medical Science A.A.S., Southwestern Community College B.S., M.H.S., Western Carolina University

Pam Bell

Coordinator of Distance Learning A.A.S., Southwestern Community College B.B.A., Montreat College

Kurt Berger

Computer Information Technology B.S., The Citadel M.S., East Carolina University

Mitchell Boudrot

Law Enforcement Training Certificate, Southwestern Community College B.A., Saint Mary’s College of Minnesota

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PERSONNEL - FACULTY

Mary Bradley

Tracy Chapple

William Brothers

L. Scott Cline

Bus. Adm. Entrepreneurship B.S., Southern Wesleyan University M.B.A., M.E., WCU Ed.S., Nova Southeastern University

Web & Computer Information Technologies B.S.B.A., Western Carolina University M.S., East Carolina University

Wendy Buchanan

Scott Clontz

Nursing A.A., Gardner-Webb University B.S., B.S.N., M.S., Western Carolina University

Advertising & Graphic Design A.A.S., Southwestern Community College B.S., Appalachian State University

Kelly Burch

Penny Cody

Mathematics B.S., Western Carolina University

Paralegal Technology B.B.A., J.D., The University of Georgia

Susan L. Cain

Communications B.A., University of Tulsa M.S., University of Louisiana

Matthew Cass

Physics/Physical Science B.S., M.S., Appalachian State University

Psychology B.A., The University of Georgia M.A., Western Carolina University

Business Clerical Oconaluftee Job Corps A.A.S., Southwestern Community College

Timothy Coffey

Criminal Justice A.A.S., Mitchell Community College B.S., M.B.A., Gardner-Webb University M.S., Appalachian State University

Barbara Connell

Nursing A.A.S., Valencia Community College B.S.N, M.S.N., Western Carolina University

PERSONNEL - FACULTY

Christopher N. Cox Respiratory A.A.S., Southwestern Community College

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Todd Doster

EMS Facilitator/ Coordinator Extension Education A.A.S., A.A.S., Southwestern Community College

Chris Cox

Debra Eavenson

English B.A., M.A., Appalachian State University

Medical Sonography A.A.S., Wallace State College B.S., Western Carolina University

Ashley Cunningham

Pamela Ensley

L. (Bucky) Dann

Owen Gibby

Criminal Justice A.A.S., Western Piedmont Community College, B.S., Gardner-Webb Univ., M.A.Ed., WCU Sociology B.A., St. Lawrence University M.Div., M.Phil., Ph.D., Drew University

Ceretta Davis

Culinary Technology A.A.S., Southwestern Community College

Michael Deaver

Computer and Electronics Engineering Technology A.A.S., Southwestern Community College B.S., WCU

Cosmetology A.A.S., Diploma, Southwestern Community College

English B.A., M.A., Western Carolina University

Frank Gunter Welding - LBJ Job Corps

Dale Hall

Medical Laboratory Technology A.A.S., Southwestern Community College B.S., M.A.Ed., Western Carolina University

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PERSONNEL - FACULTY

Ellen Heim

Brian P. Kane

Nursing B.S.N., Western Carolina University

Fine Arts B.F.A., Youngstown State University M.F.A., University of South Carolina

Eric Hester

Robert Keeling

Emergency Medical Science B.S., M.H.S., Western Carolina University

Advertising & Graphic Design A.A.S., Southwestern Community College B.F.A., American Intercontinental University

James Hippensteel

Andrea Kennedy

Jennifer Hippensteel

Susan Kimel

Robert Holt

Toni Knott

History B.A., M.A., The University of Montana

Writing Across the Curriculum B.A., King College M.A., Wheaton College

Real Estate B.S., M.S., CAGS, Virginia Tech

David Jons

Spanish B.A., Minnesota State University M.A., The University of Georgia

Medical Laboratory Technology/ Phlebotomy A.A.S., Henderson CC B.S., Eastern Kentucky University M.B.A., WCU

Physical Therapy B.A. Pfeiffer University B.S., The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Learning Assistance Center B.A., M.A., Western Carolina University

Pamela Leslie

Sonography A.A.S., Southwestern Community College Certificate, Greenville Tech

PERSONNEL - FACULTY

379

B. Eddie Lunsford

K. Eugene Norton English

Randy McCall

Derek Oetting

Biology B.S.Ed., M.A.Ed., Ed.S., Western Carolina University Ed.D., University of Tennessee

Cosmetology A.A.S., Southwestern Community College

B.A., Francis Marion University M.A., Clemson University Ph.D., University of Kentucky

Carpentry – Swain High School B.S., University of Central Missouri

Darrell McDaniels

Deanne Oppermann

Diania McRae

Diane Page

Danell Moses

Meg Rollins Petty

Forestry Conservation and Firefighting Oconaluftee Job Corps B.S., Western Carolina University

Accounting A.A., Tri-County Community College A.A.S., Southwestern Community College B.S.B.A., M.Acc., WCU

Business Administration – Office Administration/ Medical Office Administration B.S.B.A., M.A.Ed., Western Carolina University

David Myers Automotive Technology A.A.S., AshevilleBuncombe Technical Community College

Chemistry B.S., University of Wisconsin, Madison M.S., Stevens Institute of Technology

Physical Therapy B.G.S., University of Michigan, B.S., Univ. of Florida D.P.T., The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Radiography A.A.S., Southwestern Community College B.S., Western Carolina University M.S.R.S., Midwestern State University

Ronald W. Poor

Electronics Engineering Tech. Computer Engineering Tech. B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University

380

PERSONNEL - FACULTY

Carolyn Porter

Trevor Rundle

Robert Price

Amy Russ

Automotive Technology Franklin High School Certificate, Southwestern Community College

Developmental English A.A., Lake Sumter Community College B.S., University of Central Florida M.A.Ed., Saint Leo University

Debra Ray

Eric Sarratt

Cosmetology A.A.S., Southwestern Community College

Human Services B.S., Western Carolina University M.A., Appalachian State University

Matthew Reynolds

Travis Scruggs

Business Administration & Business Administration Electronic Commerce B.A., Gettysburg College J.D., University of Texas

Law Enforcement/ EMS - Extension Ed A.A.S., Southwestern Community College B.S., Western Carolina University

Kimberly Rice

Health Information B.S., Western Carolina University M.A., The College of Saint Scholastica

Tneshia Richards

Nursing Assistant A.A.S., Southwestern Community College B.S.N., M.S.N., Chamberlain College

Biology B.A., M.S., Indiana University

Fire and Rescue Coordintor

Hilary Seagle Mathematics B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University

Matthew Shirey

Carpentry – School of Alternatives (The HUB) B.S., Clarion University

PERSONNEL - FACULTY

Cyndi Slocumb

Networking B.S., University of Central Florida M.S., Old Dominion University

Kirk Stephens

Cyber Crime Technology B.S.B.A., M.B.A., Western Carolina University

381

Terry Tolle

Mathematics B.S., Northwestern Oklahoma State University M.S., Clemson University

Carol Tucker

Nursing A.S.N., B.S.N., Excelsior College M.A., Barry University

Rhonda Stephens Business Clerical

Sheri Turk

Program - LBJ Job Corps A.A.S., Southwestern Community College B.B.A., Montreat College

Early Childhood B.S., Georgia Southern University M.R.E., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary

Erin Sterling

James V. Waggener, Jr.

Respiratory A.A.S., Allegany College of Maryland B.S., Shenandoah University M.S., Northeastern University

Kimi Stevens

Nursing B.S., M.S., Western Carolina University

Jacquie Stikeleather Business Clerical Program – LBJ Job Corps B.S., Troy University

Mathematics B.S., Florida Institute of Technology M.S., University of Charleston

Penny Wells

Health Information Technology B.S., M.A., Western Carolina University Certificate, Southwestern Community College

Jeanette White

Civil Engineering Technology A.A., Florida Community College at Jacksonville B.S., University of North Florida

382

PERSONNEL - FACULTY Dawn Wick

Computer Information Technology B.A., University of North Carolina - Greensboro M.S., University of North Carolina – Pembroke

Paul Wolf

Outdoor Leadership B.S., Mankato State University M.A.Ed., Western Carolina University

PERSONNEL - STAFF

383

Darlene Anderson

Arnold Brooks

Educational Opportunities Director B.S., Excelsior College M.A., Rutgers University

Cleaning Technician

Jennifer Ashlock

Beatrice Buchanan

Administrative Assistant – Enrollment Services B.A., Texas A & M University; M.A., College of William & Mary M.A., M.A., Bangor Theological Seminary

Beverly Balliot

Accountant – Payroll B.S.B.A., Western Carolina University

Greg Bauguess

Executive Director of Institutional Advancement & College Foundation B.A., University of North Carolina Chapel Hill M.A., North Carolina State University

Nathan Beck

Cleaning Technician

Dominique Benson

Admissions Officer B.S., M.A.Ed., Western Carolina University

Kathleen Breedlove

Coordinator of Human Resources Certificate, Boulder Vocational-Technical Ctr. A.A.S., Southwestern Community College

Cleaning Technician

Claudia Buchanan

Administrative Assistant: Career Technologies B.F.A., Western Carolina University

Peter Buck

Counselor – Student Support Services B.A., St. John’s College M.A., Western Carolina University

Laurie Butler

Tutor Coordinator/ Academic Advisor A.A.S., Southwestern Community College B.S.B.A., M.E., Western Carolina University

Betsy Clayton

Administrative Assistant: Instruction and Student Services A.A.S., Southwestern Community College

Mindy Conner

Administrative Assistant: Educational Opportunities A.A.S., Southwestern Community College



PERSONNEL - STAFF

384

Cheryl Contino-Conner

Curtis Dowdle

John Cooper

Latresa Downs

Director of Student Support Services B.S., M.B.A., M.A.Ed., Western Carolina University

Electrician

Director of Public Safety A.A.S., Southwestern Community College B.S., Western Carolina University

Administrative Assistant: Extension Education

Nan Coulter

Lisa Fisher

Executive Assistant to the President and the Board of Trustees B.A., Idaho State University

Graphic Artist A.A.S., Southwestern Community College

Haitham Dawuid

Dianna Gilbert

Help Desk & PC Technician A.A.S., Southwestern Community College

College Information Center Coordinator B.A., The University of Arizona

Johnathan Dean

Joshua Goodman

Institutional Research Analyst B.S., M.Acc, Western Carolina University M.S., The University of Georgia

Grounds Technician Diploma, North Georgia Technical College

Christy Deaver

D. Fred Greene

Registrar A.A., Southwestern Community College B.S., M.A.Ed., Western Carolina University

Cleaning Technician

Nancy Dills

Lois Greene

Administrative Assistant – Macon Campus A.A.S., Southwestern Community College

Cleaning Technician

PERSONNEL - STAFF Rita Gregory

Educational Opportunities Coordinator A.A.S., Southwestern Community College B.S., M.A.Ed., Western Carolina University

Guy Hall

Cleaning Technician A.A.S., Southwestern Community College

385

Jennie Hyder Cleaning Technician

Devonne Jimison

Coordinator of GED Testing B.S.B.A., Western Carolina University

Anthony Henson

Toni E. Jones

Krystal HernandezDitmore

Dennis Keough

Financial Aid Assistant Director B.B.A., Mississippi State University M.A.Ed., Western Carolina University

Director: Distance Learning Student Success A.S., SUNY at Farmingdale, B.A., East Carolina University, M.A., University of Southern California

Toni Holland

Annette Kesgen

Accountant/Cashier A.A.S., Southwestern Community College

Upward Bound Director B.A., M.S., University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Vickie Holzknecht

Matthew Kirby

Clyanne Hyde

Patty Kirkley

Grounds Maintenance Supervisor

Computer Systems Technician A.A.S., Southwestern Community College B.S., East Carolina University

Record Technician, A.A.S., A.G.E., Southwestern Community College

Human Resources Specialist A.A., Lake-Sumter Community College B.S., University of Central Florida

College Liaison – Jackson B.A., M.A.Ed., Western Carolina University

Career Planning and Placement Coordinator B.A., M.A., Western Carolina University M.B.A., Angelo State University

PERSONNEL - STAFF

386

David Kochersberger

Brittany McConnell

Network Administrator A.A.S., Southwestern Community College

Administrative Assistant – Financial Aid A.A., Tri-County Community College A.A.S., North Georgia Technical College

Melody Lawrence

Andrea McCoy Garrett

Director of Financial Aid A.A., York College B.A., University of Nebraska, M.B.A., Western New England College

Financial Aid Counselor A.A.S., Thomas Edison State College B.S.B.A, University of South Carolina

Vickie Lepore

Melissa Medlin

Wade Lewis

Richard Middleton

Cleaning Supervisor

Courier/Mail Clerk

Dianne Lindgren

Delos Monteith

Library Director B.A., Florida Southern College M.A., University of South Florida

Institutional Research & Planning Officer B.S., WCU M.S., University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Jeff Marley

William Moore

Cheyenne Mathis

Todd Moses

Librarian B.A., University of Florida M.S., Florida State University

Program Coordinator – Fine and Heritage Arts B.F.A., Western Carolina University

Cleaning Technician

Continuing Education Registrar A.A.S., Southwestern Community College B.B.A., Montreat College

Facilities Maintenance/ Cleaning Technician B.S. Berea College

HVAC Mechanic

PERSONNEL - STAFF Erica Muse

Upward Bound Academic Advisor B.A., University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Vita Nations

Coordinator of Extension Education A.A.S., Southwestern Community College B.B.A., M.B.A., Montreat College

387

Karen Polyasko

Associate Comptroller A.B., Belmont Abbey College

Kathryn Posey

Institutional Development Associate B.S., Western Carolina University

Tonya Nifong

Amanda Pressley

Angelia Noland

Yvonne Price

Rita Norris

Lester Queen

Associate Comptroller B.S.B.A., Western Carolina University

Cleaning Technician

Kathy Owens

Michael Ramsey

Fairley Pollock

Sadie Reagan

Horticulturist A.A.S., A.A.S., Haywood Community College

College Liaison - Macon B.S., Western Carolina University

Administrative Assistant – Enrollment Services A.A., Southwestern Community College

Student Services Coordinator - Macon Campus B.A., Meredith College M.A.Ed., Ed.D., WCU

Administrative Assistant: Health Sciences B.A., Guilford College

Educational Opportunities Coordinator B.S., M.A.Ed. Western Carolina University

Coordinator of Procurement A.A., Gaston College B.A., Belmont Abbey College

Accountant B.S.B.A., M.B.A., Western Carolina University

PERSONNEL - STAFF

388

Chuck Reece

Henry Stephens

Director of Human Resources and Facility Development B.S., Clemson University M.B.A., Western Carolina University

Building Maintenance Supervisor

Cheryl Renfro

Scott Sutton

Upward Bound Academic Advisor B.A., Mars Hill College

Director Occupational Training A.A.S., SCC B.B.A., Montreat College M.A.Ed., WCU

Jason Sain

Tony Sutton

Testing Coordinator/ Enrollment Counselor B.S., Capella University

Maintenance Technician A.A.S., Southwestern Community College

Wesley Satterwhite

Wayne Sutton

Student Disability and Academic Engagement Coordinator B.A., Meredith College M.S., University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Media Support Technician A.A.S., Southwestern Community College B.S., DeVry University

Cathy Setser

Cynthia Thompson

Financial Aid Technician A.A.S., Haywood Community College

Richard Shoemaker

PC & Network Support Technician A.A.S., A.A.S., Certificate, Southwestern Community College

Martha Smith

Administrative Assistant: Public Safety Training A.A.S., Southwestern Community College

College Access Coordinator B.A., Wake Forest University

Michael Vaughn

PC & Network Support Technician A.A.S., Haywood Community College

Linda Venturo

Director of E-Learning Development and Technologies A.S., Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale B.S., M.P.A., Western Carolina University

PERSONNEL - STAFF

389

Suzanne Vincent

Kay Wolf

Patty Wall

Heather Wood

College Readiness Coordinator B.A., Iowa State University M.S.Ed., Southern Illinois University

User Support Manager A.A.S., Southwestern Community College B.S., East Carolina University

Educational Opportunities Coordinator B.A., Oklahoma Baptist University M.A.Ed., Western Carolina University

Accountant – Receivables B.S.B.A., Western Carolina University

Troy Whiteside

Jody Woodring

Jenny C. Williams

Nathan Woods

Director of Personal Enrichment and Professional Licensure B.S., Western Carolina University

Grounds Technician

Steve Wilson

David Young

Database Administrator B.S., Western Carolina University

Shipping/Receiving/ Inventory Clerk A.A.S., Certificate, Southwestern Community College

Administrative Assistant - Admissions A.A.S., A.A., Southwestern Community College B.S.B.A., WCU

Maintenance Technician

390

PERSONNEL - PART-TIME EMPLOYEES Abram, Susan, Anthropology B.S., M.A., Western Carolina University Ph.D., Auburn University Allen, Deborah, Educational Opportunities A.A., Central Piedmont Community College B.A., UNC Charlotte Alonso, Josephine, Educational Opportunities Arnold, Juanita, Educational Opportunities B.S., Western Carolina University Atterholt, Dan, Mathematics B.A., University of South Carolina M.M., Winthrop University Atwood, Thomas, English B.A., M.A., Youngstown State University M.S., Florida State University Banks, Jackie, Welding Barrett, Roy, Mathematics B.S., M.Ed., The University of Georgia Baron, Monica, Paralegal B.S.Ed., Western Carolina University J.D., Florida Coastal School of Law Barwatt, Brian, Surveying Technology A.A.S., Southwestern Community College B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University M.S., University of Tennessee Bazley, John, Table Gaming Beasley, Jeremy, Criminal Justice B.S., Appalachian State University Berryhill, Suzanne, Biology B.S., M.A.T., Western Carolina University Bigelow, Adam, Sustainability A.A.S., Haywood Community College B.S., Western Carolina University Bockstahler, Jean, Educational Opportunities B.A., The College of Saint Rose M.S.Ed., State University New York Bolado, Paula, English B.A., Univ. of North Carolina at Asheville M.A., Western Carolina University Boniface, Linda, Educational Opportunities B.S., University of Wisconsin Bradley, Misty, Table Gaming Bradley, Terry, Defensive Driving Brannon, John, Fine Arts B.S., M.S., The University of Tennessee Ph.D., State University of New York at Stony Brook Brendell, Kitty, Notary Public Buesch, Art, Mathematics B.S., University of Missouri – Rolla Burke, Cynthia J., Educational Opportunities B.S., Ball State University M.Ed., The University of Illinois Burnett, Ashley, Eduational Opportunities B.S., Western Carolina University Cadeau, Jeremy, Civil Engineering B.S., The University of North Carolina at Asheville

Campbell, Harold, Information Systems B.A., UNC-Charlotte M.B.A., Georgia State University Canty, Katie, Office Administration B.S., NC A & T State University M.S., Utah State University Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University Carothers, Sarah, Mathematics B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Carver, Chad, Table Gaming Chambless, Danielle, Educational Opportunities B.S.B.A., Western Carolina University Chockla, Andrew, Mathematics B.S., M.S., Western Carolina University Chockla, Malgorzata, Mathematics M.B.A., The Karol Adamiecki University of Economics in Katowice A.A.S., Southwestern Community College Cisneros, Pedro, Educational Opportunities Clapp, Amanda, Anthropology B.S., B.A., University of Massachusetts M.A., The University of Texas at Austin Claxton, Joseph, Educational Opportunities B.S., M.B.I.s., Georgia State University Clemmons, Kay, Educational Opportunities B.S., M.A., Western Carolina University Cloer, Carol, Music B.A., Charleston Southern University M.C.M., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary Cochran, Deborah, Biology B.S.Ed., M.S., Western Carolina University Cole, Tamera, Communications B.A., Auburn University M.A., Louisiana State University Conover, Russell, Educational Opportunities B.A., M.A., Western Carolina University Cooper, Clarence, Graphic Design B.A., University of North Carolina at Asheville Cooper, Robert T., Educational Opportunities B.A., Texas A & M University M.C.M., M.R.E., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary Cope, Carole C., Educational Opportunities B.A., Cumberland College Crespo, Patrick, Table Gaming Crockett, Rebecca, English A.A., Southwestern Community College B.A., Western Carolina University M.A., The University of Tennessee Cuellar, James, Table Gaming Danis, Joanna, Educational Opportunities B.A., M.A., The Eugeniusz Geppert Academy of Art in Wroclaw Davenport, Jenny, Physical Education A.A., Tri-County Community College B.S., M.H.S., Western Carolina University

PERSONNEL - PART-TIME EMPLOYEES Davis, Jody, Table Gaming Deakins, Sandra, Reading B.S.Ed., Georgia Southern College M.Ed., University of North Florida Decker, Veronica, Educational Opportunities A.A., Indian River State College B.A., University of South Florida DeHart, Jerry, Defensive Driving DeHart, Mary, Library Assistant A.A.S., Southwestern Community College DeHart, Savannah, History B.A., Western Carolina University M.A., East Carolina University Dellinger, Brenda, Educational Opportunities B.S., East Carolina University Duncan, John, Physical Education B.A., Florida International University M.A.Ed., Western Carolina University Durant, Nicholas, Table Gaming Edmonds, Genia, Educational Opportunities B.M.Ed., Mississippi University for Women Engle, Sidney, French B.A., B.A., M.A., The Univ. of Tennessee Faircloth-Smith, Cynthia, English M.A., Samford University Firdonsyah, Fnu, Table Gaming Foguel, Ana, Educational Opportunties Certificate, A.S., Parkland College B.A., Western Carolina University Ford, Carolyn, Civil Engineering B.S., Western Carolina University Fortner, Jennifer, Table Gaming Fox, Allison, Administrative Asst - Public Safety Training Fox, Sherry L., Developmental B.S., Western Carolina University Frady, Richard, Auto Safety Inspection Furnish, Patricia, Spanish B.A., Meredith College M.A., West Texas State Ph.D., University of Oklahoma Gift, Daniel, Table Gaming Gladden, Sandra, Biology B.S., Emory University M.S., Georgia State University Godsey, Katherine, Reading B.A., University of Central Florida M.Ed., University of North Florida Goodwin, Lynda, HRD B.S., B.S.Ed., WCU Grant, Allan, Educational Opportunities B.A., M.A., Wayne State University Ph.D., University of London Greene, Maria, Sociology A.S., Middle Georgia College B.A., Valdosta State University M.S., Georgia State University

391

Hall, Kevin Roy, Educational Opportunities B.S.B.A., Western Carolina University Hall, Phyllis Ann, Medical Lab. Techn. B.S., Western Carolina University Hallyburton, Chad, Biology B.S., North Carolina State University M.S., Western Carolina University Hanson, Sarah, English B.A., M.A., Western Carolina University Hardie, Barbara, English B.A., Belmont University M.F.A., University of Pittsburgh Hardin, Pamela, Accounting A.A.S., Southwestern Community College Harmon, Nancy, Psychology B.A., Mars Hill College M.A.Ed., Western Carolina University Harrison, Robert, Humanities A.A., Kessler Technical Training Center B.A., M.A.Ed., Western Carolina University Hart, Barbara, Biology B.S., M.S., Wright State University Hatch, Jason, Developmental Mathematics B.S.Ed., Western Carolina University Hawes, Michele, Criminal Justice A.A., B.A., M.S., Columbia College of Missouri Haynes, Elizabeth, Business B.A., Wake Forest University M.S., Florida International University Ed.D., North Carolina State University Hays, Ernest, Entrepreneurship B.S.B.M., University of Phoenix M.E., Western Carolina University Hedden, Connie, Cosmetology Certificate, Southwestern Community College Henson, Johnny, Electrical Technology A.A.S., Southwestern Community College Hess, Justin, Electronics A.A.S., Southwestern Community College Hines, Bridget, Educational Opportunities B.A., National University Hollingsworth, Ken, Geography B.S., M.A., Western Carolina University Hoos, David, Educational Opportunities A.A., University of Hartford, B.S.Ed., University of New York College at Cortland Hubbs, Rita, Chemistry B.S., Western Carolina University Huckabee, Buddy, Music B.S.Ed., M.S.Ed., Western Carolina University Ireland, Allen, English B.A. M.Ed., University of North Carolina Greensboro Jacobson, Julie, Art/Humanities B.F.A., Youngstown State University M.F.A., University of South Carolina

392

PERSONNEL - PART-TIME EMPLOYEES Luker, Jennifer, Nutrition James, Jenny, Library Assistant B.S., Western Carolina University M.A., Ph.D., University of St. Michael’s Maier, Jeffrey, Table Gaming College Matthews, David, Educational Opportunities Jarvinen, Phyllis, Psychology A.A., Northwest Florida State College Diploma, Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College B.A., University of Florida M.A., M.F.A., Western Carolina University Mauk, Dennis, Auto Dealers Jenkins, Melissa, Educational Opportunities McClure, Brian, English B.A., M.A., Western Carolina University A.S., Vincennes University McConnell, Billy, Job Corps B.A., Louisiana State University McIntosh, Michael, Mathematics Joest, Juliane, Educational Opportunities M.A., Western Governors University B.S., University of Maryland Johnson, Elizabeth, Art McManus, Erin, Success & Study Skills B.S., Lees-McRae College M.F.A., Georgia State University M.S., Wake Forest University Johnson, Randall, Table Gaming Jones, Barbara, Educational Opportunities Merritt, Elaine, Mathematics B.S., Mercer University A.B., Ripon College M.A., Piedmont College M.Ed., Ed.D., Temple University Messier, Peter, Surveying Technology Jones, Jason, Table Gaming Judson, Pamela, New Century Scholars A.A.S., B.S., University of Maine Coordinator M.S., Purdue University B.S., Ohio University Meus, Norrie, English M.S., Indiana University B.A., M.A., Western Carolina University Kearney, Denise, Office Administration M.A., North Carolina State University A.A.S., Wayne Community College Mira-Knippel, Suzanne, Early Childhood B.S., Mount Olive College B.A., M.A., The University of North M.S., East Carolina University Carolina at Chapel Hill Kehrer, Grace, English Morgan, Ernest, Econ & Political Science B.A., University of Central Florida A.B., M.A., The University of Georgia M.A., University of South Florida Mudge, Kelly, Table Gaming Keough, Patrick, Art Murphy, Kenyon, Policital Science B.F.A., New York Institute of Technology B.B.A., The University of Georgia M.F.A., East Carolina University J.D., Harvard Law School Kiesel, Alene, Educational Opportunities Myler, Patricia, Office Administration Kremlick, Linda, Educational Opportunities B.S.Ed., M.B., Georgia State University B.A., M.A., Michigan State University Nissly, Elizabeth, Educational Opportunities, Lambert, Patrick, Table Gaming A.A., Surry Community College Lance, Richard, Psychology B.A., Western Carolina University B.A., Western Carolina University Norton, Ryan, English M.S., Rollins College B.A., M.A., Western Carolina University Langford, Carole, Educational Opportunities Ockey, Christine, Educational Opportunities B.A., University of South Carolina B.A., Barry College M.S., Nova Southeastern University Olvera, Faviola, Educational Opportunities LaQuerre, Jason, Electrical Technology O’Dell, Dana, Mathematics A.A.S., Southwestern Community College B.S., B.S.Ed., M.S., M.Acc., WCU Lavere, Galadriel, Educational Opportunities Orr, Harrison, Electronics and Computer Engineering A.A., Southwestern Community College A.A.S., A.G.E., Southwestern B.A., M.A., Western Carolina University Community College Lebo, Sammijo, Table Gaming Pachelski, Leszek, Table Gaming Lillard, Steven, Criminal Justice Patterson, Rebecca, Educational Opportunities B.S., Western Carolina University B.S., Kennesaw State University Lohmeyer, Steven, Art Payne, Vianne, Communications B.S., Western Carolina University B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina M.A., University of Kentucky at Greensboro Lomax, Harold, Psychology Ploch, Maria Spanish B.S., Lubbock Christian University B.F.A., Milikin University M.A., Adams State College M.A., University of Illinois Ph.D., Saybrook University

PERSONNEL - PART-TIME EMPLOYEES

393

Poindexter, Carroll, Electricial Teran, Luisa, Educational Opportunities Quinn, Anthony, Physical Education B.A., Universidad Católica Andrés Bello B.A., The College of Idaho M.A.,Ed., Universidad Fermin Toro Ray, Clyde, History Todd, Vicki Lyn, Dev. Mathematics B.A., Western Carolina University B.S., M.B.A., Western Carolina University M.A., East Tennessee State University Turlington, Matthew, Art B.F.A., Western Carolina University Reed, Tara, Table Gaming M.F.A., University of Colorado Reisinger, Jennifer, LAC VanOrder, Jill, Educational Opportunities B.A., Carson-Newman College AA., Central Florida Community College Rinaldi, Carl, Table Gaming B.S., Saint Leo University Robertson, James, Business Waldroop, Benjamin, Job Corps A.A.S, Southwestern Community College Wampler, Steven, Psychology B.S.B.M., University of Phoenix B.A., M.S., Mississippi State University Roman, Joseph, Networking Wesolick, Duane, History B.A., M.A., University of Florida B.S., Emory Riddle Aeronautic University Romanski, Jacqueline, Psychology B.S., M.S., Florida International University M.A., Western Carolina University Ross, Katherine, Educational Opportunities Whitaker, William, Business A.A., St. Johns River State College B.A., St. Olaf College B.A., J.D., Florida State University Rowe, Anna, Table Gaming Ruby, Diane, Health and Wellness White, Deborah, Table Gaming Wilcher, Rixey, Educational Opportunities B.S., State Univ. of New York at Buffalo B.S., Old Dominion University M.S., University of North Florida M.A., College of William and Mary M.S., Nova Southeastern University Williamson, William, Accounting Rupkinsi, Brandon, Mathematics B.S.B.A., M.Acc., Western Carolina B.S., M.S., Western Carolina University Russell, Margie, Educational Opportunities University Wilson, Nancie, Psychology B.A., MA.Ed., Western Carolina B.A., M.A., University of Central Florida University Wilson, Tremaine, LAC Sanders, Magdalena, Edu. Opportunities B.S., University of Georgia B.A., University of Wroclaw Wright, Lee, Educational Opportunities Sanzo, David, Table Gaming B.S., Mississippi State University Sechser, Clifford, Surveying Technology Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Shoffeit, Amy, Educational Opportunities University B.A., Southeastern University Wylupek, Deborah, Educational Opportunities Shuman, Derek, Table Gaming B.S.Ed., Western Carolina University Siweumptewa, Jennifer, Culinary Diploma, A.A.S., Southwestern Community College Smith, Carol, Office Administration Smith, David, Table Gaming Smith, Gregory, Humanities B.A., Palm Beach Atlantic University M.Div., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary Smith, Jerrold, Educational Opportunities B.A., University of Maryland University College Snover, Crystal, Educational Opportunities A.A., Cape Fear Community College B.S., Univ. of NC Wilmington Speights, Randy, HVAC Stephens, Jack, Information Technologies A.A.S., Southwestern Community College B.A., The UNC at Asheville M.S., East Carolina University Taylor, Harry, Eduational Opportunities B.A., Emory & Henry College

394

INDEX ABOUT SCC................................................................................................................. 1-10 Academic Advising..............................................................................................................26 ACADEMIC INFORMATION.................................................................................. 25-38 Academic Forgiveness Procedure................................................................................... 35-36 Academic Probation............................................................................................................36 ACADEMIC PROGRAMS OF STUDY.................................................................... 71-248 Academic Suspension..........................................................................................................36 Accounting.................................................................................................................... 74-75 Accreditation and Approval...................................................................................................4 Add/Drop...........................................................................................................................26 Administration.......................................................................................................... 373-374 ADMISSIONS/ENROLLMENT................................................................................ 11-24 Admissions/Enrollment Policy.............................................................................................12 Admissions/Enrollment Admission to the College...............................................................12 Admissions/Enrollment Admission to a Program of Study...................................................13 Admissions/Enrollment Admission Refusal.........................................................................12 Admissions/Enrollment False Information..........................................................................12 Admissions/Enrollment Registered Sex Offenders...............................................................12 Advertising and Graphic Design.................................................................................... 76-77 Air Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Technology............................................. 78-79 Alpha Beta Gamma International Business Honor Society - Alpha Omega Chapter............34 Ambassadors.......................................................................................................................50 Annual Academic Awards Ceremony...................................................................................33 Application for Admission...................................................................................................13 Application to Selective Admissions Health Science Programs.............................................14 Associate Degrees................................................................................................................28 Associate in Arts - College Transfer................................................................................ 80-87 Associate in Fine Arts.................................................................................................... 88-89 Associate in General Education...........................................................................................90 Associate in Science....................................................................................................... 91-96 Attendance Requirements..............................................................................................17, 26 Auditing Courses.................................................................................................................30 Automotive Systems Technology................................................................................... 97-99 Board of Trustees...............................................................................................................372 Bookstore............................................................................................................................50 Business Administration............................................................................................ 100-101 Business Administration - Electronic Commerce....................................................... 102-103 Business Administration - Entrepreneurship.............................................................. 104-105 Business Administration - Office Administration....................................................... 106-107 Business & Institutional Development................................................................................67 Business and Industry Center..............................................................................................67 Career Center......................................................................................................................50 Career & College Promise...................................................................................................18 Centers/Campuses...............................................................................................................10 Certificate...........................................................................................................................28 Change of Curriculum........................................................................................................22 Change of Name/Address....................................................................................................22 Change of Schedule.............................................................................................................26 Civil Engineering Technology................................................................................... 108-109 Clubs and Organizations.....................................................................................................51 College Access.....................................................................................................................18 College Calendar.............................................................................................................. ii-iii College Tech Prep................................................................................................................18 College Transfer Pathway - Business & Economics............................................................110 College Transfer Pathway - Engineering & Mathematics...................................................111

INDEX College Transfer Pathway - Humanities & Social Sciences.................................................112 College Transfer Pathway - Life & Health Sciences............................................................113 College Vision.......................................................................................................................2 Commencement Application...............................................................................................27 Community Link - Interactive Television............................................................................30 Compliance...........................................................................................................................2 Completion of General Core Requirements........................................................................28 Computer Engineering Technology........................................................................... 114-115 Computer Information Technology........................................................................... 116-117 Computer Information Technology - Networking.............................................................118 Conduct Standards..............................................................................................................51 CONTINUING EDUCATION.................................................................................. 61-66 Continuing Education - Admission Eligibility.....................................................................62 Continuing Education - Community Service......................................................................63 Continuing Education - Computer Training.......................................................................63 Continuing Education - Cost..............................................................................................62 Continuing Education - Course Repetition.........................................................................62 Continuing Education - General Information.....................................................................62 Continuing Education - Healthcare Professions Training.....................................................63 Continuing Education - Heritage Arts................................................................................63 Continuing Education - Online Programs...........................................................................64 Continuing Education - Pre-Registration/Enrollment.........................................................66 Continuing Education - Professional Licensure and Certification........................................64 Continuing Education - Public Safety Training...................................................................64 Continuing Education - Refund Policy...............................................................................66 Continuing Education - Teacher Certificate Renewal..........................................................65 Cooperative Education........................................................................................................31 Cosmetology............................................................................................................. 119-121 Cosmetology - Manicuring/Nail Technology.....................................................................122 Course Credit by Examination............................................................................................31 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS.................................................................................... 249-370 Course Substitution............................................................................................................36 Credit for AP & CLEP.................................................................................................. 23-24 Criminal Justice Technology...................................................................................... 123-124 Criminal Justice Technology - Latent Evidence.......................................................... 125-126 Culinary Arts............................................................................................................ 127-128 Curriculum Course Prerequisites.........................................................................................36 Cyber Crime Technology........................................................................................... 129-130 Deadlines for Selective Admission Applications...................................................................14 Dean’s List...........................................................................................................................33 Degrees...............................................................................................................................28 Developmental Studies.............................................................................................. 131-132 Diploma..............................................................................................................................28 Disciplinary Suspension......................................................................................................36 Distance Learning...............................................................................................................29 Early Childhood Education....................................................................................... 133-134 Early College High School..................................................................................................18 EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES......................................................................... 57-60 Educational Opportunities - Admission Eligibility..............................................................58 Educational Opportunities - Adult Basic Skills, GED Preparation and Adult High School.....58 Educational Opportunities - Basic Skills, Literacy and GED Preparation............................58 Educational Opportunities - Compensatory Education (CED)...........................................59 Educational Opportunities - Cost.......................................................................................58 Educational Opportunities - Course Repetition..................................................................58 Educational Opportunities - English As A Second Language (ESL).....................................59

395

396

INDEX Educational Opportunities - General Education Development (GED) Testing....................59 Educational Opportunities - General Information...............................................................62 Educational Opportunities - Human Resource Development..............................................60 Electrical/Electronics Technology......................................................................................135 Electronics Engineering Technology.......................................................................... 136-137 Emergency Medical Science...................................................................................... 138-141 Environmental Science Technology........................................................................... 142-143 Expenses..............................................................................................................................40 Faculty...................................................................................................................... 375-382 Final Registration Day.........................................................................................................21 FINANCIAL INFORMATION................................................................................... 39-48 Financial Aid - Eligibility Requirements..............................................................................43 Financial Aid - Financial Need...........................................................................................43 Financial Aid - How to Apply for Financial Aid..................................................................45 Financial Aid - Other Programs...........................................................................................44 Financial Aid - Programs at SCC (Grants, Scholarships, Student Loans, Work-Study).................44 Financial Aid - Purpose.......................................................................................................43 Financial Aid - Satisfactory Academic Progress....................................................................46 Financial Aid - Special Circumstances.................................................................................47 Financial Aid - Withdrawals................................................................................................46 Gainful Employment Compliance Information...................................................................19 General Occupational Technology.....................................................................................144 Governance...........................................................................................................................2 Grades.................................................................................................................................32 Grades in Developmental Courses.......................................................................................31 Grading System...................................................................................................................32 Graduating with Honors.....................................................................................................33 Health Information Technology................................................................................ 145-147 Health Information Technology - Health Informatics................................................ 148-149 Health Information Technology - Medical Coding............................................................150 Holt Library........................................................................................................................52 Home Schooled Students....................................................................................................19 Honors/Academic Organizations.........................................................................................33 Human Services Technology...................................................................................... 151-153 Human Services Technology - Substance Abuse......................................................... 154-156 Hybrid (HY).......................................................................................................................29 ID Cards.............................................................................................................................53 Important Phone Numbers............................................................................................... 8-9 Infant/Toddler Care..........................................................................................................157 Institutional Goals.................................................................................................................2 Institutional Profile...............................................................................................................3 International Students.........................................................................................................20 Jackson Campus LAC.........................................................................................................53 Jackson Campus Map............................................................................................................5 Keys for Classroom Success.................................................................................................69 Late Registration and Drop/Add.........................................................................................21 Learning Assistance Center..................................................................................................53 Library (Holt).....................................................................................................................52 Library Cards......................................................................................................................53 Licensing of Graduates........................................................................................................35 Macon Campus................................................................................................................. 6-7 Macon Campus LAC..........................................................................................................53 Medical Assisting....................................................................................................... 158-160 Medical Laboratory Technology................................................................................ 161-164 Medical Office Administration.................................................................................. 165-166

INDEX Medical Sonography.................................................................................................. 167-170 Message from the President....................................................................................................i Minimum Course Work Requirements...............................................................................29 Mission Statement.................................................................................................................3 Multiple Degrees/Diplomas/Certificates..............................................................................29 mySCC/Web Mail/Information Technology.......................................................................17 National Technical Honor Society......................................................................................35 NC Senior Citizens.......................................................................................................20, 41 Networking Technology - CISCO.....................................................................................172 New Century Scholars.........................................................................................................18 Non-Title IV Recipients......................................................................................................42 Nursing Assistant...................................................................................................... 181-182 Nursing Associate Degree.......................................................................................... 173-178 Occupational Education Associate............................................................................. 183-184 Occupational Therapy Assistant................................................................................ 185-186 Orientation.........................................................................................................................17 Other Enrollment Policies...................................................................................................19 Other Enrollment Procedures..............................................................................................22 Other Fees...........................................................................................................................40 Outdoor Leadership.................................................................................................. 187-190 Paralegal Technology................................................................................................. 191-192 Part-time Employees................................................................................................. 390-393 Payment of Tuition and Fees...............................................................................................41 Performance Measures and Standards (2011)....................................................................248 PERSONNEL.......................................................................................................... 371-393 Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society - Alpha Eta Nu Chapter...............................35 Phlebotomy............................................................................................................... 193-195 Physical Therapist Assistant....................................................................................... 196-198 Policies/Procedures........................................................................................................ 35-37 Pre-Majors in Arts.............................................................................................................199 Pre-Majors in Arts - Business Administration, Accounting, Economics, Finance & Marketing............................................................................................. 200-201 Pre-Majors in Arts - Criminal Justice......................................................................... 202-203 Pre-Majors in Arts - Elementary Education............................................................... 204-206 Pre-Majors in Arts - English Education..................................................................... 207-208 Pre-Majors in Arts - History...................................................................................... 209-210 Pre-Majors in Arts - Middle Grades Education.......................................................... 211-213 Pre-Majors in Arts - Nursing..................................................................................... 214-215 Pre-Majors in Arts - Physical Education.................................................................... 216-217 Pre-Majors in Arts - Political Science......................................................................... 218-219 Pre-Majors in Arts - Psychology................................................................................. 220-221 Pre-Majors in Arts - Social Science/Secondary Education.......................................... 222-223 Pre-Majors in Arts - Sociology................................................................................... 224-225 Pre-Majors in Arts - Special Education...................................................................... 226-228 President’s List.....................................................................................................................33 Previously Earned Credit.....................................................................................................22 Priority Registration............................................................................................................21 Program/Course Key.........................................................................................................247 Program Titles............................................................................................................... 72-73 Radiography.............................................................................................................. 229-233 Readmission........................................................................................................................21 Real Estate Licensing................................................................................................. 234-235 Refund Policy (Curriculum).......................................................................................... 41-42 Registration.........................................................................................................................21 Repeating Courses...............................................................................................................36

397

398

INDEX Residency for Tuition Determination..................................................................................19 Respiratory Therapy.................................................................................................. 236-238 SCC Honors Program.........................................................................................................34 School Age Education............................................................................................... 239-240 Seriously Under-Prepared Students......................................................................................19 Service Excellence..................................................................................................................4 Small Business Center.........................................................................................................67 Southwestern Community College Foundation, Inc..............................................................4 Specialized Programmatic Accrediting and Approval Agencies...............................................4 Staff........................................................................................................................... 383-389 State Refund Policy.............................................................................................................42 Steps to Enroll.....................................................................................................................13 Student Grade Appeal.........................................................................................................31 Student ID’s........................................................................................................................53 Student Information............................................................................................................54 STUDENT LIFE.......................................................................................................... 49-56 Student Life........................................................................................................................54 Student Policies & Procedures.............................................................................................54 Student Records..................................................................................................................37 Student Right-to-Know Information...................................................................................55 Student Support Services.....................................................................................................55 Support Services for Students with Disabilities....................................................................55 Table of Contents.................................................................................................................iv Teleweb (TW).....................................................................................................................30 Testing.......................................................................................................................... 15-17 ACCUPLACER Placement...........................................................................................