Amistad - Teaneck Public Schools

Amistad - Teaneck Public Schools

Curriculum Maps Teaneck Social Studies Curriculum Grades 2, 4, 5, & 7 To the New Jersey Amistad Web-Based Curriculum Prepared by: Marisa M. King, Ed...

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Curriculum Maps

Teaneck Social Studies Curriculum Grades 2, 4, 5, & 7 To the New Jersey Amistad Web-Based Curriculum

Prepared by: Marisa M. King, Ed.D. Supervisor of Social Studies, Business & Practical Arts February 8, 2012

The New Jersey Amistad Curriculum

Teaneck Social Studies Curriculum Gr. 2 The second grade curriculum focuses on the study of Community, Map Skills, Native Americans, Exploring the U.S. and Exploring the World.

Note: Unit 1 in the Teaneck curriculum engages students in the study of a variety of communities, community leadership, transportation, and communication within the community.

Unit 1- Communities Students will be able to explore their community and compare it to other communities. Objective 1: What is Social Studies? Students will be able to define Social Studies. Students will be able to recognize Social Studies components. Objective 2: Using Atlases, Globes and Maps Students will be able to recognize the different parts of an atlas, globe and map. Objective 3: Rules, Laws and Local Governments Students will be able to distinguish between rules and laws. Students will be able to identify the responsibilities of local government. Objective 4: Local Government Students will be able to: Define government. Discuss who makes and enforces community laws. Identify other responsibilities of local government. Objective 5: Places in Communities Students will be able to list places found in communities. Objective 6: Places in Communities Students will be able to classify places in communities into six categories. Objective 7: Comparing Communities Students will be able to compare their own community with another community. Generalize about features of all communities.

Prepared by M. King Grade 2

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Objective 8: Rural and Urban Communities Students will be able to recognize differences between rural and urban communities. Objective 9: Rural and Urban Communities Students will be able to identify photos of rural and urban communities and complete a chart using atlas photos. Objective 10: Rural and Urban Communities Students will be able to identify urban and rural communities. Students will be able to decide what type of community Teaneck is. Objective 11: Community Jobs Students will be able to use a map to list jobs in a community. Use an atlas to list jobs in a community. Compare their jobs in their own community with jobs in other communities. Objective 12: Goods and Services Students will be able to list workers who produce goods. Students will be able to list workers who provide services. Objective 13: Producers and Consumers Students will be able to identify producers in a community. Students will be able to identify consumers in a community. Objective 14: Resources Students will be able to identify the different types of resources needed to bring goods to the consumer. Objective 15: Transportation Students will be able to define transportation. Students will be able to classify types of transportation. Students will be able to identify types of transportation in their own community. Objective 16: Communication Students will be able to define communication. Students will be able to identify types of communication. Students will be able to identify ways to communicate in their own community. Prepared by M. King Grade 2

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Unit 1 - Social Studies skills This unit will emphasize skill-based learning: reading and interpreting maps, census data, graphs, charts, timelines, primary and secondary sources, and points of view. Teachers will introduce the students to the historian’s craft (interpretation and narration).

Unit 2 – Map Skills and Geography Awareness Students will identify symbols and abbreviations used on a U.S. map. They will locate natural and cultural features. Students will also identify three types of landforms in the United States. Students will locate New Jersey and identify its natural and cultural features. Finally, students will use cardinal and intermediate directions to locate places and objects. Objective 1: Students will be able to demonstrate that a map is a drawing of a view from directly above. Students will be able to locate places on a map by comparing it with a bird’s-eye view of the location. Objective 2: Students will demonstrate an ability to use map key to identify information on a map. Objective 3: Students will be able to draw symbols for natural features on a map. Students will be able to identify how people use natural features. Objective 4:. Students will demonstrate an ability to the use map symbols. Objective 5: Students will be able to review colors, symbols, and features on a map. Objective 6: Students will be able to recognize two-letter abbreviations for states and identify states. Objective 7: Students will be able to identify natural features that are near various cities. Objective 8 Students will be able to use a raised relief map to understand high and low landforms. Students will be able to demonstrate how flat maps use symbols to show landforms. Objective 9: Students will use the four cardinal directions on a globe, on a map and in the classroom. Students will use the in-between directions on a map and in the classroom.

Prepared by M. King Grade 2

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Unit 2 - Indigenous civilizations of the Americas The student will acquire understanding of the Americas, the region’s geography and settlement patterns, the emergence of indigenous civilizations, and their diverse cultures.

Unit 3 - Native Americans Students will explore four Native American tribes by comparing and contrasting their ways of living. Objective 1: Students will be able to locate the regions of four Native American tribes and identify similarities and differences among the tribes. Students will also learn about maps and charts. Objective 2: Students will be able to identify the customs, values, and heritage of the Inuit tribe in a Shared Reading lesson. They will also be able to identify the types of shelters they made, the kinds of food they ate and the type of clothing they wore. Objective 3: Students will be able to compare and contrast the story the Inuit Cinderella by Brittany Marceau-Chenkie with the modern version of Cinderella (to prepare for this lesson, please read in advance the modern version of Cinderella). Objective 4: Students will be able to identify the customs, values, and heritage of the Iroquois tribe in a Shared Reading lesson. They will also be able to identify the types of shelters they made, the kinds of food they ate and the type of clothing they wore Objective 5: Students will be able to identify the customs, values, and heritage of the Iroquois tribe in a Shared Reading lesson. They will also be able to complete a class book based on the story pattern of Giving Thanks: A Native American Good Morning Message. Objective 6: Students will be able to identify the customs, values, and heritage of the Sioux tribe in a Shared Reading lesson. They will also be able to identify the types of shelters they made, the kinds of food they ate and the type of clothing they wore.

Prepared by M. King Grade 2

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Objective 7: Students will learn about the uses of the buffalo and create a booklet identifying some of the uses of the buffalo. Objective 8: Students will be able to identify the customs, values, and heritage of the Navajo tribe in a Shared Reading lesson. They will also be able to identify the types of shelters they made, the kinds of food they ate and the type of clothing they wore. Objective 9: Students will be able to design and create a Navajo necklace Objective 10: Students will be able to compile their work created throughout the unit and bind the pockets together. Note: Units 4 & 5 in the Teaneck curriculum incorporate the use of literature, primary source pictures, maps, globes, and other instructional resources to engage students in the study of American culture and cultures from around the world.

Unit 4 – Exploring the US Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to think analytically about how past and present interactions of people, cultures, and the environment shape the American heritage. Students will study the lives of various cultural groups. Students will learn how communities change over time and explore key figures, landmarks, and symbol in American history to gain a better understanding of the richness of American culture, traditions, beliefs, and values using the following figures, symbols, and landmarks: ¾ Cultural and natural features of New Jersey ¾ Symbols and landmarks of New Jersey ¾ Mount Rushmore ¾ Philip Reid and the Statue of Freedom ¾ Jacob Lawrence ¾ Langston Hughes ¾ Benjamin Carson ¾ Fannie Lou Hamer ¾ Marian Wright Edelman ¾ Sonia Sotomayor ¾ Albert Pujols ¾ Maya Lin ¾ TET: Vietnamese New Year’s Celebration

Prepared by M. King Grade 2

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Objective 1: Students will be able to identify symbols and landmarks of New Jersey. Students will be able to identify cultural and natural features using a map of New Jersey. Objective 2: Students will be able to recognize that a community has a history. Students will be able to recognize that natural features affect a community’s history. Students will be able to map changes in a community. Objective 3: Students will be able to recognize that natural features affect a community’s history. Students will be able to map changes in a community. Students will be able to recognize that communities continue to change. Students will be able to map future changes in a community. Objective 4: Students will be able to identify symbols of the United States. Objective 5: Students will be able to identify landmarks of the United States. Objective 6: Students will be introduced to story of Philip Reid and the Statue of Freedom. Objective 7: Students will use a labeled photograph of the Statue of Freedom to identify key components of the statue. Objective 8: Students will gain a greater appreciation for the artwork of Jacob Lawrence and learn how he told stories through his narrative painting style (story painting) by viewing a slide show of the migration series. • •

Prepared by M. King Grade 2

Be able to identify his work based on the elements of color Create their own work, borrowing the style of Jacob Lawrence by using the same bold colors, and strong geometric shapes in the human figures

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Objective 9: Students will be able to read and discuss several short poems by Langston Hughes. • •



write their own stanza in the style of Langston Hughes. Share and discuss the issues of freedom and equality that Hughes presents in his poems. reflect on a favorite poem by Langston Hughes.

Objective 10: Students will learn about the achievements of Benjamin Carson and the character traits that he values. Objective 11: Students will lean about the life and work of Fannie Lou Hamer. Objective 12: Students will learn about the life and work of Marian Wright Edelman, founder and President of the Children's Defense Fund, and the first African American woman admitted to the Mississippi state bar. Objective 13: Students will learn about the experiences and stories of Hispanic immigrants, what challenges they faced, where they are in the U.S., what culture they brought to the U.S., and how the immigrants affect U.S. economics and policy. Objective 14: Students will learn about the life and work of Sonya Sotomayor. Objective 15: Students will be able to learn about the life and work of Albert Pujols. Objective 16: Students will be able to learn about the experiences and stories of Asian American immigrants, what challenges they faced, where they are in the U.S., what culture they brought to the U.S., and how the immigrants affect U.S. economics and policy.

Prepared by M. King Grade 2

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Objective 17: Students will be able to identify the similarities and differences between traditions in the Vietnamese New Year, TET, with the traditions of several holidays celebrated in America. Students will name the symbol of the lunar year they were born in and compare the description of that year with how they perceive themselves. Unit 5 – Exploring the World Experiencing the seven continents through literature and maps. In this Unit students participate in a folktale journey. Students will read folktales from a variety of different cultures and visit all seven continents Objective 2: Students will be able to label the continents and the four oceans on a blank world map. Objective 1: Students will be able to create a passport in preparation to travel and learn about each of the seven continents. The students will be introduced to The Continent Song. They will practice singing the song throughout the unit. Key Terms/Concepts: The World continents North America South America Antarctica Europe Africa Asia Australia Atlantic Ocean Pacific Ocean Indian Ocean Arctic Ocean Unit 3 - The emerging Atlantic world (Native Americans, Africans, Europeans) The student will acquire a historical Prepared by M. King Grade 2

Covered in Grades 4 & 5

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understanding of African societies and ancient kingdoms. Students also will understand European exploration and colonization, interactions among Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans, the forms of exploitation and oppression, and how the values, traditions, and institutions of all of these peoples helped to shape the early American colonies. Unit 4 - Establishment of a New Nation/Independence to Republic The student will acquire understanding of European colonization in the Americas. The students will understand the causes of the American War for Independence, its principles, and its impact on American society and institutions.

Covered in Grades 4 & 5

Unit 5 - The Constitution and the Covered in Grades 4, 5, & 7 Continental Congress The student will learn the principles of democratic citizenship through the study of the Constitution and its origins, key principles, processes, functions, and limitations. Unit 6 - The Evolution of a New Nation Covered in Grade 5 State The student will acquire a historical understanding of the expansion of capitalism, and the growth of a market economy, the entrenchment of slavery and its expansion into newly acquired territories, as well as the expropriation of Native Americans and the atrocities inflicted upon them. Unit 7 - The Civil War and Covered in Grade 7 Reconstruction (1861–1877) The student will acquire an understanding of the complex causes and military strategies of the Civil War as well as the reasons for the outcome. The students will understand the meanings of Reconstruction and the ways in which the nation and its people struggled to construct a new social, political, and Prepared by M. King Grade 2

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economic order.

Unit 8 - Post-Reconstruction and the Origins of the Progressive Era A summary of the major issues that were discussed throughout the year, students will be able to identify major historical trends over time and assess their impact on late 19th century America. The students will see historical relationships and where these themes overlap. Unit 9 - America Confronts the 20th Century and the Emergent Modern America

Covered in Grade 7

Covered in Grade 7

America confronts the 20th century The student will acquire historical understanding of the problems the nation faced, the social/political reforms introduced by the Progressives at the local, state and national levels; the changing roles of minorities and women, the growth of African American social, political, cultural and economic institutions, the expansion of capitalism, the unionization of labor, the intensification of racial segregation, xenophobia, increased literacy and its implications, and the emergence of American imperialism. An emergent modern America: domestic and foreign issues and context The student will acquire understanding of the complexity of historical causation, and the consequences of World War I.

Prepared by M. King Grade 2

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Unit 10 – America in the 1920s and 1930s; Cultural, Political, and Intellectual Development/The New Deal, Industrialization, and Global Conflict

Covered in detail at the high school level

America in the 1920s and 1930s; cultural, political, and intellectual development The student will acquire historical understanding of society and the business boom in the1920s, the social effects of the Great Depression and reforming society through the New Deal. The New Deal, industrialization, and global conflict The student will acquire historical and geographical understanding of the circumstances, objectives, strategies and activities of dictatorships in Italy, the Soviet Union, Japan and Germany that led to World War II and to analyze and formulate an understanding of issues related to the universal human rights. Unit 11 – America in the Aftermath of Global Conflict: Domestic and Foreign Challenges, Implications and Consequences/the Era of Reform

Covered in detail at the high school level

America in the aftermath of global conflict: domestic and foreign challenges, implications and consequences The student will acquire a historical understanding of the ideological debates and confrontations of democracy, capitalism, socialism and communism; the arms race, and the consequences of foreign and domestic policies in the 1950s. Era of reform: the 1950s and 1960s Prepared by M. King Grade 2

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The student will gain historical understanding of domestic and foreign policies in the 1960s, the Civil Rights Movement, the Women’s Movement, Native American struggles, the Environmental Movement, and the effect of the Vietnam conflict on United States society. UNIT 12 – National and Global Debates, Conflicts, and Developments/America Faces the 21st Century

Covered in detail at the high school level

Post-civil rights and Vietnam era: national and global debates, conflicts and developments The student will gain historical understanding of the Nixon years, the expansion and the re-definition of executive powers, the Conservative Movement, the fall of Communism in Europe and the emergence of a new global economy. America faces the 21st century An examination of contemporary, domestic and foreign policy issues; social, cultural, economic and political future.

Prepared by M. King Grade 2

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The New Jersey Amistad Curriculum

Teaneck Social Studies Curriculum Gr. 4 The fourth grade curriculum focuses on the study of New Jersey with themes such as: Civics, Government, Geography, People, & History.

Unit 1 - Social Studies skills This unit will emphasize skill-based learning: reading and interpreting maps, census data, graphs, charts, timelines, primary and secondary sources, and points of view. Teachers will introduce the students to the historian’s craft (interpretation and narration).

Unit 2- Map Skills Map skills help us make sense of our place in the world. Using maps as tools enables students to expand their spatial thinking and visualize different locations on the Earth. Objective 1: Students will be able to read and interpret different types of maps. Unit Topics Geography Survey & Introduction Basic Map Skills Using a Map Key and Scale Types of Maps Latitude & Longitude Reading a Time Zone Map

Unit 2 - Indigenous civilizations of the Americas The student will acquire understanding of the Americas, the region’s geography and settlement patterns, the emergence of indigenous civilizations, and their diverse cultures. and Unit 3 - The emerging Atlantic world (Native Americans, Africans, Europeans) The student will acquire a historical understanding of African societies and ancient kingdoms. Students also will understand European exploration and colonization, interactions among Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans, the forms of exploitation and oppression, and how the values, traditions, and Prepared by M. King Grade 4

Unit 3- History of the State of New Jersey New Jersey is a changing place. This unit will offer students an opportunity to act and think as historians. Students will participate in the constructive process of history by studying primary documents and photographs. Viewing historic photographs, handling facsimiles of famous documents, and reading literature will bring history alive for students. Understanding the background of each primary resource will help students to put historical events and attitudes into perspective, to think progressively, and to walk in the shoes of their ancestors. This unit is divided into three categories • Lenape • Colonialism • Immigration Lenape Essential Questions • How has the geography of New Jersey Page 1 of 7

institutions of all of these peoples helped to shape the early American colonies. and Unit 4 - Establishment of a New Nation/Independence to Republic The student will acquire understanding of European colonization in the Americas. The students will understand the causes of the American War for Independence, its principles, and its impact on American society and institutions.



impacted the Lenape? How is present day life similar and different to the life of the Lenape?

Objective 1: Students will be able to describe Lenape life and culture. Objective 2: Students will be able to compare and contrast Lenape life to present day life. Objective 3: Students will be able to summarize reasons for Lenape migration to the New Jersey area and from the New Jersey area. Objective 4: Students will be able to summarize the impact of European colonization on Lenape culture. Colonialism Essential Question • How have the ideas of independence and equality evolved over time within New Jersey and the United States of America? Objective 1: Students will be able to identify events leading from colonization up to the founding of the United States. Objective 2: Students will be able to name an event which led the British colonists to declare independence from Britain. Objective 3: Students will be able to identify New Jersey’s involvement in slavery and the trans-Atlantic slave trade and how it changed over time. Immigration Essential Question • How has immigration influenced new ideas and cultural changes in New Jersey? Objective 1: Students will be able to relate to the past using historical documents and photographs.

Prepared by M. King Grade 4

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Objective 2: Students will be able to explain reason why people left their homes in other countries to settle in the United States and New Jersey. Objective 3: Students will be able to gain an understanding of immigrant challenges and successes. Objective 4: Students will be able to name a notable immigrant who has contributed to the growth of our nation. Unit 5 - The Constitution and the Continental Congress The student will learn the principles of democratic citizenship through the study of the Constitution and its origins, key principles, processes, functions, and limitations.

Unit 1 – Citizenship & Government Students will understand and practice the rights and responsibilities of a productive citizen in local, national, and global communities. Objective 1: Students will be able to describe citizenship skills and articulate how they can demonstrate citizenship skills. Objective 2: Students will be able to use a logical process to make decisions and solve problems cooperatively. Objective 3: Students will be able to identify the three levels of government. Objective 4: Students will be able to describe the responsibilities of each of the three branches of government Objective 5: Students will be able to explain and model the process of how a bill becomes a law. Objective 6: Students will be able to explain how citizens of the US are guaranteed fundamental rights by the United States Constitution. Objective 7: • Students will be able to explain how the fundamental rights of the individual and the common good of the country depend upon all citizens exercising their civic responsibilities at the community, state, national, and global

Prepared by M. King Grade 4

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levels. •

Explain how in a representative democracy, individuals elect representatives to act on behalf of the people.

Unit 6 - The Evolution of a New Nation Covered in Grade 5 State The student will acquire a historical understanding of the expansion of capitalism, and the growth of a market economy, the entrenchment of slavery and its expansion into newly acquired territories, as well as the expropriation of Native Americans and the atrocities inflicted upon them. Covered in Grade 7 Unit 7 - The Civil War and Reconstruction (1861–1877) The student will acquire an understanding of the complex causes and military strategies of the Civil War as well as the reasons for the outcome. The students will understand the meanings of Reconstruction and the ways in which the nation and its people struggled to construct a new social, political, and economic order.

Unit 8 - Post-Reconstruction and the Origins of the Progressive Era A summary of the major issues that were discussed throughout the year, students will be able to identify major historical trends over time and assess their impact on late 19th century America. The students will see historical relationships and where these themes overlap.

Prepared by M. King Grade 4

Covered in Grade 7

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Unit 9 - America Confronts the 20th Century and the Emergent Modern America America confronts the 20th century The student will acquire historical understanding of the problems the nation faced, the social/political reforms introduced by the Progressives at the local, state and national levels; the changing roles of minorities and women, the growth of African American social, political, cultural and economic institutions, the expansion of capitalism, the unionization of labor, the intensification of racial segregation, xenophobia, increased literacy and its implications, and the emergence of American imperialism. An emergent modern America: domestic and foreign issues and context The student will acquire understanding of the complexity of historical causation, and the consequences of World War I.

The Fourth Grade curriculum introduces students to many of the concepts identified in Unit 9 of the Amistad Curriculum. These concepts are further discussed and taught in Grade 7. In Grade 4 students study The Great Migration within the context of geography and environment. Unit 4 – Geography & Environment Objective 1: Students will identify and explore the types of landforms. Objective 2: Students will be able to understand the spatial organization of the earth, related to the structure of the oceans and continents, national political boundaries, and state boundaries. Objective 3: Students will be able to understand how the Great Migration affected economic, social, and cultural growth and impacted the development of urban areas, especially those in the northern states. Objective 4: Students will be able to identify the regions of New Jersey and the facts about each region. Students will be able to identify the products produced in New Jersey and basic economic principles. Objective 5: Students will be able to understand the environmental and economic impact of human practices on the earth.

Unit 10 – America in the 1920s and 1930s; Cultural, Political, and Intellectual Development/The New Deal, Industrialization, and Global Conflict

Covered in detail at the high school level

America in the 1920s and 1930s; cultural, political, and intellectual development The student will acquire historical understanding of society and the business boom in the1920s, the social effects of Prepared by M. King Grade 4

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the Great Depression and reforming society through the New Deal. The New Deal, industrialization, and global conflict The student will acquire historical and geographical understanding of the circumstances, objectives, strategies and activities of dictatorships in Italy, the Soviet Union, Japan and Germany that led to World War II and to analyze and formulate an understanding of issues related to the universal human rights. Unit 11 – America in the Aftermath of Global Conflict: Domestic and Foreign Challenges, Implications and Consequences/the Era of Reform

Covered in detail at the high school level

America in the aftermath of global conflict: domestic and foreign challenges, implications and consequences The student will acquire a historical understanding of the ideological debates and confrontations of democracy, capitalism, socialism and communism; the arms race, and the consequences of foreign and domestic policies in the 1950s. Era of reform: the 1950s and 1960s The student will gain historical understanding of domestic and foreign policies in the 1960s, the Civil Rights Movement, the Women’s Movement, Native American struggles, the Environmental Movement, and the effect of the Vietnam conflict on United States society.

Prepared by M. King Grade 4

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UNIT 12 – National and Global Debates, Conflicts, and Developments/America Faces the 21st Century

Covered in detail at the high school level

Post-civil rights and Vietnam era: national and global debates, conflicts and developments The student will gain historical understanding of the Nixon years, the expansion and the re-definition of executive powers, the Conservative Movement, the fall of Communism in Europe and the emergence of a new global economy. America faces the 21st century An examination of contemporary, domestic and foreign policy issues; social, cultural, economic and political future.

Prepared by M. King Grade 4

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The New Jersey Amistad Curriculum

Teaneck Social Studies Curriculum Gr. 5 Early US History to Slavery & Emancipation

Unit 1 - Social Studies skills This unit will emphasize skill-based learning: reading and interpreting maps, census data, graphs, charts, timelines, primary and secondary sources, and points of view. Teachers will introduce the students to the historian’s craft (interpretation and narration).

The skills identified in Unit 1 of the Amistad Curriculum are weaved throughout Teaneck’s grade 5 curriculum. The grade 5 curriculum begins with a unit on identity.

Unit 2 - Indigenous civilizations of the Americas The student will acquire understanding of the Americas, the region’s geography and settlement patterns, the emergence of indigenous civilizations, and their diverse cultures.

Unit 1 - Native Peoples of North America Native Americans (“First Nations”) migrated to the Americas and created unique cultural groups with distinct languages, government systems, and lifestyles based on accessible natural resources. Natural resources varied a great deal in different areas of the Americas (including modern day North and South America).

Introductory Unit Museum Unit The United States of America is a nation full of diverse people and ideas that have helped shape America’s modern government, economy and social system. This unit introduces student to America’s identity through geography, economy, government, and people.

Objective 1: Students will be able to explain how climate change, migratory patterns, and the availability of natural resources helped to determine various First Nations’ ways of life. Objective 2: Students will be able to identify the positive and negative consequences of various First Nations’ dependence on natural resources. Objective 3: Students will be able to differentiate the roles of men and women, as well as the coming of age of Native American children. Objective 4: Students will be able to examine First Nation spiritual beliefs and how religious beliefs became manifested in First Nation cultures.

Prepared by M. King Grade 5

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Objective 5: Students will be able to analyze Creek and Iroquois systems of society and compare and contrast with current systems of society. Unit 3 - The emerging Atlantic world (Native Americans, Africans, Europeans) The student will acquire a historical understanding of African societies and ancient kingdoms. Students also will understand European exploration and colonization, interactions among Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans, the forms of exploitation and oppression, and how the values, traditions, and institutions of all of these peoples helped to shape the early American colonies.

Unit 2 - Exploration and Colonization Conflicts and compromises occurred between indigenous groups in the Americans and European explorers from Spain, France and Great Britain. The European colonists’ motive for new wealth and prosperity clashed with the desire of Native Americans to maintain their ways of life. Furthermore, cultural differences created obstacles to effective and long-lasting compromises. Objective 1: Students will be able to describe Europe, Asia, and Africa, pre-Columbus, in terms of trade and identify the reasons for exploration. Objective 2: Students will be able to analyze the purpose and importance of Columbus’ landing and explain how the Spanish changed the way of life for the Taino. Objective 3: Students will be able to discuss how the Northwest Passage led to the exploration of North America. Objective 4: Students will be able to describe the cultures of the Aztecs and Incas in the Americas before European conflict, and examine reasons for the decline of both societies. Objective 5: Students will be able to analyze both the positive and negative consequences of the Columbian Exchange and how they affected the Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans. Objective 6: Students will be able to evaluate the “success” of the Jamestown settlement including the influence of the Powhatan (including Pocahontas).

Prepared by M. King Grade 5

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Objective 7: Students will be able to describe why the Pilgrims left England for America and describe the relationship between the Wampanoag and the Pilgrims, including Thanksgiving. and Unit 3 - Colonial America Colonists in early America came from diverse backgrounds and faced many challenges. Colonial governments participated in the Slave Trade. Objective 1: Students will be able to compare and contrast the New England, Middle, and Southern Colonies in regards to the following: geographic location and resources, names of colonies, reasons for settlement, religions, ethnic diversity, education, occupations, and government. Students will be able to explain what life was like in the colonies, and compare and contrast colonial life to students’ lives in the 21st Century. Objective 2: Students will be able to describe the horrors of slavery, including the Middle Passage, and explain the different challenges faced by African- American slaves in both the Northern and Southern colonies. Objective 3: Students will participate in a simulation of the Triangular Trade Route. Objective 4: Students will be able to describe the events that shaped the development of colonial governments by participating in a mock town meeting and discussing disagreements in a colonial court. Unit 4 - Establishment of a New Nation/Independence to Republic The student will acquire understanding of European colonization in the Americas. The students will understand the causes of the American War for Independence, its principles, and its impact on American Prepared by M. King Grade 5

Unit 4 - The Struggle for North America Americans are a people who have taken risks and fought for civil liberties throughout their history, including the Revolutionary War, slave rebellions, women’s suffrage and the Civil Rights Movement.

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society and institutions.

Objective 1: Students will be able to explain the French motives for settling the Louisiana Territory, describe LaSalle’s contribution to that motive and evaluate the significance of French control over New Orleans and the Mississippi River. Objective 2: Students will be able to identify the major causes of the French and Indian War, and discuss the changes brought about by the war, including the Native American response under Pontiac. Objective 3: Students will be able to list the taxes and other factors that led up to the American Revolution and created the Patriot cause, as well as evaluate the actions of the British government. Objective 4: Students will be able to identify the battles that began the American Revolution, the importance of the Battle of Bunker Hill, and describe the difference between Patriots and Loyalists. Objective 5: The students will be able to describe the significance of the Declaration of Independence. Objective 6: Students will be able to identify strengths and weaknesses of the American and British armies, putting emphasis on the support offered by women and African-Americans, and then describe the economic consequences brought about by the war. Objective 7: The students will be able to describe the events that turned the tide for the Patriots and impacted the outcome of the Revolutionary War. Objective 8: The students will be able to explain the importance of the Battle of Yorktown and describe the results of the American Revolution.

Prepared by M. King Grade 5

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Unit 5 - The Constitution and the Continental Congress The student will learn the principles of democratic citizenship through the study of the Constitution and its origins, key principles, processes, functions, and limitations.

Unit 5 - New Nation Students will examine the positive and negative values that developed in America that occurred as the nation began its government and grew in land, population, and wealth. Objective 2: Students will evaluate a class “constitution” to establish a relationship between the teacher/administration (government) and the students (people). Students will be able to examine the “compromises” made in the 1787 Constitutional Convention, and determine their effects. Objective 3: Students will take a gallery walk to understand the Bill of Rights, which was still another compromise (made after the Constitutional Convention, a compromise made in order to ratify the document in all states). Objective 4: Students will map the route of Lewis and Clark (and Sacagawea) as they traveled through the Louisiana Territory and decide why Americans soon went West to settle. Objective 5: Students will describe the reasons Americans developed technology innovations such as the cotton gin, the steam train, textile mill and interchangeable parts. Objective 6: Students will be able to describe the Cherokee Trail of Tears. Objective 7: Students will be able to identify sources of conflict between Texans and the Mexican government.

Unit 6 - The Evolution of a New Nation State The student will acquire a historical understanding of the expansion of capitalism, and the growth of a market economy, the entrenchment of slavery and its expansion into newly acquired territories, as well as the expropriation of Native Americans and the atrocities Prepared by M. King Grade 5

Unit 6 - Slavery and Emancipation During the early 1800s the demand for cotton grew - as well as the need for workers to maintain the plantations in the South. Although Congress eventually passed a law against bringing more African slaves into the U.S., the slave population continued to grow in the South. Differences between the North and South increased with slavery as a significantly divisive issue. AfricanPage 5 of 9

inflicted upon them.

Americans, who were enslaved, created a unique culture and community to cope with servitude and fight for freedom. Abolitionism rose and grew throughout the decades preceding the U.S. Civil War. Revolts, including the events on La Amistad in 1839, and escapes to freedom, such as those facilitated through the Underground Railroad helped to solidify the abolitionist cause and push for emancipation. Objective 1: Students will be able to describe the economic differences between the Northern and Southern states, including the South’s dependence on the institution of slavery, as well as describe the impact of cotton, tobacco, and indigo on the colonies’ economies. Objective 2: Using the Primary Source Reader, “Slavery in America,” students will understand and describe the experience of African American slaves in the South. Objective 3: Students will be able to understand the significance of the Abolitionist movement. Objective 4: Students will use on-line activities, primary sources and audio clips to discover the significance of the Underground Railroad and create a personal narrative in the voice of a slave. Objective 5: Students will act out a dialogue to compare and contrast the beliefs of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln regarding slavery and reasons for emancipation.

Unit 7 - The Civil War and Covered in Grade 7 Reconstruction (1861–1877) The student will acquire an understanding of the complex causes and military strategies of the Civil War as well as the reasons for the outcome. The students will understand the meanings of Reconstruction and the ways in which the nation and its people struggled to construct a new social, political, and economic order. Prepared by M. King Grade 5

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Unit 8 - Post-Reconstruction and the Origins of the Progressive Era A summary of the major issues that were discussed throughout the year, students will be able to identify major historical trends over time and assess their impact on late 19th century America. The students will see historical relationships and where these themes overlap. Unit 9 - America Confronts the 20th Century and the Emergent Modern America

Covered in Grade 7

Covered in Grade 7

America confronts the 20th century The student will acquire historical understanding of the problems the nation faced, the social/political reforms introduced by the Progressives at the local, state and national levels; the changing roles of minorities and women, the growth of African American social, political, cultural and economic institutions, the expansion of capitalism, the unionization of labor, the intensification of racial segregation, xenophobia, increased literacy and its implications, and the emergence of American imperialism. An emergent modern America: domestic and foreign issues and context The student will acquire understanding of the complexity of historical causation, and the consequences of World War I. Unit 10 – America in the 1920s and 1930s; Cultural, Political, and Intellectual Development/The New Deal, Industrialization, and Global Conflict

Covered in detail at the high school level

America in the 1920s and 1930s; cultural, political, and intellectual development Prepared by M. King Grade 5

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The student will acquire historical understanding of society and the business boom in the1920s, the social effects of the Great Depression and reforming society through the New Deal. The New Deal, industrialization, and global conflict The student will acquire historical and geographical understanding of the circumstances, objectives, strategies and activities of dictatorships in Italy, the Soviet Union, Japan and Germany that led to World War II and to analyze and formulate an understanding of issues related to the universal human rights. Unit 11 – America in the Aftermath of Global Conflict: Domestic and Foreign Challenges, Implications and Consequences/the Era of Reform

Covered in detail at the high school level

America in the aftermath of global conflict: domestic and foreign challenges, implications and consequences The student will acquire a historical understanding of the ideological debates and confrontations of democracy, capitalism, socialism and communism; the arms race, and the consequences of foreign and domestic policies in the 1950s. Era of reform: the 1950s and 1960s The student will gain historical understanding of domestic and foreign policies in the 1960s, the Civil Rights Movement, the Women’s Movement, Native American struggles, the Environmental Movement, and the effect of the Vietnam conflict on United States society.

Prepared by M. King Grade 5

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UNIT 12 – National and Global Debates, Conflicts, and Developments/America Faces the 21st Century

Covered in detail at the high school level

Post-civil rights and Vietnam era: national and global debates, conflicts and developments The student will gain historical understanding of the Nixon years, the expansion and the re-definition of executive powers, the Conservative Movement, the fall of Communism in Europe and the emergence of a new global economy. America faces the 21st century An examination of contemporary, domestic and foreign policy issues; social, cultural, economic and political future.

Prepared by M. King Grade 5

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The New Jersey Amistad Curriculum

Teaneck Social Studies Curriculum Gr. 7 The United States Constitution to Age of Industry, Business Growth & Class Struggle

Unit 1 - Social Studies skills This unit will emphasize skill-based learning: reading and interpreting maps, census data, graphs, charts, timelines, primary and secondary sources, and points of view. Teachers will introduce the students to the historian’s craft (interpretation and narration). Unit 2 - Indigenous civilizations of the Americas The student will acquire understanding of the Americas, the region’s geography and settlement patterns, the emergence of indigenous civilizations, and their diverse cultures. Unit 3 - The emerging Atlantic world (Native Americans, Africans, Europeans) The student will acquire a historical understanding of African societies and ancient kingdoms. Students also will understand European exploration and colonization, interactions among Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans, the forms of exploitation and oppression, and how the values, traditions, and institutions of all of these peoples helped to shape the early American colonies. Unit 4 - Establishment of a New Nation/Independence to Republic The student will acquire understanding of European colonization in the Americas. The students will understand the causes of the American War for Independence, its principles, and its impact on American society and institutions.

Prepared by M. King Grade 7

Covered in Grades 2, 4, & 5

Covered in Grades 2, 4, & 5

Covered in Grades 4 & 5

Covered in Grades 4 & 5

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Unit 5 - The Constitution and the Continental Congress The student will learn the principles of democratic citizenship through the study of the Constitution and its origins, key principles, processes, functions, and limitations.

Unit 1 – The United States Constitution: The Founding Ideas & Modern Issues After winning independence from Britain during the Revolutionary War, the new nation faced the challenges of creating a new government. The first attempt resulted in the Articles of Confederation, which included inherent weaknesses within the document. Therefore, a new governmental framework was devised at the Constitutional Convention, where a document was created to reflect the will of the people through the Amendment process. Even though debate still exists regarding the interpretation of the document, the fundamental principles of the U.S. Constitution serve as the foundation of the American government today. Objective 1: Students will be able to identify problems the new nation faced under the Articles of Confederation and determine why a new Constitution was needed. Objective 2: Students will be able to describe the proceedings of the Constitutional Convention, the specifics of the Virginia and New Jersey Plans, and how the Great Compromise satisfied both large and small states. Objective 3: Students will be able to understand and analyze the Preamble of the U.S. Constitution. Students will discuss the contradiction between American slavery and American freedom by examining issues related to slavery and the U.S. Constitution. Objective 4: Students will be able to identify the major parts of the Constitution (the system of checks and balances and separation of power, responsibilities three branches) and students will be able to explain how a bill becomes a law. Objective 5: Students will be able to describe the Bill of Rights and how the first ten amendments protect the individual rights of the people. Objective 6: Students will be able to discuss how

Prepared by M. King Grade 7

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President George Washington set a lasting precedence on the presidential office and duties, and identify his strengths and weaknesses as the first President. Objective 7: Considering the ‘X, Y, Z Affair’ and the Alien and Sedition Acts, students will be able to decide whether President Adams’ actions were viewed as an abuse of power. Unit 6 - The Evolution of a New Nation State The student will acquire a historical understanding of the expansion of capitalism, and the growth of a market economy, the entrenchment of slavery and its expansion into newly acquired territories, as well as the expropriation of Native Americans and the atrocities inflicted upon them.

Unit 2 – National Identity In this unit, students will examine the development of an American identity and value system, as the nation began to expand its territory, its economy and its democracy. The powers of the federal government grew in the years following the writing of the Constitution, and the new government supported an expanding market economy – that manifested itself uniquely in the North, South and Western territories. The fledging national identity was flush with conflicts. While the level of democratic participation increased in the early 1800s for many Americans, women, and African Americans (both free and enslaved), were denied access to equal civil liberties. While efforts were made by the U.S. government to continue growth of the capitalist economy in the North, the South and the newly acquired Western territories, many Americans were excluded from gaining economic wealth. While technological advancements in communication and transportation catalyzed new industries, a growing divide between workers and capitalist owners occurred in the North, and slavery expanded in the South. While new land in the West presented opportunities for speculators, Native Americans often lost their land and culture. These conflicts presented challenges for the new nation, and reform movements began to brew in the nation – a crucial piece of the American identity.

Prepared by M. King Grade 7

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Objective 1: Students will be able to design a U.S. postage stamp in honor of the leader of the Haitian Revolution in 1797, Toussaint L'Ouverture. Objective 2: Students will be able to describe the importance of the Louisiana Purchase and the exploration of the Louisiana Territory by Lewis, Clark and Sacajawea. Objective 3: Students will be able to explain the causes and effects of the War of 1812, including the effect of the actions taken by the Native American leader, Tecumseh. Objective 4: Students will be able to explain the pros and cons of having the federal government involved in the economy - historically and today. Objective 5: Students will be able to explain how foreign policy is created in America, and why the Monroe Doctrine is significant to America’s national identity. Objective 6: Students will be able to debate and decide whether President Andrew Jackson brought more or less democracy to American society through the creation of a report card for President Jackson. Objective 7: Students will be able to describe how labor changed as a result of the early Market Revolution. Objective 8: Students will compare and contrast modern immigration experiences with the experiences of immigrants from American’s second wave of immigration during the early 1800s. and

Prepared by M. King Grade 7

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Unit 3 – Expansion & Reform In this unit, students will examine the costs and benefits that occurred as the American government expanded the nation West. While the nation expanded in population, technological advancements, and wealth, many people, including Mexicans, Native Americans, and African Americans were exploited to increase land, labor, and natural resources. While the Northern states initiated a period of rapid industrialization and city growth, the Southern states expanded the plantation economy based on the cash crops of cotton, indigo, and tobacco. Western territories grew quickly as immigrants from other countries and pioneers from the East traveled to the West. As the Western territories grew, conflicts between settlers and Native Americans occurred. In each new territory, slavery became a moral and economic issue. Disagreements over slavery exploded in the U.S. government, and enslaved African Americans coped with the conditions of enslavement by fighting back, running away, practicing religion, and building community and culture. Reform movements, including abolitionism, women’s suffrage, temperance, and religious revivals, developed as a way to deal with the changes and challenges presented by America’s rapid expansion. Objective 1: Students will be able to use charts and graphs to interpret the relationship between cotton production and growth of slavery in the South, and use primary source documents to compare and contrast the experiences of African Americans in the North. Objective 2: Students will document the hardships of slavery in the South through the examination of both the historical record and literature. Objective 3: Students will explore some ways in which African Americans enslaved in the South coped, resisted, and escaped slavery. Prepared by M. King Grade 7

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Objective 4: Students will be able to analyze the relationship between westward expansion and slavery. Objective 5: Students will be able to write a persuasive essay as an abolitionist who supports resistance to slavery. Objective 6: Students will be able to evaluate the success of the Seneca Falls Convention. Objective 7: Students will be able to create a class definition of manifest destiny using the painting, American Progress, by John Gast. Objective 8: Students will be able to explain the experience of western pioneers on the Oregon Trail and Santa Fe Trail. Objective 9: Students will be able to evaluate how westward expansion led to conflict with Mexico. Objective 10: Students will be able to compare the reasons why the Mormons moved West to the reasons that the 49ers moved West. Unit 7 - The Civil War and Reconstruction (1861–1877) The student will acquire an understanding of the complex causes and military strategies of the Civil War as well as the reasons for the outcome. The students will understand the meanings of Reconstruction and the ways in which the nation and its people struggled to construct a new social, political, and economic order. and Unit 8 - Post-Reconstruction and the Origins of the Progressive Era A summary of the major issues that were discussed throughout the year, students will be able to identify major historical trends over time and assess their impact Prepared by M. King Grade 7

Unit 4 – Civil War and Reconstruction In this unit, students will explore the causes and effects of the U.S. Civil War, as well as evaluate the federal government’s program of Reconstruction. Students will explore primary causes of the Civil War including territorial expansion, an increase in the number of slaveholding states, and the rise in abolitionism in a variety of forms. Students will consider the role of the three branches of government in facilitating, affecting, or preventing the pathway to war, and decide if compromise is always the best outcome for ending conflict. Students will discuss American responsibility for ending slavery in the South, and decide specifically how abolitionist literature made a difference in enforcing reform. Students will also decide on the effects of the Reconstruction program, and the impact of the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments on Page 6 of 11

on late 19th century America. The students will see historical relationships and where these themes overlap.

the daily lives of African Americans. Objective 1: Students will be able to explain why conflict arose over the issue of slavery in the territories after the Mexican-American War. Objective 2: Students will be able to summarize the main points of the Compromise of 1850, and explain the effects of the Kansas-Nebraska Act. Objective 3: Students will be able to describe the impact of the novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin, and create their own short story to express their position on the Fugitive Slave Act. Objective 4: Students will be able to evaluate the effects of John Brown’s actions and the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in the case, Dred Scott v. Sanford. Objective 5: Students will be able to identify Abraham Lincoln’s early view on slavery through an analysis of the Lincoln-Douglas debates and the Election of 1860. Students will decide and defend the most significant cause of the U.S. Civil War. Objective 6: Students will be able to compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of the North and the South once the Civil War began. Objective 7: Students will be able to analyze the role of technology on the outcome of the Civil War. Objective 8: Students will be able to analyze why President Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation and to identify the effect the Emancipation Proclamation had on the lives of African American slaves. Objective 9: Students will be able to explore the contributions of women and African Americans to the fighting in the U.S. Civil War.

Prepared by M. King Grade 7

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Objective 10: Students will be able to create their own plan for Reconstruction of the South. Objective 11: Students will be able to look at the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments and evaluate whether they did or did not advance the civil rights of African Americans. Objective 12: Students will be able to consider the effects of the U.S. Supreme Court Case, Plessey v. Ferguson. Unit 8 - Post-Reconstruction and the Origins of the Progressive Era A summary of the major issues that were discussed throughout the year, students will be able to identify major historical trends over time and assess their impact on late 19th century America. The students will see historical relationships and where these themes overlap.

Unit 5 – Industry Revolution, Class Struggle & the Fight for Equality Expansion of the United States during the Industrial Revolution led to both business growth and class struggle. In particular, challenges evolved for some Americans as a result of a rapidly growing economy and inequality in the distribution of wealth. Increased wealth and corporate autonomy gave industrial leaders additional power in society, while reformers and labor activists actively fought to reform business practices. Through legislative reforms, populist revolts, and labor union strikes, Progressives and activists countered the practice of laissez faire capitalism. In West, conflicts arose as Native Americans fought for their land and cultures. In the segregated South, African Americans voted with their feet and renewed a struggle for civil rights. Additionally, an influx of new immigrants created both a “clash of cultures” and a diverse culture that was uniquely American continues in America’s urban centers. Objective 1: Students will identify the effects of the Transcontinental Railroad, new state governments, and an increase in population in the West. Objective 2: Students will be able to analyze the struggles and conflicts which faced Native Americans living in the West, and draw conclusions about the effectiveness of government policies such as the Dawes Act.

Prepared by M. King Grade 7

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and Unit 9 - America Confronts the 20th Century and the Emergent Modern America America confronts the 20th century The student will acquire historical understanding of the problems the nation faced, the social/political reforms introduced by the Progressives at the local, state and national levels; the changing roles of minorities and women, the growth of African American social, political, cultural and economic institutions, the expansion of capitalism, the unionization of labor, the intensification of racial segregation, xenophobia, increased literacy and its implications, and the emergence of American imperialism. An emergent modern America: domestic and foreign issues and context The student will acquire understanding of the complexity of historical causation, and the consequences of World War I.

Objective 3: Students will be able to describe the cattle ranching culture of the West, and compare and contrast the actual lives of American cowboys with the myth of the cattle ranching lifestyle. Objective 4: Students will be able to describe what life was like for Homesteaders and American farmers on the Great Plains, and describe the reasons for the creation of the Populist Party. Objective 5: Students will examine the causes of the Industrial Revolution, compare the experiences of the factory owners with factory workers, and decide if business tycoons like Andrew Carnegie or John D. Rockefeller were helpful or hurtful to America. Objective 6: Students will analyze the experience of new immigrants as they came to America and describe the effects of industrialization and immigration on America’s urban centers. Objective 7: Students will investigate the causes of Progressive reforms, and create a Progressive report card for three Progressive Presidents (T. Roosevelt, Taft and Wilson). Objective 8: Students will document the actions taken by leading African Americans and women during the Progressive Era and evaluate the debates that occurred regarding strategies for gaining equal rights.

Unit 10 – America in the 1920s and 1930s; Cultural, Political, and Intellectual Development/The New Deal, Industrialization, and Global Conflict

Covered in detail at the high school level

America in the 1920s and 1930s; cultural, political, and intellectual development The student will acquire historical Prepared by M. King Grade 7

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understanding of society and the business boom in the1920s, the social effects of the Great Depression and reforming society through the New Deal. The New Deal, industrialization, and global conflict The student will acquire historical and geographical understanding of the circumstances, objectives, strategies and activities of dictatorships in Italy, the Soviet Union, Japan and Germany that led to World War II and to analyze and formulate an understanding of issues related to the universal human rights. Unit 11 – America in the Aftermath of Global Conflict: Domestic and Foreign Challenges, Implications and Consequences/the Era of Reform

Covered in detail at the high school level

America in the aftermath of global conflict: domestic and foreign challenges, implications and consequences The student will acquire a historical understanding of the ideological debates and confrontations of democracy, capitalism, socialism and communism; the arms race, and the consequences of foreign and domestic policies in the 1950s. Era of reform: the 1950s and 1960s The student will gain historical understanding of domestic and foreign policies in the 1960s, the Civil Rights Movement, the Women’s Movement, Native American struggles, the Environmental Movement, and the effect of the Vietnam conflict on United States society.

Prepared by M. King Grade 7

Page 10 of 11

UNIT 12 – National and Global Debates, Conflicts, and Developments/America Faces the 21st Century

Covered in detail at the high school level

Post-civil rights and Vietnam era: national and global debates, conflicts and developments The student will gain historical understanding of the Nixon years, the expansion and the re-definition of executive powers, the Conservative Movement, the fall of Communism in Europe and the emergence of a new global economy. America faces the 21st century An examination of contemporary, domestic and foreign policy issues; social, cultural, economic and political future.

Prepared by M. King Grade 7

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