Annual Report - City of Rochester

Annual Report - City of Rochester

2010 Annual Report City of Rochester Fire Department Rochester Fire Department A Message from Mayor Thomas S. Richards Mission The City of Roche...

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2010 Annual Report

City of Rochester Fire Department

Rochester Fire Department

A Message from Mayor Thomas S. Richards

Mission

The City of Rochester Fire Department is a public safety organization that provides fire, rescue, and emergency services to a diverse community. We are committed to the preservation of life, property and the environment. Through education and public awareness programs, we enhance the quality of life and the safety of the citizens we proudly serve.

Vision

To provide the safest living and working environment by eliminating loss of life and property. We want to prevent injuries through educational partnerships with our community.

The No. 1 responsibility of any government is to provide for the safety of the public it serves. Like many pioneer communities, the first citizens of Rochester formed a government in large part to organize efforts to prevent fires and be prepared to put them out as quickly as possible. Certainly, today’s Rochester Fire Department has evolved with the times and does much more than organize bucket brigades. But when you meet the men and women of the Rochester Fire Department, it becomes clear that the underlying values of this profession are timeless: compassion, dedication, commitment, honor and bravery, to name a few. Firefighting truly is a calling that extends well beyond the hours in uniform. As you read this annual report of the Rochester Fire Department’s 2010 Calendar Year, you will see a measure of the results of those values. You will learn how well the Fire Department did at achieving its goals and meeting its benchmarks. But to truly understand the motivation of this calling, you will have meet a firefighter and see it for yourself. As the mayor of Rochester, that has been one of my great honors. I encourage you to do the same. Read this report. See how they did. Then, when you get a chance, meet a firefighter. I think you will agree, we in Rochester are truly fortunate for their service.



Thomas S. Richards, Mayor City of Rochester

A Message from Chief Caufield perore mporeru ndantio inum aperovitiis volorum quias eum si nihic tor sinum ea ni ullandaeped et remUs con esto enda aut quiducillit verum, ullessitis sitas qui corepe pro vendant veniscidel impedis sit ius nimincit dolor sum, sit provid quidit reium quia voluptas vent inventem quia debisti onecabo renitis sa ium fugiam dolenimus qui berum facere ne vellaccae poriatus del iliatur? Quis net venihiciatet ent moluptatius voles con rem im quaspel inimposae eos perferit, tempern atiossum nimus ut maxim doluptatem apedi duciend ucianturione rese volessimetum eum inusdae. Nequas est, samusant, voloremodi tem nonsecto testrum res si tor alique quam ut volut ex explign isimus nonest, omnisquam voluptas eum autemodi dolupta tenditation commoloriae magnisimpore pa volorpo stib.

John D. Caufield City of Rochester Fire

2 0 1 0 ANN U A L R EPO R T

Command Staff

Fire Chief John Caufield

Executive Deputy Chief Salvatore Mitrano III

Director of Fire Administration Molly Clifford

Deputy Chief John Kearney

Deputy Chief Martin McMillan

Deputy Chief Ronald Mendolera

Deputy Chief Scotty Williams

Deputy Chief Stephen McClary

Deputy Chief Teresa Everett

Deputy Chief William Curran 1

Rochester Fire Department

Table of Organization (As of 12/31/2010)

Fire Chief

Secretary to Fire Chief

Special Projects

Executive Deputy Chief

Director of Fire Administration

Suppression

Case Management

Code Enforcement Administration

Budget

Training

Health & Safety/ Emergency Mgmt

Payroll

Community Outreach

Apparatus

Code Enforcement

Planning & Research

Fire Investigation

Supply Depot

2

2 0 1 0 ANN U A L R EPO R T

ADMINISTRATION

Chief’s Office Initiatives

The Fire Chief’s office establishes departmental policies and priorities and is responsible for the overall management of the Fire Department. Among these responsibilities are: establishment of personnel standards and policies, work schedules, public relations and the continuous review of operations and performance. Fiscal management of administrative processes, including oversight of the operating and Capital Improvement Program (CIP) funding, also fall under the Chief’s scope of work. Additionally, the Chief’s Office develops and implements new programs and initiatives in alignment with the overall City Administration’s key goals and priorities.

In 2010, the Chief’s office in conjunction with the Department of Information Technology conducted a process mapping project to identify and map each of the department and bureau key business processes. As the City moves toward better integration of its records management systems to reduce redundancies in data gathering and processing, the Rochester Fire Department will be ready to work more efficiently as well.

Fire Department Service Delivery Model Changes

In 2010, the Rochester Fire Department rolled out its planned third year of a four year plan to move from the Quint/Midi operational concept to the Engine/ Truck model: Reorganization Plan 1st Year 2008 - Complete • Close Midi 2 I Quint 2 becomes Truck 2 • Close Midi 8 I Quint 8 becomes Truck 10

3rd Year 2010 - Complete • Close Midi 5 I Quint 5 becomes Truck 5 • Close Midi 1 I Quint 1 becomes Engine 19

2nd Year 2009 - Complete • Close Midi 3 I Quint 3 becomes Truck 3 • Close Midi 4 I Quint 4 becomes Truck 4 • Close Midi 9 I Quint 9 becomes Engine 1

4th Year 2011 – Due late Fall • Close Midi 6 I Quint 6 becomes Truck Company • Close Midi 7 I Quint 7 becomes Engine Company • Add a new Engine to N. Clinton Ave Station

3

Rochester Fire Department

ADMINISTRATION

Engine 16 Grand Re-Opening On July 20, 2010, Mayor Robert J. Duffy and Fire Chief John Caufield were joined by City Council members and other officials as they cut the ribbon for the Grand Re-Opening of Engine 16, 704 Hudson Avenue. The oldest continuously working fire house in the City of Rochester, as well as its busiest, boasts a new community room, EMS treatment area and training facilities for the fire companies that serve Northeast Rochester. Engine 16 responds to more than 3500 calls for service each year, as well as to hundreds of walk-ins who need medical treatment or other assistance. The fire house first opened its doors in 1905; original parts of the building were incorporated into the new design in recognition of its history while the rest was updated and expanded to meet the evolving challenges of the modern fire service. The extensive renovation project cost $4.5 million and is a significant investment in the Hudson Avenue neighborhood and surrounding community. Chief’s Caufield’s comments regarding the project were, “We have invested in the neighborhood and in the people who serve them by providing a state-of-the-art, accessible facility that will be a resource for community groups, a basic treatment center for our walk-in population, and a great place to work for our dedicated firefighters.” The fire house is also LEED-certified, saving taxpayer dollars in energy efficiency and lessening the operational impact on the environment.

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2 0 1 0 ANN U A L R EPO R T

History of Engine 16 by Lt. Edward Tracy

Engine 16 boasts over a century of service to the citizens of Rochester, New York. The 5th annual Report of the Department of Public Safety cited that 1904 heralded the largest and greatest number of fires in the department’s history. As the city grew, it became necessary for the Fire Department to grow accordingly. The origins of Engine 16 lie in a single paragraph contained within the Fire Department Report submitted by then Chief of The Department Little. While speaking of the progress of the last year it is noted that “contracts were let for the construction of a modern double firehouse on Hudson Avenue corner of Bernard Street, for the accommodation of a truck company, an engine and chemical and hose company. The houses are up to date in every respect and are nearly completed, when thirty men must be appointed to man the apparatus of these companies.” The Fire Department report of 1905 contains the first mention and the date of the creation of Engine Company 16. “The new engine house on Hudson

Avenue was completed and ready for occupancy on April 17, 1905, when 20 men were appointed and assigned to duty with the necessary horses and apparatus­—with Captain John Frazer in charge of the truck company—and Captain Frank A. Spears in charge of the engine company, the truck company to be known as Truck Company No. 6 and the engine company as Engine Co. 16.” This numbering system followed the order of the fire department at the time, there already existed 15 engine (or hose) companies and 5 truck companies divided into 2 battalions. A Firefighter actually referred to as either a Hoseman or Ladderman, in 1905 was compensated $960.00 per year at the top step, and worked 6 days straight with one day off. There were also time allowances to go home for meals and family responsibilities. A Battalion Chief was paid $1600.00 a year, a Captain $1140.00 and an Engineer was compensated $1020.00. The original roster of Engine 16 was comprised of 10 men. Captain Frank A. Spears, transferred from Engine 2 on 04/17/1905. 5

Lieutenant  Charles G. Michaels, promoted to Lt. from Engine 8 on 04/17/1905. Engineer Joseph Mehan, transferred from Engine 2 on 04/17/1905. Stoker Richard D. Warne, transferred from Engine 9 on 04/17/1905. Driver John McCreedy, transferred from Engine 6 on 04/17/1905. Hoseman Henery Dean, transferred from Hose 12 on 04/17/1905. Driver Charles Schroeder, appointed to the RFD on 04/17/1905. Hoseman Edward S. Walter, appointed to the RFD on 04/17/1905. Hoseman Francis P. Huck, appointed to the RFD on 04/17/1905. * Hoseman John Hennessey was the last original member assigned to Engine 16 when he transferred from Engine 8 on 07/14/1905. The original apparatus used by Engine 16 was an 1869 Silsby 2nd size 700 GPM rotary Pumper that was rebuilt in 1889. Engine 16 was a two piece company consisting of the above mentioned piece as the engine and a hose cart referred to as Hose 16. While Engine 16 became a company on April 17th 1905, they did not respond to their first alarm until April 19. At 6:50 pm on April 19th, Engine 16 responded to Box 152 for a fire at 145-147 Bernard Street that resulted in $1500.00 in damage. They also responded with Truck 6 (it’s first alarm), Engine 2 (600 North Clinton) and Hose 9 (62 Webster Ave).

Rochester Fire Department

ADMINISTRATION

Case Management: Breakdown of injury types The Case Management Office tracks and manages on-duty injuries for the Department. Maureen Hope is the Rochester Fire Department’s Case Manager and liaison with Strong Occupational and Environmental Medicine (Strong OEM). She coordinates the planning process for treatment plans and appropriate approvals for clearance to return to work from on-duty and off-duty injuries and certain non-related illness.

Grant Funding

RFD Department Flag On Friday, January 15, 2010, at the Mayor’s All Staff Meeting, Fire Chief John Caufield unveiled the newly designed Rochester Fire Department Flag. The flag will be flown by the City of Rochester and used for official RFD ceremonies. The new design comes from the work of FF Dough King and Roger Rebman, Jr., commanders of the RFD Honor Guard. With assistance from the City Communications Bureau Creative Director, John Hawk, the RFD flag was transformed from a previously designed embellishment of an ostrich, to an updated emblem that appropriately represents the RFD.

2010 was a banner year for the acquisition and use of grant funding to leverage significant equipment and apparatus purchases for the Fire Department. As funding for public services has been in serious jeopardy in recent years, securing grant funds is a significant achievement to ensure upgrades and in some cases to meet mandated safety codes and standards. The following purchases, either planned or completed in 2010, have been supported with federal grant funding: Flashover Simulator and BARB Software: Assistance to Firefighters Grant 2008 Heavy Rescue Vehicle: Assistance to Firefighters Grant 2009 Hazmat Vehicle: Urban Area Security Initiative 2008/2009 Bail Out Equipment: Assistance to Firefighters Grant 2010 Emergency Generators: Assistance to Firefighters Grant 2010

$ 95,600

Total Grant Funds:

$1,486,400

6

$ 520,000 $ 555,800 $ 245,000 $ 70,000

2 0 1 0 ANN U A L R EPO R T

RFD BUDGET FISCAL YEARS 2007 - 2011

44,000,000 41,879,300 42,000,000

41,927,700

41,910,500

41,298,600 40,137,000

40,000,000

38,000,000

36,000,000

34,000,000

32,000,000

30,000,000 FY2006-07

FY2007-08

FY2008-09

FY2009-10

FY2010-11

RFD OVERTIME FISCAL YEAR 2006 TO 2011 $2,500,000

$2,000,000

$1,500,000

- 64%

$1,000,000

$500,000

$ACTUAL

FY2005-06 $2,111,274

7

FY2006-07 $1,818,163

FY2007-08 $1,543,372

FY2008-09 $1,373,428

FY2009-10 $1,143,614

FY2010-11 $763,000

Rochester Fire Department

SUPPORT

Fire Safety Division-Code Enforcement 2010 The mission of the Fire Safety Division is to protect the public and the fire service with coordinated efforts in code enforcement and public education thereby reducing the loss of life and property due to fire and other emergencies in the City of Rochester, NY. The Fire Safety Division provides review of construction documents, permitting inspections, license inspections, safety education and training, data management, and high rise/target hazard inspections. The Division of Fire Safety also serves as the liaison between the Fire Department and other city departments, such as the Law Dept, NSC, NBD, Buildings and Zoning, as well as others. The members of Fire Safety are all New York State Code Enforcement Officials, and are experts in the field of the New York State Fire Codes. The vast majority of daily activity is to gain compliance of the New York State Fire Code through inspections and education. The Fire Safety Division continuously educates building owners and tenants while conducting inspections. This helps to gain voluntary compliance, as well as limit the number of repeat violations in the future. In 2010, Fire Safety issued 3,659 permits and approved 488 licenses generating $454,256 in revenue. In total, Fire Safety conducted 9,488 inspections including High rises, Schools, Licenses, Permits, Referrals, Re-inspections, and Special Events. Fire Safety, working with Buildings and Permits, reviewed 315 sets of building plans and 321 alarm and sprinkler tests. Fire Safety inspectors also played a key role in Community Education, working closely with the Community Outreach Group on special events, uplifts, and presentations. 2011 brings the transition of paper inspections to RedNMX for Fire Safety. This will put Fire Safety on the same system as the Suppression Division. There is likely to be a transition period that will have inspections in paper form as well as electronic on RedNMX. When everyone is on RedNMX, the inspections will be documented during the inspection eliminating the need for follow-up paperwork and filing. The inspection documentation will be done in the field, on mobile tablet PCs. This will help us to concentrate more on the inspection, and allow us to keep up with the increasing occupancy types and processes that are required to be inspected.

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2 0 1 0 ANN U A L R EPO R T

ARSON RELATED ARRESTS 2007 - 2010 118 120

108

100

80

60

51 45

40

20

0 2007

2008

2009

2010

Fire Investigation Unit The Fire Investigation Unit (FIU) consists of the Origin and Cause Section, Arson Task Force and Juvenile Firesetter Intervention Program (FRY–Fire Related Youth). The Origin and Cause section is staffed by Investigators who are responsible for determining the origin and cause of fire incidents such as structure fires, vehicle fires, outside fires, trash and dumpster fires, malicious false calls, school box pulls, burn injury incidents and carbon monoxide incidents with injury. In 2010, the Origin and Cause Section responded to 1071 incidents. The Arson Task Force (ATF) section is responsible for follow up investigations of adult related incendiary fires. The task force is composed of a multiagency collaborative team of one Rochester Fire Department Investigator, one Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco Firearms and Explosives Special Agent and one Rochester Police Department investigator. In 2010 the ATF conducted 145 investigations that resulted in 81 arrests. The Juvenile Firesetter Intervention Program (FRY) is responsible for the follow-up and intervention of fire related incidents that involve youth who are playing with fire and are at a higher risk of future criminal activities as they become adults. Nationally, children who play with fire cause nearly 80,000 structure fires per year which result in approximately 760 deaths and more than 3,500 injuries. Juveniles who enter the FRY program are referred to other health and human service agencies to provide a wholistic approach to supporting the youth and their families to proactively assist them in correcting behaviors, improving mental health and educating youth regarding accountability and decision making. The FRY program assists in keeping the youth out of the Family Court system through diversion and education in the hope of providing them the skills needed to follow a positive path as they grow to adulthood. In 2010 the FRY program made contact with 246 youth and conducted 182 juvenile interventions. 9

Rochester Fire Department

SUPPORT

Community Outreach Fire Prevention Training: The Rochester Fire Department’s Community Relations and Education Unit (CREU) worked with Prevention First and the Rochester City School District to bring the new “Home Safety Marshal” program to 3rd grade classes at several City elementary schools last year. The partners worked together to develop a program in which firefighters teach students about fire and other home dangers during one classroom session and one hands-on activity in the Fire Safety House. Each student is given a book to reinforce the lesson and takes home a home safety survey and a smoke and carbon monoxide detector sign-up that a parent can return to school for RFD follow-up. Three companies were trained to deliver the program to ensure continuity and availability. More than 600 students went through the program this year, and initial feedback has been overwhelmingly positive. Representatives of the RFD and RCSD plan to meet over the summer to evaluate the program and make adjustments before rolling out the 2011-12 program.

Supply Depot Major Activities for 2010: • Change in command (Captain Wallace retired Captain Murphy took over at the Supply Depot.

•Test of the Scott Air-Pac 75, 4.5 High pressure Self Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA), small 30 minute bottle Compressed Air Cylinders Refilled 2009: 3,820 2010: 3,379 Oxygen Cylinders Refilled 2009: 1,377 2010: 1,364 Repairs to Small Equipment 2009: 390 2010: 240 Sewing Repairs to Turn Out Gear and Miscellaneous equipment: 5,811 Hose Testing: 2010 1 ¾ inch: 29,900 ft. 2 ½ inch: 7,600 ft. 3 inch: 38,400 ft. Ladder Pipe 3” inch: 1200 ft.

Supply Depot 2010 The Supply Depot, located in the historic Headquarter’s building on 185 Chestnut Street is staffed by three full time personnel, Captain Murphy along with FF’s Zambito and Vetusky. During 2010, Captain Brad Wallace was in charge until mid-year when Captain Murphy took the helm of managing the Supply Depot. Additional support is provided by four (4) Fire Fighters whose primary responsibility is to drive the Protectives vehicle for the volunteer wing of the Rochester Fire Department, The Protectives. The Supply Depot is responsible for the bulk of inventory maintenance of the tools, equipment and supplies needed to keep the Fire Department functioning at its best. The Supply Depot staff perform routine maintenance on important equipment such as air cylinder filling and repairs and the inventory and coordination of Turn Out Gear repairs. The careful maintenance and record keeping required to keep personal protective clothing and equipment in excellent working order is critical to the safety of the Fire Fighters on the line. 10

2 0 1 0 ANN U A L R EPO R T

Training Division The Fire Fighter Trainee Program (FFTP) is a nationally recognized program designed to prepare students for a rewarding career in the Fire Service. This twoyear program is a first-step in becoming a City of Rochester Firefighter while working towards a High School diploma. This rewarding program is currently offered at East High School. The Program is offered in conjunction with the City of Rochester School District. The Fire Fighter Trainee Program was first implemented in 1994. Over the years, the demands of Fire Service have evolved from strictly fire suppression to also include specialized rescue and Emergency Medical Services. Therefore, recruitment for the trainee program was suspended in order to focus on redesigning the program improve it’s alignment with the changing demands of the profession. Rochester Fire Department Senior Staff members have been meeting regularly with Rochester City School District throughout the year to redevelop the FFTP with the anticipation of rolling out a new program in 2011. Rochester Fire Department Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Division The EMS Division, under the direction of Lt. Joseph Giorgione with the assistance of FF Darrin Batty, is charged with overseeing training for all aspects of Emergency Medical Services for the members of the Rochester Fire Department. Among the responsibilities of this Division are: EMS training classes scheduling, maintaining a corps of skilled instructors, adherence to state mandates for the administration of EMS courses, maintenance and documentation of EMS training records, and documenting each individual’s EMS training achievements. This unit coordinates the work of 17 instructors who assist the EMS Division in providing Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) and Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) courses to, not only Rochester Fire Department personnel, but also to surrounding Fire/EMS agencies. The EMS Division is the point of contact for the contract ambulance agency which is currently with Rural Metro Medical Services for issues related to Quality Assurance and compliance with contract provisions. The EMS Division works closely with the Rochester Fire Department Agency Medical Director. In 2010, the RFD issued a request for proposal for Agency Medical Director Services to area hospitals and emergency rooms. Of the responses received by the RFD, the clear choice to for the Department to enhance and improve the quality and maintenance of integrated, systematic preparedness for pre-hospital emergency medical care protocols and represent the interests of the Rochester Fire Department in the medical community as the primary local first responder agency, was Dr. Jeremy Cushman.

11

Rochester Fire Department

SUPPORT

RFD Agency Medical Director – Dr. Jeremy Cushman The Rochester Fire Department is pleased to have selected Dr. Jeremy Cushman of the University of Rochester Medical Center as the Agency Medical Director. The RFD is the primary local Emergency Medical Service (EMS) agency. Dr. Cushman will provide medical consultation services for integrated, systematic preparedness for pre-hospital emergency medical care protocols and represent the interests of the Rochester Fire Department in the medical community. His career focus and passion is to provide EMS Medical Direction to the City of Rochester and the Monroe-Livingston County area, with the goal to actively engage EMS providers within the region in order to optimize response capabilities to provide the highest quality care to residents and visitors of this region.

Dr. Cushman is Board Certified in Emergency Medicine, holds a Master’s Degree in Emergency Health Services, and is Fellowship trained in Emergency Medical Services. He has worked with both career and volunteer Fire and EMS agencies, as well as fire based EMS systems. Before moving the Rochester area in 2006, Dr. Cushman was the Associate Medical Director of Howard County Fire and Rescue, a Fire Department with 350 career firefighters, 11 fire stations, and a training academy that served a population of 282,000, with nearly 40,000 annual responses. In addition to his duties as Agency Director of the Rochester Fire Department, Dr. Cushman provides EMS medical Direction to Monroe County, Monroe County/ City of Rochester 911 Center, Greater Rochester International Airport, Monroe County Fire Bureau, Monroe County Sherriff’s Office, and all County Basic Life Support First Response Agencies, MCC Ems Programs, Barnard Fire District, Gates Ambulance, Henrietta Ambulance, Lakeshore Fire District, North Greece Fire District, Perinton Ambulance and Southeast Quadrant MCCU. Dr. Cushman will work closely with Training Division staff and provide consultation services to the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Division to provide the RFD with his expertise on emergency medical provision and documentation procedures. The breadth and depth of Dr. Cushman’s experience and knowledge of EMD codes, dispatch priorities, familiarity with special operations and hazardous materials teams, implementation and maintenance of quality assurance programs, rehabilitation and provider safety on the fire ground, among others, is, by far, an excellent addition to the Rochester Fire Department team.

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2 0 1 0 ANN U A L R EPO R T

The Medical Director will provide the following services: • Direction and guidance of prehospital emergency medical provision and documentation procedures. The Medical Director will report to the Deputy Chief of the Training Division and provide consultation services to the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Office staff. • Provide technical expertise for the Metropolitan Medical Response System (MMRS) grant program, administered by the RFD, as it relates to emergency preparedness goals and objectives as prescribed by the federal government. • Review EMS Patient Care Reports and other documentation necessary to monitor quality of care. • Participate in the Rochester Fire Department Quality Improvement/ Quality Assurance Program (QA Program). • Provide technical expertise on the design and structure of emergency medical procedures. • Participate in the EMS certification training for Rochester Fire Department (RFD) personnel. Major Activities of the EMS Division in 2010: • Participated in the review and selection process of a new Medical Director for the department. Dr. Jeremy Cushman (U of R) was awarded the contract and proves to be a valuable asset to the department by providing medical oversight, guidance and expertise as Medical Director. • The EMS Division has created an EMS Tactical Plan to define and track the

initiatives deemed a priority by the Medical Director, Fire Chief and Lt. Giorgione.

• Reorganized the CME program in order to account for training and to further evaluate compliant solutions.

• Facilitated the training of ToxMedics for the ambulance contract provider so that our HazMat Team has proper medical surveillance and care givers for incidents. This also includes the addition of a ToxMedic bag to HazMat 1.

• Acquired First Watch © with the assistance of the ambulance contract provider, which monitors response times, and reports on those thresholds where penalties occur. More importantly it gives our department accurate and real time monitoring capabilities.

• Developed AED Use & Complaint Procedure policies to ensure continuity. • Ensured that all providers of the ambulance contract provider were current in their respective NIMS certification with regards to our Health & Safety Division filing the NIMS Cast report. • Participated in the Tri Data EMS study by providing insight and records as requested by Tri Data. This study ultimately proved that our BLS 1st Response model is sufficient and successful for the City of Rochester. • The EMS Division has and continues to strengthen our working relationships with our partners in Monroe County, State and Federal agencies in order to better serve the citizens of Rochester. Worked with the ambulance contract provider to streamline replacement of EMS supplies thereby reducing our costs and travel to obtain those supplies by the Supply Depot Accomplishments • Implemented a personal CO Meter program for the Line Division by researching, developing and acquiring the ToxiRAE 3 CO meter. This will enable continuous background monitoring for toxic level of Carbon Monoxide for our responders. 13

• Improved the contract ambulance provider penalty hearing and data review process so that hearings remain only for those instances where agreements cannot be made. The reporting process now involves Director Clifford who facilitates the final penalty amount notifications between our accounting bureau and the contract ambulance provider. • Developed and reinforced Emergency Incident Rehabilitation requirements and training between the contract ambulance provider and line division. • Collected and submitted PCR and AED data from 2008 to current to the Division of Pre-hospital Medicine in order to comply with local and state reporting requirements. • Provide training to supervisory personnel within the contract ambulance service in order to clarify the roles of RFD BLS and that of the contract ambulance provider. This is also done for Rochester Police Department recruits. • The EMS Division was responsible for the collection of ambulance contract provider penalties in the amount of: $216,130 and in NYS EMS Reimbursement funds in the amount of: $64,426.92. • Total funds brought in by the EMS Division were: $280,556.92.

Rochester Fire Department

SUPPORT

Training Division Flashover Simulator Installation at Public Safety Training Facility With the help of a AFG Grant funding allocation of $108,000, the RFD installed a new flashover simulator in the Fire Training Grounds Burn Building located at the Monroe County/Rochester Public Safety Training Facility. The newly installed flashover simulator equipment provided enhancements to the structural fire training building at the Public Safety Training Facility replacing older and outdated fire simulation equipment. The new Flashover simulator training equipment provides fire department personnel with a controlled and realistic exposure to the fire flashover experience. Flashover simulators replicate the intense heat, smoke, flames and chaos of a real fire emergency, yet do so in a safe, controlled and environmentally-sound manner. This training tool will reduce the risks to incoming Firefighters by providing them with a learning opportunity in a controlled environment. Recruit Training In preparation for the rigorous demands of the Fire Service profession, the RFD Training Division provides a comprehensive classroom and hands-on training on the necessary firefighting techniques and equipment. Recruits participate in a rigorous, academically and physically demanding program. Successful recruits complete the NYS Minimum Standard 229 hours of Basic Fire Training requirements, including Hazardous Materials Operations, Firefighter I and II. In addition, the recruits receive state certifications in Rescue Tech Basic, Principles of Building Construction, Firefighter Survival, Confined Space Awareness, SCBA Confidence, Accident Vehicle Extrication Training, EVOC, Pump and Aerial Apparatus Operator, Courage To Be Safe, Fast Company Operations, and Truck Company Operations. A graduating recruit receives 15 State Certificates. In 2010, graduating recruits earned nineteen and a half (19.5) college credits from Monroe Community College. In addition, recruits received National Certification in Fire Fighter I and Fire Fighter II upon successful completion of academic and practical exercises. National Certification measures a student’s knowledge, skills, and abilities against a national standard.

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2 0 1 0 ANN U A L R EPO R T

In addition to Fire/Rescue knowledge and skills, the Rochester Fire Department recruit training program also focuses on the essential skills and additional training to obtain an EMT Certification. Recruits are required to complete a comprehensive Probationary Firefighter Field Training Program after graduation. The probationary development phase requires review and reinforcement of the information covered during recruit training as well as the introduction of new skills. The Company Officer (CO) plays an important role in the overall development of probationary firefighters. The CO is responsible for incorporating learning opportunities, for the probationary firefighter, into company level training. The training is designed to enhance the competency of the probationary firefighters’ basic firefighting and emergency medical response skills. ACCOMPLISHMENTS FOR RECRUIT TRAINING, 2010 • Recruit performance and testing standards developed/updated to align with NY State procedures • Increased the number of certified instructors available to teach Firefighter I & II and state courses to the recruits • Visited a training facility in Fort Worth, Texas with PSTF staff for ideas to enhance the PSTF; A number of upgrades/enhancements (flashover room, sound system, furniture) made to the structural trainer building giving RFD recruits more realistic conditions to enhance training were a direct result from the trip taken to Fort Worth • Recruit Training Program enhanced with the addition of three (3) thermal imaging cameras and the addition of a roof training prop at the rear of the PSTF • Collaborated with Bureau of Human Resources Training Division for provision of a fire extinguishing class for city employees • Coordinated and implemented improved Recruit Physical Fitness Program with additional equipment and exercises • Delivered a successful recruit class of 14 new Firefighters for service on the Line Division • Researched the feasibility of adopting Standards Testing 15

Rochester Fire Department

OPERATIONS

Special Operations

The Special Operations Unit provides overhead support and guidance for the department’s nine specialty teams/companies. Training, equipment research and development, and operational readiness for these specialized teams are this unit’s primary mission. The Unit represents the department on a number of local and regional committees including: • Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC) & LEPC Executive Committee • Arch Rochester Community Advisory Panel

• Urban Area Working Group (UASI grant management) • WMD Task Force (SHSP grant management)

• Monroe County Special Operations Working Group • H1N1 Planning Team

• Ginna Tactical Response Task Force • FBI Ag Terrorism Working Group

The Special Operations Unit actively pursues securing grant funds to leverage the Fire Department’s ability to fund various specialty purchases, training activities and emergency planning to improve the Fire Department’s preparedness level. The Special Operations Division works closely with the Rochester Police Department to carry out the goals of the Urban Area Security Initiatives grant program. The following are funding Major Activities for Special Operations, 2010 • Development and submission of bid specifications for the Special Operations / CBRNE Vehicle and Hazardous Materials Vehicle • NYS Ice Rescue Technician course – 8 sessions

• Continued evaluation of NYS Legislation related to “Working at Elevations” including policy development and equipment research and development • Facilitated training program for FBI Hazardous Materials Team • Research and Development for Diamond Abrasive Blades

• Collaborated with Monroe Community College for layout and props for new Technical Rescue Training Building at PSTF • Facilitated Hazardous Materials Incident Command course

• Coordinated Vehicle Extrication Instructor Certifications w/ OFPC and MCFB • Facilitated Victim Extrication Course for Extrication Back-up companies • Facilitated annual drills for • Hazardous Materials Team • Confined Space Team • Trench Rescue Team • Collapse Rescue Team

• Acquisition of new Level A ensembles – ONESuit – now meeting NFPA requirements for Haz Mat PPE

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Metropolitan Medical Response System (MMRS) The Metropolitan Medical Response System purpose is to support local jurisdictions’ ability to enhance and maintain all-hazards response capabilities to manage mass casualty incidents during early hours critical to life saving and population protection. The types of incidents covered by this program includes: Terrorist acts using WMD/ CBRNE, large scale Haz-Mat incidents, epidemic disease outbreaks, and natural disasters.

New York State defined the mission of MMRS as follows: “Prevent terrorist attacks and mitigate against man-made and natural hazards; Protect the people of New York, our critical infrastructure and key resources; Prepare to respond to and recover from both man-made and natural disasters.” Lt. David Compton, the Rochester MMRS coordinator, meets regularly with numerous agencies and regional planning partners throughout the year to develop, plan, and prioritize the needs of our region as it pertains to the parameters of the MMRS grant program. Major Activities for the Metropolitan Medical Response System, 2010 Purchases

• Tox Medic boxes with pharmaceutical supplies for the Monroe County and RFD Haz-Mat teams

• Two forklifts for the Strategic National Stockpile location in Monroe County. • Base radio for the Monroe County Dept. of Health for POD communication purposes • Two John Deere Gators with Med-Beds for RFD • Aluminum trailer to transport Gators

• Laptop computers for RFD Haz-Mat team.

• 870 Duodote auto-injectors for emergency responder cache at ECD • Radio repeaters for Genesee river gorge

• Assist with financing a patient tracking system for our region • Finance a large scale regional mass casualty exercise

17

Rochester Fire Department

OPERATIONS

2010 Community Emergency Response Team (CERT)

The Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) concept was developed and implemented by the Los Angeles City Fire Department (LAFD) in 1985. The Whittier Narrows earthquake in 1987 underscored the area-wide threat of a major disaster in California. Many of the citizens who rendered aid to their neighbors became victims because they didn’t know what to do. Further, it confirmed the need for training civilians on how to meet their own immediate needs such as food and water during a disaster. As a result, the LAFD created the Disaster Preparedness Division with the purpose of training citizens as well as private and governmental employees.

The training program that the LAFD initiated makes good sense and furthers the process of citizens understanding their responsibility in preparing for disasters. It also increases their ability to safely help themselves, their family and their neighbors. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) recognized the importance of preparing citizens. The Emergency Management Institute (EMI) and the National Fire Academy (NFA) adopted and expanded the CERT curriculum. Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT’s) are now a federal program based out of Citizen Corps and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Its federal mission, as requested by President of the United States, is for CERT members to respond as one of four premier “secondary responder” organizations. President Bush made the case for CERT on November 8, 2001 stating that:

“We will ask State and local officials to create a new modern civil defense service, similar to local volunteer fire departments, to respond to local emergencies when the manpower of government is stretched too thin….”

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The Rochester Fire Department responded to the President’s request by being the first community in New York State to create and implement the CERT model. The following is the CERT mission statement: CERT will enhance the quality of life and the safety of the citizens of Rochester by teaching and informing our citizens’ on all-hazard disaster prevention. Furthermore, the CERT program will maintain teams as a trained second tier of public safety responders focused on the preservation of life, property, and the environment as it relates to public safety, disaster mitigation and emergency management.

Rochester was also the first community to implement CERT in its public and private school systems. The Rochester Fire Department focused on fire prevention education, and the Rochester Police Department targeted community on crime prevention education. Before CERT, there was no one group tasked with educating the public on “all-hazard” disaster planning. The Rochester Community is better prepared to deal with potentially catastrophic events and disaster management due to CERT activities and training opportunities. 2010 CERT Activities: • CERT Class 21 – Feb 2010 (22 participants)

• Aquinas Institute High School Catastrophic Event Response Exercise -5/21/2010

• Truck 2 assisted – mock disaster exercise proctored by RFD at Aquinas’ stadium

• CERT Students assisted with Smoke Flames & Courage event in Charlotte 19

Rochester Fire Department

OPERATIONS

Suppression FIRE CALL TYPE 2006 - 2010 900 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 Inside

2006 743

2007 854

2008 745

2009 738

2010 684

Outside

383

487

449

410

363

Vehicle

231

212

189

201

171

FIRE FATALITIES 2006 TO 2010 10

9

9 8 7

6

6

5

5 4

3

3 2 1

0

0 2006

2007

20

2008

2009

2010

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INCIDENTS BY TIME OF DAY 2006 - 2010 2000 1800 1600 1400 1200 1000

2006

800

2007

600

2008

400

2009

200

2010

0 0000- 02000400- 06000059 0259 0459 0659 0800- 1000- 120014000859 1059 1259 1459 16001659

18001859

20002059

22002259

MANPOWER FISCAL YEARS 2008 TO 2011 520 510 500 490 480 470 460 450 440 430 420 410

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

Authorized RFD Uniform Employees FY08 to FY11 Total Uniform

511

495

495

488

Authorized RFD Uniform Employees FY08 to FY11 Firefighters

471

454

454

447

21

Rochester Fire Department

OPERATIONS

Suppression On Duty Injuries 2010 Back

10

Burns

3

Contusions

3

Eye

2

Finger/Hand

9

Foot/Ankle

8

Hearing Loss

8

Knee

7

Shoulder/Neck

10

Wrist/Elbow

5

Other

5

TOTAL FIRE RELATED INCIDENTS 2,000 1,800

1,600

1,553 1,383

1,357

1,349 1,218

1,400 1,200 1,000 800 600 400 200

2006

2007

22

2008

2009

2010

2 0 1 0 ANN U A L R EPO R T

RFD TOTAL RUNS PER YEAR 2006 - 2010 60,000

54,890

52,974

50,447

49,882

49,775

50,000

40,000

30,000

20,000

10,000

-

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

TOTAL STRUCTURE FIRES 2006 TO 2010 854

900

745

743

800

738 684

700 600 500 400 300 200 100

0 2006

23

2007

2008

2009

2010

Rochester Fire Department

OPERATIONS

Suppression FIRES IN VACANT STRUCTURES 2006 - 2010 120 104

100 100

79

75

80

69

60

40

20

0 2006

2007

24

2008

2009

2010

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The Rochester Protectives The Rochester Protectives, Inc. is a volunteer firefighter assistance organization, in existence since 1858, that works with the Rochester Fire Department. Its mission is to provide both fire and non-fire salvage services to city residents at emergency incidents. The Protectives provide assistance to the Rochester Fire Department and protect private property of citizens from unnecessary damage of by performing the following activities: • Covering or removing property • Recovering family valuables

• Providing ventilation through the use of smoke-ejecting fans • Set-up of emergency scene lighting

• Pumping water from flooded buildings • Securing broken windows and doors

Over 25,000 hours of services are provided annually by approximately 35 active members who volunteer a minimum of twelve (12) hours per week. The Fire Department provides 5,600 square feet of space at the Andrews Street facility for office, storage and bunking purposes, and a truck and driver to transport equipment. In 2010, the Protectives volunteered 24,522 hour of members’ time and responded to 327 alarms as follows: Structure Fires

268

Water Problem

61

Miscellaneous

24

25

Multiple Alarms

Broken Windows

16 3

Rochester Fire Department

COMMUNITY SERVICE

Finger Lakes Regional Burn Association Lt. Allyn J. Borrino

Most people never think about the impact a fire event has on their everyday lives, and most think that a fire incident could never happen to them. A minor cooking related fire, creating only smoke damage, can put a family out of their home for up to a year, as insurance issue are settled, interior surfaces of the home are cleaned, sealed and repainted, and clothing and furniture is cleaned or replaced. Even fewer people realize the impact a burn injury can have on their lives. From the initial burn trauma treatment they receive, to the continued outpatient surgeries they may have to endure, and not to mention the psycho-social aspects of dealing with the physical, emotional and psychological scars that are left behind. A burn injury is something no person should ever have to experience.

There is one committed group in our community that does know the implications of burn injuries, and they have been there in support of people whose lives have been changed by burn injuries for the last twenty-one years. That group of dedicated volunteers is the Finger Lakes Regional Burn Association (FLRBA). Beginning in 1988, Mike Young, then president of the Monroe County Fireman’s Association, wanted to start a foundation to benefit the Strong Burn Center. University of Rochester Fire Marshal John Hall and others proposed the idea to Dr Chris Wray, director of Strong Memorial Hospital’s Burn Unit. All involved were in support of the idea and the University of Rochester agreed to attend to the legalities of the proposition, and eventually found that forming an association rather than a foundation was the best course of action. With that, the Finger Lakes Regional Burn Association was born.

FLRBA’s founding goals encompassed support of the Strong Burn Center through equipment purchases that enhance burn care, the delivery of burn prevention education and information to the local community, providing support to juvenile burn survivors, along with an adult support group for burn survivors, and support of local burn treatment research. Only a short time into the association’s existence, John Hall was being interview on local television station WHAM, when Rochester Fire Department Fire Chief Leonard Huether saw the interview. Huether immediately called John Hall and pledged the Rochester Fire Department’s support and assistance in the association’s endeavors.

Since that time many members of the Rochester Fire Department have been involved with the Finger Lakes Regional Burn Association and their many causes. From the early days of the association until spring of 2003 Deputy Chief William Curran was the FLRBA’s treasurer. Captain Dan McBride gave much of his time and talents to the goals of the FLRBA as did Lt. Scotty Owen, who in 2002 accompanied one regional burn survivor to National Burn Camp in Washington, D.C. Additionally, in 2000 F.F. Tim D’Imperio donated his “Fire House Magazine” cash award to Finger Lakes Regional Burn Association. 26

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For many years RFD members have been part of FLRBA events such as the Firefighter’s Burn Walk, which was started in 1999 by Doug Burgess, who was the Fire Chief of the Sea Breeze Fire Department at the time. Much good work by our members has been done for the Summer Burn Camp for juvenile burn survivors, which is beginning its fifteenth year. Burn Camp is the highlight of the year for many of the children and is a psycho-social experience for children scarred by burn injuries. The annual Firefighters Ski Race started in 2002 and involved firefighters in full Turn-out gear, on skis, in teams of five, handling a fifty foot length of hose and racing down the ski slopes competing against other firefighting teams as a fund raiser for FLRBA. This Ski Race hasn’t happened in a few years, but hopefully a renewal of involvement by our firefighters to the common goals that are fundamental to both the Finger Lakes Regional Burn Association and the Fire Service community can be a part of the FLRBA’s future.

One RFD group leading a reenergized commitment to giving back, are the members of the Axe Men motorcycle organization, the majority of who are Rochester Firefighters, and all of who are Professional Union Firefighters. The Axe Men adopted FLRBA as their non-profit organization of choice a few years ago, and annually raise money to Front row: Lt. Scotty Owen, Ron Delorenzo, benefit FLRBA and its programs. Each Rick Allen (assoc. member), Jason Stroko Back row: Lt. Roger Moynes, Lt. Clayton year, for the past several years, the Eckedt, Jeff Krywy, Terry Stott, Nick Mancuso Axe Men, along with members of the emergency services motorcycle group, the Red Knights, and the law enforcement community’s Blue Knights motor cycle group, make the two hour motorcycle ride to summer Burn Camp in the Southern Tier. In 2008 their contingent was seventy-three bikers strong. These dedicated groups spend hours with the children, offering motorcycle rides, participating in games with the kids and picnicking with the campers. These members of the Rochester Fire Department, and many more, set a great example for all of us to follow when it comes to giving back to the community.

27

Rochester Fire Department

COMMUNITY SERVICE

Holy CHildhood Christmas

NEEDS A SHORT WRITE UP ceperum nessi occaborati conseque nonse nos excepe plistiur acientio mo tecepero corerita nimet libus exerspi cianis inctatquatur sum a voluptat earcil magnatem est quam et ressunt, od utectium consenimint, quiatem et volor acepreperem restemo dignihil in estrum quatur.

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Firemen pitch in for ailing brother

My son-in-law, Paul Skelly, is a lieutenant with the Rochester Fire Department. Unfortunately, he has been gravely ill with cancer for close to a year. His wife, my daughter Terry, and their four delightful daughters are doing their best to maintain a normal home life, but some things are just beyond their capacities.

On May 13, 2010 an amazing army of more than 40 firefighters descended upon the Skelly home and transformed it in just a matter of hours. If I hadn’t stopped over to see it, I wouldn’t have believed it. The house was reroofed, including tearing off and disposing of the old shingles and plywood. The trim was painted, the natural wood portions were stained, the gardens were tilled and mulched, the lawns were cut and trimmed, outdoor lighting was installed, the pool was prepared for opening. All at no cost to the family! What a wonderful group of fine young men. Thank you.



John B. Corcoran Hilton, NY

29

Rochester Fire Department

TRANSITIONS

Retirements: Date Appointments: Date Deputy Chief Stephen McClary 1/23/2010 Civilian Ellen Clifford 1/4/2010 Lieutenant Richard Miller 1/25/2010 Firefighter Christopher Courtney 3/29/2010 Firefighter John Leach 1/30/2010 Firefighter Andrew Curtin 3/29/2010 Civilian Richard Mason 1/30/2010 Firefighter James Elliott 3/29/2010 Firefighter Charles Pignato 1/30/2010 Firefighter Edward Erbland 3/29/2010 Civilian Ronald Gullo 4/17/2010 Firefighter Robert Faulkner II 3/29/2010 Firefighter Matthew Rowe 4/21/2010 Firefighter Isiah Hilaire 3/29/2010 Lieutenant Donna Kubarycz 4/30/2010 Firefighter Shawn Johnson 3/29/2010 Lieutenant George Wolf 4/30/2010 Firefighter Frederick Johnstone Jr 3/29/2010 Captain Bradley Wallace 5/2/2010 Firefighter Evan Kiner 3/29/2010 Lieutenant Michael Hutton 5/6/2010 Firefighter Frederick Mannino 3/29/2010 Lieutenant Angelo Barbetta 5/9/2010 Firefighter Ryan Nicoletta 3/29/2010 Firefighter Michael Wierzbicki 5/13/2010 Firefighter Anthony Rodriguez 3/29/2010 Firefighter Thomas Boyle 5/22/2010 Firefighter Luis Rodriguez 3/29/2010 Firefighter Gregory Noto 5/22/2010 Firefighter George Smith 3/29/2010 Firefighter Samuel Insalaco 5/27/2010 Firefighter Steven Stankovski 3/29/2010 Civilian Donald Spahn 5/29/2010 Civilian Devin Stefano 5/30/2010 Civilian Robert Frasier 6/30/2010 Civilian Lawrence Walworth 6/28/2010 Lieutenant Daniel Pignato 7/11/2010 Firefighter Peter Sciortino 7/18/2010 Promotions: Firefighter Paul Tiffany 9/13/2010 Captain Robert Mulcahy 4/16/2010 Firefighter Michael Pellittiere II 10/16/2010 Captain Kevin Murphy 4/16/2010 Firefighter Robert DeCook 10/24/2010 Lieutenant Domenic Borrelli 4/16/2010 Firefighter Frank Barbato 11/13/2010 Lieutenant Thomas Jaworowicz 4/16/2010 Captain Stephen Erb 12/4/2010 Lieutenant Andrew Lonthair 4/16/2010 Firefighter David Reinhard 12/30/2010 Lieutenant Terry Stott 4/16/2010 Lieutenant Daniel Witkowski 4/16/2010 Deceased Lieutenant David Yiannakos 5/1/2010 Lieutenant Paul Skelly 9/4/2010 Lieutenant Douglas Knapp 7/8/2010 Lieutenant Michael Nolte 7/8/2010 Lieutenant Robby Villa 7/8/2010 Lieutenant Michael Vinci 7/8/2010

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2 0 1 0 ANN U A L R EPO R T

AWARDS

Cabrera photo? Medal of Valor Firefighter Roberto Cabrera Clover Capital Firefighter of the Year Captain James Ryan Fire Chief’s Award Firefighter John Grieco Captain Stephen Batz Captain Chris McCullough Members of the Fire Investigation Unit: Lt. Allyn Borrino, FF Thomas Dorrer, FF Michael Vergari, FF William Burley, FF Rico Cortez, FF Charles Buss, FF Brian Anten, FF Abraham Crews, FF Milt Walker, FF Scott Miller, Elissa Lang, ATF Officer Dixon Robin, RPD Investigator James May Unit Commendation Award: Andrews St. Bus Accident Members of Engine 17, Rescue 11, Truck 10, Group 3: BC Stadler, Capt. John Taillie, FF Lucas Faulkner, FF Michael Sauer, FF Steve Weisensel, Capt. Steven Batz, FF Robert Brongo, FF Douglas King, FF Michael Vinci, FF Jason Wharity, FF David Bagley II, FF Joseph Geraci, FF Scott Toly 121 Liberty Pole Way Members of Truck 10, Group 2: Lt. Thomas Rogan, Lt. Terrence Stott, FF Elvis Reyes, FF Keith Rickard 40 Grover Street Members of Quint/Midi 5, Group 4: Lt. Robert Martin, FF Al White, FF Casey Brennan, FF Ron Delorenzo, FF James Flanagan, FF Keith Rickard 31

Durand Eastman Beach Members of Engine 19, Group 1: Capt. James McGowan, FF David Dunwoody, FF Thomas Centron, FF John Grieco, FF Pablo Nieves 66 Harvest Street Members of Rescue 11, Group 2: FF Hector Lopez, FF Christopher Steimer 109 Dorbeth Road Members of Quint 6, Truck 2 Group 4: Lt. Jerry Randise, FF Steve Morgan, FF Brett Smith, FF John Dix, FF John Imhoff, FF Mike Sudz 500 Carter Street Members of Engine 16, Group 3: Lt. Mark Stoianovich, FF Jeff Simpson, FF Lamont Banks, FF Juan Sierra, FF Frank Vallone EMS Life Saving Award 158 Fillmore Street Members of Truck 5: FF Brian Glise, FF Cory Trapiss 14 Arklow Street Members of Truck 10: Lt. William Moriarty, FF Anthony Biondi, FF Neal Ludwig, FF Matthew Baylock, Sgt. Richard Delorme RPD 597 Thurston Road Members of Engine 7: Capt. Paul Hanson, FF John O’Connor, FF Michael Chilano, FF Nkrumah Mabry 353 Birr Street Members of Engine 10: Lt. James McGee, FF Douglas Platt, FF Gregory Hackett, FF Nkrumah Mabry Distinguished Service Award Capt. John Taillie Lt. Terry Stott FF Willie Lightfoot FF Ernest Flagler

Rochester Fire Department

32

2 0 1 0 ANN U A L R EPO R T

33

City of Rochester Fire Department 185 Exchange Blvd. Suite 665 Rochester, NY 14614 585.428.6739 www.cityofrochester.gov