Around Spitsbergen - Oceanwide Expeditions

Around Spitsbergen - Oceanwide Expeditions

Expedition Log Around Spitsbergen 8 to 17 July, 2016 On board the M/V Ortelius MV Ortelius was named after the Dutch cartographer Abraham Ortelius ...

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Expedition Log

Around Spitsbergen 8 to 17 July, 2016 On board the

M/V Ortelius

MV Ortelius was named after the Dutch cartographer Abraham Ortelius (1527-1598) who published the first modern world atlas, the Theatrum Orbis Terrarum (Theatre of the World) in 1570. MV Ortelius was built in 1989 in Gdynia, Poland, as a research vessel for the Russian Academy of Science and was named Marina Svetaeva. In 2011 she was purchased by Oceanwide Expeditions. The vessel was re-flagged and renamed Ortelius. Now the ship is sailing as a 125-Passenger vessel. Ortelius is 91 m long, 17,6 m wide and has a maximum draft of 5,80 m, with an Ice Strength rating of UL1/1A, top speed of 13 knots and one diesel engine generating 3200 kW.

Around Spitsbergen

Captain Ernesto Barría, and his International Crew of 52 Including Hotel Manager –Robert McGillivray (Netherlands) Asst. Hotel Manager – Heidi Dohn (Denmark) Head Chef – Przemyslaw Wisniewski (Poland) Sous-Chef – Roden Paguio (New Zealand) And Expedition Leader – Jim Mayer (UK) Asst. Expedition Leader – Barbara Post (Austria) Expedition Guide – David Drummond (USA) Expedition Guide – Christophe Gouraud (France) Expedition Guide – Ben Jackson (New Zealand) Expedition Guide – Frigga Kruse (Germany) Expedition Guide – Pernille Søegaard (Denmark) Expedition Guide – Josef Wermelinger (Switzerland) Expedition Doctor – Jürgen Preimesberger (Austria)

Welcome you all on board the Ortelius!

Day 1 – July 8 Longyearbyen 16:30 GPS position: 78°13.8’ N / 015°36.10’ E Weather: +15°C, sunny, no wind

Around one o’clock in the afternoon all of us were in Longyearbyen in Spitsbergen. This former coal mining settlement has a population of about 2,300 and is one of the world’s northern most settlements. We were taken to the town, which gave everyone a chance to see the town centre and excellent museum in the large modern university building. On display in the museum is the whaling history of the archipelago and plenty of information about wildlife, early exploration and World War II. Longyearbyen is named after the American, John Munro Longyear (1850-1922), one of the founders of the Arctic Coal Company (1906-1916). Coal is still produced in a mine near Longyearbyen but not in quantities as seen in the twentieth century. Our expedition ship and home for the next week, Ortelius was alongside at the "coal pier" and ready to welcome us for an exciting journey! Our stay on board started with a warm welcome in the lecture room by hotel manager Robert with a useful speech about the ship, from basic rules about toilet system to high tech wifi and internet connections. We also heard a bright safety briefing by second officer Andre about abandon ship procedures and how to react in case of distress signals. This was followed by an exercise with gathering at the muster station. Always good to know such things, and hopefully not put them into practice! We then gathered around our expedition leader Jim who introduced us to the rest of the team and we all toasted to our great adventure ahead with Captain Ernesto Barría. After a great dinner prepared by the chefs Christian and Paguio, we were sailing in the large fjord of Isfjorden. On both sides of Isfjorden flat-lying sedimentary rocks only 45–60 million years old were exposed, very young compared to most other parts of Spitsbergen, carved by recent glaciers to display beautiful U-shaped valleys.

Day 2 – July 9 Kongsfjorden 12:00 GPS position: 78°57.2’ N / 012°02.9’ E Weather: +15°C, sunny, no wind We woke up in the Kongsfjord, front of the Kongsbreen (glacier), with a gorgeous sunshine. Shortly after breakfast, we gather in the lecture room with Jim for a mandatory briefing on guidelines, zodiac operations and polar bear safety. Then it was time to put the preparation into action and we started disembarking around 10 O’clock. The zodiacs brought us to land at Ny London, an old marble mine on Blomstrandhalvøya. All the remains in Ny London, including railway lines, steam boilers and drills, were used between 1910 and 1920 when the Northern Exploration Company, founded by Ernest Mansfield, invested heavily in geological investigations and some trial mining hoping to find good quantities of high quality marble. The remarkable species seen this morning were a breeding pair of long-tailed jaeger as well as a breeding pair of red-throated diver with two little chicks. After lunch we went to an information meeting about the research village Ny-Ålesund. It used to be a mining village until 1962 when the last out of several mining accidents took place. At that time the mine was owned by Norway, and eventually the prime minister of Norway had to resign due to lack of safety precautions in the mine. Nowadays the village is inhabited by numerous scientists, especially during summer, along with arctic terns and other wildlife. We had a nice walk around the village, visited the local shop and posted mail at the world’s northernmost post office. Some of us took the short trip to the airship mast where the Norwegian arctic hero, Roald Amundsen, had his final stop before he made the first transpolar flight with the zeppelin N-1 in 1926. Situated close to the mast we heard about the competition between Amundsen and Umberto Nobile and the following tragedy which led to the death of Amundsen in 1928. Prior to dinner we enjoyed a recap where David gave us more information about the arctic tern. We were impressed by the fact that this small bird, weighing only 120 grams, travelled more than 70 000 kilometers every year. After dinner we proceeded further north, and we were all excited for what the morning after would bring.

Day 3 – July 10 Liefdefjorden & Woodfjorden 12:00 GPS position: 79°41.2’ N / 013°23.6’ E Weather: +13°C, sunny, no wind The morning wake up call fell earlier than planned this morning. The time was 7.15 when Jim greeted us good morning with the good news of a polar bear in sight. As we sailed through Woodfjorden Frigga spotted the bear walking north along the coast line on Reindyrflya and it was a perfect start to our sunny day. While we were eating the tasty breakfast, Ortelius entered Liefdefjorden and we arrived at Andøyane. The zodiacs were launched and we all explored the islands in the fantastic weather. The birds were home. The arctic terns were feeding on the surface, glaucous gulls were on their nests, male eiders were swimming in the fjord, a great skua was sitting ashore, wating for the next meal to appear and the red phalaropes were to be seen along the shoreline, feeding and swimming around in little circles. The female phalaropes seemed to have left for warmer climes. As if this wasn’t enough, Christophe’s zodiac found us all a female polar bear, resting in the green moss. We all shared a unique time with this bear which seemed not to bothered at all by our presents – very special. It was a happy team that returned to Ortelius for lunch and the fact that the crew had made us another fantastic meal, just made it all even better. Meanwhile, Captain Ernesto and the team took us further into Liefdefjord and we repositioned to Texas Bar. Here we had three different hikes on offer; short, medium and long. No matter which adventure you picked, you got to enjoy the beautiful landscape, the view over the fjord and flowers like mountain avens, tufted taxifrages and mountain sorrels. The long hikers made it all the way up to the face of Hannabreen. Here we got to touch the glacier itself, a first for some in the team. Before returning to the ship, the adventures took a swim in the Arctic water. Le grand finale of the day was yet to come. The captain took us even further into the fjord so that we could enjoy a close look at the more than 4,5 km long Monaco Glacier. A bearded seal was hauled out on an ice flow among the brash ice scattered through the bay. Dinner was great and the dinning room was loud, stories being told about the moments we all just shared here in Svalbard. It was true, we had had another day of beautiful weather and amazing experiences. Now it was time to rest and be ready for what tomorrow would bring.

Day 4 – July 11 Phippsøya & pack-ice 12:00 GPS position: 80°40.9’ N / 020°43.6’ E Weather: +5°C, cloudy, wind from E (Force 6) We had steamed 120 nautical miles north to arrive 0730 hrs at the northern most Svalbard Archipelago’s Seven Islands. The wind was blasting over the backlit and picturesque steep mountains with ethereal down swept cloud caps swirling at Phippsøya. We mounted up our zodiacs and powered into the tempestuous wind waves full of saltwater spray over the bows. Ashore, we divided into our usual three hiking groups, conducting sorties over 6-700 million year old metamorphosed igneous granite round boulders, covered in foliose lichens dried to a blackish pie crust in this polar desert. We saw a probable old Norwegian trapper’s cabin and three walruses were hauled-out on the sandy beach. Enroute, we encountered a territorial pair of arctic jaeger, who nearly landed on guest’s heads in their typical strong nest defense. We also located polar bear scat from a furry meal. While a great landing, many were ready to warm up with a nice hot and tasty lunch. Afternoon lectures on photography by Ben and sea ice with Barbara were enjoyed by all. By 1830 hours, we were entering the pack ice. No more than half an hour and four kilometers in and we saw a female polar bear laying down on the ice our front of the ship. Well, we slowly pushed our way through the white jig-saw puzzle ice pieces and incredibly, she stood up and began to follow her pre-BBQ nose arrow straight to our location. Including coming right up under the bow and down the port side partway and back around down to mid-ships, on the starboard. The foredeck and along the sides, all guests were outside watching intently and filling their memory chips completely with first hand ice bear imagery! After an hour, she decided that we weren’t going to share our dinner and she went her way, and we went inside for our famous BBQ supper. Everyone was most satisfied with this less than common personal encounter with a polar bear!!

Day 5 – July 12 Pack ice, North Spitsbergen 12:00 GPS position: 81°34.7’ N / 021°54.9’ E Weather: +3°C, overcast, wind from ESE (Force 5) Our day began a little different to all others on the expedition so far. We spent a very special and peaceful night in the pack ice. The previous evening the Captain had shut the engine off and let us drift over night. By the time the engines fired to life in the morning, we had drifted over 5 miles with the ice. Much like some of the early explorers in the Arctic. After a filling breakfast everyone’s mind turned to the main focus of the day, finding polar bears. The expedition staff organised themselves into a bridge roster to look for bears. They joined the Captain and his officers in search of the King of the Arctic. Due to very dense ice pack conditions, the call was made to leave the pack and head further east along the ice edge. Due to the heavily packed ice the ship was only able to 2 knots whereas in open water we were able to move at 11 knots. While we headed further east, the expedition staff and Sandra Walser presented lectures on seals of Svalbard and photography. Just before lunch the Captain worked his magic again and found another bear. Initially the bear showed little interest in the ship, however, after our lunch, the bear came to life and walked over and visited the ship, much to the delight of the passengers, staff and crew. After this most special encounter, the fog rolled over the ice and it was time for us to turn south and head for our next destination in Hinlopenstretet.

Day 6 – July 13 Hinlopenstretet & Palanderbukta 12:00 GPS position: 79°36.7’ N / 018°36.2’ E Weather: +7°C, overcast, wind from SSE (Force 5) Nothing beats a morning at Alkefjellet. After an enjoyable breakfast we all started our zodiac cruise among the thousand of Guillemots breeding at the 100 meters tall, steep cliffs at this magical place in Hinlopenstretet. The light looked beautiful to the north and towards the south we had a good look at the waterfall of melt water draining the Odinjøkulen ice cap. The guillemots were busy as ever, flying to and from the cliff while the glaucous gulls were keeping a close eye from above. Fighting kittiwakes in flight were falling from up high and also a great skua and an arctic skua were spotted. It was raining with bird guano and some got hit by it, just lucky, that this means good luck. The cruise finished off with a look at the Pyntbreen and back at the ship, the hotel staff welcomed us with hot chocolate and cake!!! After lunch we had about two hours sailing before we reached Palanderbukta. Excited and ready for new impressions, we landed at Zeipelodden on the soft limestone beach. In 3 groups we explored the beautiful desserts of Nordaustlandet with a great view out over the bay, which had a few growlers shining blue in the distance. The Svalbard poppies were flowering in both its white and yellow morphs, together with many of the other arctic plants. Also the frost patterned ground caught our interest and making for a very special landscape to hike in. The day had been full of adventures and now it was time to meet for the daily recap, before the hotel crew spoiled us once again, with a fantastic dinner.

Day 7 – July 14 Barentsøya & Edgeøya 12:00 GPS position: 78°15.0’ N / 021°48.3’ E Weather: +5°C, overcast, wind from ESE (Force 4) Sailing under cloudy skies south in the Hinlopenstretet we arrived at Kapp Waldburg for our morning landing. Here black-legged kittiwakes nest in profusion on the ancient sedimentary ledges of a box canyon. Scouting the area, we discovered two polar bears near our landing and so prudently decided to zodiac cruise instead of hiking. This provided great views of Svalbard reindeer, up to five arctic skua chasing kittiwakes with beaks full of nesting vegetation, arctic fox exploring the lunch options at the cleft cliff mouth and an inquisitive polar bear too. At least four bears were spotted mostly relaxed within the glacial moraine remains complex. Common eider flocks greeted our ten zod loads at the Freemanbreen Glacier faces as the Captain brought the ship nearer for our return for lunch. Afterwards, we proceeded south to Edgeøya at Dolerittneset where historic walrus processing occurred. We enjoyed a long hike to the ridge top and a medium walk to see more reindeer, ivory gull, snow buntings and of course, many male walruses resting on the hut beach.

Day 8 – July 15 Hornsund 12:00 GPS position: 77°01.9’ N / 015°57.5’ E Weather: +10°C, foggy, no wind Overnight we sailed 170 nautical miles around the Southern tip of Spitsbergen and into Hornsund. Looking to keep things interesting, Josef woke us up with his version on the daily wake-up call. We were all pleasantly surprised with the weather when we finally emerged from our cabins. The plan for the morning, explore the icebergs and glacier of Burgerbukta. There was an air of expectation as we boarded the zodiacs for our exploration. We were instantly greeted with massive pieces of amazing ice as they floated through the mist that lay over Burgerbukta. The zodiacs picked and weaved their way through this amazing icescape until we reached the massive terminal face of Paierlbreen. The scale of ice and rock that lay before us was hard to comprehend. Jim estimated the height of the ice cliffs to be close to 90m high. As we turned and headed back the ship we passed gliding fulmars, black guillemots, arctic skua, kittiwakes and a solitary puffin! With the fog setting in and limiting vision almost completely, we sailed to Brepollen. It was here, Jim made the call to turn and head west to the continental shelf in search for whales and better visibility.

Day 9 – July 16 Bellsund & Barentsburg 12:00 GPS position: 78°07.1’ N / 013°42.9’ E Weather: +10°C, foggy & overcast, wind variable (Force 3) As we have come to learn by now, the plan B worked out almost as well as the plan A. Dense fog obscured the view and prevented any possibility of landing in the Bellsund area. Thus Ortelius sailed north, destination Isfjord in the hope of clearer conditions. During the passage news reached us that Isfjord too was blanketed. Expedition Leader Jim came up with a fog-proof plan and just after lunch we stepped ashore in Russia (or may be that should be Ukraine) at Barentsburg. This mining town on the edge of Grønfjord is home to 400 souls of whom 80% are Ukrainian. Our walk around the settlement took us through a cultural time warp. A bust of Lenin stared out above the over-grown town square; a smoky power station provided sickly yellow light inside the bar were 78% cocktails are available. The bar is located next to the hospital, just in case. Some passengers ventured to the edge of the town and found little auks and a fox, others spent time in the museum where exhibits ranged from polar bears to Soviet era medals. All returned to the ship after this, our final landing, to prepare for Captain’s Cocktails. We raised a class with Captain Barría to celebrate the end of a very successful voyage. Cheers!

Day 10 – July 17 Longyearbyen, Spitsbergen 08:00 GPS position: 78°13.8’ N / 015°36.10’ E It was now time to say farewell to our great adventure, to our safe floating home and to our lovely new friends! Some of us had an early flight and a bus took us to the airport at 6 am. The rest of us went down the gangway at about 9 am at the "coal pier". A bus took us to town so that we could do a bit of visit, shopping and mailing from one of the northern most settlements, before heading to the airport.

Total distance sailed on this voyage: 1,232nautical miles / 2,282 kilometres On behalf of Oceanwide Expeditions, Captain Ernesto Barría and the Officers, all Crew, Expedition Team and Hotel Team: it has been a pleasure travelling with you! www.oceanwide-expeditions.com

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1 - Longyearbyen, Isfjorden 2 - New London, Blomstrandhalvøya 3 - Ny-Ålesund, Kongsfjorden 4 - Andøyane, Liefdefjorden 5 - Texas Bar, Liefdefjorden 6 - Monacobreen, Liefdefjorden 7 - Phippsøya, Sjuøyane 8 - Packice & polar bears

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9 - Alkefjellet, Hinlopenstretet 10 - Zeipelodden, Palanderbukta 11 - Wahlenbergfjorden (ship Cruise) 12 - Kapp Waldburg, Freemansundet 13 - Dolerittneset 14 - Burgerbukta, Hornsund 15 - Brepollen, Hornsund (ship cruise) 16 - Continential Shelf 17 - Barentsburg, Grønfjorden 18 - Longyearbyen, Isfjorden

Birds - Vögel English Name

Deutscher Name

Latin Name

Red-throated diver Northern Fulmar Pink-footed Goose Barnacle Goose Common Eider King Eider Long-tailed Duck Rock Ptarmigan Purple Sandpiper Sanderling Common Ringed Plover Red Phalarope Ruddy Turnstone

Sterntaucher Eissturmvogel Kurzschnabelgans Weisswangengans Eiderente Prachteiderente Eisente Alpenschneehuhn Meerstrandläufer Sanderling Sandregenpfeifer Thorshühnchen Steinwälzer

Gavia stellata Fulmarus glacialis Anser brachyrhynchus Branta leucopsis Somateria mollissima Somateria spectabilis Clangula hyemalis Lagopus mutus hyperboreus Calidris maritima Calidris alba Charadrius hiaticula Phalaropus fulicarius Arenaria interpres

Arctic Jaeger Long-tailed Jaeger Pomarine Jaeger Great Skua Glaucous Gull Lesser black-backed Gull Black-legged Kittiwake Ivory Gull Arctic Tern Brunnich’s Guillemot Black Guillemot Little Auk Atlantic Puffin Snow Bunting

Schmarotzerraub-möwe Falkenraubmöwe Spatelraubmöwe Skua Eismöwe Heringsmöwe Dreizehenmöwe Elfenbeinmöwe Küstenseeschwalbe Dickschnabellumme Gryllteiste Krabbentaucher Papageitaucher Schneeammer

Stercorarius parasiticus Stercorarius longicadus Stercorarius pomarinus Catharacta skua Larus hyperboreus Larus fuscus Rissa tridactyla Pagophila eburnea Sterna paradisaea Uria lomvia Cepphus grylle mandtii Alle alle Fratercula arctica Plectrophenax nivalis

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Mammals - Säugetiere English Name Walrus Bearded seal Ringed seal Harp Seal Harbour/Common Seal Blue Whale Minke Whale Fin Whale Humpback Whale Beluga Arctic Fox Polar Bear Spitsbergen Reindeer

Deutscher Name Walross Bartrobbe Ringelrobbe Sattelrobbe Seehund Blauwal Zwergwal Finnwal Buckelwal Weißwal Eisfuchs Eisbär Svalbard Renntier

Latin Name

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Odobenus rosmarus Erignathus barbatus Phoca hispida Pagophilus groenlandicus Phoca vitulina Balaenopentera musculus Balaenoptera acutorostrata Balaenoptera physalus Megaptera novaeangliae Dephinapterus leucas Alopex (Vulpes) lagopus Ursus maritimus Rangifer tarandus platyrhynchus

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Jim Mayer – Expedition Leader Jim has been travelling in the Arctic and Antarctic for the last 20 years. He started on a student expedition to catch and ring Barnacle Geese on Svalbard in 1990. Since then has led expeditions in Arctic Norway,

Iceland,

Greenland

and

Svalbard. Jim attempted to ski the length of Svalbard from south to north but had to give up when all his food was eaten by polar bears. In 2000 he made the mistake of accidentally skiing 560km across the Greenland Icecap. For Oceanwide, Jim was on the expedition team of the maiden voyages of the Plancius to South Georgia and the Antarctic in January 2010 and now works on both ships in all parts of the polar world. "Jim's biography of Ernest Shackleton, "A Life in Poetry" is now available, visit www.facebook.com/shackletonalifeinpoetry for more information." DEUTSCH:

Jim ist seit vielen Jahren in der Arktis und Antarktis unterwegs. Als Student kam er 1990 zum ersten Mal nach Spitzbergen, um im Rahmen eines wissenschaftlichen Projekts Nonnengänse zu fangen und zu beringen. Später versuchte er Spitzbergen von Norden nach Süden auf Ski zu durchqueren, musste dieses Unternehmen allerdings aufgeben, als sein Proviant von Eisbären gefressen wurde. Im Jahr 2000 machte er den Fehler mit einem Mann, den er in einer Kneipe kennen gelernt hat, eine 560 km lange Ski-Überquerung des grönländischen Inlandeises zu wagen. Danach zog es ihn erst einmal in die Antarktis, wo er für den „British Antarctic Survey“ auf der Rothera-Station und auf dem Rutford Gletscher arbeitete. Dort kümmerte er sich vorrangig um die Abfallentsorgung der Forschungsstation. Wenn Sie etwas über die Polargeschichte, die Pelztierjäger auf Spitzbergen oder „Wie man lieber nicht zum Nordpol fliegt“ wissen wollen, fragen Sie Jim!

Barbara Post – Guide & Lecturer Barbara Post was born in Austria and has since her childhood days a sincere interest in nature and mountaineering. Therefore the biology study in Innsbruck, a city in the Alps, fitted perfectly to her interests. During her bachelor study program she already started to work for several projects as scientific research assistant, always related to mountain research. She also did microscopic analyses (taxonomy) of the macrozoobenthos fauna in freshwater ecosystems of Spitsbergen. At this time she started to love cold ecosystems worldwide and decided to write her Master thesis in the Lake and Glacier Ecology Research Group, whose expertise lies in Arctic, Antarctic and Alpine research. With a thesis about water bears living on the surface of glaciers, Barbara finished her Master of Science/Zoology. Barbara is coauthor in two book chapters about “Polyextremophiles – Life in the Ice”. Keen to share her knowledge, she is involved since 2003 in an education program called “Youth into Science” where she is lecturing and guiding pupils. Her last research project was about bacteria in glacier ice at the University of Innsbruck. Since 2012 she is a passionate nature guide in the Arctic. Her travels include Norway, Jan Mayen, Svalbard, Iceland and Greenland. In 2014 she started to join expeditions to the Falkland Islands, South Georgia and Antarctic Peninsula. DEUTSCH: Die Österreicherin Barbara Post war seit ihrer Kindheit interessiert an der Natur und am Bergsport. Daher passte das Biologiestudium in Innsbruck, einer Stadt in den Alpen, perfekt zu ihren Interessen. Schon während ihres Bachelorstudiums arbeitete sie wissenschaftlich in verschiedenen Projekten immer mit Schwerpunkt „Alpine Forschung“. Auch forschte Barbara taxonomisch an makrozoobenthos Organismen aus den Fließgewässern Spitzbergens. In dieser Zeit entwickelte sie eine große Leidenschaft zu kalten Ökosystemen weltweit und begann ihre Masterarbeit am Institut für Ökologie/Limnologie in einer Arbeitsgruppe, die auf hochalpine Seen und Gletscher in der Arktis, Antarktis und in den Alpen spezialisiert ist. Mit einer Arbeit über Bärtierchen, kleine mehrzellige Tiere die auf der Gletscheroberfläche leben, beendete Barbara ihr Studium in Biologie/Zoologie. Sie ist Co-Autorin in zwei Buchartikeln über „Polyextremophile- Leben im Eis“. Seit 2003 engagiert sie sich für die „Junge Universität“, einer Organisation die Schülern einen Einblick in die Wissenschaft bietet. Ihr letztes Forschungsprojekt beschäftigte sich mit Bakterien im Gletscher-Eis auf der Universität Innsbruck. Barbara arbeitet seit 2012 als begeisterte Naturführerin in der Arktis, ihre Reisen gehen nach Norwegen, Jan Mayen, Spitzbergen, Island und Grönland. Seit 2014 nimmt sie auch an Expeditionen in die Antarktis und auf subantarktische Inseln teil.

David Drummond – Guide & Lecturer David's Naturalist life began at an early age as an environmental educator and he continues to love teaching people from around the world. He is a wildlife biologist specializing with various vertebrates such as raptors, carnivores, land and marine birds and mammals. He has opened numerous hearts and minds to natural and cultural history through his professional work with expedition companies, government agencies, conservation organizations, consulting, schools and private outfitters, and has led many worldwide bird/wildlife tours and adventure treks. David’s B.S. included wildlife, environmental studies, and a cultural history minor at Western Washington University, USA. The "Birdman" also enjoys outdoor activities such as climbing, skiing, sea kayaking, wildlife/nature photography and poetry. He has sailed on expedition ships around the world and from the Arctic to Antarctica. This is David’s eleventh expedition season where he enjoys exploring the bio-synergies of the polar regions with you! Deutsch: David startete früh seine Karriere als Naturalist und er liebt es sein Wissen mit allen Leuten zu teilen. Er ist ein Wildtierbiologe der sich auf verschiedene Wirbeltiere spezialisiert hat, wie terrestrische marine Vögel und Säugetiere. Er arbeitete schon auf zahlreichen Expeditionen als Naturführer, für den Naturschutz, leitete Natur,- und Abenteuerreisen (spezialisiert auf Vogelkunde und Wildtierbiologie) und lehrte in Schulen. So konnte er schon viele Menschen für die Natur,- und Kulturgeschichte begeistern. David studierte Wildtierbiologie, Umweltschutz und Kulturgeschichte auf der Western Washington Universität in der USA. Der „Vogelmann“ liebt Freizeitsport wie Klettern, Skilaufen, Kajaking auf dem Meer, Wiltier,- und Naturfotografie und Gedichte. Er segelte rund um die Welt auf Expeditionsschiffen, von der Arktis bis in die Antarktis. Dies ist David’s elfte Expeditions-Saison!

Christophe Gouraud — Guide & Lecturer

Christophe  Gouraud  –  Guide  &  Lecturer  

Christophe   was   born   in   France   in   1978   and   has  been  passionate  about  birds  since  he  was   a  child.  After  spending  five  years  in  Canada  on   his  master  degree  in  ecology,  Christophe  went   to   Alaska.   He   lived   on   the   tiny   Middleton   Island   as   a   research   assistant   to   study   the   ecology   of   seabirds,   mainly   the   Black-­‐legged   Kittiwake.   He   explores   polar   regions   since   2007   and   joined   many   expeditions   in   Svalbard,   Greenland,   Nunavut,   Antarctic   Peninsula,  the  Falklands  and  South  Georgia.  In   2009,   he   joined   the   International   Fund   for   Houbara   Conservation   and   worked   as   a   biologist  field  worker  in  Morocco,  United  Arab   Emirates   and   Kazakhstan,   on   the   Houbara   Bustard.   In   the   footsteps   of   Buffon,   Cuvier   and   Temminck,   Christophe   inventories   collections   of   birds   that   have   been   collected   during   famous   expeditions   around   the   world   during   the   18   and   19th   centuries.   He   is   the   He explores polar regions since 2007 and joined many expeditions in scientific   referee   of   the   Baillon   collection   (La   Châtre,   France)   and   the   Caire-­‐ Svalbard, Greenland, Antarctic Peninsula, the Falklands and Chabrand   collection  Nunavut, (Barcelonnette,   France).   South Georgia. -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐   Christophe   wurde   1978   in   Frankreich   geboren.   Schon   als   Kind   entdeckte   er   After spending in Canada on his masters degree in ecology, seine   Liebe  five für   years die   Vogelkunde   (Ornithologie).   Nach   einem   fünfjährigen   Christophe went to Alaska. He lived on the tiny Middleton Island a ging   Aufenthalt  in  Kanada  um  seinen  Abschluss  in  Biologie/Ökologie  zu  mas achen,   Christophe   nach  to Alaska.   lebte   er   auf   der   kleinen   Middleton   Insel,   um   als   research assistant studyDort   the ecology of seabirds, mainly the BlackForschungsassistent   zu   arbeiten.   Christophe   forschte   an   ökologische   legged Kittiwake. Fragestellungen   der   Dreizehenmöwen.   Als   Naturführer   erkundet   er   seit   2007   die   Polargebiete,   er   nahm   an   vielen  Fund Expeditionen   nach   Svalbard,   Grönland   In 2009, he joined the International for Houbara Conservation and und     Nunavut   sowie  field zur   Antarktische   Halbinsel,   den   Falkland   Inseln   und   worked as a teil,   biologist worker in Morocco, United Arab Emirates andSüd   Georgien.   Auch   arbeitete   er   als   Feldbiologe   für   drei   Saisonen   an   einer   Vogelart   Kazakhstan, on the Asianin   and Africanden   Houbara Bustard. namens   Kragentrappe   Marokko,   Vereinigten   Arabischen   Emiraten   und   Kasachstan.   erstellt     Inventarlisten   historischen   In the footsteps ofChristophe   Buffon, Cuvier or Temminck, Christophevon   inventories Vogelsammlungen   für   Museen.   Diese   ausgestopften   Vögel   stammen   von   collections of birds that have been collected during famous expeditionsSchon     Expeditionen   aus   dem   achtzehnten   und   neunzehnten   Jahrhundert.   around the Cuvier   world during the 18 and 19th centuries. He is the scientific diese   Buffon,   und   Temminck,   berühmte   Naturforscher,   bearbeiteten   Tiere.   wissenschaftlicher   Beauftragter   für   die   referee ofChristophe   the Baillonist  collection (La Chatre, France) and theBaillon   Caire- Sammlung   (La  Châtre,   Frankreich)   und  auch  der  france). Caire-­‐Chabrand  Sammlung  (Barcelonnette,   Chabrand collection (Barcelonnette, Frankreich).  

Christophe was born in France in 1978 and has been passionate about birds since he was a child.

Keen to share knowledge between people, Christophe is also involved since 2006 with the Ornithological Worldwide Literature database (OWL).

Ben Jackson – Guide & Lecturer Growing up in New Zealand’s great outdoors has meant that Ben has been involved in outdoor activities his whole life. From a young age weekends were spent on the water sailing Auckland’s Hauraki Gulf and exploring the Coromandel Ranges. Ben works primarily as a White Water Kayak Instructor sharing his time between New Zealand, California and Norway. A degree in Adventure Recreation and Outdoor Education has lead him to teach in many facets of the outdoors in his 17 years as an educator and guide. Ben’s passion for kayaking and adventuring has taken him on many trips around the globe including paddling Uganda’s White Nile, the USA’s Grand Canyon and a month long expedition in the Indian Himalayas. Kayaking also lead him to higher latitudes with time spent running Kayak programs and Expedition Leading in the Arctic and Antarctic. His passion for wildlife, adventure and people make him ideally suited to working with the adventures and challenges of life in the Polar Regions. When not sailing the polar regions he likes keeping things interesting with adventures involving photography, kayaking, mountain biking and surfing. Deutsch: Ben ist mit und in der Natur von Neuseeland aufgewachsen. Von klein an verbrachte er seine Wochenende segelnd in den Gewässern von Auckland im Hauraki Golf und zog durch die Coromandel Ranges. Ben arbeitet hauptberuflich als Kajak Instruktor und verbringt seine Zeit zwischen Neuseeland, Kalifornien und Norwegen. Ein Abschluss in Adventure Recreation und Outdoor Education ermöglicht ihm viele Facetten der Natur zu lehren. Er arbeitet seit 17 Jahren als Ausbildner und Führer. Die Begeisterung für Kajaking und Abenteuer in der Natur lieβen ihn schon rund um die Welt reisen. Dazu gehört das Paddeln in Ugandas Weissem Nil, im Grand Canyon (USA) und zu einer monatelangen Expedition im Indischen Himalaya. Das Kajaking führte ihn auch in höhere Breitengrade mit Kajak- und Expeditionsprogrammen in der Arktis und Antarktis. Bens Begeisterung für Tiere, Abenteuer und Menschen zeichnen ihn auch bei der Arbeit in Polaren Regionen mit allen Herausforderungen aus. Wenn Ben nicht auf Schiffen in Polaren Regionen arbeitet interessiert er sich für Kajaking, Fotografie, Mountainbike fahren und surfen.

Frigga Kruse – Guide & Lecturer Inspired by a fellow German, I began my very own continental drift with a move to Papua New Guinea in the early 1990s, finishing high school in the tropics and embarking on a northerly odyssey via the UK and Ireland to the Netherlands at present. Along the way, I dabbled in archaeology and geology, temporarily considering forensics, geotechnical engineering, and commercial archaeology, before completing a PhD in polar industrial archaeology with a focus on British mining on Spitsbergen. The Arctic continues to captivate

me

as

I

currently

investigate

the

environmental consequences of 400 years of naturalresource exploitation in Svalbard. It is a very lucky circumstance that the boundary between work and leisure is blurred.

DEUTSCH: Durch einen deutschen Landsmann inspiriert, began meine eigene Kontinentalverschiebung mit einem Umzug in die tropischen Gefilde von Papua-Neuguinea in den frühen 90er Jahren. Nach der High School fand ich mich auf einer nördlichen Odysee über Grossbritannien und Irland in die Niederlande wieder. Unterwegs versuchte ich mich in Archäologie und Geologie, zeitweise grüblend über forensische Archäologie, Ingenieursgeologie oder die Leitung einer archäologischen Abteilung. Letztendlich habe ich den akademischen Weg gewählt und kürzlich eine Doktorarbeit über arktische Industriearchäologie mit Fokus auf den britischen Rohstoffabbau in Spitzbergen abgeliefert. Die Arktis hält mich seitdem in ihrem Bann. Ich erforsche momentan die Auswirkungen der 400-jährigen Geschichte der Ausbeutung (Walfang, Pelzjagd und Bergbau) auf die Ökosysteme des Archipels. Für mich geht ein Traum in Erfüllung, auf diese Weise Arbeit und Hobby miteinander verbinden zu können.

Pernille Søergaard – Guide & Lecturer Pernille comes from Denmark. Having gained a Bachelor in Social Anthropology she is currently studying for a Master's when she’s in Copenhagen. Pernille is a lover of adventure and the outdoors. She has spent the past nine Boreal summers working as a rafting guide in Norway and California. When not exploring, she is a competitive boulder and indoor climber competing both nationally and internationally. Her travels and competitions have brought her to climbing destinations all over Europe. She has also spent time white water rafting and kayaking, sea kayaking, climbing, surfing, mountain biking and hiking in the United States, Australia, Central and South America, Thailand and New Zealand. She first journeyed to the polar regions during the 2011-12 season and was instantly sold. Now she has worked 4 seasons in Antarctica and is equally at home in a kayak or zodiac. Pernille enjoys working with people especially when it takes place in the outdoors. Furthermore she likes informing and educating people on Antarctic and Arctic wild life, much like her grandfather did when he toured Europe and America with the worlds largest - and smallest mammals. Pernille speaks Danish, Swedish, English, enough Norwegian and heaps of Kiwi. Deutsch: Pernille kommt aus Dänemark. Nach ihrem Bachelor in sozialer Anthropologie macht sie momentan ihren Master wenn sie in Kopenhagen ist. Pernille liebt das Abenteuer in der freien Natur. In den vergangenen neun Sommern arbeitete sie als rafting guide (Wildwassersport) in Norwegen und Kalifornien. Außerdem klettert sie gerne und das auf hohem Niveau: sie nimmt an nationalen und internationalen Wettbewerben im bouldering und indoor climbing teil. Ihre vielen Reisen und die Wettbewerbe haben sie betreits an die schönsten Kletterziele Europas geführt. Wenn es die Zeit zuläßt, vergnügt sich Pernilla auch mit Kajaking, Seekajak, Surfen, Mountainbiking und Wandern in der USA, Australien, Neuseeland, Thailand, Zentral,- und Südamerika. In 2011/12 hat es sie auf die erste Antarktisreise verschlagen. Nach vier Saisons als expedition guide fühlt sie sich dort im Kayak sowie im Zodiac wie zu Hause. Es macht ihr riesigen Spass, ihre Erfahrungen und ihr breites Wissen über die polare Tierwelt zu teilen – wie es bereits ihr Opa tat, der mit einem der größten und auch kleinsten Säugetiere der Erde durch die Welt tourte. Pernille spricht Dänisch, Schwedisch, Englisch, etwas Norwegisch und reichlich “Kiwi”.

Josef Wermelinger – Expedition Guide Josef is Swiss and well familiar with nature, be it skiing, rock climbing, trekking or alpine mountain and glacier tours. Diving in lakes, rivers, the sea and his interest in boating have been the basis for a long-standing passion for wildlife watching under and above water all year round. During his professional career as electronics engineer and managing director of his own company he widely travelled and developed a strong interest in the interrelation of natural phenomena and urban influences. Being an enthusiastic diving instructor and licensed scientific diver his activities took him to many destinations. Collaboration in research projects on sharks and their behaviour showed the complex correlation between economic interests, exploiting natural resources and sustainable environmental protection. Other projects include maritime archaeology and hydrographical measurements. In recent years, he has focussed his activities on video and photo projects on wildlife in polar regions, such as Greenland, Iceland and Svalbard, including diving und trekking. Since 2008 Josef has been working on vessels as a guide in the Arctic as well as in Antarctica. Combining technology, wildlife watching and active co-operation in research projects have become his new challenge.

Ich bin Schweizer, aufgewachsen mit Schi, kletternd im Fels und auf bei alpinen Hochtouren. Das Segeln und Tauchen auf und in den einheimischen Seen und das Interesse an Booten dokumentieren das langjährige Interesse am Wasser. Die berufliche Karriere als Ingenieur und Firmeninhaber ermöglichten langjährige Reisen und Einsichten zur Wechselwirkung von natürlichen Vorgängen und urbanen Interessen. Die Mitarbeit als Tauchinstruktor und lizenzierter wissenschaftlicher Taucher bei Forschungsprojekten um Haie zeigte die komplexen Zusammenhänge zwischen wirtschaftlichen Interessen, die Nutzung von natürlichen Recourcen und nachhaltigem Naturschutz. Andere Projekte ermöglichten die Mitarbeit bei Unterwasserarchäologie und hydrografische Messungen. Die kurzfristigen ökonomischen Eingriffe, die Faszination der Unterwasserwelt sowie Video- und Fotoprojekte in Grönland und Spitzbergen vertieften das Interesse an polaren Gebieten. Seit 2008 arbeite ich auf Expeditionsschiffenals Guide in der Arktis und Antarktis.

2016

TRAVEL WRITING

COMPETITION Write a Blog, Win a Trip!

Fancy yourself as a travel writer? Enter our annual travel writing competition for your chance to win a free cruise to Antarctica in March 2017! Write about your experience! What was it like to camp out under the Auroras? Was it scary when you encountered a polar bear? Was this your first cruise and were you nervous about crossing open waters? After all, how your expedition made you feel is what you’re going to carry with you for the rest of your life. If you share your experience you just might win yourself a cruise to Antarctica in March 2017!

Here’s what you need to do: 1. Write a post (600 – 1200 words) in Dutch, English, or German about what excited you the most on your Oceanwide Expeditions cruise. The topic is entirely up to you. 2. Get it seen! You can either get it posted online yourself (for example, as a post on your own blog) OR send it to us so we can post it for you on our blog. 3. Create a hyperlink or two inside of your post that links back to the particular trip you took as found on our website. The link could connect to the ship’s page, the trip itinerary, the particular destination’s page, or perhaps a page related to one of the activities you enjoyed. 4. Add 1 to 3 pictures (they should be 1 MB minimum in size, in landscape format and attached separately when you decide to send your entry to us). 5. Send it in! You can either send your post to us at [email protected] OR send us the URL (the web address) if you posted the blog somewhere else. Either way, make sure you include your full name, e-mail address and phone number. Read the full terms and conditions on oceanwide-expeditions.com/page/contest-terms

PRIZES A cruise to Antarctica valued at over €6000 2x

A €250 voucher good for Oceanwide Expeditions!

7x

A €150 voucher good for Oceanwide Expeditions!

E NT R I E S C LO S E

DECEMBER 31 Our lucky winners will be contacted by e-mail and Facebook by January 15, 2017 and will receive the award in March 2017.

2016

PHOTOGRAPHY

CONTEST

Picture Yourself Winning a Free Cruise! Everyone knows a picture is worth a thousand words, but did you know that your photos might now also be worth a chance to win a free cruise to Antarctica valued at over $6000 in March 2017! Share your experience! Did you catch a rare seabird on the wing? Do you have a panorama of the Northern Lights filling the sky? Did you get up close and personal with a penguin? Did you capture a look of awe or wonder on a fellow passenger’s face? If you’ve been a passenger on any one of our past voyages we want to see your pictures. You’re free to send in as many pictures as you wish. The best pictures are the ones that capture what it’s like to take one of our special expeditions to the remote and beautiful ends of the Earth.

PRIZES A cruise to Antarctica valued at over €6000 2x

A €250 voucher good for Oceanwide Expeditions!

7x

A €150 voucher good for Oceanwide Expeditions!

UPLOAD YOUR PHOTO AT WWW.OCEANWIDE-EXPEDITIONS.COM/

FA NTA S T I C-P H OTO/C R E AT E

The size of your photo should be between 1MB and 8MB. Entries close at December 31, 2016 Read the terms and conditions of the contest on www.oceanwide-expeditions.com/page/contest-terms

Around Spitsbergen

Captain Ernesto Barría, and his International Crew of 52 Including Hotel Manager –Robert McGillivray (Netherlands) Asst. Hotel Manager – Heidi Dohn (Denmark) Head Chef – Przemyslaw Wisniewski (Poland) Sous-Chef – Roden Paguio (New Zealand) And Expedition Leader – Jim Mayer (UK) Asst. Expedition Leader – Barbara Post (Austria) Expedition Guide – David Drummond (USA) Expedition Guide – Christophe Gouraud (France) Expedition Guide – Ben Jackson (New Zealand) Expedition Guide –Frigga Kruse (Germany) Expedition Guide – Pernille Søegaard (Denmark) Expedition Guide – Josef Wermelinger (Switzerland) Expedition Doctor – Jürgen Preimesberger (Austria)

Welcome you all on board the Ortelius!

Around Spitsbergen Friday July 8th

Longyearbyen WELCOME ABOARD! Your luggage will be delivered to your cabin as soon as possible. Please check to make sure you have received all of your luggage! Feel free to explore the ship and enjoy a tea or coffee in the Bar/Lounge on deck 6 TBA

Once we have all passengers on board, we will ask you to gather in the lecture room on deck 3 to meet for a mandatory ‘Safety at Sea’ briefing by the Second Officer Andre. Everybody has to attend this briefing! This will be followed by a mandatory lifeboat drill.

±18.00

Departure of the Ortelius. Do go outside to enjoy the views as we depart but please keep clear of the fore-deck.

18.45

Hotel Manager Robert will give you an introduction to the ship, including details of dining arrangements, internet and accounts. This will be in the bar.

19.00

Captain Ernesto Barría invites all passengers to a reception in the bar (Deck 6) and Expedition Leader Jim will introduce your expedition staff and inform you about our plans for the next few days.

19.30

Dinner is served in the dining room (Deck 4 behind Reception).

*TBA = ‘To be announced’. Please listen for announcements on the speaker system. The first part of the evening we will sail through the large Isfjord towards the open sea. Then we head north, along the outer coast of Prince Karls Foreland, towards Kongsfjord. Through-out the evening it worth-while keeping watch from the deck as there is always the chance to see a distant whale blow!

Around Spitsbergen Saturday July 9th

Kongsfjorden and Ny Ålesund 07.15

Wake-up call.

07.30

Breakfast buffet is available in the restaurant for 1 hour.

08.30

Rubber boots hand out. Please listen for announcements as we will call you deck by deck.

09.30

Please join the Expedition Team in the Lecture Room (deck 3) for a mandatory briefing on our field guidelines, Zodiac (small boat) operations, and Polar Bear safety. If you would like to come ashore during this voyage, then you must attend! Everything else is optional…

TBA

Time to put your newly learned skills to the test as we make a short landing at Ny London in Kongsfjord. On shore you can expect to find some lovely tundra, the remains of a British mining operation and keep your eyes open for a long tail skua which often nests in the area.

13.00

Buffet Lunch is served in the dining room.

14.30

Please join Jim in the lecture room for a pre landing briefing. Here at Ny Ålesund, a village devoted to science, there is also the opportunity to send post cards and it is your last chance for souvenir shopping. You may free roam in the village: please stay on the roads and do not enter any buildings. Do not leave the village without a guide. If you would like to learn more about the attempts to fly from here to the North Pole then please meet at Amundsen’s statue (at the top of the main road) at 16.30 for a walk to the airship mast.

19.00

Recap in the bar and learn about our plans of tomorrow.

19.30

Dinner is served in the Dining Room.

Around Spitsbergen Sunday July 10th

Liefdefjord 07.45

Wake-up call.

08.00

Breakfast buffet is available in the restaurant for 1 hour.

09.15

We would like to embark our English speaking guests for a zodiac cruise in the Andøyane, a group of islands where we find lovely bird life: look out for grey phalarope (they are red!) and king eiders.

09.45

We would like to embark our German speaking guests for the zodiac cruise. During lunch time we will be in sight of the mighty Monacobreen Glacier, so don’t spend too long eating soup!

13.00

Buffet Lunch is served in the dining room.

14.30

We will head ashore for a mix of long, medium and short hikes at Texas Bar. If in doubt, go leisurely or medium. There are likely to be streams to cross and, for long hikers, a moraine ridge. All groups will have a chance to visit a lovely trapper cabin.

19.00

Recap in the bar and learn about our plans of tomorrow.

19.30

Dinner is served in the Dining Room.

Around Spitsbergen Monday July 11th Phippsøya and in the Search of Sea Ice

07.15

Wake-up call.

07.30

Breakfast buffet is available in the restaurant for 1 hour.

08.45

In the morning we aim to reach Phippsøya, the largest of the Sjuøyane, the northernmost island group in Svalbard. Nothing lies between here and the top of the world. Many have been attracted by this outpost and some have left signs of their visits with their names added to the map. Phippsøya is named after Constantine John Phipps, a British naval commander who visited these islands in 1773. We aim to take you on shore here for a short walk so that you can experience the polar desert.

12.30

Buffet Lunch is served in the dining room. During the afternoon we will sail north-east towards the pack ice. This is a unique environment and we will explore it for the next 24 hours.

15.00

Ben will give a talk in the lecture room about Polar photography. Barbara will give a talk at the same time about sea ice in German, it will be repeated in English tomorrow.

18.00

Recap in the bar and learn about our plans of tomorrow.

19.00

A special dinner is served

Around Spitsbergen Tuesday July 12th

Sea Ice Exploration 07.45

Wake-up call.

08.00

Breakfast buffet is available in the restaurant for 1 hour. Today we will continue to explore the pack ice in search of high arctic wildlife. We will be on-board Ortelius for the whole day. Join us on deck as we look out for seals and polar bears. Remember if we are lucky enough to have a bear close to the ship that sudden shouts or door bangs can scare polar bears away.

10.30 Svalbard:

Do join David in the lecture room for a talk on the Savvy Seals of

12.30

Buffet Lunch is served in the dining room.

15.30

Barbara will give her ‘Ecosystem Sea Ice’ talk in English in the Lecture room. Meanwhile Frigga will present a brief history of Spitzbergen, in German, in the bar.

we have already seen a bearded seal and walrus, and by the time David is on stage we may have spotted more! At the same time Sandra will talk about polar photography in the bar in German.

We will squeeze out as much time as possible in the sea ice today. At some point during the afternoon we will have to turn south to continue our circumnavigation of Spitsbergen. 18.00

Join us for a recap in the bar and to learn about our plans of tomorrow.

19.00

Dinner is served in the dining room, which is still on deck 4 behind reception.

Around Spitsbergen Wednesday July 13

Alkefjellet and Zeipelodden Today we will explore the Hinlopenstretet and Nordaustlandet – the second largest island in the Svalbard archipelago, where we hope to take you ashore to experience the true polar desert. 07.45

Wake-up call.

08.00

Breakfast buffet is available in the restaurant for 1 hour.

TBA

We would love to take you on a zodiac cruise to the magnificent bird cliffs at Alkefjellet, home to about 60,000 breeding pairs of Brünnich’s guillemots. This location combines impressive geology, wildlife and scenery and it is not to be missed! Dress warmly, we expect to be out for around 2 hours.

12.30

Buffet Lunch is served in the dining room.

TBA

This afternoon we aim to land at Zeipelodden on Nordaustlandet, to see the polar desert. Look out for the hardy Svalbard Poppy, one of the few plant species able to survive here. Also under your feet you may see patterned ground created by repeated freezing and thawing of the surface layer. We will offer the usual mix of long, medium and gentle walks.

19.00

Recap in the bar and learn about our plans of tomorrow.

19.30

Dinner is served in the Dining Room.

Around Spitsbergen Thursday July 14

Barentsøya and Edgeøya We will be in the eastern region of the archipelago today was we try to tick off two more islands in the Svalbard archipelago, namely Barentsøya and Edgeøya. 07.45

Wake-up call.

08.00

Breakfast buffet is available in the restaurant for 1 hour.

09.45

A canyon leading from the tundra into the side of Barentsøya provides a home for a kittiwake colony. We will offer medium and leisurely options this morning: leisurely will stroll from the beach to the canyon and back, around 750m. For those who would like to gain a little height and have a look down on the kittiwakes from above, we’ll offer a medium walk.

12.30

Buffet Lunch is served in the dining room.

TBA

In the afternoon we will try to land at Kapp Lee on Edgeøya where we sometimes find walrus. The long hike will take a route to the top of the mountain and medium and leisurely remain lower down, where we can see remains of early settlements including whale and walrus bones from previous hunts.

19.00

Recap in the bar and learn about our plans of tomorrow.

19.30

Dinner is served in the Dining Room.

Around Spitsbergen Friday July 15

Hornsund It is a long way from Edgeøya to Hornsund so we will be sailing during the first part of the morning. However if the visibility is good the views of southern Svalbard are great. 07.45

Josef’s Wake-up call!

08.00

Breakfast buffet is available in the restaurant for 1 hour.

~11.00

We would like to take you for a zodiac cruise amongst the ice bergs of Burgerbukta, a side fjord of Hornsund. Dress warmly, we will be out for around 2 hours, and will travel towards the face of the glacier.

13.00

Buffet Lunch is served in the dining room.

TBA

This afternoon we will try to land at Gåshamna, or Goosebay. This is one of the oldest charted sites on Svalbard. Today it is possible to find bow head whale skulls a little way in shore. A medium hike will lead to some remains of Pomor times (Frigga will be on hand to explain all!) and for the biologically minded, keep your eyes open for the eponymous goose.

19.00

Recap in the bar and learn about our plans of tomorrow.

19.30

Dinner is served in the Dining Room.

Around Spitsbergen Saturday July 16

Bellsund 07.45

Wake-up call.

08.00

Breakfast buffet is available in the restaurant for 1 hour. We would like to take the medium hikers ashore at Ahlstrandodden and they will enjoy a yomp over the tundra to Bamsebu where the rest of the guests will come ashore. At Bamsebu we have the chance to sit quietly and sketch, write, photograph, sleep, find flowers, reflect and anything else! We call this a ‘perimeter landing’ – please stay within the circle of guides.

09.15

Medium hikers ashore

10.00

Everyone else ashore

12.30

Buffet Lunch is served in the dining room. During the afternoon Robert and Heidi will call you deck by deck to come to the reception to settle your accounts.

TBA

Once account settlement is complete we will make a final (short) landing at Ingeborgfjellet. You will have the option of a medium hike to find some little auks (this involves some uphill walking), staying low to try to find reindeer, or a very leisurely amble very close to the landing site.

18.30

Please join Captain Barría in the bar for a farewell toast.

19.00

Dinner is served in the Dining Room.

20.30

Rubber boot collection – we need to check your names on the list so please stand-by for announcements before returning your boots.

Around Spitsbergen

Sunday July 17

Longyearbyen - Disembarkation 05.15

Wake-up call one: Good morning!

05:30

If you are departing early, please leave your check in luggage outside your cabin by this time. Pastries, juice, tea and coffee will be available in the bar.

06.00

A bus will take you to the airport for flight SK4499 at 07.30hrs.

07.15

Wake up call two!

07.30

Breakfast. Please leave your main luggage outside your cabin before breakfast.

09.00

Disembarkation for all passengers.

We will ensure your luggage is ready for you to pick up on the pier side. Please leave your keys at the reception desk as you leave the ship Before you go in the bus, identify your luggage on the pier and take it to the luggage vehicle. Your luggage will be stored in the secure vehicle, which will meet you at the airport in the afternoon in time for your flight. If you are not flying today, do not put your luggage in the truck! 09.00

A chartered bus will take you to the parking area at the Svalbard Butikken (the main shopping centre in Longyearbyen). You will have time to explore the town. If you are staying in town, your luggage should go with you in this bus. From the centre of town you can walk or catch a taxi to your hotel.

13.00

Airport Transfer for passengers on flight SK4425 at 14h45. A bus will depart from Svalbard Butikken to the Airport, where you will pick up your luggage.

We wish you a safe onward journey. It has been a pleasure having you on board the M/V Ortelius!