“THIS IS THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT” FLANNEL BOARD

“THIS IS THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT” FLANNEL BOARD

“THIS IS THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT” FLANNEL BOARD LESSON PLAN by JUDY SILVER BEFORE CLASS Materials White board, markers and eraser or rag. Flannel bo...

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“THIS IS THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT” FLANNEL BOARD LESSON PLAN by JUDY SILVER BEFORE CLASS Materials White board, markers and eraser or rag. Flannel board and felt cut-out figures of characters and house or paper blow-up cut-outs from story book backed with Velcro ON BOARD Keywords: Cumulative tale: story that builds, one block on another, with elements interlinking, connected by a common thread and interacting one on another. CLASS BEGINNING Greet students and tell them what we will do—listen quietly to a story, recite it following my lead and then make their own story on the same pattern. CLASS ACTIVITIES 1. Seated at desks or on floor, students watch and listen as instructor recites tale using flannel board. Instructor leads class in repeating the poem, leaving manipulatives on flannel board. 2. Instructor introduces cumulative tale concept. Explain need for connected subjects, which students should then order in a logical interaction, from the least roughly to the greatest. Point to the model poem, ‘House that Jack Built,’ which centers around a house where a number of animals and people interact. The first item, though, is an inanimate object, the malt, which, along with the house, only works for the first and second verses, because they do not need to do anything active to anything else. Following are the smallest animal, the rat, and then the cat, the dog and the cow. Humans are then introduced, not ordered by importance or pecking order, only how the chain the students invent works for their interactions. Instruct to use precise or interesting active verbs, like ‘swallowed’, rather than ‘ate,’ and ‘gazed,’ rather than ‘looked at.’ 3. Students work in small groups to generate a community of people and animals that can be described as interacting with each other in a chain, using carefully chosen active verbs. May not use any from model poem. They brainstorm on paper, with one student acting as Recorder of the group’s ideas. Emphasize no need for complete sentences at this stage. 4. Work on rhymes for adjective phrases, if time and students appear able. Suggest ‘moon,’ write on empty part of board. Ask students to generate rhymes for it. Instructor writes them in a circle around the word ‘moon’. Plug one into ‘House that Jack Built.’ EG. Balloon, cartoon, croon, tune, dune, June, lagoon, noon, afternoon, raccoon, spoon, swoon, typhoon 5. In groups, students pick a rhyme scheme, perhaps with instructor guidance, and generate rhymes for at least two later lines in their poems. 6. Re-seated in semi-circle, students share their work, group by group, with whole class, the instructor writing key words on board. Instructor chooses one to use to fill in the blanks on the Frame, above. Class reads result aloud. Class discusses what it did and learned. Frame for Class with Mastery of POS: This is the common noun1 that [proper] noun + active verb (subordinate clause) This is the common noun2 that active verb the common noun1 (modifying phrase) that preceding subordinate clause This is the common noun3 that active verb the common noun2 (new modifying phrase) that preceding modifying phrase + subordinate clause 1 of 2

Judy Silver, House that Jack Built - 2 of 2 LANGUAGE STANDARDS—GRADE 4, unless indicated otherwise WRITING STANDARDS Text Types & Purposes 3. Write narratives to develop…imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details and clear event sequences. a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing…characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. b. Use…description to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations. c. Use a variety of transitional words and phrases to manage the sequence of events. d. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely. SPEAKING & LISTENING STANDARDS Comprehension & Collaboration 1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (…teacher led) with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly. b. Follow agreed upon rules for discussion and carry out assigned roles. c. Pose and respond to specific questions to clarify or follow up on information and make comments that contribute to the discussion and link to the remarks of others. d. Review the key ideas expressed and explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion. LANGUAGE STANDARDS Conventions of Standard English 1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. GRADE 3 b. Explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs in general and their functions in particular sentences. h. Ensure subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement. j. Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions. GRADE 4 f. Form and use prepositional phrases. g. Produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting in appropriate fragments and run-ons. GRADE 5 d. Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense. Vocabulary Acquisition & Use 4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies. a. Use context (eg. definitions, examples or restatements in a text) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. GRADE 5: (eg. cause/effect relationships or comparisons in text) 6. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that those that signal precise actions…(eg., quizzed, whined, stammered) and that are basic to a particular topic (eg., wildlife, conservation and endangered when discussing animal preservation).