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B R O O K L I N E , V E R M O N T 0 5 3 4 5

BROOK LINE 2016 A N N U A L R E P O R T •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  B R O O K L I N E ,   V E R M O N T   0 5 3 4 5 Town of Brookline ...

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BROOK LINE

2016

A N N U A L R E P O R T • 

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B R O O K L I N E ,   V E R M O N T   0 5 3 4 5

Town of Brookline General Information Town Office....................................................P.O. Box 403 736 Grassy Brook Road Brookline, Vermont 05345 802-365-4648; fax: 802-365-4092 Tuesday and Thursday 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. First Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Or by appointment Selectboard.....................................................First and third Wednesday, 7:00 p.m., Town Office www.brooklinevt.com/selectboard Planning Commission....................................First Thursday, 7:30 p.m., Town Office Brookline Elementary School Board...............Third Tuesday, 6:30 p.m. Leland & Gray School Board..........................Second and fourth Tuesday, 7:00 p.m. Riverside Cemetery........................................$200 per space. Contact Cemetery Commission. Health & Sewage Disposal Ordinance...........See Town Clerk Highway Regulations.....................................See Town Clerk Landfill...........................................................Access permits available at District Scale House Fire & Rescue.................................................9-1-1 or 1-603-352-1100 Fish & Game License.....................................See Town Clerk or online at http://vtfishandwildlife.com/

Cover photo: Round School House, Kendra Brooks, photographer.

Contents Town General Information.......Inside Cover

Lister’s Report........................................... 30

Warning for 2017 Brookline

Planning Commission Report.................. 30



Road Commissioner’s Report................... 31

Town Meeting.................................. 2

Warning for 2017 Brookline

Brookline Preservation Committee.......... 32



Town Clerk’s Report................................. 34

School District Meeting................... 3

Town Officers Elected................................ 4

Delinquent Tax Report as of

Town Officers Appointed........................... 5



Auditor’s Report......................................... 6

Vital Statistics 2016.................................. 36

2016 Brookline Town Meeting Minutes,

Regulations Governing Dog



March 1, 2016.................................. 7

Ownership..................................... 37

Select Board Report.................................. 19

WCSU Superintendent’s Report............... 38

Town Operating/Highway Proposed

WCSU Proposed 2018 Budget.................. 39



Special Education Budget......................... 41

2018 Budgets................................. 21

December 31, 2016........................ 36

Town Employees Compensation.............. 25

Newbrook Elementary Principal’s

Brookline Estimated Tax Rates

Report............................................ 42

(2017-2018).................................. 26

Brookline School Proposed

Brookline Consolidated Balance Sheet





Three Prior Years Comparison/School

FY 2016......................................... 27

2018 Budget................................... 47

Highway Fund Balance Analysis as of



Tax Impact..................................... 48



June 30, 2016................................ 28

Dedication................................................ 50

Treasurer’s Report..................................... 29

In Memory................................................ 51

The town of Brookline owes so much to the many volunteers who have given of themselves over the years. If you are interested in participating in any of the local groups, serving on a board, or helping out at events, please attend meetings, contact the groups directly, or talk with the Town Clerk.

BROOK LIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6 1

Warning 2017 BrooklineTown TownMeeting Meeting Warning forFor 2017 Brookline Thelegal legalvoters voters of of the the Town areare hereby warned to meet in the RoomRoom at theatBrookline SchoolSchool buildingbuilding in the in the The TownofofBrookline Brookline hereby warned to meet in Multipurpose the Multipurpose the Brookline saidTown Town of of Brookline Brookline on thethe 1s17 th ofday March at 10:00atin10:00 the forenoon to transact following business: business: of March in the forenoon tothe transact the following said onTuesday, Tuesday, Article 1.

ARTICLE 1. Article 2. ARTICLE 2. Article 3. ARTICLE 3. Article 4. ARTICLE 4. Article5.5. ARTICLE Article6.6. ARTICLE Article7.7. ARTICLE

To elect a moderator.

To elect a Moderator. To elect a Town Clerk. To elect a Town Clerk. To elect a Town Treasurer. To elect a Town Treasurer. To elect a Collector of Delinquent Taxes. To elect a Collector of Delinquent Taxes. Toelect electall all other other officers officers required To requiredbybylaw. law. Shall the Town accept the s Report? Shall the Town accept theAuditor’ Auditor’s Report? Shallthe thetown Townvote voteto to approve approve the Fund expenditures, netnet of non-tax Shall the General Generaland andHighway Highway Fund expenditures, of non-budgeted revenues, for the town as follows: Tax budgeted revenues, for the town as follows: TotalTotal Municipal Taxes to be raised $ 267,840.00 Municipal Taxes to be raised $290,222 A rticle 8. To see what dates the Town will vote to collect taxes? ARTICLE 8. To see what dates the Town will vote to collect taxes? Article9.9. Shall Shallthe theTown Town voters .00 toto bebe raised by taxes in continuing support of theof following organizations? ARTICLE votersappropriate appropriate$6,331 $6,306.00 raised by taxes in continuing support the following organizations? Organization

Article 10. Article 11.

FY 16 Approved

FY 17 Requested

Organization FY 2017 Approved FY 2018 Requested American Red Cross ......................................................$ 250.00......................$ 250.00 American Red Cross………………………..…..………………..…..…. $ 250.00 …..…..…… $ 250.00 CRT, The Current Ct River Tranit.................................... 250.00........................ 250.00 CRT-The Ct River Transit………………..………..………....… 250.00 ………....… 250.00 Grace Current Cottage Foundation............................................... 300.00........................ 300.00 Green Mtn Foundation……………………………………….……… RSVP.............................................................. 150.00........................ 150.00 Grace Cottage 300.00 300.00 Green-Up Vermont. ............................................................ 50.00.......................... 50.00 Green-Up Vermont ……….……………………………..……..…….…. 50.00…………….. 50.00 Groundworks Collaborative: a merge of Brattleboro Groundworks Collaborative: (Formerly Brattleboro Area Drop In Center & Morningside Shelter................... 200.00........................ 200.00 Drop in Center & Morningside Shelter) ………………..….….….…. 300.00……………… 300.00 Historical Society of Windham County........................... 250.00........................ 250.00 Historical Windham County…………………….…….…...… 250.00……………… 250.00 LelandSociety & Gray of Education Foundation............................ 250.00........................ 250.00 Project FeedEducation the Thousands. ............................................ 100.00........................ 100.00 Leland & Gray Foundation…………………….……..…..….. 250.00……………… 250.00 Senior 350.00........................ 350.00 Moore FreeSolutions............................................................... Library……………………………………….……..…..…... 200.00……………… 225.00 SEVCA.............................................................................. 465.00........................ 465.00 Project Feed theFood Thousands………………………..……….………..….. 100.00……………… 100.00 Townshend Bank..................................................... 100.00........................ 100.00 Senior Solutions…………………………………………….………....… 650.00……………… 500.00 VABVI-VT Assoc for the Blind......................................... 100.00........................ 100.00 VACD............................................................................... 100.00........................ 100.00 SEVA…………………………………………………….………..…..… 465.00……………… 465.00 Valley Cares Inc..for .............................................................. 821.00........................ 821.00 VABVI-VT Assoc. the Blind …….…………………………………. 100.00……………… 100.00 Vermont Center Lndependent Living................................ 80.00.......................... 80.00 Valley Cares, Inc……………………………..…………………….……. 821.00……………… 821.00 Visiting Nurse Alliance.................................................. 1,000.00..................... 1,000.00 Vermont Independent Living……………………………………. 80.00 West Center River Watershed Alliance........................................ 110.00........................80.00……………… 110.00 Visiting NurseCounty Alliance………………………………………………..… 1,000.00…………….... 1,000.00 Windham Humane Society................................. 500.00........................ 500.00 s Freedom Center................................................ 650.00........................ 650.00 WestWomen’ River Watershed Alliance…………………………………….…..... 110.00………………. 110.00 Youth Services.................................................................. 255.00........................ 255.00 Windham County Humane Society…………………………………..…... 500.00………………. 500.00 Total Requested FY 2016.......................................... $6,331.00................... $6,331.00 Women’s Freedom Center……………………………………………..…. 650.00………………. 500.00 Youth Services…………………………………………………………..… 255.00………………. 255.00

Shall the Town voters approve a new appropriation in the amount of $200 for the Moore Free Library? Shall the Town voters approve an increase of $100.00 in appropriation for Groundworks Collaborative which merged TotalBrattleboro All Appropriations Requests To Be Voted $6,581.00 $6,306.00 Area Drop in Center & Morningside Shelter? Article 12. Shall the Town voters approve an increase of $300.00 in appropriation for Senior Solutions? ARTICLE 10. Shall the voters of the Town of Brookline vote to collect its current taxes by its Town Treasurer pursuant Article 13. Shall the Town re-appropriate the $8,000.00 from the previous town meeting(Article 10) to be used for a new salt/sand shed? to 32 V.S.A. § 4791? Article 14. Shall the Town voters approve raising $2,000.00 in reserve per year in anticipation of an outside audit of all town financial records every 4 years? ARTICLE approve$8,734 the appropriation of up toand $11,000.00 for recycling Article11. 15. Shall Shallthe the town Town voters voters approve for the NewBrook Fire Rescue Mutual Aid Dues?costs for fiscal year 2018. Article 16. Shall the voters of the Town of Brookline vote to collect its current taxes by its Town Treasurer pursuant to 32 V.S.A. § 4791? ARTICLE 12. Shall the town voters approve re-consideration of the name of the Brookline Meeting House. Article 17. Shall the Town voters approve the spending up to $36,210.00 from existing reserved funds on needed renovations on the Historic Church Community Center? ARTICLE 13. To transact any other otherbusiness business that may legally this meeting. Article 18. To transact any that may legally comecome beforebefore this meeting. Dated this 23th day of January 2016

Dated this 18th day of January, 2017 Bernardine Hoard, Dorothy Maggio,Bruce BruceMello, Mello, Stanley Jr., Michael O’DonnellTanza Bernardine Hoard, Dorothy Maggio, StanleyNoga E. Noga, Jr., Gwendolyn

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BROOKLIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6

Warning for 2017 Brookline and Newfane School District Meeting



BROOK LIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6 3

Town Officers Elected TITLE

NAME

TERM EXPIRES

Moderator…………………………....... David Y. Parker, Jr……………………………….…..…............ 2017 Town Clerk………………………......... Guy Tanza………………………………………………........... 2017 Treasurer…………………………......... Somara Zwick……………………………………….…............ 2017 Delinquent Tax Collector…………...... Guy Tanza…………………………………………..…............. 2017 Selectboard…………………..…........... Stanley E. Noga, Jr…..elected to 2 yr term .……..…….......... 2017 Gwendolyn Tanza... elected to 2 yr term……….…….............. 2018 Dorothy Maggio…..elected to 3 yr term................................... 2019 Bernardine Hoard ..elected to 3 yr term ………………........... 2018 Bruce Mello.……….elected to 3 yr term………………........... 2017 Listers………………………..……....... Donald Gokey……………………………………………......... 2018 Sheila Gokey………….............................................................. 2019 Marsha Omand………………………………………............... 2017 Auditors……………………………...... Heidi Nystrom……………………………………………......... 2018 Frank Rucker………………………………………….…......... 2019 Kendra Brooks……………………………………….…............ 2017 School Directors…………………......... Sharon Greene…………………………………………............. 2018 Dorothy Maggio………………………………………….......... 2017 Alecia O’Donnell…………………………………………......... 2019 School District Treasurer…………....... Samantha Bovat…………………………………...……............ 2018 LGHUS School Director…….……........ Vacant……………………………………….……..................... 2017 Cemetery Commissioners…………...... Mike Winot elected to finish 5 yr term…………….…............ 2017 Dorothy Maggio (Appointed)………………………………….2018 Doug Wellman………………………………………….…....... 2019 Cynthia Nau…………………………………….…................... 2020 Howard Osgood........................................................................ 2021 First Constable……………………....... (Selectboard) Second Constable…………………....... (Selectboard) Trustee of Public Funds…………......... Guy Tanza……………………………………….…….............. 2017 Town Agent………………………........ Guy Tanza.………………………………………..………........ 2017 Town Grand Juror……………….......... David Y. Parker Jr.……………………………………............... 2017 Town State Representatives…..…......... Carolyn Partridge…………………………………….…........... 2017 Matthew Trieber…………………………………….…............. 2017 Justice of the Peace………………........ Marsha Omand………………………………………............... 2019 Cynthia Nau………………………………………….…........... 2019 Gwen Tanza……………………………………………............. 2019 Guy Tanza……………………………………………............... 2019 Marji Wellman……………………………………….............. 20179

4

BROOKLIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6

Town Officers Appointed TITLE

NAME

TERM EXPIRES

Assistant Town Clerk............................ Gwendolyn Tanza………………………….............................. 2017 Assistant Treasurer................................ Louise Sirois………………………………….…..…................. 2017 Guy Tanza…………………………………………................... 2017 Marie F. Tattersall...................................................................... 2017 Road Commissioners............................ Archie Clark……………………………………….…............... 2017 Highway Foreman…………………… Mark Bills……………………………………….……............... 2017 Health Officer…………………….........Dorothy Maggio..............................................................01/01/2018 Assistant Health Officer........................ Gwendolyn Tanza...........................................................01/01/2018 Forest Fire Warden…………………..... Lester D. Rink………………………………….….…............... 2017 Deputy Forest Fire Warden………….. Michael W. Winot ………………..…………………................ 2017 Town Service Officer…………….......... Cynthia Nau…………………………………………................ 2017 Surveyor of Wood & Lumber……….... Lester D. Rink…………………………………......................... 2017 Tree Warden………………………….... Mark Bills……………………………………………................ 2017 Windham Regional Commissioners….. Cynthia Nau……………………………………….…............... 2017 Guy Tanza...……………………………………….…............... 2017 Pound Keeper……………………...…..Windham County Humane Society…………………............... 2017 Animal Control Officer…………..….... Nancy Libby…….……………………………..…..................... 2017 Historical Society………………...….... Cynthia Nau………………………………..……..…................ 2017 Doug Wellman….……………………………………............... 2017 Jack Greene….…………………………………….…............... 2017 Emergency Mgmt Coordinator….......... Vacant…………………….……................................................ 2017 Rescue, Inc……………………………..Vacant ………… ………………………………..…….............. 2017 Town 911 Coordinator………………... Guy Tanza……….. ……………………………….................... 2017 SEVCA………………………………....Vacant…………………………………….…………................. 2017 WCSWMD (Landfill)……………......... David Jones……………………………………….…................ 2017 Planning Commission…………...…….Barbara Bourne……………………………….…….................. 2017 Suzanne d’ Corsey……………………………………............... 2018 Charlie Ezequelle, Chairman……………………………………2020 Tom Kavet……………………………………........................... 2019 Vacant.…………….…………………………………................ 2019 Brookline Meeting House Committee Peter Meyer, Chairman……..………………….…….............. 2017 Bruce Mello…………………………………….….…............... 2017 Helen Samuels….……………………………….……............... 2017 Kerry Bourne...…………………………………….…............... 2017 Mark Bills………………………………………….................... 2017 Lee Anne Parker……………………………………………... .. 2017



BROOK LIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6 5

Auditors’ Report

T

his auditor’s report is provided in connection with our audit of the financial statements of the Town of Brookline, which comprise the respective financial position of the governmental Funds as of June 30, 2016, and the respective changes in financial position for the year then ended. In our opinion the financial statements are presented fairly, in all material respects, in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. We have followed auditing procedures as recommended by the Vermont League of Cities and Towns and as required by Vermont Law. Our opinion included the following considerations: 1) The financial statements include all properly classified funds and other financial information of the Town and all component units required by generally accepted accounting principles. All material transactions have been recorded in the accounting records and are reflected in the financial statements.

5) We are in agreement with the adjusting journal entries that the Treasurer proposed, and confirmed that they have been posted to the general ledger.

2) Expenses have been appropriately classified and allocated to functions and programs in the financial statements. We have reconciled salary expenses reported in the statements to the IRS 941 report and confirmed tax deposits have been remitted on time.

In our opinion the Treasurer has suitable skill, knowledge, and experience to maintain and administer the accounting and related fiduciary functions of the Town. The Town is very fortunate to have the capable administrative services of our elected Treasurer and Clerk.

3) Revenues are appropriately classified within general revenues and contributions to restricted funds.

Respectfully submitted by elected auditors: Heidi Nystrom, Kendra Brooks and Frank Rucker Dated: January 22, 2017

6) We are not aware of any pending or threatened litigation, claims, or assessments or unasserted claims or assessments that are required to be accrued or disclosed in the financial statements. There have been no communications from regulatory agencies concerning noncompliance with, or deficiencies in, financial reporting practices that are currently pending. 7) To comply with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles that apply to Government Wide Activities and the Statement of Net Position, the Auditors have asked the Treasurer to provide a statement of fixed assets with related information on depreciation, book value, and long term debt. We expect to have this information available in the near term and will include in next year’s Town Report.

4) All bank accounts have been reconciled to the Town’s general ledger accounting system and inter-fund activity balances have been appropriately classified, reported, and reconciled.

Our Brookline E-mail list includes more than one hundred people. This is one of the ways in which we communicate news and announcements of local interest to our community. If you would like to be added to the list, please e-mail Julie Lavorgna at [email protected] (And, please, if your E-mail address has changed, let Julie know.)

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BROOKLIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6

2016 Brookline Town Meeting Minutes, March 1, 2016



BROOK LIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6 7

2016 Brookline Town Meeting Minutes (cont’d)

8

BROOKLIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6

2016 Brookline Town Meeting Minutes (cont’d)



BROOK LIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6 9

2016 Brookline Town Meeting Minutes (cont’d)

10

BROOKLIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6

2016 Brookline Town Meeting Minutes (cont’d)



BROOK LIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6 11

2016 Brookline Town Meeting Minutes (cont’d)

12

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2016 Brookline Town Meeting Minutes (cont’d)



BROOK LIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6 13

2016 Brookline Town Meeting Minutes (cont’d)

Respectfully submitted, Guy Tanza, Town Clerk David Parkert, Jr., Moderator

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BROOKLIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6

2016 Brookline Town Meeting Minutes (cont’d)



BROOK LIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6 15

2016 Brookline Town Meeting Minutes (cont’d)

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BROOKLIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6

2016 Brookline Town Meeting Minutes (cont’d)



BROOK LIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6 17

2016 Brookline Town Meeting Minutes (cont’d)

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BROOKLIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6

Selectboard Report

T

he members of the Brookline Select Board continue to serve the residents of the town in every way possible. Each individual member contributes his or her special talents, experiences and knowledge to help run our small municipality in the most economical and community-centered way possible. Our elected officials are sworn to uphold the law, maintain the town records accurately, and develop a reasonable budget annually. Our appointed officers continue to serve the town as representatives to various local, county and state-level commissions and organizations. As we review the highlights of the past year, we would be remiss not to mention the many hours put in by our town clerk, our listers, auditors, school directors, commissioners, and our justices of the peace. Those who were appointed to work on special projects such as our roads and highways, our trees and forests, our historically significant buildings, cemeteries and emergency plans help maintain the high level of service Brookline is proud to offer. MEMBERS OF THE SELECT BOARD Bernardine Hoard continued this year to chair the select board. Her understanding of the needs of the town have helped the board complete vitally important plans that will guide us through unforeseen emergencies. We completed the town’s Hazard Mitigation Plan this year which was a timeintensive undertaking. Bernardine has led this board through a difficult year that involved several litigious cases that never seemed to go away. Her service has been invaluable in moving the board forward. Dorothy Maggio acted as vice-chair to the select board. Originally completing the last two years of an incomplete term, she was re-elected to a full three-year term last March. Dot continues to learn more about the parameters within which a selectperson operates. She joins Nancy Libby in handling the ACO duties, is our town’s newest cemetery commissioner, health officer, and occasional minute taker for the select board. In the past three years, Bruce Mello has worked tirelessly on understanding the responsibilities of this Select Board in regards to owning two newto-us buildings - the Brookline Meeting House and

the Brookline school building which is leased out to Sunny Lane Day Care. He has gone above and beyond normal expectations in bringing important information to the board for action, including but not limited to heating systems, restoration of historically important structures as well as physically getting things done. Stan Noga continued to provide expert advice and research on many projects this year. The board knows that when Stan says he is going to do some research on a project we will get a detailed review of what was done in the past, what was planned for by others and what would be the best way to get from one point to the next in the future. Stan, along with Bruce Mello and Guy Tanza, has on several occasions done emergency repairs at SLDC this year- above and beyond the call of duty for a Select Board member. His contribution of time and effort saves the town money. Gwen Tanza was elected to the Select Board this year. As the appointed assistant town clerk, Gwen was aware of the many facets of municipal government. As a Select Board member, she understands that we each support whatever project that comes before the board. Gwen has volunteered to be the deputy health officer and has made herself available to assist in any way possible. Her professionalism makes her an ideal member of this board. The Select Board is very much indebted to our hard working town clerk, Guy Tanza. He is at every Select Board meeting and hearing held throughout the year. Guy maintains our website and is the cameraman for the videoed meetings shown on Fact 8 TV. Guy is meticulously organized making it a pleasure to work with him. Somara Zwick is our town treasurer. Somara works throughout the year ensuring that the town is properly meeting its fiduciary responsibilities. She meets with the Select Board to review budget revenue and expenses and guides us as we set the tax rates. Louise Sirois keeps our books in order and is very much appreciated. SUMMARY OF FY 2016-2017 This year the town was fortunate to get the maximum grant available to pave more of Grassy Brook Road. In addition there was substantial work

BROOK LIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6 19

Selectboard Report (Cont’d) done on Putney Mountain Road and Hill Road. Archie Clark also obtained Better Back Roads Grant money to improve some of our less-traveled roadways as well. Mark Bills is such a hard-working employee for the town. His knowledge about invasive plants, culvert repair and road safety such as adding proper signage makes our town safe and enjoyable. The addition of two buildings has increased the select board’s responsibilities. Subcommittee work developed a three-year lease with Sunny Lane Day Care. Old fashioned work-bees were popular this year with the Select Board first getting together to mitigate the beginnings of mold problems in the multipurpose room at SLDC. Ceiling tiles were removed and replaced as well during the first work bee. A long weekend project later in the summer involved cleaning out the back storage room at SLDC which was still filled with desks, chairs, equipment and old books left from the school. Residents were invited to come by and look through the books and sporting equipment and take home what they wanted. The rest was sorted into two dumpsters. It was HARD work. We are proud of what we do and enjoy working together as a team. Most recently, we have been investing in proactive maintenance with the boiler at SLDC making sure it is efficiently heating the building. Unfortunately a water pipe did freeze in late November and the ceiling work done during our first work bee was damaged. Guy, Stan and Bruce all worked on getting the area insulated and the problem has been corrected.

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The Select Board is pleased to dedicate this year’s town report to the Brookline Meeting House Advisory Committee. Their work on our historic church building is highlighted on the dedication page. We are truly grateful for the time and effort that wonderful group of volunteers put into the improvements needed to make that building the future hub of town activities. In closing, the Select Board is made up of ordinary citizens working together with a common goal... to make Brookline a safe, attractive and vital community for all who live here to enjoy. Please join us when you can. Come to a meeting, look over our website, join an activity and make suggestions. Stop in for a visit!

BROOKLIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6

Town Operating/Highway Proposed 2018 Budget FY2016 ADOPTED REVENUE & EXPENDITURES REPORT POPOSED BUDGET - *see BUDGET notes

FY2016 ACTUAL

FY2017 FY2018 Budget ADOPTED BUDGET PROPOSED Increase (7/1/16BUDGET (Decrease) 6/30/17)

TOWN OPERATIONS TOWN OPERATING REVENUES Current Taxes (Adopted Budgets, Actual, Proposed Budget) Current Tax Revenue for Appropriations

71,067

65,936

$

125,261

133,521

6,331

6,331

$

6,931

6,306

8,260 (625)

-

(2,990)

-

-

-

40,000

20,880

10,000

-

(10,000)

Penalties

3,200

1,683

800

1,000

200

Interest on Taxes

1,500

2,817

1,000

1,000

-

Current Use (Hold Harmless Payments)

337

7,865

7,500

7,800

300

State Per Parcel Payments

-

345

300

300

-

USA-Deconte Funds - Forest Svc Rev Sharing

100

127

100

100

-

Civil Fines

-

792

-

-

Listers Education Grants (Restricted)

-

386

-

-

Education Tax Accrual Adjustment - Prior & Current yr net (12/21/16 update) Delinquent Taxes - see notes below

4,500

4,069

4,000

4,800

600

919

600

560

(40)

25

17

25

-

(25)

800

908

900

900

-

90

30

50

30

1,200

985

1,000

1,200

Reimbursements - LGUHS Election Costs, Other

-

355

-

-

-

Transfer from other fund

-

16,422

-

-

-

Town Fines/Animal Impound Fees/Other income

-

430

-

-

-

Interest On Investments TOTAL TOWN OPERATING REVENUES - NON TAX & NO appropriations

100

Clerk Fees (80% Recording + other fees) Dog License Fees & Fines Fishing Hunting License Copies Marriage/Civil Union Records Restoration Revenue(20%Recording - Restr'd)

98

800

(20) 200

20

10

(10)

26,295

17,700

(8,595) (960)

129,850

128,405

158,487

157,527

Selectboard

2,750

2,750

6,550

6,550

-

Town Clerk

TOTAL TOWN OPERATING REVENUES TOWN OPERATING EXPENDITURES

18,000

19,103

21,560

21,560

-

Treasurer/Tax Collector

3,000

5,306

5,925

5,925

-

Delinquent Tax Collector

3,000

2,395

3,600

3,600

-

Listers

4,200

2,115

4,400

4,400

Auditors

1,000

564

1,500

1,100

-

-

-

6,240

6,240

-

-

-

-

Health Officer Assistant Town Clerk

3,250

5,631

Listers-Reappraisal

-

Election Officials

200

226

200

200

6,500

7,428

7,740

8,140

Assistant Treasurer



-

(400)

400

BROOK LIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6 21

Town Operating/Highway Proposed 2018 Budget (cont’d) FY2016 ADOPTED REVENUE & EXPENDITURES REPORT POPOSED BUDGET - *see BUDGET notes Selectboard Clerk

1,500

FY2017 FY2018 Budget ADOPTED BUDGET PROPOSED Increase (7/1/16BUDGET (Decrease) 6/30/17)

FY2016 ACTUAL

1,296

1,500

1,500

-

-

-

-

-

Payroll Taxes - General Fund (Wages times $.0765)

3,320

3,892

4,530

Payroll Service Fees

1,000

1,213

1,100

4,530 1,200

Supplies & Postage - Town Operations (See notes)

Animal Control Officer (Extraordinary services/Emergency)

100

6,000

6,496

6,000

4,000

(2,000)

Supplies & Postage - Town Report Expense

-

-

-

1,500

1,500

Supplies & Postage - Planning Commission Expense

-

-

-

4,500

4,500 -

Abatements

-

-

-

-

Legal Notices

800

997

800

800

Seminars & Mileage

1,500

2,203

1,100

1,500

400

Town Office-Electric

1,100

1,070

900

1,100

200

200

249

200

250

Town Office-Telephone

1,650

1,512

1,500

1,500

Town Office-Fuel

2,800

1,608

Brookline Church Building-Electric

-

50 -

2,800

2,500

(300)

Brookline Church Building-Fuel

200

-

200

50

(150)

Computer Services-Maintenance/Support

700

413

900

900

-

300

295

300

300

Legal Services

12,500

24,180

7,500

5,000

(2,500)

Rescue Services

14,305

14,305

14,734

14,734

-

Fire Department Services - (Annual Request)

9,000

9,000

9,000

9,000

-

Fire Department Services - (Mutual Aid dues)

-

-

8,734

9,258

524

Copies

500

437

500

400

(100)

1,900

1,841

1,900

1,350

(550)

800

740

800

800

-

Fire Alarm

Copier Contract Town Property Maintenance

-

600

830

600

800

200

1,392

1,462

1,400

1,535

135

950

993

993

1,179

186

NEMRC Software-license & support

2,000

2,094

1,900

2,000

WSWMD Landfill Fees: NO RECYCLING in 2017

8,000

7,462

8,000

6,120

(1,880)

Law Enforcement

3,800

2,253

3,600

3,600

-

Insurance/Bonds (Includes Historic Town Bldgs)

600

Recycling Trash Removal Dues-VLCT Dues-WRC

4,000

4,692

5,000

5,600

Old Cemeterys-Lawn mntc

300

240

300

300

Brookline School Purchase

-

County Tax

5,277

Animal Impound Expense

100

250

Audit Reserve Budgeted 2017

-

-

Fire permits/other misc TOTAL TOWN OPERATING EXPENSE (Before Appropriations)

50

18

127,467

142,835

FY2018 BUDGET TOTAL TO BE RAISED BY TAXES - Town Office: - Not including APPROPRIATIONS - THIS goes in Current Tax Line 1

-

-

1

4,300

100

4,800

5,400

200

250

2,000

50

-

50

50

151,556

151,221

$ 125,261

133,521

$

600 (2,000) (335)

$

8,260

SEE SEPARATE LIST OF APPROPS

Appropriations (Proposed amounts voted separately)

22

6,331.00

6,331

BROOKLIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6

$

6,931

6,306 $

(625)

TownOperating/Highway Proposed 2018 Budget (cont’d) FY2016 ADOPTED REVENUE & EXPENDITURES REPORT POPOSED BUDGET - *see BUDGET notes Appropriations (New $ in FY18, Warned & Voted Separately)

FY2016 ACTUAL

FY2017 FY2018 Budget ADOPTED BUDGET PROPOSED Increase (7/1/16BUDGET (Decrease) 6/30/17)

-

TOTAL TOWN OPERATING EXPENDITURES

$

TOWN OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT) See notes

$

133,798 (3,948)

149,166

$

158,487

(20,761)

$

0

157,527 $

(960)

-

NOTES TOWN OPERATING REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES

- All amounts rounded to the nearest $1 - Current Tax $ in FY17 adopted budget includes Special Articles voted at March 2016 Town Meeting - Cash expenditure for Elementary and High School Taxes FY2016 Elementary Education Taxes Paid Leland & Gray High School Taxes Paid

511,470 339,845

Total Education Taxes Paid by Brookline

851,315

- FY18 Supplies Budget increased and detail broken out for Town Report costs and Town Planning budget - FY 2016 Actual Deficit related to extraordinary legal expenditures; $3,948 of deficit reflected in FY2016 budget due to application of FY15 Surplus - Cash basis delinquent tax revenues collected were $60,016. Per VT Statute, amounts collected within 60 days of FY2015 year end were counted in 2015.

HIGHWAY OPERATIONS HIGHWAY OPERATING REVENUES Current Taxes State Aid FY 2014 Emergency Grant Balance - Pond Flood damage

140,144

140,144

153,313

156,701

3,388

37,000

38,447

37,000

38,000

1,000

-

48,377

-

-

Permits Revenue

100

100

100

100

-

Interest on Investments

300

566

300

250

(50)

TOTAL HIGHWAY OPERATION REVENUES (b4 budgeted tax)

177,544

227,633

$

37,400

38,350

$

4,338

TOTAL HIGHWAY OPERATION REVENUES

177,544

227,633

$

190,713

195,051

$

4,338

HIGHWAY OPERATING EXPENDITURES

-

Summer Salaries and Mileage (including emergency, special work,etc)

15,000

23,216

15,500

15,500

1,070

1,400

1,186

1,186

-

33,000

49,416

35,000

Summer Employee mileage

-

Summer Payroll Tax Exp

37,000

2,000

Highway Emergency - Additional Fire Dept Svcs

-

145

-

-

Highway Contractors - Emergency 0099

-

45,300

-

-

21,000

34,548

21,000

21,000

-

800

294

800

800

-

61

23

61

61

Winter Contract Svcs/Equipment

33,000

32,935

33,000

33,000

-

Winter Materials

21,000

5,590

21,000

21,000

-

450

481

400

450

Summer Contract Svcs/Equip Rental (increase for addtl work req)

Summer Hwy Material Winter Salaries Winter Payroll Taxes

Town Shed-Electric Town Shed Maintenance Seminars - Hwy Employees Insurance-Highway



-

(0)

50

1,000

-

1,000

1,000

200

-

200

200

3,800

4,200

400

3,800

3,031

-

Town Equipmnt Fuel\Parts\Mntce

4,000

293

4,000

4,000

-

Road signs

1,800

251

1,800

1,800

-

BROOK LIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6 23

Town Operating/Highway Proposed 2018 Budget (cont’d) FY2016 ADOPTED REVENUE & EXPENDITURES REPORT POPOSED BUDGET - *see BUDGET notes Culverts Paving Retreatment/Lines Bridge Maintenance TOTAL HIGHWAY OPERATION EXPENDITURES

FY2016 ACTUAL

FY2017 FY2018 Budget ADOPTED BUDGET PROPOSED Increase (7/1/16BUDGET (Decrease) 6/30/17)

4,500

3,244

4,500

4,500

-

25,000

108,813

28,000

30,000

2,000

5,000

7,240

5,000

5,000

-

170,681

316,220

180,697 $

4,450

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

4,649

4,916

4,466

4,354

185,330

331,136

$

176,247

HIGHWAY FINANCING EXPENDITURES Bond Principal Repayment Bond interest TOTAL HIGHWAY FUND EXPENDITURES INCLUDING FINANCING, Excluding any specially warned articles

$

FY2018 BUDGET TOTAL TO BE RAISED BY TAXES for Highway - THIS goes in Current Taxes Hwy Revenues HIGHWAY FUND SURPLUS (SHORTFALL)

190,713

$ 153,313 $

(7,786)

(103,504)

Total TOWN & HWY TAX INCREASE BEFORE APPROPRIATIONS:

24

$

BROOKLIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6

-

$

(112)

195,051 $

4,338

156,701

$

3,388

$

11,648

-

Town Employees Compensation TOWN EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION - Gross Pay 07/01/15 - 06/30/16



BROOKS, KENDRA NYSTROM, HEIDI RUCKER, FRANK ZWICK, SOMARA TOTAL

$ $ $ $ $

687.75 813.75 467.25 33.50 2,002.25

GOKEY, DONALD GOKEY, SHEILA OMAND, MARSHA WOODS, DOUG TOTAL

$ $ $ $ $

285.00 915.00 1,878.00 30.00 3,108.00

HOARD, BERNARDINE $ MAGGIO, DOROTHY $ MELLO, BRUCE $ NOGA JR., STANLEY E.$ O'DONNELL, MICHAEL $ TOTAL $

750.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 2,750.00

BARUS, PETER MECKLE, SHANNON SIROIS, LOUISE TOTAL

$ $ $ $

480.00 990.00 31.25 1,501.25

TANZA, GUY TANZA, GWEN TOTAL

$ $ $

100.50 125.00 225.50

TOWN CLERK TANZA, GUY $ TOTAL $ ASSISTANT TOWN CLERK TANZA, GWEN $ TOTAL $ DELINQUENT TAX COLLECTOR TANZA, GUY $ TOTAL $ TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR ZWICK, SOMARA $ TOTAL $ ASSISTANT TREASURER SIROIS, LOUISE $ TANZA, GUY $ TOTAL $ HIGHWAY BILLS, EVERETT A $ BILLS, EVERETT MARK $ TOTAL $

Cash Basis

19,823.64 19,823.64 5,843.75 5,843.75 2,512.51 2,512.51 5,440.45 5,440.45 6,468.00 1,197.63 7,665.63 7,093.25 11,649.75 18,743.00

BROOK LIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6 25

Brookline Estimated Tax Rates (2017–2018) Town of Brookline ESTIMATED Municipal Tax Rates for 2017-2018 Proposed Budget FY/2018

Proposed Rates FY2018

FY17 FY18 Increase Adopted Adopted Rates FY2017 Rates FY2016 (decrease)

$

715,854 0.1865 0.2189 0.4054

0.1600 0.2141

0.1069 0.2128

0.0265 0.0048

$

133,521 156,701 290,222

0.3741

0.3197 $

0.0313

6,306 6,306

0.0088 0.0000 0.0088

0.0087 0.0008 0.0096

0.0091 0.0000 0.0091

0.0001 (0.0008) (0.0008)

0.0290 0.0154 0.0532 0.4586

0.0000 0.0121 0.0000 0.0028 0.0000 0.0245

0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0115 0.0206

0.0290 (0.0121) 0.0154 (0.0028) 0.0286

Total Municipal taxes to be voted

20,761 11,000 38,067 328,289

0.3987

0.3403

0.0599

Total Municipal taxes to be raised before local exemption

328,289

0.4586

535

0.0007

Municipal Grand List (as billed fy16 Grand List) OperationsTo Be Voted -Proposed FY 2018 Budget Town office operations (General fund) Highway fund operations Total annual operations taxes to be warned & voted Special Articles to be voted - FY2018 (FY 17 shown for Adopted ) Gen. Fd - Appropriations Gen Fd - New Appropriation Requests Subtotal - All Appropriations to be Voted/Voted Town Operating Fund Deficit Refunding Tax Town Op - Fire Dept Mutual Aid Dues (FY18, in Operating budget) Town Op - Recyling Services Article Town Op - Reserve for future Audit Article Highway - Equipment /Town Shed (FY16 article) Total Special articles - Town Op & Highway to be voted

Local Exemption(s) Veterans (3000 x 1.782)(Education)(not-voted)estimated rate (30,000 x .01 x res. Tax rate) TOTAL MUNICIPAL TAXES/RATE to be raised less Gen fund surplus, if available TOTAL MUNICIPAL TAXES/RATE to be raised

$

328,823 328,823

$

0.3987

0.3403

0.0007

0.4593 0.0000 0.459 $

0.0006

0.3994 0.0000 0.399 $

0.3409 -0.0167 0.324 $

Education taxes voted at school district annual meeting for information only: Prorated equalized rates per Brookline/Newfane Joint school equalized rates LGUHS [Brookline share] Total Equalized School Property Tax rates All grades Pre-k through grade 12

$ $

0.847 0.831

$ $

0.902 0.682

$ $

0.868 0.686

$

1.678

$

1.584

$

1.554

Total CLA adjusted School Property Tax rates

$

1.782

$

1.608

$

1.491

Total Municipal and school Homestead Education tax rate Estimate Total Percent Change from FY 2017

$

2.241 $ 12%

2.007

$

1.815

Total Non Resident Municpal and CLA adjusted Education property tax rate

$

2.105

1.950

$

1.797

Anticipated Income Cap Percent for School Tax on Household Income, if eligible

26

2.9%

BROOKLIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6

$

2.8%

2.8%

0.0599 0.0000 0.0600 0.060

138,297 60 172

4,198

316,519 316,519

$

Fund Balances as of June 30, 2016

-

0

0

40,851 $

34,790 $ 9,904 (3,844)

7.2%

-

40,851 $

40,851 40,851

$

0

17,554 $

33,205 $ 771 (16,422)

3.1%

-

17,555 $

17,555

17,555

-

$

(0)

4,850 $

4,774 $ 241 (165)

0.9%

-

4,850 $

4,850 4,850

-

$

(1)

25,425 $

23,950 $ 2,970 (1,495)

4.5%

0

25,424 $

25,424 25,424

-

25,424 $

25,424

Reappraisal

4,850 $

4,850

Historical

$

$

(4,587) $

$ 13,028 (17,615)

0.0%

-

(4,587)

(4,587)

$

$

2,864 $

2,649 $ 344 (129)

0.5%

(0)

2,864 $

2,864 2,864

-

2,864 $

2,864

Community Group

4,587 4,587 $

-

-

School Building

- All amounts are rounded to the nearest $1.00 - Reserved and/or Restricted fund amounts in the General Fund are for restoration of records and state funds received for listers education - Reserved and/or Restricted fund amounts in the Highway Fund includes bond revenues received for bridge reconstruction and special amounts voted by the town for paving/retreatment, bridges, equipment, and Ellen Ware Road. All Highway Funds are restricted to use of Highway operations see additional report of Highway Fund Balance detail - All Cemetery Funds are restricted to that fund. The amount shown as specifically restricted was set forth by the grantor of those specific monies. - The Community Group fund separate bank account was closed in 2016. Funds are now allocated within the Town's General Money Market - Multi Funds. Interest income earned on these funds is allocated pro-rata to each special fund based on their monthly balance. - School Building Fund as of December 2016 has no deficit and a small surplus fund balance of $114.

0

(20,735) $ 316,519 $

62.2%

27 $ 420,023 $ 128,405 227,633 (149,167) (331,136)

20.7%

(0)

$ 117,793 $ 353,931 $

(31,211) 10,476 (20,735)

$

17,555 $

40,851 $

-

17,555

Loan/Rehab

40,851

Brookline Meetinghouse

33,213 $ 138,528 $ 37,411 $

$

Notes to Balance Sheet:

Highway

20,631 $ 353,931 39,055 32 37,980 16,910 3,184 $ 117,793 $ 353,931 $

$

Fund Balances as of June 30, 2015 Plus Annual Revenues Less Annual Expenses

Fund Percentage of Consolidated Total

PROOF (assets - liab+fund bal=0)

Total Liability and Fund Balances

Unreserved/Unrestricted Funds Reserved/Restricted Funds Total Fund Balances

Fund Balances

Accounts Payable & Accrued Expenses License fees payable to State Property Tax Overpayments Payable Due to Other Funds Total Liabilities

Liabilities

Cash held in Separate Bank Accounts Cash held in Money Market - Multi Funds Town Office Cash Drawer Due From Other Funds Municipal Revenues Receivable Delinquent Education Taxes Receivable Total Assets

Assets

General Fund

Town of Brookline Consolidated Balance Sheet For the Year Ended June 30, 2016

(0)

5,795 $

6,419 $ 6 (630)

1.0%

-

5,975 $

4,795 1,000 5,795

180 180 $

5,975 $

5,975 $

Cemetery

(0)

388,536

525,837 383,302 (520,603)

100.0%

(1)

569,242

(13,449) 401,985 388,536

142,495 60 172 37,980 180,706

380,537 130,599 32 37,980 16,910 3,184 569,242

Total

Brookline Consolidated Balance Sheet FY 2016

BROOK LIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6 27

28

BROOKLIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6 -293 35,431 $

-141,463 135,852 $

$

-

0 3,930 $

1,875 $

4,000 $

111,823 $

$

1,875

4,000

-

$

2,055 $

25,000 38,447 48,377 -

2,148

-

31,724 $

99,711

$

$

$ $ $

2,055 $

165,492 $

NOTES TO HIGHWAY FUND BALANCE ANALYSIS - all amounts rounded to nearest $1 - Emergency expense related to FY 2014 grant paid and completed in FY2016, per extension. Final reimbursements were received in FY 2016.

Total Revenues Less: 2016 Cash Expenditures Balance as of 6/30/2016

Unrestricted Revenues - Budgeted by Line item Grant Revenues - State Highway Aid Grant Revenues - FY2014 Emergency Grant Balance Bond Principal and Interest Budgeted

$

Balance as of 6/30/2015 Plus: 2016 Revenues:

4,000 $

63,476 $

$

-

38,476

Grants Revenues received - State Highway Aid Grants Revenues received - State Forest Svc Reimbursements received - Property Owner

Total Revenues Less: 2015 Cash Expenditures

4,000

25,000

Unrestricted Revenues - Budgeted by Line item Grants Revenues received - Culverts Grant

3,528

4,000

4,000 -

29,872 $

34,311 $

$ $

72,037 $

18,000 $ 15,276 $ 38,761 $

$

$ $ $

201,726 $

Balance as of 6/30/2014 Plus: 2015 Revenues:

Total Revenues Less: 2014 Expenditures

Balance as of 6/30/2013 Plus: 2014 Revenues: Unrestricted Revenues - Budgeted by Line item Grants Revenues received - Emergency Grant Grants Revenues received - State Highway Aid

-43,134 103,755 $

9,500 $

-

9,500

137,389 $

65,316

70,588 $

-

-

9,500 61,088

132,117 $

4,856 $

14,592 $

9,500 $ 5,092 $ $

$ -6,461 $

-

-

$

$

$

$

$

$ $ $

-14,649 $

-127,191 37,552 $

85,786 $

-

85,786

78,957 $

131,842

112,322 $

1,500 1,500

112,322 -

98,477 $

161,384 $

104,026 $

104,026 $ $ $

-331,136 316,519

227,633

126,161 38,447 48,377 14,649

420,022

299,016

250,386

38,476 1,500 1,500

150,822 61,088

468,653

204,079

194,654

135,526 20,368 38,761

Undesignated Total Highway Highway Fund $ 155,836 $ 478,077

14,649 $

14,649

-

Bond Principal and Interest

6,461 $

-

-

-

-

-

6,461

-

-

-

Grader Paving/ Highway Repair/Repla Bridges & Retreatmnt Equipment cement Culverts Ellen Ware Rd $ 164,000 $ 29,400 $ 122,381 $ 6,461

Highway Fund Balance analysis as of June 30, 2016

Highway Fund Balance Analysis as of June 30, 2016

Treasurer’s Report

G

enerally when I begin to write up this report each year I try to emphasize the most positive aspects of the year. This year’s report I am going to continue in that spirit but must begin with some of the harder financial challenges of the town. Our fiscal year that ended June 30, 2016 (FY2016) was a difficult year with the result of some cumulative expense increases coming home to roost, so to speak. One of the biggest to deal with has been our legal expenses. During the past three fiscal years our town incurred close to $50,000 in legal expenses of which just over $45,000 related to one matter. Our cumulative legal fees through December 2016 are now almost $65,000, most related to the same matter. The town’s related indirect administrative costs – wages, supplies, etc. –aren’t even included in these amounts. Primarily due to these expenses, we closed FY2016 with a deficit. The required Article warning the amount necessary to fund this is part of this year’s Town Report. Although we are cautiously hopeful that this level of legal expense is in the past, we are going to have to consider how to manage contingencies such as this in the future should they occur. With two additional properties added to our town buildings, our Brookline Meetinghouse and the School Building, additional insurance expense has been added to town costs. Our School Building rent covers most of its cost, but until the Brookline Meetinghouse has sustainable revenues to offset overhead, that expense is part of the Town Operations budget. On to the positive points, our Brookline Meetinghouse Committee has done an admirable job of fundraising, both from individuals in our town and beyond. They are continuing their efforts with more grants received in our current fiscal year 2017. My personal hat goes off to them. They are building on the foundation that the Ladies Benevolence Society/Historic Brookline Church Preservation group kept going in past years.



We are also fortunate that our Highway Fund built up a sufficient surplus that covered a great deal of road work done in FY2016, such as the Hill Road paving and repairs to portions of Putney Mountain road as well. Additionally the first of the Better Back Roads grants awarded to our town in FY2016 was completed and funds received in FY2017. More highways grants were awarded in FY2017, but I guess that will be written about next year. The fiscal year budget proposed for 2018 is going to be a challenge. The Select Board, Road Commissioner, Road Foreman and the Town Clerk did their best to thoughtfully put a budget together for the voters’ consideration. Although municipal taxes make up only a small portion of our total property tax bill (apprx. 15%) the budgeting process is important. While we keep hoping that costs will come down and work will decrease, it does not seem that reality is in our near future. As always, I can’t end without saying again that as Town Treasurer and as the Collector of Current Taxes I am very fortunate to have the neverfailing support of the other Town officials, elected and appointed. I believe we are fortunate that there continues to be open discussion and a cooperative, supportive spirit throughout our town of Brookline, and thank all town residents for this spirit. Respectfully submitted, Somara Zwick, Treasurer/Current Tax Collector

BROOK LIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6 29

Listers’ Report

L

isters’ life has continued in a very smooth mode. We continue to meet monthly, the last Monday of each month starting at 5:15 PM, and other meetings when needed at arranged times. Tuesdays and Thursdays AM are optional times, as well. If there are needs, Listers may be reached through the Town Clerk, 365-4648. The Listers continue to attend educational workshops offered by the State. The most beneficial are NEMRC and MICROSOLVE, our Lister Programs, workshops plus APEX, our drawing program. Brookline is made of 343 parcels. We continue to work at appraising parcels, site visits, property transfers, current (land) use, homestead declarations monitored, Lister Cards updated, Grand List processed, grievances heard and acted upon. Last year we heard six grievances, which were acted upon auspiciously. A grievance from three years ago was finally settled for certain with the state upholding our findings. Our new tax maps from DiBernardo Associates of Bellows Falls are excellent. We do continue to keep a list of changes for our next update.

Our Common Level of Appraisal (CLA), which provides us a town wide comparison of our total listed value to the State’s estimate of total fair market, and our Coefficient of Dispersion (COD), which measures the average deviation from market value of sold properties from the average town wide level of appraisal, are within the acceptable range. The acceptable range for the CLA is 80% to 100% with 100% being perfect. The acceptable range for the COD is 0% - 20%. Last year both were within range and this year both are still within range. CLA is 94.17% and the COD is 9.86%. When the CLA and COD are not within the acceptable range, a town wide reappraisal is needed. We do thank the people of Brookline for their cooperation as we do appraisals of property, new homes, renovations, sheds, other buildings, etc. We strive to keep property equalized. Again, thank you very much Respectively, Donald Gokey, Sheila Gokey, Marsha Omand

Brookline Planning Commission

T

he Brookline Planning Commission meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7:00 p.m. at the Town Office. Notices, surveys, documents, agendas, and minutes of the meetings are available on the Town Website. The Planning Commission produced, disseminated, and compiled the Town Survey, for use in the creation of the 2018 Town Plan. Of the 355 Town Surveys mailed out and made available, 70 households, or approximately 20% responded. At the time of writing this, the Town Plan is well underway, including follow-up input from residents on renewable energy.

30

The Planning Commission works closely with the Town Office, Select Board, and Windham Regional Commission, which this past year included information on the development of a Hazard Mitigation/Emergency Plan, as well as support for grant applications for the 2018 Town Plan. The current Planning Commission consists of returning members Tom Kavet (Chair), Charlie Ezequelle, Barbara Bourne, and Suzanne d’Corsey. We are looking for volunteers who are interested in serving on the Planning Commission. As always, the Planning Commission meetings are open to the public and we welcome your participation.

BROOKLIN E T OWN R E P OR T 2 0 1 6

Road Commissioner’s Report

“R

oad Work Ahead” These three words best describe what folks all over Town saw this construction season. The season started up on Putney Mountain Road where the old black top was ground, a layer of new gravel was placed and new pavement went down. This completed a project that the Town has been working on for some years. At the same time a section of Hill Road was paved. In May an 80%, $175,000.00 paving grant was awarded for Grassy Brook Road. With paving prices at a low from recent years, the board decided to use all the grant money for blacktop. This allowed us to pave about two miles of Grassy Brook Road, but first seven culverts needed to be replaced. All this work resulted in many detours and one lane of traffic for a time. Thank-you to all for putting up with these delays. The work on Greer Road Bridge was completed with new locust beams placed between all existing ones and the deck placed back on. The stream bank stabilization project on Parker Road that received a grant last year, was completed in August 2016. The ledge removal along a narrow section of Athens Road was completed this year with a Better Roads Grants from V TRANS. The large culvert just south of the Papoose Road, which has been settling in recent years due to decay. Grants have been applied for three of the last four years with no success. In late fall it was decided to grind the blacktop and place steel plates down and repave. This is a short term repair to get us through until a grant can be secured for total replacement.



The sand/salt shed replacement grant has been applied for with a notification date of mid-January. I will have more news on this at Town Meeting when we know the results of that application, but no special article for additional funds will be needed. Plans for 2017 include repaving the remainder of Putney Mountain Road and about 1.2 miles of Hill Road, Replacing the sand/salt shed and replacing the culvert mentioned above. Mark and I will be updating the culvert and bridge inventory which needs to be done every 5 years. Many THANKS to the entire Select Board, Treasurer, Town Clerk, and the Road Crew and all of you for making this all come together. Archie Clark Road Commissioner

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Brookline Preservation Committee

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arly in 2016 the Brookline Church Preservation Committee wondered if changing the name of the building would be appropriate and supported by our community. In the committee’s mind the decision was two fold; the building is no longer used as a church and some organizations don’t award grant money to religious entities. Hoping that the building will someday be used as a community center, meetinghouse or arts venue, we querried our community and asked them to cast their vote on a new name. A total of fourty five votes were returned with the “Brookline Meetinghouse” winning the majority of the votes. So in the spring of 2016 we have begun referring to the Brookline Baptist Church, aka the Historic Brookline Church, as the Brookline Meetinghouse. As old habits are hard to break,we acknowledge that some people will always call it the Brookline Church, but that’s fine with us. 2016 was a very busy year at the Brookline Meetinghouse. Two major repairs occurred late in the summer. All eleven windows in the brick portion of the building were professionally restored at a cost of $10,350. The cost of this work was covered by our Sponsor-a-Window fundraiser last December, a $2,500 grant from the Windham Foundation, as well as $2,000 from the repair fund built up by the Ladies Benevelent Society. All cracked or broken panes of glass were replaced with period glass donated by a community member. These windows, which were in really rough shape are now breathing new life and light into the building. The other major repair was aimed at eliminating a 3” sag in the floor and ceiling as well as straightening the steeple. This was accomplished by installing two temporary sixteen foot long 8X8 timbers vertically from floor to ceiling in the sanctuary. Hydraulic and screw jacks were placed underneath the timbers in the crawlspace and up she went! The floor went up, the temporary posts went up, the ceiling and queenpost truss went up, the backside of the steeple went up and now she’s back where she was originally. The steeple is no longer leaning and she’s enjoying her new posture. Large stone pillars were added in the crawlspace and huge hemlock timbers were added to the steeple framing, to add strength and help keep the building 32

straight. Existing 8X8 roof rafters were pressed back into position which had slipped out of place when the framing failed, sometime in the last 100 years. The cost of this repair was $24,500 and was paid for equally by the Ladies Benevolent Society Repair Fund and the VT Rotating Loan Fund as voted upon and approved at our 2015 Town Meeting. We have high aspirations for 2017. Following the recommendations made to us by Historical Preservationist Jan Lewandowski in 2014, our upcoming priorities are first, the balustrade and belfry roof repair, followed by the repair to the foundation underneath the wooden addition. We applied for a $19,210 matching State grant, of which the State granted us $7,955 to cover almost half of these repairs. This will enable the repair fund to go that much further, perhaps allowing us to add ADA handicapped access or painting the building. A local theatrical director has expressed his interest in using the Meetinghouse as a venue to produce plays and musicals. Perhaps we can collaborate with surrounding towns to combine or share events. The 40’ X 28’ community room is large enough for reunions or community gatherings. The kitchen is fully equipped with vintage appliances but it needs plumbing updates and lots of TLC. The advisory committee raised $8,285 during 10 fundraisers in 2016 and private donations totaled $1,850. We applied for and were granted a $2,500 grant to help defray the cost of repairing the windows. A committee member attended a two day conference on reclaiming and reusing historic buildings. We opened the building to the public three times during 2016. We sponsored open houses in June and October as well as welcoming 50+ Trick or Treaters for the first time. We cleared large trees and brush along the southern boundary and hope to continue landscaping improvements in 2017. We do our best to keep our community informed. We use Julie Lavorgna’s email list, Front Porch Forum as well as “Historic Brookline VT Church Renovations” on Facebook. Our meeting minutes are posted on brooklinevt.com. If you would like to join Julie’s email list please email her at [email protected] and ask to be added to the Brookline email list.

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Brookline Preservation Committee (cont’d) We would also like to take this opportunity to once again thank the Ladies Benevolent Society for their tireless fundraising in the past. When the building was transferred to the Town of Brookline in 2014, a $30,000 repair fund accompanied it. Without this tremendous head start we would have had to start from scratch and would not have accomplished what we did in 2016. The Brookline Meetinghouse advisory committee invites you to attend our meetings, join our committee, help with upcoming events or work bees. We anticipate many exciting events in the coming year and hope that you will be a part of it. The Brookline Meetinghouse Advisory Committee: Mark Bills, Kerry Bourne, Bruce Mello, Peter Meyer, Lee Anne Parker and Helen Samuels



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Town Clerk’s Report

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he winds of change are blowing – year 2016 will go into the record books for many reasons. It started with one of the warmest winters since records have been kept. Most winter sports enthusiasts and oil delivery companies were feeling pretty depressed. A.S. Clark & Sons probably put more salt and sand down then they did plowing, but as usual they did a great job in keeping our roads open and safe. We had a relatively good maple sap gathering season in spite of the roller coaster spring. Speaking of spring, Town Meeting/Presidential Primary day we were greeted by a power outage that lasted all morning and by the time power came back on around 12:15 p.m., all 41 hearty souls at town meeting were beginning to show the stress signs of having no heat. We had one of the first cold “hot” buffets that I can remember, but for the most part we just adapted and got on with it. After all, “we are Vermonters” and the food was still really good! Mud Season was short lived, but taken care of by our experienced Highway Department. You know the drill – gravel, gravel and just a little more gravel. Finally, after a real cold start to April (killing most of the apple tree buds), Easter Sunday was here and the kids from town enjoyed the Great Easter Egg Hunt, put on by the O’Donnell clan. Approximately 25 children enjoyed themselves searching for eggs and turning them in for prizes. It truly is a Brookline Spring ritual and a big thank you to the Brookline Community Group for supplying the eggs and gifts. Green Up Day was well attended and David Jones took over the helm as the new Green Up Day Coordinator and he did an excellent job. Thanks Dave. As spring wanes, things really started getting busy for the Highway Department. Road Commissioner, Archie Clark, and Road Foreman, Mark Bills, were kept busy applying for grants and completing repairs prior to paving. Grading of the dirt roads after a relatively easy mud season, trimming trees, repair and replacement of culverts and the real big push of repaving close to 75% of our roads. Archie had applied for and was successful in receiving a $175,000 grant, after a number of years of rejection. Our roads are in great shape and the future 34

looks good for the other 25% that may be addressed in 2017. The town had a good and somewhat dry summer. A few real warm days, but for the most part a normal Vermont summer. The town office was the center of activity this year, with four different Australian ballot voting events – February, Leland & Gray Budget Vote; March, Presidential Primary; August, State Primary and November the General Election. We have transitioned to almost all things being digital and electronic, including the reporting of the voting. We have new property transfer tax returns software, increase of marriage license fees, increase of hunting license fees, increase of dog license fees that were all mandated by the State of Vermont. The town is very fortunate to have four high powered computers and all are on the Windows 10 platform. The Town Clerk’s Office has recorded 547 pages of land records; 26 property transfer tax returns; 6 current land use permits; 2 curb cut permits; sold 134 dog licenses; 2 marriage licenses; processed 10 excess weight permits and 10 hunting licenses. The work horse of the office, the printer/copy machine, made 22,296 copies/prints. As most know, we monitor all e-mails and telephone messages daily. We may only be open two days a week (Tuesday and Thursday 9-2), but most of you know my car and if you see it parked at the office on off hours, you know you can stop in and that you will be helped. Some people have even called me at home - the fact is that we are never too far away to address your concerns. We may be a small town with limited resources, but we are always connected one way or the other. November of this year saw one of the highest voter turnouts in modern history with the Presidential election, the town having a 75% turnout. It proved to be a pretty hectic time in our office with the final lights going out around 12:15 a.m. Special thanks to Cynthia Nau, Marsha Omand and Gwen Tanza who were there from start to finish – a long 15 hr day. Also deserving praise are the Board of Civil Authority (BCA) members who assisted in the long night of counting ballots. It certainly was one for the record books.

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Town Clerk’s Report (cont’d) As December arrived, it was that time of the year when everyone works even harder – budget season. Our town has faced many challenges this year. Some we were able to control and some just got away from us. Legal fees took a big chunk of change out of us, but the good news is the town did prevail! I cannot think of anything more important as protecting your assets. The town did that well, but the price proved costly. The challenges of being a landlord (as the town now owns the school, church, round school house, town garage and the town office) has escalated due to a number of factors, including insurance, heat, utilities and normal wear and tear. As mentioned earlier, the winds of change are blowing. On a more pleasant note, I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of you who have made my job just a little bit easier. Our selectboard has done an incredible job this term and deserve our respect and gratitude for a job well done. As a town, between our website, www.brooklinevt. com and videotaping of most meetings, we have reached a level of true transparency. There is no reason for anyone not to know what is going on and how we got there. The Brookline Meeting House Committee have had great success in their attempts at receiving grants and in their fund raising campaigns. Our Listers continue their incredible job of maintaining our Grand List. Somara Zwick, our Treasurer, and her Assistants, Louise Sirois and Marie Tattersall, all do a remarkable job of making sure our town finances are carefully



controlled and in total compliance with all tax and banking laws. Our Planning Commission is doing their due diligence in preparing us for our new town plan due in 2018. My Assistant Clerk, Gwen, who just happens to be my wife (for those of you out there that wonder why she corrects me from time to time), I cannot say enough good about her. Her computer and administrative skills add another dimension that is so important to a system now mostly digital/electronic. To all of you – Thank You, Thank You. I look forward to your continued support. As my friend, Vinny Linguine would say, “Let’s go to Ricks!” Regards, Guy Tanza Town Clerk

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Delinquent Tax Report as of December 31, 2016 Delinquent Tax Report as of December 31, 2016

The Town of Brookline is very pleased to report that there are no delinquent taxes as of December 31, 2016.

Vital Records BIRTHS DATE

NAME OF CHILD

SEX

PARENTS

February 26, 2016...... Dylan Lawrence Reno.............................................M..........Leigh-Anne Reno Terry James Reno, Sr. May 22, 2016.............. Cora Winter Cusma................................................F ..........Amy Marie Cusma Jess William Winter July 3, 2016................. Abigail Joelle LeBlanc.............................................F...........Carly Judith LeBlanc David Charles LeBlanc

MARRIAGES DATE

BRIDE

GROOM

March 19, 2016................. Nancy Powers Caldwell........................... Peter Chase Libby

DEATHS DATE NAME

AGE

March 19, 2016..................Lori Clark Amidon....................... 57 May 12, 2016.....................Trevor Nathan Moore................... 30 May 22, 2016.....................William (Billy) J. Pagach.............. 63 July 30, 2016......................Mitchell A. Ellison........................ 60 September 5, 2016.............Gloria Hope Rouleau.................... 87 October 11, 2016...............Betsey Shaw Regan........................ 95

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PLACE Brookline, VT

Regulations Governing Dog Ownership REGULATIONS GOVERNING DOG OWNERSHIP All dogs or wolf-hybrids six (6) months or older must be licensed by April 1, 2017. Fees are as follows: Before April 1, 2017 Spayed/Neutered or wolf-hybrid…9.00 Unneutered dog or wolf-hybrid…13.00

After April 1, 2017: Spayed/Neutered or wolf-hybrid…11.00 Unneutered dog or wolf-hybrid… 17.00

These fees include $5.00 that is sent to the State: $1.00 goes to the State Rabies Program and $4.00 goes to the States Spay/Neutering Program. Any dog not licensed by May 30, 2017 the owner will be charged a $50.00 fine per animal, according to the Brookline Dog Ordinance. A copy of the ordinance is on file at the Town Office. Dogs or wolf-hybrids over 3 months of age shall be vaccinated against rabies. The initial vaccination shall be valid for 12 months. Within 9-12 months of the initial vaccination the animal shall receive a booster that will be valid for 36 months. A copy of the rabies certificate will be given to the Town Clerk upon licensing the animal. There will be a Rabies Clinic at the NewBrook Fire Department, Route 30, Newfane, VT on Saturday, March 25, 2017 from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. All animals must be either on a leash or in a cage. The following is a summary of the fees collected in 2016 by the Town of Brookline.

Spayed Female Male Neutered

Qty 62 9 12 51

Town 248.00 72.00 96.00 204.00

State 310.00 45.00 60.00 255.00

Late Fees 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00

Total

134

$620.00

$670.00

$16.00

Total 562.00 121.00 160.00 463.00 1306.00

RABIES ALERT

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Rabies is a disease that can kill animals and people. Vermont law requires rabies shots for all CATS and DOGS Rabies shots help protect pets and pet owners from rabies. Enjoy wildlife from a safe distance. Remember, rabid animals have been found in all Vermont counties. Questions? Call the Vermont Rabies Hotline: 1.800.472.2437

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WCSU Superintendent’s Report Windham Central Supervisory Union Superintendent’s Letter 2017 The Windham Central Supervisory Union (WCSU) is in the midst of great challenge and opportunity. All school district members and community representatives in the WCSU have participated in our two Act 46​ ​Study Committees. One committee created Articles of Agreement and a report for the Leland and Gray towns (Brookline, Jamaica, Newfane, Townshend, and Windham). The other committee created Articles of Agreement and a report for the towns of Dover, Marlboro, and Wardsboro. All the members of the study committee worked diligently to ask tough questions, seek answers, and ultimately create a new governance structure on which citizens of each town will vote on March 7th. With declining enrollment statewide, as well as in many of the towns in the WCSU, creating sustainable structures for the future of education in our communities is difficult. However, we are all up to the task. With these real challenges comes opportunity and the potential for evolution. There is a sense of excitement and positivity about the direction our schools and our supervisory union are currently taking. Many changes have already occurred. We have a new Superintendent, a new Business Manager, a new Director of Curriculum, a new Information Technology Director, a retiring Special Education Director, a new Middle/High School principal, a new elementary principal, a new teaching principal and three retiring elementary principals. The collaboration between this influx of new people and our existing staff has created a synergy of talent, dedication and wisdom. We are showing our respect and appreciation for our foundation while moving forward to build our future. We are fortunate to have so much support from all of our communities. The WCSU has been selected to participate in a grant opportunity offered by the Vermont Agency of Education. We will be receiving consulting services and an audit of our Special Education Services. We believe this study will provide us with data that will help us strategically deploy resources in a more effective manner. I encourage everyone to participate in the information sessions for current budgets and the proposed new governance structures. No one can be sure where the WCSU will land on March 8th, but I am confident that the leadership of the individual school boards, the WCSU board, our principals, and the teachers and staff of the WCSU are ready to embrace the challenge. Thank you for supporting our schools. William Anton, WCSU Superintendent of Schools

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WCSU Proposed Fiscal Year 2018 Budget



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WCSU Proposed Fiscal Year 2018 Budget (cont’d)

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Special Education Budget



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NewBrook Elementary Principal’s Report NewBrook Elementary Principal’s Report December 23, 2016 Introduction I have been the principal at NewBrook Elementary School for the past two-and-a-half school years. I love working at NewBrook; I enjoy forming relationships with our students and staff and the families that make up our community. NewBrook students are thoughtful, kind and fun and their families are supportive and involved in their school life. As members of the NewBrook staff, we work together with purpose. We enjoy our students and make decisions with the children in mind. I am thankful for the support and feedback that members of the NewBrook staff have offered me and for the relationships that they form and maintain with one another and with the children and families that we together serve. I feel very lucky to be working in a school and supervisory union that attracts such high quality and student-centered staff. I also am thankful to work in the beautiful West River Valley. Staffing, Professional Development and Curriculum We hired some excellent new staff this year: Mr. Brady Andersen, our new Special Educator, Mr. Andrew Worden, our new physical education teacher and Ms. Marisa Pisani, our new classroom para-educator. Mr. Worden has been accepted into an officer training program in the United States Marine Core, and though we will miss him, we are all very proud of him and thankful for his service to country. Gia Casella, our afterschool program coordinator, will be facilitating our physical education classes for the balance of the school year. Mr. Ryan Cutting will also be joining us in January of 2017. He will be our new Academic Support teacher, working part time to help us to appropriately intervene with every student we serve. Last spring, the NewBrook Leadership Team recommended that we re-assign one of our upper level teachers to the first grade in order to better serve our large first grade class of 23 children. We formed two balanced groups of our first graders and both classrooms are inviting places for the children to learn and grow together. Ms. Paradis took on this challenging re-assignment with delight. We are very proud of our 2016-17 master schedule, which we developed over the second half of the last school year. Our schedule includes skills blocks for all grade levels. We dedicate these blocks of time to intervention and enrichment. Vertical teams were created in order to allow staff to best serve our students in our skills blocks, clustered in grade bands, as follows: K-1, 2-3, 4 and 5-6. Our staff benefit from weekly common planning time in order to plan for appropriate groupings for enrichment and intervention, using a “all hands on deck” approach, including the classroom teachers, our special education staff and our interventionists. On the supervisory union level, we have made some fundamental changes in our WCSU office staff. Mr. Bill Anton is our new superintendent. Mr. Anton was Principal of the Year while working at The Dover School and as our superintendent is continuing to illustrate his dedication to providing all children and educators with opportunities to grow and be successful. Ms. Jen McKusick is our new WCSU Director of Curriculum. In this new position, Ms. McKusick is working as a support for our schools as we work to improve our service to children. Our new WCSU Business Manager, Ms. Laurie Garland, hit the ground running and has been a great support to NewBrook as we planned our budget, our kitchen renovation project and our solar project. Mr. Anton and his staff are hard at work to further unify the WCSU member schools, creating efficiencies and supporting our structures for professional learning, while recognizing the individual goals and personalities of the communities to which each member school is in service.

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NewBrook Elementary Principal’s Report (cont’d) Communication and Technology We are continuing to find new ways to utilize technology in order to enhance instruction and to support communication. Universal computer access (1:1 computing) allows NewBrook teachers to utilize web-based lessons and software, Gmail communication and age-appropriate, cloud-based editing processes. Hoping to improve communication with our community, we continue to update the NewBrook School website and FaceBook page regularly with posts that include celebrations, announcements, photos and other important dates. Our use of the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC) web-based assessment continues to evolve. Vermont joined with a group of other states to develop the next generation of educational tests for both Literacy and Mathematics. The SBAC is aligned with the Common Core State Standards, uses the latest computer adaptive testing technologies and will provide a range of summative, interim and formative tools that we will be able to use for a variety of educational purposes. For the past two years, we have utilized the interim SBAC assessment with our students as part of our WCSU-wide assessment plan. Our staff uses this formative data, along with other local and nationally normed assessments, as a tool to create their student groupings and to track each student’s progress. Along with these nationally-normed assessments, NewBrook staff regularly offer our students a wide array of ways that they can show what they have learned, appealing to our broad group of learners. We are planning two technology safety trainings this spring, one for our elder students and one in the evening for families and community members. School Climate and Enrichment Programs The staff at NewBrook is dedicated to maintaining a school climate in which all children are comfortable and available to learn. Our school-wide expectations are clear: We are Safe, We are Engaged, We are Respectful. By focusing upon these three simple guiding principles, we all measure our behaviors and attitudes accordingly. At NewBrook, we regularly acknowledge students and teachers for their accomplishments, while providing varied opportunities for parents, families and community members to take part in our programming on a regular basis. During our monthly All-School Sings, we take the time to acknowledge our students. We read the names of all of the students who have been given Falcon Awards during the month. Falcon Awards are mailed home in recognition of students for their acts of kindness or their academic accomplishments. During our All-School Sings, we also recognize our Student of the Month, chosen by our staff. Each of our specials teachers award students who have been especially engaged in our broad range of enriching opportunities. We even award a classroom with the Golden Plunger, as a thanks for their exceptional tidiness. I give the Principal’s Award as well, in acknowledgement of student leadership and service to school. For staff, our Golden Apple is a peer recognition award that is passed monthly between staff. Parents, guardians and members of the community are welcome to attend our All-School Sings, which are posted outside the school, on our website and on our Facebook page. We plan our eight week Winter Sports Program on Wednesdays beginning in January. We offer ice skating in Brattleboro, skiing/snowboarding at Stratton, cross-country skiing at Grafton and snowshoeing and rock climbing at NewBrook. This year, some of our youngest students will be taking part in nature activities led by visiting staff from the Bonnyvale Environmental Education Center. Children who take part in the Stratton program receive a season lift pass at Stratton and ALL NewBrook students are eligible for a free season pass at Mount Snow! Our Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports work continues. PBiS is a proactive, school-wide, systems approach to improving social and academic competence for all students. We plan school-wide incentives and celebrations for our students and collect behavioral data to allow pre-emptive decision-making.



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NewBrook Elementary Principal’s Report (cont’d) We also teach our students the specifics of the Bullying, Hazing & Harassment law in our classrooms every fall. We are planning our annual Diversity Week in January, our school-wide theme week intended to encourage our students to consider a wide range of issues surrounding human difference in our country. Ms. Suzanne Paugh, our art teacher, wrote a grant and hired an artist in residence to work with our students on a project that will become a permanent installation at NewBrook. We will have many small-group sessions, run by school staff and guests. Ms. Anderberg, our school chef, is planning to widen our palates with foods from around the world. As we have for the past two years, Diversity Week will culminate with a student drumming performance led by a guest musician and educator, Mr. Todd Roach. Our fifth graders spend a week at Keewaydin Environmental Education Center (KEEC) every spring. This five day, four night trip is paid for with local funds. KEEC offers hands-on, experiential learning in a variety of natural habitats, all within only a few miles of their campus in Salisbury, Vermont. Our sixth graders fund raise all year to pay for their Sixth Grade Trip, which is a two night three day educational experience in beautiful Montreal. Thanks to Ms. VanPamelen for all of her efforts to make this wonderful experience happen for our students. Our Spelling Bee Team always participates effectively and competitively in the WCSU spelling bee! A Twenty-First Century Grant funds the majority of our after school program, L’AFTER, which is a critical part of our school’s programming. We offer a healthy snack, guided homework support and a wide variety of educational and enriching activities and programming. L’AFTER activities are taught by community members and school staff. Our Educational Support Team is a voluntary committee whose goal is to support struggling students, their families and their teachers. We meet weekly to create immediately actionable plans, to pair students with outside supports and to brainstorm and share practices. Community Our annual Open House and Potluck Dinner, on September 29, was well-attended and solely positive. Staff relayed information about communications, homework and classwork expectations. Teachers shared student work and elaborated on units in progress and curricular information. The people of Brookline and Newfane are excellent cooks! Our Farm to School Committee planned our third annual Community Farm and Field Day on November 4, 2016. Our students learned about the origins of our food, composting, vermiculture, and the history of food preservation. They tasted a wide variety of foods, created art projects and played field games. Our students played a waste-sorting relay race with a member of the Windham Solid Waste Management District staff. Community members volunteered to bake pizzas in the adobe pizza oven that we built two years ago. We celebrated at the end of the day singing together. Our fourth annual Harvest Celebration and Art Show, on November 17, was very well-attended and superfun. We packed the multi-purpose room with our students, their families and friends. Our staff made soup, our PTO provided desserts and we listened to live music while featuring our students’ art work. We are hosting monthly Milk & Cookies & Stories events with Brookline and Newfane children who are not yet attending Kindergarten. We meet in the NewBrook Elementary School Library and enjoy milk and cookies and a story read by the school Principal! Our intention is to encourage these families to build relationships with one another and to invite new families into our educational community.

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NewBrook Elementary Principal’s Report (cont’d) NewBrook students reach out to the community by taking part in a Food Drive for the Townshend Food Shelf and Project Feed the Thousands. Our UNICEF fundraising was a huge success as well. Energy Committee Update On October 23, 2014, the Brookline and Newfane voters passed two articles that “give the Brookline/Newfane Joint Board the ability (1) to enter into a Solar Net Metering Credit Purchase Agreement for up to 20 years and (2) to install a new air-to-air heat pump system financed through a municipal loan of up to $330,000.” Our progress is as follows: HVAC Project  

ARC Mechanical installed 23 air-to-air heat pump units and the necessary piping, control wiring and electric. They installed 4 condenser units, two to the south of the building and two to the east of the building as well as two fresh air units on the eastern slope of our roof line. In February of 2016, we began heating our building with these new units and then took the edge off of the humid summer air in June.

Solar Project A contract with SunEdison was signed on October 2, 2015. However, as you may be aware, SunEdison declared bankruptcy in April and is currently restructuring. On November 9, 2016 the members of the NewBrook Energy Committee met with a representative of Vesco Energy Services, based in South Burlington, whom SunEdison has contracted to oversee our permitting process. We are excited to report that SunEdison expects our solar project will proceed according to the following timeline: November, 2016 - 45 Day Notice filed December, 2016 - CPG Application Submitted March, 2017 - Permits Approved April, 2017 - Construction Start May 2017 - Modules on Site July 2017 - Interim Completion and Interconnection Approved August 2017 - Final Closing Kitchen Improvements and Offering We are in the process of developing a kitchen facility improvement plan. We plan to work within our budget and capital savings to make the kitchen improvements necessary to enable us to purchase and process more local foods and to further reduce our non-recyclable waste. We are collaborating with a local design company who is working with us to create a phased plan to expand and improve our kitchen. We are considering leasing a small, commercial dishwasher and purchasing an additional prep sink and prep table. For the third year in a row we were awarded a Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program USDA Grant for the 2015-2016 school year. This money allows us to provide a daily fresh fruit and vegetable snack to every student, at no cost to families during our morning snack time. We serve breakfast and lunch as well.



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NewBrook Elementary Principal’s Report (cont’d) 2017-18 Budget The administration proposed this FY18 budget in order to continue to create a school experience for every NewBrook student that will results in their academic, social and emotional progress. The request would provide us with the ability to meet the needs of each child while caring for the investments that have been made in the past. I would like to highlight the following:  

 

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Our budget includes an increase for our high quality afterschool program, L’AFTER. Our 21st Century Grant funding is waning and we are responsible for additional local funding this year. The new Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) includes more specific direction around the spending of our federal Title I grant funds. To be compliant, we need to fund our Information Technology (IT) position with local funds and hire a .5 FTE licensed Academic Support teacher to be paid with our Title I funding. Our Special Education spending has increased due to our growing case load. We hired a second Special Educator for FY17 and have budgeted for the position again in FY18. With the passing of Act 148 all Special Education revenues will be paid to the central office. The expense that you see in the NewBrook budget is a “net” cost of special education. NewBrook’s total Special Education expenses for FY 18 are estimated to be a 31% increase from FY 17. In order to be compliant with Act 166, we are proposing $93,000 for FY18 to cover the cost of 10 hours of pre-K per week for the three and four year olds in Brookline and Newfane. The mandated waste management program is costing us an extra $2,000 per year. We need to have a compost dumpster along with our trash and recycling dumpsters. Closing Statement

Again, I would like to thank the entire NewBrook community for all of the support I have received as your Principal. We are all quite proud of our smooth opening to the 2016-17 school year and we will continue to move forward as a school, providing our students with the essential skills for success in today’s world. The proposed budget will allow us to deliver our balanced, skill-based curriculum while supporting the essential and enriching initiatives already in place. Please visit our website (newbrookschool.org) or our Facebook page for regular updates, event notices and news items. If you can, please join us for one of our monthly All-School Sings to get a flavor for the great things that NewBrook has to offer. Please do not hesitate to call or e-mail me to set up an appointment if you have any questions or concerns or if you would like to tour the building. I have time for you! The school staff and I are looking forward to a wonderful second semester with the children of Brookline and Newfane. Thank you all for your support as we work with the children that you entrust to us. Sincerely,

Scotty Tabachnick School Principal

Please

us on FaceBook for updates! www.newbrookschool.org

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2018 Proposed Brookline School Budget



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Three Prior Years Comparison

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Three Prior Years Comparison (cont’d)



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Dedication 2016 Town Report Is Dedicated to the Brookline Meeting House Advisory Committee Members.

T

he Select board is very lucky to have such an active group of people volunteering their time and energy on the revitalization of our beautiful historic 1836 church building, now known as The Brookline Meeting House. The building was deeded to the Town of Brookline by the Brookline Ladies’ Benevolent Society as that group of women was disbanding. With the building now the town’s responsibility, a small group of residents established the Brookline Meeting House Advisory Committee. With the support of the select board and generous donations over the past few years as well as the money saved up by the Ladies Benevolent Society much work has been done on this town jewel. Currently the committee is chaired by Peter Meyer but originally Stan Noga was the chairperson. There are five other active members working together to get grants researched and bids processed. Bruce Mello (liaison to the select board), Kerry Bourne, Helen Samuels, Lee Ann Parker and Mark Bills make up the current committee. The best way to fully grasp the scope of the work already done on the building is to review the agendas and minutes for the meetings which are posted on the town’s website. Their progress has been remarkable and for this reason, the 2016 Town Report is dedicated to them. The group meets during the warmer months in the Meeting House every other Tuesday on opposite weeks from the select board meetings. Since the building is not heated, the meetings are held at the Town Hall during the colder months. The meeting schedule is reduced during the winter months but agendas are posted online if anyone is interested in sitting in with the group as they actively plan the next project or two. Past projects that have been completed include making sure the land under the church and the school building are properly recorded in the deeds. Stan Noga helped get that detail done when the building was first transferred to the town. Structural repairs which stabilized the steeple began in the crawlspace under the floor of the sanctuary right on 50

through to the queen posts and trusses in the attic area. This major project eliminated the tilt in the steeple and leveled out the floor of the building. While the roof is still being improved, there was some slate patching done on the north side of the building with slate obtained from Craigslist. One of the most visible projects to date was the window repair done this past summer. Eleven windows were removed, broken panes were replaced with period glass obtained from EBay and the wood was properly primed, installed and painted. The Advisory Committee ran a very successful Sponsor a Window campaign which was well supported. Mold was treated, bat guano was cleaned up, and landscaping has been started. Volunteers met and cut back brush to open up the south border of the property. The committee raised money by auctioning off the 1.5 cords of mixed hardwood that was cut during the cleanup. One of the upcoming projects will be the repair of the belfry roof and pinnacle balustrades. The committee successfully applied for and earned a matching grant from the State Preservation Trust which will help pay for this project. A donor has made a restrictive gift of $1,000.00 to make improvements in the current kitchen in the building. The vintage floor and appliances along with the plumbing date back to the 1950’s. The bathroom is not ADA compliant nor are there any wheelchair ramps into the building yet. The community room has a drop ceiling that needs some attention and the chimney could certainly use some repointing to start with. The Brookline Meeting House Advisory Committee envision the building evolving into a space where various activities can occur. There is talk of us using the building to put on plays, hosting musical events, and even eventually being able to have our annual Town Meeting held there. So far two weddings have been celebrated in the sanctuary, and a 4-H demonstration on horse care was held the community room. Family celebrations, graduation parties, ice cream socials on the lawn are all possible examples of what the future may hold for this beautiful building. The Brookline Community Group has raised money to support these types of events in town. The Meeting House committee has also held a

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Dedication (cont’d) trick or treat night this past Halloween to get people to stop by and see the inside of the building and to encourage more residents to get involved. You are invited to join this devoted group of volunteers at any time. Do you have a few hours a month to help out? Contact Peter Meyer and let him know of your interest. This is OUR building, it can be whatever we want it to be. The committee is proud to say that the work being done is from donation, not your tax dollar.

The Select board wants to again thank the members of the Brookline Meeting House Advisory Committee for all of their hard work, devotion and care shown in the preservation of our historic church building. Your drive and accomplishments have made such a difference and it is much appreciated. Thank you… Thank you… Thank you!

In Memory

I

n Memory of… In the past we have made note of one or two residents who passed away during the year. This year our vital records page listed the births of three babies and the death of six of our neighbors. It was so sad to learn that two young residents of Brookline passed away after fighting cancer for many years. Lori Amidon was only 57 when she died in March. Her five-year battle against cancer ended peacefully with her loving husband Sam at her side. We shall miss seeing her horses peacefully graze in their field at the base of Putney Mountain. She is missed by all who knew her. We were all very saddened when Trevor Moore lost his battle against cancer. He fought hard and long, seventeen years to be exact after being diagnosed. While we shall remember his sense of humor and love of everything outdoors and of course his dogs, it is heartbreaking to all those who survived Trevor to see his life end at 30 years of age. Much too young. Only ten days later, Bill Pagach passed away with his wife of 42 years by his side. How do you explain to his three grandchildren and his many nieces, nephews and cousins that he will no longer be able to take them hunting and fishing? Those who gathered at his life celebration made donations to the NewBrook Junior Fire & Rescue in his name ensuring his memory lives on.



Mitchell Ellson passed away in the summer. A carpenter who was able to demonstrate Yankee ingenuity when he built things and a man who loved his family dearly. Again, a neighbor who passed away but is remembered fondly by many. Gloria Rouleau passed away at her home in Brookline. She led a full life serving as an honest and committed worker. Gloria enjoyed the simple things in life like her favorite TV shows and of course her loving grandchildren and greatgrandchildren. May she rest in peace. When Betsey Regan passed away this fall, she left a legacy of service behind her. Born in 1921, Betsey lived a very long and service-oriented life. She was a nurse who retired in our little town of Brookline. It was here that she gave of her time and talents knitting hats for children, playing music for anyone to enjoy and working on projects with the Ladies’ Aid Society. She too had the pleasure of spoiling her many grandchildren and great-grandchildren. We miss her. While you pause to think of those who have passed on this year, we are happy to welcome the three newest residents born in 2016. Dylan, Cora and Abigail. May their memories of growing up in Brookline be filled with happiness, love and an appreciation of what it means to be a part of a caring community.

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Notes

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Notes



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Town of Brookline P.O. Box 403 736 Grassy Brook Road Brookline, Vermont 05345

Prsrt Mkt U.S. Postage PAID W. Chesterfield NH Permit 1