Barrick Gold Corporation - cloudfront.net

Barrick Gold Corporation - cloudfront.net

   UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549     Form 6-K     REPORT OF FOREIGN PRIVATE ISSUER PURSUANT TO RULE 13...

6MB Sizes 2 Downloads 60 Views

  

UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

 

Form 6-K  

 

REPORT OF FOREIGN PRIVATE ISSUER PURSUANT TO RULE 13a-16 OR 15d-16 UNDER THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 For the month of March 2016 Commission File Number: 1-9059

 

 

Barrick Gold Corporation (Registrant’s name)

 

  Brookfield Place, TD Canada Trust Tower, Suite 3700 161 Bay Street, P.O. Box 212 Toronto, Ontario M5J 2S1 Canada

 

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant files or will file annual reports under cover of Form 20-F or Form 40-F. Form 20-F   ¨             Form 40-F   x Indicate by check mark if the registrant is submitting the Form 6-K in paper as permitted by Regulation S-T Rule 101(b)(1):   ¨ Indicate by check mark if the registrant is submitting the Form 6-K in paper as permitted by Regulation S-T Rule 101(b)(7):   ¨     

SIGNATURES Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

    BARRICK GOLD CORPORATION Date: March 28, 2016

  By:                        /s/ Richie Haddock     Name:           Richie Haddock     Title:   Senior Vice President and       General Counsel

EXHIBIT

  Exhibit  

Description of Exhibit

99.1   

Technical Report on the Cortez Joint Venture Operations, Lander and Eureka Counties, State of Nevada, U.S.A.

Exhibit 99.1

 

BARRICK GOLD CORPORATION

   

TECHNICAL REPORT ON THE CORTEZ JOINT VENTURE OPERATIONS, LANDER AND EUREKA COUNTIES, STATE OF NEVADA, U.S.A. NI 43-101 Report Qualified Persons: Kathleen Ann Altman, Ph.D., P.E. R. Dennis Bergen, P.Eng. Stuart Collins, P.E. Chester Moore, P.Eng. Wayne Valliant, P.Geo.

  March 21, 2016  

RPA Inc. 55 University Ave. Suite 501   |   Toronto, ON, Canada M5J 2H7   |    T + 1 (416) 947 0907    www.rpacan.com

Report Control Form  

Document Title

Technical Report on the Cortez Operations, State of Nevada, U.S.A.     

Client Name & Address

 

Barrick Gold Corporation Brookfield Place, TD Canada Trust Tower Suite 3700, 161 Bay Street, P.O. Box 212   Toronto, Ontario M5J 2S1  

  Document Reference

  

  Project#2471                        

 

   

Issue Date

  March 21, 2016   Wayne Valliant Dennis Bergen Stuart Collins Chester Moore   Kathleen A. Altman

Lead Author

  Status &  Issue No.

  

  

 

 

  FINAL       Version                                                 

   

         

  

          (Signed)  (Signed) (Signed) (Signed)   (Signed)

   

 

 

 

   

 

Deborah McCombe  

 

 

Project Manager Approval      

 

   

 

 

 

Project Director Approval  

 

   

 

 

  Report Distribution

 

  

 

 

   

 

   

 

 

 

 

   

  No. of Copies

 

 

 

(Signed)

  Name

 

(Signed)

 

Graham Clow

 

(Signed)

 

Wayne Valliant  

     

 

 

Peer Reviewer

 

 

  

  Client

 

 

  RPA Filing

 

 

 

 

 

1 (project box)  

Roscoe Postle Associates Inc.





55 University Avenue, Suite 501       Toronto, ON M5J 2H7       Canada       Tel: +1 416 947 0907       Fax: +1 416 947 0395       [email protected]       

FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION This  report  contains  forward-looking  statements.  All  statements,  other  than  statements  of  historical  fact  regarding  Barrick  or  Cortez,  are  forward-looking statements. The words “believe”, “expect”, “anticipate”, “contemplate”, “target”, “plan”, “intend”, “project”, “continue”, “budget”, “estimate”, “potential”, “may”, “will”, “can”, “could” and similar expressions identify forward-looking statements. In particular, this report contains forward-looking statements with respect to cash flow forecasts, projected capital, operating and exploration expenditure, targeted cost reductions, mine life and production rates, potential mineralization and metal or mineral recoveries, and information pertaining to potential improvements to financial and operating performance and mine life at the Cortez mine that may result from the Cortez Underground Expansion Project and certain other Value Realization Initiatives. All forward-looking statements in this report are necessarily based on opinions and estimates made as of the date such statements are made and are subject to important risk factors and uncertainties, many of which cannot be controlled or predicted. Material assumptions regarding forward-looking statements are discussed in this report, where applicable. In addition to such assumptions, the  forward-looking  statements  are  inherently  subject  to  significant  business,  economic  and  competitive  uncertainties  and  contingencies.  Known  and  unknown factors  could  cause  actual  results  to  differ  materially  from  those  projected  in  the  forward-looking  statements.  Such  factors  include,  but  are  not  limited  to: fluctuations in the spot and forward price of commodities (including gold, copper, silver, diesel fuel, natural gas and electricity); the speculative nature of mineral exploration  and  development;  changes  in  mineral  production  performance,  exploitation  and  exploration  successes;  risks  associated  with  the  fact  that  the  Cortez Underground Expansion  Project  and  certain  other  Value  Realization  Initiatives  are  still  in  the  early  stages  of  evaluation  and  additional  engineering  and  other analysis  is  required  to  fully  assess  their  impact;  diminishing  quantities  or  grades  of  reserves;  increased  costs,  delays,  suspensions,  and  technical  challenges associated with the construction of capital projects; operating or technical difficulties in connection with mining or development activities, including disruptions in the  maintenance  or  provision  of  required  infrastructure  and  information  technology  systems;  damage  to  Barrick’s  or  Cortez’s  reputation  due  to  the  actual  or perceived  occurrence  of  any  number  of  events,  including  negative  publicity  with  respect  to  the  handling  of  environmental  matters  or  dealings  with  community groups,  whether  true  or  not;  risk  of  loss  due  to  acts  of  war,  terrorism,  sabotage  and  civil  disturbances;  uncertainty  whether  the  Cortez  Underground  Expansion Project or any of the other Value Realization Initiatives will meet Barrick’s capital allocation objectives; the impact of global liquidity and credit availability on the timing  of  cash  flows  and  the  values  of  assets  and  liabilities  based  on  projected  future  cash  flows;  the  impact  of  inflation;  fluctuations  in  the  currency  markets; changes  in  interest  rates;  changes  in  national  and  local  government  legislation,  taxation,  controls  or  regulations  and/or  changes  in  the  administration  of  laws, policies  and  practices,  expropriation  or  nationalization  of  property  and  political  or  economic  developments  in  the  United  States;  failure  to  comply  with environmental and health and safety laws and regulations; timing of receipt of, or failure to comply with, necessary permits and approvals; litigation; contests over title  to  properties  or  over  access  to  water,  power  and  other  required  infrastructure;  increased  costs  and  physical  risks,  including  extreme  weather  events  and resource shortages, related to climate change; and availability and increased costs associated with mining inputs and labor. In addition, there are risks and hazards associated  with  the  business  of  mineral  exploration,  development  and  mining,  including  environmental  hazards,  industrial  accidents,  unusual  or  unexpected formations, pressures, cave-ins, flooding and gold bullion, copper cathode or gold or copper concentrate losses (and the risk of inadequate insurance, or inability to obtain insurance, to cover these risks). Many of these uncertainties and contingencies can affect Barrick’s actual results and could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied in any forward-looking statements made by, or on behalf of, Barrick. All of the forward-looking statements made in this report are qualified by these cautionary statements.  Barrick  and  RPA  and  the  Qualified  Persons  who  authored  this  report  undertake  no  obligation  to  update  publicly  or  otherwise  revise  any  forwardlooking statements whether as a result of new information or future events or otherwise, except as may be required by law.

 

  

www.rpacan.com

TABLE OF CONTENTS

   

  

1 SUMMARY  Executive Summary  Technical Summary

              

PAGE  

1-1   1-1   1-9  

2 INTRODUCTION

    

2-1  

3 RELIANCE ON OTHER EXPERTS

    

3-1  

4 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION AND LOCATION  Land Tenure  Royalties

              

4-1   4-1   4-2  

5 ACCESSIBILITY, CLIMATE, LOCAL RESOURCES, INFRASTRUCTURE AND PHYSIOGRAPHY  Accessibility  Climate  Local Resources  Infrastructure  Physiography

                 

           

5-1   5-1   5-1   5-2   5-2   5-3  

6 HISTORY

    

6-1  

7 GEOLOGICAL SETTING AND MINERALIZATION  Regional Geology  Local Geology  Property Geology  Mineralization

              

8 DEPOSIT TYPES

    

8-1  

9 EXPLORATION  Exploration Potential

         

9-1   9-1  

10 DRILLING  Reverse Circulation Drilling Methods  Core Drilling Methods  Conventional and Mud Drilling Methods  Collar Surveys  Down Hole Surveys  Sample Recovery  Geotechnical and Hydrological Drilling  Grade Control Drilling  Mineral Resource Delineation Drilling  Sampling Method and Approach  Bulk Density Determination  Logging, Sampling, and Sample Storage facilities

                                      

  7-1     7-1     7-5     7-9     7-12  

  10-1     10-3     10-3     10-4     10-4     10-4     10-5     10-5     10-6     10-6     10-21     10-25     10-26  

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page i    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

 RPA Comments on Sampling Method and Approach  Quality Assurance and Quality Control  Cortez Laboratory  RPA’s Comments on QA/QC

           

  10-26     10-27     10-31     10-32  

11 SAMPLE PREPARATION, ANALYSES AND SECURITY  Analytical Laboratories  Sample Preparation  Analysis  Sample Security  RPA’S Comments on Sample Preparation, Analysis, and Security

                 

           

11-1   11-1   11-2   11-3   11-4   11-6  

12 DATA VERIFICATION  Databases  Barrick Reviews  External Reviews  RPA Database Review  RPA Opinion

                 

           

12-1   12-1   12-1   12-3   12-3   12-2  

13 MINERAL PROCESSING AND METALLURGICAL TESTING  Introduction  Metallurgical Testing  Ore Routing  Gold Recovery Estimates  Deep South Zone Metallurgical Testing  Summary and Conclusions

                    

             

13-1   13-1   13-1   13-2   13-2   13-7   13-9  

14 MINERAL RESOURCE ESTIMATE  Summary  Pipeline Complex  Cortez Hills Complex  Cortez Pits  Gold Acres

                 

  14-1     14-1     14-2     14-20     14-39     14-43  

15 MINERAL RESERVE ESTIMATE  Summary  Open Pit Mineral Reserves  Underground Mineral Reserves  Reconciliation  RPA Opinion

                 

  15-1     15-1     15-6     15-20     15-26     15-36  

16 MINING METHODS  Recent Production History  Underground Mine  Cortez Life of Mine Plan

           

  16-1     16-1     16-15     16-41  

17 RECOVERY METHODS  Introduction  Oxide Ore Milling  Oxide Ore Heap Leaching

           

       

17-1   17-1   17-1   17-3  

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page ii    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

 Refractory Ore Treatment

     17-4  

18 PROJECT INFRASTRUCTURE  Roads  Tailings Storage Facility  Dumps  Stockpiles  Leach Pads  Power

                    

             

18-1   18-1   18-1   18-1   18-4   18-4   18-4  

19 MARKET STUDIES AND CONTRACTS  Markets  Contracts

     19-1        19-1        19-1  

20 ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES, PERMITTING, AND SOCIAL OR COMMUNITY IMPACT  Environmental Studies  Mine Permitting  Social and Community Requirements  Mine Closure Requirements

              

21 CAPITAL AND OPERATING COSTS  Capital Cost Estimate  Operating Costs

     21-1        21-1        21-2  

22 ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

     22-1  

23 ADJACENT PROPERTIES

     23-1  

24 OTHER RELEVANT DATA AND INFORMATION

     24-1  

25 INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS

     25-1  

26 RECOMMENDATIONS

     26-1  

27 REFERENCES

     27-1  

28 DATE AND SIGNATURE PAGE

     28-1  

29 CERTIFICATE OF QUALIFIED PERSON

     29-1  

  20-1     20-1     20-1     20-9     20-15  

LIST OF TABLES

   

    

   PAGE  

Table 1-1 Table 1-2 Table 1-3 Table 1-4 Table 6-1 Table 6-2 Table 10-1 Table 10-2 Table 10-3

   Mineral Resources – December 31, 2015    Mineral Reserves – December 31, 2015    Capital Costs    LOM Operating Costs    History of Exploration and Mining at Cortez Site    Annual Production, 1969–2015    Drill Hole Types    RC Sample Reduction    Blast Hole Sample Reduction

     1-3        1-4        1-18        1-18        6-2        6-6        10-1        10-22        10-25  

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page iii    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

Table 11-1 Table 13-1 Table 13-2 Table 13-3 Table 13-4 Table 13-5 Table 13-6 Table 13-7 Table 14-1 Table 14-2 Table 14-3 Table 14-4 Table 14-5 Table 14-6 Table 14-7 Table 14-8 Table 14-9 Table 14-10 Table 14-11 Table 14-12 Table 14-13 Table 14-14 Table 14-15 Table 14-16 Table 14-17 Table 14-18 Table 14-19 Table 14-20 Table 14-21 Table 14-22 Table 14-23 Table 14-24 Table 14-25 Table 14-26 Table 15-1 Table 15-2 Table 15-3 Table 15-4 Table 15-5 Table 15-6 Table 15-7 Table 15-8 Table 15-9 Table 15-10 Table 15-11 Table 15-12 Table 15-13 Table 15-14 Table 15-15 Table 16-1 Table 16-2

   Chain of Custody Summary    Cortez Oxide Mill Gold Recovery Equations    Cortez Heap Leach Ultimate Gold Recovery Equations    Refractory Ore Gold Recovery Equations    Production Data 2013-2015    Heap Leach Gold Production    Deep South Zone Test Results (Au Recovery)    Deep South Zone Optimization Samples Analytical Results    Mineral Resource Summary – December 31, 2015    Cortez Mineral Resource Models    Pipeline Complex Mineral Resource Summary – December 31, 2015    Pipeline Complex Mineral Resource Reporting Cut-off Grades    Pipeline Complex Block Model Parameters    Search Ellipse Orientations Of Structural Domains – Pipeline Complex    Summary of Gold Grade Caps – Pipeline Complex    Low Grade Omnidirectional Variogram Models – Pipeline Complex    Estimation Pass Summary – Pipeline Complex    Summary of Composite Weights – Pipeline Complex    Bulk Density – Pipeline Complex    Comparison of Basic Statistics of Gold Values – Pipeline Complex    Cortez Hills Complex Mineral Resource Summary – December 31, 2015    Cortez Hills Complex Mineral Resource Reporting Cut-off Grades    Cortez Hills Complex Block Model Parameters    Cortez Hills Complex CapPing    Cortez Hills Complex - Bulk Density    Cortez Hills Complex - Classification Distance Criteria    Cortez Pits Mineral Resource Summary – December 31, 2015    Cortez Pits - Estimation Pass Summary    Cortez Pits - Bulk Density    Gold Acres Refractory Mineral Resource Summary – December 31, 2015    Gold Acres Indicator Model Estimation Parameters    Interpolation Passes Inside and Outside the Gold Acres 0.50 Indicator Model    Gold Acres Bulk Density    Gold Acres Untransformed Gold Statistics    Total Mineral Reserves – December 31, 2015    Proportion of Reserves by Deposit    Processing as Percent of Total Tons/Ounces    Open Pit Leach Cut-Off Grades    Open Pit Mill Cut-Off Grades    Open Pit Refractory Cut-Off Grades    Mill Leach Inter-Process Cut-Off Grade    Cortez Hills and Pediment Whittle Pit Optimization Parameters    Pipeline and Crossroads Whittle Pit Optimization Parameters    Underground Cut-off Grade Calculations    Cortez Hills Open Pit Reconciliation    Cortez Hills Open Pit Reconciliation by Process Type    Pipeline Open Pit Reconciliation    Pipeline Open Pit Reconciliation By Process Type    Underground Mineral Reserve Reconciliation    Mine Operations Summary 2012-2015    Cortez Operation – LOM Open Pit Production

     11-6        13-3        13-3        13-4        13-5        13-6        13-8        13-9        14-1        14-2        14-3        14-4        14-6        14-8        14-9        14-10        14-12        14-13        14-14        14-18        14-20        14-21        14-23        14-25        14-27        14-29        14-40        14-42        14-42        14-44        14-45        14-46        14-47        14-47        15-2        15-5        15-6        15-15        15-16        15-17        15-18        15-19        15-19        15-23        15-28        15-29        15-31        15-32        15-33        16-1        16-11  

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page iv    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

Table 16-3 Table 16-4 Table 16-5 Table 16-6 Table 16-7 Table 16-8 Table 16-9 Table 16-10 Table 16-11 Table 16-12 Table 16-13 Table 16-14 Table 16-15 Table 16-16 Table 16-17 Table 16-18 Table 20-1 Table 20-2 Table 20-3 Table 21-1 Table 21-2 Table 21-3

   Cortez Hills/Pediment – LOM Open Pit Production    Pipeline/Crossroads – LOM Open Pit Production    Percentages of Mined Processing Ore Types    Major Open Pit Equipment    Rock mass characterization for the Deep South Zone    Summary of Proposed Hydraulic Radii by Geotechnical Domain    Underground Equipment Fleet    Key Factors Deep South Zone PFS    Underground LOM Production    Underground LOM Ore Types    Underground Ore Source By Zone    Cortez Operation – LOM Mining    LOM Ore Processed - Roaster    LOM Ore Processed – Pipeline Mill    LOM Ore Processed – Heap Leach    LOM Total Ore Processed    Important Environmental Documents and Plans of Operations for Pipeline and Cortez Hills    Major Environmental Permits    Surface Disturbance Authorization    Capital Costs    LOM Operating Costs    Manpower

     16-12        16-12        16-13        16-14        16-22        16-23        16-36        16-37        16-40        16-40        16-41        16-42        16-43        16-43        16-44        16-44        20-3        20-8        20-16        21-1        21-2        21-2  

LIST OF FIGURES

   

    

   PAGE  

Figure 4-1 Figure 4-2 Figure 4-3 Figure 4-4 Figure 4-5 Figure 7-1 Figure 7-2 Figure 7-3 Figure 10-1 Figure 10-2 Figure 10-3 Figure 10-4 Figure 10-5 Figure 10-6 Figure 10-7 Figure 10-8 Figure 10-9 Figure 10-10 Figure 10-11 Figure 10-12 Figure 13-1

   Location Map    Land Ownership Map    Deposit Locations    Cortez Hills Infrastructure    Pipeline Complex Infrastructure    Regional Geology    Local Geology    Local Stratigraphy    Drill Hole Map    Pipeline Complex Drill Hole Plan    Pipeline Deposit – Cross Section 58000N (A-A’)    Crossroads Deposit - Cross Section 52800N (B-B’)    Gold Acres Drill Hole Plan    Gold Acres Deposit - Cross Section 59800N (A-A’)    Cortez Hills Drill Hole Plan    Cortez Hills – Cross Section 28600N (A-A’) Breccia, Middle and Lower Zones    Pediment - Long-Section B-B’    Lower Zone - Long-Section C-C’    Cortez Pits Area (NW Deeps) Drill Hole Plan    Cortez Pits Area – Cross Section 38200N    Historical Heap Leach Data

     4-3        4-4        4-5        4-6        4-7        7-4        7-7        7-8        10-2        10-8        10-9        10-10        10-11        10-12        10-14        10-15        10-16        10-17        10-19        10-20        13-7  

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page v    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

Figure 14-1 Figure 14-2 Figure 14-3 Figure 14-4 Figure 14-5 Figure 14-6 Figure 14-7 Figure 14-8 Figure 14-9 Figure 14-10 Figure 14-11 Figure 14-12 Figure 14-13 Figure 14-14 Figure 14-15 Figure 15-1 Figure 15-2 Figure 15-3 Figure 15-4 Figure 15-5 Figure 15-6 Figure 15-7 Figure 15-8 Figure 15-9 Figure 16-1 Figure 16-2 Figure 16-3 Figure 16-4 Figure 16-5 Figure 16-6 Figure 16-7 Figure 17-1 Figure 17-2 Figure 17-3 Figure 18-1 Figure 18-2 Figure 20-1

   Resource Estimation Domains Pipeline Complex    Low Grade, Omnidirectional Variograms at Pipeline Complex    Mineral Resource Classification, Crossroads Deposit, Pipeline Complex    Section 52600 N: Comparison of Block and Composite Gold Grades at Crossroads Deposit, Pipeline Complex    Resource Estimation Domains Cortez Hills Complex    Comparison of Block and Composite Grades at Pediment Deposit, Cortez Hills Complex    Comparison of Block and Composite Grades within the Breccia Zone, Open Pit Portion, Cortez Hills Complex    Comparison of Block and Composite Grades within the Breccia Zone, Underground Portion, Cortez Hills Complex    Comparison of Block and Composite Grades within the Middle Zone, Cortez Hills Complex    Comparison of Block and Composite Grades within the Lower Zone, including Deep South, Cortez Hills Complex    CHUG Lower Zone Comparison of Block and Composite Mean by Middle Zone one    CHUG Middle Zone Comparison of Block and Composite Mean by Middle Zone one    CHUG Breccia Zone Comparison of Block and Composite Mean by Middle Zone one    CHOP Breccia Zone Comparison of Block and Composite Mean by Middle Zone one    CHOP Pediment Zone Comparison of Block and Composite Mean by Middle Zone one    Deposit Locations    Cortez Hills and Pediment Ultimate Pit Areas    Cortez Hills Open Pits, Waste Dumps, and Infrastructure    Pipeline and Crossroads Ultimate Pit Areas    Pipeline Pits and Phases    Schematic View of the Cortez Hills Underground    Total Underground Ore Reconciliation 2014-2015    Underground Oxide Ore Reconciliation 2014-2015    Underground Roaster Ore Reconciliation 2014-2015    Site Layout    Cortez Hills Open Pit Recommended Pit Slope Design    Crossroads Recommended Slope Design    CHUG LOM Mine Production Rate    CHUG LOM Gold Production and Head Grade    Geotechnical Domains    Main Ramp Layout Relative to Geological Features, Looking North    Pipeline Mill Process Flow Sheet    Simplified Heap Leach Flow Sheet    Goldstrike Roaster Flow Sheet    Pipeline Complex Infrastructure    Cortez Hills Complex Infrastructure    Boundaries and Permit Areas

                                                                                                                                                                                        

14-7   14-11   14-15   14-19   14-24   14-32   14-33   14-34   14-35   14-36   14-37   14-37   14-38   14-38   14-39   15-4   15-9   15-10   15-12   15-13   15-22   15-34   15-35   15-36   16-3   16-7   16-8   16-16   16-17   16-23   16-24   17-6   17-7   17-8   18-2   18-3   20-2  

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page vi    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

1 SUMMARY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Roscoe Postle Associates Inc. (RPA) was retained by Barrick Gold Corporation (Barrick) to prepare an independent Technical Report on the Cortez Open Pit and Underground Mine Operations (the Cortez Operations or the Mine), in Eureka and Lander Counties, Nevada, USA. The purpose of this report is to support public disclosure of Mineral Resources and Mineral Reserves at Cortez as of December 31, 2015. This Technical Report conforms to NI 43-101 Standards of Disclosure for Mineral Projects. RPA visited the operations between May 5 and 7, 2015. Barrick is a Canadian publicly traded mining company with a portfolio of operating mines and projects across five continents. The Cortez Operations are located in northeastern Nevada approximately 62 mi west and south of Elko. The Cortez Mine is a joint venture between two wholly-owned subsidiaries of Barrick, Barrick Cortez Inc. (60%) and Barrick Gold Finance Inc. (40%). The Cortez Operations consist of the Pipeline, Crossroads, Gap, Cortez Hills (CHOP), and Pediment open pits, the Cortez Hills underground (CHUG) mine, a 13,000 ton per day (stpd) carbon-in-leach (CIL) gold plant, heap leach pads and heap leach processing plants, the planned Crossroads open pit, with additional Mineral Resources contained in the Cortez Pits and Gold Acres open pits. The nearby deposit of Hilltop is also part of the Mine but does not have reportable resources at this time. The open pit is a large scale operation utilizing a conventional truck and shovel fleet and mining approximately 400,000 stpd of ore and waste. Mining operations move between the various pits over the Life of Mine (LOM) plan. The underground mine is a 2,000 stpd mechanized mine. Ore from the mines is treated at an oxide mill at the site, on leach pads, and refractory ore is shipped to Barrick’s Goldstrike operation for processing. Barrick completed a Pre-feasibility  Study (PFS) for underground mining  in the Deep South Zone (the Cortez Underground Expansion Project), below currently permitted areas of the CHUG. The PFS indicated that the project has the potential to contribute average underground production of more than 300,000 ounces per year between 2022 and 2026 at average all-in  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 1-1    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

sustaining costs of approximately $580 per ounce. More detailed planning, subsequent to the PFS, has resulted in the current LOM beginning underground gold production  from  the  Deep  South  Zone  in  2022  and  producing  300,000  ounces  per  year  between  2023  and  2027.  Initial  capital  costs  are  estimated  to  be  $153 million. The PFS supports conversion of approximately 1.7 million ounces of Measured and Indicated Resources in the Deep South Zone to Proven and Probable Reserves as of December 31, 2015. The PFS timeline assumes that permitting will take approximately three to four years and Barrick expects to commence this process in the first half of 2016. On this basis, following the receipt of permits, dewatering and development work could begin as early as 2019 or 2020, with initial production from the Deep South Zone commencing in 2022. The expansion of the underground mine is expected to offset the impact of the end of mining in the Cortez Hills open pit, which is scheduled to conclude in 2018. Table 1-1 summarizes the Cortez Mineral Resources as of December 31, 2015. Table 1-2 summarizes the Cortez Mineral Reserves as of December 31, 2015.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 1-2    

  

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 1-1 MINERAL RESOURCES – DECEMBER 31, 2015 Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

   

 

Mine

Measured Resources    Indicated Resources    Measured + Indicated    Inferred Resources   Grade Contained Grade Contained Grade Contained Grade Contained Tons

(oz/st

Gold

Tons

(oz/st

Gold

Tons

(oz/st

Gold

Tons

(oz/st

Gold

  (000 st)    Au)     (000 oz)     (000 st)     Au)     (000 oz)     (000 st)     Au)     (000 oz)     (000 st)     Au)     (000 oz)  

Open Pit Pipeline Gap Crossroads Gold Acres Cortez Hills Pediment Cortez Pits Sub-Total

          1,231      0.022          167      0.025          1,530      0.014          213      0.124          —        —            —        —            472      0.094        3,613

  0.034

 

Underground Cortez Hills Breccia Cortez Hills Middle Cortez Hills Lower Cortez Deep South Sub-Total Total

          167      0.339          —        —            —        —            —        —          167

  0.339

 

  3,780

  0.048

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      27     14,617      0.019      4      2,402      0.019      22     17,500      0.014      26      3,266      0.104      —        —        —        —        —        —        45      3,611      0.051      124

  41,395

  0.026

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      56      335      0.329      —        1,065      0.328      —        942      0.273      —        663      0.255      56

  3,005

  0.295

 

181

  44,400

  0.044

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      275     15,848      0.019      47      2,569      0.020      237     19,030      0.014      340      3,479      0.105      —        —        —        —        —        —        183      4,083      0.056      1,082

  45,009

  0.027

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      110      502      0.332      350      1,065      0.328      257      942      0.273      169      663      0.255      886

  3,172

  0.297

 

1,969

  48,180

  0.045

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    302      1,698      51      —        259     12,220      367      305      —        3,440      —        411      227      1,283      1,206

  19,359

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    167      9      350      82      257      541      169      710      943

  1,341

 

2,149

  20,700

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  0.03      —        0.01      0.10      0.04      0.01      0.02      0.02

 

 

 

 

  0.47      0.35      0.25      0.42      0.35

 

0.04

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

44   —     167   32   122   3   27   395

 

4   28   133   301   466

861

 

 

Notes:  

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

CIM definitions were followed for Mineral Resources. Mineral Resources are estimated at various cut-off grades depending on material type and processing stream. Mineral Resources are estimated using an average gold price of US$1,300 per ounce. A minimum mining width of 10 ft was used. Mineral Resources are additional to and exclusive of Mineral Reserves. Numbers may not add due to rounding.

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Joint Venture, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 1-3    

  

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 1-2 MINERAL RESERVES – DECEMBER 31, 2015 Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

   

  

Zone

Total Proven    Total Probable           Total Proven + Probable   Contained Contained Contained Tons

Grade

Gold

Tons

Grade

Gold

Tons

Grade

Gold

   (000)      (oz/st)      (000 oz)           (000 st)      (oz/st Au)     (000 oz)           (000 st)      (oz/st Au)     (000)  

Open Pit Pipeline Crossroads Cortez Hills Pediment Open Pit Subtotals Underground Breccia Zone Middle Zone Lower Zone Deep South Underground Subtotals Stockpiles Mill Stockpiles Leach Stockpiles Refractory Stockpiles Stockpile Subtotals Total

              1,470       0.019            8,135       0.035            1,564       0.127            762       0.032          11,931

   0.045

  

              120       0.514                                     120

   0.514

  

              1,510       0.096            57       0.014            2,248       0.130          3,814

   0.115

  

   15,866

   0.065

  

          28          15,985       287          86,613       198          17,145       24          20,506       537

       140,249

  

        62          205               3.544               3.777               5.266       62

       12,792

  

          145            1            293            438

          1,037

       153,042

  

             0.017       266          17,455       0.033       2,880          94,749       0.116       1,984          18,709       0.027       547          21,268       0.040

   5,677

       152,181

  

           0.486       100          324       0.365       1,292          3,544       0.351       1,324          3,777       0.322       1,697          5,266       0.345

   4,414

       12,912

  

                                                              3,814

  

0.066

   10,092

       168,908

  

   0.017       294   0.033       3,167   0.117       2,182   0.027       571   0.041

   6,214

   0.497       161   0.365       1,292   0.351       1,324   0.322       1,698   0.347

   4,476

            0.115

  

438

0.066

   11,129

Notes:  

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

CIM definitions were followed for Mineral Reserves. Mineral Reserves are estimated at cut-off grades that range from 0.004 oz/st Au to 0.205 oz/st Au depending on deposit, mining method, and process type. Mineral Reserves are estimated using an average gold price of US$1,000 per ounce to year 2020 and US$ 1,200 per ounce thereafter. A minimum mining width of 15 ft was used. Bulk density varies from 0.052 st/ft 3 to 0.091 st/ft 3 , depending on material type. Numbers may not add due to rounding.

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Joint Venture, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 1-4    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

CONCLUSIONS Based on the site visit and review of the documentation available, RPA offers the following interpretation and conclusions: GEOLOGY AND MINERAL RESOURCES  

 



  The Cortez deposits are “Carlin” style porphyry/epithermal deposits hosted by sedimentary rocks.



  The sampling, sample preparation, analyses, security, and data verification meet or exceed industry standards and are appropriate for Mineral Resource estimation.



  The parameters, assumptions, and methodology used for Mineral Resource estimation are appropriate for the style of mineralization.



  Mineral Resources are reported exclusive of Mineral Reserves and are estimated effective December 31, 2015.



  Total Mineral Resources at the Cortez Operations are:

 

   

   

   

   

 



  Measured - 3.78 million tons, grading 0.048 oz/st Au, containing 181,000 oz Au.



  Indicated - 44.40 million tons, grading 0.044 oz/st Au, containing 1,969,000 oz Au.



  Inferred - 20.7 million tons, grading 0.04 oz/st Au, containing 861,000 oz Au.

 

   

   

 



  Open Pit Mineral Resources at the Cortez Operations are:

 

 



  Measured - 3.61 million tons, grading 0.034 oz/st Au, containing 124,000 oz Au.



  Indicated - 41.40 million tons, grading 0.026 oz/st Au, containing 1,082,000 oz Au.



  Inferred - 19.4 million tons, grading 0.02 oz/st Au, containing 395,000 oz Au.

 

   

   

 



  Underground Mineral Resources at the Cortez Operations are:

 

 



  Measured - 0.17 million tons, grading 0.339 oz/st Au, containing 56,000 oz Au.



  Indicated - 3.01 million tons, grading 0.295 oz/st Au, containing 886,000 oz Au.



  Inferred - 1.34 million tons, grading 0.35 oz/st Au, containing 466,000 oz Au.

 

   

 

MINING AND MINERAL RESERVES  

 



  The Mineral Reserves are contained within four open pit deposits, four zones in one underground deposit, and surface stockpiles.



  The December 31, 2015 Mineral Reserves as stated by Cortez are estimated in a manner consistent with industry practices.



  Total Mineral Reserves at the Cortez Operations are:

 

   

   

 



  Proven: 15.9 million tons, grading 0.065 oz/st Au, containing 1.03 million oz Au.



  Probable: 153.0 million tons, grading 0.066 oz/st Au, containing 10.09 million oz Au.

 

   

 



  Open Pit Mineral Reserves at the Cortez Operations are:

 

 



  Proven: 11.9 million tons, grading 0.045 oz/st Au, containing 0.54 million oz Au.

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 1-5    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

 



  Probable: 140.2 million tons, grading 0.040 oz/st Au, containing 5.67 million oz Au.

 

 



  Underground Mineral Reserves at the Cortez Operations are:

 

 



  Proven: 0.1 million tons, grading 0.514 oz/st Au, containing 0.06 million oz Au.



  Probable: 12.8 million tons, grading 0.345 oz/st Au, containing 4.41 million oz Au.

 

   

 



  The open  pit  mine  is a  conventional  operation  that  currently  has 400  st and  345 st  class  off-highway  haul trucks  which are  loaded  by  one 35 yd  3 hydraulic shovel and five 48 yd 3 to 77 yd 3 size electric shovels.



  The Cortez operation is permitted to dewater up to approximately 36,000 gpm from the underground and open pit mine areas.



  Mine production rates are projected to average 157 million tons per year (Mstpa) of total material from 2016 to 2022. Average open pit ore mining rate is approximately 19.1 Mstpa.



  CHUG is a mechanized decline access underground mine operating at approximately 2,000 stpd of ore.



  The Breccia, Middle, and Lower Zones of the underground mine are mined or planned to be mined using drift and fill mining methods.



  The mining methods and equipment are considered to be suitable for the deposits.



  In the Deep South Zone, Measured and Indicated Mineral Resources were converted to approximately 1.7 million oz of Proven and Probable Mineral Reserves as of year-end 2015 on the basis of a positive PFS.



  The conclusions and recommendations of the Deep South Zone PFS are reasonable and appropriate for the deposit.



  The Deep South Zone PFS work included re-evaluation of the geotechnical characteristics and the design for the mining of the Deep South includes long hole stoping which is expected to be more productive and lower cost than the drift and fill mining.



  The Deep South Zone has the potential to be a standalone expansion of the CHUG.

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

PROCESS  

•  

  RPA is of the opinion that metallurgical test work completed for the Mine has been appropriate to establish optimal processing routes for the different mineralization styles encountered in the deposits and that the gold recovery calculations for all of the processing options are currently appropriate to estimate the amount of gold that will be recovered over the LOM.

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 1-6    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

 



  The mill and heap leach operations at Cortez are well run, cost effective processing facilities for oxide ore.



  There  are  no  appropriate  processes  for  single  and  double  refractory  ore  at  Cortez.  Therefore,  these  ore  types  are  shipped  to  Goldstrike  for processing.  Limits  to  the  transportation  rates  imposed  by  environmental  permits  restrict  the  amount  of  ore  that  can  be  shipped  to  1.2  Mstpa.  If additional refractory ore is mined, it must be stockpiled.



  Total Carbonaceous Material (TCM) processing at Goldstrike is advanced technology that provides additional capacity for processing carbonaceous, preg-robbing ore without displacing material that is processed in the roaster. It also allows processing of ore with elevated concentrations of arsenic. The TCM technology uses calcium thiosulfate (CaTs) to leach the gold after pressure oxidation rather than cyanide and resin-in-pulp to recover the gold from the leach solution.

 

   

 

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS  

 



  One of the risks to the Mine is the receipt of permit approvals from the various government agencies.



  Cortez is diligent in managing its permitting and all environmental requirements for the property.



  RPA is not aware of any environmental issues that could materially impact Barrick’s ability to extract the Mineral Resources or Mineral Reserves at this time.

 

   

 

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS  

 



  RPA has performed  an  economic  analysis  of  the  Cortez  Operations  using  the  estimates  presented  in  this  report  and confirms  that  the  outcome  is  a positive cash flow that supports the statement of Mineral Reserves.

RECOMMENDATIONS Based upon its work, RPA provides the following recommendations. GEOLOGY AND MINERAL RESOURCES  

 



  Continue to revise and update the Mineral Resource modelling procedures, with specific consideration to the potential additional mineralization trend in the Crossroads pit and the incorporation of an ordinary kriging run as an additional validation check at Cortez Hills.



  Review the classification criteria, with consideration to variogram models based on single mineralization domains at Cortez Hills, and the inclusion of classification wireframe shells, particularly for the Measured component, or the incorporation of classification smoothing scripts.

 

 

MINING AND MINERAL RESERVES  

 



  Continue ore reconciliation tracking and attempt to identify and report the causes of any large changes on a monthly basis.

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 1-7    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

 



  Present the reconciliation results showing the percentage differences and not the absolute differences.



  Develop a set of orebody characteristics (width, height, grade, rock conditions) considered appropriate for long hole stoping and identify the quantity and location of those portions of the orebody amenable to long hole stoping.



  Consider the Lower Zone rock bin capacity to ensure that a smooth ore feed from the mine can be maintained.



  Review the small amounts of Inferred material within stope designs with a view to changing the classification  of these small areas so that Inferred Mineral Resources are not included in the stope plans.



  Modify the LOM and Mineral Reserve estimation process to include:

 

   

   

   

   

 



  a reconciliation between the LOM plan and the Mineral Reserve estimate



  a tabulation of the Mineral Resources converted by classification including the Inferred Mineral Resources



  a review of those Inferred Mineral Resources within the LOM plan to determine whether any can or should be reclassified as Indicated Mineral Resources



  the impact on the LOM plan of including the Inferred Mineral Resources within the plan at zero grade

 

   

   

   

 



  Prepare detailed reconciliations and comparisons for any future conversions to new or different software packages to identify any issues in the process.



  Continue the mine dewatering and careful highwall slope monitoring.



  Re-evaluate the use of blast movement monitoring to improve grade control.



  Develop detailed grade control accounting and stockpile management procedures.



  Refine use of cross over grades, and standardize the Mineral Reserve reporting with the LOM production schedule.



  Implement ore drive width increases to increase the productivity and/or production rate of the drift and fill mining.



  Assess areas of the Lower Zone for the application of long hole stoping methods and implement trials if suitable areas can be identified.

 

   

   

   

   

   

 

Continue to advance the planning of the Deep South Zone, which is included in the LOM plan, to optimize the production and development schedules in future years.  

 



  Continue to evaluate the initiative to process mineralized waste concurrently with material from the underground resource.

PROCESSING  

 



  Continue to evaluate new ore types and to optimize the processes to increase recovery and/or to decrease costs.

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 1-8    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

 



  Continue to work collaboratively  with the  Goldstrike  staff  to maintain  and  improve  the metallurgical  accounting  for treatment  of  Cortez  ore  in the roaster and the TCM process.

ENVIRONMENTAL  

 



  Continue to expedite environmental permitting as required to support the changes in operations and development of new areas of the Mine.

COSTS  

 



  Continue to evaluate and implement opportunities for cost savings and profitability improvements.

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS Under NI 43-101 rules, producing issuers may exclude the information required in this section on properties currently in production, unless the technical report includes  a  material  expansion  of  current  production.  RPA  notes  that  Barrick  is  a  producing  issuer,  the  Cortez  Mine  is  currently  in  production,  and  a  material expansion is not being planned. RPA has performed an economic analysis of the Cortez Mine using the estimates presented in this report and confirms that the outcome is a positive cash flow that supports the statement of Mineral Reserves.

TECHNICAL SUMMARY PROPERTY DESCRIPTION AND LOCATION The Cortez Operations are located 62 mi southwest of Elko, Nevada, USA, in Eureka and Lander Counties. All Mineral Reserves and Mineral Resources, in addition to existing and future facilities to be used to exploit the Mine’s deposits, are on public lands administered by the Battle Mountain or Elko Field Offices of the U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM). At  Cortez,  Barrick  directly  controls  approximately  216,124  acres  of  mineral  rights  with  ownership  of  mining  claims  and  fee  lands.  There  are  10,461  claims consisting of:  

 



  9,630 unpatented lode claims



  575 unpatented mill-site claims



  104 patented lode claims



  125 patented mill-site claims



  27 unpatented placer claims and 185 patented mill-site claims

 

   

   

   

   

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 1-9    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

All lease agreements and claim holdings are current and in good standing. EXISTING INFRASTRUCTURE There is extensive infrastructure in place to support the Cortez Operations including:  

 



  The 13,000 stpd No. 2 Mill complete with run-of-mine (ROM) pad and crushing circuit



  Pipeline leach pad areas (Area 28 and Area 30) and gold recovery plant



  Area 34 leach pad and gold recovery plant for the CHOP and Pediment



  A tailings management facility



  A gyratory crusher at the CHOP and an 11 mi long conveyor to the No. 2 Mill



  Existing open pit mines at CHOP, Cortez, and Pipeline



  Pit dewatering wells and pumps for the open pits and the CHUG



  Infiltration ponds for the disposal of water



  An existing underground mine at CHUG



  Batch plant for shotcrete and cemented rock fill preparation



  Stockpile areas for an assortment of ore types



  Office complexes at the Mill No. 2, Mill No. 1, CHUG, and CHOP



  Equipment maintenance shops at CHOP, CHUG, and adjacent to the Mill No. 2



  Exploration offices, core handling and core storage warehouse



  System of public and private roads connecting the facilities



  Shared business support services from the business unit offices in Elko

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

HISTORY Mining  in  the  Cortez  Mining  District  began  with  the  discovery  of  silver  ore  in  1862.  Underground  silver  mining  was  conducted  in  the  area  until  the 1930s. Mineralization at Hilltop was also identified during the 1860s. Gold mineralization at Gold Acres was discovered in the late 1920s and mined by a small mining company from 1935 to 1960. In 1959, American Exploration & Mining Co. (AMEX), a wholly-owned US subsidiary of Placer Development Ltd. (subsequently Placer Dome Inc.), entered into a lease-option agreement on the properties and started extensive exploration. In 1964, AMEX formed the Cortez Joint Venture (CJV). The CJV initiated open pit mining in the Cortez open pits from 1968 to 1972 and moved to the Gold Acres North and South pits in 1973. Leaching and milling of Gold Acres stockpiles and  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 1-10    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

dumps continued until 1983. Mill grade ores were mined from 1987 to 1996 and processed at Cortez Mill No. 1. In 2003, the CJV commenced shipping Gold Acres refractory stockpiles for toll processing at third-party facilities. The  Horse  Canyon  deposits  were  discovered  in  early  1976.  Three  pits,  North,  South,  and  South  Extension,  were  mined  in  the  period  from  1984  to 1987. Exploration drilling campaigns at the Horse Creek deposit, originally discovered in the late 1960s, occurred in the mid-1980s and intermittently over the last ten years and are ongoing. The  Pipeline  deposit  was  discovered  by  CJV  geologists  in  March  1991  during  drilling  of  deep  condemnation  holes.  The  Gap  deposit  was  discovered  in  1991 adjacent to the planned Stage 9 of the Pipeline pit. In  November  1991,  CJV  discovered  the  South  Pipeline  deposit.  Construction  of  Mill  No.  2  and  pre-stripping  of  the  first  stage  of  the  Pipeline  pit  began  in 1996. Continued drilling resulted in the 1998 discovery of the Crossroads deposit beneath 550 ft of alluvium. In 1996, CJV geologists began a program that led to the 1998 discovery of the Pediment deposit. The Cortez Hills deposit was discovered in  October 2002. In 2004,  the  Cortez  Hills  Lower  Zone  was  discovered.  In  November  2008,  the  Environmental  Impact  Statement  (EIS)  for  the  Cortez–Pediment  development  was approved. Production from underground began in late 2008, and the first ore production from CHOP occurred in late December 2009. Barrick acquired an interest in Cortez through the 2006 acquisition of Placer Dome Inc. In March 2008, Barrick acquired its 100% interest in the Mine, purchasing the former Kennecott 40% interest, from Rio Tinto. GEOLOGY AND MINERALIZATION The Cortez gold district is in the eastern Great Basin of the Basin and Range Province. The Paleozoic basement rocks of northeastern Nevada are made up of a western  deep-water,  eugeoclinal  siliclastic  assemblage  (Upper  Plate)  and  an  eastern  shallow-water,  miogeosynclinal  carbonate  assemblage  (Lower  Plate)  of sedimentary strata. Cortez lies within the “Battle Mountain-Eureka Trend” (BMT), an alignment of gold mines and occurrences located in a northwest-southeast belt extending from the Marigold Mine some 50 mi northwest  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 1-11    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

of Cortez, to Ruby Hill at Eureka 60 mi to the southeast. Paleozoic basement rocks have been folded and faulted, and cut by younger Jurassic and Tertiary aged intrusions. The  Cortez  deposits  are  “Carlin”  style  sedimentary  rock-hosted  and  porphyry/epithermal  deposits.  Carlin  deposits  form  as  structurally  and/or  stratigraphically controlled replacement bodies consisting of strata-bound, tabular, disseminated gold mineralization occurring in Silurian-Devonian carbonate rocks. Deposits are localized  at  contacts  between  contrasting  lithologies,  metamorphosed  to  varying  extents.  They  can  also  be  discordant  or  breccia-related.  The  deposits  are hydrothermal  in  origin,  are  usually  structurally  controlled  and  at  Cortez  are  hosted  in  Lower  Plate  carbonate  strata  exposed  by  two  erosional windows through allochthonous Upper Plate siliclastic units; the windows are on either side of Crescent Valley. Mineralization  consists  primarily  of  submicron  to  micrometre-sized  gold  particles,  very  fine  sulphide  grains,  and  gold  in  solid  solution  in  pyrite.  Gold  is disseminated throughout the host rock matrix in zones of silicified and decarbonatized, argillized, silty calcareous rocks, and associated jasperoids. Gold may occur around  limonite  pseudomorphs  of  authigenic  pyrite  and  arsenopyrite.  Major  ore  minerals  include  native  gold,  pyrite,  arsenopyrite,  stibnite,  realgar,  orpiment, cinnabar, fluorite, barite, and rare thallium minerals. Gangue minerals typically comprise fine-grained quartz, barite, clay minerals, carbonaceous matter, and latestage calcite veins. In the Cortez district, the favoured host rocks for gold mineralization are the Devonian Wenban Limestone, followed by the Horse Canyon and Roberts Mountain Formations.  Mineralization  reflects  an  interplay  between  structural  and  lithological  ore  controls  in  which  hydrothermal  solutions  from  intrusives  moved  to favourable porous decalcified limestone. Mineralized  host  rocks  are  predominantly  characterized  as  oxides,  along  with  sulphidic  and  carbonaceous  refractory  material.  Carbon  content  in the deposits is highly variable and occurs generally in the Devonian Wenban Limestone and the Roberts Mountain Formation. Supergene alteration extends up to 656 ft depth resulting in oxide ores, which overlie the refractory sulphides. Alteration has liberated gold by the destruction of pyrite and resulted in the formation of oxide and secondary sulphate minerals, which include goethite, hematite, jarosite, scorodite, alunite, and gypsum.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 1-12    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

EXPLORATION STATUS Modern exploration commenced along the Battle Mountain–Eureka Trend in the 1960s, and has been nearly continuous since that time. Exploration in the Cortez district has been undertaken by Barrick and its predecessor companies such as the CJV and has included mapping, various geochemical and geophysical surveys, pitting, trenching, petrographic, and mineralogy studies, and various types of drilling. Barrick has advanced stage exploration drilling projects at Cortez. Exploration projects include underground drilling programs at Cortez Hills Lower Zone (Deep South), Horse Canyon Cortez exploration project, and metallurgical testwork at Hilltop. MINERAL RESOURCES RPA considers the December 31, 2015 Mineral Resource estimate completed by Barrick to be reasonable, acceptable, and reported in compliance with Canadian Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Petroleum (CIM) Definition Standards for Mineral Resources and Mineral Reserves dated May 10, 2014 (CIM definitions) as incorporated by reference into NI 43-101. The Mineral Resources are exclusive of Mineral Reserves and are summarized in Table 1-1. The  Mineral  Resources  are  estimated  from  three  dimensional  block  models  created  using  Vulcan  software.  Surfaces  and  solids  representing  topography, overburden, geological units, and gold mineralization were incorporated into the resource block models. Resource estimates utilize drill hole, survey, geological, analytical and bulk density information entered, validated and maintained in a centralized acQuire SQL Server database. Industry standard best practices were used to obtain the data; quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) protocols, as well as data validation procedures, were employed to ensure that the quality and quantity of data used for the resource estimates were appropriate and acceptable. MINERAL RESERVES The  Mineral  Reserves  for  Cortez  as  of  December  31,  2015  are  summarized  in  Table  1-2.  These  Mineral  Reserves  are  a  combination  of  the  open  pit  and underground operations and the stockpiles. RPA considers  the  Mineral  Reserve  estimate,  completed  by Barrick,  to  be  reasonable,  acceptable,  and reported  in accordance  with  CIM definitions  and NI  43101. The Mineral  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 1-13    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

Reserves are generated based upon the mine designs applied to the Measured and Indicated Mineral Resources. The design methodology uses both the cut-off grade estimation and economic assessment to design and validate the Mineral Reserves. MINING METHOD The current Cortez site has been operating since 1988. Currently, the active mining areas are the Cortez Hills and Pediment pits, the Pipeline and Crossroads pits, and the Cortez Hills underground. Open pit  mining  at  Cortez  Hills  and  Pipeline  is  by conventional  open  pit  methods  using hydraulic  and electric  front shovels  and large,  off-highway  dump haul trucks.  The  open  pit  mine  life  is  estimated  to  be  three  years  for  Cortez  Hills  (2016  through  2018)  and  eight  years  for  the  Pipeline  Complex  (2016  through 2023). The open pit operations has an estimated current daily material movement capacity of 400,000 stpd. Underground mining is being carried out in the Breccia, Middle, and Lower zones. The underground mine is operating at a rate of 2,000 stpd with all ore hauled to surface  by  truck.  The  mining  is  all  by  drift  and  fill  mining  method.  Management  are  working  on  plans  to  increase  the  mine  production  by  improving  the productivity of the drift and fill mining and implementing long hole stoping in some areas of the Lower Zone. Under the current mine plan, which includes the Deep South Zone project, underground mining at Cortez Hills is scheduled through 2028. As a result of a positive PFS completed in 2015, approximately 1.7 million ounces of Measured and Indicated Mineral Resources in the Deep South Zone, a down dip extension of the Lower Zone below the 3,800 ft level, were converted to Proven and Probable Mineral Reserves as of year-end 2015. Under the current mine plan, which incorporates the Cortez Underground Expansion Project, the Deep South Zone is proposed to be mined using long hole stoping methods and will use extensions to the planned Lower Zone infrastructure for the movement of rock, men, and materials. Mining of the Deep South Zone requires dewatering below the 3,800  ft  level  and  this  requires  an  amendment  to  the  Plan  of  Operations  (PoO).  The  permitting  process  is  expected  to  take  three  to  four  years.  This  permit amendment application is planned to be submitted in 2016. On this basis, following the receipt of permits, dewatering and development work could begin as early as 2019 or 2020, with initial production from the Deep South Zone commencing in 2022. The expansion of the underground mine will help to offset  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 1-14    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

the impact of the end of mining in the Cortez Hills open pit, which is expected to conclude in 2018. The majority of the ore in the Deep South Zone is oxide ore which is proposed to be treated in the Pipeline Mill or at heap leach facilities at Cortez after the Pipeline Mill operation ceases in 2023. Over the past four years, the underground mine production has been steady at approximately 2,000 stpd to 2,200 stpd ore. Over the same period, the grade has decreased from 1.07 oz/st Au to 0.63 oz/st Au. In 2015, 23.4 Mst of ore was mined and 24.7 Mst was processed at a head grade of 0.50 oz/st Au. Gold production was 999,278 oz. MINERAL PROCESSING Ore from Cortez is either processed on site in the oxide processing facilities or transported to Barrick’s Goldstrike operation for refractory ore treatment. Mill No. 2, or the Pipeline mill, is a nominal 13,000 stpd oxide processing plant with crushing, a semi-autogenous grinding (SAG) mill, a ball mill, grind thickener, a carbon-in-column (CIC) circuit for the grind thickener overflow solution, a CIL circuit, tailings counter-current-decantation (CCD) wash thickener circuit, carbon stripping and reactivation circuits, and a refinery to produce gold doré. A primary gyratory crusher is located adjacent to the CHOP together with a series of overland conveyors that transport the ore to the coarse ore stockpile at Mill No. 2. There is a primary jaw crusher at Mill No. 2 that is used when processing ore from Pipeline and in the future, Crossroads. Tailings are stored in a zero-discharge tailings storage facility. A double liner covers the entire tailings area, extending completely under the dam embankment. Low-grade oxide material is leached as ROM ore on three prepared double-lined leach pads. Pregnant solution from the leach pads is fed to CIC columns for gold recovery. The loaded carbon from the heap leach operation is transported to the mill for gold recovery.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 1-15    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

Area 28 heap leach circuit has a water balance that is interlinked with the Pipeline mill circuit since it uses the tailings pond under-drain solution as leach solution and excess pad effluent is processed in the mill CIC circuit. Area 28 is at maximum capacity for ore stacking and is no longer an operating leach pad. The Area 30 heap leach circuit is independent of the Pipeline mill. Ore delivery to the pad recommenced in 2013 and is set to continue through 2023. Area 34 heap leach is a third pad that was designed to treat CHOP ore. The first cells were placed under leach during March 2011 and ore deliveries are scheduled to continue through 2018 based on the current LOM plan. Ores that have a cyanide soluble (shake test) to fire assay gold (AA/FA) ratio of less than 50% are transported to Goldstrike for processing in either the pressure oxidation (POX) circuit or the roaster. Haulage of refractory ore to Goldstrike is currently limited by permit to 1.2 Mstpa. At Goldstrike, two options are currently available for processing refractory ore. It will either be processed in the roaster followed by a CIL circuit or in the TCM process, which includes POX followed by resin-in-leach with CaTs. MARKET STUDIES Gold  is  the  principal  commodity  at  Cortez  and  is  freely  traded,  at  prices  that  are  widely  known,  so  that  prospects  for  sale  of  any  production  are  virtually assured. Prices are usually quoted in US dollars per troy ounce. ENVIRONMENTAL, PERMITTING, AND SOCIAL CONSIDERATIONS Cortez  and  Barrick  have  environmental  groups  and  management  systems  to  ensure  that  the  necessary  permits  and  licences  are  obtained  and  maintained. These groups  also  carry  out  the  required  monitoring  and  reporting  required.  Cortez  has  developed  an  environmental  management  system  (EMS)  to  help  manage  the environmental requirements. The BLM issued the original EIS and Record of Decision (ROD) in November 2008 and a supplemental EIS and ROD in March 2011. In October 2012, Cortez submitted a second proposed amendment to the existing PoO (APO2). All components of the APO2 application were approved by the BLM on February 24, 2014. Cortez  submitted  additional  proposed  modifications  to  the  PoO  in  August  2014  and  then,  following  a  revision,  in  October  2014.  The  proposed modifications include:  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 1-16    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

 



  Deepen the Gap Pit from 4,400 ft amsl to 4,360 ft amsl



  Construct the Range Front Declines and associated infrastructure



  Expand the Area 30 heap leach facilities by 240 acres



  Modify mining rate between the Cortez Hills and Pipeline



  Add a water treatment plant and infrastructure to reduce naturally occurring arsenic concentrations in the dewatering water



  Allow off-site ore haulage up to approximately 1.2 Mstpa site wide



  Reconfigure the Pipeline, Canyon, and Gap waste rock facilities



  Infrastructure additions

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

An APO-3 was approved by the BLM and a ROD was completed in 2015. A number  of  permits  are  required  to  operate  the  Cortez  Mine.  Cortez  adheres  to  permitting  guidelines  from  the  BLM, the  Nevada  Revised  Statutes (NRS), the Nevada Administrative Code (NAC), and other federal government requirements. CAPITAL AND OPERATING COST ESTIMATES The total capital expenditure in the 2016 LOM plan is $2,011 million broken down as shown in Table 1-3. This  total  includes  capital  required  to  expand  underground  mining  into  the  Deep  South  Zone  below  currently  permitted  levels.  The  project  has  the  potential  to contribute underground production beginning in 2022 and will average more than 300,000 ounces per year between 2023 and 2027 at average all-in sustaining costs of approximately $580 per ounce. Initial capital costs are estimated to be $153 million and sustaining capital is estimated to be $58 million, for the Deep South Zone project total of $211 million.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 1-17    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 1-3 CAPITAL COSTS Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Year

  

 

2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 Total

                                         

US$  M     US$  M     US$ M     US$ M     US$ M     US$ M     US$ M     US$ M     US$ M     US$ M     US$ M     US$ M     US$ M     US$ M

  

    

Deferred

Operating    

Expansion    

Exploration    

Fixed

Equipment    

Mobile

Equipment    

Regulatory    

Grand

Total  

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         

                         

  350.5     376.9     399.7     362.2     200.5     70.5     43.6     47.8     67.0     84.5     6.7     0.5     0.5  

2,011

58.6     50.7     145.5     253.8     131.7     19.7     12.9     29.5     46.2     41.4     0.9     —       —       791

  

222.1     284.1     169.3     61.5     29.5     21.7     6.8     5.7     7.7     29.4     2.3     —       —       840

  

9.8     8.1     11.8     11.0     11.3     6.1     4.0     2.9     2.6     1.8     1.6     —       —       71

  

43.5     19.8     22.5     22.5     13.8     13.4     7.5     2.2     0.4     0.4     0.3     —       —       146

  

7.4     9.3     12.8     6.1     12.4     7.9     10.7     5.9     8.4     9.8     —       —       —       91

  

9.1     5.0     37.8     7.4     1.8     1.6     1.6     1.6     1.6     1.7     1.6     0.5     0.5     72

  

The LOM operating costs are shown in Table 1-4.

TABLE 1-4 LOM OPERATING COSTS Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

   

  

Open Pit    

Underground 

Mine $/t mined

  

US$ /st mined    

Unit

    

 

1.79    

 

86.59  

Mine $/t milled Process G&A Refine freight Royalty Total

                 

US$/st milled     US$/st milled     US$/st milled     US$/st milled     US$/st milled     US$/st milled    

  12.60       7.43       2.40       0.01       2.21       24.66    

           

104.82   22.87   24.02   0.09   4.90   156.70  

VALUE REALIZATION INITIATIVES In addition to the Cortez Underground Expansion, i.e., expanding underground mining into the Deep South Zone, below currently permitted  levels, Barrick has recently  conducted  a  technical  review  of  the  Cortez  Operations  with  the  objective  of  identifying  potential  opportunities  to  increase  production  capacity.  The opportunities that have been identified so far include:  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 1-18    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

CORTEZ PITS MINING The Cortez Pits area is located to the north of the current Cortez Hills underground portal and the area was previously mined between 1969 and 1993. There is a remaining  resource  below  the  historic  Cortez  Pits  that  is  a  continuation  of  the  mined-out  portion  of  the  Cortez  deposit.  The  current  reported  Measured  plus Indicated Mineral Resources total 4.1 Mt at a grade of 0.056 oz/st Au with 227,000 oz of contained gold. Pending the appropriate level of studies to convert the mineralization  to  Mineral  Reserves,  mining  would  be  by  open  pit  methods  of  the  primarily  heap  leach  grade  material.  A  total  of  163,000  oz  is  expected to be recovered using a process recovery of 74.1%. There  is  sufficient  drilling  information  associated  with  this  deposit  to  model  the  resource  in  terms  of  gold  grade,  however,  additional  drilling  information  is required for geotechnical guidance and metallurgical testing. The deposit also allows for resource upgrades at gold prices greater than US$1,400. HAULAGE CAPACITY INCREASE The Cortez Hills operation currently ships refractory ores via over-the-highway haul trucks to the Goldstrike operation for processing. Haulage is currently limited by permit to 1.2 Mstpa. An opportunity exists to expand the shipping rate to 2.2 Mstpa during the APO-4 permitting process, allowing increased shipping to begin upon permit receipt in 2020. Permit submittal is currently scheduled for Q1 2016. Additional technical studies are underway to determine increased haulage parameters including fleet sizing and road base suitability. Increased shipping rates will allow advancing the current LOM production stream of refractory material. PRODUCTION CAPACITY INCREASE BY 10% Cortez Hills operation has identified an opportunity to increase production capacity by an approximately 10% increase of the CIL process plan and heap leach (HL) capacity. This will be achieved as follows:  

 



  Partial solution recycle is pursued applying pregnant leach solution to new material for the first 30 days of leaching.



  CIL  process  plant  throughput  is  achieved  by  maximizing  SAG  and  ball  mill  power  draw  along  with  improved  secondary  grinding  circuit  control strategies.

 

   

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 1-19    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

•  

  Increased  capacity  will  advance  production  and  cash  flow  streams  along  with  slight  reduction  in  unit  costs.  Implementation  is  currently  underway (10%  complete)  as  the  majority  of  infrastructure  is  in  place.  Capital  cost  is  estimated  to  be  $10  million  (conceptual  level)  for  solution distribution. Improvements in throughput are estimated to be 10% to 20% for HL and 5% to 12% for CIL.

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 1-20    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

2 INTRODUCTION Roscoe Postle Associates Inc. (RPA) was retained by Barrick Gold Corporation (Barrick) to prepare an independent Technical Report on the Cortez Open Pit and Underground Mine Operations (the Cortez Operations or the Mine), in Eureka and Lander Counties, Nevada, USA. The purpose of this report is to support the public  disclosure  of  Mineral  Resources  and  Mineral  Reserves  at  Cortez  as  of  December  31,  2015.  This  Technical  Report  conforms  to  NI  43-101  Standards  of Disclosure for Mineral Projects. Barrick is a Canadian publicly traded mining company with a portfolio of operating mines and projects across five continents. The Cortez Operations are located in northeastern Nevada approximately 62 mi west and south of Elko. The Cortez Mine is a joint venture between two wholly-owned subsidiaries of Barrick, Barrick Cortez Inc. (60%) and Barrick Gold Finance Inc. (40%). The Cortez Hills Project is 100% owned by Barrick Cortez Inc. The Cortez Operations consist of the Pipeline, Crossroads, Gap, Cortez Hills (CHOP), and Pediment open pits, the Cortez Hills underground (CHUG) mine, a 13,000 short ton per day (stpd) carbon-in-leach (CIL) gold plant, heap leach pads and heap leach processing plants, and the planned Crossroads open pit, with additional Mineral Resources contained in the Cortez Pits and Gold Acres open pits. The nearby deposit of Hilltop is also part of the Mine but does not have reportable resources at this time. The open pit is a large scale operation utilizing a conventional truck and shovel fleet and mining approximately 400,000 stpd of ore and waste. Mining operations move between the various pits over the Life of Mine (LOM) plan. The underground mine is a 2,000 stpd mechanized mine. Ore from the mines is treated at an oxide mill at the site and on leach pads and refractory ore is shipped to Barrick’s Goldstrike operation for processing. Barrick completed a Pre-feasibility  Study (PFS) for underground mining in the Deep South Zone (the Cortez Underground Expansion Project),  below currently permitted  areas  of the CHUG. The PFS indicated  that the project  has the potential  to contribute  underground production  of more than 300,000 ounces per year between  2022 and  2026 at  average  all-in  sustaining  costs  of  approximately  $580 per  ounce.  More detailed  planning,  subsequent  to the  PFS, has resulted  in the current LOM beginning underground gold production from the Deep  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 2-1    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

South  Zone  in  2022  and  producing  300,000  ounces  per  year  between  2023  and  2027.  Initial  capital  costs  are  estimated  to  be  $153  million.  The  PFS  supports conversion of approximately 1.7 million ounces of Measured and Indicated Resources in the Deep South Zone to Proven and Probable Reserves as of December 31, 2015. The PFS timeline assumes that permitting will take approximately three to four years and Barrick expects to commence this process in the first half of 2016. On this basis, following the receipt of permits, dewatering and development work could begin as early as 2019 or 2020, with initial production from the Deep South Zone commencing in 2022. The expansion of the underground mine is expected to offset the impact of the end of mining in the Cortez Hills open pit, which is scheduled to conclude in 2018. SOURCES OF INFORMATION Site visits were carried out by Wayne Valliant, P.Geo., RPA Principal Geologist, Chester Moore P.Eng., RPA Principal Geologist, Dennis Bergen, P.Eng., RPA Associate Principal Mining Engineer, Stuart Collins, P.E., RPA Principal Mining Engineer, and Kathleen Ann Altman, Ph.D., P.E., RPA Principal Metallurgist, from May 5 to 7, 2015. Discussions were held with personnel from Barrick and Cortez:  

 



  Larry Snider, Senior Resource Geologist



  Roger Bond, Senior Geologist



  Andrew Ostendorf, Resource Geologist



  Felipe Salamanca, Open Pit Chief Engineer



  Robert Dudley, Accounting Supervisor



  Jim MacPherson, Senior Mine Engineer



  Dave Pierce, Water Management Superintendent



  Lynnette Hutson, Senior Business Analyst



  Patrick Jenks, Chief Geotechnical Engineer



  Mark D. Miller, Environmental Manager



  Nick Atiemo, Environmental Superintendent



  Brian D. Taylor, Environmental Specialist III (Public Lands)



  Amiee Keys, Environmental Specialist II (Environmental Management System)



  Steve Cashin, Process Manager



  Jon Kamensky, Superintendent Metallurgical Services & Heap Operations



  Jeff Olson, Metallurgist



  Emrah Yalcin, Senior Metallurgist



  Pamela Moyo, Senior Metallurgical Engineer



  Erin Lee Buck, Metallurgist



  James (Sam) Edens, Metallurgical Coordinator



  Brandon Cooper, Metallurgist



  Theo Kandawasvika, Technical Services Superintendent

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 2-2    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

 



  Beverley O’Malley, Cortez Hills Underground, Chief Geologist

Mr. Valliant is responsible for the overall preparation of this report and reviewed the geology, sampling, assaying, and resource estimate of the open pit part of the operation described in Sections 7 to 12 and 14 as well as the general information in Sections 4, 5, and 6. Mr. Moore reviewed the geology, sampling, assaying, and resource estimate of the underground part of the operation described in Sections 7 to 12 and 14. Mr. Collins reviewed the mining practices, reserve estimate, and economics of the open pit division and is responsible for the open pit portions of Sections 15, 16, 18, 19, 21, and 22. Mr. Bergen reviewed the mining practices, reserve estimate, and economics of the underground division and is responsible for the underground portions of Sections 15, 16, 18, 19, 21, and 22. Dr. Kathleen Ann Altman reviewed the metallurgical and environmental aspects of the operation and is responsible for Sections 13, 17, and 20. All authors share responsibility for Sections 1, 2, 3, 24, 25, 26, and 27. The documentation reviewed, and other sources of information, are listed at the end of this report in Section 27 References.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 2-3    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS Units of measurement used in this report conform to the imperial system. All currency in this report is US dollars (US$) unless otherwise noted.

  A amsl A bbl btu °C C$ cal cfm cm cm 2 d dia dmt dwt °F ft ft 2 ft 3 ft/s g G Gal g/L Gpm g/t gr/ft 3 gr/m 3 ha hp hr Hz in. in 2 J k kcal kg km km 2 km/h kPa kVA kW

                                                                                       

annum average mean sea level ampere barrels British thermal units degree Celsius Canadian dollars calorie cubic feet per minute centimetre square centimetre day diameter dry metric tonne dead-weight ton degree Fahrenheit foot square foot cubic foot foot per second gram giga (billion) Imperial gallon gram per litre Imperial gallons per minute gram per tonne grain per cubic foot grain per cubic metre hectare horsepower hour hertz inch square inch joule kilo (thousand) kilocalorie kilogram kilometre square kilometre kilometre per hour kilopascal kilovolt-amperes kilowatt

                                                                                       

kWh L lb L/s m M m 2 m 3 µ µg m 3 /h mi min µm mm mph MVA MW MWh oz oz/st ppb ppm psia psig RL s st stpa stpd t tpa tpd US$ USg USgpm V W wmt wt% yd 3 yr

                                                                                       

kilowatt-hour litre pound litres per second metre mega (million); molar square metre cubic metre micron microgram cubic metres per hour mile minute micrometre millimetre miles per hour megavolt-amperes megawatt megawatt-hour Troy ounce (31.1035g) ounce per short ton part per billion part per million pound per square inch absolute pound per square inch gauge relative elevation second short ton short ton per year short ton per day metric tonne metric tonne per year metric tonne per day United States dollar United States gallon US gallon per minute volt watt wet metric tonne weight percent cubic yard year

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 2-4    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

3 RELIANCE ON OTHER EXPERTS This  report  has  been  prepared  by  Roscoe  Postle  Associates  Inc.  (RPA)  for  Barrick  Gold  Corporation  (Barrick).  The  information,  conclusions,  opinions,  and estimates contained herein are based on:  

 



  Information available to RPA at the time of preparation of this report,



  Assumptions, conditions, and qualifications as set forth in this report, and



  Data, reports, and other information supplied by Barrick and other third party sources.

 

   

 

For the purpose of this report, RPA has relied on ownership information provided by Barrick. RPA has not researched property title or mineral rights for Cortez and expresses no opinion as to the ownership status of the property. RPA has relied on Barrick for guidance on applicable taxes, royalties, and other government levies or interests, applicable to revenue or income from Cortez. Except for the purposes legislated under provincial securities laws any use of this report by any third party is at that party’s sole risk.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 3-1    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

4 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION AND LOCATION The Cortez Gold Mine is located 62 mi southwest of Elko, Nevada, USA. The Mine is located in Eureka and Lander Counties (Figure 4-1). The Cortez property is surrounded by the Cortez Joint Venture Area of Interest (CJVAOI) that covers approximately 1,053 mi 2 (Figure 4-2). The deposits and infrastructure are illustrated in Figures 4-3, 4-4, and 4-5. The CJVAOI includes private land, patented, and unpatented mineral claims and fee land and land controlled by competitors. The co-ordinates of the Pipeline open pit are approximately 40°15’ North latitude and 116°43’ West longitude.

LAND TENURE At  Cortez,  Barrick  directly  controls  approximately  216,124  acres  of  mineral  rights  with  ownership  of  mining  claims  and  fee  lands.  There  are  10,461  claims consisting of:  

 



  9,630 unpatented lode claims



  575 unpatented mill-site claims



  104 patented lode claims



  125 patented mill-site claims



  27 unpatented placer claims and 185 patented mill-site claims

 

   

   

   

 

All lease agreements and claim holdings are current and in good standing. The 2015 holding costs for the Cortez property include $1.7 million in holding costs and $496,015 in lease payments. Unpatented lode and mill-site claims are held under the 1872 mining law as amended, which requires the annual payment of $155 per claim on or before noon on the first of September each year. If the annual payment is not made for that specific claim, the claim will lapse and be subject to forfeiture. Patented ground or claims are surveyed by a certified mineral surveyor, and appropriate monuments placed in the ground. Each unpatented claim is marked on the ground, and does not require a mineral survey.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 4-1    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

All Mineral Reserves and Mineral Resources, in addition to existing and future facilities to be used to exploit the Mine deposits, are on public lands administered by the Battle Mountain or Elko Field Offices of the U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

ROYALTIES The Cortez operation is subject to a number of royalties. All production at Cortez is subject to a 1.28595% gross smelter return (GSR) royalty payable to the former shareholders of Idaho Mining Corporation. This was originally a 2.5% GSR royalty covered by a capping of ounces produced; the production limit has been met and  the  royalty  reduced  to  a  1.28595%.  GSR  is  defined  as  100%  of  smelter  revenue  before  deductions  for  refining  and  transportation.  The  Idaho  Mining Corporation  royalty  pertains  to  any  production  from  the  Pipeline,  South  Pipeline,  Crossroads,  Gap,  Gold  Acres,  Cortez  NW  Deep,  Cortez  Hills,  Pediment,  and Hilltop deposits. Royal Gold Inc. (Royal Gold) holds a sliding-scale GSR royalty over the Pipeline/South Pipeline deposits ranging from 0.40% to 5.0%. An additional sliding-scale GSR royalty is held over the undeveloped Crossroads deposit. ECM Inc. (ECM) holds a net value royalty of 3.75% of gold sales from the South Pipeline deposit. Rio Tinto holds a sliding-scale royalty (of 0% at gold prices less than $400/oz to 3% at gold prices greater than $900/oz) on 40% of all Cortez production in excess of 15 million ounces on and after January 1, 2008, which has not yet occurred. The State of Nevada imposes a 5% net proceeds tax on the value of all minerals severed in the State. This tax is calculated and paid  based on a prescribed net income formula which is different from book income. RPA is not aware of any environmental liabilities on the property. Barrick has all required permits to conduct work on the property. RPA is not aware of any other significant factors and risks that may affect access, title, or the right or ability to perform work on the property.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 4-2    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 4-3    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 4-4    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 4-5    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 4-6    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 4-7    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

5 ACCESSIBILITY, CLIMATE, LOCAL RESOURCES, INFRASTRUCTURE AND PHYSIOGRAPHY ACCESSIBILITY The  Mine  is  reached  by  travelling  approximately  32  mi  east  from  Battle  Mountain,  Nevada,  on  US  Interstate  80.  Alternative  access  is  from  Elko,  Nevada, approximately 45 mi west to the Beowawe exit, then approximately 35 mi south on Nevada State Route 306, which extends southward from US Interstate 80. Both US Interstate 80 and Nevada State Route 306 are paved roads. The  mining  district  is  also  crossed  by  a  network  of  gravel  roads,  providing  easy  access  to  various  portions  of  the  Mine.  All  roads  are  suitable  for  all  weather conditions; however, in extreme winter conditions, roads may be closed for short periods for snow removal. The Union Pacific Rail line runs parallel to US Interstate 80 to the north of the Mine. Elko, the closest city to the Mine, is serviced by daily commercial airline flights to Salt Lake City, Utah.

CLIMATE The  Mine  is  located  in  the  high  desert  region  of  the  Basin  and  Range  physiographic  province.  There  are  warm  summers  and  generally  mild  winters,  however, overnight freezing conditions are common during winter. The mean annual temperature is 51°F. Precipitation averages six inches per year, primarily derived from snow and summer thunderstorms. Typically, the months with the greatest precipitation are March, May, and November. During the winter months at elevations above approximately 5,500 ft amsl, precipitation generally occurs as snow. Evaporation is estimated at 39 in. per year. Operations continue on site year-round and are not materially impacted by weather.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 5-1    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

LOCAL RESOURCES Cortez is located in a major mining region and local resources including labour, water, power, contractors and suppliers, and local infrastructure for transportation of supplies are well established. The majority of the workforce lives in the nearby towns of Elko, Spring Creek, Carlin, and Battle Mountain. Electric power is provided to the Cortez site by NV Energy via an approximately 50 mi long radial transmission line originating at their Falcon substation. The incoming NV Energy line terminates at the Barrick owned Pipeline Substation. Two 120 kV lines that tap onto the NV Energy power line feed Barrick owned 120 kV  power  lines:  an  approximately  9  mi  extension  to  serve  the  Cortez  Hills  development  and  an  approximately  3  mi  extension  to  serve  the  South  Pipeline  and Crossroads pits. Water for process use at Cortez Mill No. 2 is supplied from the Pipeline open pit dewatering system. Approximately 1,450 gallons per minute of the pit dewatering volume is diverted for plant use. Additional water can be sourced as needed from wells at Mill No. 1. Process water supply for Cortez Hills will be drawn in whole or in part from dewatering operations. If sufficient volume cannot be produced by dewatering, process water will be supplied by existing production wells at the Pipeline and/or Cortez facilities. Water from the CHUG is pumped across Crescent Valley to an existing surface re-infiltration area.

INFRASTRUCTURE There is an extensive infrastructure in place to support the Cortez Operations including:  

 



  The 13,000 stpd No. 2 Mill complete with run-of-mine (ROM) pad and crushing circuit (including a primary jaw crusher)



  Pipeline leach pad and gold recovery plant



  Area 34 leach pad and gold recovery plant for Cortez Hills and Pediment



  A tailings management facility

 

   

   

   

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 5-2    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

 



  A gyratory crusher at the Cortez Hills open pit (CHOP) and an 11 mi long conveyor to the No. 2 Mill



  Existing active open pit mines at CHOP, Cortez, Pipeline, and Crossroads



  Pit dewatering wells and pumps for the open pits



  Infiltration ponds for the disposal of water



  An existing underground mine at Cortez Hills Underground (CHUG)



  Batch plant for shotcrete and cemented rock fill preparation



  Stockpile areas for an assortment of ore types



  Office complexes at the Mill No. 2, Mill No. 1, CHUG, and CHOP



  Equipment maintenance shops at CHOP, CHUG, and adjacent to the Mill No. 2



  Exploration offices, core handling, and core storage warehouse



  System of public and private roads connecting the facilities



  Shared business support services from the business unit offices in Elko

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

PHYSIOGRAPHY The Pipeline mine and Mill No. 2 are located at the southern end of the Crescent Valley in Lander County, Nevada. The Cortez Hills deposits and operations are located at the northern end of Eureka County. The Crescent Valley is a structural and topographic basin between the Northern Shoshone Range on the west and the Cortez Range on the east. Most mine facilities are on the west side of the valley at an elevation of approximately 5,000 ft amsl. This includes the original workings of the Gold Acres mine, now inactive, the Pipeline pit, the Gap pit and the proposed Crossroads pit. The property is located at elevations between 4,500 ft amsl and 6,000 ft amsl on the valley floor and up the side of Mount Tenabo. The Cortez Mine and Mill No. 1 (both inactive) are located along the northern edge of the Cortez Range seven miles southeast of the Pipeline pit. The Cortez Hills and Pediment deposits are located in the Cortez Hills approximately three miles south of the Cortez Pits and at an elevation of approximately 6,000 ft amsl.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 5-3    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

The vegetation consists primarily of shrubs and grasses, such as sagebrush, rabbitbrush, cheatgrass, and grama. Juniper trees, pinion pine, mountain mahogany, and a variety of grasses are also present. In general, vegetation is relatively sparse. The valley floor is sparsely vegetated while the mountain slopes have small pinion pine and juniper trees. No endangered or threatened species, BLM-sensitive species, or plants proposed for listing have been identified in the Mine area. Fauna that have been observed in the Mine area are typical of those of the Great Basin area, and include jackrabbits, cottontail rabbits, mule deer, antelope, coyotes, various rodents, and reptiles. No proposed threatened, or endangered species are considered to exist within the Mine area.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 5-4    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

6 HISTORY Mining  in  the  Cortez  Mining  District  began  with  the  discovery  of  silver  mineralization  in  1862  along  the  quartzite  outcroppings  at  the  western  base  of  Mount Tenabo, some four miles to the southeast of the Cortez Mill No. 1 complex. Underground silver mining was conducted in the area until the 1930s. Mineralization at Hilltop was also identified during the 1860s. The majority of production occurred between 1915 and 1951 from underground sources, with approximate production of 18,000 ounces of gold, 360,000 ounces of silver and subordinate amounts of lead, copper, and antimony. Gold mineralization at Gold Acres was discovered in the late 1920s and mined by a small mining company from 1935 to 1960. The mine was one of the few gold operations to remain open during World War II. In 1959, American Exploration & Mining Co. (AMEX), a wholly-owned US subsidiary of Placer Development Ltd. (subsequently Placer Dome Inc. (Placer Dome) and  Barrick),  entered  into  a  lease-option  agreement  on  the  properties  of  the  Cortez  Metals  Co.  and  started  extensive  exploration  of  the  mine  workings  and surrounding area. In 1963 AMEX entered into an exploration agreement with Idaho Mining Corp., which had acquired large areas of mineralized ground adjoining the AMEX holdings. In 1964, AMEX formed the Cortez Joint Venture (CJV) with the added participation of the Bunker Hill Co., Vernon F. Taylor, Jr., and Webb Resources Inc. The US Geological Survey found anomalous gold in altered outcrops at the base of the Cortez Range in 1966. The CJV shortly afterwards discovered the Cortez deposit. Production at Cortez began in 1969 and continued until 1972, and then resumed from 1988 to 1993. Production was from the F-Canyon, Cortez, and Ada 52 pits. Waste dumps from the operations were reclaimed during the 1990s. The Cortez process facilities include three inactive heap leach pads, West, East and 91C  leach  pads,  constructed  in  1972,  1984,  and  1990  respectively.  The  leach  pads  have  been  inactive  since  1994.  Seven  tailings  storage  areas  are  situated  in  the Cortez area, TA 1 to TA 7, inclusive.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 6-1    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 6-1 HISTORY OF EXPLORATION AND MINING AT CORTEZ SITE Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Period

  

Activity

1862–1932 1912–1921 Late 1920s 1935–1960 1964 1966 1968 1969–1972; 1988–1993 1973–1976 1976–1983 1983–1987 1987–1996 1989 1991 1994 1996 1997 1998 1999 2001 2002 2003 2004–2009 2005 2006 2008

                                                                          

Cortez Silver mine in operation Mining of gold, lead, copper and antimony at Hilltop Gold Acres deposit discovered Gold mined from the Gold Acres deposit by other companies. Gold Acres mined as an open pit operation CJV formed Cortez deposit discovered Horse Creek (formerly Red Hill) discovered by Homestake Mining Co. Cortez deposit mined New southern extension of the Gold Acres deposit mined and Horse Canyon deposit discovered Low-grade oxide ores from Cortez and Gold Acres heap leached Horse Canyon deposit mined Mining resumed in the Cortez and Gold Acres deposits Acquisition of Hilltop deposit Pipeline, South Pipeline, Crescent and Gap deposits discovered Commenced mining the Crescent pit within the north western portion of the South Pipeline deposit Mining commenced on the Pipeline deposit Production at Mill No. 2 commenced. Total development and capital costs were $250 million. Crossroads and Pediment deposits discovered. Mill No. 1 was placed on care and maintenance. Plan of Operations was submitted for Pipeline expansion and Pediment South Area heap leach facility was commissioned Cortez Hills deposit discovery announced Infill drilling continued at Cortez Hills and Pediment deposits Discovery of Lower Zone at Cortez Hills Completion of positive internal Feasibility Study on Cortez Hills Barrick acquires Placer Dome; commencement of mining at the South Gap deposit Acquisition of remaining 40% interest in the Mine through Barrick purchase of Kennecott interest from Rio Tinto. Positive Record of Decision received for Cortez Hills development Development of open pit commences at Cortez Hills. Mining halted at the Pipeline Complex. Goldrush deposit discovered. Production resumed at Pipeline Complex.

2009 2011 2013

           

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 6-2    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

The CJV initiated exploration drilling around the pre-existing Gold Acres deposit in 1969, and obtained exploration rights to the former mining area in 1969. Open pit mining began in 1973, from the North and South pits. Low-grade ores from Gold Acres were mined and processed by heap leaching until 1976. Leaching and milling of Gold Acres stockpiles and dumps continued until 1983. The Gold Acres heap leach facility is associated with the deposits. Drilling resumed, resulting in the discovery of refractory gold mineralization in the vicinity of the North pit. Mill-grade ores were mined from 1987 to 1996 and processed at the Cortez Mill No. 1. Total production from this deposit (historic and recent) is estimated to exceed 500,000 ounces of gold. In 2003, the CJV commenced shipping Gold Acres refractory stockpiles for toll-processing at third-party facilities. The  Horse  Canyon  deposits  were  discovered  in  early  1976.  Three  pits,  North,  South,  and  South  Extension  were  mined  in  the  period  from  1984  to 1987. Approximately 3.5 million tons were mined with approximately 385,000 ounces of gold recovered. The Pipeline, South Pipeline, and Crossroads gold deposits occur in sequence from northwest to southeast and were entirely concealed beneath pediment gravels up to 300 ft thick. The Pipeline deposit was discovered by CJV geologists in March 1991 during drilling of deep condemnation holes on the pediment east of Gold Acres. The Gap deposit was discovered in 1991 adjacent to the planned Stage 9 of the Pipeline pit. The Pipeline South area was initially controlled by association placer claims under the control of the CJV since the early 1970s. Only scattered sub-ore grade gold has been identified. The area was over-staked with lode claims by ECM in early 1987. By May 1987, Royal Gold had leased this property, known as the GAS claims, from ECM. The claim conflict was resolved by the formation of the Royal/Cortez Joint Venture between Royal Gold and the CJV later that year. Royal Gold completed geophysical surveys and drilling programs between 1987 and 1989 that led to the identification  of additional sub-economic gold grades, primarily in an anomaly known as GAS 2. Although a mineral resource was estimated no further work was undertaken by Royal Gold or by CJV due to the limited amount of drill data available. No further drilling by Royal Gold occurred due to lack of funding.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 6-3    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

In August 1991, the Royal/Cortez Joint Venture was terminated and the CJV leased the property directly from ECM. A later dispute between Royal Gold and the CJV concerning termination of the Royal/Cortez Joint Venture led to the formation of the South Pipeline Project and the royalty structure. In November 1991, the CJV discovered the South Pipeline deposit. Additional gold was identified in August 1992. Step-out and in-fill drilling continued through July  1994.  This  drilling  confirmed  the  presence  of  a  relatively  shallow  gold  occurrence  above  the  water  table,  the  Crescent  deposit.  Mining  of  the  Crescent  pit (northwest part of the South Pipeline deposit) commenced in May 1994 and was completed in 1997. The Crescent pit has since been subsumed by the Pipeline pit. An internal Feasibility Study (FS) covering the Pipeline and South Pipeline deposits was completed by Placer Dome Technical Services in 1995. Construction of Mill No. 2 and pre-stripping of the first stage of the Pipeline pit began in 1996. The Pipeline pit has estimated Mineral Reserves and is included in Barrick’s current LOM plan. Two waste dumps are permitted (Gap and Pipeline). Associated infrastructure includes the integrated Pipeline heap leach and tailings facility, South Area heap leach facility, and Mill No. 2. Continued drilling along northwest-southeast structural trends at Pipeline in 1998 resulted in discovery of the Crossroads deposit southeast of the South Pipeline deposit. Crossroads is concealed beneath 550 ft of alluvium. It represents a continuation of mineralization from South Pipeline. In 1996, CJV geologists began a program to test for concealed mineralization south of the Cortez Mine. Geochemical and geophysical surveys were used to guide deep reverse circulation (RC) drilling, initially focusing on an area immediately west of the Cortez Fault. In 1998, the Pediment deposit was discovered in a deep RC  drilling  program  designed  to  test  potential  for  bedrock  mineralization  in  the  central  and  western  portions  of  the  alluvium-covered  Cortez  Fault Corridor. Subsequent RC and core drilling programs through 2002 defined the Pediment deposit. The Cortez Hills deposit was discovered in October 2002 as part of an RC drilling exploration program investigating a steep gravity gradient anomaly near the projected intersection of north–northwest-trending Cortez Fault Corridor structures and west–northwest-trending faults  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 6-4    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

beneath alluvial cover immediately to the north of the Pediment deposit. In 2004, the Cortez Hills Lower Zone was discovered as part of the step-out drilling to the west of the Cortez Hills deposit. In November 2008, the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Cortez–Pediment development was approved. The project was developed as two open pits and  a  concurrent  underground  development  of  a  high-grade  portion  underlying  the  pits.  Production  from  underground  began  in  late  2008,  and  the  first  ore production of CHOP phases one through three occurred in late December 2009. In  March  2008,  Barrick  acquired  a  100%  interest  in  the  Mine,  purchasing  the  former  Kennecott  40%  interest  for  a  consideration  of  $1.695  billion  in  cash,  an additional  $50  million  payable  if  and  when  an  additional  12  million  ounces  of  contained  gold  Mineral  Resources  were  added  to  Barrick’s  December  31,  2007 Mineral Reserve statement for Cortez, and a sliding-scale royalty payable to Rio Tinto on 40% of all Cortez production in excess of 15 million ounces on and after January 1, 2008. In 2012, the threshold of an additional 12 million ounces added to Mineral Resources was reached, and the $50 million payment was made to Rio Tinto. Production from the Mine in the period 1969 to 2015 is summarized in Table 6-2.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 6-5    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 6-2 ANNUAL PRODUCTION, 1969–2015 Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Year Ended

  

Gold

(000 oz)

    1969     1970     1971     1972     1973     1974     1975     1976     1977     1978     1979     1980     1981     1982     1983     1984     1985     1986     1987     1988     1989     1990     1991     1992     1993     1994     1995     1996     1997     1998     1999     2000     2001     2002     2003     2004     2005     2006     2007     2008     2009     2010     2011     2012     2013     2014     2015



Total

                                                                                                                                               

166 209 120 190 76 104 74 28 2 2 2 8 21 25 47 49 56 62 51 42 40 54 58 77 67 70 111 161 407 1,138 1,328 1,010 1,188 1,082 1,065 1,052 904 427 323 428 518 1,140 1,421 1,370 1,337 901 999 20,010

 

 

  

 

  

 

Note:  Production  from  1969  to 2005 is  total  production,  reported  on  a 100% basis,  sourced  from  corporate  annual  reports.  Production  from  April  to  December 2006, 2007, and January to February 2008 is the Barrick interest only, at 60% of production. Barrick production at 100% is included from March 2008 onwards.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 6-6    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

7 GEOLOGICAL SETTING AND MINERALIZATION REGIONAL GEOLOGY The  Mine  is  located  in  the  eastern  Great  Basin  (Basin  and  Range  Province)  at  the  southern  closure  of  Crescent  Valley,  a  northeast  trending  structural  and topographic basin between the Northern Shoshone Range on the west and the Cortez Range on the east. The Mine lies within the “Battle Mountain-Eureka Trend” (BMT), an alignment of gold mines and occurrences located in a northwest-southeast belt extending from the Marigold Mine some 50 mi northwest of Cortez, to Ruby Hill at Eureka 60 mi to the southeast. Two regionally  recognized  Paleozoic  assemblages  comprise  the  basement  sedimentary  strata  of  northeastern  Nevada. These  assemblages  were deposited  on the western continental margin of North America. The western assemblage is a deep water marine package of siliciclastic rocks consisting of mudstone, chert, siltstone, sandstone,  and  minor  limestone.  The  eastern  shallow  water  sedimentary  assemblage  consists  predominantly  carbonate  rocks  including  limestone,  dolomite,  and some quartzite units. The eastern assemblage underlies all other stratigraphic units in eastern and central Nevada. Jurassic to Cretaceous intrusive rocks of granitic composition intrude the Paleozoic sedimentary rock and are locally exposed as stocks, sills, and dikes. Tertiary extrusive rocks unconformably overlie the older packages and are dominated by a bimodal suite of rhyolite and basaltic flows with associated felsic tuffs and lesser amounts of intermediate volcanic rocks. Post-mineralization Eocene to Oligocene quartz porphyry dikes and sills have been emplaced along low angle thrust faults as well as high angle structures, in some cases intruding the gold deposits. Late Tertiary and Quaternary erosional products have partially filled the valley basins with coalescing alluvial fan deposits marginal to the mountains and finer-grained alluvium in the valley centres. The Antler orogeny extensively deformed Paleozoic rocks of the Great Basin in Nevada and western Utah during Late Devonian and Early Mississippian time. In the late Devonian about 350 million years ago, the Antler volcanic island arc terrane collided with what was then the west coast of North America and the North American Plate. The collision zone is marked by  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 7-1    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

the Roberts Mountains Thrust, a system of low-angle thrust faults along which the Upper Plate clastic rocks were thrust some 90 miles eastward over the Lower Plate carbonates. Mesozoic compressional deformation was also important regionally as indicated by various east and west as well as north-northeast and southsouthwest verging thrusts. Tertiary faulting developed basins and ranges with the former subsequently filled with volcanic and sedimentary rocks during Tertiary time. Gold mineralization occurred at the onset of Tertiary volcanism, approximately 39 million years ago. The  stratigraphic  section  is  cut  by  a  series  of  north-northwest,  northwest,  northeast,  and  north-northeast  striking  high-  and  low-angle  faults  with  extensive fracturing, brecciation, and folding. These faults both control and displace mineralization, with evidence for both dip-slip and oblique-slip displacements. Jurassic and  Tertiary  intrusive  rocks  utilized  both  high  and  low-angle  faults  as  they  intruded  the  Paleozoic  section.  Cenozoic  Basin  and  Range  deformation  most  likely reactivated the majority of faults in the area. In terms of their regional tectonic setting, the BMT gold deposits are hosted in carbonate rocks within a thick sequence of Paleozoic miogeosynclinal sedimentary rocks coincident with:  

 



  the thinned western margin of the North American craton in early Paleozoic times,



  the west-central portion of the Lower Devonian Antler foreland basin,



  the east edge of deformation related to the late Paleozoic Humboldt orogeny,



  an area of Jurassic plutonism, metamorphism and deformation,



  the hinterland of the early Tertiary Sevier orogenic belt, and



  the broad zone of Eocene to Miocene calc-alkaline magmatism and tectonic extension that occurred throughout much of the Great Basin.

 

   

   

   

   

 

The collision between the Antler terrane and the North America Plate induced higher crustal temperatures and pressures, which produced numerous hot springs along the suture zone. Several episodes of subsurface magmatism are known to have occurred subsequent to the collision. During these episodes, and particularly during the Eocene epoch, hot springs brought dissolved minerals toward the surface, precipitating them out along fissures. Among these minerals were gold and silver. Most of the largest gold deposits lie within approximately 300 ft of the Roberts Mountain Thrust at the base of the Upper Plate allochthon. Geochronologic study indicates that most of the gold in the BMT was emplaced over a short interval of time between approximately 42 Ma and 36 Ma. Analyses of the sulphosalt galkhaite  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 7-2    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

from the Rodeo deposit at Barrick’s Goldstrike Mine (Carlin Trend) have yielded a mineralization age of 39.8 ± 0.6 Ma. The regional geology is shown in Figure 7-1.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 7-3    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 7-4    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

LOCAL GEOLOGY Both the western and eastern Paleozoic assemblages are present in the Cortez area. At Cortez the western assemblage, termed the Upper Plate, includes:  

 



  Devonian Slaven Formation cherts and argillites



  Silurian Elder Formation sandstone and Fourmile Canyon Formation



  Ordovician Vinini and Valmy Formations siliclastic rocks

 

   

 

The eastern assemblage, or Lower Plate, consists of:  

 



  Devonian Horse Canyon Formation laminated calcareous siltstone, mudstones with interbedded chert and silicified siltstones



  Early Devonian Wenban Formation carbonate turbidites, debris flows, micrites, and silty limestones



  Silurian-Devonian Roberts Mountains Formation laminated silty limestones



  Ordovician Eureka Formation quartzites and Hanson Creek Formation sandy dolomites



  Cambrian Hamburg dolomite

 

   

   

   

 

Two erosional windows of Lower Plate rocks are mapped in the Cortez area  both located at the southern end of Crescent Valley (Figure 7-2). The Gold Acres window on the eastern flank of the Shoshone Range, is buried to the east beneath the alluvial fill of Crescent Valley, and presumably is offset by the Crescent fault located on the south side of the valley near the Cortez Mine. South of the Crescent fault is the Cortez window, which appears to be a continuation of the Gold Acres window. The Cortez window is a two to three mile-wide, north–south trending zone that extends from the margin of Crescent Valley near the existing Cortez Mine south through the Cortez Hills area and into the northern Grass Valley area. Aeromagnetic studies indicate that intrusive rocks underlie most of the Cortez Mountains. Outcrops of igneous intrusions in the Cortez district are granodiorite of Jurassic-cretaceous age (104 Ma to 150 Ma) and the Jurassic-age quartz monzonite Mill Canyon Stock. Felsic and mafic and dikes of similar age occur primarily in north  to northwest  striking  faults.  Contact  metamorphism  affects  the  sedimentary  rocks  adjacent  to  the larger  igneous  bodies  and is  evident  in  the  formation  of marble, calc-silicates, hornfels, and skarn. Post-mineral porphyry dacite and rhyodacite dikes and sills of Tertiary age are present and notable where they cross-cut mineralized zones.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 7-5    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

The local geology and stratigraphy of the Cortez Mine area is shown in Figures 7-2 and 7-3, respectively. The Gold Acres, Pipeline, Gap, and Crossroads gold deposits are at the south end of the Shoshone Range located on the west side of Crescent Valley within the Gold Acre Lower Plate window. Gold Acres mineralization  is hosted within  the Roberts  Mountains  thrust fault,  which is up to 400 feet  thick in the mine.  The Pipeline, South Pipeline, Gap, and Crossroads deposits occur within Lower Plate Horse Canyon, Wenban, and Roberts Mountains Formations. The Hilltop gold deposit, located approximately 10 mi north of Gold Acres is hosted by an Eocene porphyry and surrounding brecciated, Upper Plate siliciclastic sedimentary rocks of the Ordovician Valmy Formation along a northwest-trending belt of similar aged intrusions. The Cortez Pits, Cortez Hills, and Pediment gold deposits are on the south side of Crescent Valley associated with the Cortez Lower Plate window. The Cortez Hills  mineralized  breccia,  thrust  fault  related  Middle  and  Lower  zones  are  within  Horse  Canyon,  Wenban,  and  Roberts  Mountains  units.  The  Pediment  deposit appears to be contained within Miocene-age conglomeratic sediments located immediately southwest of the Cortez Hills deposit. The Horse Canyon deposit is in the Cortez Range approximately four miles east of Cortez Hills and is emplaced in Horse Canyon and Wenban units. The Buckhorn gold mine, approximately  seven miles  east  of Cortez, is a past producer  that shut down in 1991 with historical  production  of 250,000 ounces of gold.  It  is  a low-sulphidation  epithermal  vein and  replacement  mineralization  localized  by structures  and permeable  horizons  in Tertiary  basalts  and  underlying fanglomerate.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 7-6    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 7-7    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 7-8    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

PROPERTY GEOLOGY Deposit  descriptions  for  the  Pipeline  Complex,  Gold  Acres,  Pediment,  and  Cortez  Pits  deposits  were  extracted  in  whole  or  in  part  from  the  Scott  Wilson RPA Cortez 2010 Audit Report and modified where required for this Report to reflect the current geological understanding of these areas. PIPELINE COMPLEX PIPELINE/SOUTH PIPELINE/CROSSROADS The Pipeline, South Pipeline, and Crossroads deposits are separate zones of one gold-mineralized system, which collectively strike approximately N20W for over 8,000  ft  and  extend  up  to  5,000  ft  wide  E-W.  Economic  gold  grades  do  not  occur  over  the  full  expanse  of  this  system,  but  variable  degrees  of  hydrothermal alteration  are  evident  including  oxidation,  decalcification,  weak  contact  metamorphism,  argillization,  silicification,  and  carbonization.  Mineralization  at  the Pipeline Complex occurs just outboard of the metamorphic aureole associated with the Gold Acres intrusive. Alluvial cover is absent in the northwest, but thickens up to 450 ft in the eastern Pipeline pit area and ranges from 315 ft to 770 ft over the Crossroads deposit to the south. The  area  is  characterized  by  folded  and  low-angle  faulted  Paleozoic  carbonates.  The  primary  host  rocks  are  variably  altered,  thin-  to  thick-bedded, carbonate turbidites,  debris  flows,  micrites,  and  silty  limestones  of  the  Devonian  Wenban  Limestone  and  thin-bedded,  planar-laminated  calcareous  siltstones,  mudstones, inter-bedded chert, and silicified siltstones of the Devonian Horse Canyon Formation overlying. At depth, planar laminated, silty limestones of the Silurian Roberts Mountains Formation also host mineralization. Initial  porosities  in  the  turbidites,  siltstones,  and  silty  limestones  were  enhanced  through  argillization  and  decarbonitization  along  structural  and  stratigraphic controls. Thrust and normal faulting have shattered the more brittle cherty and silicified beds creating a secondary porosity. The highest and most continuous gold grades occur in the inter-bedded cherts and silicified turbidites of the Horse Canyon Formation and in the Wenban Formation either where capped by the Horse Canyon Formation or in areas of more intense decarbonitization. Host formations have been thickened and repeated by low-angle thrusting largely associated with the Late Devonian Antler Orogeny.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 7-9    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

GAP The Gap deposit is hosted in Devonian Wenban Limestone and lies west of the Pipeline Deposit. Mineralization occurs where north-northwest and northeast, highangle faults intersect thermally altered Devonian Wenban Limestone in the axis of the Gold Acres antiform. Bedding in the Devonian Wenban Limestone is subhorizontal to gently east-dipping. Portions of the limestone host-rocks of the deposit that lie within the metamorphic aureole of the Gold Acres Stock have been altered to calc-silicate marble, hornfels, skarn, and gossan. Skarn within the Gap pit can be correlated with the upper skarn in the Gold Acres deposit. GOLD ACRES The Gold Acres pit is centred on the axis of a low-amplitude, north-northwest trending antiform. The primary host rocks to the mineralization are sheared Upper Plate siliciclastics and greenstones of the Ordovician Valmy Formation and cherts and quartz siltstone of the Devonian Slaven Formation, sheared Lower Plate silty limestone  with  discontinuous  thin  phosphatic  black  lenses  of  the  Silurian  Roberts  Mountains  Formation  and  micrite  to  silty  micrite  of  the  Devonian  Wenban Limestone. The intensity of metamorphism associated with the Gold Acres Stock varies depending on original lithology and ranges from hornfels to calc-silicate marble to skarn. Drill hole intercepts indicate that the pluton is 400 ft to 600 ft below the current Gold Acres pits. Two discrete horizons, referred to as “Upper Skarn” and “Lower Skarn,” have been mapped at Gold Acres. The Upper Skarn unit is a bleached felsic sill-like body with  endoskarn  development  and  is  presumed  to  be  associated  with  the  granodioritic  Gold  Acres  Stock  of  Jurassic-Cretaceous  (104  Ma  to  150  Ma)  age.  The “Lower  Skarn”  is  a  garnet–diopside  skarn  believed  to  be  lower  Wenban  Limestone.  The  two  skarn  horizons  are  separated  by  an  80  ft  to  200  ft  thick  zone comprising slices of Upper and Lower plate rocks known as the Imbricate Thrust Zone (ITZ). CORTEZ HILLS COMPLEX The Cortez Hills Complex includes the Cortez Hills Breccia, Middle and Lower zones, and the Pediment deposit. BRECCIA, MIDDLE AND LOWER ZONES The upper levels of mineralization in the Cortez Hills deposit are hosted in the Horse Canyon Formation. The bulk of the deposit is hosted in the Devonian Wenban Limestone. At depth,  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 7-10    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

mineralization  is  also  hosted  by  Roberts  Mountains  Formation  as  well  as  Hanson  Creek  Dolomite.  The  range-bounding  Cortez  Fault  is  located  just  east  of  the deposit. The location of Breccia gold mineralization appears to have been emplaced on hydrothermal brecciated and fractured rocks that are centred on a northwest striking and  moderately  southwest  dipping  fault  and  its  attendant  structures,  named  the  Voodoo  Fault.  At  depth  the  stratigraphy  has  been  deformed  by  thrust  faulting leading to both folding and fracturing. Gold mineralization at depth occurs as tabular, sub-horizontal to shallow dipping zones associated with calcareous rocks subject to preparation by alteration and deformation; this deeper mineralization forms the Middle and Lower zones at Cortez Hills. Post-mineral quartz porphyry dikes and sills intrude the Cortez Hills deposits. A northwest trending swarm of steely dipping dikes defines the limits between the Middle and Lower zones. PEDIMENT The Cortez Pediment deposit is located in a Tertiary gravel-filled canyon immediately south of Cortez Hills and appears to have originated from material and gold eroded from the top of the Cortez Hills deposit. In contrast to rock formations, the gravels at Pediment display inverted stratigraphy in that the deepest unit is a 50 ft to 200 ft thick siltstone-dominated gravel sourced from the gold mineralized Horse Canyon Formation and it underlies a limestone-dominated gravel (100 ft to 800 ft thick) derived  from the erosion  of uplifted,  barren  Devonian  Wenban  Limestone.  The  gravels  are  covered  by thin,  unconsolidated  fanglomerate  composed  of Eureka  Quartzite  fragments,  the  quartzite  having  been  exposed  by  later  uplift  east  of  the  Cortez  Fault.  There  are  no  obvious  structural  controls,  although  the Pediment deposit is strongly elongated north–northeast. CORTEZ PITS (NW DEEPS) The  Cortez  NW  Deeps  deposit  is  hosted  by  strongly  altered,  thin-  to  medium-bedded  silty  limestone  of  the  Roberts  Mountains  Formation  and  by  sheared and altered  interbedded  dolomite  and  limestones  of  the  underlying  Ordovician  Hanson  Creek  Formation.  Devonian  Wenban  Limestone  caps  most  ridges  and  hills around the NW Deeps deposit  and locally  appears  to have acted as a cap rock over alteration systems in the underlying Roberts Mountains Formation. Prior to mining, Quaternary alluvium formed a thin veneer of cover over the deposit. Alluvium thickens abruptly to the north across the Cortez range-front normal fault.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 7-11    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

Quartz monzonites of the Jurassic Mill Canyon Stock are present east of the deposit on the uplifted side of a north–northwest-trending normal fault. Numerous Oligocene quartz porphyry dikes and sills intrude the deposit. These dikes are considered to be post-mineralization. A series of north–northwest-trending and northeast-trending faults cut the Roberts Mountains Formation at the deposit. Mineralization occurs where these faults intersect shallow east-dipping thrust breccia zones (thrust duplexes) within the Roberts Mountains Formation.

MINERALIZATION With the exception of Cortez Hills, the description of mineralization for this section is taken largely from the July 2010 Scott Wilson RPA Cortez audit report with modifications as required for this report. Gold mineralization is reported as Mineral Resources for the following nine deposits in the Cortez area:  

 



  Pipeline Complex (3 deposits) – Pipeline, Gap and Crossroads



  Gold Acres



  Cortez Hills Complex (4 zones) – Breccia, Middle, Lower and Pediment



  Cortez Pits (NW Deeps)

 

   

   

 

Mineralization consists primarily of submicron to micrometre-sized gold particles, very fine sulphide grains, and gold in solid solution in pyrite. Mineralization occurs disseminated throughout the host rock matrix in zones of silicified and decarbonatized, argillized, silty calcareous rocks, and associated jasperoids. Gold may  occur  around  limonite  pseudomorphs  of  authigenic  pyrite  and  arsenopyrite.  Major  ore  minerals  include  native  gold,  pyrite,  arsenopyrite,  stibnite,  realgar, orpiment, cinnabar, fluorite, barite, and rare thallium minerals. Gangue minerals typically comprise fine-grained quartz, barite, clay minerals, carbonaceous matter, and late-stage calcite veins. Argillization is characterized by removal of kaolinite and growth of illite in proximity to controlling faults. Arsenic, antimony, iron, and copper accompany gold in north–northwest oriented fault structures and silver, arsenic, manganese, and lead in northeast trending faults.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 7-12    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

In  the  Cortez  district,  the  favoured  host  rocks  for  gold  mineralization  are  the  Wenban  Limestone,  followed  by  the  Horse  Canyon  and  Roberts  Mountain Formations.  Mineralization  reflects  an  interplay  between  structural  and  lithological  ore  controls  in  which  hydrothermal  solutions  from  intrusives  moved  to favourable porous decalcified limestone. Mineralization is predominantly characterized by oxides, and sulphidic and carbonaceous refractory material. Carbon content in the deposits is highly variable and occurs generally in the Devonian Wenban Limestone and Roberts Mountain Formation. Supergene alteration extends up to 656 ft depth resulting in oxide ores, which overlie the refractory sulphides. Alteration has liberated gold by the destruction of pyrite and resulted in the formation of oxide and secondary sulphate minerals, which include goethite, hematite, jarosite, scorodite, alunite, and gypsum. PIPELINE COMPLEX Mineralization at Pipeline occurs where an east-dipping thrust duplex crosses a deep-seated 305° striking fracture system. The majority of the mineralization  is tabular and stratiform with a shallow easterly dip. The main Pipeline deposit is 50 ft to 300 ft thick, tabular zone at 500 ft to 600 ft beneath the surface; it dips at a low angle to the east and extends 750 ft north-south by 1500 ft east-west. South Pipeline consists of two zones 1) a shallow zone starting at 65 ft to 150 ft depth and 2) a deep zone starting at 1,000 ft. The shallow zone occupies an area of approximately 1,800 ft by 2,000 ft, north and east respectively, and exhibits both low-angle and high-angle structural controls on gold distribution.  The  deep  zone  occupies  an  area  200  ft  north-south  by  600+  ft  east-west,  is  up  to  250  ft  thick  and  is  more  closely  associated  with  high-angle structures. Drill depths average 1,000 ft although drill holes up to 1,400 ft are not uncommon in the centre of the deposit where mineralization ranges from 400 ft to over 1,000 ft thick. Crossroads lies at the south end of the Pipeline trend and is deeper, varying in thickness from less than 10 ft to greater than 300 ft with a primary control of lowangle structures sub-parallel to bedding and an overall 20  o easterly dip. The zone is intensely sheared, shattered, and/or brecciated, with minor offsets along the high-angle faults. Oxidation extends to depths in excess of 1,300 ft. Crossroads consists of two mineralized zones: an upper stratiform zone  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 7-13    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

along  the  Horse  Canyon–Wenban  contact  and  a  deeper  zone  controlled  by  an  east-northeast  striking,  west  dipping  (20°  to  25°)  structural  zone  that  cuts  across stratigraphy. At Gap, mineralization occurs where north-northwest and northeast, high-angle faults intersect thermally altered Wenban Formation in the axis of the Gold Acres antiform.  A  northern  zone  of  mineralization  is  primarily  hosted  within  gossan  horizons  cut  by  high-angle  faults  in  thermally  altered  Devonian  Wenban Limestone.  The  southern  zone  is  outside  the  metamorphic  aureole;  mineralization  occurs  within  a  1,000  ft  wide  corridor  of  strong  fracturing  bounded  on  the northeast side by a high-angle, N45W northeast-dipping fault. Gold mineralization is post-metamorphic and strongly oxidized. Carbon alteration is prevalent and increases with depth. GOLD ACRES At  Gold  Acres,  the  mineralized  area  is  approximately  6,000  ft  long  by  2,500  ft  wide  with  an  average  thickness  ranging  from  80  ft  to  200  ft.  Mineralization is mainly refractory;  high gold grades (greater  than 0.10 oz/st Au) are associated with secondary carbon and/or fine-grained sooty sulphide minerals. Minor oxide gold mineralization is hosted within the Upper Plate rocks overlying the Imbricate Thrust Zone (ITZ). The Lower Skarn is largely barren of gold, although it does host minor polymetallic mineralization (Zn–Mo–Cu) presumed to be coeval with intrusive emplacement and skarn formation. The Gold Acres deposit was developed in two lobes, the north (London Extension Pit) and the south (Old Gold Acres Pit, or OGA). The London Extension Pit is bounded on the north by the northeast striking, moderately westward dipping (50° to 60°) Gold Acres Fault. The Gold Acres Fault down drops the ITZ and Gold Acres  Stock  approximately  200  ft  to  the  northwest.  The  Island  Fault  separates  the  London  Extension  and  OGA  pits  and  strikes  approximately  to  the  north– northeast, dipping at 50° to the northwest. The Island Fault apparently down-drops mineralization in the London Extension Pit relative to the OGA Pit. Multiple northeast-trending faults between the Gold Acres and Island Faults incrementally down-drop mineralized stratigraphy to the north in a stair-step pattern. Both pits have been inactive since 1995 except for a small program in the London Extension Pit in 2000–2001 when refractory ore was mined to supply a third-party for processing.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 7-14    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

CORTEZ HILLS COMPLEX BRECCIA, MIDDLE AND LOWER ZONES Breccia  gold  mineralization  is  hosted  in  hydrothermally  brecciated  and  fractured  rocks  that  are  spatially  associated  with  the  Voodoo  Fault  and  its  attendant structures.  Altered,  matrix  supported  breccia  bodies  contain  the  highest  gold  grades  and  are  surrounded  by  “crackle”  breccias  and  highly  fractured  rock  with moderate gold grades continuing outwards to less fractured rocks with lower grades. Most of the Breccia mineralization dips moderately southwest enveloping the Voodoo  Fault.  The  upper  portion  has  a  northeast  dip  that  possibly  reflects  control  by  an  antithetic  structure.  Breccia  Zone  mineralization  extends  from  a  near surface elevation of 5,850 ft to 4,070 ft, terminating just east of the Middle Zone. It is approximately 1,000 ft wide with a northwest trend, and varies in width from 250 ft to 1,900 ft. Mineralization of the Middle and Lower zones lie at depth to the west and southwest of the Breccia zone. These sub-horizontal, tabular zones are associated with alteration  localized  along  a  complex  zone  of  thrust  faulting  and  back  thrusts  in  the  Roberts  Mountain  Formation  that  has  also  incorporated  slices  of  Devonian Wenban Limestone. A swarm of northwest trending post mineral quartz porphyry dikes separates the Middle from the Lower Zone. The Lower Zone has a distinct northwest-southeast trend in the Roberts Mountain and Hanson Creek Formations that is interpreted as the crest of a plunging antiform. The Middle zone occurs between elevations 4,235 ft and 3,825 ft, is approximately 1,800 ft wide northwest-southeast by 1,300 ft long northeast-southwest, and ranges in thickness from 10 ft to 270 ft. The Lower Zone lies at an elevation of 4,260 ft to the northwest and 3,060 ft to the southeast, extends 4,300 ft northwest-southeast, varies in width from 1,450  ft  in  the  north  to  500  ft  in  the  south  and  ranges  in  thickness  from  60  ft  to  270  ft.  Both  the  Middle  and  Lower  zones  are  open  to  both  the  northwest and southeast. Post-mineral dikes and sills are significant in that they are estimated to account for up to 10% of the waste rock volume within portions the Cortez Hills deposits. Gold mineralization is often spatially associated with decalcification and to a lesser degree silicification. Deep oxidation at Cortez Hills is inferred to be related to deep, convection-driven circulation of mixed meteoric and spent hydrothermal fluids during the waning stages of the mineralizing event. The enhanced weathering phenomenon resulted in significant carbonate dissolution and clay formation as well as extremely deep oxidation of gold-bearing iron  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 7-15    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

sulphide minerals. Arsenates of copper and zinc have been noted in, and adjacent to, oxidized mineralization. PEDIMENT Most  of  the  gold  in  the  Pediment  deposit  is  present  within  the  lower  of  the  two  gravel/  conglomerate  units  draped  over  a  paleobasement  of  thermally  altered limestone and marble. Two mineralized zones have been delineated 1) a shallow zone along the southern extent of the deposit, with a depth to the top of the zone ranging from 150 ft to 300 ft, and 2) a deeper zone at the northern part of the deposit, which begins at a depth of approximately 500 ft. Both mineralized zones exhibit a tabular geometry and occupy a general area of 3,000 ft north-south by 600 ft east–west. Gold mineralization is associated with clasts of strongly altered carbonate rocks that have been oxidized and are similar to mineralization found in situ in the near-surface portion of the Cortez Hills Complex. CORTEZ PITS (NW DEEPS) The Cortez NW Deep deposit is a continuation of the mined-out main Cortez deposit. The deposit consists of remnants of oxide mineralization in the east wall of the  Bass  Pond  pit  and  deeper,  sulphide  and  carbonaceous  mineralization.  A  series  of  north–northwest  trending  and  northeast  trending  faults  cut  the  Roberts Mountains Formation at the deposit. Gold mineralization is localized where these faults intersect shallow east dipping thrust breccia zones (thrust duplexes). Most of the Cortez NW Deep higher-grade gold mineralization (less than 0.1 oz/st Au) occurs in two zones lying between the 4,200 ft and 4,500 ft elevations beneath the old Cortez open pit floor. Present surface elevations are between 4,800 ft and 5,300 ft. One zone consists of an oxidized and strongly altered thrust zone within the Roberts Mountains Formation and the other is an unoxidized, sulphide-bearing thrust zone at the top of the Hanson Creek Formation. Post mineral quartz porphyry dikes have been emplaced along high-angle faults. Locally,  silica  overprints  all  lithologies,  but  does  not  show  a  strong  correlation  with  gold  at  a  local  scale.  Silicification  occurs  as  massive  fault  fill,  bedding replacements  after  decalcification  and  as micro-veinlets.  Massive  silicification  fills  both north–northwest  and northeast  trending  faults.  Bedding  replacement  by silica occurs along beds that were originally carbonate-rich. Oxidation is pervasive at 4,700 ft elevation. Mineralization becomes dominantly refractory at 4,200 ft to 4,350 ft elevation.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 7-16    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

8 DEPOSIT TYPES The  Cortez  deposits  are  “Carlin”  style  sedimentary  rock-hosted  and  porphyry/epithermal  deposits.  Carlin  deposits  form  as  structurally  and/or stratigraphically controlled replacement  bodies consisting of stratabound, tabular, disseminated gold mineralization  occurring in Silurian-Devonian carbonate rocks. Deposits are localized at contacts between contrasting lithologies, metamorphosed to varying extents. They can also be discordant or breccia-related. Host  rocks  are  most  commonly  thinly  bedded  silty  or  argillaceous  carbonaceous  limestone  or  dolomite,  commonly  with  carbonaceous  shale.  Although  less mineralized,  non-carbonate  siliciclastic  and  rare  metavolcanic  rocks  can  locally  host  gold  that  reaches  economic  grades.  Felsic  plutons  and  dikes  may  also  be mineralized at some deposits. The  deposits  are  hydrothermal  in  origin  and  are  usually  structurally  controlled.  The  carbonate  host  rocks  are  part  of  an  autochthonous  miogeoclinal  carbonate sequence  (Lower  Plate)  exposed  as  tectonic  windows  beneath  the  Roberts  Mountain  allochthon.  The  lower  Paleozoic  allochthonous  (Upper  Plate)  rocks  are siliciclastic  eugeoclinal  rocks  that  were  displaced  eastward  along  the  Roberts  Mountain  Thrust  over  younger  units  during  the  upper  Paleozoic  Antler Orogeny. Carlin deposits are localized along the thrust. Current models attribute the genesis of the deposits to:  

 



  epizonal plutons that contributed heat and possibly fluids and metals;



  meteoric fluid circulation resulting from crustal extension and widespread magmatism;



  metamorphic fluids, possibly with a magmatic contribution, from deep or mid-crustal levels;



  upper crustal orogenic-gold processes within an extensional tectonic regime.

 

   

   

 

The past-producing Buckhorn gold-silver mine and the Hilltop gold project are examples of different styles of mineralization in the Cortez District. Buckhorn is a typical example of a low-sulphidation epithermal system while Hilltop is an intrusive-related deposit. Hilltop is an Eocene-age system clearly associated with 38 Ma to 39 Ma felsic gold-copper porphyries, while Buckhorn is a Miocene occurrence, deposited during the initiation of 15 Ma to 17 Ma Northern Nevada Rift extension and associated bimodal volcanism.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 8-1    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

9 EXPLORATION Modern exploration commenced along the Battle Mountain–Eureka Trend in the 1960s, and has been nearly continuous since that time. Exploration in the Cortez District has been undertaken by Barrick and its predecessor companies such as the CJV and has included mapping, various geochemical and geophysical surveys, pitting, trenching, petrographic, and mineralogy studies, and various types of drilling. The description regarding drilling, sampling methods, and sample quality is discussed in Section 10 Drilling. Many of the targets being investigated are partially or totally concealed by younger overburden and Tertiary rock cover or by allochthonous Upper Plate Paleozoic siliclastic rocks. Geophysical surveys are being used to help map buried bedrock features.    

EXPLORATION POTENTIAL There is potential for further increases in Mineral Resources. Barrick  funds  a  multi-million  dollar  exploration  budget  each  year  for  the  Cortez  area.  Barrick  has  advanced  stage  exploration  drilling  projects  at  the mine. Exploration planned for 2015 includes:  

 

1.

Underground

 

 

a.

Cortez Hills Lower Zone (Deep South) – $7.9M to complete a 42-hole infill drilling (11,600 m) program for resource advancement in the Cortez Hills Lower Zone below the 3,800 ft amsl elevation (Deep South Pre-feasibility Study (PFS) area).

b.

CHUG Frontiers – $2.7M to complete 12 step out holes (4,270 m) along potential southern extensions of the Deep South resource and to explore the Renegade Zone approximately 200 m below the current resource.

c.

Deep Roberts – $1.7M to complete five holes (2,700 m) to explore for potential deep mineralization in previously untested horizons up to 300 m below the current Deep South resource.

a.

Barrick  completed  49  holes  for  19,000  ft  of  drilling  at  Hilltop,  outlining  a  body  of  epithermal,  intrusive-related  gold mineralization. There is still potential to expand this target as it remains open in several directions. The next steps are to complete fill-in drilling for grade continuity, metallurgical test-work for recovery process options and extension drilling to expand the mineralization and establish a reportable mineral resource at Hilltop

 

   

   

 

2.

Surface

 

   

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 9-1    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

 

b.

Mill Canyon South – $1.5M to complete three holes (2,750 m) to test targets north of the Horse Canyon Mine and Goldrush discovery.

c.

Crescent  Valley  –  $0.6M  to  complete  one  drill  hole  (+1,000m)  to  evaluate  potential  for  extensions  of  Cortez  mineral  system  on  the hanging-wall side of the Crescent Fault.

d.

Fourmile Canyon – $0.3M to complete a surface evaluation/targeting program in the area north of the Goldrush discovery.

e.

North Pipeline – $0.1M to complete surface evaluation and targeting focusing on the area north of the Pipeline pit.

 

   

   

 

Longer-term exploration potential remains for deep underground targets in the Gold Acres Window, as well as for potential open-pit and underground-mineable targets in the southern and eastern Cortez Window.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 9-2    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

10 DRILLING This description of drilling is taken largely from a previous report entitled “Technical Report on the Cortez Joint Venture Operations, Lander and Eureka Counties, State of Nevada, USA”, dated March 2012. It has been updated based on RPA’s site visit and subsequent review of available documentation. Exploration and drilling activities for resource development in the Cortez district span a period of more than 40 years and include a variety of drilling techniques and the  use of numerous  different  drill  contractors.  Approximately  20,448 drill  holes  are  currently  in the  Barrick  Cortez  database.  This  number  is known to be incomplete, as a significant portion of the drilling completed by companies other than Barrick and the CJV have not been incorporated in the digital database. The drill hole types included in the database are summarized in Table 10-1. RPA notes that a small number of these holes have been completed since the latest Mineral Resource update.

TABLE 10-1 DRILL HOLE TYPES

Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Drilling Type

  

Number of Holes    

Reverse Circulation Core Other Total

           

     

 

  

 

 

13,717     4,345     2,386     20,448

    

  

%  

  67     21     12  

100

 

 

 

Figure 10-1 illustrates the distribution of drill holes contained in the database for the Cortez district. Drill hole collars included in this figure are not representative of the total drilling within the Mine. Many of the drill holes external to the Cortez and Gold Acre Windows were completed for reconnaissance purposes.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 10-1    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 10-2    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

REVERSE CIRCULATION DRILLING METHODS Reverse circulation (RC) drilling is currently used during the initial phases of exploration, condemnation drilling, and to pre-collar diamond coring holes through intervals  of  overburden  and  unaltered  cap  rocks.  RC  holes  range  in  diameter  from  4.5  in.  to  7.0  in.  Diameters  of  6.5  in.  and  6.75  in.  are  currently  used  for exploration. Current  practice  is  for  RC  holes  encountering  mineralization  to  be  bracketed  on  four  sides  by  core  holes  increasing  the  density  of  core  holes  in  mineralized zones. RC pre-collar holes are cased with 4.5 in. casing and core drilling is continued through mineralization and footwall rocks. The depth to which RC drilling is used depends on the water table depth, which is in turn dependent on mining dewatering activity in the area. Since 1980, RC has been typically used for 600 ft to 3,500 ft holes. RC pneumatic hammers are used up to 1,800 ft. Auxiliary compressors are used to increase the effectiveness of the down-hole hammers. Tri-cone rock bits are used at depths below the working depth of hammer bits. Centre-return hammers and bits were used for RC drilling at Pipeline. The deepest RC hole at Pipeline reached a depth of 4,540 ft while the deepest at Cortez Hills has been 4,400 ft.

CORE DRILLING METHODS Core sizes for wire-line diamond drilling are typically HQ (2.5 in. diameter) for resource development drilling. Occasionally, core holes are reduced from HQ size to NQ (1.9 in. diameter) size in difficult drilling conditions. Surface metallurgical core includes HQ and PQ-3 (3.27 in. diameter) sizes. Conventional  core  handling  methods  and  wax  impregnated  cardboard  core  boxes  are  used  by  the  contractors  who  deliver  the  core  to  the  logging  facility  on site. Core runs of 5 ft are typical in waste rock zones, but the shattered and broken nature of the Pipeline shear zone usually results in shorter runs. The drill crew inserts wooden blocks to mark the end of each core run. Manual versus natural breaks in the core are clearly marked with a wax crayon. Core is delivered to the logging shed by technicians or the drilling foreman at least once per shift.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 10-3    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

CONVENTIONAL AND MUD DRILLING METHODS These drilling method use air to pull the sample from the bit to the hole collar up the outside of the drill stem. Typically conventional air holes were short, and terminated at the water table. The drill diameter range was from 5.5 in. to 6.5 in. Conventional mud drilling used a similar sampling technique, with drill waterbased bentonite clay/inorganic polymer muds employed facilitating drill sample return. Mud rotary drill holes range in diameter from 6 in. to 9 in. Mud-rotary drills have  been  used  to  drill  relatively  thick  sections  of  alluvium  over  the  Crossroads  deposit  or  in  areas  being  condemned  for  waste  dumps  and  processing facilities. Core tools were used to complete the bedrock sections of these holes. Limited information remains on the drilling, logging, and sampling methodology for hole-types that were drilled prior to the mid-1990s.

COLLAR SURVEYS Collar coordinates from the 1960s to the 1980s drilling were determined by optical surveys, field estimates, Brunton compass and pacing, or compass-and-string distance.  Recent  campaigns  have  hole  collars  surveyed  with  either  Total  Station  electronic  distance  measurement  (EDM)  or  geodetic-grade,  global  positioning system (GPS) instruments. Two separate reference grids (Pipeline Mine grid and Cortez grid) are maintained. Survey Data in remote areas is collected in Truncated Universal Transverse Mercator (TUTM) Coordinates and then converted to the appropriate mine grid.

DOWN HOLE SURVEYS Down hole surveying began in 1991 at the Pipeline deposit. Significant deviations were shown in RC drilling and down hole surveying has been carried out since then. Most holes were surveyed with a recording gyroscope by a commercial contractor. Readings are taken every 50 ft down hole and digitally transferred to the database. Boyles Brothers Drilling used a multi-shot recording gyroscope (MSRG) tool until April 1993. Silver State Surveying later performed all MSRG surveys and  currently  contractors  WelNav  and  International  Directional  Services  LLC  (Deep  South)  provide  the  surveys.  Mahoney  et  al. (2009) reports that significant work has been carried out by Cortez to determine the accuracy of the instruments of each contractor.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 10-4    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

Underground core holes drilled prior to May 2008 were surveyed down-hole by Deep South. Since then surveying has been done by Cortez personnel using Reflex magnetic instrumentation. Geotechnical holes have been drilled in each discovery to date using oriented tools. These normally use a plasticine, triple scribe, and down-hole camera system. Down-hole surveys for a limited number of holes are incomplete where ground conditions such as caving restrict access for the survey instrument.

SAMPLE RECOVERY In general, core-drilling practices at Pipeline, Crossroads, Gap, the Cortez Pits (NW Deeps), Cortez Hills and Pediment ensure a relatively high core recovery. Core recovery is sufficient to provide representative samples of a sedimentary rock-hosted gold deposit. Prior to 1991, core recovery values and RC sample weights were not  routinely  digitized  or  added  to  the  general  drill  hole  database.  Wet  drilling  conditions  for  RC  holes  prohibit  measurements  of  sample  weights  as  a  result recovery of RC materials cannot be calculated. Core recoveries are maximized by use of triple-tube core barrels, face-discharge bits, and special drilling mud. Core recovery averaged 93% for 314 holes used in the Pipeline and South Pipeline FS (Placer Dome Technical Services, 1995). The median core recovery for the Cortez Hills deposit was 96%. Only four core holes in  the  Cortez  Hills  deposit  had  less  than  80%  core  recovery  and were located  in an approximate  150 ft  by 150 ft geographic  area  in the upper  extreme  eastern portion of the lower-grade mineralized area near the intersection of four faults.

GEOTECHNICAL AND HYDROLOGICAL DRILLING Geotechnical and hydrological holes have been drilled to provide raw data for the hydrological and geotechnical portions of the PFS and FS on the Pipeline and Cortez Hills deposits, and subsequently to support mining operations. Thirty-two underground core holes have been drilled for geotechnical purposes. These holes were designed parallel to planned drifts and served to predict the character of the rock mass to be developed.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 10-5    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

GRADE CONTROL DRILLING OPEN PIT Blast holes in rock on 50 ft ore benches are drilled on a staggered pattern approximately 22 ft by 25 ft with an 8 3 / 4 in. bit. This spacing has been decreased to 16 ft by 16 ft in carbonaceous ore. On 40 ft waste benches, blast hole (8  3  /  4  in. bit) spacing ranges from 22 ft by 22 ft up to 27 ft by 27 ft. Blast holes in alluvium employ a 8 3 / 4 in or 9 7 / 8 in bit and are spaced from 22 ft by 22 ft up to 27 ft by 27 ft apart on a square grid as determined by the blast engineer. All blast holes have a four foot sub-drill. UNDERGROUND Initial  core  drilling  for  the  breccia  zone  was  completed  with  flat  fans  of  HQ  core  holes  drilled  to  nominal  50  ft  spacing  across  the  body  of  the  projected mineralization at Cortez Hills. These fans are drilled approximately every 60 ft to 75 ft on the vertical axis of the body. Additional Cubex RC fan drilling using a four  inch  bit  is  carried  out  on working levels  at  a  nominal  25 ft  to  50  ft  spacing.  Down hole  surveys  for Cubex  are  conducted  by the  drill  contractor,  Connors Drilling LLC, which uses Reflex instrumentation run within PVC tubing placed in the hole. Subsequent  core  drilling  has  been  from  drill  platforms  that  drill  perpendicular  (shower  heads)  to  mineralization.  Breccia  zone  holes  were  drilled  from  the hangingwall side of the deposit. Middle and Lower Zones holes are drilled from development drifts located directly above the mineralization. Cubex (underground RC drills) drilling is used for grade control and can be drilled from active mining levels or dedicated drill bays

MINERAL RESOURCE DELINEATION DRILLING Surface drilling is initially carried out on a 400 ft square pattern, closing in the next stage to a 200 ft grid. In-fill drilling is done on a five-spot pattern, resulting in an  average  hole  spacing  of  141  ft.  At  Pipeline,  “X-shaped”  patterns  of  more  closely  spaced  holes  have  been  drilled  to  provide  information  for  gold  grade variography; this may locally decrease the hole spacing to approximately 70 ft. Underground  mineralization  is  drilled  to  a  nominal  200  ft  spacing  from  surface,  then  underground  drilling  is  conducted  to  reduce  spacing  to  100  ft  or  less  for Mineral Resource to  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 10-6    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

Mineral Reserve transition. Prior to production additional underground drilling is completed to close up the spacing to between 25 ft and 50 ft for final mine design. Drill holes are generally vertical. Inclined core holes were drilled at Cortez Hills to confirm the orientation of relatively high-grade gold-mineralized zones and to obtain  geotechnical  information  for  the  planned  Cortez  Hills  pit.  Several  angle  core  holes  were  drilled  at  the  Cortez  Pits  (NW  Deep)  and  Pipeline  to  provide geotechnical data and further delineate areas of mineralization. PIPELINE COMPLEX AND GOLD ACRES Drilling in the area of the Pipeline Complex including the Pipeline, Crossroads, Gap and Gold Acres deposits comprises 5,419 drill holes for approximately five million feet. Drilling dates from the 1960s to 2014, and comprises conventional, RC and core drilling. Almost all of the conventional drilling was in upper portions of the deposits, and has subsequently been mined out. Approximately  20 conventional  holes  were drilled  after  2006, for  approximately  60,000 ft.  The resource estimation database contains 3,266 holes totalling 2,908,456.8 ft of which 2,973 are core holes for 2,704,949 ft and 293 are RC holes for 203,508 ft, including predrilling for core holes. Additional metallurgical and ore characterization drilling was done in 2014 in the Pipeline Complex. The resource drilling database for Gold Acres consists of 1,725 surface drill holes for 461,363 ft and includes over 68,700 assays. Figure 10-2 illustrates a drill hole location plan for the Pipeline Complex including the Pipeline, Crossroads, and Gap deposits. Figures 10-3 and 10-4 show representative cross sections through the Pipeline and Crossroads deposits, respectively. Figure 10-5 shows a surface plan with drill hole locations for the Gold Acres deposit and Figure 10-6 provides a representative cross section through the deposit.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 10-7    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 10-8    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 10-9    

 

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 10-10    

 

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 10-11    

 

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 10-12    

 

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

CORTEZ HILLS AND PEDIMENT The 2015 resource extraction showed that the surface and underground drilling in the area of the Pediment and Cortez Hills deposits totals over two million feet in 3,542 holes completed from 1964 to 2015. This includes RC, core, dewatering, piezometer, and various other drilling types. The drill data for Cortez Hills was culled  and  data  with  various  quality  assurance/quality  control  quality  assurance  and  quality  control  (QA/QC)  issues  (i.e.  downhole  contamination,  poor  assay sampling, missing collars and surveys, etc.) was later excluded from the resource estimations. Drill holes at the Pediment and Cortez Hills deposits are nominally spaced at 100 ft by 100 ft. Underground drilling of the Breccia Zone varies from 50 ft by 50 ft or less in areas of active underground mining to 150 ft by 150 ft within the “open-pit only” portions of the Mineral Resources. Underground drill hole spacing in the Middle Zone of Cortez Hills varies from 50 ft by 50 ft to 25 ft by 25 ft or less. Drill spacing in the Lower Zone of Cortez Hills varies from 50 ft by 50 ft to 100 ft by 100 ft depending on the level delineation across the deposit. Figure 10-7 shows a location plan for the Cortez Hills Complex including the Breccia, Middle, and Lower Zones of Cortez Hills and the Pediment deposit. Figures 10-8 to 10-10 show cross and longitudinal sections illustrating the geology, gold mineralization limits, and typical drill hole density for the various Cortez Hills zones.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 10-13    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 10-14    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 10-15    

 

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 10-16    

 

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 10-17    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

CORTEZ PITS (NW DEEP) Drilling in the Cortez Pits area dates back to before 1967, but only validated holes from 1986 to 2015 are included in the drill database used for resource work. The Mineral Resource estimate is supported by approximately 280,860 ft of drilling in 450 holes and 37,415 assays. This includes 245,951 ft of RC drilling in 396 holes and 34,952 ft of core drilling in 54 holes. Figure 10-11 presents the drilling for the Cortez Pits area and Figure 10-12 is a typical cross section.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 10-18    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 10-19    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 10-20    

 

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

COMMENTS ON DRILLING In RPA’s opinion, the quantity and quality of the lithological, geotechnical, collar, and down hole survey data collected in the exploration, delineation, and grade control drill programs are sufficient to support Mineral Resource and Mineral Reserve estimation. RPA also notes that:  

 



  Drill hole orientations are appropriate with respect to the orientation of the mineralization.



  Drilling is normally perpendicular to the strike of the mineralization, but depending on the dip of the drill hole and the dip of the mineralization drill intercept widths are typically greater than true widths.



  Drill hole intercepts adequately reflect the nature of the gold mineralization. Down hole composite data indicate areas of higher-grade and lower-grade mineralization, and waste material within the deposits.



  The deposits have been well drilled.



  Through interpretation and aggregation of the drill hole data, the sections provide a representative estimation of the true thickness of the mineralization for the various deposits in relation to planned pit and underground mining boundaries that are used to constrain the Mineral Resources and Mineral Reserves.



  Collar surveys have been performed using industry-standard instrumentation.



  Down hole surveys have been performed using industry-standard instrumentation.

 

   

   

   

   

   

 

SAMPLING METHOD AND APPROACH RC SAMPLING Drillers carry out the sampling on the RC drill rig. After material discharges from the hydraulic, revolving wet sample splitter on the cyclone, the fraction to be sampled was subdivided by a Y-shaped joint in a 5 in. sample discharge pipe and each split collected in a five-gallon plastic bucket lined with 19 in. by 22 in. Micro-Pore  sample  bags.  Bags  are  pre-numbered  and  tagged  by  Cortez.  Recently,  collection  has  been  modified  to  Micro-Pore  bags  placed  in  one-gallon  metal sleeves  hung  beneath  each  arm  of  the  Y  pipe  splitter.  Samples  are  allowed  to  air  dry  in  the  field  and  are  then  picked  up  at  the  drill  sites  by  geological technicians. Where areas are relatively open to the public, this loss of chain of command may compromise sample security. RC chip samples (typically - 1 / 2 in.) were collected by drillers in 5 ft intervals for Gold Acres drilling and in the initial 1991 drilling at Pipeline. By late 1991, RC samples at Pipeline were collected on 10 ft intervals per the Cortez Hills protocol. The 10 ft samples weigh from 10 lb  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 10-21    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

to 15 lb and represent a mass reduction to a small percent of the original. The sample reduction is summarized in Table 10-2.

TABLE 10-2 RC SAMPLE REDUCTION Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  RC Hole Diameter

     

10 lb

10 ft Length   

15 lb

7” 4.5” 7” 4.5”

           

2% 6% 41x 17x

           

4% 9% 27x 11x

RC sampling procedures were modified for drilling at the Pediment deposit in accordance with recommendations by consultant Francis Pitard in 1999. Samples weighing from 35 lb to 40 lb are now collected from development RC holes at Pediment. Footage  intervals  were  recorded  by  a  technician  on  a  separate  shipment  record  from  the  corresponding  sample  numbers.  Commercially  prepared standards and blank samples of landscaping marble are inserted by the drillers randomly into the numbering sequence prior to sample pickup. Chip samples of each RC interval are collected and stored in plastic chip trays for geologic logging. Each chip tray represents about 200 ft of drilling. Chips are logged by project geologists or geological contractors. The logging form is set up to record stratigraphic formation, rock type, rock textural characteristics, veining, significant minerals, alteration, and estimated sulphide, carbonate and carbon content. Completed logs are entered into a master database. Chip trays are stored in a central warehouse facility  on site. Until the 1970s, representative  RC chips were glued to boards as hole records;  however,  none have survived.  Digital  backup copies of the geologic logs are stored offsite. All hardcopy logs that were used prior to the inception of digital logging are archived in files, labelled, and stored in the exploration or mine geology offices. Drilling is almost always carried out with water injection. Drilling below elevations ranging from 5,000 ft to 5,700 ft at Cortez Hills is below the water table. Total sample weight cannot be measured because of wet drilling conditions; therefore RC recovery cannot be calculated.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 10-22    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

CORE LOGGING AND SAMPLING Drill  core  is  washed  and  photographed  prior  to  logging.  Core  is  digitally  photographed  wet,  except  in  cases  of  exceptionally  poor  rock  quality.  Older  film photographs have been scanned and electronically archived. Step-out exploratory drill holes are summary-logged and representative chip samples are collected at one foot intervals, making up a composite sample over 20 ft.  The chip  samples  are  analyzed  for  gold as well as multi-element  geochemistry.  Chip samples  are excluded from grade estimations. If the core was later cut, the cut core values are used for grade estimation, if the core was not cut, because of low grade assay results than the chip grades are set 0.0001 oz/st Au and treated as waste during grade estimation. Retained core character samples are stored on site at the Pipeline and Cortez core storage facilities. When the assays are returned for the exploratory hole, detailed geologic logging is carried over the mineralized interval, bracketed by 100 ft of core above and below. The interval is then cut and resubmitted for gold assay. In-fill and development drill holes are subjected to detailed geologic and geotechnical logging. The core is logged by a geologist for geological and geotechnical elements. Prior to 2004, logging was either done on paper and then entered into a computer or entered  directly  into  a  computer  and  was  verified  by  Placer  Dome  software  with  text  and  graphics  capability.  After  review  by  geologists,  corrected  logs  were reprinted and electronically merged into the master database by a computer administrator. After the implementation of an acQuire SQL Server database in 2004, logging  was  changed  to  an  acQuire  data  input  form.  This  requires  selection  of  attributes  from  a  prescribed  list,  avoiding  entry  of  non-standard  symbols  or qualifiers. The computerized geological logging format allows for recording mineralogy, structure, texture, alteration, rock type, colour, brightness, lightness, grain size, sorting, sphericity, shape, degree of decalcification, and carbon content. Point load tests of selected intervals and other geotechnical data were collected by staff technicians and the geology department. After mid-2006, Golder Associates Ltd. (Golder) carried out this task, but only on core drilled for geotechnical purposes or upon request. Most drill-core from Pipeline and Cortez Hills was sampled and assayed at 10 ft intervals, though several holes were assayed at 5 ft or variable geological intervals early in the drilling programs. Since 2004, exploration core holes have been sampled on 10 ft intervals in barren  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 10-23    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

rock and on geologically defined intervals up to five feet in mineralization. Underground core is sampled on 5 ft intervals, however, samples could be a minimum of 2 ft to a maximum of 6 ft to facilitate respecting lithological or mineralization contacts. Almost all core was sawn in half by a Cortez technician except for underground core where whole core is sampled. A hydraulic splitter has been used for extremely hard rock to maintain acceptable production rates. Any fragmented core less than one inch diameter was split through a riffle splitter. One-half of the core or a riffle split  was  placed  back  in  the  original  core  box  and  the  other  half  in  10  in.  by  22  in.  Micro-Pore  cloth  sample  bags  with  a  numbered  paper  sample  tag.  Sample numbers are assigned using sample ticket books. The sample number was also handwritten on the exterior of the bag with a permanent marking pen, along with the drill hole number. Including drill hole numbers with sample labels is not considered best practice. A technician recorded footage intervals on a separate shipment record form with the corresponding sample number. Metallurgical core was quartered, with one quarter retained as a character sample and the remaining assayed and consumed for metallurgical testing. The  retained  core  is  stored  on  site.  Barrick  exploration  has  a  core  storage  facility,  which  contains  drilling  for  the  site,  located  near  the  Pipeline  administration office. Other sample storage areas include the East Pit at Cortez Pits and the Gold Acres Pit. CONVENTIONAL AIR-ROTARY AND MUD-ROTARY SAMPLING Sampling was carried out at 5 ft to 10 ft intervals. Early (mid-1980s) rotary air sampling may have been accomplished in dry conditions using non-porous plastic bags. Sample numbers were assigned using sample ticket books. BLAST HOLE SAMPLING The practice is to double sample the 40 ft blast holes on mineralized horizons. One sample represents the bottom 20 ft, while the other represents the upper 20ft of the hole. Any 40 ft trim shots are single sampled as are 20 ft holes on a 20 ft bench. A representative sample of blast-hole drill cuttings is collected by placing a 6 in. diameter, 12 in. tall vertical cylinder near the drill hole and inside the rig dust rubber curtain. Approximately 7 lb to 8 lb of material is collected. The sample number records the location and uses a bar-coded tag. Samples are assayed at the Cortez Mine assay laboratory. Analytical data are incorporated electronically into the blast-hole database. The blast hole sample reduction is summarized in Table 10-3.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 10-24    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 10-3 BLAST HOLE SAMPLE REDUCTION Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Diameter (in.)

     

9.875 8.875 9.875 8.875

           

Sample Reduction to: 7 lb   8 lb

0.22% 0.53% 465x 188x

       

0.25% 0.61% 407x 164x

   

7 lb

Including Sub-Drill 8 lb  

       

0.20% 0.44% 511x 225x

       

0.22% 0.51% 447x 197x

Blast-hole sample results are used for open-pit mine grade control, but are not used for Mineral Resource and Reserve estimates. UNDERGROUND MUCK SAMPLING (CORTEZ HILLS) Muck sampling is the only means of grade control currently used at Cortez Hills underground. Grab samples are collected by shovel from the bucket of the 6-yard scoop tram load-haul-dump (LHD). At the truck bay, the LHD operator takes a sample of every 1 st , 5 th , 10 th , and 15 th LHD load from the muck pile of a given round. The muck sample is placed in 12 in. by 18 in. bar coded bags and represents approximately 20 lb of material. Analysis developed by Pierre Gy and screen tests determined that samples of one inch to two inch fragments plus fines are representative. Samples are assayed at the Cortez Mine assay laboratory. Analytical data are incorporated electronically into a muck database within the acQuire database and there is a plan to use the muck sample results and the exploration drilling results in a Vulcan software grade control module to create mini-block models. Underground muck  sample  results  are  used for mine  grade  control,  i.e.,  material  routing  on  a round by  round basis,  but  are  not used  for  Mineral Resource and Mineral Reserve estimates.

BULK DENSITY DETERMINATION Whole core sampling for bulk density measurement was initiated in April 1992 at the Pipeline deposit and density was determined for a total of 467 ore and waste samples. Standard practice since 1999 has been to collect samples at 35 ft to 40 ft intervals in mineralized rock and one sample within 50 ft. in the hanging wall and footwall. Generally, density samples are  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 10-25    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

taken 0 ft to 50 ft above the mineralization, in mineralization, and 0 ft to 50 ft below the mineralization. Core is prepared by the Cortez geology staff and the mine metallurgical laboratory carries out the density measurements. The primary method of measuring core density is by wax immersion. Competent core is coated in wax and then immersed in water. There are five other methods, which have been used in the past and may be used on occasion depending on the situation. Those other methods are:  

 

1.

Fragment displacement (lacquer coated fragments are immersed in water)

2.

Core displacement (lacquer coated core is immersed in water)

3.

Core axis length and diameter is measured and applied to dry weight of sample

4.

Plastic sleeve (poor quality core in PVC pipe is wrapped and immersed in water)

5.

Buoyancy (competent core is wrapped in cellophane and immersed in water)

 

   

   

   

 

Cortez has compiled bulk densities for the various rocks and overburden for each deposit. Values range from 11.7 ft 3 /st to 16.6 ft 3 /st for rocks and 16.2 ft 3 /st to 19.1 ft 3 /st for alluvium and the Pediment deposit.

LOGGING, SAMPLING, AND SAMPLE STORAGE FACILITIES Cortez has permanent facilities for core logging and sampling, as well as storage warehouses. RPA visited the exploration core facility located near the Pipeline Mill and found the layout to be clean, organized and in line with industry standards for layout, facilities and procedures. Drill core, RC chips, retained character core, pulp, and pulp duplicate samples are stored onsite in the Cortez and Pipeline storage warehouses. Older core for mined-out portions of the deposits has been skeletonized  to  reduce  storage.  Samples  rejects  are  retained,  but  stored  outside  where  they  degrade  after  two  to  three  years  at  which  time  they  are  no  longer useful. Prior to 2006, core could be stored in open air core yards, but this practice has been discontinued.

RPA COMMENTS ON SAMPLING METHOD AND APPROACH In RPA’s opinion, the core handling, logging, and sampling protocols conform to industry-standard practice, are being carried out to a reasonable standard, and are acceptable for Mineral Resource and Mineral Reserve estimation.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 10-26    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

QUALITY ASSURANCE AND QUALITY CONTROL Since 2006, Barrick corporate geochemists have visited the laboratories that undertake analysis and sample preparation for the Cortez Mine. QA/QC for sampling, sample  preparation,  and  assaying  has  evolved  at  Cortez  since  1991.  Current  procedures  include  insertion  of  blanks  and  certified  standard  samples  into  sample streams to the mine and commercial laboratories, check assays of pulp duplicates by commercial laboratories, and assaying of coarse reject duplicates. Barrick’s QA/QC practices at Cortez exploration  comprise  a  minimum  of  one  standard,  one  blank  and  one  duplicate  introduced  per  batch  of  30  samples  to  the sample stream resulting in 10% quality control samples. Underground grade control drilling involves insertion of one standard and one control blank for every 30 samples, however, because whole core is often sampled there is no opportunity for duplicate samples. The acQuire  database  is  maintained  by  the  Database  Administrator  at  Barrick  Gold  Exploration  Inc.  office  in  Elko.  The  assay  laboratories  report  results  to  the central office as well as the project geologist. Monthly QA/QC reports are prepared by the Database Administrator. The report evaluates the performance of the QA/QC  samples,  identifies  any  QA/QC  failures,  and  tracks  their  investigation  and  resolution  including  any  assay  re-runs.  Failures  are  reported  to  the  project geologist who decides on a course of action. Issues that cannot be resolved by the project geologist result in a re-run of an entire batch or in some cases an entire hole. Assays are maintained on temporary status until signed off by the central office and the project geologist. The  QA/QC  program  for  2015  included  standards,  blanks,  and  duplicates,  which  accounted  for  greater  than  6%  of  the  total,  an  insertion  rate  of  approximately 1:14. The failure rate was 1.8% and all of the issues were resolved. STANDARD SAMPLES Certified Reference Standard (CRM) samples are materials of known values used to check and quantify the analytical accuracy of laboratories. At Cortez standards were originally made from stockpile materials at the mine. Since 2006, commercially available standards have been used. Certified Reference Standard (CRM)  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 10-27    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

samples  were  purchased  from  Rocklabs as pulps that  were  assayed  in a round robin  of 28 laboratories  or made  from  bulk samples  sent from  Barrick’s  Nevada operations to CDN Resource Laboratories Ltd. to make reference material after a 14 laboratory round robin. The average value and its standard deviation (SD) for the  round  robins  are  certified.  The  variation  from  the  standard’s  mean  value  in  standard  deviations  defines  the  QA/QC  variance  and  is  used  to  determine acceptability of the standard sample assay. Approximately 150 g of sample material is submitted per QA/QC sample. There are currently fourteen standard samples being used with expected samples ranging from 0.00825 oz/st Au to 0.45442 oz/st Au. Standard samples are inserted into the sample stream at a ratio of 1:30 for surface exploration and approximately 1:15 for open pit production samples and underground diamond drill samples. The criteria for pass or failure are as follows.  

 



  Assay value < certified mean ±2 SD g Pass



  Assay value ³ mean ±2 SD and £ mean ±3 SD g Warning or Failure



  Assay value > mean ±3 SD g Failure

 

   

 

A failure is declared when the same standard exceeds two consecutive ±2 SD warnings or when an individual result exceeds ±3 SD from the expected result. The geologist in charge is notified when a standard failure occurs. The geologist then determines if the failure can be accepted or if the laboratory needs to re-run the failing batch. BLANK SAMPLES A blank control sample is material with a zero gold value. Blanks are inserted to assess sample preparation, specifically to identify “grade smearing” or sample carryover in subsequent samples caused by improper sample preparation and contamination, and to evaluate analytical “background noise”. Prior to 2006, blank material was made from:  

 



  Un-mineralized drill core from Gold Acres



  Waste rock from the Cortez Pits



  Alluvial gravel taken from a pit near the Gold Acres haul road

 

   

   

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 10-28    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

Since 2006 landscape marble has been the material used to make blank samples for QA/QC at Cortez. The following criteria are used to evaluate analytical results received for blank samples.  

 



  Assay result less than 0.002 oz/st Au - Pass



  Pass limit is extended by 1% carry-over from surrounding samples



  Assay result equal to or greater than 0.002 oz/st Au - Failure

 

   

 

The geologist in charge is notified when a blank failure occurs. The geologist then determines if the failure can be ignored or if the laboratory needs to re-run the failing batch. Laboratory procedures include cleaning of the sample preparation circuit after sample batches, however, the 1% allowance of carry-over grade from surrounding samples makes some allowance for potential contamination from high grade samples processed within a sample batch. DUPLICATE SAMPLES Duplicate samples of coarse rejects provide information on sample preparation and assay precision, while duplicate pulp samples may be used to quantify analytical precision. The assay results of the duplicates are analyzed by preparing scatter plots and relative difference plots that compare the difference of grade of the pairs to the mean grade of the pairs. The pass/fail criteria used by Barrick for duplicate pulp samples is nominally +/- 20%. OUTSIDE CHECK SAMPLES American Assay Laboratories were sent 2% of the Cortez original sample pulps for independent check assays during 2015. Using the original assay results from the primary laboratory as a guide, the geologist selects the pulps to be submitted for check assay. The chosen suite of pulps are representative of the ore types present in the samples, and include high grade, low grade, and waste material. Requirements for this protocol include:  

 

1.

The original pulp splits must be submitted, not a duplicate split taken from pulp rejects.

2.

The pulps are submitted to the secondary laboratory in one batch and should be assayed together.

3.

At least one standard sample (SRM) pulp is included with each lot of check assay pulps.

 

   

   

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 10-29    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

Recent practices at Cortez for independent check assays are to have the primary laboratory, ALS Chemex, randomly select every 20  th pulp and forward these to American Assay Laboratory for a second check assay. This represents a 5% check ratio. Pass/fail criteria used is ±20% of the original value. In the past, results of check assaying on pulps and coarse rejects were not routinely evaluated. Check assays, however, were used intermittently to evaluate biases between the mine laboratories and commercial laboratories. For  the  period  1992  to  1996,  a  large  number  of  commercial  laboratories  were  used  to  check  assays  by  Laboratory  No.  1.  No  record  was  kept  of  the  source laboratories for each check in all cases; therefore, some of the data cannot be differentiated by laboratory. A detailed review of check and duplicate assay records in 2003  reduced  the  number  of  unidentified  laboratory  assays  to  approximately  4%.  No  significant  bias  was  detected  between  the  mine  and  the  commercial laboratories. Check assay plots show a relatively high variability between the mine laboratory and commercial laboratories for 1997 through 1999 assaying. For grades greater than 0.01 oz/st Au, a majority of check assays are within ±20% to ±30% of the original value, which is somewhat higher than the expected ±10%. Check assays on samples primarily from the Pediment and Cortez Hills deposits by Rocky Mountain Geochemical and American Analytical laboratories in 2000 to 2003 show less variability, with most checks within ±10% of the original value. In 2003, Cortez investigated these biases in detail and adjusted historical assays for the Pipeline, South Pipeline, Crossroads, and Gap deposits for laboratory biases and sampling biases. The practice of adjusting assays has been discontinued. Checks of the mine laboratory (Laboratory No. 1) assays were made for the 1995 FS. A pulp duplicate was prepared for one in every five Pipeline core sample and one in every ten South Pipeline core sample. A pulp duplicate was prepared for one in every ten RC sample for Pipeline and one every twenty RC sample for South Pipeline.  These  were  assayed  by  Monitor  Geochemical  Laboratory  and  the  Placer  Dome  Research  Centre.  Since  1995,  this  procedure  of  checking  the  mine laboratory assays has continued using Rocky Mountain Geochemical  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 10-30    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

Laboratory, American Assay Laboratory, Barringer Laboratories (now Inspectorate), and Monitor Geochemical Laboratory. SCREEN CHECKS Screen  check  assaying  is  not  done  at  Cortez.  Previous  test  work  determined  that  coarse  gold  has  not  been  an  analytical  issue  to  date,  given  the  disseminated distribution and very fine grained character of the gold mineralization.

CORTEZ LABORATORY The on-site Cortez laboratory runs its own internal QA/QC program. They use commercial prepared and purchased standards of various grades. Current frequency of control samples is as follows:  

     



  Production samples (FA-GRAV and CNL-AA) •   21 samples per set •   1 standard, 1 blank, and 1 duplicate per set



  Mill shift samples (solutions and solids) •   1 standard for each solution set of 23 samples and each solid set of 12 samples



  XRF – Carbon analysis •   1 standard for each set of 20 samples



  Leco – Carbon and sulfur analyses •   1 standard and 1 blank for each set of 22 samples



  Exploration samples (FA-GRAV and CNL-AA) •   21 samples per set •   1 standard, 1 blank, and 1 duplicate per set

 

     

     

     

     

The laboratory is organized such that quality control samples are inserted automatically. Different grades of standards are used and run with underground, open pit and mill process samples. A monthly QA/QC compliance report details investigative findings regarding samples that fail the control criteria. With respect to gold analysis by both fire assay with  a  gravity  finish  (FA-GRAV)  and  cyanide  leach  and  AA  finish  (CNL-AA)  the  following  pass/fail  criteria  are  applied  by  the  Cortez  laboratory.  The  pass criterion for standards is two standard deviations; standard  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 10-31    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

variance between two and three standard deviations is taken as a warning; action is required when variance exceeds three standard deviations. The pass criterion for blanks is gold values less than 0.002 oz/st Au.

RPA’S COMMENTS ON QA/QC In RPA’s opinion, the QA/QC protocols and reports meet industry-standard practice and provide the necessary control to identify potential analytical problems and allow for corrective follow-up and re-analysis when required.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 10-32    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

11 SAMPLE PREPARATION, ANALYSES AND SECURITY Analytical  procedures  that  support  Mineral  Resource  estimation,  including  sample  preparation  and  sample  analysis,  were  performed  by  independent  analytical laboratories without company involvement from 2005 to the present. Samples prior to that date were primarily prepared and analyzed by the Cortez laboratory.

ANALYTICAL LABORATORIES Prior to 2000, the mine laboratories at Mill No. 1 (Laboratory No. 1) and Mill No. 2 (Laboratory No. 2) assayed a majority of exploration samples, principally those for Pipeline, Crossroads, Gap, and Cortez NW Deep (Cortez Pits). Laboratory No. 1 was located at the old Cortez Mine facility and closed in 1997. Laboratory No. 2 was constructed in 1997 and currently is operating at the Pipeline process facility. A number of commercial laboratories were used for assaying or check assaying since 1991, including Rocky Mountain Geochemical Laboratory, American Assay Laboratory, ALS Chemex, Barringer Laboratories (now Inspectorate), the Placer Dome Research Centre, and Monitor Geochemical Laboratory. ALS Chemex has been the primary independent commercial laboratory. A majority of core and RC samples for Cortez Hills and Pediment deposits were prepared by the ALS Chemex sample preparation facility in Reno, Nevada, and assayed in Vancouver, B.C. From  2005,  all  exploration  assaying  as  well  as  underground  assaying  for  development  drilling  at  Cortez  Hills  and  supplementary  drilling  at  Pipeline,  Gap,  and Crossroads, has been performed by ALS Chemex. The mine laboratory has been principally used for mine related grade control samples and processing analysis. The  mineral  laboratories  used  are  ISO  registered  except  for  the  Inspectorate  (Barringer),  Rocky  Mountain  Geochemical  Laboratory,  Monitor  Geochemical Laboratory, and the Cortez Mine laboratories.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 11-1    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

SAMPLE PREPARATION Sample preparation protocols for the commercial and mine laboratories were similar. The initial sample preparation for Pipeline drilling in 1991 to 1992 was:  

 



  Sample bags were dried at 350°F for six to 12 hours.



  Samples were weighed on a triple beam balance to an accuracy of 0.1 kg.



  Samples were fed through a TM Engineering Ltd.’s (TM) Rhino Jaw Crusher set at 1/8”.



  Entire sample was screened to minus 10 mesh. Oversize was run through a Bico disc pulverizer to reduce the oversize to minus 10 mesh.



  Entire samples were split to 500 g with a Jones-type splitter. The 500 g split was dried a second time.



  A 500 g aliquot was pulverized to 100% passing 150 mesh in a TM vibratory ring pulverizer. Pulverized sample was homogenized on a roll mat. Ring pulverizer was cleaned by pulverizing a crushed crucible between each sample.



  Reject was retained and stored.

 

   

   

   

   

   

 

The coarse-crush protocol was changed to 80% passing 10 mesh in late 1992, and between 1992 and 1997 it was changed to 95% passing 6 mesh. By 1998, the crushing protocol was changed to:  

 



  Entire sample crushed to minus  1 ⁄ 4 in. using a jaw crusher.



  Entire sample crushed to 95% passing 8 mesh in a rolls crusher.



  500 g aliquot split for pulverizing to minus 200 mesh in an automated pulverizer.

 

   

 

This protocol was maintained until 2000 when new crushing and grinding equipment was acquired by mine Laboratory No. 2. The mine laboratory now uses a RockLabs  crusher  and  rotary  splitter  and  a  TM automated  ring-and-puck  pulverizer  for  exploration  samples.  The  RockLabs  splitter  uses  a  two-stage  process  to crush  the  entire  exploration  sample  to  95%  passing  10  mesh  and  produce  a  500  g  sample  aliquot.  The  500  g  is  pulverized  for  75  seconds  in  the  automated pulverizer, producing a product of 95% passing 175 mesh. Gravel is pulverized between each run of the 24-compartment pulverizer to clean the unit. Crush and pulverizer specifications are checked once weekly. Balances are calibrated every six months. Blast-hole samples from 3 lb to 20 lb are crushed to 95% passing 6 mesh in a TM Rhino jaw crusher. A 250 g to 300 g aliquot is split with a Jones-type riffle splitter. No reject is retained.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 11-2    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

The 250 g to 300 g aliquot is then pulverized for 150 seconds in a manual ring-and-puck pulverizer or for 75 seconds in the TM automated pulverizer. ALS Chemex uses the following sample preparation procedures for Cortez samples:  

 



  High temperature drying of samples (DRY-21 procedure).



  Weigh,  dry,  fine  crush  entire  sample  to  better  than  70%  minus  2  mm,  split  off  up  to  250  g  and  pulverize  split  to  greater  than  85%  passing  75  µm (PREP-31 procedure).



  Compositing procedure, homogenize the composite pulp, gravimetric procedure (CMP-22).

 

   

 

ANALYSIS A standard fire assay with gravimetric finish is performed on one-assay ton (29.18 g) pulp aliquots for all core and RC samples analyzed by the mine laboratory. If the initial fire assay is greater than 0.1 oz/st Au, an additional fire assay is performed. If the initial fire assay is greater than 0.2 oz/st Au, two additional fire assays are performed. The mean value of the two or three assays was used for resource estimation in the Pipeline FS resource model. In 2004, ALS Chemex assayed Cortez Hills and Pediment samples by fire assay and AA finish, using a 30 g pulp aliquot. All samples reporting greater than 0.1 oz/st  Au on the initial  assay  were  re-assayed  by fire  assay with gravimetric  finish.  Cyanide  leach  gold assays were performed  for initial  FA assays  higher  than 0.008 oz/st Au. A cold cyanide shake leach, analyzed by AA, is performed if the initial fire assay is higher than 0.015 oz/st Au. If the initial fire assay is higher than 0.040 oz/st Au and lower than 0.15 oz/st Au, a “preg-rob” test is performed. This is performed by combining 10 g of pulp with 20 mL of a 0.050 oz/st Au cyanide solution and agitating for eight to ten minutes, then analyzing by AA. Samples with a cyanide AA/fire assay ratio of less than 0.3 are routinely assayed for sulphur and total carbon in a LECO furnace. The  current  practice  is  to  fire  assay,  AA,  and  preg  rob  on  all  intervals  within  pre-selected  zones.  More  selective  triggers  apply  in  unmineralized  zones.  The following general protocol is used for gold and multi-element analyses:  

 



  Gold analyses: Gold assay (0.005 ppm to 10 ppm) by 30 g fire assay – atomic absorption (AA) analysis (Au-AA23 procedure).

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 11-3    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

 



  Au (0.03 ppm to 50 ppm by cyanide leach – AAS, 30 g nominal weight (Au-AA13 procedure).



  Au by fire assay and gravimetric finish, 30 g nominal weight, range 0.05 ppm to 1,000 ppm Au (Au-GRA21 procedure).



  Multi-element analyses by aqua regia digestion/ICP-AES/ICP-MS, 51 elements or 48 element analyses by four acid and ICP-AES/ICP-MS (ME-MS41 procedure or ME-MS61m procedure, respectively).

 

   

 

A Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) was implemented at mine Laboratory No. 2 in 1998. Laboratory No. 2 uses a sample bar code system and transfers  all  information  to  the  mine  database  electronically  via  the  LIMS.  ALS Chemex  assay  certificates  are  downloaded  from  the  ALS  Chemex  website  and loaded directly into the mine database using acQuire®. Twenty foot composites made from core and RC samples are routinely analyzed for a 49 element suite by ALS Chemex. For the underground development holes, multi-element analysis is performed on every sample (~5 ft intervals). The trace-element  suite is obtained by inductively coupled plasma–arc atomic  absorption spectroscopy (ICP) following an aqua regia digestion of the sample pulp. Trace elements include As, Sb, Hg, Tl, Fe, and Ca, which in association with Au, show positive  or  negative  correlations  with  mineralized  areas.  High  Hg  analyses  from  the  partial-digestion  ICP  data  have  been  checked  against  cold-vapour  hydride analyses, also run at ALS Chemex, and have shown generally close correlation (±5%) with the cold-vapour values. The multi-element ICP suite has changed in composition and detection limits several times in the last 15 to 20 years as analytical techniques have improved. Additional assay methods, as recorded in the database of the 1960s, were typically used for exploration or other specialized purposes such as gas sampling, and were  not  consistently  carried  out.  They  include  gravimetric,  sulphuric  acid  digest,  total  copper,  neutron  activation  analysis,  X-ray  diffraction,  and  X-ray fluorescence methods.

SAMPLE SECURITY Grade control samples from operations are managed by employees of the Cortez mining operation and its drill contractors, while exploration samples are managed by Barrick exploration personnel and its contractors. Prior to 2008 the chain-of-custody was managed by CJV staff and their contractors.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 11-4    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

Blast hole samples are delivered  directly  from the pits to the Cortez laboratory. Underground muck samples are delivered initially  to the Portal and then to the sample room at the F-Canyon Office block. Underground RC samples are taken directly to the F-Canyon sample room. Underground drill core boxes are taken directly to F-Canyon lay-down area. Exploration samples, after leaving the drill rigs, are taken by Company personnel to the secure Exploration Complex. Sample security relies on the samples being either always attended to by Company personnel or stored in the locked on-site preparation facility or stored in a secure area prior to pick-up by ALS Laboratory personnel or delivery to the on-site Cortez laboratory. For the most part, a unique and independent sample number is used for  each  sample  with  dispatch-submittal  sheets  and  database  entries  used  to  track  the  progress  of  samples  and  to  ensure  that  all  samples  are  received  by  the laboratory. Unique and independent sample numbers and sample tags are used in all cases except underground muck samples that are identified by location, e.g., heading and footage. Sample dispatch and submittal sheets are used to check and track samples through the system. Sample information is entered into the computer database to help tracking and for receipt of results. Table 11-1 summarizes the chain-of-custody of the samples from the collection point to the analytical laboratory.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 11-5    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 11-1

CHAIN OF CUSTODY SUMMARY Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Blast-holes (OP)

   Muck (UG)

Grade Control    Core (UG)

   RC (UG)

Material Collection at Source

        Exploration Drilling         RC

      

      Core

    

 

Cortez drillers

   Cortez loader operator

   Cortez Geotechnician

   Drill Contractor

       Drill Contractor

     Barrick employees

 

Transportation from Source, Handling, Sample Delivery to Lab

 

    

 

     Barrick employees

      

Cortez drill & blast personnel

   Cortez Supervisor

   Drill Contractor

   Drill Contractor

     Barrick employees  

Cortez employees   

Cortez employees

Cortez employees

  

  

 

Barrick       Geotechnician

    

 

  

   ALS employees

   ALS employees

       ALS employees

     ALS employees

 

      

Sample Preparation and Analysis

    

 

Cortez lab

   Cortez lab

   ALS lab

   ALS lab

       ALS lab

     ALS lab

RPA’S COMMENTS ON SAMPLE PREPARATION, ANALYSIS, AND SECURITY In RPA’s opinion, the sample preparation, analytical procedures, and sample security used at Cortez for mining operations and exploration projects are adequate for use in the estimation of Mineral Resources.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 11-6    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

12 DATA VERIFICATION RPA  checked  previous  Cortez  and  external  data  reviews  and  has  conducted  independent  reviews  in  2010,  2012,  and  again  in  the  preparation  of  this  Technical Report.  RPA  did  not  collect  independent  samples  as  the  historical  production  of  19  million  ounces  of  gold  clearly  demonstrates  the  presence  of  economic mineralization.

DATABASES The Cortez technical database is being managed by the acQuire system implemented in 2004 replacing an earlier database system. Exploration data from a variety of sources are imported into acQuire using a variety of techniques and procedures to check the integrity of the data entered. Data that were collected prior to the introduction of digital logging have been subject to validation, using built-in program triggers that automatically checked data upon upload to the database. Since the  mid-1990s,  geological  data  have  been  validated  by  software  routines  and  uploaded  directly  into  the  database.  Analytical  data  are  uploaded  from  digital sources. Survey data is uploaded by the project geologist from digital survey files. Verification is performed on all digitally collected data upon upload to the main database, and includes checks on surveys, collar co-ordinates, lithology data, and assay data. Since 2009, Cortez Hills and Pipeline Complex blast-hole data and Cortez Hills underground Cubex drilling data are also imported into acQuire. Database  security  and  integrity  is  accomplished  by  restricting  access  and  user  level  permissions  that  are  set  by  the  Database  Manager.  Once  data  entry  and validation are completed for a drill hole, access is locked. There are procedures for updates that retain all the original information and prioritize use of the updates.

BARRICK REVIEWS REVIEW OF ASSAY BIASES In 2003, an in-house study was carried out to determine the causes of historical biases between resource estimates based on exploration drilling, mine production based on blast-hole models, and mill production. Results indicated that:  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 12-1    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

 



  Blast hole assays performed by atomic absorption were biased low.



  Blast hole and exploration hole fire assays performed by the mine laboratories were biased low relative to fire assays by commercial laboratories.



  There are sampling losses in exploration holes, which result in an occasional low bias, even though core recovery is very high.



  There are smoothing effects in resource estimation procedures that result in lower average grades in RC holes.



  Small scale higher grade zones may exist between holes and are missed by drilling.

 

   

   

   

 

Bias adjustment factors were developed, however, by 2006 most of the affected areas had been mined out. Remaining data were evaluated on a hole by hole basis and where a down-hole contamination or bias issue occurred it was noted. The drill hole in question was flagged and was not used to support Mineral Resource or Mineral Reserve estimates. No bias adjustment factors for assay data have been used since 2007. CORE VERSUS RC DRILL COMPARISON, CORTEZ HILLS An in-house study, triggered by down-hole contamination noted in at least three RC drill holes, was undertaken in July 2004 to compare results from RC and core holes used in the Cortez Hills resource estimate. Core versus RC twin data were reviewed and resources were estimated separately based on only RC data and on only core data for comparison. Preliminary results suggested that core holes on average were of higher grade than RC holes, depending on the grade range. The core  averages  were considered  to be biased  high because  core holes were  more common  in the high-grade  centre  of the  deposit. Individual  RC/core twin holes compared  reasonably  well,  showing less  of  a  high  bias  in  the  core  holes.  Additional  core  drilling  at  Cortez  Hills  since  2004 has  replaced  the  contaminated  RC holes. BLAST HOLE SAMPLING REVIEW Cortez reviewed the use of a pie sampler versus the cylinder sampler and found no significant difference in assays between the methods for 1,900 blast holes. The cylinder sampler has been retained.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 12-2    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

EXTERNAL REVIEWS Sampling reviews were undertaken in 1992 and 1999 by Francis Pitard, checking elements of the sample preparation procedures. Modifications were made to RC sample collection for the Pediment deposit drilling. AMEC reviewed the Cortez Hills and Pediment drill database in 2004 and 2005, checking lithological and analytical data and database integrity. Data were found to be suitable to support Mineral Resource estimation.

RPA DATABASE REVIEW RPA undertook reviews of the database as part of an audit review report in July 2010, as part of a Technical Report in 2012, and again in the preparation of this Technical Report. JULY 2010 REVIEW RPA received drill hole and block model databases in Vulcan/ISIS formats. Files were reformatted to ASCII and imported into Gemcom GEMS 6.2.2 software for review. GEMS was employed to validate the drill hole database using software routines that trap errors and potential problems. GEMS validation routines found some down-hole survey records lacking collar zeros (fourth bullet above) and several cases of zero intervals, most at the end of lithology files/tables. None of these minor errors impact on resource estimation. Otherwise the drill hole databases were clean and readily imported. JANUARY 2012 REVIEW Drill hole and block model databases for each of the resources reported by Cortez for mid-2011 were received from Barrick in Vulcan/ISIS formats. The validation review focused on the databases supporting the June 30, 2011 Mineral Resource and Reserve estimates for the Cortez Hills Complex open pit, underground, and Lower Zone models that represented 76% of the contained gold in the Mineral Reserves.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 12-3    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

The  resource  databases  were  imported  into  Vulcan  3D  Version  8.0.3  software  for  review.  Vulcan  database  validity  routines  found  no  errors  with  out  of  range values, or from-to intervals, and that sample lengths and assays values were within reasonable limits. With a few minor exceptions drill hole collars were found to be within the area limits of the model. All the data was consistently presented and organized and all units within the database were consistent. RPA also carried out a spot check comparison of the supplied resource databases against original documents for collar surveys, down-hole surveys, and laboratory assay certificates. The 35 holes checked for collar surveys were all found to be correctly entered. Two of the 16 holes reviewed for down hole surveys had minor errors that were corrected. The azimuth and inclination measurements for the remainder of the database entries were found to correspond with the original down hole survey measurements. The gold fire assay (“fa1”) and cyanide leach assay (“aa1”) values for 16 holes were checked against the original laboratory assay certificates. The fire assay values corresponded to the original certificates for all 16 holes. Two of the 16 holes had cyanide leach values that did not correspond to the laboratory reports and were corrected. MAY 2015 REVIEW RPA undertook the following validation checks as part of the database validation routine:  

 

1.

Overlapping sample intervals

2.

Empty database tables

3.

Visually anomalous survey records

 

   

 

RPA also undertook a spot check comparison of the supplied resource databases against original documents for laboratory assay certificates. The gold fire assay values  for  12  underground  drill  holes  and  five  surface  drill  holes  were  checked  against  the  original  laboratory  assay  certificates.  All  1,004  fire  assay  values corresponded to the original certificates.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 12-4    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

RPA OPINION It is RPA’s opinion that the Cortez database is well prepared, as well as adequate and suitable for Mineral Resource estimation.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 12-2    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

13 MINERAL PROCESSING AND METALLURGICAL TESTING INTRODUCTION During the nearly 40 year history of the Cortez Mine, a significant number of metallurgical studies including laboratory scale and/or pilot plant test work have been completed and historical operating data is available. The Cortez Mine has utilized numerous processes including carbon-in-leach (CIL) for higher grade oxide ore, heap leaching for lower grade oxide ore, roasting for carbonaceous refractory ore and pressure oxidation for higher grade sulphidic ore. Mill No. 1, which included CIL and a roaster, was placed on care and maintenance at the end of October 1999. The roaster has been inactive since 1995, and it is currently being demolished.

METALLURGICAL TESTING Metallurgical testing of new ore types has confirmed the choices for processing unit operations and provided data to estimate capital and operating costs and gold recovery for the various ore types. Test data has also been generated to determine the expected performance in Mill No. 2 as new reserves have been identified and included in the LOM plans. Recent metallurgical testing was or is being conducted to confirm the metallurgical performance of Pediment heap leach ore, Gap, Pipeline Phases 10C and 10D, Gold Acres, Cortez Pits, Cortez Hills Underground high grade oxide ore, and Minex samples from East Pediment, among others. Additional work is on-going to predict the metallurgical characteristics of the ore from Deep South (Olson, 2014a, 2014b, 2014c, 2014d, 2015e, Barrick Cortez, Inc., 2015a). Cortez has extensive metallurgical testing facilities so much of the work is done on site, however, they make use of outside labs when specific expertise is needed or when timing dictates that the data is needed sooner than the in-house lab can provide it. Testing is conducted by McClelland Laboratories Inc., Hazen Research Inc., at the Barrick Goldstrike lab, and by AuTec in Vancouver, British Columbia, among others.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 13-1    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

ORE ROUTING Ore  routing  is  conducted  based  on  cyanide  leaching  amenability  to  fire  assay  ratio  (CNAA  to  FA  ratio).  If  the  AA  to  FA  ratio  is  greater  than  50%,  the  ore  is designated as oxide ore. If the AA to FA ratio is less than 50%, the ore is designated as refractory. The oxide ore will be routed to the Pipeline Mill or a heap leach pad depending on the gold grade. The refractory ore is routed to the Goldstrike roaster.

GOLD RECOVERY ESTIMATES The recovery of gold is a function of the processing method (CIL, heap leaching, roasting, and arsenic concentration for refractory ore) and the lithology of the mineralization being processed. The recoveries used to support Mineral Resource and Mineral Reserve estimations are based on recovery equations that are derived from feasibility studies, metallurgical laboratory test work and historic production data, as summarized in Tables 13-1 to 13-3. These figures are incorporated in the Lerchs–Grossman pit shells that constrain the Mineral Resources and Mineral Reserves to be extracted by open pit mining methods. Test work reports and plant operating results were reviewed to verify the reported recoveries used in the Mineral Resources and Mineral Reserves estimates. For leach ore, the estimated recovery figure for Pipeline oxide is based on actual heap performance values.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 13-2    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 13-1 CORTEZ OXIDE MILL GOLD RECOVERY EQUATIONS Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Head Grade (oz/st Au)    Recovery Equations

Ore Pit

 

Cortez Hills Underground

  >0.800    % Recovery = 94.0 – 57.1 x Sulphide Sulphur (%)   £ 0.800    % Recovery = 25.7 x CNAA/HG + 9.7 x CNAA + 59.3   >0.920    % Recovery = 95.66 – 2.44   >0.150    % Recovery = [100 x HG – 1.3 x Ln(HG) – 4.1] / HG -2.4   £ 0.150    % Recovery = (18 x HG) + 86.4 – 5.9   Option 1    % Recovery = 89.0   Option 2    % Recovery = 8.36 x HG – 9.78 x AAFA + 96.4   > 0.207    % Recovery = 88.1 – 8.3   £ 0.207    % Recovery = 85.11 x EXP(0.36 x HG) – 11.9      % Recovery = 88.0

Cortez Hills Open Pit

Cortez Pits 1 Pipeline/ South Pipeline/South Gap Crossroads Notes:  

1

Prefer Option 2 if there is confidence in the AAFA ratio in the block model HG = gold head grade in oz/st Ln = natural log function EXP = Exponential Function CNAA = cyanide shake in oz/st AAFA = CNAA/HG (ratio)

TABLE 13-2 CORTEZ HEAP LEACH ULTIMATE GOLD RECOVERY EQUATIONS Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Open Pit

  

Recovery Estimate

Cortez Hills Pediment Cortez Hills Underground (crushed leach)

     

% Recovery = 80% % Recovery = 70% Breccia and Middle Zone % Recovery = 84 Lower Zone and Deep South % Recovery = 70 % Recovery = 75 % Recovery = 62% % Recovery = 62% % Recovery = 55%

Cortez Pits Pipeline (Phase 10) Crossroads South Gap

              

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 13-3    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 13-3 REFRACTORY ORE GOLD RECOVERY EQUATIONS Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Process

Roaster 1

RF1 Discount

 

         

Head Grade (oz/st Au)

> 1.150 0.250 < HG  £  1.150 0.125 < HG £ 0.250 £ 0.125

   Gold Recovery Equations

   % Recovery = 93.07    % Recovery = 3.1719 x Ln(HG) + 92.612    % Recovery = 71.836 + 40.456 x (HG) - 0.009 x 730 + 0.151 x 85    % Recovery = -1017.2 x (HG) 2 + 377.14 x (HG) + 51.909    Recovery Discount of 1.5% for Arsenic Discounts

Notes:  

1

Roaster  recovery  estimates  assume  730  tons-per-operating-hour  and  85%  sulfide  oxidation.  The  estimates  for  autoclave  recovery  are  not  dependent  on throughput or efficiency. HG = Gold Head Grade in oz/st Ln = Natural Log Function TCM = Calcium Thiosulfate Leach Table  13-4  summarizes  the  results  of  the  budgeted  versus  actual  data  taken  from  the  Cortez  Flash  Reports,  which  was  evaluated  to  verify  the  recovery estimates. For an operating mine, RPA considers this data to be more reliable for determining if the recovery estimates are accurate than reporting on metallurgical test data and samples.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 13-4    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 13-4 PRODUCTION DATA 2013-2015 Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

   

  

2013

 

        2014         2015 Actual

Actual

Actual

vs.

vs.

vs.

   Actual    Budget    Budget        Actual    Budget    Budget        Actual    Budget    Budget

OPEN PIT Pit Mill Grade Processed (oz/st) Recovery Rate (%) Average Tons per Day Leach Grade Processed (oz/st) Recovery Rate (%) Average Tons per Day Autoclave Grade Processed (oz/st) Recovery Rate (%) Average Tons per Day Roaster Grade Processed (oz/st) Recovery Rate (%) Average Tons per Day Open Pit Total Grade Processed (oz/st) Recovery Rate (%) Average Tons per Day

                         0.166    0.163    102%      89    90    99%      10,797   11,154   105%                 0.018    0.018    105%      40    48    84%      46,655   49,825   94%                 0.265    0.242    109%      94    91    103%      309    327    94%                 0.174    0.174    100%      94    91    103%      655    680    96%                 0.049    0.047    105%      74    77    97%      58,416   61,986   94%  

                                         

                         0.064    0.063    102%      77    83    93%     10,057   10,864   93%                 0.013    0.013    105%      72    86    83%     64,406   61,477   105%                                                             0.149    0.149    100%      83    84    99%      2,196    2,278    96%                 0.024    0.024    99%      76    85    89%     76,658   74,620   103%  

 

UNDERGROUND Mill Grade Processed (oz/st) Recovery Rate (%) Average Tons per Day Autoclave Grade Processed (oz/st) Recovery Rate (%) Average Tons per Day Roaster Grade Processed (oz/st) Recovery Rate (%) Average Tons per Day Underground Total Grade Processed (oz/st) Recovery Rate (%) Average Tons per Day

                                                  

      0.928    91    1,611       0.610    85    371                   0.869    90    1,982   

          0.934    99%   91    100%   1,509    107%        0.608    100%   86    99%   377    98%                            0.869    100%   90    100%   1,886    105%  

                                         

                     0.110    0.076    145%    89    85    105%    9,573    11,253   85%             0.013    0.010    135%    53    101    53%   54,443   37,400   146%             0.138    NA    68    NA    133    NA             0.143    0.120    120%    85    82    103%    1,341    2,392    56%             0.031    0.030    103%    75    88    85%   65,490   51,044   128%

 

                                 

               0.729       89       1,201             0.711       84       449             0.457       81       84             0.711       88       1,734   

          0.721    101%   92    97%   1,073    112%        0.804    88%   88    96%   482    93%        0.371    123%   89    90%   35    241%        0.738    96%   91    97%   1,589    109%  

                                 

               0.662       84       924             0.832       77       124             0.618       92       1,130             0.648       88       2,178   

      0.608    109% 88    95% 925    100%    0.871    96% 87    88% 724    17%    0.311    198% 89    104% 255    444%    0.668    97% 88    100% 1,904    114%

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 13-5    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

The estimated and actual gold recoveries correlate well which indicates that the recovery estimates are accurate. Table  13-5  compares  the  contained,  estimated  recoverable,  and  actual  recovered  gold  ounces  for  the  life  of  the  Cortez  heap  leach  pads  (i.e.  Areas  28,  30,  and 34). Figure 13-1 provides the same data graphically.

TABLE 13-5 HEAP LEACH GOLD PRODUCTION Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Year

  

Contained (000 oz)     

1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015

                                                        

                                     

55     228     327     570     1,080     1,434     1,978     2,773     3,206     3,509     4,020     4,477     4,651     4,725     4,763     4,859     5,173     5,376     5,752    

Estimated

Recoverable (000 oz)     

Actual

Produced (000 oz)  

                                     

                                     

38     155     223     387     735     966     1,295     1,780     2,051     2,240     2,540     2,768     2,867     2,920     2,948     3,031     3,256     3,371     3,620    

28   124   211   283   526   805   1,133   1,626   2,004   2,207   2,491   2,706   2,866   2,925   3,009   3,105   3,245   3,401   3,611  

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 13-6    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

FIGURE 13-1 HISTORICAL HEAP LEACH DATA

 

The  data  clearly  shows  that  the  estimated  gold  production  from  the  heap  leach  pads  and  the  actual  gold  production  correlate  well.  This  is  also  true  for  each individual heap leach pad.

DEEP SOUTH ZONE METALLURGICAL TESTING AuTec completed optimization and variability testing using samples from the Deep South Zone. McClelland Laboratory, Inc. also completed column leach tests using  the  oxide  samples  from  Deep  South  Zone.  The  results  of  the  testing  program  were  used  to  support  a  PFS  of  the  Cortez  Underground  Expansion  Project (AuTec,  2015). Eighty  samples  were  used  to create  eight  composite  samples that were used for the optimization  testing.  Variability  testing  was also conducted using the 80 samples. Comminution testing for 60 samples estimated that the majority of the samples are moderately hard (A x b < 40), but a few samples were exceptionally soft (A x b > 300) with respect to SAG milling. Bond work index (BWi) tests were conducted on seven of the composite samples at a closing size of 105 µm. The average BWi is 11.3 kWh/st. The comminution test results indicate  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 13-7    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

that the grinding characteristics of Deep South samples are similar to the ore mined at Cortez Hills. A series of tests were conducted using the optimization samples to complete the following tests:  

 



  Column leach tests



  Direct cyanide leach (DCN)



  CIL tests



  Bench top roaster followed by CIL (BTR-CIL)



  Bench top alkaline pressure leach tests followed by CIL (BTALK-CIL)



  Bench top alkaline pressure leach tests followed by thiosulfate resin in leach (TCM) (BTALK-TCM)

 

   

   

   

   

 

The results are summarized in Table 13-6.

TABLE 13-6 DEEP SOUTH ZONE TEST RESULTS (AU RECOVERY) Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Sample

 

Ore Type

 

Au (oz/st)

 

DCN

 

CIL

 

BTRCIL

 

BTALKCIL

 

BTALKTCM

 

Column Tests

V1 V2 V3 V4 V5 V6 V7 V8 Minimum Maximum Average

                     

Oxide Oxide Oxide Oxide Oxide Oxide Refractory Refractory

                     

0.238 0.598 0.683 0.680 0.187 0.225 0.436 0.256 0.683 0.187 0.418

                     

67.2% 82.6% 83.3% 63.6% 82.4% 77.8% 12.3% 32.3% 12.4% 84.0% 63.1%

                     

87.4% 88.1% 91.2% 88.1% 89.1% 89.9% 15.7% 85.9% 15.7% 91.8% 72.6%

                     

84.9% 88,7% 91,2% 88.1% 89.1% 89.9% 91.2% 85.9% 84.9% 91.2% 88.6%

                     

81.5% 88.2% 89.1% 76.0% 89.3% 88.1% 83.2% 89.9% 76.0% 89.9% 85.6%

                     

68.4% 42.2% 26.8% 30.2% 28.7% 36.9% 82.6% 89.5% 26.8% 89.5% 50.7%

                     

76.5 71.5 77.6 47.0 84.4 74.4 —   —   47.0 84.4 76.9

The key assays for the samples are summarized in Table 13-7.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 13-8    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 13-7 DEEP SOUTH ZONE OPTIMIZATION SAMPLES ANALYTICAL RESULTS Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Sample

  

Au

(oz/st)  

CNAA/HG 

V1 V2 V3

     

0.238   0.598  

65.7%   92.5%  

  

0.683  

91.4%  

  

0.680  

87.8%  

  

0.187  

97.6%  

  

0.225  

89.1%  

0.10%   0.05%   £  0.01%  £  0.01%  £  0.01%  £  0.01% 

     

0.436   0.256  

15.8%   34.3%  

1.38%   0.34%  

V4 V5 V6

S=

 

V7 V8

Corg

1.17% 0.02% 0.02% 0.04% 0.02% 0.03% £  0.01% 0.17%

The  Deep  South  Zone  PFS  recommends  that  the  heap  leach  recovery  can  be  estimated  using  the  relationship  between  the  CNAA  and  HG  ratio  and  the  direct cyanidation test results plus the relationship between DCN and column leaching. The resulting equation is: HL %Au Recovery = 1.315 x CNAA/HG) – 40.481 The CIL recovery can be estimated accurately by applying the relationship between the CNAA/HG ratio and the CIL recovery using this equation: CIL % Au Recovery = 0.942 x CNAA/HG The recovery for refractory ore processed in the Goldstrike roaster followed by CIL were estimated using the current roaster recovery curves and grades from the Deep South Zone PFS production schedule. The average recovery for refractory ore sent to the roaster/CIL plant is estimated to be 88.7%.

SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS Metallurgical  test  work  completed  for  the  Mine  has  been  appropriate  to  establish  optimal  processing  routes  for  the  different  ore  types  encountered  at Cortez. Historical process data demonstrates that the metallurgical recovery models have been reliable. The metallurgical testing data available for ore scheduled to be processed in the LOM plan indicates that the models and methods used for estimating metallurgical performance will continue to be  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 13-9    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

successful.  Based  on  these  observations,  RPA  concurs  that  the  samples  used  to  generate  the  metallurgical  data  and  the  historical  operating  data  have  been representative. Therefore, the estimates used to estimate future performance appear to be accurate.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 13-2    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

14 MINERAL RESOURCE ESTIMATE SUMMARY A  summary  of  the  Mineral  Resources,  excluding  Mineral  Reserves,  for  Cortez  as  of  December  31,  2015,  is  shown  in  Table  14-1.  The  Mineral  Resources  are presented by the most likely mine extraction method and gold recovery process. Cut-off grades for the Mineral Resources were established using a gold price of US$1,300 per ounce.

TABLE 14-1 MINERAL RESOURCE SUMMARY – DECEMBER 31, 2015 Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

       Mine & Process Type

     

Total Measured and Indicated      Contained Tons      Grade      Gold      (000 st)      (oz/st Au)     (000 oz)     

Open Pit Mill Heap Leach Refractory Open Pit Total

              

     6,001      34,998       4,010    

45,009

  

Underground Mill Refractory Underground Total

           1,574            1,598          3,172

  

  

Total Open Pit & Underground

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

  

     

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

   48,180

  

   0.058     0.011     0.117     0.027

    

  

     

 

   0.293       0.301       0.297

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

0.045

  

   345     390     471     1,206

    

  

Total Inferred

  Contained Tons      Grade      Gold   (000 st)      (oz/st Au)     (000 oz)  

     2,031      16,833       494    

19,359

    

 

 

  

     

 

      462       131       481       1,210       943

   1,341

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

2,149

   20,700

  

   0.09     0.01     0.12     0.02

    

  

     

 

   0.28       0.36       0.35

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

0.04

  

175   159   61   395

 

37   429   466

 

 

861

Notes:  

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

CIM definitions were followed for Mineral Resources. Mineral Resources are reported at the cut-off grades given in Tables 14-4, 14-14, 14-22 and 14-25. Mineral Resources are reported using a gold price of US$1,300 per ounce. A minimum mining width of 10 ft was used. Mineral Resources are additional to and exclusive of Mineral Reserves. Numbers may not add due to rounding.

RPA is not aware of any known environmental, permitting, legal, title, taxation, socio-economic, marketing, political, or other relevant factors that could materially affect the Mineral Resource estimate. Mineral Resources decreased relative to EOY 2014 due to mining depletion as well as the completion of a PFS at Deep South Zone, Cortez Hills as material was reclassified as Mineral  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-1    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

Reserve.  Changes  in  cut-off  grades  and  associated  optimized  pit  shells  following  lower  operating  costs  increased  the  Mineral  Resources  at  Pipeline  and  Gold Acres. New model interpretation and new drilling in the underground portion of Cortez Hills added or upgraded Inferred ounces. Cortez is currently reporting Mineral Resource estimates for four principal areas in the district. These include the Pipeline Complex and the Gold Acres deposit on the west side of Crescent Valley and the Cortez Hills Complex and Cortez Pits areas on the east side of the valley. Each of the mentioned areas include several gold deposits or zones. Table 14-2 identifies the principal areas, their included deposits or zones, when the Mineral Resources were most recently updated, and which group is responsible for the reported Mineral Resource estimate. TABLE 14-2 CORTEZ MINERAL RESOURCE MODELS Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Area

Pipeline Complex  

Cortez Hills Complex  

Cortez Pits Gold Acres

  

                             

Deposits or Zones included

Pipeline Gap Crossroads Pediment Breccia (open pit) Breccia (underground) Middle Lower NW Deeps

   Last Update   

                             

MID 2014    MID 2014    MID 2014      MID 2015    MID 2015    MID 2015    MID 2015    MID 2015    EOY 2012    2008   

Responsible Group

Tucson Technical Group Mine Technical Group Mine Technical Group Mine Technical Group Mine Technical Group Mine Technical Group Mine Technical Group Mine Technical Group

Details of the Mineral Resource estimation for each area are described in the sections below.

PIPELINE COMPLEX Mineral Resources, exclusive of Mineral Reserves are listed in Table 14-3. Cut-off grades for the reported Mineral Resources were established using a gold price of US$1,300 per ounce and are shown in Table 14-4.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-2    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 14-3 PIPELINE COMPLEX MINERAL RESOURCE SUMMARY – DECEMBER 31, 2015 Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

     

  

Mill Material      Leach Material      Refractory Material      Total   Grade

Grade

Grade

Grade

Tons

(oz/st

Ounces Tons

(oz/st

Ounces Tons

(oz/st

Ounces Tons

(oz/st

Ounces    (000 st)     Au)      (000 oz)     (000 st)      Au)      (000 oz)     (000 st)     Au)      (000 oz)     (000 st)      Au)      (000 oz) 

Measured Resources Pipeline    Gap    Crossroads    Total Measured    Indicated Resources Pipeline    Gap    Crossroads    Total Indicated    Measured & Indicated Resources Pipeline    Gap    Crossroads    Total M+I    Inferred Resources Pipeline    Crossroads    Total Inferred      

  

  

  

  

  278       0.059         51       0.056         165       0.044      

494

   0.053

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

  2,293       491       1,536    

4,320

  

  0.057       0.048       0.042    

0.051

  

     

  2,571       542       1,701    

4,814

  

  0.057       0.049       0.042    

0.051

  

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

  

 

 

  260       0.08         740       0.06      

1,000

   0.07

  

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

16     3     7     26

  

  953       0.011       116       0.012       1,364       0.011    

2,434

   0.011

  

     

130     24     65     219

  

 12,242       1,905      15,964    

30,112

  

  0.011       0.012       0.011    

0.011

  

     

147     27     72     245

  

 13,196       2,022      17,329    

32,546

  

  0.011       0.012       0.011    

0.011

  

     

 

 

 

  

  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

  

  

 

 

 

20       1,387       0.01       47      11,378       0.01       67

   12,765

   0.01

  

  

 

  

 

  

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

11     1     15     27

     

     

 

 

—         —         —            —         —         —

   —

  

 

 

 

 

  

 

138     23     172     333

  

  82       0.085       5       0.093       —         —      

87

   0.085

  

     

149     24     187     360

  

  82       0.085       5       0.093       —         —      

87

   0.085

  

     

 

 

  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

  

 

 

13       52       0.20       105       101       0.15       118

   154

   0.17

  

  

 

  

 

  

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

—       —       —       —

  

  1,231       0.022         167       0.025         1,530       0.014      

2,928

     0.018      

7     0     —       7

  

 14,617       2,402      17,500    

34,519

  

  0.019       0.019       0.014       0.016    

       

7     0     —       7

  

 15,848       2,569      19,030    

37,447

  

  0.019       0.020       0.014       0.016    

       

 

 

 

  

  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

  

  

 

 

10       1,698       0.03       15      12,220       0.01       26

   13,918

   0.02

  

  

 

  

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 



27   4   22   53  

275   47   237   559  

302   51   259   612  

44   167   211

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:  

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

CIM definitions were followed for Mineral Resources. Mineral Resources are reported using a gold price of US$1,300 per ounce and using cut-off grades given in Table 14-4. Bulk densities vary by formation and zone and are listed in Table 14-11. Open pit Mineral Resources are constrained by an optimized pit shell. Mineral Resources are additional to and exclusive of Mineral Reserves. Numbers may not add due to rounding.

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Joint Venture, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-3    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 14-4 PIPELINE COMPLEX MINERAL RESOURCE REPORTING CUT-OFF GRADES Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Area

  

Cut-off grade

(oz/st Au)

  

Mill     

Leach  

Refractory

Crossroads

                 

Lower Upper Lower Upper Lower Upper

                 

 0.03         0.03         0.03       

0.004   0.03    0.004   0.03    0.004   0.03   

0.067

Gap Pipeline

0.065 0.065

DATA For resource estimation, the drill hole data were limited to holes within or immediately adjacent to the various block model boundaries. A total of 3,335 drill holes over 2,994,466 ft and 275,123 assays are in the database. GEOLOGICAL MODELLING Three-dimensional  wireframe  surfaces  were  constructed  in  2010  by  Rangefront  Consulting,  LLC  (Goss,  2010),  representing  alluvium-bedrock  contact,  rock formations, and alteration. The final surfaces were created considering, in order of importance:  

 



  1”:1,000’ scale geologic mapping in the Shoshone Range



  1”:50’ scale mapping in Pipeline, Gold Acres London extension, OGA and Gap pits



  27 geologic cross sections covering the Pipeline Complex at a scale of 1”:100’



  Geological logs, based on drill holes completed during or after 2004



  Down hole, multi-element geochemistry in conjunction with analyses from the NITON portable XRF unit



  Geophysical interpretations

 

   

   

   

   

 

Surfaces were triangulated using sub-parallel cross sectional line work, which were modified to fit with surface mapping, intersecting cross sections, drill hole data and/or  the  results  of  geophysical  interpretations.  Snapping  to  drill  hole  intercepts  was  performed  on  sections  with  reliable  results,  but  not  drill  holes  between sections.  The  work  was  completed  using  the  Mira  Geoscience  GoCad  Mining  Suite  and  the  resultant  geological  interpretation  was  used  to  flag  formation  and alteration contacts in the block model and inform the interpolation design.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-4    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

In addition to formation and alteration, topography and area wireframe surfaces and solids were used to define boundaries and mineralization controls within the Pipeline Complex block model. The three established areas corresponding to the main deposits, Pipeline, Crossroads, and Gap are shown in Figure 14-1. Deposits Pipeline and Crossroads are separated by the east high-wall fault in the southern end of the Pipeline pit. Each area was treated individually during the estimation process. ESTIMATION SUMMARY Gold mineralization in the Pipeline Complex is complex. It ponds and pools at formational  contacts and stratigraphic boundaries, but can also follow structural trends related to compressional and extensional faulting. The estimation method developed by the Tucson Technical Group sought to incorporate this understanding into the block model by giving priority to stratigraphic over structural mineralization trends, where interpreted, and by using probabilities to categorize high and low grade blocks, where, due to the nature of the deposit, would be very difficult to accomplish using traditional “wireframing”. At  Crossroads  and  Gap,  this  was  accomplished  by  running  both  a  structural  and  stratigraphic  oriented  indicator  estimation  for  each  area,  then,  where  the stratigraphic  indicator  reported  a  higher  probability  value  than  the  structural  indicator,  it  was  flagged  as  a  stratigraphically  controlled  block  in  the  model.  All remaining blocks were assigned as structurally controlled. This mineralization control was then applied to low grade indicator values. High grade indicators were estimated with elements based upon stratigraphic control only. Pipeline was considered too complex to apply this technique and was estimated using trends based upon stratigraphy only. All stratigraphic units at the Pipeline Complex were unfolded prior to the indicator estimation using Maptek’s Vulcan tetramesh modelling feature. Unfold surfaces were based on the 2010 geological model. Based on the result of the indicator estimation runs and analysis, blocks at Gap and Crossroads were flagged as being structurally or stratigraphically controlled, and as low or high grade. Blocks at Pipeline were flagged as low or high grade based on probability results of the stratigraphically controlled gold grade indicator estimation only. Raw assay samples were then back-flagged from the block model and divided into groupings based on area, dominant mineralization control and indicated grade category. Each sample group was then capped, re-composited, and estimated individually using parameters unique to each group.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-5    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

The  block  model  was  then  validated  and  classified.  Details  of  this  multi-stepped  mineral  resource  estimation  process  at  the  Pipeline  Complex  are  listed  in  the following sections. BLOCK MODEL A 40 ft x 40 ft x 20 ft block model was developed over the Pipeline Complex in Maptek’s Vulcan software. The block model parameters are listed in Table 14-5. Following estimation of variables, the model was reblocked to 40 ft x 40 ft x 40 ft to conform to bench height for mine design purposes.

TABLE 14-5 PIPELINE COMPLEX BLOCK MODEL PARAMETERS Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Min

Easting (ft)  

97,000  

   

Max

109,120  

 

Northing (ft)

  Max  

Min  

Max

49,500  

61,980  

2,880  

5,540

Min

Elevation (ft)

  Easting 

40  

Block Size (ft) Northing 

40

 

  Elev. 

Easting 

20  

303  

Number of Blocks Northing 

312  

Elev.

133

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-6    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 14-7    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

INDICATOR INTERPOLATION The Tucson Technical Group applied Inverse Distance squared (ID2) for the estimation of high and low grade indicators to categorize each block within each of the areas at the Pipeline Complex as high or low grade, and, in the case of Gap and Pipeline, as dominated by stratigraphic or structural control on mineralization. A low grade gold indicator was assigned at a threshold of 0.002 oz/st, in all areas. High grade gold indicators were assigned at thresholds of 0.05 oz/st, 0.10 oz/st, 0.15 oz/st for Gap, Crossroads, and Pipeline, respectively. Table 14-6 shows the general orientations of the structural mineralization control search ellipses within each area.

TABLE 14-6 SEARCH ELLIPSE ORIENTATIONS OF STRUCTURAL DOMAINS – PIPELINE COMPLEX Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Domain

  

Azimuth  

Plunge  

Dip

Gap Crossroads

     

320°    330°   

20°    10°   

-10° 10°

Indicators were estimated into unique high grade stratigraphic, and low grade stratigraphic and structural indicator block variables at Gap and Crossroads, and into high and low grade stratigraphically controlled indicator block variables at Pipeline. Stratigraphic high and low grade indicator estimation runs employed a search ellipse of 400 ft x 400 ft x variable, oriented parallel to the unfolded surfaces of each mineralized formation: Devonian Wenban (DW) within the Devonian Horse Canyon (DHC), Silurian Roberts Mountain (SRM), Hanson Creek (OHC), and the Quaternary Alluvium (QAL). Structural search ellipse dimensions for Gap and Crossroads were 400 ft x 400 ft x 60 ft, and limited to the SRM and DW formations at Gap and to the DW formation at Crossroads. A minimum and maximum of five and 13 composites, respectively for each indicator variable was used. The number of composites per drill hole was limited to two, which in tandem with composite restrictions, forced contribution from three drill holes to estimate an indicator value for a block. Following  estimation,  mineralization  control  was  ranked  at  Gap  and  Crossroads  based  on  the  outcome  of  the  low  grade  indicators.  Where  the  stratigraphically control indicator in the low grade threshold yielded a higher probability value than the structurally controlled indicator, it  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-8    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

was ranked as the dominant control. All other blocks were assumed to be structurally controlled. The results of the indicator estimation and mineralization control ranking as well as the modelled formation and alteration codes were back-flagged from the block model to the original drill hole database to accommodate data selection for grade interpolation. GRADE CAPPING AND COMPOSITING Flagged raw gold assays were capped for outliers based on examination of cumulative probability plots and histograms by the Tucson Technical Group. The capped assays  were  composited  using  down-hole  20  ft  lengths.  Composites  honoured  domain  boundaries,  and  were  distributed  to  prevent  the  formation  of  residual composites. A summary of gold grade caps is shown in Table 14-7.

TABLE 14-7 SUMMARY OF GOLD GRADE CAPS – PIPELINE COMPLEX Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Domain

  

Gap

(oz/st Au)  

Pipeline

(oz/st Au)  

Crossroads (oz/st Au)

High Grade Low Grade Waste QAL

           

0.40 0.18 0.07 0.07

1.20 0.40 0.10 0.07

0.70 0.30 0.10 0.07

           

           

Where  drill  holes  were  completed  in  mineralization  (gold  greater  or  equal  to  0.003  oz/st  Au),  and  at  depth  were  poorly  supported  by  surrounding  drill  hole information, an additional 20 ft composite was added manually to the end of the hole at a null grade to prevent the extension of gold below the depth of drilling. A total of 397 drill holes were modified. Intervals with poor recovery that could not be sampled were excluded from the compositing routine and estimation, as were selected drill holes identified by the onsite team as having poor location, sampling, or drilling angle to mineralized structures. Unsampled intervals were assigned a background gold grade of 0.0001 oz/st Au.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-9    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

VARIOGRAPHY Normalized,  omnidirectional  variograms  were  modeled  over  the  low  grade  domains  of  Gap,  Crossroads  and  Pipeline,  shown  in  Figure  14-2  and  in  Table 148. Variograms of the blast hole data at Pipeline and Gap were also modeled (not shown).

TABLE 14-8 LOW GRADE OMNIDIRECTIONAL VARIOGRAM MODELS – PIPELINE COMPLEX Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Area

  

Type Nugget

                                

Structure 1 Structure 2 Structure 3 Structure 4 Total Variance

 

Range (ft) Variance Range (ft) Variance Range (ft) Variance Range (ft) Variance

  

Gap

                                

  

Pipeline   

Crossroads

Spherical    0.1    25    0.2    100    0.5    350    0.05    600    0.1    0.95   

Spherical    0.1    25    0.2    100    0.5    350    0.05    600    0.1    0.95   

Spherical 0.1 25 0.2 100 0.5 350 0.05 600 0.1 0.95

The models for each of the areas are identical, however, the values derived from the variography for informing search ellipse parameters are based on the raw data.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-10    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 14-11    

 

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

GRADE INTERPOLATION Gold  was  interpolated  into  high  and  low  grade  indicator  areas  individually  for  each  formation  within  Pipeline,  Gap  and  Crossroads  using  a  five  pass inverse distance  cubed  (ID3)  estimation  approach,  and  incorporating  mineralization  control  at  Gap  and  Crossroads  (Table  14-9).  The  first  pass  employed  a  box  search equal to the block size. Search ellipse dimensions were set to the lag distance at 80% and 90% of the variogram sill for each area for the second and fourth passes, respectively, which were each followed by a pass using a smaller search ellipse with less composite restrictions. As with the indicator estimation, blocks flagged as dominated by stratigraphic mineralization control employed Vulcan’s tetramesh unfolding. Grade estimations incorporating structural control were limited to the DW formation at Crossroads and to the DW and SRM formations at Gap.

TABLE 14-9 ESTIMATION PASS SUMMARY – PIPELINE COMPLEX Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Pass

  

Major (ft)     

Gap 1 2 3 4 5 Pipeline 1 2 3 4 5 Crossroads 1 2 3 4 5

                                                     

     20       180       70       320       100          20       180       70       320       130          20       180       70       320       130    

Semimajor (ft)     

Minor-

strat

(ft)   

   20     180     70     320     100        20     180     70     320     130        20     180     70     320     130    

   10    variable   variable   variable   variable      10    variable   variable   variable   variable      10    variable   variable   variable   variable  

                             

Minor – struct

(ft)   

10 20 20 40 40 n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 10 20 20 40 40

                                                     

Min

composites  

1 2 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 1

                                                     

Max

composites  

99 3 3 3 3 99 3 3 3 3 99 3 3 3 3

                                                     

Max

composites per hole

99 1 1 1 1 99 1 1 1 1 99 1 1 1 1

Select  composite  weights  were  assigned  manually  by  the  Tucson  Technical  Group  to  allow  limited  influence  of  composite  groups  (grade  and  mineralization control) across domain boundaries. For example, low grade, stratigraphically controlled composites were assigned a weight of 0.25 in the high grade domain at Gap, and a weight of 0.1 at Pipeline and Crossroads.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-12    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

A complete summary of composite weights used in grade interpolation are shown in Table 14-10.

TABLE 14-10 SUMMARY OF COMPOSITE WEIGHTS – PIPELINE COMPLEX Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Deposit Area/Grade Zones

  

High

Grade    

Gap High Grade Low Grade Stratigraphic Control Low Grade Structural Control Waste - Stratigraphic Control Waste - Structural Control Pipeline High Grade Low Grade - Stratigraphic Control Waste - Stratigraphic Control Crossroads High Grade Low Grade - Stratigraphic Control Low Grade - Structural Control Waste - Stratigraphic Control Waste - Structural Control

                                               

     1       0.75       0.75       0.1             1       0.5       0.1          1       0.5       0.5       0.1       

Low Grade

Stratigraphic Control     

Low Grade Structural

Control     

   0.25     1        0.1           0.1     1     0.1        0.1     1        0.1       

         1        0.1                          1        0.1    

     

           

   

   

Waste

Stratigraphic Control     

     

           

   0.1     0.1        1           0.1     0.1     1        0.1     0.1        1       

Waste

Structural Control  

 

0.1  

 

1  

 

0.1  

 

1  

In addition to gold based upon fire assay results, cyanide leach gold and carbon were also estimated for use in material type definition in conjunction with geology, alteration, and area flags. Nearest neighbour interpolation was run in parallel to ID3 for fire assay gold for validation purposes. Where areas over the Pipeline Complex have been mined and backfilled with waste, grades, and densities were updated to reflect. BULK DENSITY Bulk density values were assigned to the rock unit formations and alteration types. Table 14-11 lists the bulk density values used for the deposits in the Pipeline Complex.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-13    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 14-11 BULK DENSITY – PIPELINE COMPLEX Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Formation

  

Density (st/ft 3 )  

DW DHC SRM OHC Abyss Marble SRM - Marble Skarn SRM - Skarn Gossan SRM - Gossan Shear Silica QAL Dumps

                                            

                             

0.07645   0.07645   0.0746   0.0837   0.0798   0.0779   0.08554   0.0789   0.091   0.0737   0.0655   0.068   0.07399   0.06169   0.05714  

CLASSIFICATION The Measured component of the Mineral Resource is assigned to blocks directly intersected by drill holes used in the interpolation, and estimated during the initial box search. Indicated Mineral Resources are defined as when estimated in the second or third pass, equal to a maximum distance range of 80% of the variogram sill. Inferred Mineral Resources are those blocks estimated in the two final passes, where the search ellipse dimensions are equal to, or smaller than, a distance range  of  90%  of  the  variogram  sill  for  each  area.  A  classification  script  updated  the  block  model  to  reclassify  isolated  blocks  assigned  a  class  of  Indicated  as Inferred. A cross section showing classification of blocks meeting Mineral Resource criteria over the Crossroads deposit is shown in Figure 14-3. REBLOCKING Subsequent to grade estimation, the Pipeline Complex block model was reblocked to 40 ft x 40 ft x 40 ft for use in mine planning. Grade variables were averaged into the larger block size and weighted by density, all other variables were assigned based on majority.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-14    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 14-15    

 

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

MODEL VALIDATION Checks and validation performed by the Tucson Technical Group included:  

 



  Examination of the interpolation scripts and comparison to the interpolation plan



  Visual comparisons of interpolated gold grades relative to drill hole composite values on sections and plans.



  Results of the estimation were compared to the blast hole block model



  Comparison of block model grades and gold assays using histograms and cumulative frequency plots



  Comparison of the ID3 estimation to the nearest neighbor (NN) estimation model



  Local trends in the grade estimates were reviewed using swath plots

 

   

   

   

   

 

Following  these  checks,  the  Tucson  Technical  Group  concluded  that  the  block  model  was  globally  unbiased  and  demonstrated  good  correlation  between  the different estimation methods and different supports. RPA has reviewed various modelling aspects of the Pipeline Complex, with focus on the Crossroads deposit, which represents approximately 25% of classified material at Cortez. RPA’s observations and comments from the model validation are provided below. All comments are based on the mid 2014 model data, which has been depleted to December 31, 2014. RPA conducted several checks on the drill hole database and composite file provided by the Tucson Technical Group, including a search for duplicate and missing samples, overlapping intervals, anomalous values and missing tables. No significant errors were found. Compositing routines were checked to confirm appropriate flagging and selected domains were reviewed using histograms, probability plots, and decile analysis to confirm appropriate gold grade caps. RPA is satisfied with the compositing routines and chosen gold grade caps and finds the composites appropriate for resource estimation. RPA reviewed the stratigraphic surfaces against the drill hole data and found the general trends of the surfaces to be honoured.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-16    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

RPA reviewed block and database flagging, field calculation, block estimation, and block calculation files and scripts provided by the Tucson Technical Group for errors and found them to be in good order. RPA compared flagged formation codes to formation wireframes and expected stratigraphy and density and found the block model to be appropriately flagged. Block model sizes and orientations were reviewed and found appropriate to the drilling density, mineralization and proposed mining methods. Assigned  density  values  in  the  block  model  were  compared  to  measured  density  values  in  drill  core  using  basic  statistics.  The  average  values of the measured density within each formation and alteration zone compared well to the assigned block model value, if slightly conservative. Omnidirectional variography continues to be the predominant tool to evaluate grade continuity and set interpolation search distances. Detailed variography should be carried out, where sample numbers are sufficient, to evaluate grade continuity anisotropy and better quantify search ellipse parameters for interpolation of the grade block models. Search  ellipse  dimensions  were  compared  to  the  omnidirectional  variography  completed  by  the  Tucson  Technical  Group  and  found  to  be  reasonable.  A  strong northeastern  mineralization  trend  was  visually  observed  by  RPA  in  the  composites  and  resultant  block  model.  RPA  is  of  the  opinion  that  this  trend  may  be discernible  using  directional  variography  in  unfolded  space,  which  would  yield  more  precise  variogram  models  to  inform  search  ellipse  dimensions  in  future updates. RPA also recommends updating the variogram models to fit with raw data. RPA created isotropic and anisotropic grade shells using Aranz’ Leapfrog software for comparison with interpolated blocks and to identify mineralization trends. The  block  model  and  grade  shells  were  spatially  comparable.  An  additional  mineralization  trend,  dipping  approximately  35°  to  the  west  was  visible  within  the Crossroads pit. RPA recommends exploring this mineralization trend further. RPA conducted visual comparisons of assay, composite and block gold values in cross section and plan and found good spatial correlation. Gold grade was not observed to extend into  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-17    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

regions dominated by waste and did not appear to be overly smoothed in higher grade areas. An example cross section of composite and block gold grades is shown in Figure 14-4. RPA compiled basic statistics, histograms and probability plots of blocks and composites within the SRM, OHC, Abyss fault, DHC including DW, and QAL units of Crossroads, above a gold cut-off of 0.004 oz/st, and found excellent spatial correlation. Basic statistics are summarized in Table 14-12.

  TABLE 14-12 COMPARISON OF BASIC STATISTICS OF GOLD VALUES – PIPELINE COMPLEX Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

   

  

Crossroads Blocks Composites Gap Blocks Composites Pipeline Blocks Composites

                          

Minimum (oz/st Au)     

           

   0.004     0.004        0.004     0.004        0.004     0.004    

Maximum (oz/st Au)     

           

   0.649     0.649        0.389     0.389        1.200     1.200    

Mean

(oz/st Au)    

           

   0.024     0.027        0.013     0.015        0.031     0.040    

Number of

Data Points 

  107,788     7,883      

93,265   4,812  

  256,466     18,594  

RPA  reviewed  the  classification  criteria  at  the  Pipeline  Complex  as  well  as  visually  inspected  classified  blocks  in  cross  section  and  plan  view.  RPA  considers restricting  the  Measured  component  of  the  Mineral  Resource  to  those  blocks  directly  intersected  by  drill  holes  to  be  conservative.  Additionally,  assigning classification  of  Indicated  and  Inferred  primarily  by  interpolation  pass  has  resulted  in  isolated  blocks,  and  a  spotted  dog  appearance  in  cross  section,  which  is impractical for mine design purposes. RPA recommends a review of classification criteria at Pipeline Complex and is of the opinion that future updates consider the inclusion of classification wireframe shells, and revision of classification smoothing scripts.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-18    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 14-19    

 

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

CORTEZ HILLS COMPLEX Open pit and underground development are present at the Cortez Hills Complex. Areas designated for open pit development include the Pediment deposit and the near-surface portion of the Breccia zone. The Cortez Hills Breccia, Middle and Lower zones, as well as the Deep South extension of the Lower zone, make up the underground component. Mineral Resources at Cortez Hills Complex, exclusive of Mineral Reserves are listed in Table 14-13. Cut-off grades used in reporting Mineral  Resources  were  established  using  a  gold  price  of  US$1,300  per  ounce  and  are  shown  in  Table  14-14.  Measured  and  Indicated  Mineral  Resources  are limited to the underground portions of the Cortez Hills Complex.

TABLE 14-13 CORTEZ HILLS COMPLEX MINERAL RESOURCE SUMMARY – DECEMBER 31, 2015 Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

     

Measured Resources Underground Breccia Zone Total Indicated Resources Underground Breccia Zone Middle Zone Lower Zone Deep South Total Measured and Indicated Resources Underground Breccia Zone Middle Zone Lower Zone Deep South Total Inferred Resources Open Pit Breccia Zone Pediment Total

 

Mill Material   Tons

Grade

Ounces   (000 st)    (oz/st Au)    (000 oz) 

 

            146        146

 

            295          200          396          538        1,428

 

            —          —

 

            —            —            —            —          —

 

            —            —            —            —        —

 

            2,615          410        3,025

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

        441          200          396          538        1,574

 

            796          —          798

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    0.342      0.342

 

    0.338      0.300      0.258      0.280      0.288

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  0.339      0.300      0.258      0.280      0.293

 

    0.12      —        0.12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

50   50

 

100   60   102   150   412

    

149   60   102   150   462

 

93   —     94

 

Leach Material    Refractory Material    Total   Tons

Grade

Ounces Tons

Grade

Ounces Tons

Grade

Ounces   (000 st)    (oz/st Au)    (000 oz)    (000 st)    (oz/st Au)    (000 oz)    (000 st)    (oz/st Au)    (000 oz) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    —        —

 

    —        —        —        —        —

 

    —        —        —           —

 

    0.01      0.01      0.01

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

        —        21      —

  21

 

        —        40      —        865      —        546      —        125      —

  1,577

 

        —        61      —        865      —        546      —        125      —

  1,598

 

        25      29      3      —        28

  29

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    0.317      0.317

 

    0.261      0.335      0.284      0.149      0.301

 

    0.280      0.335      0.284      0.149      0.301

 

    0.10      —        0.10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

        7      167      7

  167

 

        10      335      290      1,065      155      942      19      663      474

  3,005

 

        17      502      290      1,065      155      942      19      663      481

  3,172

 

        3      3,440      —        411      3

  3,851

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    0.339      0.339

 

    0.329      0.328      0.273      0.255      0.295

 

    0.332      0.328      0.273      0.255      0.297

 

    0.04      0.01      0.03

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

56   56

 

110   350   257   169   886

 

167   350   257   169   943

 

122   3   125

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-20    

  

     

www.rpacan.com

 

 

Mill Material    Leach Material    Refractory Material    Total   Tons

Grade

Ounces Tons

Grade

Ounces Tons

Grade

Ounces Tons

Grade

Ounces   (000 st)    (oz/st Au)    (000 oz)    (000 st)    (oz/st Au)    (000 oz)    (000 st)    (oz/st Au)    (000 oz)    (000 st)    (oz/st Au)    (000 oz) 

Underground Breccia Zone Middle Zone Lower Zone Deep South Total

       9          14          27          81        131

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  0.47      0.23      0.21      0.29      0.28

 

 

 

 

 

  4      3      6      24      37

 

 

 

 

  —        —        —        —        —

 

 

 

 

 

 

  —        —        —        —        —

 

 

 

 

 

    —        0      —        68      —        513      —        629      —

  1,210

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  0.24      0.37      0.25      0.44      0.35

 

 

 

 

 

    0      9      25      82      127      541      277      710      429

  1,341

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  0.47      0.35      0.25      0.42      0.35

 

 

 

 

 

4   28   133   301   466

 

Notes:  

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

CIM definitions were followed for Mineral Resources. Mineral Resources are reported using a gold price of US$1,300 per ounce and using cut-off grades given in Table 14-14. Bulk densities vary by formation and zone and are listed in Table 14-16. Open pit Mineral Resources are limited to Inferred material inside the reserve pit. There is no optimized pit shell extending beyond the reserve pit at Cortez Hills. Mineral Resources are additional to and exclusive of Mineral Reserves. Numbers may not add due to rounding.

TABLE 14-14 CORTEZ HILLS COMPLEX MINERAL RESOURCE REPORTING CUT-OFF GRADES Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Area

  

Material Type  

Lower Cut-off grade

(oz/st Au)   

Open Pit Cortez Hill Breccia Zone

  

                                                                 

                                                                 

        

Mill Leach Refractory

        

Mill Leach Refractory

     

Mill Refractory

     

Mill Refractory

     

Mill Refractory

     

Mill Refractory

Pediment

Underground Breccia Zone

Middle Zone

Lower Zone

Lower Zone – Deep South

0.03 0.004 0.075 0.03 0.004 0.075

0.128 0.152 0.133 0.158 0.136 0.161 0.110 0.110

Upper Cut-off grade

(oz/st Au)

0.03

0.03

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-21    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

DATA For the purpose of resource estimation, the drill hole data was limited to drill holes within or immediately adjacent to the block model extents. The 2015 resource database includes 3,542 drill holes comprising 310,9661ft and 283,041 assays. This database includes all drill holes used for Mineral Resource estimates for all of Cortez Hills including Pediment open pit, Breccia open pit and underground, and underground Middle and Lower zones. BLOCK MODEL AND MINERALIZED DOMAINS Block  modelling  at  the  Cortez  Hills  Complex  was  performed  by  the  Mine  Technical  Group  at  Cortez.  Geologic,  structural  and  alteration  interpretations were provided  by  onsite  geologists.  Three  dimensional  solids  and  surfaces  constructed  from  these  interpretations  were  used  as  the  basis  for  defining  mineralization domains. Cortez Technical Services built a series of estimation domain wireframes using grade breaks derived from statistical analysis of gold distributions in conjunction with structural and alteration elements derived from geological logs and core photographs. This approach was particularly useful for the volumetric definition of the very  high-grade  transported  hydrothermal  breccias  and  the  surrounding  moderate-grade  crackle  breccia  or  fractured  rock  bodies  of  the  Cortez  Hills  Breccia zone.  All  of  the  mineralized  domain  wireframes  (mzones)  were  bounded  by  a  sub-economic  grade  domain  wireframe  to  provide  dilution  grades  for  mine planning. Wireframes representing barren, post-mineralization dikes and sills were modelled and cross cut the mineralization domain wireframes. Pediment deposit grade shells were built in a similar manner with boundaries honouring geological units and contacts, structural features and the distribution of gold  mineralization  intersected  in  the  drill  holes.  High  grade  wireframes  at  a  gold  cut-off  grade  of  0.20  oz/st  were  built  to  confine  high-angle  structural features. Low angle, intermediate grade wireframes were built using a gold cut-off grade of 0.03 oz/st. An outer, low-grade wireframe was built at a gold cut-off grade of 0.004 oz/st to encompass potential heap-leach material and provide dilution grades for mine planning of the higher grade wireframes located within. An overview of the zones at Cortez Hills Complex are shown in Figure 14-5. Two 10 ft x 10 ft x 10 ft sub-blocked models for the underground areas of the Cortez Hills deposit were built by the Cortez Mine Technical Group. The first was built to define the lower  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-22    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

portions (< 5,000 ft elev) of the Breccia zone and the second, deeper model defines the Middle, and Lower zones, including Deep South. Both were constructed honouring domain boundaries and formational contacts. Minimum and maximum sub block dimensions of 5 ft x 5 ft x 2 ft and 10 ft x 10 ft x 10 ft were defined within mineralized domains; parent blocks of 30 ft x 30 ft x 20 ft were retained in areas outside these zones. A third model over the Pediment deposit and upper Breccia Zone (> 5,000 ft) was defined using parent blocks of 10 ft x 10 ft x 10 ft, with sub block dimensions of 5 ft x 5 ft x 2 ft. Following interpolation of all variables in the sub-blocked model, it was re-blocked to 30 ft x 30 ft x 50 ft. Block model parameters are shown in Table 14-15.

TABLE 14-15 CORTEZ HILLS COMPLEX BLOCK MODEL PARAMETERS Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

     

     

Easting (ft) Min    Max

Open Pit Breccia Zone and Pediment Underground Breccia Zone Underground Middle and Lower Zones (including Deep South)

   29,400    36,990    21,000    31,290    3,800    7,200    29,400    36,300    22,320    31,320    3,800    7,200    29,010    36,300    22,320    31,320    2,800    7,200

   

   Original Block Size (ft)    Reblocked Block Size (ft)    Easting    Northing    Elev.    Easting    Northing    Elev.

Open Pit Breccia Zone and Pediment Underground Unmineralized Parent Underground Mineralized Parent Underground Sub-block

           

10 30 10 5

           

10 30 10 5

     

           

Northing (ft)    Min    Max   

10 20 10 2

           

30

           

Elevation (ft) Min    Max

30

   50         

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-23    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 14-24    

 

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

GRADE CAPPING AND COMPOSITING Assays  contained  in  mineralized  envelopes  were  grouped  according  to  their  statistical  parameters,  and  reviewed  together  to  determine  the  relevant  gold caps. Details of the mzone grouping and resultant gold caps is shown in Table 14-16.

TABLE 14-16 CORTEZ HILLS COMPLEX CAPPING Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Area and Group

  

Pediment I High Grade II Intermediate Grade Breccia I Very High Grade II High Grade III Low Grade Middle Zone I High Grade II High Grade III High Grade IV Intermediate Grade Lower Zone I High Grade II High Grade III High Grade IV Intermediate Grade

                                                  

Uneconomic Buffer Zone Unestimated Zones

     

Mzone

 

231, 228, 230, 227, 234, 212, 210, 214, 213, 237 224, 225, 220, 226, 232, 215, 219, 233, 216, 235 229, 236 202

                                 

10 101, 201

   

321 301, 302, 303, 304, 313, 332 30,40,49 15-29, 31-39, 41-48, 51 11-14 143-149,161,162,198 133,135,141,142, 121-126,191,192,196 131,132,134,151-154,156-158,111,112,155,193-195 110, 130, 140, 150, 190

Gold Assay Cap (oz/st)  

   

3.5   0.6  

     

10   5.5   0.25  

       

2   2.3   1.7   0.5  

       

2   1   1   0.4  

 

0.1  

Capped assays were composited down hole at 10 ft lengths. This composite length was chosen to allow for the higher resolution grade interpolation needed for underground mine planning and is close to the accepted smallest mining unit for underground (SMU). Intervals with poor recovery that could not be sampled were excluded from the compositing routine and estimation, as were selected drill holes identified by the onsite team as having poor location, sampling, or drilling angle to mineralized structures. Unsampled intervals were assigned a background gold grade of 0.0001 oz/st Au. Assays lengths were distributed within each domain to prevent the formation of residual composites.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-25    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

VARIOGRAPHY Directional variograms were developed for gold and used to establish search distances equal to lag at 80% and 90% of the total sill variance range for the different estimation domain groups. In most cases, data from multiple domains was interpreted together in a group. Search ellipses were based on the ranges modeled in the variograms and preferred orientations of modelled mineralized zones. GRADE INTERPOLATION Grade models were interpolated using ID3 employing varying search criteria (directions and distances) customized to each domain within the models. The Breccia zone, Middle zone, Lower zone, and Pediment deposit have been modelled with 33, 44, 24, and 8 individual estimation domains, respectively. The interpolation approach within the Middle and Lower zones at Cortez included four nested estimation runs; the first being equal to 80% of the variogram sill, with a minimum of three and maximum of five composites, and only two composites per hole. These composite restrictions were also applied to the third pass, which used a search ellipse equal to 90% of the variogram sill. The second and fourth passes used search ellipses equal to half the dimensions of the first and third passes, respectively, but  reduced  the  composite  restrictions  to  allow  a  block  to  be  estimated  with  a  single  composite.  The  Pediment  and  Breccia  zone  interpolation  approached  also included an initial box search, 5 ft x 5 ft x 5 ft, which allowed a single composite to estimate a block, if that composite was centred on the block. BULK DENSITY Bulk densities were determined from average tonnage factors (TF) measured for the different mineralized domains, rock formations or units, and refractory and oxide materials. Table 14-17 lists the bulk densities used in the block model at the Cortez Hill Complex.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-26    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 14-17 CORTEZ HILLS COMPLEX - BULK DENSITY Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Area

  

TF 1   

1/TF   

Default QAL (Cortez Hills) QCL(Cortez Hills) QAL (Pediment) QCL (Pediment) QCS DHC DW SRM Dike (mzone 900)

                             

13.5      15    19.1   18.3   17.9   16.2   12.4   12.4   13.8  

0.0741   0.0552   0.0667   0.0524   0.0546   0.0559   0.0617   0.0806   0.0806   0.0725  

Breccia Zone

  

TF   

1/TF   

mzone 11 (oxide) mzone 11 (refractory) mzone 12 mzone 13 mzone 14 mzone 15 mzone 20 (oxide) mzone 20 (refractory) mzone 21 mzones 22 - 33 mzone 34 mzone 35 (DHC) mzone 35 (DW) mzone 35 (CHUG model) mzone 36 & 37 mzone 38 mzone 39 mzone 40 (oxide) mzone 40 (refractory) mzones 41 - 48 mzone 49 (oxide) mzone 49 (refractory) mzone 51

                                                                    

12.6   12.3   16.6   13.9   13.0   12.6   13.2   12.8   12.8   12.6   16.6   15.4   13.8   13.8   13.8   12.6   18.1   14.4   13.7   12.6   14.4   13.7   12.6  

0.0794   0.0813   0.0602   0.0719   0.0769   0.0794   0.0758   0.0781   0.0781   0.0794   0.0602   0.0649   0.0725   0.0725   0.0725   0.0794   0.0552   0.0694   0.0730   0.0794   0.0694   0.0730   0.0794  

Pediment

  

TF   

1/TF   

mzone 332 (DW) mzone 321 (DHC)

     

13.5   15.5  

0.0741   0.0647  

Comments

default

Comments

low grade halo around main breccia low grade halo around main breccia low grade capping zone low grade upper breccia low grade - north breccia wing main breccia zone main breccia zone footwall zones - dominantly breccia footwall zones - dominantly breccia capping zone upper high grade breccia upper high grade breccia upper high grade breccia north breccia wing south breccia wing mineralized QCS high grade breccia core high grade breccia core footwall zones high grade breccia core high grade breccia core breccia Comments

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-27    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

mzone 301 mzone 302 to 313 mzone 321 mzone 332 mzone 2 (SRM, OHC, QAL) mzone 2 (DW and DHC)

                 

 15.9      15.9      15.5      13.5      15.9      13.5    

 0.0630      0.0630      0.0647      0.0741      0.0630      0.0741    

Middle Zone

  

TF     

1/TF     

101 110 (oxide) 110 (refractory) 130, 140, 150 (oxide) 130, 140, 150 (refractory) 111, 112, 121 - 126, 191-196 (oxide) 111, 112, 121 - 126, 191-196 (refractory) 131 - 135, 141 - 149, 151-158, 161, 162, 198 (oxide) 131 - 135, 141 - 149, 151-158, 161, 162, 198 (refractory) Dikes

                             

 12.1      12.1      12.3      12.1      12.2      12.5      12.8      12.5      13.0      13.8    

 0.0826      0.0826      0.0813      0.0826      0.0820      0.0800      0.0781      0.0800      0.0769      0.0725    

Lower Zone

  

TF     

1/TF     

Default Dikes 201 202 (oxide) 202 (refractory) High grade (oxide) High grade (refractory)

                    

 12.2      13.8      12.4      13.2      12.3      13.3      13.1    

 0.0816      0.0725      0.0806      0.0758      0.0813      0.0752      0.0763    

based on truck study of alluvial ores

based on truck study of alluvial ores

Comments

Comments

mzone 210 to 237 mzone 210 to 237

Notes:  

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

TF: Tonnage Factor QCL : Quaternary conglomerate, limestone dominated clasts QCS : Quaternary conglomerate, siltstone dominated clasts DHC : Devonian Horse Canyon Formation DW : Devonian Wenban Formation SRM : Silurian Roberts Mountains Formation Dike : Barren Dikes mzone : Interpreted mineralized zone used to limit estimation

CLASSIFICATION Blocks  at  the  Cortez  Hills  Complex  were  classified  considering  estimation  pass  and  the  Cartesian  distance  to  the  nearest  informing  composite  sample  (same domain), with some downgrading at the discretion of the modelling geologist. In general, blocks estimated in the first estimation pass, a box search, were assigned a classification of Measured; Indicated  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-28    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

Mineral  Resources  were  those  with  an  informing  composite  sample  within  80%  of  the  modelled  variogram  sill  distance  for  the  different  domains.  All  other estimated  blocks  were  assigned  a  classification  of  Inferred,  equal  to  a  distance  of  90%  of  the  modelled  variogram  sill  value  for  each  domain,  as  well  as  some additional areas with lower geological confidence. Blocks in the Middle and Lower zones were limited to a classification of Indicated. A summary of classification criteria employed at the Cortez Hills Complex is shown in Table 14-18.

TABLE 14-18 CORTEZ HILLS COMPLEX - CLASSIFICATION DISTANCE CRITERIA Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

     

     

Breccia Zone Pediment Middle Zone Lower Zone

           

Maximum Cartesian Distance to Closest Composite (ft) Measured    Indicated    Inferred

5 5 —   —  

           

150 240 150 170

           

270 375 292 257

MODEL VALIDATION RPA  has  reviewed  various  modelling  aspects  of  the  Breccia,  Middle  and  Lower  Zones,  and  the  Pediment  deposit.  RPA’s  observations  and  comments from the model validation are provided below. All comments are based on Mid-2015 model data. The model has been depleted to December 31, 2015. Mineralization solids were checked for conformity to drill hole data, continuity, similarity between sections, overlaps, appropriate terminations between holes and into  undrilled  areas,  and  minimum  mining  thicknesses.  The  wireframe  solids  were  mostly  snapped  to  drill  hole  intervals,  reasonably  consistent,  continuous, honoured minimum thickness criteria, and are generally representative of the extents and limits of the mineralization. Block  model  sizes  and  orientations  were  reviewed  and  are  considered  by  RPA  to  be  appropriate  to  the  drilling  density,  mineralization,  and  proposed  mining methods. Compositing routines were checked to confirm that composites started and stopped at the intersections with the wireframes, that the composite coding is consistent with the wireframes. RPA is satisfied with the compositing routines and finds the composites appropriate for resource estimation.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-29    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

Capping statistics were reviewed for a series of individual zones and compared to the statistics of capping groups defined by Barrick. RPA is satisfied with the chosen caps, however, they appear to be conservative when compared to caps derived from individual zones. RPA recommends performing capping statistics on individual zones in future updates. Visual  inspection  and  comparison  of  drill  hole  composites  against  mineralized  solids  was  made  for  a  number  of  sections  from  the  Breccia,  Middle  and  Lower Zones and Pediment deposit. The mineralized solids and gold grade shells were found to conform well to the drill hole composite grades. A cross section for each zone of the Cortez Hills Complex comparing composite and block gold grades is shown in Figures 14-6 to 14-10. The drilling data, which include surface as well as tighter spaced underground core and Cubex holes, are locally clustered. Although no de-clustering was employed for the ID3 interpolation, the low number of composites and octant restriction used in the interpolation method helps to de-cluster the composites. Previous auditors have recommended that the current model should be validated by ordinary kriging, so as to limit the overestimation of high-grade tons, typical where dense drilling in high grade underground areas dominates an inverse distance estimation. While this has not been done, regular reconciliation to production reveals that the model does slightly overestimate high grade tons, but also underestimates average grade of processed material. Overall reconciliation between production and the reserve model remains close, but shows consistent positive gains from production relative to the model. RPA recommends validation by ordinary kriging be performed as part of the next model update at Cortez Hills Complex. Contact plots were prepared for selected mineralization domains and confirmed the appropriateness of hard boundaries between the domains during estimation. RPA  reviewed  the  variogram  models  for  selected  mineralization  domain  groups  and  prepared  variogram  models  representing  selected  individual  mineralization domains  for  comparison.  RPA  found  the  trend  of  the  Barrick  variogram  models  to  be  consistent  with  the  RPA  models,  however,  Barrick  consistently  resolved longer ranges in all directions than was observed in the RPA models based on a single domain. RPA recommends performing variography on single domains where supported by sufficient sample density, and applying the findings of those variogram models to smaller domains with similar lithological and grade characteristics.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-30    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

RPA reviewed the classification criteria at the Cortez Hills Complex as well as visually inspected classified blocks in cross section and plan view. RPA considers restricting the Measured component of the Mineral Resource to those blocks directly intersected by drill holes to be conservative. RPA is of the opinion that in general  classification  of  blocks  is  in  line  with  industry  best  practices,  however,  notes  that  the  classification  of  blocks  in  the  Lower  Zone  appears  to  be  more aggressive  than  the  Middle  and  Breccia  zones.  RPA  also  notes  that  the  reblocking  performed  in  the  open  pit  has  volumetrically  reduced  the  Measured  block component of the Breccia zone. RPA recommends reviewing classification criteria using variogram ranges based on individual domains. RPA is of the opinion that the drill hole density and reconciliation results are supportive of much of the Indicated material within the Breccia zone and some of the Indicated material in the Middle Zone being reclassified as Measured. RPA confirmed that proposed and actual underground mining areas within the final open pit Breccia Zone were depleted of gold prior to reblocking. Reported Mineral Resources for the open pit are restricted to Inferred material within the final reserve pit shell. Underground Mineral Resources are limited by a grade shell enclosing blocks above 0.1 oz/st Au, filtered to remove isolated blocks, and a minimum mining width of 10 ft. Figures 14-11 to 14-15 provide comparative statistics for the Breccia and Pediment open pit model (CHOP), and the Breccia, Middle, and Lower zone underground models (CHUG).  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-31    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 14-32    

 

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 14-33    

 

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 14-34    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 14-35    

 

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 14-36    

 

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

FIGURE 14-11 CHUG LOWER ZONE COMPARISON OF BLOCK AND COMPOSITE MEAN BY MIDDLE ZONE ONE

 

FIGURE 14-12 CHUG MIDDLE ZONE COMPARISON OF BLOCK AND COMPOSITE MEAN BY MIDDLE ZONE ONE

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-37    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

FIGURE 14-13 CHUG BRECCIA ZONE COMPARISON OF BLOCK AND COMPOSITE MEAN BY MIDDLE ZONE ONE  

FIGURE 14-14 CHOP BRECCIA ZONE COMPARISON OF BLOCK AND COMPOSITE MEAN BY MIDDLE ZONE ONE  

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-38    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

FIGURE 14-15 CHOP PEDIMENT ZONE COMPARISON OF BLOCK AND COMPOSITE MEAN BY MIDDLE ZONE ONE

 

CORTEZ PITS The Cortez Pits area, one of the Value Realization Initiatives, is located to the north of the current Cortez Hills underground portal and the area was previously mined  between  1969  and  1993.  There  is  a  remaining  resource  below  the  historic  Cortez  Pits  that  is  a  continuation  of  the  mined-out  portion  of  the  Cortez deposit. The current reported Measured plus Indicated Mineral Resources total 4.1 Mt at a grade of 0.056 oz/st Au with 227,000 oz of contained gold. Pending the appropriate level of studies to convert the mineralization to Mineral Reserves, mining would be by open pit methods with primarily heap leach processing. A total of 163,000 oz would be expected to be recovered using a process recovery of 74.1%. There is sufficient drilling information associated with this deposit to model the resource in terms of gold grade, but additional drilling information is required for geotechnical guidance and metallurgical testing. The deposit also allows for resource upgrades at gold prices greater than US$1,400.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-39    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

As the Cortez Pits Mineral Resources have not been updated since end of year 2012, and represent a very small percentage of the total Mineral Resources at Cortez, the block model was not reviewed by RPA as part of this updated Report. There are no Mineral Reserves at Cortez Pits and only Mineral Resources from the open pit portion of the model have been reported. Cut-off grades for the reported Mineral Resources were established using a gold price of US$1,300 per ounce. Table 14-19 details the Mineral Resources at Cortez Pits.

TABLE 14-19 CORTEZ PITS MINERAL RESOURCE SUMMARY – DECEMBER 31, 2015 Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

       

   Mill Material    Leach Material    Refractory Material    Total    Tons    Grade    Ounces   Tons    Grade    Ounces   Tons    Grade    Ounces   Tons    Grade    Ounces    (000 st)   (oz/st Au)   (000 oz)   (000 st)   (oz/st Au)   (000 oz)   (000 st)   (oz/st Au)   (000 oz)   (000 st)   (oz/st Au)   (000 oz)

Measured Indicated M+I

   167       1,020       1,187   

Inferred

  

  

 

  

234   

 

0.121    0.079    0.085      

 

0.06   

20    229    80    2,223    100    2,452      

 

  

14    1,043   

 

0.011    0.012    0.012      

0.01   

 

3    28    30      

13   

 

76    368    444      

7

  

 

0.286    0.204    0.218      

0.08   

 

22    472    75    3,611    97    4,083      

1

 

  

   1,283   

 

0.094    0.051    0.056      

0.02   

 

45 183 227 27

Notes:  

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

CIM definitions were followed for Mineral Resources. Mineral Resources are reported using a gold price of US$1,300 per ounce and gold cut-off grades of 0.030 oz/st and 0.061oz/st for the mill and refractory material, respectively, and a grade range from 0.004 oz/st to 0.030 oz/st for heap leach material. Bulk densities vary by formation and are listed in Table 14-21. Mineral Resources are constrained by an optimized pit shell. Numbers may not add due to rounding.

The following sections have not been significantly modified from the previous technical report (RPA, 2012). DATA Drill hole data in the resource database was limited to valid drill holes within or immediately adjacent to the block model extents. As at July 1, 2011 a total of 450 drill  holes  for  280,860  ft  and  37,415  assays  were  included  in  the  database.  This  includes  holes  re-instated  following  RPA’s  2010  audit  of  the  deposit  which prompted a review of excluded drill holes from 1986 and later by the Mine Technical Group at Cortez to determine their validity for inclusion in the database.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-40    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

BLOCK MODEL AND MINERALIZED DOMAINS Wireframe  solids  and  surfaces  of  rock  formations,  faults,  dikes,  overburden,  waste  dumps,  and  backfill  were  constructed  from  topographic,  drill  hole  and,  pit mapping information, as well as interpreted cross-sections. Approximately  15  wireframe  solids  of  continuous  high  and  low  grade  mineralization  were  interpreted  through  inspection  of  the  drill  hole  geology  and  gold grades.  High  grade  domains  at  depth  were  based  on continuous  gold  values  above  a  0.15  oz/st  to  0.20  oz/st  cut-off  grade.  At shallower  depths,  and  potentially mineable by open pit, high grade domains were defined based on continuous gold assays greater than 0.030 oz/st. Wireframe solids representing low grade material were built to encompass potential heap-leach material at shallow depths, and to provide dilution grades for mine planning of the higher grade wireframes located within. All the defined high and low grade domains honour the drill data and typically extend only half way to the nearest unmineralized drill hole. A low-grade indicator envelope (0.003 oz/st at a 0.5 probability) was also established to constrain the gold mineralization. A high resolution, three dimensional block model was constructed using 10 ft x 10 ft x 10 ft blocks to allow use for underground applications and planning. CAPPING AND COMPOSITING The capping grades were determined through evaluation of high-grade outliers on cumulative probability plots and histograms constructed for the low and high grade mineralized domains. A capping grade of 1.25 oz/st was applied to raw gold assays inside the high-grade zones and a 0.20 oz/st capping grade was applied to grades outside the high grade domains. The capped assay values were composited at 10 ft lengths down the hole; a length determined to be appropriate for consideration of underground mining. GRADE INTERPOLATION Estimates were made with multiple nested ID3 passes using an octant-based search ellipsoid with a limit of two samples per octant to avoid undue influence from clustered  composites.  The  search  ellipse  dimensions  and  distances  correspond  to  ranges  at  80%  and  100%  of  variogram  sill  value,  as  derived  from  directional variography. Hard boundaries were applied so that the data used was sourced only from the applicable mineralized solid. The long axis of the search  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-41    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

ellipsoids was suitably oriented to the long axis trend of the individual domains. A number of grade variables were estimated including total gold grade (fire assay, fa) and cyanide leach gold (aa) with the aa/fa ratio used for determining processing options. Table 14-20 summarizes the estimation passes.

TABLE 14-20 CORTEZ PITS - ESTIMATION PASS SUMMARY Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

     Estimation Pass

  

Inside mineralized solids 1 2 3 Outside mineralized solids 4 5

   Range (ft)       Estimation Semi-

Samples

Flag    Major   Major   Minor   Min/Max/Max per DH   

         100 series       200 series       300 series             500       600   

75 60 130 15 130

                    

60 40 100 15 100

                    

30 20 55 10 55

                    

3/5/2 2/5/2 1/7/2 1/99/99 1/7/2

                    

Purpose

80% sill filler 100% sill Proximal to DH Distal from DH

Following interpolation of the gold variables, dike solids were incorporated into the block model with the applicable dilutions of gold grades. The block model was regularized from 10 ft x 10 ft x 10 ft blocks to 30 ft x 30 ft x 20 ft blocks for the portion potentially mineable by open pit. BULK DENSITY The rock unit bulk densities for Cortez Pits were updated in 2011 from those used in previous models. Table 14-21 summarizes the bulk densities used for tonnage calculations. TABLE 14-21 CORTEZ PITS - BULK DENSITY Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Formation/ Rock Type

  

Code   

Tonnage Factor (ft 3 /st)   

Bulk Density (st/ft 3 )

Roberts Mountain Hansen Creek Eureka Quartzite Quaternary Alluvium Historic Dumps Dikes

                 

SRM   OHC   OE    QAL        

13.1 12.2 12.2 15 18 14.2

0.076 0.082 0.082 0.067 0.056 0.070

                 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-42    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

CLASSIFICATION The Measured component of the Mineral Resource is applied to blocks directly intersected by drill holes used for the estimates, essentially a box search. Indicated Mineral Resources are defined as those out to a range at 80% of the sill, and Inferred Mineral Resources at the range of 100% of the variogram sill. Blocks not meeting the above criteria are unclassified. Resulting resources were examined for amenability to development and mining and downgraded where applicable. MODEL VALIDATION The Cortez Mine Technical Group undertook validation checks including:  

 



  Examination of the interpolation scripts and comparison to the interpolation plan



  Visual comparisons of interpolated gold grades relative to drill hole composite values on sections and plans



  Block model grades were compared to composite grades using histogram and cumulative frequency plots



  Comparison of the resource model to a nearest-neighbor (NN)

 

   

   

 

The above validation checks supported the conclusions that the block model is globally and locally unbiased, and that there is good agreement between the block and composite gold grades.

GOLD ACRES As Gold Acres has not been updated since 2008, and represents a very small percentage of the Mineral Resources at Cortez, it was not reviewed by RPA as part of this technical report. There are no Mineral Reserves at Gold Acres and Mineral Resources are limited to refractory ore. Cut-off grades for the reported Mineral Resources were established using a gold price of US$1,300 per ounce. Table 14-22 details the refractory Mineral Resources at Gold Acres.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-43    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 14-22 GOLD ACRES REFRACTORY MINERAL RESOURCE SUMMARY – DECEMBER 31, 2015 Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

     

   

   

Measured  Indicated  Measured + Indicated  Inferred   

     

Tons    (000 st)  

Grade    (oz/st Au)  

Ounces (000 oz)

           

213    3,266    3,479    305   

0.124 0.104 0.105 0.103

26 340 367 32

  

 

  

 

              

 

Notes:  

1. 2. 3. 4.

CIM definitions were followed for Mineral Resources. Mineral Resources are reported using a gold price of US$1,300 per ounce and using a gold cut-off grade of 0.062 oz/st. Mineral Resources are constrained by an optimized pit shell. Numbers may not add due to rounding.

The following sections have not been significantly modified from the previous technical report (RPA, 2012). DATA For resource estimation, the drill hole data were limited to holes within or immediately adjacent to the block model extents. A total of 1,725 drill holes for 461,363 ft and 68,702 assays are in the database; the database for Gold Acres has not changed since mid-2008. Holes 4344, 435, 4424, 4425, 4512, 4527, 7404, 89931, and 90816 were excluded. RC holes with potential down-hole contamination remain in the database and their exclusion should be revisited for future models. CAPPING AND COMPOSITING Grade distribution statistics show a grade capping level of 0.5 oz/st Au is appropriate. Nine samples were capped in the drill hole database. Capped assays were composited down-hole at 10 ft lengths. BLOCK MODEL AND MINERALIZED DOMAINS Geology wireframe surfaces and solids were modelled, however, visual review of the models for the lower skarn, Roberts Mountain Thrust, and Gold Acres Fault suggest that they are not relevant as controls for mineralization. The 2008 resource estimate does not include a  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-44    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

“Carbon” or “Refractory” model since the refractory nature of the deposit could not be predicted geologically or metallurgically at the time. Three mineralization domains were established based on visual review of the spatial distribution of gold grades by the Mine Technical Group at Cortez. Domain 1: High grade trending along a fold axis bearing 305° Domain 2: East dipping mineralization (-15°) bearing 340° Domain 3: Shallowly dipping mineralization striking 340°, varying in dip direction from eastward in the south, to westward north of section 60250 N A three-dimensional 20 ft x 20 ft x 10 ft block model was developed over these domains, which were estimated using 10 ft composites. Following grade estimation, the 20 ft x 20 ft x 10 ft blocks were re-blocked up to a 40 ft x 40 ft x 20 ft model to better represent mining on 20 ft benches. The model extends 6,500 ft east, 9,000 ft north, and 1,500 ft vertically, from an origin of 91,000 E, 55,000 N and 4,300 elev. No rotation was applied. INDICATOR BLOCK MODEL The composites in the drill hole database were flagged at a gold indicator threshold of 0.015 oz/st Au. The composites were interpolated using orientations in line with the individual domains. Composites within the block model volume defined by the indicator model (greater than or equal to 50% probability of 0.015 oz/st grade) were back flagged in the composite database. Indicator estimation model parameters are listed in Table 14-23.

TABLE 14-23 GOLD ACRES INDICATOR MODEL ESTIMATION PARAMETERS Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

   

  

Estimation   

Bearing 

Dip  

Axes (ft)

  

Domain 1 Domain 2 Domain 3

        

Indicator 1   Indicator 1   Indicator 1  

305°   340°   160°  

0°   -15°  -15° 

300x300x50   300x300x50   300x300x50  

No. of Composites

Min./Max./Max. per DH

3/15/2 3/15/2 3/15/2

GRADE INTERPOLATION Grade interpolation for Gold Acres was carried out in multiple passes using ID3 inside and outside the indicator model based on parameters shown in Table 1424. Search ellipse  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-45    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

distances corresponding to 80% and 90% of sill ranges from an omnidirectional correlogram (not shown) defined the second and fourth passes, which were each followed by a pass defined by a smaller search ellipse, and with fewer composite restrictions. Additionally, a nearest neighbour interpolation was performed on gold grades for the purposes of block model validation using a 250 ft x 250 ft x 50 ft search ellipse, estimating 33% of blocks in the model. Mined-out blocks were coded above the topographic surface and waste rock dumps were flagged.

TABLE 14-24 INTERPOLATION PASSES INSIDE AND OUTSIDE THE GOLD ACRES 0.50 INDICATOR MODEL Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

    

      Distance (ft)    Azimuth Dip Major Semi-

Minor    (°)    (°)    Axis    Major   Axis   

Estimation

11001 11100 11131 11250 12100 12131 12250 13100 13131 13250 21100 21131 21250 22100 22131 22250 23100 23131 23250

Inside 0.50 Indicator Model                              

Sample    Min./Max./

Per DH   

Estimated

0 305 305 305 340 340 340 160 160 160

                             

0    0    0    0    -15    -15    -15    -15    -15    -15   

10.1    120    50    250    120    50    250    120    50    250   

10.1    120    50    250    120    50    250    120    50    250   

5.1 30 15 50 30 15 50 30 15 50

                             

1/9/1 2/3/1 1/3/1 2/3/1 2/3/1 1/3/1 2/3/1 2/3/1 1/3/1 2/3/1

                             

0.4% 98.6% 4.8% 100% 59.4% 19.1% 80.2% 54.3% 17.4% 77.2%

Outside 0.50 Indicator Model    305    305    305    340    340    340    160    160    160

                          

0    0    0    0    -15    -15    -15    -15    -15   

100 50 250 -15 50 250 100 50 250

100 50 250 100 50 250 100 50 250

30 15 50 100 15 50 30 15 50

                          

2/3/1 1/3/1 2/3/1 2/3/1 1/3/1 2/3/1 2/3/1 1/3/1 2/3/1

                          

25.2% 0.7% 8.4% 7.9% 1.2% 10.5% 5.4% 1.0% 8.2%

                          

                          

BULK DENSITY Bulk densities are shown in Table 14-25.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-46    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 14-25 GOLD ACRES BULK DENSITY Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Rock Type

 

 

Skarn   Dumps, Backfill   All Other Rocks  

  

Tonnage Factor (ft 3 /st)   

Bulk Density (st/ft 3 )

        

11.49 16.00 13.00

0.0870 0.0625 0.0769

        

CLASSIFICATION The Measured component of the Mineral Resource is applied to blocks directly intersected by drill holes used for the estimates, essentially a box search. Indicated Mineral Resources are defined as those out to a range at 80% of the sill, and Inferred Mineral Resources at the range of 90% of the variogram sill. Blocks not meeting the above criteria are unclassified. Resulting resources were examined for amenability to development and mining and downgraded where applicable. MODEL VALIDATION As part of the 2010 RPA audit, block grades were compared to composites by visual inspection of vertical sections. Gold block grade statistics and distributions were compared to composite grade statistics and distributions for Au greater than or equal to 0.01 oz/st (Table 14-26).

TABLE 14-26 GOLD ACRES UNTRANSFORMED GOLD STATISTICS Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

   

Gold Cut-off = 0.01 oz/st    Grade

   (ft)   (oz/st Au)       

Blocks - All Incr. % and grade Comps Incr. % and grade

   30,510     33.2%     95,941     32.2% 

 

  

0.041 0.013 0.049 0.013

       

       

Gold Cut-off = 0.02 oz/st    Grade

(ft)   (oz/st Au)       

  20,375     17.0%    65,057     17.3% 

0.055 0.024 0.067 0.024

       

       

Gold Cut-off = Gold Cut-off = 0.10 0.03 oz/st oz/st         Grade

Grade

(ft)   (oz/st Au)        (ft)   (oz/st Au)

  15,194     42.7%    48,422     38.3% 

0.066 0.052 0.081 0.053

       

       

   2,176      7.1%      11,692     12.2%  

0.152 0.152 0.169 0.169

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 14-47    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

15 MINERAL RESERVE ESTIMATE SUMMARY The Mineral Reserves are contained within four open pit deposits, four underground zones in the Cortez Hills deposit, and surface stockpiles. Proven and Probable Mineral Reserves for the Mine as at year-end 2015 are estimated to be 168.9 Mt grading 0.066 oz/st Au containing approximately 11.1 million oz Au. In the Deep South  Zone,  the  PFS  supports  the  conversion  of  approximately  1.7  million  oz  of  Measured  and  Indicated  Mineral  Resources  to  Proven  and  Probable  Mineral Reserves as at year-end 2015. The Mineral Reserve estimate for Cortez as at December 31, 2015 is summarized in Table 15-1. Open pit Mineral Reserves represent approximately 90% of the total tons and 56% of the total ounces of contained gold. Current open pit mine life is eight years (2016 to 2023). Underground Mineral Reserves represent approximately 8% of the total tons and 40% of the total ounces of contained gold. Current underground mine life, including the Cortez Underground Expansion Project, is 13 years (2016 to 2028). RPA is of  the  opinion that  the  December  31,  2015 Mineral  Reserves  as stated  by  Cortez  are  estimated  by competent  professionals  in a manner  consistent  with industry practices.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-1    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 15-1 TOTAL MINERAL RESERVES – DECEMBER 31, 2015 Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

   

  

Zone

Total Proven           Grade Contained Tons

(oz/st

Gold

   (000 st)      Au)      (000 oz)          

Open Pit Pipeline Crossroads Cortez Hills Pediment Open Pit Subtotals Underground Breccia Zone Middle Zone Lower Zone Deep South Underground Subtotals Stockpiles Mill Stockpiles Leach Stockpiles Refractory Stockpiles Stockpile Subtotals Total

              1,470       0.019            8,135       0.035            1,564       0.127            762       0.032          11,931

   0.045

  

              120       0.514                                     120

   0.514

  

              1,510       0.096            57       0.014            2,248       0.130          3,814

   0.115

  

   15,866

   0.065

  

   28      287      198      24      537

       62               62

       145      1      293      438

    1,037

   

Total Probable           Total Proven + Probable   Grade Contained Grade Contained Tons

(oz/st

Gold

Tons

(oz/st

Gold

(000)      Au)      (000 oz)           (000 st)      Au)      (000 oz)  

                15,985       0.017       266          86,613       0.033       2,880          17,145       0.116       1,984          20,506       0.027       547         140,249

   0.040

   5,677

                    205       0.486       100          3.544       0.365       1,292          3.777       0.351       1,324          5.266       0.322       1,697         12,792

   0.345

   4,414

                                                                   153,042

   0.066

   10,092

   

             17,455       0.017       294       94,749       0.033       3,167       18,709       0.117       2,182       21,268       0.027       571      152,181

   0.041

   6,214

             324       0.497       161       3,544       0.365       1,292       3,777       0.351       1,324       5,266       0.322       1,698      12,912

   0.347

   4,476

                                       3,814

   0.115

  

438

   168,908

   0.066

   11,129

Notes:  

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

CIM definitions were followed for Mineral Reserves. Mineral Reserves are estimated at cut-off grades that range from 0.004 oz/st Au to 0.205 oz/st Au depending on deposit, mining method, and process type. Mineral Reserves are estimated using an average gold price of US$1,000 per ounce to year 2020 and US$ 1,200 per ounce thereafter. A minimum mining width of 15 ft was used. Bulk density varies from 0.052 st/ft 3 to 0.091 st/ft 3 , depending on material type. Numbers may not add due to rounding.

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Joint Venture, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-2    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

There are two principal locations of the Cortez mineral deposits, Pipeline and Cortez Hills. Pipeline and Crossroads are located on the valley floor approximately seven miles to the northwest of the Cortez Hills/Pediment deposit, which is located on the southern flank of Mount Tenabo. The location of the deposits is shown in Figure 15-1. The  Pipeline  pit  is  nearly  completed  and  previously  produced  in  excess  of  one  million  ounces  of  gold  per  year  for  more  than  seven  years.  The  pit  is  currently inactive, however, there is pre-stripping occurring in the Crossroads area in 2015. The Phase 10 area of the pit was actively mined in 2015, and this area will be mined in five phases. Portions of the Pipeline pit have been backfilled with mine waste. The Crossroads pit is located immediately south of the Pipeline pit and stripping is planned to continue in 2016. The planned pit will be up to 1,700 ft deep, and there is extensive alluvium cover, which is 500 ft to 800 ft thick. Crossroads was designed with five phases. The  Cortez  Hills  deposit  is  located  approximately  seven  miles  to  the  southeast  of  the  Pipeline  pit  on  the  southern  flank  of  Mount  Tenabo.  Open  pit  operations commenced at CHOP at the start of 2009, and mining has progressed at a rapid pace. The shops and office facilities, gyratory crusher, 37,000 ft long conveyor from the gyratory crusher to the Mill No. 2 at Pipeline, and the assorted roads and other infrastructure are all in place and operating efficiently. There is one phase of mining left at CHOP. CHUG is the portion of the Cortez Hills deposit, which is being extracted by underground mining. There are twin declines to the Breccia Zone and production is underway using the mechanized underhand cut and fill mining method with a cemented rock fill (CRF). The underground mine has exploited the part of the Breccia Zone that could not be mined by open pit. Mining is underway in the Middle and Lower Zones above the 3,800 ft level. With the approval of the third proposed amendment  (APO3)  to  the  Plan  of  Operations  (PoO)  in  September  2015,  development  of  the  Range  Front  Declines  (RFDs)  to  access  the  Lower  Zone  can commence.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-3    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 15-4    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

The  Deep  South  Zone  is  an  extension  of  the  Lower  Zone  below  the  3,800  ft  level.  The  Mineral  Reserves  in  this  area  have  been  confirmed  by  a  positive PFS. Dewatering and development  below the  3,800 ft level  will require  an amendment  to the PoO. The permitting  is expected  to take  three  to four years.  This permit amendment application is planned to be submitted in 2016. On this basis, following the receipt of permits, dewatering and development work could begin as early as 2019 or 2020, with initial production from the Deep South Zone commencing in 2022 or 2023. The expansion of the underground mine will help to offset the impact of the end of mining in the Cortez Hills open pit, which is expected to conclude in 2018. RPA is of the opinion that there is a reasonable expectation that the permit amendment will be obtained. The proportion of the total reserve in each of the mineral deposits is shown in Table 15-2. While the Pipeline Complex (Pipeline and Crossroads) has the larger tonnage, the bulk of the gold is in the Cortez Hills deposits.

TABLE 15-2 PROPORTION OF RESERVES BY DEPOSIT Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

    Area/Zone

     

% of Total   Mined Tons 

Pipeline Crossroads Cortez Hills Pediment Open Pit Subtotals Breccia Zone Middle Zone Lower Zone Deep South Zone Underground Subtotals Mill Stockpiles Leach Stockpiles Refractory Stockpiles Stockpile Subtotals

                                         

                           

   

10%   56%   11%   13%   90%   0%   2%   2%   3%   8%   1%   0%   1%   2%  

% of Total   Mined Ounces 

                           

3%  28%  20%  5%  56%  1%  12%  12%  15%  40%  1%  0%  3%  4% 

Within the Mineral Reserves, there are four processing classifications. Ore is segregated into one of the following processing methods:  

 



  ROM heap leaching;



  Conventional CIL;



  Refractory – CaTs Process (also referred to as rf3);

 

   

   

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-5    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

 



  Refractory – Roaster (also referred to as rf2);

The  five  processing  options  are  the  oxide  mill  at  Pipeline,  heap  leaching  on  any  one  of  a  number  of  heap  leach  pads  at  Cortez  (Cortez  Hills/Pediment  or Pipeline/Crossroads), and refractory ore treatment processes located at the Barrick Gold’s Goldstrike operation. The planned processing option as a proportion of the Mineral Reserve tons and contained gold is summarized in Table 15-3.

TABLE 15-3 PROCESSING AS PERCENT OF TOTAL TONS/OUNCES Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

    Area/Zone

     

Mill % of tons    

     % of oz    

Leach      % of tons     % of oz    

Refractory   % of tons     % of oz 

Pipeline Crossroads Cortez Hills Pediment Open Pit Subtotals Breccia Zone Middle Zone Lower Zone Deep South Zone Underground Subtotals Mill Stockpiles Leach Stockpiles Refractory Stockpiles Stockpile Subtotals Total

                                            

       

       

     



       

       

     



       

       

     



       

       

     



1     13     5     5     23

   0     1     1     3     4

   1     0     0     1

   29

  

1     14     13     4     31

   1     3     3     14     21

   1     0     0     1

   54

  

9     40     4     8     61

   0     0     0     0     0

   0     0     0     0

   61

  

       

       

     



1     7     1     2     11

   0     0     0     0     0

   0     0     11     11

   11

  

0     3     2     0     5

   0     1     2     0     3

   1     1     0     3

   10

  

       

       

     



0   7   6   0   13

0   8   9   1   19

3   3   35   40

35

In the 2015 estimate, there was a redesign of the Cortez Hills Breccia Zone with some of the reserves assigned for underground extraction, and removed from the open pit reserve from 2014. In addition, the Pipeline/Crossroads pit areas were redesigned based on lower operating costs.

OPEN PIT MINERAL RESERVES The Cortez open pit Mineral Reserves consist of the CHOP, composed of Cortez Hills and Pediment, and the Pipeline, composed of Pipeline and Crossroads. The Mineral Resources within the Cortez Pits and Gold Acres are also planned for open pit mining. Yearly pit designs with corresponding excavation schedules have been developed for both the CHOP and Pipeline pit areas.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-6    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

OPEN PIT MINE DESIGN CORTEZ HILLS AND PEDIMENT Open pit mining is active on the upper portion of the Cortez Hills and Pediment deposits. A four-stage pit was planned for Cortez Hills and a two-stage pit for Pediment. The pits have a shared high wall between the larger and deeper Cortez Hills pit and the Pediment pit. Approximately 71 Mst of pre-stripping occurred during the plant construction period prior to full mining commencement. The CHOP production schedule was initially impacted by delays in permit approvals, and also in 2011, by concerns related to the stability of part of the Phase 3 high wall. These changes have led to uneven ore and waste production, and the required stockpiling  of  ore  when  it  was  available  in  the  mine,  however,  the  mining  rate  has  regularly  exceeded  the  processing  capacity.  Currently,  the  open  pit  mining operations are balanced, and the mine is operating within its targets. Daily mine production rates for the LOM are planned at 300,000 stpd to 500,000 stpd; with an overall average of 400,000 stpd. The long axis length of the Cortez Hills and Pediment pit is approximately 8,400 ft, and the minor axis width is approximately 5,600 ft. The estimated pit bottom elevation is 4,640 ft amsl. The two, primary pit exits are 5,950 ft amsl and 5,720 ft amsl, respectively. Typical road widths are 120 ft to the 4820 bench, and from the 4820 bench to the 4640 bench, the haul road narrows to approximately 70 ft to 80 ft wide. Road grades average 10%. Single benching is normal with berm widths that range from 24.5 ft to 36.4 ft. Bench heights are 50 ft. An approximate 100 ft wide catch bench  is  included  for  every  420  ft  of  vertical  extent.  The  in-pit  Cortez  Hills  haul  road  is  approximately  12,500  ft  long,  and  the  Pediment  in-pit  haul  road  is approximately 6,300 ft long. The  Cortez  Hills  and  Pediment  pit  areas  are  shown  in  Figure  15-2.  Figure  15-3  is  an  isometric  view  of  the  Cortez  Hills  pits,  waste  dumps,  and  heap  leach processing areas. All mine material is drilled and blasted. Oxide ore is transported to Mill No. 2 via the 37,000-ft long overland conveyor. A gyratory primary crushing system was constructed  at  Cortez  Hills  to  reduce  maximum  rock  size  prior  to  conveyance.  Mill  ore  is  staged  into  various  grade-based  stockpiles  at  the  primary crusher. Materials from these stockpiles are blended into the crusher to meet specific short-term production targets. Refractory ore is shipped by truck to Goldstrike to be processed.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-7    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

A 100 Mst capacity heap leach facility was constructed south of the Pediment pit to treat low-grade oxide mineralization. This low-grade material is not crushed, but is truck dumped ROM ore. The pad is expected to be approximately 13 million ft 2 in final area at the end of the third phase of construction. All leach material is planned to be placed directly on the leach pad. The  carbon  absorption  plant  comprises  three  trains  of  carbon  columns.  Loaded  carbon  is  transported  to  the  Pipeline  mill  for  stripping  and  gold recovery. Regenerated carbon is returned to the Pediment plant. Two main waste dumps are utilized. This includes the construction of the North Waste Rock Facility, as well as the expansion of the current Canyon dump. No acid rock drainage is expected from material mined from the Cortez Hills complex. Because of geotechnical and permitting constraints on the open pit and surface/underground trade-off costing a significant portion of the high grade at Cortez Hills is not amenable to surface mining. The upper portions of the high grade Breccia Zone are being mined from underground.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-8    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 15-9    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 15-10    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

PIPELINE AND CROSSROADS Barrick plans to operate the Pipeline and Crossroads open pits by using conventional open pit mining techniques. The area has been mined since 1997 in staged development phases (Pipeline and Gap). The next planned mining area will be waste stripping for the Crossroads area. The long axis length of the Pipeline and Crossroads pits are approximately 12,700 ft, and the minor axis width is approximately 8,100 ft. The estimated pit bottom elevation is 3240 ft amsl. The two, primary pit exits are 4,840 ft amsl and 4,920 ft amsl, respectively. The current Crossroads pit design is a circular shape in plan, with a diameter of about 3,300 ft; a pit floor elevation at 3,240 ft; and overall wall heights between 1,235 ft to 1,300 ft. These heights are based on mining the waste dump in the north/northeast wall areas out, and pushing the toe of this dump well behind the pit crest. The upper walls in Crossroads will be developed in alluvium, and  the  lower  walls  in  bedrock,  with  the  alluvium  exposure  increasing  from  about  350  feet  on  the  west  side  of  the  pit,  to  about  800  feet  on  the  east side. Corresponding elevations for the alluvium/bedrock contact are about 4,520 ft along the west wall, and 4,120 ft along the east wall. Typical road widths are 120 ft to the 3600 bench, and from the 3600 bench to the 3240 bench, the haul road narrows to approximately 70 ft wide. Road grades average 10%. Single benching is normal with berm widths that range from 25 ft to 27 ft. Bench heights are 40 ft. An approximate 100 ft wide catch bench is design every 420 ft of vertical. The in-pit Crossroads haul road is approximately 18,600 ft long, and the Pipeline in-pit haul road is approximately 14,100 ft long. The Pipeline and Crossroads ultimate pit areas is shown in Figure 15-4. The Pipeline Complex and the approximate phases are shown in Figure 15-5.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-11    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 15-12    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 15-13    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

Mining is accomplished with a typical drill, blast, load, and haul cycle, using conventional truck-and-shovel equipment. The bulk of the mining equipment used by Barrick was purchased in 1996 for use in mining the Pipeline and South Pipeline deposits. An additional shovel, additional trucks, and support equipment were purchased in late 2004 and early 2005 to facilitate the mining of Phases 8 and 9. Further haul truck fleet replacements and increases occurred in 2014. Another shovel was purchased and put into production in Q1 of 2013. All  leach  material  is  placed  directly  on  the  leach  pad.  A  small  portion  of  the  mill  ore  is  stockpiled  to  ensure  consistent  crusher  feed.  Refractory  ore  is  also stockpiled, and shipped Goldstrike for processing. The waste is hauled and placed in permanent waste dumps. OPEN PIT CUT-OFF GRADE A cut-off grade estimation report was compiled for the end-of-year (EOY) 2015 Mineral Reserve estimates. The report covers:  

 



  The gold price $1,000/oz for EOY2015.



  The applicable Cortez Mine royalty payments.



  The process operating costs and on-site (and off-site) metal recoveries by material type, applicable or selected process method, and orebody.

 

   

 

Gold  prices  assumptions  are  dictated  by  the  corporate  office.  Royalties  at  Cortez  vary  by  area,  metal  price,  and  processing  type.  The  various  royalties  cover different areas, which are described internally as royalty areas to assess Mineral Reserves for each area. Certain royalties are held by subsidiaries of Barrick, and these royalties are excluded from consideration in the cut-off grade estimation. The royalty is estimated for each of five different areas, and a realized gold price net of the royalty is estimated for use in the cut-off grade calculation. A set of process and overhead costs for the various processing options were estimated by the process manager together with a set of six recovery equations relating process recovery to head grade. Cut-off grades (COG) do not include mining costs, unless there is a marginal cost for ore compared to waste in a given pit. Cut-off grades consider the general and administration (G&A) costs as part of the process cost. Since 0.002 to 0.004 oz/st is the lowest detectable range in the assay lab, the heap leach COG of 0.004 oz/st, for practical purposes, was set to 0.004 oz/st. In addition, previous heap leach COG calculations stated 0.004 oz/st  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-14    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

as the breakeven cut-off grade input (BCOG inpit ), and the plans for permitting and expanding heap leach facilities were based on this higher COG. If lowering the COG to 0.003 oz/st requires additional permitting or expansions to either facility, then this material will likely become uneconomic to process, and will be routed as waste. The leach cut-off grades including G&A are shown in Table 15-4 for the various deposits at a gold price of $1,000/oz. The annual, Cortez open pit cut-off grade report includes the cut-off grade estimates that range from $900/oz to $1,400/oz gold prices.

TABLE 15-4 OPEN PIT LEACH CUT-OFF GRADES Barrick Gold Corporation-Cortez Operations

   

Deposit

   

   

Cortez Hills   Pediment   Pipeline Phase 10         Crossroads      

     

     Royalty Region  

Proc. Cost   ($/st)   

G&A Cost   ($/st)   

Royalty   (%)  

Approximate Recovery   (%)  

Cut-off Grade (oz/st Au)

                          

1 1 1 2 3 4 2 4 5

1.45 1.45 1.65 1.65 1.65 1.65 1.65 1.65 1.65

0.81 0.81 0.81 0.81 0.81 0.81 0.81 0.81 0.81

0.93%   0.93%   0.93%   0.93%   10.47%  6.22%   10.47%  10.47%  10.47% 

80% 70% 75% 62% 62% 62% 62% 62% 62%

0.004 0.004 0.004 0.004 0.004 0.004 0.004 0.004 0.004

                          

                          

                          

                 

Note: Gold Price used $1,000/oz Au. For the mill cut-off grade, Cortez applies a base case cut-off grade including G&A costs. Open pit cut-off grades were held constant at 0.030 oz/st Au for reserve reporting. The cut-off grade estimates are shown in Table 15-5.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-15    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 15-5 OPEN PIT MILL CUT-OFF GRADES Barrick Gold Corporation-Cortez Operations

   

   

Deposit

   

Cortez Hills Pediment

        Pipeline Phase 10       Crossroads    

     

     Royalty Region  

Proc. Cost   ($/st)   

G&A Cost   ($/st)   

Royalty  (%)  

Approximate

Recovery   (%)  

Cut-off Grade (oz/st Au)

                          

1 1 1 2 3 4 2 4 5

11.17 11.17 11.17 11.17 11.17 11.17 11.17 11.17 11.17

6.08 6.08 6.08 6.08 6.08 6.08 6.08 6.08 6.08

0.9%   0.9%   0.9%   0.9%   10.5%   6.2%   10.5%   10.5%   10.5%  

81% 81% 81% 74% 74% 74% 74% 88% 88%

0.030 0.030 0.030 0.030 0.030 0.030 0.030 0.030 0.030

                          

                          

                          

                 

Note: Gold Price used $1,000/oz Au. The recovery equations used in the cut-off grade calculation in Table 15-5 have been developed by the site personnel and are outlined below.

  Equation Number

Cortez Hills Open Pit Cortez Pits  

Pipeline/ South Pipeline/ South Gap Crossroads

  

HG, oz/st

 

Oxide Mill Recovery Equation

                       

>0.920 >0.150 <=0.150 Option 1 Option 2 > 0.207 <= 0.207

               

%Rec = 95.66 - 2.4 %Rec = [100 x HG - 1.3 x LN(HG)-4.1] / HG - 2.4 %Rec = (18 x HG) + 86.4 – 5.9 % Rec = 89.0% %Rec = 8.36 x HG – 9.78 x AAFA + 96.4% %Rec = 88.1 – 8.3 %Rec = 85.11 x EXP(0.36 x HG) – 11.9 %Rec = 88.0

The roaster cut-off grades are estimated in the same manner as the other cut-off grades. The cut-off grades with and without the mining costs are approximately equal to the high-grade and low-grade refractory ore stockpile cut-off grades. The cut-off grade estimates are shown in Table 15-6.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-16    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 15-6 OPEN PIT REFRACTORY CUT-OFF GRADES Barrick Gold Corporation-Cortez Operations

   

         

Deposit

Cortez Hills Pediment

Pipeline Phase 10

Crossroads

Royalty     Region     

                                                 

1 1 2 3 4 5 2 4 5

                                                 

Proc. Cost     ($/st)     

45.03 45.03 46.68 46.68 46.68 46.68 46.68 46.68 46.68 46.68

                                                 

G&A Cost     ($/st)     

10.29 10.29 10.29 10.29 10.29 10.29 10.29 10.29 10.29 10.29

                                                 

Royalty   (%)   

Approximate Recovery    (%)   

Cut-off Grade (oz/st Au)

0.9%    0.9%    0.9%    10.5%    6.2%    10.5%    9.4%    10.5%    10.5%    9.4%   

74% 74% 75% 76% 76% 76% 76% 76% 76% 76%

0.075 0.075 0.080 0.080 0.080 0.080 0.083 0.083 0.083 0.083

                             

Note: Gold Price used $1,000/oz Au. The  recovery  equations  used  in  the  cut-off  grade  calculation  in  Table  15-6  have  been  developed  by  the  site  personnel  based  on  operational  and  verified with extensive metallurgical test, and are outlined below. Gold Recovery Equations (Alkaline Autoclave/TCM Leach)  

 



  Recovery = 95.0% - 6.86 -1.5 + 1.95 = 88.59

If Au Grade >0.28 & £ 1.3  

 



  Recovery = 6.4334(HG) 3 – 23.02(HG) 2 + 28.56(HG) + 82.247 – 6.86 - 1.5 + 1.95



  Recovery = 661.36(HG) 3 – 628.91(HG) 2 + 208.23(HG) + 65.114 – 6.86 – 1.5 + 1.95

If Au Grade £ 0.28  

 

Gold Recovery Equations (Roaster)

  Ore Type

Roaster RF1 Discount

  

HG, oz/st

   Roaster Recovery Equation

Equation    Reference

              

> 1.150 > 0.250 > 0.125 <= 0.125

   %Rec = 93.07%    %Rec = 3.1719 x LN (HG) + 92.612    %Rec = 71.836 + 40.456 x HG – 0.009 x 730 x 0.151 x 85    %Rec = -1017.2 x (HG)^2 + 377.14 x HG + 51.909    Recovery Discount of 1.5% for Arsenic Impacts

            Goldstrike 2015    Met. Guidelines

In the case where the mine delivery of mill ore exceeds the mill capacity, there is a cut over or cross over grade to dictate which material that exceeds the normal mill cut-off grade should go to the leach pad instead of the mill. The cut-off grade estimates are shown in Table 15-7.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-17    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 15-7 MILL LEACH INTER-PROCESS CUT-OFF GRADE Barrick Gold Corporation-Cortez Operations

   

Deposit

   

   

           Royalty Region  

Cortez Hills Pediment

        Pipeline Phase 10       Crossroads    

                          

1 1 1 2 3 4 2 4 5

                          

Process Process Cost    Cost    Royalty  ($/st)    ($/st)    (%)  

1.45 1.45 1.45 1.45 1.45 1.45 1.45 1.45 1.45

                          

11.17    11.17    11.17    11.17    11.17    11.17    11.17    11.17    11.17   

0.9%   0.9%   0.9%   0.9%   10.5%   6.2%   10.5%   10.5%   10.5%  

Cut-off Grade (oz/st Au)

0.200 0.120 0.104 0.112 0.108 0.112 0.064 0.064 0.063

Note: Gold Price used $1,000/oz Au. RPA recommends that Cortez continue to refine its detailed grade control accounting and stockpile management procedures. DILUTION AND EXTRACTION There is no specific dilution allowance in the open pit Mineral Reserve estimate, as the block size is considered to account for dilution incurred during mining. The open pit design is based upon 100% extraction of the open pit Mineral Reserves. Cortez should re-evaluate the use of blast movement monitoring (BMM) to improve grade control, reduction dilution, and maximize mining recovery. OPEN PIT OPTIMIZATION The optimized  economic  pit  shells  selected  for  the  basis  of  open  pit  designs  were  created  using  the  Whittle  4X  software  package.  Whittle  is  a  commonly  used commercial  product  that  uses  various  geologic,  mining,  and  economic  inputs  to  determine  the  pit  shell  of  greatest  net  value.  Whittle  implements  the  LerchsGrossmann 3D network-flow optimization method. The Lerchs-Grossmann 3D algorithm is a true pit optimizer used for determining the optimal ultimate limit for open-pit mines. Whittle input parameters  are  presented  below. Tables 15-8 and 15-9 summarize  the key open pit inputs for the Whittle  analysis  on each of the primary, two open pit areas; Cortez Hills and Pipeline.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-18    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 15-8 CORTEZ HILLS AND PEDIMENT WHITTLE PIT OPTIMIZATION PARAMETERS Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Block Dimensions Origin Coordinates Number of Columns, Rows, Levels Mining Cost Adjustment Factor Formula Slope Templates (Interramp Angles, degrees) 8 Sectors Gold Price Leach Cost + G&A Mill Cost + G&A Refractory Cost + G&A

                             

30 ft x 30 ft x 50 ft 29400, 22320, 3800 253, 343, 68 1.58+IF((IZ-38)>0,abs(IZ-38)*0.0063*2,abs(IZ-38)*0.0082*2) 40,41,35,39,40,39,34,40 degrees, respectively US$1,000/oz US$1.45 + $0.81 US$11.17 + $6.08 US$65.76 + $10.29

TABLE 15-9 PIPELINE AND CROSSROADS WHITTLE PIT OPTIMIZATION PARAMETERS Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Whittle Parameter

  

Block Dimensions Origin Coordinates Number of Columns, Rows, Levels

   40 ft x 40 ft x 20 ft    97000, 49500, 2880    303, 312, 133 PL&SG: 1.48+IF((IZ-50)>0,abs(IZ-50)*0.005*2,abs(IZ-50)*0.0066*2) XRS: if(IZ-50>0,XRMC*0.87,XRMC+0.237)    XRMC: 1.43+IF((IZ-50)>0,abs(IZ-50)*0.005*2,abs(IZ-50)*0.0066*2)    45,41,44,36.5,37,41,38,45,37,40,43,43.5,21 degrees, respectively       US$1,000/oz    US$1.65 + $0.81    US$11.17 + $6.08    US$46.68 + $10.29

Mining Cost Adjustment Factor Formula Slope Templates (Interramp Angles, degrees) Thirteen Sectors Gold Price Leach Cost + G&A Mill Cost + G&A Refractory Cost + G&A

Description

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-19    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

UNDERGROUND MINERAL RESERVES Underground mining is all at the Cortez Hills Underground (CHUG). The CHUG has four zones, the Breccia Zone, Middle Zone, Lower Zone and the Deep South Zone. A schematic view of the underground workings is shown in Figure 15-6. There are Mineral Reserves in all four zones. The Breccia Zone is at the bottom of the planned open pit with the current underground mining extracting the high grade breccia. Lower grade material around the Breccia Zone will be mined by open pit methods. The open pit mining will ultimately extend to below the uppermost stoping areas of the Breccia Zone. The upper most level of the Breccia Zone is the 4820 level and the base of the CHOP is the 4525 level. The Middle Zone is being developed and production from the Middle Zone commenced in 2015. The Middle Zone is being mined using cut and fill methods. The Lower Zone was the subject of a 2014 FS prepared by Stantec-Mining and Barrick. The study provided the basis for the conversion of Lower Zone Mineral Resources to Mineral Reserves. The Lower Zone has a permit boundary at the 3,800 ft level. To avoid the potential to encroach upon that boundary the Mineral Reserves and planned workings were cut off by management at the 3,845 ft level. Mining is planned to be by cut and fill mining. Longhole stoping is also being considered for some areas of the Lower Zone. Development for the Lower Zone is underway with production planned to commence in 2016. The Deep South Zone is an extension of the Lower Zone but is all below the 3,800 ft level. The Deep South Zone was the subject of a 2015 PFS completed by Barrick  and  Minetech  USA, LLC to  support  the  conversion  of  approximately  1.7  million  ounces  of  Measured  and  Indicated  Resources  to  Proven  and  Probable Reserves. The Deep South mining requires amendments to the PoO to permit dewatering and mining below the 3,800 ft level. This permit amendment application is  planned  to  be  submitted  in  2016.  The  permitting  is  expected  to  take  three  to  four  years.  On  this  basis,  following  the  receipt  of  permits,  dewatering  and development work could begin as early as 2019 or 2020, with initial production from the Deep South Zone commencing in 2022 or 2023. The expansion of the underground mine will help to offset the impact of the end of mining in the Cortez Hills open pit, which is expected to conclude in 2018.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-20    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

The Deep South Zone is expected to be mined using long hole stoping methods. The upper bound of the Deep South Zone Mineral Reserves is the 3,845 ft level. The twin portals from the F Canyon to the Breccia Zone were commissioned in 2006, with first ore being mined in December of 2008. The underground mine generates high grade milling ore and refractory ore. Mining is currently underway in the Breccia and Middle Zones using a drift and fill mining method with CRF placed in all stoped voids. There has been no production from the Lower Zone to date. The mine is a mechanized operation with ramp access via the F Canyon twin declines to the Breccia Zone and internal ramps below that for the Breccia Zone and extending to the Middle and Lower Zones. All of the ore is hauled to surface by 30 st haulage trucks and the trucks back haul CRF to the stopes. Ground conditions in the upper ore zone are very poor and headings are all supported with shotcrete and Swellex bolts. Planning for the Lower Zone includes two new parallel declines accessing the Lower Zone. The drives have been named the Range Front Declines (RFD) for their location. These new declines will reduce the haulage and access distances, provide additional ventilation and escape ways and provide a planned conveyor gallery for the movement of rock from the mine to surface. Planning for the Deep South Zone includes a conveyor system to connect to the conveyor in the RFDs for the movement of ore and waste to surface.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-21    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 15-22    

 

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

UNDERGROUND CUT-OFF GRADE A cut-off grade estimation report is compiled for the mid-year 2015 Mineral Reserve estimates. The report covers:  

 



  The gold price of $1,000/oz for EOY2015 and $1,200/oz after 2021.



  The applicable Cortez Mine royalty payments.



  The process operating costs and on-site (and off-site) metal recoveries by material type, applicable or selected process method, and orebody.

 

   

 

Gold price assumptions are set by the corporate office. Royalties at Cortez vary by area, metal price, and processing type. For the CHUG the Net Smelter Return (NSR)  used  in  the  COG  calculation  is  1%  for  the  Breccia,  Middle,  and  Lower  Zones  and  2.13%  for  the  Deep  South.  Mining  costs,  process  costs  and  process recoveries were estimated for the Breccia, Middle, Lower, and Deep South Zones to determine the cut-off grade. Three different processing options are available for ore from the underground mine. The COG results are summarized in Table 15-10.

TABLE 15-10 UNDERGROUND CUT-OFF GRADE CALCULATIONS Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Unit Cost

  

Oxide

Heap

Leach     

Oxide

Mill     

                                                     

  1,000       0.93                         3.31                            1.00       

  1,000       0.93       86       83       83      107.64      113.00      115.02       10.37       23.58         141.59      146.95      148.97       5.64       0.80       1.00    

0.174

  

Breccia, Middle, and Lower Zones Gold Price (US$/oz) Royalty (%) Recovery (Breccia Zone) (%) Recovery (Middle Zone) (%) Recovery (Lower Zone) (%) Mining Operating Cost (Breccia Zone) ($/st ore) Mining Operating Cost (Middle Zone) ($/st ore) Mining Operating Cost (Lower Zone) ($/st ore) Process Operating Cost ($/st ore) G&A Operating Cost (All Zones) ($/st ore) Transportation Costs ($/st ore) Total Operating Cost (Breccia Zone) ($/st ore) Total Operating Cost (Middle Zone) ($/st ore) Total Operating Cost (Lower Zone) ($/st ore) Sustaining Capital UG ($/st ore) Sustaining Capital (Tailings Charge) ($/st ore) Refining ($/oz) BCOG (oz/st Au) 2015 EOY (Breccia Zone)

Roaster  



  1,000     0.93     92     90     90    107.64    113.00    115.02     30.38     19.18     14.65    171.85    177.21    179.23     5.64     1.00  

0.195

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-23    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

Unit Cost

  

Oxide

Heap

Leach     

BCOG (oz/st Au) 2015 EOY (Middle Zone) BCOG (oz/st Au) 2015 EOY (Lower Zone)

     

     

0.187

  

0.189

  

                                   

  1,300       2.13       70       92.95       3.31             96.26             1.00    

0.108

  

  1,300       2.13       85       92.95       10.37            126.90       5.64       0.80       1.00    

0.123

  

Oxide

Mill     

Roaster  

0.205

0.208

Deep South Zone Gold Price (from Pre-feasibility Study) (US$/oz) Royalty (%) Recovery (Deep South Zone) (%) Mining Operating Cost (Deep South) ($/st ore) Process Operating Cost ($/st ore) G&A Operating Cost (All Zones) ($/st ore) Transportation Costs ($/st ore) Total Operating Cost (Deep South) ($/st ore) Sustaining Capital UG ($/st ore) Sustaining Capital (Tailings Charge) ($/st ore) Refining ($/oz) BCOG (oz/st Au) 2015 EOY (Deep South)



  1,300     2.13     88.7     92.95     30.38     14.65    157.16     5.64     1.00  

0.144

Ore characterization and ore shape geometry constrains the mining methods that can be used to mine the Middle zone. To successfully segregate the ore and mine the complex geometry in Middle zone a highly selective mining method is being employed. Cut and fill mining provides the required mining selectivity and has been used in the cut-off grade calculations. DILUTION AND EXTRACTION The underground Mineral Reserves for the Breccia, Middle, and Lower Zones include an allowance of 5% at zero grade to account for ore handing dilution plus CRF dilution of 3% on primary levels, 5% on secondary levels, and 10% on the bottom levels. The underground Breccia Zone extraction is based upon the extraction of 100% of the Mineral Reserves within a 0.2 oz/st shape. Edge dilution is accounted for in the Middle and Lower Zones in level pancake designs by extending the extents of the level by 8 ft (a typical round) beyond the planned stope limits. The Deep South Zone Mineral Reserves include internal dilution consisting of material within the 0.1 oz/st Au COG stope shapes and which will be mined as part of the stope. In addition, an external dilution tonnage allowance of 11.3% at zero grade has been included in the Mineral Reserve estimate. This value was based upon experience at operations using similar mining methods. RPA is of the opinion that the dilution estimate is appropriate at this stage of the  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-24    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

mine development. Stope void surveys and continued reconciliation of production to the Mineral Reserves will demonstrate the accuracy of the dilution estimate. The Deep South Zone Mineral Reserves, as presented in the PFS, have an extraction factor of 100%. RPA is of the opinion that the extraction of the long hole stopes in the Deep South Zone is unlikely to be 100%. Rather there can be minor losses expected in primary stopes and larger losses in the wider, backfill walled secondary stopes. RPA is of the opinion that the losses should be estimated as 2% in the primary stopes and 8% in the secondary stopes for an overall extraction of 95%. STOPE PLANNING In the Breccia Zone, the ore is taken as all of the resource within the 0.2 oz/st grade mine design. For the Middle Zone, stope shapes are developed and the tonnes and  grade  within  these  shapes  is  taken  from  the  block  model.  The  Breccia  and  Middle  Zones  are  being  mined  by  drift  and  fill  mining.  The  2015  Middle  Zone Mineral Reserves are based upon drift and fill mining. In the Lower Zone the Mineral Reserves are based upon the overall design shapes and the planned mining method for the 2015 Mineral Reserve estimate is cut and fill mining. Management are considering long hole mining methods for certain parts of the Lower Zone. The Deep South Zone has been interpreted as a -20º SE plunging extension of the Lower Zone. It extends for 2,100 ft along strike and is planned to be mined from the 3,800 ft level to the 3,050 ft level. The Deep South Zone consists of an upper section that is an average of 180 ft wide and 120 ft thick, a central section that is an average of 200 ft wide and 85 ft thick, and the lower section, known as Renegade, which is 120 ft long by 160 ft wide and 120 ft thick. Deep South Zone stopes are planned to be long hole stopes mined in a sequence of primary and secondary stopes. The stopes will be 60 ft high from footwall to footwall. This leaves a 45 ft long hole stope after excavation of the 15 ft high undercut. The primary stopes will be 20 ft wide while the secondary stopes will be 30 ft wide. The stopes will be transverse long hole stopes and the length of the stopes will be the “width” of the Deep South Zone which is up to 200 ft. A 200 ft long primary stope will yield approximately 3,000 tons of ore in development plus 20,000 tons in stope ore.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-25    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

Stope dimensions were selected based upon operating assumptions as well as geotechnical considerations. Mine Design Engineering prepared a pre-feasibility level geotechnical assessment and provided the parameters for stable stopes for different areas of the Deep South. The analysis used the modified Mathew’s stability analysis  and  the  recommendations  were  to  remain  in  the  stable  unsupported  region  of  the  stability  curve.  According  to  the  stope  stability  analysis,  it  may  be necessary to mine the stopes in 33 ft sections to maintain side wall stability. Where the ore thickness is over 60 ft, there will either be stacked long hole stopes or mining of the balance of the height by drift and fill. RPA is of the opinion that the stope designs are appropriate but notes that more detailed design and analysis will be necessary for stope layouts and especially for stope scheduling in view of the potential short panels along the stope length.

RECONCILIATION An ongoing reconciliation  between the Mineral  Reserve estimate  and the mine production is an important step in assessing the Mineral Reserve estimation and operating  parameters  at  a  mine.  Cortez  maintains  a  reconciliation  between  the  Mineral  Reserve  model,  the  grade  control  results,  and  the  actual  production  or Declared Ore Mined (DOM). The stockpiling of ore and the various process streams (mill/leach/autoclave/roaster) complicates the reconciliation between Mineral Reserves and production. CORTEZ HILLS OPEN PIT The CHOP yearly open pit reconciliation for 2012 through the end of 2015 is shown in Tables 15-11 and 15-12. Table 15-11 compares the grade control, Mineral Reserve, and declared ore mined on a yearly time basis. Table 15-12 compares the grade control to the Mineral Reserve by processing types (heap leaching, oxide mill, and refractory). The grade control models have consistently reported more tonnage (20% higher in the period), and the gold production has been 13% higher than the Mineral Reserve model. Barrick notes that the Mineral Reserve blocks are 20 ft high, while the mining is often done on 40 ft to 50 ft benches. The 50 ft benches and the push to advance the pit resulted from  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-26    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

regulatory and legal pressures in Cortez Hills, and the plan is to mine on 20-ft high benches in the future, if dilution reaches unacceptable levels. A further aspect of the reconciliation is the existence of narrow high-grade, steeply-dipping structures that may have been missed in the exploration drilling, and these structures can contribute to positive reconciliation results over a number of benches. This phenomenon is especially prevalent in Cortez Hills Breccia Zone. It should be noted that practically all material above a 0.004 oz/st Au cut-off grade reports to either heap leaching, the oxide mill, or a refractory processing streams. The  Pediment  area  of  the  Cortez  Hills  pit  experienced  a  high,  positive  reconciliation  for  heap  leach  material  in  2014.  This  positive  reconciliation  occurred, primarily due to the lack of exploration drilling in the Pediment pit area. The grade control results and the Mineral Reserve estimates are being compared monthly and that the reconciliation of the two results is reasonable.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-27    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 15-11 CORTEZ HILLS OPEN PIT RECONCILIATION Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

    Year

   

  

   

  

2012   2013   2014   2015   2012 - 2015  

              

 

  

   

  

   

  

  Year

2012   2013   2014   2015   2012 - 2015  

              

Grade Control (GC)   Grade

Tons   (oz/st Au)  Ounces  

10,443,690  14,587,764  3,006,851   20,931,924  48,970,229 

0.090 0.057 0.035 0.032 0.052

 

  936,890     834,893     104,519     674,678     2,550,980 

               

              

 

  

Grade Control vs Ore Reserve   Grade

Tons   (oz/st Au)  Ounces  

     

6% -2% 144% 40% 20%

         

 

     

13% 8% -49% -19% -5%

         

18% 6% 25% 14% 13%

         

               

              

Ore Reserve (OR - MI&I)   Grade

Tons   (oz/st Au)  Ounces  

9,898,852   14,924,772  1,232,478   14,910,707  40,966,809 

0.080 0.053 0.068 0.040 0.055

 

  793,063     784,051     83,735     591,070     2,251,919 

               

              

 

  

Declared Ore Mined vs Ore Reserve   Grade

Tons   (oz/st Au)  Ounces  

     

10% -2% 162% 44% 23%

         

 

     

15% 8% -50% -17% -4%

         

26% 7% 29% 19% 17%

         

               

              

Declared Ore Mined (DOM) Grade

Tons   (oz/st Au)   Ounces

10,872,068   14,699,191   3,226,343   21,437,492   50,235,094  

0.092 0.057 0.034 0.033 0.053

 

         

996,793 835,492 108,424 702,192 2,642,901

 

Declared Ore Mined vs Grade Control Grade

Tons   oz/st Au)   Ounces

4% 1% 7% 2% 3%

         

2% 0% -3% 2% 1%

         

6% 0% 4% 4% 4%

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Joint Venture, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-28    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 15-12 CORTEZ HILLS OPEN PIT RECONCILIATION BY PROCESS TYPE Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

    Year

  

 

  

 

Tons

Leach   Grade

  (oz/st Au)  Ounces      

2012   2013   2014   2015   2012 - 2015 

  5,204,249     9,966,234     2,290,990     17,686,194    35,147,667 

   

     

   

  

 

Year

Tons

  5,498,968     9,786,240     —       12,171,470    27,456,678 

   

   

Year

  

2012   2013   2014   2015   2012 - 2015 

  81,980     151,252    23,773     234,402    491,407 

0.013 0.011 —   0.017 0.014

  71,117     111,579    —       202,657    385,353 

Tons

  5,192,066     4,290,493     711,587     3,245,730     13,439,876 

Leach   Grade

  (oz/st Au)  Ounces      

2012   2013   2014   2015   2012 - 2015       

0.016 0.015 0.010 0.013 0.014

Mill   Grade

  (oz/st Au)  Ounces      

Tons

 

Tons

         

-5% 2% 0% 45% 28%

  23%   15%     36%   36%     0%   0%     -20%   16%     0%   28%  

         

  847,462     613,131     80,404     440,276     1,981,273 

  47,375     331,037    4,274     —       382,686 

0.157 0.213 0.080 —   0.205

  7,448     70,510    342     —       78,300 

0.164 0.131 0.068 0.130 0.136

  715,563     659,566     83,735     246,107     1,704,971 

19% -15% -42% 71% 7%

18% -7% -4% 79% 16%

         

0.090 0.057 0.035 0.032 0.052

  7%   9%   258%   53%   0%   0%   0%   0%   179%   45%

  17%     446%     0%     0%     306%  

         

  936,890   834,893   104,519   674,678   2,550,980

Totals - Ore Reserve Grade

Tons   (oz/st Au)  Ounces

  44,479   0.144   6,383     9,898,852     92,556   0.139   12,906    14,924,772    —     —     —       1,232,478       —         14,065,573    137,035  0.141   19,289    40,121,675 

Grade Control (GC) vs. Ore Reserve Model (OR) Mill   Refractory      Grade

Grade

Tons Tons   (oz/st Au)  Ounces         (oz/st Au)  Ounces     

  -1%     9%     66%     4%     8%  

Totals - Grade Control Grade

Tons   (oz/st Au)  Ounces

  10,443,690    14,587,764    3,006,851     20,931,924    48,970,229 

Ore Reserve Model (OR) Mill   Refractory      Grade

Grade

  (oz/st Au)  Ounces       Tons   (oz/st Au)  Ounces     

  4,355,406     5,045,976     1,232,478     1,894,103     12,527,963 

Leach   Grade

  (oz/st Au)  Ounces      

0.163 0.143 0.113 0.136 0.147

Refractory      Grade

Tons   (oz/st Au)  Ounces     

0.080 0.053 0.068 0.032 0.053

  793,063   784,051   83,735   448,764   2,109,613

Totals - % Difference Grade

  (oz/st Au)  Ounces

Tons

6% -2% 144% 49% 22%

  13%     8%     -49%     1%     -1%  

18% 6% 25% 50% 21%

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Joint Venture, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-29    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

PIPELINE OPEN PIT There was a hiatus in production from the Pipeline pit from 2009 through 2012. Production was just beginning to enter the ore zone in the Gap Phase 3 pit in the last quarter of 2013, and it was completed in 2014. Portions of the Gap pit area experienced negative reconciliations in 2013 and into 2014. An improved resource model was created in 2014/2015 to address this issue. In addition, the Pipeline mineralization contains varying amounts of heap leach, oxide mill, and refractory material within each pit phase. Only leach ore was mined from the Pipeline area in 2015. The Pipeline/Gap yearly open pit reconciliation for 2012 through the end of 2015 is shown in Tables 15-13 and 15-14. Table 15-13 compares the grade control, Mineral  Reserve,  and  declared  ore  mined  on  a  yearly  time  basis.  Table  15-14  compares  the  grade  control  to  the  Mineral  Reserve  by  processing  types  (heap leaching, oxide mill, and refractory). The grade control models have reported less tonnage (11% lower in the period), and the gold production has been 9% lower than  the  Mineral  Reserve  model.  Updated  Mineral  Resource  and  Mineral  Reserve  models  for  the  Pipeline  complex  were  completed,  and  were  used  for  the 2015/2016 mine planning.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-30    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 15-13 PIPELINE OPEN PIT RECONCILIATION Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

    Year

2012 2013 2014 2015 2012 - 2015

  Year

2012 2013 2014 2015 2012 - 2015

   

  

   

  

         

   —        6,076,378      23,018,648     1,682,083      30,777,109 

 

  

   

  

   

  

         

              

Grade Control (GC)         Grade

Tons   (oz/st Au)  Ounces        

—   0.019 0.016 0.014 0.016

 

           

—     116,462  363,931  23,476   503,869 

         

   —        9,061,132     24,288,534     1,226,709     34,576,375 

    

Grade Control vs Ore Reserve         Grade

Tons   (oz/st Au)  Ounces        

0% -33% -5% 37% -11%

         

0% 18% -3% 32% 2%

Ore Reserve (OR - MI)         Grade

Tons   (oz/st Au)  Ounces        

—   0.016 0.016 0.011 0.016

 

           

—     147,006  395,080  12,987   555,073 

         

   75,528      6,102,508     23,297,092     1,722,710     31,197,838 

    

Declared Ore Mined vs Ore Reserve         Grade

Tons   (oz/st Au)  Ounces        

  0%        -100%     -21%        -33%     -8%        -4%     81%        40%     -9%        -10%  

0% 21% -1% 34% 7%

Declared Ore Mined (DOM) Grade

Tons   (oz/st Au)  Ounces

  -100%          -19%          -5%          88%          -4%       

0.196 0.02 0.016 0.014 0.017

 

         

14,805 119,402 376,262 24,433 534,902

 

Declared Ore Mined vs Grade

Control Grade

Tons   (oz/st Au)  Ounces

0% 0% 1% 2% 1%

         

0% 2% 2% 2% 5%

         

0% 3% 3% 4% 6%

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Joint Venture, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-31    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 15-14 PIPELINE OPEN PIT RECONCILIATION BY PROCESS TYPE Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

     

   

Leach   Grade

  (oz/st Au)  Ounces       

Year

 

Tons

2012 2013 2014 2015 2012 - 2015

         

0   5,233,801   19,677,465  1,682,083   26,593,349 

   

    Year

 

Tons

         

  7,956,961   21,662,378  1,226,709   30,846,048 

    Year

 

Tons

2012 2013 2014 2015 2012 - 2015

         

0% -34% -9% 37% -14%

         

0    76,467     232,837    23,476     332,780   

—   0.011 0.012 0.011 0.012

         

   91,320     250,567    12,987     354,874   

Tons

  0   —     0      834,953   0.046   38,607       3,334,170  0.039   130,351      0   —     0      4,169,123  0.041   168,958   

Leach   Grade

  (oz/st Au)  Ounces       

2012 2013 2014 2015 2012 - 2015    

—   0.015 0.012 0.014 0.013

Grade Control (GC) Mill   Refractory        Grade

Grade

  (oz/st Au)  Ounces        Tons   (oz/st Au)  Ounces      

Tons

  0   —     0       7,624   0.182   1,388       7,013   0.106   743       0   —     0       14,637  0.146   2,131    

  0     6,076,378     23,018,648    1,682,083     30,777,109 

Ore Reserve Model (OR) Mill   Refractory        Grade

Grade

  (oz/st Au)  Ounces        Tons   (oz/st Au)  Ounces      

    —          1,099,121  0.05   55,342       2,593,865  0.055   141,535      0   —     0      3,692,986  0.053   196,877   

    —          5,050   0.068   343       32,291  0.092   2,978       0   —     0       37,341  0.089   3,321    

Grade Control (GC) vs. Ore Reserve Model (OR) Mill   Refractory        Grade

Grade

Tons   (oz/st Au)  Ounces        Tons   (oz/st Au)  Ounces      

         

0% -24% 29% 0% 13%

  0%         -16%         -7%         81%         -6%      

  0%   0%   -8%   -30%   -29%   -8%   0%   0%   -24%   -14%

              

         

0%   0%   0%     51%   168%   305%     -78%   15%   -75%     0%   0%   0%     -61%   64%   -36%    

         

—   0.019 0.016 0.014 0.016

         

0 116,462 363,931 23,476 503,869

Totals - Ore Control Grade

Tons   (oz/st Au)  Ounces

  —       9,061,132     24,288,534    1,226,709     34,576,375 

Leach   Grade

  (oz/st Au)  Ounces       

0% 36% 0% 32% 9%

Totals - Grade Control Grade

Tons   (oz/st Au)  Ounces

—   0.016 0.016 0.011 0.016

         

—   147,006 395,080 12,987 555,073

Totals - % Difference Grade

Tons   (oz/st Au)  Ounces

0% -33% -5% 37% -11%

         

0% 19% 0% 32% 2%

  0%   -21%   -8%   81%   -9%

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Joint Venture, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-32    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

UNDERGROUND YEAR-YEAR RECONCILIATION The October 2015 YTD reconciliation for the Breccia Zone and for the Middle Zone is shown in Table 15-15, the majority of the production to date is from the Breccia Zone. Middle Zone production commenced in mid-2013. The table includes the Declared Ore Mined (DOM), grade control (GC), (previously referred to as “as mined”, and Mineral Reserve (MR) values. In the Breccia Zone the reconciliation compared to the Mineral Reserve is positive. The as mined vs. Mineral Reserve is higher due to the existence of high grade material between drill holes that is not reflected in the model. This material is well above the current mining cut-off grade and delineation drilling in these areas was not required. In the Middle Zone the reconciliation is even or positive compared to the Mineral Reserves. There has been no mining of the Lower Zone to date. RPA  is  of  the  opinion  that  the  CHUG  mining  is  demonstrating  a  good  reconciliation  to  the  Mineral  Reserves.  RPA  considers  the  reconciliation  work  to  be important and recommends continued review of the results, this will be important as mining is moving to new zones and possibly to new methods.

TABLE 15-15 UNDERGROUND MINERAL RESERVE RECONCILIATION Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

   

  

Tons

Grade

     (oz/st Au)    

Oz

     Tons 

 

Grade

(oz/st Au) 

 

Oz  

DOM DOM vs. GC Grade Control AM vs. MR Mineral Reserve DOM vs. MR

Breccia Zone - October 2015 YTD      475,948                  458,999                  431,005            

0.699       332,893              104%     0.749       343,870              106%     0.650       280,292              110%    



  93%     97%    115%    123%    108%    119% 

DOM DOM vs. GC Grade Control AM vs. MR

Middle Zone - October 2015 YTD      151,583                  148,004            

0.472       71,542              102%     0.486       71,866               98%    



  97%    100%    115%    112% 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-33    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

Tons

Grade

     (oz/st Au)    

 

  

Mineral Reserve DOM vs. MR

     151,699            

Oz

     Tons 

 

Grade

(oz/st Au) 

0.422      64,011              100%    

 

Oz  

  112%    112% 

MONTHLY RECONCILIATION Cortez  maintains  a  monthly  reconciliation  record  for  the  underground  including  monthly  and  three  month  moving  average  (3MMA)  calculations  for  the total underground ore, oxide ore, and three categories of refractory ores. The reconciliation is broken down by zone (Breccia and Middle) and includes a total for the underground. The monthly total, oxide and autoclave reconciliations are shown below in Figures 15-7 to 15-9. The reconciliation for roaster ore and TCM is not shown due to the limited tonnage produced to date. All of the reconciliation shown in this section is for the comparison of declared ore mine to the Mineral Reserve as this represents the fundamental comparison between the estimate and production.

FIGURE 15-7 TOTAL UNDERGROUND ORE RECONCILIATION 2014-2015

 

Overall, the underground reconciliation is positive for tons, grade, and ounces and the positive trend was maintained through the period for the 3MMA. Continued positive reconciliation indicates that the Mineral Reserve estimate may be too conservative and a review of the estimation parameters may be warranted.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-34    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

FIGURE 15-8 UNDERGROUND OXIDE ORE RECONCILIATION 2014-2015

 

The  underground  oxide  ore  tonnage  reconciliation  has  moved  from  negative  to  positive  and  back  to  negative  over  the  period  considered.  The  grade  has demonstrated a larger positive reconciliation initially offsetting the negative reconciliation on tons and then adding to the positive gold reconciliation as the tonnage moved to positive reconciliation. The positive trend in the reconciliation would warrant review and consideration to assess the possible causes but the high grade Breccia Zone is now virtually complete.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-35    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

FIGURE 15-9 UNDERGROUND ROASTER ORE RECONCILIATION 2014-2015

 

The  roaster  ore  reconciliation  has  demonstrated  a  wide  range  of  positive  and  negative  reconciliation  results  through  the  period.  The  tonnage  reconciliation  has generally  been  favourable  but  the  grade  reconciliation  has  been  generally  negative  through  2015  leading  to  a  negative  reconciliation  between  the  declared  ore mined and the Mineral Reserves. RPA recommends that the tracking continue and that attempts to identify the cause of large changes be completed and reported on a monthly basis. Reconciliation  of  production,  planning  and  mineral  reserves  is  also  maintained  for  the  RF2  and  RF3  refractory  ores,  the  results  are  variable  and  RPA is of the opinion that the small tonnage to date does not support detailed review. RPA is of the opinion that the maintenance and regular review of the reconciliation is an important part of the Mineral Reserve estimation process. RPA concurs with the presentation of the reconciliation results focused upon the percentage differences and not the absolute differences.

RPA OPINION RPA is not aware of any known environmental, permitting, legal, title, taxation, socio-economic, marketing, political, or other relevant factors that could materially affect the Mineral Reserve estimate.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-36    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

RPA  notes  that  permit  approval  for  the  mining  of  the  Deep  South  Zone  will  be  required,  however,  based  on  previous  experience  at  the  operation,  there  is  a reasonable expectation that the permit will be obtained.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 15-37    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

16 MINING METHODS RECENT PRODUCTION HISTORY The Cortez Mine consists of an operating open pit and underground mine with production from several open pit deposits and one underground mine. Production is currently coming from the CHOP, the Pipeline open pit, and the CHUG as well as material from stockpiles accumulated from previous mining. The operations at Cortez are well established, systems are in place, and the Mine is reasonably staffed to the correct levels. The mine production history for the past four years (20122015) is summarized in Table 16-1.

TABLE 16-1 MINE OPERATIONS SUMMARY 2012-2015 Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Item

  

Open Pit Tons Mined Tons Per Day Tons of Ore Grade (oz/st Au) Contained Ounces Tons Operating Waste Capitalized Tons Waste Tons Waste Re-handle Tons Total Tons Moved

                                

     119,663,896       326,951       10,443,690       0.090       936,890       70,408,971       38,811,236       109,220,206       3,393,491       123,057,388    

Underground Tons Mined Tons of Ore Tons Per Day (total) Grade (oz/st Au) Contained Ounces Tons Waste Tons Tons Backfill Tons Total Feet Development

                          

               

2012

    

   837,350     539,029     2,288     1.071     577,146     298,322     564,904     34,888    

2013

    

     147,106,347       403,031       20,664,143       0.046       951,356       35,410,750       91,031,454       126,442,204       3,982,140       151,088,487                    

   783,807     611586     2,159     0.834     510,178     172,221     627,205     32,882    

2014

    

2015

 

     167,068,297       457,721       25,996,090       0.018       468,087       80,635,648       60,436,559       141,072,207       2,203,327       169,271,624    

                   

166,079,219   455,011   22,614,007   0.031   698,154   120,786,196   22,679,016   143,465,212   2,113,533   168,192,752  

   807,746     643597     2,213     0.714     459,536     146,847     620,279     33,582    

               

1,020,966   763,320   2,091   0.627   478,336   257,647   641,404   42,335  

               

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-1    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

OPEN PIT MINE MINE OPERATIONS Open pit ore is mined by a conventional shovel-truck process at the rate of approximately 17.7 Mstpa with a LOM stripping ratio of 7:1 (waste tonnes to one tonne of ore). Mining occurs in two separate areas separated by a distance of approximately 12 mi; Cortez Hills composed of Cortez Hills and Pediment, and Pipeline composed of Pipeline, Gap, and Crossroads. Figure 16-1 illustrates the location of the open pit mines. Benches are a nominal height of 50 ft, and mined in one pass. Blast movement monitoring (BMM) has been used in the past but is not in current use at the Cortez Operations. BMM is carried out using directional transmitters located in dedicated blast holes prior to blasting. After the blast occurs, the directional transmitters emit a frequency with information relating to their respective coordinates, which are in turn compared to their original coordinates in order to determine the overall movement of the blast pile. Typically,  blast  patterns  are  22  ft  by  25  ft.  Typical  blast  hole  diameters  for  Cortez  Hills  and  Pipeline  are  8.75  in.  and  9.875  in.,  respectively.  Sub-drill  length averages four feet. Powder factors for Cortez Hills and Pipeline average 0.388 lb explosive per ton (lb e /st) and 0.479 lb e /st, respectively. Typical, horizontal waste haul distances for Cortez Hills’s ore and waste are 4,400 ft and 5,700 ft, respectively. Pipeline ore and waste haul horizontal distances are 8,660 ft and 5,800 ft, respectively.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-2    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 16-3    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

OPEN PIT DESIGN The open pit designs are based upon an optimized pit design followed by a detailed design and the development of phase plans for each of the pits. The design uses metal  prices,  costs,  and  recoveries  based  upon  operating  experience.  Pit  slopes  are  based  upon  geotechnical  assessments  by  a  third  party,  and  Cortez  has  a geotechnical engineer on staff to provide ongoing review of the pit slope performance. Dewatering factors also play a major role in the design and development of the open pits with regard to operation efficiencies and geotechnical factors. MINE DESIGN PARAMETERS The open pit designs include consideration of the dewatering requirements and of the different types of waste that may be encountered during stripping. At the CHOP, a protected cultural area was declared on the northeast side of the pit, which has limited the pit expansion on that side. The following design criteria were used for the Cortez Hills and Pediment open pits:  

 



  50 ft bench height on primary stripping benches and final walls;



  20 ft bench height within refractory ore benches as needed;



  Fresh rock inter-ramp wall slope angles range from 35° to 43° depending on material type and wall orientation;



  Bench face angles planned to be 65°;



  12% maximum haul road grade, typically 10%;



  120 ft wide haul roads;



  Minimum mining width of 250 ft, however, narrower widths are mined over short distances, e.g., ramp drop cuts.

 

   

   

   

   

   

 

The following design criteria are used for the Pipeline, Gap, and Crossroads open pits:  

 



  40 ft to 50 ft bench height on primary stripping benches;



  40 ft to 50 ft bench height on ore benches;



  20 ft bench height on ore benches in case that its needed;



  Alluvium inter-ramp wall slope angle varying from 35° to 49°;



  Fresh rock inter-ramp wall slope angles ranging from 37° to 50° depending on material type and wall orientation;



  Bench face angles ranging from 35° to 70° depending on material type;



  12% maximum haul road grade, typically 10%;



  120 ft wide haul roads;

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-4    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

 



  Minimum mining width of 300 ft in Crossroads and 250 ft in Pipeline, however, narrower widths are mined over short distances, e.g., ramp drop cuts.

GEOMECHANICS The geotechnical  model  is a compilation  of information  sourced  from  geotechnical  cell  mapping,  geological  mapping,  core  logging, and supplementary drilling designed  to  intersect  areas  of  geotechnical  interest,  material  strength,  highwall  performance,  and  hydrological  data.  Material  strength  estimates  for  the  Cortez deposits are derived from:  

 



  Historic and current material strength testing programs conducted by various consultants.



  Core logging by Barrick and external consultant geologists and geotechnical engineers from drill holes located in and around the deposits.



  Back-analysis of historical failures in similar rock types.

 

   

 

Golder, and more recently Piteau Associates Engineering, Ltd. (Piteau), have conducted extensive geotechnical studies on the Pipeline, South Pipeline, Crossroads, and  Gap  deposits.  All  four  deposits  are  overlain  with  up  to  approximately  600  ft  to  800  ft  (i.e.,  Crossroads)  of  alluvium  material.  The  inter-ramp  angles  for alluvium are 49° at Pipeline and up to 43° at Cortez Hills/Pediment pit area. In the Pipeline and South Pipeline deposits, final wall slopes in rock are designed with inter-ramp  angles ranging from 34° to 50° depending on rock type and wall orientation.  The geotechnical  work on Crossroads and Gap in 2001 concluded  that similar slope design criteria could be applied to these deposits. Subsequent pit designs have incorporated geological, geotechnical, and hydrological conditions so as to provide safe operating conditions. Golder  (2006)  recommended  a  static  loading  factor  of  safety  of  1.2,  and  a  seismic  factor  of  safety  of  1.0.  The  Operating  Basis  Earthquake  (OBE) acceleration associated  with  the  Crescent  Fault  is  0.18g.  A  pseudostatic  coefficient  equal  to  50%  of  the  OBE  acceleration,  or  0.09g,  was  applied  to  evaluate  the  effects  of seismic loading on stability. Mining  operations  have  been  proceeding  in  these  areas  since  1998.  Cortez  undertakes  constant  monitoring  of  pit  walls  through  geotechnical  cell  mapping, geological structure mapping, groundwater monitoring, bench inspections, slope stability, and slope movement analyses. For the most part, the pit walls appear to be in good condition. A high wall multi-bench failure occurred on the west wall of Pipeline, the failure has limited access to the bottom of Phase 9. Cortez actively manages the pit wall failure risks.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-5    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

Piteau  is  the  geotechnical  engineering  consultant  of  record  for  the  Cortez  Hills  open  pit  development,  and  has  developed  the  pit  design  for  the  bench  scale (including bench face angle and berm widths), inter-ramp scale (inter-ramp angle), and overall slope scale (overall angle). The inter-ramp slope angles range from 37° to 45° depending on rock type and wall orientation. The Cortez Hills Phase 6 pit design sectors are shown in Figure 16-2. A minimum Factor of Safety of 1.2 is required for all inter-ramp and overall slopes. Summarized below are important geotechnical and hydrogeological recommended by Piteau on July 4, 2014 for the CHOP, and these factors can also be generally applied to the Pipeline pit:  

 



  Nine distinct hydrogeological compartments in the CHOP, which will require redundant capacity of deep wells (+3,000 ft) and horizontal drains.



  Investigate 50 ft high bench designs.



  A  reduction  of  Hoek-Brown  (2002)  Disturbance  Factors  to  account  for  blasting,  stress  relief,  and  slope  relaxation  based  on  calibrated,  Universal Distinct Element Code (UDEC) modelling of the east wall in the Cortez Hills/Pediment pit.



  Use best practice blasting techniques to minimize back break, but maintain optimum rock fragmentation.



  Update numerical modelling of the pit to actively monitor the east wall in the CHOP.

 

   

   

   

   

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-6    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 16-7    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 16-8    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

During the FS work for Cortez Hills, relatively poor rock quality conditions were noted in many portions of the proposed pit area, particularly in the northeast, east, and  southeast  walls  in  the  vicinity  of  the  Cortez  Fault  Zone,  which  is  located  on  the  east  side  of  the  deposits  near  the  base  of  Mount  Tenabo.  Maintaining  the stability  of  pit  walls,  haul  roads,  and  access  ramps  will  require  depressurizing  zones  of  high  pore  pressure  up  to  approximately  1,500  ft  behind  the  pit wall.  Maintaining  stability  will  also  require  limiting  the  overall  and  inter-ramp  slope  angles,  excavating  wide  catch  benches/step-outs  at  designated  vertical intervals during excavation of the pit wall, and reducing the potential for inter-ramp slope failures along geologic structures through the use of controlled blasting techniques and managed sinking rates. DEWATERING Dewatering is a priority for the Pipeline, Crossroads, Cortez Hills, and Pediment open pit operations. At the Pipeline pit, there are a  series of dewatering wells around the perimeter of the pit. These dewatering wells discharge water, which is used for operations and discharged to ground infiltration areas called RIBs. There is  a  permitted  limit  on  the  dewatering  rate  and  Cortez  has  a  dewatering  model  to  predict  the  rate  of  dewatering  and  for  planning  the  locations  for  wells.  The following list summarizes the dewatering amounts for the Cortez mine as referenced in the LOM2015 – MinePlan Summary_v01:  

 



  Permitted Total Pumping Rates Nevada Department of Water Resources (NDWR) – 44,816 gpm annualized (72,288.4 AFA).



  Permitted Dewatering Rate Bureau of Land Management (BLM), 2008 – 36,100 gpm.



  Permitted Irrigation Rates NDWR – 4,089 gpm annualized (6,595.27 AFA).



  Permitted Consumptive Use Rates NDWR – 3,099 gpm annualized (4,998.74 AFA).



  Permitted Infiltration Rates Nevada Department of Environmental Protection (NDEP) Water Pollution Control Permit (WPCP) NEV0095111 – 34,500 gpm (55,648.7AFA).



  Permitted Consumptive Rate BLM, 2004e – 34,500 gpm.

 

   

   

   

   

 

The  Cortez  Hills/Pediment  pit  area  hydrogeological  blocks  are  more  compartmentalized  than  the  Pipeline/Crossroads  pit  hydrogeological  blocks,  due  to complicated structures, rock types, and pumping depths. One of the major challenges for the successful depressurization/dewatering of the Cortez Pits is the deep bedrock pumping of the aquifers with submersible well pumps that have installed motor horsepower’s of 1,500 hp, which are some of the largest size submersible pump motors manufactured. The installation of surface  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-9    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

booster pumps helps reduce the load/stress on the submersible well pumps. Additional deep wells (3,000 ft to 4,000 ft deep) are required in the Cortez Hills area. The dewatering operations are modelled to keep the groundwater 50 ft to 100 ft below the pit bottom in the Pipeline pit area. The water is either used in the process facilities (3,099 gpm), irrigation (4,089 gpm), or infiltrated back into the groundwater via infiltration basins (34,500 gpm). Dewatering  of  the  open  pits  should  continue  to  be  an  important  priority  of  the  Cortez  operation.  In  conjunction  with  the  dewatering,  careful  highwall  slope monitoring is being done and should be continued. OPEN PIT PRODUCTION SCHEDULE The LOM plan schedule is based upon keeping Cortez Mill No. 2 operating at full capacity. There is no planned shutdown, beyond routine maintenance, of the Cortez mill within the LOM plan. Ore will be stockpiled in some years and/or the cut-off grade between leach and mill will be managed to maintain the mill feed. As refractory ore is mined, it is first stockpiled, then it is shipped to Barrick’s Goldstrike operation, which is approximately 70 mi north of Cortez, for processing. Refractory  ore  trucking  is  currently  subject  to  permitted  tonnage  limitations  of  approximately  1.2  Mstpa.  The  over-the-highway  trucks  have  an  approximate capacity of 23 tons per load. The open pit  mining  plan for  a given pit  is developed  by setting  up haulage  strings  by pit,  by location  in the pit, by pit phase, and by delivery point. With the application of truck speeds, cycle times are then estimated, and with the application of truck availability the total haulage capacity is estimated and scheduled. The same  schedule  is  used  to  generate  the  equipment  replacement  and  retirement  schedule.  Within  the  scheduling  process,  the  operation  is  considered  to  be  truck limited. A shovel schedule is maintained, however, as previously noted, the limiting factor in the schedule is considered to be the haulage capacity. The various open pits are scheduled considering the ore and waste quantities, ore grades, and the centralization of activity to the extent possible. Current mine life is estimated to be eight years (2016–2023). Average, total daily open pit mine production from the Cortez operation is estimated to 400,000 stpd.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-10    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

Production  is  currently  focused  on  the  CHOP  for  the  period  of  2016  through  2018.  The  modifications  to  the  mine  schedules,  due  to  the  slow  receipt  of  initial permits and concerns with respect to the stability of the northeastern corner of the Phase 4, have led to an uneven schedule of ore delivery. The permitting delays and highwall stability issues have also resulted in large waste stripping commitments followed by ore production, which must be stockpiled to even out the ore flow to the Cortez Mill No. 2. Table 16-2 is a LOM mine production summary from all of the Cortez open pit operations. Mining of the Pipeline and Crossroads pit area will primarily be composed of waste mining from 2016 to 2018. Primary ore mining from Pipeline and Crossroads is currently estimated to take place from 2018 through 2023.

TABLE 16-2 CORTEZ OPERATION – LOM OPEN PIT PRODUCTION Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Year

2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 Totals

Total Tons Mined

(000)   

Tons

Per Day   

Tons of Ore (000)   

Grade

(oz/st Au)  

   168,844       166,756       167,606       167,606       143,385       130,682       93,758       60,526       15,788       1,114,951  

461,321   456,866   459,195   459,195   391,762   358,033   256,871   165,826   40,516      

25,117 12,082 14,899 12,982 13,064 23,769 26,919 11,741 6,228 146,801

0.032 0.101 0.067 0.041 0.032 0.015 0.020 0.056 0.126 0.043

  

                             

Contained

Gold

(oz)   

Tons

Waste

(000)   

   795,315    143,727      1,223,721   154,674      1,005,451   152,707      536,194    154,624      422,546    130,321      365,441    106,913      543,093    66,839       660,971    48,785       787,431    8,561       6,340,163   967,151  

Stripping Ratio

5.7 12.8 10.2 11.9 10.0 4.5 2.5 4.2 1.37 6.59

Note: Schedule includes re-handle Table 16-3 is a summary of the CHOP operation, which consists of the Cortez Hills and Pediment pits.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-11    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 16-3 CORTEZ HILLS/PEDIMENT – LOM OPEN PIT PRODUCTION Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Year

  

Total Tons Mined

(000)   

2016 2017 2018 Totals

           

133,216 60,797 13,836 207,849

Tons

Per Day   

Tons of Ore

(000)   

   363,978   18,824      166,566   9,765       37,908    5,240          33,829  

Grade

(oz/st Au)  

0.038 0.122 0.145 0.079

Contained

Gold

(oz)   

Tons

Waste

(000)   

   706,475    114,392      1,194,412   51,031       759,194    8,597       2,660,081   174,020  

Stripping Ratio

6.1 5.2 1.6 5.1

Note. Schedule includes re-handle. Table 16-4 is an open pit mine production summary for the Pipeline and Crossroads pits.

TABLE 16-4 PIPELINE/CROSSROADS – LOM OPEN PIT PRODUCTION Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Total Tons

Tons of

Contained

Tons

Mined

Tons

Ore

Grade

Gold

Waste Stripping

   (000)    Per Day    (000)    (oz/st Au)   (oz)    (000)    Ratio

Year

2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 Totals

                             

35,628 105,960 153,770 167,606 143,385 130,682 93,758 60,526 15,788 907,103

   97,343    6,293       290,300   2,317       421,286   9,659       459,195   12,982       391,762   13,064       358,033   23,769       256,871   26,919       165,826   11,741       40,516    6,228          112,972  

0.014 0.013 0.025 0.041 0.032 0.015 0.020 0.056 0.126 0.033

   88,840    29,334       29,309    103,643      246,257    144,111      536,194    154,624      422,546    130,321      365,441    106,913      543,093    66,839       660,971    48,785       787,431    8,561       3,680,082   793,131  

4.7 44.7 14.9 11.9 10.0 4.5 2.5 4.2 1.37 7.02

Note. Schedule includes re-handle. The mine schedule has been developed to yield an average of 4.4 Mstpa of oxide ore for the Cortez Mill No. 2. The total annual tonnage will be 169.5 million tons in 2016, slightly decreasing to 167.6 million tons in 2017, and 167.6 million tons in 2018. Table  16-5  shows  the  approximate  percentage  of  each  processing  category  (leach,  oxide  mill,  and  refractory)  mined  for  tonnage  and  contained  gold  ounces, respectively. Cortez should refine their use of cross over grades, and standardize the Mineral Reserve reporting with the LOM production schedule.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-12    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 16-5 PERCENTAGES OF MINED PROCESSING ORE TYPES Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

     Area/Zone

  

Pipeline Crossroads Cortez Hills Pediment Open Pit Subtotals Breccia Zone Middle Zone Lower Zone Deep South Zone Underground Subtotals Mill Stockpiles Leach Stockpiles Refractory Stockpiles Stockpile Subtotals

                                         

Mill % of Mill tons     

     % of oz     

Leach % of Leach tons     

     % of oz     

Refractory % of Refractory tons     

  % of oz  

       

       

 

       

       

 

       

       

  13       66       7       14    

100

     0       0       0       0    

0

        0       

0

  

       

       

       

       

1   20   18   0   39

1   24   26   3   54

 

8   8

4     44     18     16     82

   1     2     2     10     15

   3           3

  



2     26     24     7     58

   2     6     5     27     40

   2          

2

  

 

15     66     6     13     100

   0     0     0     0     0

      0        0

  

 

1     31     21     0     53

   0     14     16     2     33

         13     13

  

OPEN PIT INFRASTRUCTURE The  open  pit  infrastructure  has  been  developed  at  both  the  CHOP  and  Pipeline  areas.  There  are  shops  and  offices  at  the  Pipeline  mill  area  to  support  open  pit operations at the Gap, Pipeline, and Crossroads pits, and there are shops and offices at the CHOP to support operations in that area. The  road  network  for  haulage  and  for  light  vehicle  access  is  well  developed,  and  there  are  multiple  stockpile  areas  with  storage  based  upon  the  grade  and processing type of the material being stockpiled. OPEN PIT EQUIPMENT AND MAINTENANCE There is an extensive mobile equipment fleet at the Cortez Operations. The major surface mobile equipment is listed in Table 16-6. Dozers (including large rubbertire dozers), graders, blast hole drills, maintenance vehicles, a heavy haul trailer, and other equipment are present to support the operations. The Cortez operation has an adequate number of primary and support equipment, and the equipment is properly maintained.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-13    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 16-6 MAJOR OPEN PIT EQUIPMENT Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Unit

  

2015 Number of Units   

Liebherr T282B trucks (400 st) Caterpillar 795F trucks (345 st) P&H 4100 XPB shovel P&H 2800 XPB shovel EX-5500 excavator L2350 loader 1 Rubber tire dozer 1 Crawler dozer 1 Caterpillar 16H grader 1 Caterpillar 24H grader 1 Atlas Copco PV271 drill DrillTech SP55 DrillTech D75K Water trucks 1

                                         

25 30 5 2 3 1 4 2 1 7 2 9 2 4

                                         

LOM Average Number of

Units   

LOM Average Availability

(%)   

LOM Average Utilization

(%)

19 30 2 3 1 1 8 9 2 4 6 1 1 6

80 88 87 87 85

70 70 93 90 85

                                         

85 75 75

                                         

75 70 70

Note 1: 2014 numbers applied to LOM totals. As of October 2014 In addition, there is a large fleet of light vehicles for crew transportation and supervision. The fleet size is consistent with the needs of this large operation, which is spread over a significant area with outlying facilities. From a mine planning perspective the mining operation is limited by haulage capacity. Cortez’s truck fleet is currently made up of Caterpillar 795Fs (350 st class) and Liebherr T282Bs (400 st class). The main loading units are two, P&H 4100 electric shovels (73 yd 3 to 77 yd 3 buckets); three, P&H 2800 electric shovels (48 yd 3 buckets); and one, Hitachi EX5500 hydraulic excavator (35 yd  3 bucket). For planning purposes all the shovels are given target availabilities, machine utilizations, and tons per operating hour (tpoh).  For  the  P&H  4100,  2800,  and  Hitachi  5500  the  planed  productivities  are  approximately  120,000,  70,000,  and  45,000  stpd,  respectively,  during  months without planned downs. In 2015, actual P&H 4100, 2800, and Hitachi 5500 shovel productivities averaged approximately 5800 tpoh, 3500 tpoh, and 2400 tpoh, respectively. Truck productivities for the Liebherr T282B and Caterpillar 795F trucks averaged, approximately 730 tpoh and 710 tpoh, respectively in 2015.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-14    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

A small fleet of self-perform equipment is used to load and haul oxide material from the stockpiles to either the mill, or to the gyratory crusher.

UNDERGROUND MINE The mining is all mechanized, with large scale equipment. The mining method is underhand cut and fill with a cemented rock backfill. Headings are cycled using conventional drill/blast/muck/support on a round by round basis. Material is loaded into haul trucks, and hauled to surface. Top-cut headings are typically 15 ft by 15  ft  and  undercut  widths  vary  from  18  ft  to  30  ft  wide  (depending  on  ground  conditions  and  ore  geometry)  with  15  ft  heights.  Wider  ore  cuts  are  being implemented to improve productivity and mine production. The  bottom  level  of the  CHOP was  originally  planned  to be  the  4,670  ft  level;  this  was the  nominal  top  A cut  of the  CHUG. Subsequent  design changes have resulted in the top of the Breccia Zone moving up to the 4820 level. The pit floor will extend to the 4,525 ft level, however, the high grade centre portion will be a CRF material. Mine production was approximately 2,100 stpd of ore in 2015. The Breccia Zone production has been decreasing as the reserves in that zone are depleted and the Middle Zone tonnage has been increasing through the year. In 2015, the majority of mine production was still from the Breccia Zone, however, that will change to the Middle Zone in 2016. Lower Zone production and the RFD development are scheduled to begin in 2016. The exploration drift on the 3,800 ft level has been extended to permit further exploration of the Deep South Zone. Over the past four years the mine production has been steady at approximately 2,200 stpd ore. Over the same period, the grade has decreased from 1.07 oz/st Au to 0.63 oz/st Au. MINE DESIGN The CHUG is accessed by twin declines driven to the upper level of the deposit. Access for the lower levels of Breccia Zone and to the Middle and Lower Zones is by a spiral ramp adjacent to the orebody. The twin declines are interconnected at regular intervals and these connections contain air doors to separate the intake and exhaust  airways.  At  the  portal  area,  there  are  permanent  offices  and  maintenance  facilities  together  with  a  backfill  plant  and  shotcrete  batch  plant.  In  2016, development of an additional set of twin declines (RFD), for  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-15    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

access to the Lower Zone, will begin. The declines will provide additional means of egress as well as house a conveyor for ore and waste transport from the Lower and Deep South Zones. The mining is all mechanized with large scale equipment. The plan is to expand the production tonnage rate through the mining of the Middle  and Lower zones and then to further  increase  the production  rate  with the addition of the Deep South Zone. The increase in production rate over time is shown in Figure 16-4. The gold grade and contained gold in the mine feed are shown in Figure 16-5.

FIGURE 16-4 CHUG LOM MINE PRODUCTION RATE

 

Source: Barrick 2016  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-16    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

FIGURE 16-5 CHUG LOM GOLD PRODUCTION AND HEAD GRADE

 

Source: Barrick 2016 BRECCIA ZONE The mining is carried out by underhand drift and fill with a CRF. Ore is drilled with two boom jumbos, blasted on a round by round basis, loaded into haul trucks, and hauled to surface. The top cut headings are 15 ft high by 15 ft wide. Successive headings (under backfill) are 15 ft high by 20 ft wide and the plan is to increase the width of these headings to 30 ft. Access headings are typically 16 ft wide by 16 to 18 ft high. The 18 ft heading is needed to provide space for the rigid ventilation ducting. The Breccia Zone was broken into 75 ft high sections (five cuts) and mined by first taking a top or “A cut” in a section. The A cut is mined to the extent of the high grade (typically, the 0.20 oz/st grade shell), and each drift is filled after mining. The B cut is then taken below the A cut in the same fashion. The E cut is the final cut in a section, and in this case, the floor and back of the stope drives are a CRF. The cuts are offset by a small angle so that the successive CRF “beams” are not exactly over one another. MIDDLE ZONE The Middle  Zone was initially  planned  to be  mined  using blast  hole stopes and  the mining  rate  was planned  to  be increased  to  2,500  stpd.  After  review  of the geometry of the Middle Zone  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-17    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

the mining method was changed back to cut and fill mining. This is again under review in the search for more productive mining rates. The current plan is to mine the Middle Zone in the same manner as the Breccia Zone. LOWER ZONE The Lower Zone Mineral Reserves are based upon a FS and the APO3 revision to the PoO, approved in September 2015, which was required before development of the new declines to the Lower Zone could commence. The Lower Zone FS is based upon cut and fill mining. The  Lower  zone  development  of  the  RFDs  will  extend  to  the  3800  level.  One  of  the  declines  will  be  used  as  a  conveyor  gallery  for  the  transport  of  ore  and waste. Ore and waste that must be removed to surface will be handled by LHD and truck to bins above the 3800 level. From there the rock will be conveyed to surface. Other services such as a backfill plant and service area will also be constructed in the Lower Zone area near the declines. DEEP SOUTH ZONE The Deep South Zone Mineral Reserves are based upon the PFS and a planned revision to the PoO to permit dewatering below the 3,800 ft level which is required before  that  dewatering  can  commence.  With  more  detailed  geological  and  geotechnical  review  after  the  Scoping  Study,  the  access  has  been  relocated  to  the footwall on the eastern side of the Deep South Zone to avoid crossing dikes and faults. The Deep South Zone development is expected to follow the dewatering downwards. There will be a stope access ramp as well as a conveyor gallery. The conveyor will be built progressively with a total of four legs. Ore and waste from the Deep South Zone will be handled by truck and LHD on the levels and then fed through feeder breakers before being conveyed to surface via the Deep South and RFD conveyor systems. The Deep South Zone PFS is based upon long hole stoping with a sequence of primary and secondary stopes.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-18    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

GEOMECHANICS AND GROUND SUPPORT GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATIONS MIDDLE AND LOWER ZONES SRK Consulting (Canada) Inc. (SRK) completed a geotechnical assessment of the Middle Zone and Lower Zone based on data collected over a period of seven years.  The  Lower  Zone  is  an  elongated,  tabular,  shallowly  dipping  body  located  within  the  plane  of  a  low-angle  thrust  complex  that  is  divided  into  three domains.  Ground  conditions  outside  the  plane  of  the  thrust  complex  are  expected  to  be  good  to  excellent,  with  rock  mass  rating  (RMR)  over  75.  Within  the complex echelon thrust (known as the Ponderosa fault), which hosts the bulk of mineralization, geotechnical conditions worsen, with RMRs less than 55. Complex anastomosing faults with heavy decalcification and volume loss in the ore contribute to poor RMR and rock quality designation (RQD). The clay-altered margins of post-ore dikes have RMRs in the 35 to 45 range and below; however, they are generally narrow (<10.0 ft true thickness). The dikes themselves may create aquitards and small-volume perched aquifers, complicating geotechnical conditions. Complete dewatering of the mineable zones will be critical to successful operations. The  geotechnical  conditions  in  the  Middle  Zone  and  Lower  Zone  were  evaluated  using  an  assessment  of  drill  core  from  geologic  and  geotechnical  drilling programs.  SRK  created  a  geotechnical  block  model  for  the  Breccia  Zone,  Middle  Zone,  and  Lower  Zone,  and  attempted  a  correlation  between  the  drill  hole geotechnical data and the observed ground conditions in the Breccia Zone. This correlation was extrapolated to the Middle Zone and Lower Zone. The following points summarize the data review completed for the available geotechnical data at Cortez Hills.  

 



  Good data coverage for the Breccia Zone, moderate-to-good for the Middle Zone, and limited for the Lower Zone.



  No structural orientation data (except for limited mapping) for the Middle Zone and Lower Zone.



  Categorization of joint conditions in historic data.



  Uncertainty of RQD and intact rock strength (IRS) conducted through core logging in all areas.



  Limited laboratory strength testing.

 

   

   

   

   

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-19    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

 



  Limited QA and QC systems implemented on geotechnical data collection and database.

SRK believes that the current database is of sufficient quality and density to be used for input to a geotechnical block model. The geotechnical block model is considered viable for parameter estimation through the Breccia Zone and Middle Zone, and northern portions of the Lower Zone (north  of  approximately  28300N).  Confidence  level  decreases  and  estimation  risk  increases  in  the  southern  portions  of  the  Lower  Zone  as  drill  hole  spacing increases. Given the limited drill hole coverage in the Lower Zone (and therefore risks to confidence levels), the rock mass evaluation considered each pod as an individual entity based solely on the drill holes intersecting each pod. A re-evaluation of the geotechnical data is not considered necessary for the planned cut-and fill mining methods. Man-entry opening span designs were empirically assessed and determined to be 16 ft to 25 ft in fair rock and less than 10 ft in poor rock. Longhole stoping opportunities were assessed to develop guidelines for design should longhole stoping mining methods be determined to be appropriate for mining the Lower Zone. The generally weak rock mass, depth, and structure appear to significantly limit longhole stope dimensions. Stability numbers generally plot in the lower range of the database where the stable transition zone is wide, and therefore uncertain. Maximum hydraulic radii for stope configurations are generally <16.4 ft for most stope surfaces, but still carry significant failure risks, which equates to small stopes. Stope pillars were analyzed by tributary area methods using the Obert pillar formula (Obert and Duvall 1967). A range of pillar configurations at various extraction ratios was examined, and it can be seen that pillar load / extraction dominates stability more than pillar geometry. Stability issues appear at approximately 50% extraction, regardless of pillar geometry. SRK cautions that in poor rock conditions, the problem appears at even lower extraction, approximately 20% to 25%, and further  indicates  that  a  longhole  stoping  mining  method  in  these  ground  conditions  is  unsuitable.  While  this  is  the  most  conservative  position,  ore  bodies  with similar rock conditions have been successfully mined using longhole stoping mining methods in northern Nevada.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-20    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

Ground support requirements were determined empirically and by analytical methods. Empirical methods are general and do not define the mechanisms involved in support mechanics, but do offer a good initial estimate. Continued geotechnical data collection will provide the greatest benefit to the Lower Zone areas. As infill drilling continues along the strike of the Lower Zone, the geotechnical block model can be updated and geotechnical domains established for the Middle Zone. The 2012 drilling updates improved the integrity of the model and showed no need to downgrade previous assumptions. The current version of the block model should be calibrated and interrogated against actual rock mass conditions, on an ongoing basis, as the areas are exposed underground. GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATION DEEP SOUTH ZONE Pre-feasibility level geotechnical characterization and assessments were carried out for the determination of longhole stope dimensions and to predict interaction between active production and the underground infrastructure. Geotechnical  core  logging  has  historically  been  carried  out  by  Cortez  Exploration  site  wide.  Since  2014,  and  to  meet  Deep  South  specific  requirements, geotechnical  core  logging  has  also  been  done  by  Golder  Associates,  Inc  (Golder).  Early  assessment  for  the  Lower  Zone  by  SRK  Consulting  (SRK)  (2011) discouraged the usage of long hole stopes, which was a premise reviewed in the Deep South Zone PFS. In early 2015, Mine Design Engineering (MDEng) was engaged to provide rock mechanics assessments for determination of stope dimensions and ground support requirements.  Geotechnical  assessments  were  completed  with  the  geological  interpretations  and  models  provided  by  Cortez  Exploration  in  Q3  2015,  including deposit scale faults, geological contacts. In addition, the geotechnical core logging and oriented core databases developed from the Golder core logging program were also used. The geotechnical database included approximately 28,000 ft of geotechnical core logging, point load testing and a core sampling and laboratory testing program. A supplementary geotechnical database consisting in over 120,000 ft of core maintained by Cortez Exploration was used to provide additional coverage for context purposes.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-21    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

MDEng broke down the deposit in three broad geotechnical domains that accounted for the relative distribution of the gold mineralization and the dikes system: the Dike Hanging Wall (Dike HW), imbricated within dikes (within dikes) and the Dike Footwall but in the hanging wall of the Pondex Fault (Dike FW) as depicted in Figure 16-6. Ground conditions were interpreted to vary from fair to good with mean RMR ranging between 55 and 65. Q’ values rate as very good. A gradual deterioration of ground conditions is observed towards the south into the Dike FW domain. Mean geotechnical parameters per zone and rock formation are presented in Table 16-7.

TABLE 16-7 ROCK MASS CHARACTERIZATION FOR THE DEEP SOUTH ZONE Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  North Central South         (mostly Dike HW)    (mostly Within Dike)    (mostly Dike FW)                 Srm   Ohc   QP         Srm   Ohc   QP         Srm   Ohc   QP        

   

Hardness RQD Spacing (ft) RMR North sector generally north of N-26750; South sector generally south of N-2600

       

Hardness scale according to field ISRM scale from R0 to R6

       

  R3.9    76%     1.4      63  

R3.9  62%  1.1   58  

R3.6  73%  1.6   61  

       

  R4.3    79%     1.4      65  

R4.3  67%  1.3   61  

R3.8  63%  1.1   57  

       

  R3.2    59%     1      52  

R2.6  25%  0.4   37      

R2.5  41%  0.8   44    

         

   

  Notes: Srm refers to the Silurian Roberts Mountain Formation Ohc refers to the Ordovician Hanson Creek Formation QP refers to the Quartz Porphyritic Intrusions  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-22    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

FIGURE 16-6 GEOTECHNICAL DOMAINS

 

Source: Barrick 2016 MDEng  broke  the  mining  area  into  eight  mining  domains.  Allowable  hydraulic  radii  for  the  mining  domains  were  estimated  using  Potvin’s  (1988) Modified Mathews Stability Graph. These hydraulic radii are summarized in Table 16-8 and provide the basis for the stope dimensions.

TABLE 16-8 SUMMARY OF PROPOSED HYDRAULIC RADII BY GEOTECHNICAL DOMAIN Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

   

Back - supported Back - unsupported N&S Walls E&W Walls

  

Footwall Domain (ft)   

Dyke Domain (ft)   

HW Domain

(ft)

           

8.2 11.5 8.2 to 13.1 9.8 to 11.5

8.2 to 9.8    11.5 to 13.1    8.2 to 13.1    9.8 to 11.5   

9.8 13.1 11.5 to 14.1 11.5

           

Based on these recommendations, long hole stopes 20 ft wide in the primary and 30 ft wide in the secondary stopes, and 75 ft sill-to-back heights were feasible in the Dike FW and Within Dikes domains. In the more competent Dike HW, long hole stopes 25 ft wide in the primary and 35 ft wide in the secondary stopes were recommended. MDEng recommended panel lengths of 21 ft to 44 ft.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-23    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

RPA notes that the relatively short panel lengths will increase the scheduling complexity and costs in the planned long hole stoping as each panel will need a slot raise and will need to be filled before successive panels can be mined. The PFS did not consider this level of detail in the mine planning. RPA recommends that the stope designs be reviewed considering the recommended panel lengths and stope orientations provided by MDEng. UNDERGROUND DEVELOPMENT The underground development consists of a main ramp and production level accesses spaced vertically every 60 ft. While the main ramp is located in the footwall of the Pondex Fault, all the secondary development for accessing the stopes in production must cross the Pondex Fault from the east.

FIGURE 16-7 MAIN RAMP LAYOUT RELATIVE TO GEOLOGICAL FEATURES, LOOKING NORTH

 

Source: Barrick 2016  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-24    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

This  infrastructure  corresponds  to  the  Ramp  domain.  The  domain  is  formed  by  Srm  rock  units  and  has  been  minimally  investigated  as  it  has  been  outside  the Exploration area of interest. Two geotechnical core holes were drilled and logged into this domain; these core holes showed a fair to very good rock mass, hard limestone and dikes with RMR between 60 and 80 but with localized fractured intervals in both dikes and limestone and even fewer intervals with altered/soft rock. For  the  Pondex  Fault  itself,  a  high  level  inspection  of  RMR  suggests  that  Fair  to  Poor  ground  conditions  can  typically  be  expected.  The  area  is  located  in  a structurally  complex  zone,  where  high  and  low  angles  faults  and  dike  filled  faults  occur.  Geological  interpretations  are  limited  in  this  area  but  are  enough  to recognize possible splays of the Pondex Fault, such as the Bugsby Fault (Bugsby), near the south end of the Deep South. Conditions of sympathetic features like Bugsby are undetermined. As the ramp is sited between these faults, more drilling throughout the far south is required. NUMERICAL MODELLING A pre-feasibility level numerical model was developed by MDEng (2015b) in FLAC3D to investigate the possible interactions between the long term infrastructure and  the  production  areas  in  terms  of  induced  high  stresses.  Results  of  these  analysis  indicated  that  the  proposed  main  ramp  is  situated  beyond  the  regions  of significant mine induced redistribution of induced stresses and that no adverse stress loading or stress shadowing of the ramp is predicted by the model. Level accesses will be exposed to stress loading with damage ranging from minor bulking of ribs to severe squeezing and extensive rehabilitation or ultimately loss of access. MDEng noted that these simulations were explicitly run under a conservative set of parameters. MDEng provided the following recommendations for further geotechnical work:  

 



  Use of the structural model for further engineering work.



  Refinement of the structural model to enable the designer to spatially locate them in the stopes and identify ground control issues.



  Identification of additional faults outside of the deposit area especially in the footwall of the Pondex fault.

 

   

   

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-25    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

 



  Modelling of both favourable and adverse alteration modes in and around the Deep South will augment the deposit understanding as well as refining the extents of the geotechnical domains.



  Continued geotechnical core logging, core orientation, and additional rock sampling and testing.



  Drilling of supplementary geotechnical core holes to cover areas outside the mineralized targets.



  Continued usage of exploration core holes to cover areas inside the mineralized targets.



  Additional discussions in term of quality assurance issues including auditing the database, review of the geotechnical core logging standard, and retraining current and new geotechnicians.



  Core logging to be continued by Cortez Exploration in a systematic manner.



  Updating of geotechnical assessments to include revisions on the deposit’s structural model, grade shell, supplemental geotechnical core logging data, and oriented core data.



  Numerical modelling to support mine optimization should be continued.

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

Current groundwater levels are located above the 4000 level. All analysis assumed dry conditions. GROUND SUPPORT – BRECCIA ZONE, MIDDLE ZONE, AND LOWER ZONE The ground conditions in the ore zones are poor and the CRF is more competent than the ore. This is the reason for the choice of mining method and the use of CRF. Rock conditions in the host rock are fair to good. All production openings are backfilled with a designed backfill with a 700 psi unconfined compressive strength (UCS) based on minus two inches crushed rock, 35% fines, and 7.5% cement binder. Cylinder tests indicate that the CRF strength consistently exceeds the design strength. The standard ground support regime includes the use of shotcrete and eight foot long Swellex bolts with 12 ft Swellex bolts used in intersections. Mesh is used as required. Other support designs are specific to areas where additional support is considered necessary.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-26    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

GROUND SUPPORT – DEEP SOUTH MDEng recommended ground support for development headings according to rock quality. There were three general categories depending upon ground conditions:  

 

1.

Seven foot long resin grouted bolts or inflated bolts with screen mesh

2.

Bolts and screen plus three inches of shotcrete over the screen

3.

Shotcrete, then bolts and mesh then shotcrete over mesh.

 

   

 

Long  hole  open  stopes  may  be  designed  according  to  the  unsupported  or  supported  hydraulic  radius  (HR)  Guidelines.  “Unsupported”  stope  backs  will  require primary ground support for man access during top and bottom cut development and drilling. “Supported” stope backs require added secondary support to maintain stability of larger spans. If it is elected to support stope backs it may be assumed that double strand bulbed cable bolts on a 6.5 ft by 6.5 ft pattern or Super Swellex on a five foot square pattern will be utilized (with cable or bolt length equal to   1 ⁄ 2 the stope span). The bolting pattern will likely vary by formation or alteration domain due to variable ground conditions (to be refined once more details on mine methods and plans are available. RPA notes that the unsupported stope wall span is 33 ft and, to gain the benefits of larger stopes, it will be necessary to provide support for the stope walls. MINING METHOD – BRECCIA ZONE MIDDLE ZONE AND LOWER ZONE All of the mining to date and the planned mining of the remaining ore is by underhand cut and fill mining with CRF. This method was selected based upon:  

 



  the poor ground conditions in many areas



  the success in Nevada with generating good backs and walls with CRF



  the high grade of the orebody and the desire to minimize losses and dilution



  the selectivity of the method to separate the different ore types



  experience in other area mines with poor ground conditions

 

   

   

   

 

There are disadvantages to the cut and fill mining, most notably:  

 



  It is an expensive method as it is virtually a drift and fill method.



  It is not a highly productive method.

 

   

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-27    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

In the early planning stages for the Middle Zone, long hole stoping was considered and was coupled with plans for increased mine production. However, not all areas of the Middle Zone are considered to be thick enough for the application of a long hole stoping method. Management have expressed the desire to increase the output from the underground mine and one of the considerations is a move to long hole stoping in areas where the deposit is considered appropriate for such bulk mining. RPA is of the opinion that a move to some level of long hole stoping may be practical, however, all aspects of such a mining method should be considered. In particular, RPA is of the opinion that there will be higher dilution and ore losses with a long hole method. In higher grade areas, these impacts can quickly offset expected reductions in operating costs. RPA  recommends  that  Cortez  develop  a  set  of  orebody  characteristics  (width,  height,  grade,  rock  conditions)  considered  appropriate  for  long  hole  stoping  and identify  the  quantity  and  location  of  those  portions  of  the  Middle  and  Lower  zones  amenable  to  long  hole  stoping.  This  information  coupled  with assumptions related to operating costs, dilution, and ore loss would permit an evaluation of the method for the Cortez deposit. MINING METHOD – DEEP SOUTH The revised geological interpretation of the Deep South Zone coupled with the geotechnical studies of the area and the geometry of ore zones were used to evaluate a number of mining methods which led to the selection of long hole stoping. The stope dimensions are, in RPA’s opinion, suitable to provide productivity benefits compared to drift and fill mining without being so tall as to increase the risk of  excessive  dilution  due  to  improper  long  hole  drilling.  The  geotechnical  analysis  does  indicate  that  relatively  short  stope  sections  will  have  to  be  mined  to maintain sidewall stability. Ore  will  be  blasted  using  vertical  down holes and  a  slot  raise  to  open  mining  in the  stope.  The  PFS discusses  the  use  of drop  raises  but  RPA recommends  the investigation into a small raise drill or a large diameter drill such as the Machine Roger V30 drill. Blasted ore will be mucked  using remote control  LHDs and hauled by truck or LHD to ore passes. Ore will be sized using a feeder breaker prior to being conveyed to surface.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-28    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

RPA is of the opinion that the proposed mining method is suitable for the deposit. GRADE CONTROL BRECCIA, MIDDLE AND LOWER ZONES Faces  are  sampled  as  the  development  advances  and  the  sample  grades  are  used  to  estimate  the  mine  production  grade  and  to  determine  the  limits  of  the  ore drives. This area of the mine is planned using a 0.2 oz/st Au contour. Muck piles are sampled by the LHD operator, who is to take a sample from every fifth bucket, while mucking. Ore is hauled to surface by truck and if necessary dumped into separate muck piles for each round. On surface the muck piles can be resampled by the geologist to assess the grade. Ore from the Cortez Hills underground may be oxide and sent to the mill at Cortez or it may be refractory and sent to Goldstrike. After the muck pile grade sample results are in, the muck is taken to a metal removal plant for the removal of scrap metal. After that step, the ore is either stockpiled for shipment to Goldstrike or hauled to the Cortez mill for processing. All  rock  with  an  AA/FA  ratio  of  0.5  and  greater  as  oxide  and  rock  with  ratios  less  than  0.5  are  treated  as  refractory.  Refractory  ore  is  sent  in  lots  to Goldstrike. Sample assay data and LECO results are sent to Goldstrike to assist in their handling of the ore. The Cortez Hills underground ore may be processed in either the roaster or the autoclaves at Goldstrike. Oxide ore is processed in the Cortez plant DEEP SOUTH ZONE The majority of the ore from the Deep South Zone is projected to be oxide ore which will be processed at the Pipeline Complex mill as long as that plant is in service. After the Pipeline Mill is shutdown, the Deep South ore is scheduled to be processed on the heap leach pads. The refractory ore from the Deep South is all forecast to be from the Renegade area. Grade control and ore segregation methods have not been outlined in the PFS. These measures will need to be defined for operations. Long hole stoping provides the opportunity to obtain samples from the long holes as they are drilled and this can then be supplemented with bucket sampling as is currently practised.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-29    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

INFRASTRUCTURE ACCESS The current mine access is via the twin declines. The two declines from the F Canyon extend for approximately 7,000 ft at a -6% grade to the 4770 level. The mine is equipped with a main ramp that accesses the Breccia Zone as well as a second ramp that parallels the main spiral, giving access to the Middle Zone 3920 Level and on to the Lower Zone. Workings continue on the exploration decline for the Lower Zone. Emergency access is a combination of ladderways in the ventilation system as a supplement to the main spiral ramp as well as an emergency hoist in one of the main ventilation raises. The Lower Zone will be accessed with two RFDs to the 3810 level. The declines will be connected at regular intervals for ease of construction. When the declines are complete, a conveyor will be installed in the west decline and the other decline will be used for access and ventilation. The F Canyon declines will continue to be used for ventilation and access. Access to the Deep South Zone was originally planned to be by extension of the RFDs to a loading area at the bottom of the Deep South Zone. The geotechnical investigations indicate that the ground conditions for an extension of the RFDs would be poor and the planned sequence would have required complete dewatering of the Deep South before the loading area could be installed. The plan is to develop the stope access decline in the footwall on the eastern side of the Deep South Zone and to develop a four leg conveying system which can be advanced downwards and put into service in steps as the mine is dewatered. MINE VENTILATION The underground mine ventilation is achieved with the air entering the mine in the west decline and proceeding via fresh air raises to each sublevel, and exhaust air travelling up the east decline. The twin declines have connections (with airlock doors) at regular intervals. Two blind bored ventilation shafts were installed for the mine ventilation circuit. The first was a 12 ft diameter raise and the second was a 14 ft diameter raise. The raises are approximately 1,000 ft long and when fully connected to the mine the ventilation capacity of the mine will be increased to 1.2 million cfm.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-30    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

Deep  South  ventilation  will  be  fed  from  the  3910  development  drift  to  the  access  ramp,  through  the  stoping  levels,  and  exhaust  out  the  haulage  ramp.  Access points, as well as ventilation raises, will be coordinated with the existing and planned Lower Zone development above the 3800 Ventilation and escape raises are designed to connect between the footwall access levels and the haulage ramp. The primary fresh airway is the man and material access ramp and the exhaust airway is the haulage and conveyor ramp. It is envisioned that a two stage regulator door be installed on each level to regulate air flow. One stage of the regulator would be for normal mining operating ventilation and the second stage to allow direct venting of blasting gases. MINE DEWATERING – BRECCIA ZONE, MIDDLE ZONE AND LOWER ZONE There are two mine dewatering lines and a major pump station at the foot of the main declines. The underground mine pumping system in the F Canyon declines has a capacity of 6,000 gpm based upon the initial mine design. As of May 2015, the dewatering rates are 93 gpm of “contact water” from mining activity and 225 gpm of non-contact water from the underground dewatering of the Sage block of the open pit. The active mining areas of the mine have been dewatered and the mine workings were generally dry, with some muddy areas and small puddles in the stope cuts. In the lower areas of the mine there are spots where the back is wet. RPA did not notice water dripping from the back in any location. In  the  Breccia  Zone  and  Middle  Zone,  horizontal  drain  holes  are  drilled  into  the  planned  stope  A  cuts  before  mine  development  to  drain  water  before  mining commences. A similar strategy will be employed when developing levels in the Lower Zone. The Middle Zone has been dewatered using surface wells. A dewatering plan is in place for the Lower Zone using surface wells. Projected Lower Zone average pumping rates for the three wells (DW-15, 20 and 21), all from the surface, are as follows:  

 



  2016     2,657 gpm



  2017     2,624 gpm



  2018     2,271 gpm



  2019     1,891 gpm



  2020     1,662 gpm

 

   

   

   

   

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-31    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

The three dewatering wells collectively can pump at a rate of 2,900 gpm (10,980 L/min). Pumping at this rate is projected to have the Lower Zone dewatered to the 3800 level in Q2 2018. The data used for modeling and predictions for the Lower Zone came from the measured responses of the monitoring wells due to DW-15 pumping. Although the groundwater monitoring system continues to be developed, a spatially well distributed series of test wells and piezometers have been installed. This network of wells will monitor the proposed drawdown along the decline as well as monitor the western portion of the operating boundary. MINE DEWATERING DEEP SOUTH- FROM SURFACE WELLS Dewatering below the 3,800 ft level will require revisions to permits. The Deep South Zone PFS timeline assumes that permitting will take approximately three to four years and Barrick expects to commence this process in 2016. On this basis, following the receipt of permits, dewatering and development work could begin as early as 2019 or 2020, with initial production from the Deep South Zone commencing in 2022 or 2023. There has been a significant quantity of hydrogeological investigation related to the dewatering of the Lower Zone and the Deep South portions of the underground deposit. There are indications that the Lower Zone and Middle Zone aquifers are not directly connected. This may impact the dewatering of the zones and the behaviour of the rocks during mining. Dewatering wells installed between 2010 and 2014 were not screened deep enough to fully dewater the Deep South orebody. While wells DW-15, DW-20, and DW-21 are able to continue pumping after the 3800 level has been dewatered, they will only be able to dewater to a depth of approximately 3200 ft while the Deep South extends to the 3050 level. Five additional pumping wells will be installed to dewater the orebody to below the lowest proposed mining level. These wells will be installed prior to mining below the 3,800 ft level and will be operated along with existing wells in order to achieve the necessary dewatering rate. Estimated average combined pumping rates of 6,900 gpm, with a peak pumping discharge rate of 9,500 gpm, will be needed for seven years to support mining below the 3800 level. Once  water  levels  reach  the  3,800  ft  level,  pumping  from  the  existing  dewatering  wells  will  be  throttled  back  to  maintain  groundwater  levels  at  the  3,800  ft level. Active dewatering of the ore body is scheduled to begin when the Record of Decision (ROD) is received for mining of  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-32    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

Deep  South. Additional  surface  wells,  as  well  as  infrastructure,  will  be  required  to  attain  dewatering  and  meet  development  and  ore  production  schedules  from 2020 to 2027. It is currently envisioned that this will require five additional surface dewatering wells. The drilling and construction of these wells is scheduled to commence in 2016 with the construction of one well each year until 2020. This schedule must be maintained in order to achieve desired dewatering levels. This array of new production dewatering wells in conjunction with the existing well network will allow dewatering of the orebody to meet production schedules. MINE DEWATERING DEEP SOUTH – FROM UNDERGROUND The primary dewatering of Deep South is by the use of surface deep well pumps. The addition of pump stations is to address any fugitive or perched water that is encountered  during  operations.  The  system  is  designed  to  handle  a  nominal  1,000  gpm.  An  8  inch  schedule  40  steel  discharge  line  is  included  in  the  haulage decline. One mobile pump skid with a receiver tank will support the development as it advances. A similar system without the receiver tank will be placed in the first  permanent  pump  station.  The  mobile  pump  will  be  placed  in  the  second  permanent  pump  station  at  the  completion  of  the  development  work.  Sump excavations are included in the development estimate. BACKFILL AND SHOTCRETE A dual purpose backfill/shotcrete batch plant is located at the mine portal in F Canyon. Mine trucks are loaded at the portal elevation and the backfill is taken into the mine as a back haul. There is also a shotcrete batch plant located at the portal and there are mix trucks to haul the prepared shotcrete mix to the face. As part of the development plan for the Middle and Lower zones, a backfill and shotcrete plant is proposed near the base of the RFD. The plant will be set up so that sand rock and concrete can be delivered from surface via boreholes. As the open pit expands, it will be necessary to relocate the backfill crusher to a location consistent with the planned surface area above the planned backfill plant. In the future, a fleet of underground trucks will still be required to haul ore from stopes and to haul backfill from the new plant to the stoping areas. Cemented backfill for the primary stopes of the Deep South will come from the underground backfill plant to be constructed to service the Lower Zone.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-33    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

ROCK HANDLING Rock is all hauled by truck up the declines to the F Canyon yard with the exception of some waste rock which can be used as backfill in the course of mining. The rock handling via the F Canyon declines will remain in service until after completion of the RFDs and a new rock handling system. After that time, the F Canyon declines will not be needed for rock haulage. With the planned conveyor to be installed in the RFD, there will be ore passes for material where practical and ore haulage from other areas to a series of five bins to be located at the base of the conveyor system. The five bins will provide a dedicated bin for each of the three ore types plus waste rock with one bin left as a spare for use as required. The bins are planned to be 12 ft in diameter and 60 ft tall to provide approximately 350 ton capacity in each. The bins will be fed by dumping upon grizzlies equipped with rock breakers and designed to provide -12 in. material. Waste handling for primary development of the Deep South Zone will require LHD and truck haulage until the orepass/conveyor system is established. Once the system is in place, ore and waste handling from the work areas will be by LHD only. Truck traffic in the working areas of the mine will be limited to backfill haulage only. LHDs will deliver the ore to the level orepass, through a grizzly and onto a feeder breaker at the haulage ramp. The feeder breaker will load the Deep South Zone conveyor for transport to the material storage bins. Ore will be transferred to the material storage bins at the 3,830 ft level, then enter the RFD conveyor system for transport out of the mine. The Deep South steering committee recommended the installation of a conveyor system after consideration of the alternatives. The uppermost conveyor is planned to be installed and operational by 2022 to support mining of the Deep South Zone. This conveyor would also be able to support the mining of the Lower Zone above the 3,800 ft level. MAINTENANCE All of the underground equipment maintenance is performed at a shop complex located adjacent to portal. There is also a small maintenance bay on the 420 level.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-34    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

POWER Power is supplied to the mine via the F Canyon declines and via a power line installed in the ventilation raise. When the RFDs are in place, another power line will service the mine via the RFD. There will then be three electrical feeds to the mine which will provide good backup and options for the delivery of power to the work places. The mine is fed by the F Canyon substation, power is then distributed underground to various switch gear at 13.8 kV. From the underground switch gear power is then distributed to various mobile load centres ranging from 750 kVA to 1,250 kVA. The mobile load centres then transform 13.8 kV to 480 V to supply power to the various working faces and infrastructure within the underground for use. A series of three backup generators are located in F Canyon to provide backup power to the underground in the event of power outage at the main substation. The  existing  operating  average  power  demand  for  underground  operations  is  4.4  MW  with  an  additional  0.7  MW  from  the  North  Vent  Raise.  Lower  Zone expansion is expected to add an additional 2MW to 4 MW of operating load to the existing infrastructure. The Deep South power loads are expected to add 6.7 MW in surface loads (pumps) and 5.6 MW in underground loads. With an estimated diversity factor of 70% the operating load for the Deep South is estimated to be 8.2 MW As  part  of  the  Lower  Zone  expansion,  a  new  underground  distribution  substation,  4400  substation,  will  be  located  below  the  North  Ventilation  Raise footprint.  Permanent  power  for  the  expanded  underground  will  be  fed  through  this  substation  via  two  350  MCM  feeders  to  the  underground  distribution system. The 4400 substation is fed from two separate circuits originating at Cortez Hills by 13.8 kV overhead power lines. A separate power circuit to the Deep South will come from a 13.8 kV cable feeder originating at the RFD Surface Portal. COMMUNICATIONS The  underground  mine  communications  system  includes  radio  and  fibre-optic  cables,  and  a  mine  dispatch  system  which  utilizes  Jigsaw  software.  This  system provides real time monitoring for all underground equipment and permits the monitoring of activity.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-35    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

OFFICES Underground mine offices, and the mine dry are located at a building adjacent to the portal. There is a small office underground for shift supervisors located just below the 4445 level. MINE EQUIPMENT The underground mobile equipment fleet consists of large scale LHDs and haulage trucks, two boom jumbos, and ground support jumbos. There are also concrete and shotcrete carriers and shotcrete units. A list of the underground equipment is shown in Table 16-9. It is RPA’s opinion that the equipment is appropriately sized for the planned operations. The mine equipment is serviced at a surface shop immediately adjacent to the portal.

TABLE 16-9 UNDERGROUND EQUIPMENT FLEET Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Unit

  

Number

Jumbo - 2 boom Cat R1600 G loader Bolter Truck AD-30 Scissor Lift/Lube/Utility Grader Telehandler Tractors Concrete hauler Shotcrete units Forklift Other

                                   

4 9 6 11 6 2 4 11 3 2 2 11

DEEP SOUTH MINING AND EQUIPMENT The Deep South Zone PFS presents the study as a stand-alone case, but the mine equipment included in the capital costs presents the equipment as if the Deep South Zone was an extension of the CHUG and was relying on replacement of units already in service. Additional capital may be required for the Deep South if the active units are still in use in the Middle Zone and Lower Zone.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-36    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

SUMMARY OF THE DEEP SOUTH PRE-FEASIBILITY STUDY The Deep South Zone as described in more detail in the preceding sections of this report is the southern (down dip) extent of the Lower Zone located below the 3,800 ft level. A revision to the PoO is required for mining in this area. The area was the subject of a PFS completed in December 2015 by Barrick and Minetech USA LLC. The Deep South Zone PFS advanced the level of study from the previous scoping level study. Based upon geotechnical review the access was revised and the use of longhole stoping was accepted. The key parameters of the Deep South Zone PFS study are shown in Table 16-10. The total capital of $211.6 million includes initial capital costs of $153 million and sustaining capital of $58 million at average all-in sustaining costs of approximately $580 per ounce.

TABLE 16-10 KEY FACTORS DEEP SOUTH ZONE PFS Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Ore tons Contained Oz Recovered Oz

        

(000)      6,006   (000)      2,072   (000)      1,605  

Capital Development Primary Footwall Material Handling Ventilation Fixed Equipment Mobile equipment Dewatering Engineering Total Development Contingency Total Capital

                                   

   US$ M   US$ M   US$ M   US$ M   US$ M   US$ M   US$ M   US$ M   US$ M   US$ M   US$ M  

  26.7     23.4     5.5     9.3     36.1     30     23     14.9     179.4     32.2     211.6  

Operating Costs Direct operating Refining Royalties Total

              

   US$ M   US$ M   US$ M   US$ M  

  696.9     1.2     19.4     717.6  

AISC

   US$/oz     580  

The Deep South Zone is planned to commence operation in 2022 after receipt of permits and increased surface pumping to lower the water levels. The Deep South ore is largely oxide ore  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-37    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

in nature with the PFS estimating only 15% of the ore as refractory. The oxide processing extends beyond the planned life of the pipeline mill and the majority of the Deep South oxide ore will be processed by heap leaching. The recommendation of the PFS was to move ahead with the design and implementation of the plans for the Deep South Zone. The work plan for the Deep South Zone includes the following elements:  

 



  Finish drilling the orebody on 100 ft (30m) nominal centres to define edges and extent of gold mineralization.



  Perform additional drilling for geotechnical information in the footwall of the Pondex Fault, specifically in areas of the proposed ramp design that lack geotechnical data.



  Carry out additional lab testing to characterize material strength.



  Conduct geotechnical evaluation of the vertical development utilizing dedicated geotechnical pilot holes.



  Complete  further  geotechnical  modeling  to  address  any  influence  of  geotechnical  components  on  long-term  infrastructure  stability  including constructing refined constitutive models (plasticity), the incorporation of large-scale structural features, and simulation of extractive sequences.



  Construct an alteration model to assist in geotechnical evaluation.



  Investigate  stope  sizing  parameters;  current  recommendations  are  based  on  the  most  conservative  formation  in  each  ore  zone  and  domain  and possibilities exist that higher rock mass opportunities exist locally that will allow increasing panel lengths in primary stopes during transverse stoping.



  Continue to optimize both transverse and longitudinal longhole stope designs evaluating stability of openings proposed in the PFS.



  Investigate alternative bulk mining methods such as modified sub-level stoping.



  Implement dewatering strategy starting in 2016; one well will be drilled and constructed for each of the following five years so that the full dewatering infrastructure will be in place at the time the ROD for AP04 is granted.



  Carry out additional column leach and direct cyanidation tests of composites representing the various material types.



  Perform additional CIL testing of carbonaceous oxide material.



  Repeat BTALK-TCM tests to assess noise in the procedure.

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-38    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

 



  Investigate the potential for continued oxide milling past proposed current shutdown date (other oxide sources and or toll milling).



  Study integration of Deep South mine plan with existing Lower Zone mine plan to boost production to 5,000 stpd.



  Do further evaluation of underground pumping requirements.



  Verify ventilation requirements for increased production rates.



  Evaluate manpower and equipment requirements based on integration of Deep South into Lower Zone mine plan.



  Prepare a plan of execution.



  A contingency plan will need to be performed as part of the Deep South FS to assure that sufficient emergency generator capacity exists to meet the operating and safety requirements of the Cortez Hills Underground division.

 

   

   

   

   

   

 

RPA concurs with the overall recommendation of the PFS and the elements of the work plan. RPA recommends special attention be paid to the:  

 



  longhole stope design parameters



  impact of the longhole stope designs upon the production scheduling



  alternative processing options after the open pits are completed to increase the recovery of gold.

 

   

 

RPA is of the opinion that the study has been completed to a level consistent with that of a PFS and is suitable for the conversion of Mineral Resources to Mineral Reserves. UNDERGROUND PRODUCTION SCHEDULE The  current  CHUG  production  schedule,  which  includes  the  Deep  South  Zone,  is  based  upon  the  mining  of  approximately  2,000  stpd  of  ore  increasing  to approximately 4,000 stpd by 2023. The mining rate is expected to drop off to 3,000 stpd in 2027 before terminating in 2028. The mining moves from the nearly depleted  Breccia  Zone  to  the  Middle  Zone  then  the  Lower  Zone  and  ultimately  to  the  Deep  South  Zone.  The  Deep  South  Zone  has  the  potential  to  contribute underground gold production beginning in 2022 and averaging approximately 300,000 oz per year between 2023 and 2027. This timing differs slightly from the PFS as the current LOM is based on more detailed planning subsequent to the PFS. The underground LOM plan is shown in Table 16-11.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-39    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 16-11 UNDERGROUND LOM PRODUCTION Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

   

Ore Grade Contained Waste Waste

Total

Tons (oz/st Ounces Tons Per Tons Tons Per Backfill

   (000)    Au)    (000)    Day    (000)    Day    Tons (000)

  

2016   2017   2018   2019   2020   2021   2022   2023   2024   2025   2026   2027   2028   Total 

   727    0.454   330    760    0.343   260    774    0.342   264    853    0.332   283    899    0.337   303    951    0.339   323    1,011    0.362   365    1,348    0.348   469    1,353    0.357   483    1,483    0.331   491    1,423    0.311   443    1,169    0.358   419    162    0.260   42    12,912   0.347   4,476

                                         

2,007 2,092 2,138 2,357 2,484 2,619 2,792 3,723 3,736 4,086 3,930 3,230 447 2,228

   285    788    645    378    1,041    690    224    620    702    271    749    831    86    239    823    127    351    831    259    717    877    341    943    1,235    358    989    1,499    165    454    1,589    150    415    1,478    64    176    1,545    8    21    291    2,717   469    13,035

The underground LOM production by ore type is shown in Table 16-12. The split on the refractory ore type varies from year to year, but overall the underground production is projected to be approximately 53% oxide and 47% refractory. The production split by zone is shown in Table 16-13.

TABLE 16-12 UNDERGROUND LOM ORE TYPES Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

   

  Year  

   

   Percent of Tons    Percent of Ounces    Ox   Rf1   Rf2   Rf3   OX   Rf1   Rf2   Rf3

2016   2017   2018   2019   2020   2021   2022   2023   2024   2025   2026   2027   2028   Total 

                                         

40   42   35   32   36   20   32   61   63   71   87   92   89   56  

17    13    9    4    6    12    11    5    8    7    1    0    0    7   

43    45    56    64    58    68    57    33    29    22    12    8    11    37   

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

                                         

41    37    31    31    32    17    32    62    57    65    88    92    90    53   

28    21    12    7    9    18    16    7    13    12    1    0    0    11   

31    42    56    62    59    65    53    30    30    23    11    8    10    36   

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-40    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 16-13 UNDERGROUND ORE SOURCE BY ZONE Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

   

  Year  

2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028

   

                         

   Breccia    Middle    Lower       Tons   Ounces   Tons   Ounces   Tons   Ounces  

Deep South Tons    Ounces

   213       80       30                                                               

               2    226    849    815    1000   1228   1016   128   

140    441    15    477    6    471       417       428       534       335       118       170       131       21               

167 176 159 143 138 175 135 39 86 69 6

                                      

72    202    272    437    472    414    449    381    367    352    173    153    34   

22 69 100 141 166 147 160 138 131 123 65 55 8

                                      

0.5 70 292 265 300 372 364 34

RPA recommends that Cortez modify the LOM and Mineral Reserve estimation process to include:  

 



  a reconciliation between the LOM plan and the Mineral Reserve estimate



  a tabulation of the mineral resources converted by classification including the Inferred Mineral Resources



  a  review  of  those  Inferred  Mineral  Resources  within  the  LOM  plan  to  determine  whether  any  can  or  should  be  reclassified  as  Indicated  Mineral Resources



  show the impact on the LOM plan of including the Inferred Mineral Resources within the plan at zero grade

 

   

   

 

RPA recommends that any future conversions to new or different software packages be accompanied by detailed reconciliations and comparisons to identify and resolve the type of issues identified above.

CORTEZ LIFE OF MINE PLAN The Cortez LOM plan, which incorporates the Deep South Zone, includes the open pit mining of the Cortez Hills, Pediment, Pipeline, and Crossroads open pits as well as the underground mining at Cortez Hills. The ore will be processed at the Pipeline mill, heap leach facilities at  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-41    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

Cortez, and at the roaster and autoclave facilities at the Barrick Goldstrike operations. The LOM plan is developed by site personnel on an annual basis as part of the budgeting process. The plan is routinely updated to reflect changing conditions that may impact upon the site gold delivery schedule. In the immediate  future,  the  planned  processing  rate  for  refractory  ores  sent  to  Goldstrike  has  been  limited  to  1.2  million  stpa  total.  This  is  considered  to  be  a regulatory issue related to the highway transportation of the ore from Cortez to Goldstrike and emissions from the processing facilities. MINING The LOM plan for the open pit and underground mining is shown in Table 16-14. Open pit mining continues to 2023, while the CHUG mining  continues until 2028.

TABLE 16-14 CORTEZ OPERATION – LOM MINING Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Year

 

2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 Totals

                           

 

  

OP Ore

Overall

Contained OP UG Ore Ore

Contained UG Tons

Ore Grade Gold Ounces

Tons

Grade

Gold Ounces

(000 st)    (oz/st Au)    (000)    (000 st)    (oz/st Au)   (000 oz Au)

   32,458       10,680       13,698       15,797       13,576       35,001       23,874       8,404       2,100       1,369       1,603       1,767       883       161,212  

0.032 0.094 0.061 0.044 0.044 0.021 0.027 0.086 0.148 0.139 0.077 0.073 0.065 0.044

                                         

1,047 1,008 829 695 596 724 652 722 311 191 123 129 57 7,084

   727       760       774       853       899       951       1,011       1,348       1,353       1,483       1,423       1,169       162       12,912  

0.454 0.343 0.342 0.332 0.337 0.339 0.362 0.348 0.357 0.331 0.311 0.358 0.260 0.347

                                         

330 260 264 283 303 323 365 469 483 491 443 419 42 4,476

The underground mine production is 7% of the total tonnage mined, but the contained gold is 38% of the total gold mined at Cortez. The LOM plan includes the increase in mining rate in the underground mine. This rate increase will assist in maintaining the gold production rate as the underground grades in the future are considerably lower than in the past.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-42    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

PROCESSING The processing portion of the LOM plan is shown in Tables 16-15 to 16-18. Ore is treated in the oxide mill at the Pipeline complex until the end of 2026. The final two years of operation are low grade material. The LOM plan generally treats high grade material sooner than lower grade material and the large amount of heap leach ore results in high tonnage and relatively low grade overall. Refractory ore is hauled to Goldstrike with the highest grade ore available always shipped first. At Cortez; the plan is to reduce stockpiling of ore to the extent practical, so that lower grade material, planned for the leach pad, may be diverted to fill excess capacity at the Pipeline mill. Conversely, lower grade ore from the material planned to go the mill, may be diverted to the heap leach facility so that gold can be recovered rather than stored in stockpiles.

TABLE 16-15 LOM ORE PROCESSED - ROASTER Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Year

 

2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 Total

                           

 

  

Tons

Processed (000)   

Grade

(oz/st Au)  

Contained Ounces   

Recovery (%)   

Recovered

Gold (000 oz)

                                         

1,269 1,205 1,211 1,215 1,207 1,992 1,976 1,849 1,839 1,800 1,785 1,863 901 20,112

0.243 0.233 0.278 0.282 0.293 0.231 0.184 0.238 0.256 0.202 0.100 0.088 0.068 0.205

308 281 337 343 353 461 363 440 471 364 178 163 61 4,123

87 87 88 88 88 87 85 87 87 86 79 77 73 86

269 245 297 303 312 402 309 383 412 313 141 126 45 3,557

                                         

                                         

                                         

                                         

TABLE 16-16 LOM ORE PROCESSED – PIPELINE MILL Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Year

 

2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

         

 

  

Tons

Processed (000)   

Grade

(oz/st Au)  

Contained Ounces   

Recovery (%)   

Recovered

Gold (000 oz)

              

4,487 4,536 4,344 3,967 3,955

0.121 0.202 0.142 0.111 0.111

544 916 618 442 439

84 87 86 79 80

459 796 529 350 350

              

              

              

              

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-43    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

Year

 

2021 2022 2023 2024 Total

         

 

  

Tons

Processed (000)   

Grade

(oz/st Au)  

Contained Ounces   

Recovery (%)   

Recovered

Gold (000 oz)

              

3,943 3,895 3,960 764 33,852

0.062 0.101 0.168 0.060 0.127

244 393 665 46 4,307

79 79 79 80 82

192 311 525 37 3,548

              

              

              

              

TABLE 16-17 LOM ORE PROCESSED – HEAP LEACH Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Year

 

2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 Total

                           

 

  

Tons

Processed (000)   

   27,429       5,699       8,917       11,468       9,313       30,018       19,013       3,943       850       1,053       1,241       1,073       145       120,160   

Grade

(oz/st Au)  

Contained Ounces   

Recovery (%)   

Recovered

Gold (000 oz)

0.019 0.013 0.015 0.017 0.011 0.011 0.014 0.022 0.326 0.302 0.313 0.359 0.263 0.026

525 72 138 193 107 342 261 86 277 318 388 385 38 3,130

34 237 136 95 69 29 42 146 101 71 68 68 68 70

180 170 188 184 74 100 110 126 280 226 265 262 26 2,190

                                         

                                         

                                         

TABLE 16-18 LOM TOTAL ORE PROCESSED Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Year

 

2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 Total

                           

 

  

Tons

Processed (000)   

   33,185       11,440       14,472       16,650       14,475       35,952       24,884       9,752       3,453       2,852       3,026       2,936       1,045       174,124   

Grade

(oz/st Au)  

Contained Ounces   

Recovery (%)   

Recovered

Gold (000 oz)

0.041 0.111 0.076 0.059 0.062 0.029 0.041 0.122 0.230 0.239 0.187 0.187 0.095 0.066

1,376 1,269 1,093 978 899 1,047 1,017 1,191 794 682 566 548 99 11,560

66 95 93 86 82 66 72 87 92 79 72 71 71 80

908 1,210 1,014 837 736 694 730 1,034 729 539 405 388 70 9,295

                                         

                                         

                                         

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 16-44    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

17 RECOVERY METHODS INTRODUCTION Historically, Cortez ore was processed in a 1,800 stpd CIL plant called Mill No. 1, as crushed ore on heap leach pads, and refractory ore was pre-oxidized in a circulating fluid bed roaster. The crushing and leaching circuits were built in 1969; the roasting circuit was completed in 1990. The Mill No. 1 processing facilities were placed on care and maintenance in 1999. Ore from Cortez can either be processed on site in the oxide processing facilities or transported to the Goldstrike operation for refractory ore treatment.

OXIDE ORE MILLING Mill No. 2, or the Pipeline mill, was commissioned in 1997 to process oxide ore from the Pipeline open pit mine. The treatment plant currently includes crushing, semi-autogenous grinding (SAG) mill, ball mill, grind thickener, carbon-in-column (CIC) circuit for the grind thickener overflow solution, carbon-in-leach (CIL) circuit,  tailings  counter-current-decantation  (CCD)  wash  thickener  circuit,  carbon  stripping  and  reactivation  circuits,  and  a  refinery  to  produce  gold  doré.  A debottlenecking  project  was  completed  during  March  2011.  Plant  throughput  is  currently  estimated  at  13,000  stpd  depending  on  the  hardness  of  the  ore  being processed. Figure 17-1 provides the simplified process flow sheet for Mill No. 2. To accommodate the incoming ore feed from Cortez Hills, a primary gyratory crusher was installed adjacent to the Cortez Hills open pit. The crusher discharges onto a series of overland conveyors that transport the ore to the coarse ore stockpile at Mill No. 2. ROM ore from South Pipeline is dumped into the crusher dump pocket at the mill and discharges onto a vibrating grizzly. Grizzly oversize material is crushed in a jaw crusher. Grizzly undersize material and the jaw crusher discharge are conveyed to the coarse ore stockpile. The grinding circuit includes one SAG mill and one overflow ball mill. Discharge from the SAG mill is screened on one of two vibrating screens.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 17-1    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

Screen oversize is conveyed to a cone crusher where it is crushed prior to being recycled to the SAG mill feed. Screen undersize and ball mill discharge flow by gravity to the hydrocyclone feed pump box. The slurry is pumped from the pump box to the hydrocyclones. The ball mill is operated in closed circuit with the hydrocyclones to produce the target grind size for the CIL circuit, which is nominally 110 µm. The underflow from the hydrocyclones is recycled to the ball mill feed; the overflow from the hydrocyclones discharges into an agitated surge tank, which feeds the grind thickener. An appreciable amount of gold is dissolved in the grinding circuit so a CIC circuit is used to recover gold from the grind thickener overflow solution. The grind thickener underflow is pumped to the CIL circuit, which consists of eight CIL tanks, sixteen screens, and eight carbon-forwarding pumps. The slurry overflows by gravity  from  the  first  tank  to  the  eighth.  Carbon  that  has  been  stripped  and  reactivated  is  added  to  the  last  tank  and  is  advanced  counter  current  to  the  slurry flow. Cyanide and milk-of-lime  are added stage-wise to maintain optimum leaching conditions. The nominal retention time is 44 hours. This is increased to 54 hours when milling  harder  ore  at  a lower  plant  throughput. The discharge  from  the CIL circuit  flows by gravity  to the  tailings  CCD thickener  circuit.  The CIL tailings are washed in two high-capacity thickeners. The wash solution from the CCD circuit is pumped to the process water tank for reuse in the grinding and CIL circuits. Loaded carbon from the CIL and CIC circuits is washed with dilute (3%) hydrochloric acid before elution. The acid is removed from the carbon by washing with fresh water. The washed carbon is transferred to the elution column by pressure eduction. Three columns provide for acid washing and three for gold elution. The pressurized  Zadra  process  is  used  for  gold  elution.  Hot  strip  solution  containing  approximately  two  percent  sodium  hydroxide  is  circulated  through  the  elution column.  Elevated  temperature  and  pressure  are  maintained  in  the  elution  column.  Pregnant  strip  solution  is  stored  in  the  preg  tank  before  being  pumped  to the electro-winning (EW) cells. Electro-winning takes place in six EW cells. After loading with gold, the stainless steel wool cathodes are washed with high pressure water. The gold sludge from the EW cells is dewatered in a filer press. The stripped cathodes are returned to the EW cells. The filter cake is dried, melted in an induction furnace, and poured into  doré  bars.  The  stripped  carbon  is  transferred  from  the  elution  column  over  a  screen  and  into  the  reactivation  furnace  feed  tanks.  Carbon  reactivation  is accomplished in two propane-fired kiln-type furnaces.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 17-2    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

Tailings  are  stored  in  a  zero-discharge  tailings  storage  facility  (TSF).  A  double  liner  covers  the  entire  tailings  area,  extending  completely  under  the  dam embankment. A two foot thick blanket drain of crushed rock covers the liner to permit seepage from the tailings to be collected in a lined ditch outside the dam embankment. All tailings solutions return to the mill.

OXIDE ORE HEAP LEACHING Low-grade oxide material is leached as ROM ore on three prepared double-lined leach pads. Pregnant solution from the leach pads is fed to CIC columns for gold recovery. The loaded carbon from the heap leach operation is transported to the mill for gold recovery in the carbon elution and EW circuits and the refinery. The carbon is also acid washed and regenerated at the mill. Make-up solutions come from the mill or mine dewatering wells to account for evaporative losses and ore saturation requirements. A simplified flow sheet for the heap leach operation is shown as Figure 17-2. Area 28 heap leach circuit has a water balance that is interlinked with the Pipeline mill circuit since it uses the tailings pond under-drain solution as leach solution and excess pad effluent is processed in the mill CIC circuit. Area 28 is at maximum capacity for ore stacking and is no longer an operating leach pad. The Area 30 heap leach circuit is independent of the Pipeline mill. Ore delivery to the pad recommenced in 2013 and is set to continue through 2023. Area 34 heap leach is a third  pad  that  was  designed  to  treat  Cortez  Hills  open  pit  ore.  The  first  cells  were  placed  under  leach  during  March  2011  and  ore  deliveries  are  scheduled  to continue through 2018 based on the current LOM plan. PRODUCTION CAPACITY INCREASE BY 10% - VALUE REALIZATION INITIATIVE Cortez Hills operation has identified an opportunity to increase production capacity by an approximately 10% increase of the CIL process plan and heap leach (HL) capacity. This will be achieved as follows:  

 



  Partial solution recycle is pursued applying pregnant leach solution to new material for the first 30 days of leaching.



  CIL  process  plant  throughput  is  achieved  by  maximizing  SAG  and  ball  mill  power  draw  along  with  improved  secondary  grinding  circuit  control strategies.



  Increased  capacity  will  advance  production  and  cash  flow  streams  along  with  slight  reduction  in  unit  costs.  Implementation  is  currently  underway (10% complete) as the

 

   

   

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 17-3    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

 

majority  of  infrastructure  is  in  place.  Capital  cost  is  estimated  to  be  $10  million  (conceptual  level)  for  solution  distribution.  Improvements  in throughput are estimated to be 10% to 20% for HL and 5% to 12% for CIL.

REFRACTORY ORE TREATMENT Ores that have a cyanide soluble (shake test) to fire assay gold (AA/FA) ratio of less than 50% are transported to Goldstrike for processing in the roaster. Haulage of  refractory  ore  to  Goldstrike  is  currently  limited  by  permit  to  1.2  million  stpa.  At  Goldstrike,  the  ore  will  be  processed  in  the  roaster  followed  by  a  CIL circuit. Goldstrike also has the opportunity to process refractory ore using the total carbonaceous material (TCM) process, which includes pressure oxidation (POX) followed by resin-in-leach (RIL) with calcium thio-sulphate (CaTs) but this option is not contemplated for Cortez ore at this time. Fluid bed roasters were constructed at Goldstrike in 1999 to treat carbonaceous refractory ores that could not be treated effectively by the POX circuit that existed at  Goldstrike  at  that  time.  The  roasters  process  double  refractory  (i.e.,  sulphide  refractory  and  total  organic  carbon  refractory)  feed  with  a  moderate  carbonate content  to  help  fix  the  sulphur  dioxide  that  is  generated  by  the  oxidation  reactions.  Minimum  sulphide  sulphur  levels  are  required  to  maintain  sufficient  bed temperatures.  When  the  ore  does  not  contain  the  minimum  required  sulphide  sulphur  content,  sulphur  prills  are  used  as  a  supplement  to  provide  the  energy necessary to operate the roasters. The flow sheet for the Goldstrike roasters is shown in Figure 17-3. The roasters  use  oxygen  to  oxidize  organic  carbon  and  sulphide  sulphur  prior  to  processing  the  neutralized  slurry  in  a  conventional  CIL  circuit.  There  are  two circuits, each include crushing and dry grinding followed by a two stage roaster, a calcine quenching tank, and dust and gas handling operations. The quenched gas goes to the gas cleaning stage, which is common to both roaster circuits, and the calcine is processed in common neutralization and CIL circuits. The loaded carbon is sent to the main refinery for elution, regeneration, and production of the gold doré. Ore routing from Cortez to Goldstrike is optimized to provide maximum value to the Cortez operation.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 17-4    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

HAULAGE CAPACITY INCREASE – VALUE REALIZATION INITIATIVE The Cortez Hills operation currently ships mined refractory ores via over-the-highway haul trucks to the Goldstrike operation for processing. Haulage is currently limited by permit to 1.2 million stpa. An opportunity exists to expand the shipping rate to 2.2 million stpa during the AP-04 permitting process, allowing increased shipping to begin upon permit receipt in 2020. Permit submittal is currently scheduled for Q1 2016. Additional technical studies are underway to determine increased haulage parameters including fleet sizing and road base suitability. Increased shipping rates will allow advancing the current LOM production stream of refractory material.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 17-5    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 17-6    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 17-7    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 17-8    

 

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

18 PROJECT INFRASTRUCTURE The infrastructure for the Cortez Operations is developed and in service. The facilities and infrastructure in the vicinity of the Pipeline and Cortez Hills Complex is shown in Figures 18-1 and 18-2.

ROADS The Cortez Operations are accessed by paved public roads. The Mine has a number of private roads for access to the various facilities. The private roads include small vehicle roads as well as a network of haul roads. The haul roads are built to a width suitable for the haul trucks. The development of the CHOP included the construction of a new public road to replace the original public road, which has now become part of the CHOP waste dump.

TAILINGS STORAGE FACILITY Current  capacity  is  expected  to  accommodate  the  tailings  from  Mill  No.  2  through  2012.  The  Phase  IV  raise  was  under  construction  at  the  end of 2011 and is expected to provide capacity through the first and second quarter of 2013. A permit application for the Cell 4 starter dam is expected for January 2012, which will make Cell 4 available for additional tailing storage in January 2013. The engineering of the Phase V raise for the TSF is underway.

DUMPS There are permitted waste dumps at the CHOP, Pipeline, and Gap pits for the storage of waste.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 18-1    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 18-2    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 18-3    

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

STOCKPILES The open pit production schedules have significant variation in ore delivery over time and there is a high proportion of the ore, which is stockpiled after mining and before processing. There are 14 oxide stockpile options all based upon the grade of material and varying from leach grade to ore in excess of 0.75 oz/st Au. Leach material is generally delivered directly to the leach pad. There are 12 key mill ore categories based on a range of grades, and from 0.02 oz/st Au to 0.1 oz/st Au, the categories are separated by 0.01 oz/st Au. There are 12 refractory ore stockpile categories ranging from 0.04 oz/st Au to greater than 0.4 oz/st Au. Production scheduling for the oxide mill is based upon a balance of feed grade based upon the material available in the stock piles plus the expected ore delivery from the pits. For the refractory material the selection of material to be processed is based upon the highest grade stockpiles being shipped to Barrick’s Goldstrike facility first.

LEACH PADS The LOM capital plan allows $24 million for the expansion of heap leach pads.

POWER Electrical power is obtained from the grid and from the Western 102 power plant with transmission by NV Energy. Power is purchased on a wholesale basis using dedicated buyers. The load is predicted on an hourly basis and the Western 102 supply is used to balance the load. The Western 102 plant delivers power to Barrick operations at Cortez, Goldstrike, and Turquoise Ridge. Electric power is provided to the Cortez site by NV Energy via an approximately 50-mile long radial transmission line originating at their Falcon substation. The incoming NV Energy line terminates at the Barrick owned Pipeline Substation. Two, 120kV Taps onto the NV Energy power line feed the Barrick-owned 120kV power lines as follow:  

 



  Approximately nine miles of extension to serve the Cortez Hills development; and



  Approximately three miles of extension to serve the South Pipeline and Crossroads pits.

 

   

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 18-4    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

The current load at Cortez has a peak of 36 MW. The current transmission lines have the capacity for 44 MW, and with the addition of capacitors, the capacity of the  line  could  be  increased  to  56  MW.  Further  improvements  could  increase  the  capacity  to  70  MW  to  80  MW,  but  any  expansion  beyond  80  MW,  additional transmission capacity will be required. The Cortez Mine currently has 54MW of Network Integrated Transmission Service from NV Energy for the delivery of capacity and energy from the Midpoint 345 kV and Dove 120 kV points of receipt. The Cortez Mine also has a Distribution Service DOS agreement with NV Energy to a level of 31 MW. Barrick purchases power from the western electric grid for delivery to Midpoint 345 kV and/or generates power at Barrick’s Western 102 power plant for delivery to the Dove 120 kV bus. Electric demand at the Cortez Mine was estimated in 2014 to approach 50 MW through the LOM. NV Energy has completed a preliminary study that concluded that  the  existing  average  power  is  30  MW  and  33  MW  peak.  Cortez  Mine  has  expressed  interest  to  NV  Energy  to  match  the  Transmission  Service  and  DOS agreements at 54 MW. NV Energy has instructed Cortez Mine that modifying the DOS agreement to 54 MW based on projected LOM power demand will require that two 10 MVAR capacitor banks be installed at the Cortez mine. Cortez mine has budgeted for the installation of one 120 kV, 10 MVAR capacitor bank in each 2016 and 2017. The radial 120 kV transmission line serving the Cortez Mine is thermally limited to about 100 MVA of capacity; however, the real capacity restriction is related to the line voltage drop that occurs between Falcon substation and the Cortez Mine. NV Energy is required to limit this voltage drop to 5% per their regulators, the North American Electric Reliability Corporation. The ultimate power delivery capacity of this existing line is likely between 60 MW and 70 MW with the addition of voltage support capacitors. A series capacitor and/or a static VAR compensator may result in additional capacity. Barrick will be contracting with a transmission consultant to identify the actual ultimate capacity of this existing line. The consultant will also identify options to construct transmission infrastructure to increase the transmission capacity to Cortez beyond the limits of the existing line.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 18-5    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

19 MARKET STUDIES AND CONTRACTS MARKETS Gold  is  the  principal  commodity  at  Cortez  and  is  freely  traded,  at  prices  that  are  widely  known,  so  that  prospects  for  sale  of  any  production  are  virtually assured. Prices are usually quoted in US dollars per troy ounce.

CONTRACTS Cortez  is  a  large  modern  operation  and  the  owner  is  a  major  international  firm  with  policies  and  procedures  for  the  letting  of  contracts.  These  policies  and procedures would lead to contracts that are normal for this scale of operation. The contracts for smelting and refining are normal contracts for a large producer. The joint venture agreement remains in place though it is now between two wholly owned subsidiaries of Barrick.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 19-1    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

20 ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES, PERMITTING, AND SOCIAL OR COMMUNITY IMPACT ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES Due to the size of the various projects, environmental studies are on-going at Cortez to ensure that the required monitoring is completed and reported and that best practices are utilized to meet the environmental requirements.

MINE PERMITTING The Cortez Operations are predominantly located on public lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) with a small portion on private lands owned by Barrick Cortez Inc. The operations are located in Eureka and Lander counties with BLM jurisdiction from the Battle Mountain and Elko field offices. No facilities are located in Eureka Country, however, the Mine boundary extends onto BLM-administered lands in Eureka County to accommodate a portion of the Cortez Hills open pit and ancillary facilities. The boundaries and permit areas are shown in Figure 20-1. As  shown  in  the  legend  of  the  figure,  properties  of  cultural  and  religious  importance  are  designated  by  PCRI  and  HC/CUEP  is  the  abbreviation  for  Horse Canyon/Cortez Unified Exploration Project. Cortez has established, documented, and implemented an Environmental Management System (EMS) in accordance with the ISO 14001:2004 Standard, the Barrick Environmental Policy (the Policy), and the Barrick Gold Environmental Management System Standard (BGEMS). Cortez utilizes the Responsibility Information Management System (RIMS) web-based software platform as a primary tool for establishing, implementing, and maintaining various elements of the EMS (Barrick Cortez, 2014a).  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 20-1    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

  

Page 20-2    

 

 

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

MAJOR PERMIT REQUIREMENTS The major permits required for operating on public lands are the approval of the Plan of Operations (PoO) by the BLM and a Reclamation Permit from the BLM and Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). The Cortez property has received approval for a number of plans of operations (PoO) and reclamation permits since the early 1980s. Permits were issued to allow mining and processing of ore from the East Pit, Horse Canyon Pit, Gold Acres, South Extension Pit, Cortez Canyon, Cortez Hills, and other areas that are no longer actively mined. Table 20-1 lists the major environmental analysis documents (e.g. Environmental Assessment (EA), Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), and Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS), Record of Decision (ROD)) and PoOs that have been issued for the currently active areas of the Mine (i.e., Cortez, Pipeline, and Cortez Hills).

TABLE 20-1 IMPORTANT ENVIRONMENTAL DOCUMENTS AND PLANS OF OPERATIONS FOR PIPELINE AND CORTEZ HILLS Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Dates

   Description

January 1996 January 2000 December 2003 November 2008 November 2008 January 2011 March 2011 October 2012 February 2014 October 2014 September 2015

                                

Cortez Pipeline Gold Deposit Final EIS South Pipeline Project Final EIS Pipeline/South Pipeline Pit Expansion Project Final EIS Cortez Hills Expansion Project Final EIS ROD and PoO Amendment Approval Cortez Hills Expansion Project Supplemental Final EIS Cortez Hills Expansion Project ROD and PoO Amendment Approval 2012 Amendment to Plan of Operations and Reclamation Permit Application 2012 Amendment to PoO and ROD Approval Revised Amendment 3 to PoO and Reclamation Permit Application Revised Amendment 3 to PoO Approval

CORTEZ HILLS EXPANSION PROJECT (APO1) In  August  2005,  Cortez  submitted  an  Amendment  to  the  Pipeline/Pipeline  South  Plan  of  Operations  for  the  Cortez  Hills  Expansion  Project  and  associated Modification  to  Reclamation  Plan  Permit  Application  to  the  BLM.  The  BLM  prepared  the  Draft  EIS  in  2007.  In  2008,  the  Final  EIS  and  a  ROD  and  Plan  of Operations Amendment Approval were issued by the BLM. BLM’s decision to approve the expansion project was challenged in federal court. The US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit found that the plaintiffs were likely to succeed on the merits of their challenge with respect to the environmental analysis in the EIS for shipping of refractory ore to Goldstrike for processing and increased pumping of groundwater. Following  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 20-3    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

the finding of the Court of Appeals, the BLM prepared an SEIS to address those areas. (BLM, 2007) While the SEIS was prepared, on remand from the US Circuit Court, the Nevada US District Court granted BLM’s motion for summary judgement for the areas of the  EIS  that  were  considered  adequate,  but  they  entered  a  limited  injunction  against  shipping  of  refractory  ore  from  Cortez  Hills  and  pumping  volumes  of groundwater  that  were  higher  than  previously  approved  rates.  Following  the  completion  of  the  SEIS,  the  BLM  issued  a  second  ROD  and  Plan  of  Operations Amendment Approval. A summary of the proposed activities (BLM, 2011) include: Cortez Hills Complex:  

 



  New open pit (Cortez Hills Pit) for development of Cortez Hills and Pediment ore zones



  Development of underground operation



  Underground mining



  New groundwater dewatering system to include in-pit, perimeters, and underground facilities



  New Grass Valley Heap Leach Facility with associated solutions ponds, new carbon-in-column (CIC) facility, and reagent storage area



  New stockpiles for ore, subgrade ore, and growth media



  New waste rock facilities (Canyon, North, and South)



  New ancillary facilities (maintenance shop, safety, security, and administrative facilities, 90 day temporary waste storage area, and fuel and lubricant storage facilities)



  New primary crusher, conveyor offload stockpiles, and a conveyor system that is approximately 12 miles long



  Two new water supply wells and associated power distribution, water pipelines, and water reservoir or head tank



  Construction and upgrade of haul roads



  Relocation of portions of an existing county road and 60 kV power transmission line within the Mine boundary



  Installation of a new 120 kV power transmission line segment and substation



  Construction of a new Class III waivered landfill



  Development of a new borrow source in Grass Valley



  Modification of the existing Horse Canyon/Cortez Unified Exploration Project (HC/CUEP) boundary to remove overlap with the Cortez Gold Mines PoO boundary

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

Cortez Complex:  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 20-4    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

 



  Deepening of existing Cortez Mine open pit



  Expansion of existing Cortez Waste Rock Facility



  Expansion of existing F-Canyon backfill



  New Cortez Heap Leach Facility with associated solution ponds, CIC facility, and reagent storage area



  Expansion of existing tailings facility



  Expansion of diesel fuel storage facilities



  Ancillary facilities for underground support (backfill crushing, additional ore stockpiles, shotcrete plant, conveyor onload area, and haul road)

 

   

   

   

   

   

 

Pipeline Complex:  

 



  Expansion of existing Pipeline Pit (North Gap Pit Expansion)



  Expansion of existing Pipeline Waste Rock Facility



  New North Gap backfill



  Relocation of existing county road around waste rock facility expansion area



  Expansion of the existing Pipeline Mill to facilitate an increase in throughput from currently permitted 13,500 stpd to an average of 15,000 stpd



  Modification  of  the  existing  Pipeline/South  Pipeline/Gold  Acres  exploration  permit  boundary  to  remove  overlap  with  the  Cortez  Gold  Mines  PoO boundary

 

   

   

   

   

 

2012 AMENDMENT TO PLAN OF OPERATIONS AND RECLAMATION PERMIT APPLICATION (APO2) In October 2012, Cortez submitted a second proposed amendment to the existing PoO. The proposed modifications were (Barrick, 2012):  

 



  Reconfiguring  the  North  Waste  Rock  Facility  (NWRF)  footprint  and  storm  water  diversions  within  an  area  previously  authorized  for  waste  rock, ancillary, and conveyor corridor disturbance



  Incorporating an ore stockpile on the surface of the NWRF footprint



  Relocating a six million ton stockpile of ore to Goldstrike at the rate of 800,000 stpa for approximately eight years



  Adding ancillary facilities including a potable water well and associated distribution pipeline, and a bank of capacitors



  Constructing approximately ten miles of rangeland fence to the perimeter of the relocated County Road 225

 

   

   

   

 

All components of the APO2 application were approved by the BLM on February 24, 2014.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 20-5    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

AMENDMENT 3 TO PLAN OF OPERATIONS AND RECLAMATION PERMIT APPLICATION (APO3) In August 2014 and revised in October 2014, Cortez submitted additional proposed modifications to the PoO (Barrick Cortez, 2014b). The proposed modifications include:  

 



  Deepen the Gap Pit from 4,400 ft amsl to 4,360 ft amsl



  Construct the Range Front Declines and associated infrastructure

 

   

 



  Construct twin declines and associated surface infrastructure on the range front north of the Canyon waste rock facility



  Establish additional surface facilities to support the Cortez Hills Underground

 

   

 



  Expand the Area 30 heap leach facilities by 240 acres



  Modify mining rate between the Cortez Hills and Pipeline areas to optimize surface mining activities



  Add a water treatment plant and infrastructure to reduce naturally occurring arsenic concentrations in the dewatering water



  Allow off-site  ore haulage up to approximately  1.2 million  tons per year site wide (i.e., no longer limit  the haulage from the stockpiles  to 800,000 stpa).



  Reconfigure the Pipeline, Canyon, and Gap waste rock facilities

 

   

   

   

   

 



  Expand the Gap waste rock facility by 220 acres and increase the height by 200 ft



  Increase the height of the Pipeline waste rock facility by 300 ft



  Increase the height of the Canyon waste rock facility by 160 ft

 

   

   

 

•   Infrastructure addition

 

 



  Administration building, maintenance shop, fuel skid in the ancillary facility area



  Reconfigure the LOM power line locations

 

 

All components of the APO3 application were approved by the BLM on September 28, 2015. APO4: DEEP SOUTH EXPANSION AND INCREASE DEPTH OF CROSSROADS PIT Cortez  began  discussions  for  the  next  proposed  changes  with  the  BLM  and  the  State  of  Nevada  in  April  2015  (Barrick  Cortez,  2015b).  Major  elements of the expansion include:  

 



  Expansion of the existing Cortez Hills underground mine by increasing the depth of mining from 3,800 ft to 2,500 ft



  Expand the Pediment portion of the Cortez Hills Pit and shift the Plan boundary to the east



  Backfill the Cortez Hills Pit



  Expand the Grass Valley heap leach facility



  Expand the existing Cortez Pit and WRF

 

   

   

   

   

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 20-6    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

 



  Expand/deepen the Crossroads Pit (Pipeline Complex) by 200 ft and reconfigure the backfill



  Add Stage 11 to the Pipeline Pit



  Expand the existing Gold Acres Pit and expand the WRF



  Construct an additional water treatment plant in the Cortez Hills Complex



  Add rapid infiltration basin (RIB) galleries and surface pipeline on fee land outside the PoO in Crescent Valley



  Construct additional RIBs in Grass Valley and Pine Valley



  Construct a surface water line in Pine Valley to convey treated dewatering water



  Potentially construct a water reservoir and pipelines at Rocky Pass for dewatering water management



  Additions/revisions to facilities and disturbance

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 



  Expand the Plan boundary to capture proposed facilities



  Modify the surface mining rate to allow up to 600,000 tons per day



  Expand the existing Pipeline oxide ore stockpile



  Additional ore stockpiles



  Add ancillary disturbance around existing and proposed facilities



  Powerlines, pipelines, buildings, communication sites, haul roads, access roads, borrow areas, etc.



  Underground surface infrastructure (vent raises, boreholes, surface plants, etc.)

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

•   Increase off-site ore haulage to 2.5 Mstpa with the potential for backhauling ore to Cortez

 

 

•   Revise dewatering and disposal rates

The Deep South Zone PFS timeline assumes that permitting will take approximately three to four years and Barrick expects to commence this process in 2016. OTHER PERMIT REQUIREMENTS A number of federal and state permits are required to operate the Cortez Mine. Cortez adheres to permitting guidelines from the BLM, the Nevada Revised Statutes (NRS), the Nevada Administrative Code (NAC), and additional federal government requirements. A summary of the major environmental permits for the Cortez Operations is provided in Table 20-2.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 20-7    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

TABLE 20-2 MAJOR ENVIRONMENTAL PERMITS Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Activity or Permit

  

Integrated Monitoring Plan

Jurisdiction

   Water Pollution Control Permit Water Pollution Control Permit

  

BLM

State   

   NDEP - BMRR

   State

   NDEP - BMRR

  

  

  

     

     

     

State

Dam storage permits

State   

  

  

  

  

  

  

     

     

State

  

NDEP - BWPC      

  

  

   State

  

NDOW

  

  

Potable Water Permit

NDEP - BMRR NDEP - BAPC

   State

     

  

Number

  

Issued

NDEP - BSDW   

  

09-01-95   

   NEV0095111

   NEV0093109

  

NEV0000023 On-going

10-20-16   

05-01-93   

NEV2007106      

NA

11-02-95   

  

01-23-17   

07-30-07      

04-13-90

  

Pipeline Tails Dam J-553 Buttress       Pipeline Tails Dam J-647    Phase III Raise       Cortez Hills Fresh J-626    Water Reservoir       Cortez Hills Storm J-656 & J657 Water Retention    Pond #1, #2 Dams       Cortez Area 28 TSF J-659    Cell 4 Dam       Cortez Area 28 TSF J-663    Phase IV Raise          Reclamation Permit    0093    Class I Air Quality AP1041-2141    Operating Permit       Mill #1 UIC GU07RL-51036             Pipeline Mill    S-34569    Pipeline Heap Leach S-34567    Facilities       Cortez Hills Process S-31579    Facility       Cortez Mill No. 1 S-314104    Facility       Barrick Cortez Gold LA-0892-12NTN    Mines Pipeline      

Expires

  

09-11-18      

07-22-15 1

   03-23-10

  

  

  

Integrated Monitoring Plan Pipeline Infiltration Pipeline Project Cortez Hills Expansion Cortez Gold Mine

   NDWR

  

State State

Permit Name

NDWR   

  

Discharge/ Underground Injection Permit Industrial Artificial Pond Permits

Agency

  

Water rights/reallocation/ diversion changes   

Reclamation Permit Air Quality Permits

  

Federal

NA   

07-26-10

NA   

06-01-09

NA   

06-08-11

NA   

01-05-12

NA   

08-09-11 07-13-00 01-28-08

NA      

NA 01-28-13 2

   10-10-12 11-14-11 11-14-11

10-09-17      

11-14-16 11-14-16

   04-20-14

04-21-19   

04-01-11

03-31-16   

04-09-15

04-30-16   

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 20-8    

  

 

  Activity or Permit

  

Jurisdiction

  

  

      Storm Water Permit

  

   NDEP - BAPC

   State Federal

   Landfill

      NDEP - BWPC

State

State   

Permit Name

  

  

      State

   Mercury Operating Permit to Construct Phase II    Hazardous Materials Storage    Jurisdiction Determination

Agency

  

   Nevada State Fire    Marshall    Army Corps of Engineers       NDEP - BWM      

www.rpacan.com   

Number

  

NV0000892    C    Cortez Mill No. 1 LA-2570-12NTNC Potable Water System NV0002570       Barrick Cortez Hills    LA-1097-NTNC    Storm Water NVR300000 General Permit       Mercury Operating AP1041-2220 Permit to Construct       Cortez Gold Mines 50304 & 50330       Cortez Mining Area JD South of Crescent Valley       Class III Waivered Landfill      

Issued

  

Expires

   04-09-15

04-09-15 03-01-13

04-30-16      

04-30-16 02-28-18

   07-16-12    03-01-15

02-29-16   

02-25-10

06-16-20   

03-31-14

03-31-19   

1 – Five year renewal permit application is under review by NDEP-BMRR; Cortez continues to operate under existing permit 2 – Five year renewal permit application is under review by NDEP-BAPC; Cortez continues to operate under existing permit

  NDEP – Nevada Division of Environment Protection BMRR – Bureau of Mining Regulation and Reclamation BAPC – Bureau of Air Pollution Control

  NDWR – Nevada Division of Water Resources   BSDW – Bureau of Safe Drinking Water   BWM – Bureau of Waste Management

SOCIAL AND COMMUNITY REQUIREMENTS Barrick is a major corporation and employer in Nevada that is actively involved in being a responsible corporate citizen. CORTEZ COMMUNITY CONTEXT The Cortez mine site is located approximately 30 miles southeast of Battle Mountain, Nevada in Lander County. The majority of its approximately 1300 employees reside in the Elko/Spring Creek area (Elko County) with about ten percent residing in Battle Mountain (Lander County) and ten percent residing in Crescent Valley Township (Eureka County). The rural communities located in northeastern Nevada are primarily dependent upon the mining industry for employment and economic security. This has created a very  supportive,  pro-mining  culture  in  these  communities  where  most  employees  live,  however,  Cortez  operates  on  lands  traditionally  used  by  the  Western Shoshone tribes and bands, and operations make great efforts to demonstrate respect for indigenous cultural resources,  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 20-9    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

environmental stewardship, and shared benefits to receive support from Western Shoshone communities. Water resources, air quality, and public safety associated with the use of over-the-road trucking for ore transport are key concerns for both the rural communities and  Western  Shoshone  communities.  Crescent  Valley  Township  is  the  community  most  affected  by  mining  operations,  as  it  shares  a  watershed,  air  shed,  and roadways  with  the  Cortez  Operations.  Furthermore,  agricultural  water  users  throughout  the  Humboldt  River  Basin  routinely  express  interest  in  new  water allocations and uses with the area, and insist on protection of established water rights. Barrick’s  Community  Relations  Department  engages  regularly  with  community  members  and  leadership  of  the  rural  host  communities  and  Western Shoshone communities  in  various  formal  and  informal  settings.  The  Community  Relations  (CR)  department  (and  at  times  mine  staff)  participate  in  numerous  education, health, economic development, cultural, and family welfare initiatives at the community level (e.g., community investments, Gold Fever educational programming for  elementary  school  students,  community  event  sponsorships,  economic  development  authorities)  and  regional  level  (e.g.,  support  for  Great  Basin  College programs, the White Ribbon Project for prevention of domestic violence, and Western Shoshone language and cultural preservation efforts). A full demographic report appears in the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) completed for the Cortez Hills Project in November 2008 (see Section 3.13 of that document). The demographic and statistical information was updated by Barrick in 2014. Key updates are summarized in the text below. POPULATION AND DEMOGRAPHICS Of the three  counties  from  which Cortez  draws  its  workforce,  Elko  County  has  the largest  population  at  approximately  49,000  with  a  growth rate  around three percent. Lander County’s population is approximately 6,000 residents while Eureka County has approximately 2,000 residents. Approximately 400 Eureka County residents are located in Crescent Valley, the closest community to Cortez (approximately 15 miles north). Ethnically, the local populations are more than 80% white and approximately five percent Native American, with the balance of the residents identified primarily as Hispanic. A comparison to the 2000 census shows a reduction in the relative percentage of Native  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 20-10    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

American residents census caused primarily by the immigration of other ethnicities and stagnant tribal enrollments. CONSULTATION PROCESSES/STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT/COMMUNITY INTERACTIONS Because permitting efforts require a formal consultation process managed by the BLM, the CR group works collaboratively with the Permitting Group to ensure that consultation efforts are complementary to the BLM’s process. As new projects develop, Barrick holds public meetings (and advertise a local grievance mechanism according to the Grievance Management Procedure) if internal strategy  deems  appropriate  so  that  citizens  in  the  surrounding  areas  may  come  to  learn  more  and  express  their  support  or  concerns.  Barrick  may  also  share employment growth projections with local government and organizations if needed for local planning purposes. Barrick  also  strives  to  maintain  a  positive,  open  relationship  with  the  local  media.  Traditionally  Barrick  has  been  proactive  in  initiating  coverage  of  projects, expansions, or changes in operations or processes. As deemed appropriate, the Barrick Communications Group will engage the media for coverage. In addition to mandated regulatory processes, Barrick’s CR team maintains a regular program of engagement with local governments, community members, local organizations,  and  other  stakeholders  associated  with  projects  under  development  and  in  operation.  This  program  includes  meeting  these  stakeholders  in  both formal and informal settings, providing opportunity to gain a greater understanding of concerns and opinions related to Barrick’s projects and operations. OTHER INFORMATION GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE In accordance with Barrick’s Community Relations Management System and documented Grievance Management Procedure, any and all grievances presented to the company will be brought to the attention of CR and other relevant internal parties so that immediate action may be taken. The entity bringing the grievance will be engaged as soon as practical to ensure all parties fully understand the grievance and how a mutually agreeable resolution may be reached. Barrick is committed to cooperating with concerned parties, within reason, to mitigate  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 20-11    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

concerns. As needed, and appropriate, site tours may be conducted to ensure a better understanding of the Mine and mining operations. KEY IMPACTS/OPPORTUNITIES Opportunities for proactively addressing social risks include open, up front communication, timely response to enquiries and concerns, and providing assurance that Barrick  will  continue  to  operate  within  the  guidelines  mandated  by  local,  state,  and  federal  regulatory  agencies.  Barrick  has,  and  will  continue  to  conduct  its operations in full compliance with all regulatory agency requirements. Community impacts include:  

 



  Mine development and operation should maintain (and potentially increase) local employment and tax revenues.



  Ore hauling and/or processing options may increase water consumption by mine operations, generate air emissions that require mitigating controls, increase truck traffic over area roadways, and disturb grounds with potential cultural resources and/or wildlife habitat.



  Dewatering  operations  would  increase  the  extent  of  groundwater  drawdown  and  may  require  mitigation  controls  to  address  potential  impacts  to groundwater resources, surface water resources, and/or riparian habitat and associated existing uses.

 

   

 

EMPLOYMENT Unemployment rates in the area are relatively low (approximately 3.4%) with about one quarter of the workforce directly employed in the mining industry. Lander and  Eureka  Counties  have  an  unusual  situation  where  total  employment  in  the  counties  is  greater  than  their  populations  due  to  commuting  workforces  based primarily in Elko County. HOUSING Vacancy rates in the area for all housing range from 10% to 15%, however, short-term and rental housing options have a much lower vacancy rate than long-term housing. Economically-driven slowing in the mining industry is causing vacancy rates to increase at the present time. Temporary housing is available in numerous hotel/motels and RV parks in the area. Occupancy rates for the temporary housing are decreasing at the present time due to the current slowdown in area mining activity.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 20-12    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

EMERGENCY SERVICES In general,  law enforcement,  fire protection,  and ambulance  services  are available  to service  the communities  from which Cortez draws its employees. Staffing emergency services in Crescent Valley remains a challenge as fire and ambulance services depend exclusively on volunteers from a community where residents are frequently short-term. Cortez maintains its own fire protection and ambulance services to meet the needs of its employees, and may assist communities under special circumstances at their request. COMMUNITY RELATIONS MANAGEMENT PLAN Cortez is incorporated into the Community Relations Management System for North American operations. Community Relations incorporates any required new components into the Social Management Plan and site specific plans will be developed if needed. Specific components of the Social Management Plan pertaining to this project include:  

 



  Proactive engagement with local communities and nearby residents to provide updates and timely response to any questions and concerns from the communities.



  Execution  of  the  Community  Development  Plan  to  assist  communities  in  their  ability  to  share  economic  benefits  and  maintain/expand  a  local workforce.



  Diligent pursuit of a Mine Operations and Benefit Sharing Agreement (MOBSA) with the Western Shoshone communities in the area to recognize their traditional use of the area and formalize benefit sharing arrangements.



  Proactive engagement with local communities to describe the water quantity, water quality and air quality impacts, and planned mitigation measures.



  Working with the Crescent Valley residents to identify and mitigate the effects of increased truck haulage on State Route 306 (in conjunction with the Permitting Groups’ interaction with the Nevada Department of Transportation).



  Working  with  Western  Shoshone  communities  on  the  observation  of  and/or  participation  in  the  management  of  cultural  resources  and  traditional plants.



  Engaging with wildlife organizations regarding the potential impacts to habitat and their mitigation.



  Working with Pine Valley residents, and other interested agricultural users in the Humboldt River Basin, to understand the effects of dewatering on groundwater and surface water resources and mitigate any potential impacts to water rights.

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 20-13    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

SUMMARY OF GOVERNMENT RELATIONS The  local  government  has  historically  supported  the  Cortez  Mine  with  an  unusual  exception  in  2004  stemming  from  needs  to  balance  competing  development issues primarily related to water resources and housing that was readily resolved. The Nevada State government is generally supportive of mining. Its regulatory agencies are mature, and the license and permitting processes are well established and understood by the mining industry. Some Western Shoshone communities have administratively and legally challenged Cortez permits on the basis of perceived insufficient mitigation of impacts to cultural and water resources. The  federal  government  and  its  agencies  generally  oppose  new  land  disturbance  on  public  lands  without  offsetting  mitigation  efforts.  Although  the  National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process is well understood, positive permitting outcomes and timelines are never certain. POLITICAL AND INVESTMENT CLIMATE The citizenry within the area in which Barrick Cortez Mine operates are generally supportive of Barrick activities, but there are many constituencies within the area that will need attention to ensure support. Fortunately, Barrick has excellent opportunities to build relationships and alliances with these groups on common ground issues such as water management, economic development and protection, and management of sage grouse habitat. Mining is a major contributor to the local economy in the form of wages and taxes, however, Barrick Cortez and any proposed projects or changes to the operation are expected to generate political controversy to some extent, based on past experience regarding the resolution of water resources, air quality, and cultural resource impacts. The investment climate within Nevada remains one of the best in the United States, however the nation is an increasingly difficult country in which to develop new projects, and this environment could deteriorate further depending on new regulation and taxes. GOVERNMENT PORTFOLIO OF AGENCIES The Mount Lewis Field Office of the BLM, located in Battle Mountain, Nevada, would be the lead agency with respect to any National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process. Under NEPA, the BLM would include input from NDEP, as a cooperating agency, for review of air,  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 20-14    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

water,  and  hazardous  waste  impacts.  Other  likely  cooperating  agencies  during  NEPA  include  the  US  Fish  and  Wildlife  Service,  the  Nevada  Natural  Heritage Program, the NDOW, and various Native American tribes. GOVERNMENT RELATIONS MANAGEMENT PLAN The key impacts  are  water  resources,  air  quality,  and increased  truck  traffic.  Barrick  will continue  to engage  with  the  Lander  County  Commissioners, Crescent Valley Town Board, Eureka County Commissioners, Pine Valley residents, and other local communities to discuss these impacts, identify any unforeseen impacts related to population growth, housing, or other issues, and to identify effective mitigation strategies. The Permitting Group and site environmental staff interact with the BLM and NDEP to secure the necessary environmental permits for the project. The regulations and processes needed to obtain the permits from the various State agencies are well understood, and the process itself is not expected to be problematic. Obtaining additional revenue is a key issue for Nevada at present. There are frequent attempts to modify the existing taxation formula for industry in general and mining in particular. Tactics and strategy for dealing with these attempts are delegated to the corporate level within Barrick. Many  members  of  the  Cortez  staff  contribute  to  Barrick’s  political  action  committee.  These  funds  are  used  to  support  Senators  and  Representatives  that  are supportive of the mining industry. This committee has been instrumental in influencing new regulation and shaping opinion on mining law. These activities are delegated to US Executive Director and others within the corporate team.

MINE CLOSURE REQUIREMENTS Cortez submitted an amendment application to the PoO and Reclamation Permits in November 2011. The PoO amendment (APO2) was approved by the BLM in February  2014.  The  approved  APO2  authorized  an  additional  41  acres  on  public  lands  to  be  disturbed  and  reclassified  an  additional  98  acres  of  previously authorized disturbance. An amendment (APO3) to APO2 was submitted to the BLM in August 2014 to accommodate planned mine expansion activities. APO3 was approved on September 28, 2015.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 20-15    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

Reclamation of disturbed areas resulting from mining activities will follow the approved Reclamation Plan and will be completed in accordance with BLM and NDEP regulations that are intended to prevent unnecessary or undue degradation of public lands by operators authorized by the mining laws. The authorized surface disturbance for the Cortez areas is summarized in Table 20-3.

TABLE 20-3 SURFACE DISTURBANCE AUTHORIZATION Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Complex

  

Public

(acres)     

Private (acres)     

Total

(acres)  

Cortez Hills Cortez Pipeline Gold Acres Total

              

  4,599       1,477       9,381       361    

15,818

  

  8       589       53       232    

882

  

  4,607     2,066     9,434     593  

16,700

The  state  of  Nevada  requires  a  reclamation  bond  based  on  the  disturbed  areas.  Following  approval  of  APO3,  the  bond  increased  to  $227,523,322.  The  surety amount  is reviewed  every three  years  or whenever  a PoO amendment  is submitted  for  review and approval  to determine  if the  current  bond is still adequate  to execute the approved Reclamation Plan. The permit is valid for the life of the Mine unless it is modified, suspended, or revoked by NDEP. To  the  best  of  RPA’s  knowledge,  there  are  no  environmental  issues  that  could  materially  impact  Barrick’s  ability  to  extract  the  mineral  resources  or  mineral reserves at this time.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 20-16    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

21 CAPITAL AND OPERATING COSTS CAPITAL COST ESTIMATE The total capital expenditure in the 2016 LOM plan is $2,011. The total includes capital required to expand underground mining into the Deep South Zone below currently permitted levels. The Deep South Zone has the potential to contribute average underground production of more than 300,000 ounces per year between 2023 and 2027 at average all-in sustaining costs of approximately $580 per ounce. Initial capital costs are estimated to be $153 million and sustaining capital is estimated to be $58 million, for the Deep South project total of $211 million. The capital  costs for  Cortez  are  developed  and revised  on an  annual  basis  as  part  of  the  budget  cycle.  The  2016  LOM capital  plan  as  developed  at  the  site  for approval by the corporation is shown below in Table 21-1. The  capital  includes  ongoing  sustaining  capitals  as  well  as  capital  for  the  expansion  of  some  of  the  facilities.  The  scope  of  the  capital  costs  for  the  Mine  is appropriate.

TABLE 21-1 CAPITAL COSTS Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

  Year

 

2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 Total

                           

 

    

                                         

Deferred

Fixed

Mobile

Grand    Operating   Expansion   Exploration   Equipment   Equipment   Regulatory   Total

US$ M   US$ M   US$ M   US$ M   US$ M   US$ M   US$ M   US$ M   US$ M   US$ M   US$ M   US$ M   US$ M   US$ M  

58.6 50.7 145.5 253.8 131.7 19.7 12.9 29.5 46.2 41.4 0.9 —   —   791

                                         

222.1 284.1 169.3 61.5 29.5 21.7 6.8 5.7 7.7 29.4 2.3 —   —   840

                                         

9.8 8.1 11.8 11.0 11.3 6.1 4.0 2.9 2.6 1.8 1.6 —   —   71

                                         

43.5 19.8 22.5 22.5 13.8 13.4 7.5 2.2 0.4 0.4 0.3 —   —   146

                                         

7.4 9.3 12.8 6.1 12.4 7.9 10.7 5.9 8.4 9.8 —   —   —   91

                                         

9.1 5.0 37.8 7.4 1.8 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.7 1.6 0.5 0.5 72

                                         

350.5 376.9 399.7 362.2 200.5 70.5 43.6 47.8 67.0 84.5 6.7 0.5 0.5 2,011

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 21-1    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

OPERATING COSTS The operating costs for Cortez are developed annually as part of the site budget process. In the mine area the costs are developed on a zero based budgeting system incorporating  experience  from  previous  periods.  The  LOM  operating  costs  are  shown  in  Table  21-2.  In  RPA’s  opinion,  the  operating  costs  for  the  Mine  are reasonable.

TABLE 21-2 LOM OPERATING COSTS Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations

   

  

 

Open Pit    

Underground 

Mine $/t mined

  

US$/st mined  

  

 

1.79    

 

86.59  

Mine $/t milled Process G&A Refine/Freight Royalty Total

                 

US$/st milled   US$/st milled   US$/st milled   US$/st milled   US$/st milled   US$/st milled  

  12.60       7.43       2.40       0.01       2.21       24.66    

           

104.82   22.87   24.02   0.09   4.90   156.70  

MANPOWER Manpower levels for the LOM plan are shown in Table 21-3. Manpower levels remain relatively steady through the mine life until the cessation of mining, and then the cessation of processing at the site.

TABLE 21-3 MANPOWER Barrick Gold Corporation - Cortez Operations

  Year

 

2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023

               

 

  

Open Pit Mining   

Underground Mining   

                       

631 631 648 604 527 527 492 401

343 367 375 379 379 379 379 379

                       

                       

Processing  

G&A, Site Services, Safety, Security,

Environmental   

Total

182 182 171 171 171 168 157 147

126 126 126 115 120 120 101 74

1,282 1,306 1,320 1,269 1,197 1,194 1,129 1,001

                       

                       

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 21-2    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

22 ECONOMIC ANALYSIS Under NI 43-101 rules, producing issuers may exclude the information required for Section 22 Economic Analysis on properties currently in production, unless the technical report includes a material expansion of current production. RPA notes that Barrick is a producing issuer, the Cortez Mine is currently in production, and a material  expansion  is  not  being  planned.  RPA  has  performed  an  economic  analysis  of  the  Cortez  Operations  using  the  estimates  presented  in  this  report  and confirms that the outcome is a positive cash flow that supports the statement of Mineral Reserves.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 22-1    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

23 ADJACENT PROPERTIES In 2011 the discovery of the Red Hill and Goldrush deposits was announced by Barrick. The two deposits are located four miles southeast of the Cortez Hills mine and 15 mi southeast of the Pipeline mine. Based on the results of wide spaced drilling, Barrick originally outlined two zones of gold mineralization along a seven kilometer long trend. The mineralization is primarily hosted in a favorable carbonate unit and has a tabular geometry. Host rocks are similar to those found at Barrick’s Cortez Hills and Goldstrike mines. The majority of the mineralization intersected to date is refractory and occurs at depths between 150 m and 500 m. Continued drilling of the mineralization has shown that the two deposits are in fact joined. As a result, the deposit has been renamed Goldrush, which includes both Red Hill and the original Goldrush deposits. At December 31, 2015, Barrick reported (2015 Year-End Report and Fourth Quarter Results) Measured and Indicated Mineral Resources for Goldrush to be 27.7 million tons grading 0.308 oz/st Au and containing 8.6 million ounces of gold, plus an Inferred Mineral Resource of 6.3 million tons grading 0.262 oz/st Au and containing 1.6 million ounces of gold. In  addition,  Barrick  has  identified  a  new  target  known  as  Fourmile,  located  one  to  three  kilometers  north  of  the  Goldrush  discovery.  This  area  is  geologically similar to the high grade Deep-Post and Deep-Star deposits in the Goldstrike area. Early drilling has intersected mineralization well above the average grade of the Measured and Indicated Resources at Goldrush. Potential quantities and grades in these preliminary results are conceptual in nature and there has been insufficient exploration at Fourmile to define a Mineral Resource at this time and it is uncertain that further exploration will result in the target being delineated as a Mineral Resource. RPA has not independently verified this information and this information is not necessarily indicative of the mineralization at Cortez.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 23-1    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

24 OTHER RELEVANT DATA AND INFORMATION No additional information or explanation is necessary to make this Technical Report understandable and not misleading.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 24-1    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

25 INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS Based on the site visit and review of the documentation available, RPA offers the following interpretation and conclusions: GEOLOGY AND MINERAL RESOURCES  

 



  The Cortez deposits are “Carlin” style porphyry/epithermal deposits hosted by sedimentary rocks.



  The sampling, sample preparation, analyses, security, and data verification meet or exceed industry standards and are appropriate for Mineral Resource estimation.



  The parameters, assumptions, and methodology used for Mineral Resource estimation are appropriate for the style of mineralization.



  Mineral Resources are reported exclusive of Mineral Reserves and are estimated effective December 31, 2015.



  Total Mineral Resources at the Cortez Operations are:

 

   

   

   

   

 



  Measured - 3.78 million tons, grading 0.048 oz/st Au, containing 181,000 oz Au.

• •

  Indicated - 44.40 million tons, grading 0.044 oz/st Au, containing 1,969,000 oz Au.   Inferred - 20.7 million tons, grading 0.04 oz/st Au, containing 861,000 oz Au.

 

     

 



  Open Pit Mineral Resources at the Cortez Operations are:

 

 



  Measured - 3.61 million tons, grading 0.034 oz/st Au, containing 124,000 oz Au.



  Indicated - 41.40 million tons, grading 0.026 oz/st Au, containing 1,082,000 oz Au.



  Inferred - 19.4 million tons, grading 0.02 oz/st Au, containing 395,000 oz Au.

 

   

   

 



  Underground Mineral Resources at the Cortez Operations are:

 

 



  Measured - 0.17 million tons, grading 0.339 oz/st Au, containing 56,000 oz Au.



  Indicated - 3.01 million tons, grading 0.295 oz/st Au, containing 886,000 oz Au.



  Inferred - 1.34 million tons, grading 0.35 oz/st Au, containing 466,000 oz Au.

 

   

 

MINING AND MINERAL RESERVES  

 



  The Mineral Reserves are contained within four open pit deposits, four zones in one underground deposit, and surface stockpiles.



  The December 31, 2015 Mineral Reserves as stated by Cortez are estimated in a manner consistent with industry practices.



  Total Mineral Reserves at the Cortez Operations are:

 

   

   

 



  Proven: 15.9 million tons, grading 0.065 oz/st Au, containing 1.03 million oz Au.



  Probable: 153.0 million tons, grading 0.066 oz/st Au, containing 10.09 million oz Au.

 

   

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 25-1    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

 



  Open Pit Mineral Reserves at the Cortez Operations are:

 

 



  Proven: 11.9 million tons, grading 0.045 oz/st Au, containing 0.54 million oz Au.



  Probable: 140.2 million tons, grading 0.040 oz/st Au, containing 5.67 million oz Au.

 

   

 



  Underground Mineral Reserves at the Cortez Operations are:

 

 



  Proven: 0.1 million tons, grading 0.514 oz/st Au, containing 0.06 million oz Au.



  Probable: 12.8 million tons, grading 0.345 oz/st Au, containing 4.41 million oz Au.

 

   

 



  The open pit mine is a conventional operation with 400 st and 345 st class off-highway haul trucks which are loaded a 35 yd  3 hydraulic shovel and five 48 yd 3 to 77 yd 3 electric shovels.



  The Cortez operation is permitted to dewater up to approximately 36,000 gpm from the underground and open pit mine areas.



  Mine  production  rates  are  projected  to  average  157  Mstpa  over  the  next  six  years  from  2016  to  2022.  Average  open  pit  ore  mining  rate  is approximately 19.1 Mstpa.



  CHUG is a mechanized decline access underground mine operating at approximately 2,000 stpd of ore.



  The Breccia, Middle, and Lower Zones of the underground mine are mined or planned to be mined using drift and fill mining methods.



  Mineral Resources in the Deep South Zone were converted to Mineral Reserves on the basis of a positive PFS completed by Barrick and Minetech (USA) LLC.



  The mining methods and equipment are considered to be suitable for the deposits.



  In the Deep South Zone, approximately 1.7 million oz of Measured and Indicated Mineral Resources were converted to Proven and Probable Mineral Reserves as of year-end 2015 on the basis of a positive PFS.



  The conclusions and recommendations of the Deep South Zone PFS are reasonable and appropriate for the deposit.



  The  Deep  South  Zone  PFS  work  included  re-evaluation  of  the  geotechnical  characteristics  and  the  design  for  the  mining  of  the  Deep  South  Zone includes long hole stoping which is expected to be more productive and lower cost than the drift and fill mining.



  The Deep South Zone has the potential to be a standalone expansion of the CHUG.

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 25-2    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

MINERAL PROCESSING AND METALLURGICAL TESTING  



  RPA is of the opinion that metallurgical test work completed for the Mine has been appropriate to establish optimal processing routes for the different mineralization styles encountered in the deposits and that the gold recovery calculations for all of the processing options are currently appropriate to estimate the amount of gold that will be recovered over the LOM.



  The mill and heap leach operations at Cortez are well run, cost effective processing facilities for oxide ore.



  There  are  no  appropriate  processes  for  single  and  double  refractory  ore  at  Cortez.  Therefore,  these  ore  types  are  shipped  to  Goldstrike  for processing.  Limits  to  the  transportation  rates  imposed  by  environmental  permits  restrict  the  amount  of  ore  that  can  be  shipped  to  1.2  Mstpa.  If additional refractory ore is mined, it must be stockpiled.



  TCM  processing  at  Goldstrike  is  advanced  technology  that  provides  additional  capacity  for  processing  carbonaceous,  preg-robbing  ore  without displacing material that is processed in the roaster. It also allows processing of ore with elevated concentrations of arsenic. The TCM technology uses calcium thiosulfate to leach the gold after pressure oxidation rather than cyanide and resin-in-pulp to recover the gold from the leach solution.

   

   

   

 

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS  

 



  One of the risks to the Mine is the receipt of permit approvals from the various government agencies.



  Cortez is diligent in managing its permitting and all environmental requirements for the property.



  RPA is not aware of any environmental issues that could materially impact Barrick’s ability to extract the Mineral Resources or Mineral Reserves at this time.

 

   

 

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS  

 



  RPA has performed  an  economic  analysis  of  the  Cortez  Operations  using  the  estimates  presented  in  this  report  and confirms  that  the  outcome  is  a positive cash flow that supports the statement of Mineral Reserves.

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 25-3    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

26 RECOMMENDATIONS Based upon its work, RPA provides the following recommendations. GEOLOGY AND MINERAL RESOURCES  

 



  Continue to revise and update the Mineral Resource modelling procedures, with specific consideration to the potential additional mineralization trend in the Crossroads pit and the incorporation of an ordinary kriging run as an additional validation check at Cortez Hills.



  Review the classification criteria, with consideration to variogram models based on single mineralization domains at Cortez Hills, and the inclusion of classification wireframe shells, particularly for the Measured component, or the incorporation of classification smoothing scripts.

 

 

MINING AND MINERAL RESERVES  

 



  Continue ore reconciliation tracking and attempt to identify and report the causes of any large changes on a monthly basis.



  Present the reconciliation results showing the percentage differences and not the absolute differences.



  Develop a set of orebody characteristics (width, height, grade, rock conditions) considered appropriate for long hole stoping and identify the quantity and location of those portions of the orebody amenable to long hole stoping.



  Consider the Lower Zone rock bin capacity to ensure that a smooth ore feed from the mine can be maintained.



  Review the small amounts of Inferred material within stope designs with a view to changing the classification  of these small areas so that Inferred Mineral Resources are not included in the stope plans.



  Modify the LOM and Mineral Reserve estimation process to include:

 

   

   

   

   

   

 



  a reconciliation between the LOM plan and the Mineral Reserve estimate



  a tabulation of the Mineral Resources converted by classification including the Inferred Mineral Resources



  a review of those Inferred Mineral Resources within the LOM plan to determine whether any can or should be reclassified as Indicated Mineral Resources



  the impact on the LOM plan of including the Inferred Mineral Resources within the plan at zero grade

 

   

   

   

 



  Prepare detailed reconciliations and comparisons for any future conversions to new or different software packages to identify any issues in the process.



  Continue the mine dewatering and careful highwall slope monitoring.

 

   

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 26-1    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

 



  Re-evaluate the use of blast movement monitoring to improve grade control.



  Develop detailed grade control accounting and stockpile management procedures.



  Refine use of cross over grades, and standardize the Mineral Reserve reporting with the LOM production schedule.



  Implement ore drive width increases to increase the productivity and/or production rate of the drift and fill mining.



  Assess areas of the Lower Zone for the application of long hole stoping methods and implement trials if suitable areas can be identified.

 

   

   

   

 

Continue to advance the planning of the Deep South Zone, which is included in the LOM plan, to optimize the production and development schedules in future years.  

 



  Continue to evaluate the initiative to process mineralized waste concurrently with material from the underground resource.

PROCESSING  

 



  Continue to evaluate new ore types and to optimize the processes to increase recovery and/or to decrease costs.



  Continue to work collaboratively  with the  Goldstrike  staff  to maintain  and  improve  the metallurgical  accounting  for treatment  of  Cortez  ore  in the roaster and the TCM process.

 

 

ENVIRONMENTAL  

 



  Continue to expedite environmental permitting as required to support the changes in operations and development of new areas of the mine.

COSTS  

 



  Continue to evaluate and implement opportunities for cost savings and profitability improvements.

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 26-2    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

27 REFERENCES AuTec Innovative Extractive Solutions Ltd., 2015, Cortez – Deep South Project Update 3, May 12, 2015. Barrick Gold Corporation, 2015, 2015 Year-End Report and Fourth Quarter Results, February 17, 2016 Barrick Gold Corporation, 2016, Press Release – Barrick Reports Project Study Results, February 22, 2016. Barrick of North America and Stantec-Mining, 2014, Concerning: Cortez Hills Lower Zone Feasibility Study Revision 0, May 15, 2014. Barrick of North America, 2014, Concerning: Cortez Hills Underground Mine Expansion below 3800 Level Scoping Study Revision 0, August 25, 2014. Barrick Gold of North America and Minetech USA, LLC, 2015 Cortez Hills Deep South Prefeasibility Study, December 7, 2015. Barrick Cortez, Inc., 2012, 2012 Amendment to Plan of Operations and Reclamation Permit Application (NVN-067575 (11-4A)), October 2012. Barrick Cortez, Inc., 2014a, Barrick Cortez, Inc. Environmental Management System Practices Manual, November 2014. Barrick  Cortez,  Inc.,  2014b,  Amendment  3  to  Plan  of  Operations  and  Reclamation  Permit  Application  (NVN-067575  (11-4A)),  August  2014,  Revised  October 2014. Barrick Cortez, Inc., 2015a, Ore Characterization Project Schedule, May 6, 2015. Barrick Cortez, Inc., 2015b, Barrick Cortez – Deep South Expansion Project Initial Project Presentation/Pre-Plan of Operations Kick-Off Meeting, April 20, 2015. Bureau of Land Management,  2008, Cortez Hills Expansion Project,  Record of Decision and Plan of Operations Amendment Approval, NVN-067575, NV063EIS06-011, November 2008. Bureau of Land Management, 2011, Cortez Hills Expansion Project, Record of Decision and Plan of Operations Amendment Approval, NVN-067575, DOI-BLMNV2010-0132-SEIS, November 2011. Choi,  Y.,  Baron,  J.Y.,  Wang,  Q.,  Langhans,  J.,  Kondos,  P.,  2013,  Thiosulfate  Processing  –  From  Lab  Curiosity  to  Commercial  Application,  World  Gold Conference, Brisbane, Australia, September 26–29, 2013. Ring, G., 2015, Cortez Hills Lower Zone Deep South Dewatering Schedule, a memo from to D. King, November 3, 2015. Goss, J., 2010, Gold Acres Window Geologic Modeling, prepared for Barrick Gold-Cortez by Rangefront Consulting, LLC (January 1, 2010).  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 27-1    

 

  

www.rpacan.com

 

MD Eng, 2015, MDEng Report #1111-R1505-01, Scoping Study Geotechnical Mine Design for Cortez Hills Deep South, May 25, 2015. MD Eng, 2015, MDEng Report #1111-R1510-01, Prefeasibility Study Geotechnical Mine Design for Cortez Hills Deep South. MD Eng, 2015, Cortez Deep South Prefeasibility Level Site Characterization, September 10, 2015. MD Eng, 2015, Cortez Deep South Prefeasibility Level Stress Modelling, October 2, 2015. Minetech USA, LLC, 2015, Cortez Deep South Underground Mining Report, December 7, 2015. Olson, J., 2014a, Ore Characterization Meeting Minutes, June 26, 2014. Olson, J., 2014b, Ore Characterization Meeting Minutes, July 31, 2014. Olson, J., 2014c, Minutes from the Ore Characterization Meeting, August 28, 2014. Olson, J., 2014d, Revision to Lech Ore Routing Guidelines, November 6, 2014. Olson, J., 2014e, Ore Control Guidance Update Memo, November 24, 2014. Olson, J., 2015, Ore Characterization Meeting Minutes, January 22, 2015. Potvin, Y., 1988, Empirical Open Stope Design in Canada. Ph.D. Thesis. University of British Columbia, 343 p. RPA,  2012,  Technical  Report  on  the  Cortez  Joint  Venture  Operations,  Lander  and  Eureka  Counties,  State  of  Nevada,  U.S.A.,  prepared  for  Barrick  Gold Corporation, filed on SEDAR March 28, 2012. SRK, 2011, Cortez Hills Underground Geotechnical Assessment for the Middle and Lower Zones”, August 2011.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 27-2    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

28 DATE AND SIGNATURE PAGE This  report  titled  “Technical  Report  on  the  Cortez  Operations,  State  of  Nevada,  U.S.A.”  and  dated  March  21,  2016  was  prepared  and  signed  by  the  following authors:

  Dated at Toronto, ON March 21, 2016

Dated at Toronto, ON March 21, 2016

Dated at Toronto, ON March 21, 2016

Dated at Toronto, ON March 21, 2016

Dated at Toronto, ON March 21, 2016

 

  (Signed and Sealed) “ Kathleen Ann Altman ”

     

    Kathleen Ann Altman, Ph.D., P.E.   Principal Metallurgist

 

  (Signed and Sealed) “ R. Dennis Bergen ”

     

    R. Dennis Bergen, P.Eng.   Principal Mining Engineer

 

  (Signed and Sealed) “ Stuart E. Collins ”

     

    Stuart E. Collins, P.E.   Principal Mining Engineer

 

  (Signed and Sealed) “ Chester M. Moore ”

     

    Chester M. Moore, P.Eng.   Principal Geologist

 

  (Signed and Sealed) “ Wayne W. Valliant ”

     

    Wayne W. Valliant, P.Geo.   Principal Geologist

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 28-1    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

29 CERTIFICATE OF QUALIFIED PERSON KATHLEEN ANN ALTMAN I Kathleen Ann Altman, Ph.D., P.E., as an author of this report entitled “Technical Report on the Cortez Operations, State of Nevada, U.S.A.” prepared for Barrick Gold Corporation and dated March 21, 2016, do hereby certify that:  

1.

I  am  Principal  Metallurgist  and  Director,  Mineral  Processing  and  Metallurgy  with  RPA  (USA)  Ltd.  of  Suite  505,  143  Union  Boulevard,  Lakewood,  Co., USA 80228.

 

2.

I  am  a  graduate  of  the  Colorado  School  of  Mines  in  1980  with  a  B.S.  in  Metallurgical  Engineering.  I  am  a  graduate  of  the  University  of  Nevada,  Reno Mackay School of Mines with an M.S. in Metallurgical Engineering in 1994 and a Ph.D. in Metallurgical Engineering in 1999.

 

3.

I am registered as a Professional Engineer in the State of Colorado (Reg. #37556) and a Qualified Professional Member of the Mining and  Metallurgical Society of America (Member #01321QP). I have worked as a metallurgical engineer for a total of 33 years since my graduation. My relevant experience for the purpose of the Technical Report is:

 

 



  Review  and  report  as  a  metallurgical  consultant  on  numerous  mining  operations  and  projects  around  the  world  for  due  diligence  and  regulatory requirements.



  I have worked for operating companies, including the Climax Molybdenum Company, Barrick Goldstrike, and FMC Gold in a series of positions of increasing responsibility.



  I  have  worked  as  a  consulting  engineer  on  mining  projects  for  approximately  15  years  in  roles  such  a  process  engineer,  process  manager,  project engineer, area manager, study manager, and project manager. Projects have included scoping, pre-feasibility and feasibility studies, basic engineering, detailed engineering and start-up and commissioning of new projects.



  I  was  the  Newmont  Professor  for  Extractive  Mineral  Process  Engineering  in  the  Mining  Engineering  Department  of  the  Mackay  School  of  Earth Sciences and Engineering at the University of Nevada, Reno from 2005 to 2009.

 

   

   

   

4.

I have read the definition of “qualified person” set out in National Instrument 43-101 (NI 43-101) and certify that by reason of my education, affiliation with a professional association (as defined in NI 43-101) and past relevant work experience, I fulfill the requirements to be a “qualified person” for the purposes of NI 43-101.

 

5.

I visited the Cortez Operations on May 5-7, 2015.

 

6.

I am responsible for Sections 13, 17, and 20 and share responsibility with my co-author for Sections 1, 2, 3, 24, 25, and 27 of the Technical Report.

 

7.

I am independent of the Issuer applying the test set out in Section 1.5 of NI 43-101.

 

8.

I  co-authored  a  previous  report  on  the  property  entitled  Technical  Report  on  the  Cortez  Joint  Venture  Operations,  Lander  and  Eureka  Counties,  State  of Nevada, U.S.A.

 

9.

I have read NI 43-101, and the Technical Report has been prepared in compliance with NI 43-101 and Form 43-101F1.

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 29-1    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

10.

At the effective date of the Technical Report, to the best of my knowledge, information, and belief, the Technical Report contains all scientific and technical information that is required to be disclosed to make the Technical Report not misleading.

Dated this 21 st day of March, 2016 (Signed and Sealed) “ Kathleen Ann Altman ” Kathleen Ann Altman, Ph.D., P.E.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 29-2    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

R. DENNIS BERGEN I, Raymond Dennis Bergen, P.Eng., as an author of this report entitled “Technical Report on the Cortez Operations, State of Nevada, U.S.A.” prepared for Barrick Gold Corporation and dated March 21, 2016, do hereby certify that:  

 

1.

I am an Associate Principal Mining Engineer with Roscoe Postle Associates Inc. of Suite 501, 55 University Ave. Toronto, ON, M5J 2H7.

2.

I  am  a  graduate  of  the  University  of  British  Columbia,  Vancouver,  B.C.,  Canada,  in  1979  with  a  Bachelor  of  Applied  Science  degree  in  Mineral Engineering.  I  am  a  graduate  of  the  British  Columbia  Institute  of  Technology  in  Burnaby,  B.C.,  Canada,  in  1972  with  a  Diploma  in  Mining Technology.

3.

I am registered as a Professional Engineer in the Province of British Columbia (Reg. #16064) and as a Licensee with the Association of Professional Engineers, Geologists and Geophysicists of the Northwest Territories (Licence L1660). I have worked as an engineer for a total of 35 years since my graduation. My relevant experience for the purpose of the Technical Report is:

 

   

   

 



  Practice as a mining engineer, production superintendent, mine manager, Vice President Operations and a consultant in the design, operation, and review of mining operations.



  Review and report, as an employee and as a consultant, on numerous mining operations and projects around the world for due diligence and operational review related to project acquisition and technical report preparation.



  Engineering and operating superintendent at the Con gold mine, a deep underground gold mine, Yellowknife, NWT, Canada



  General Manager of the Ketza River Mine, Yukon, Canada



  Vice President Operations in charge of the restart of the Golden Bear Mine, BC, Canada



  General Manager in Charge of the Reopening of the Cantung Mine, NWT, Canada



  Mine Manager at three different mines with open pit and underground operations.



  Consulting engineer (RPA Associate Principal Mining Engineer) for over nine years working on project reviews, engineering studies, Mineral Reserve audits, technical report preparation, and other studies for a wide range of worldwide projects.

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

4.

I  have  read  the  definition  of  “qualified  person”  set  out  in  National  Instrument  43-101  (NI  43-101)  and  certify  that  by  reason  of  my  education, affiliation  with a professional  association  (as defined  in NI 43-101) and past  relevant  work experience,  I fulfill  the  requirements  to be a “qualified person” for the purposes of NI 43-101.

5.

I visited the Cortez Operations on May 5-7, 2015.

6.

I am responsible for the underground portions of Sections 15, 16, 18, 19, 21, and 22 and share responsibility with my co-authors for Sections 1, 2, 3, 24, 25, 26, and 27 of the Technical Report.

7.

I am independent of the Issuer applying the test set out in Section 1.5 of NI 43-101.

8.

I co-authored a previous report on the property entitled Technical Report on the Cortez Joint Venture Operations, Lander and Eureka Counties, State of Nevada, U.S.A.

   

   

   

   

   

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 29-3    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

 

9.

I have read NI 43-101, and the Technical Report has been prepared in compliance with NI 43-101 and Form 43-101F1.

10.

At the effective date of the Technical Report, to the best of my knowledge, information, and belief, the Technical Report contains all scientific and technical information that is required to be disclosed to make the Technical Report not misleading.

 

 

Dated this 21 st day of March, 2016 (Signed and Sealed) “ R. Dennis Bergen ” Raymond Dennis Bergen, P.Eng.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 29-4    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

STUART E. COLLINS I,  Stuart  E.  Collins,  P.E.,  as  an  author  of  this  report  entitled  “Technical  Report  on  the  Cortez  Operations,  State  of  Nevada,  U.S.A.”  prepared  for  Barrick  Gold Corporation and dated March 21, 2016, do hereby certify that:  

1.

I am Principal Mining Engineer with RPA (USA) Ltd. of 143 Union Boulevard, Suite 505, Lakewood, Colorado, USA 80228.

 

2.

I am a graduate of South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, South Dakota, U.S.A., in 1985 with a B.S. degree in Mining Engineering.

 

3.

I am a Registered Professional Engineer in the state of Colorado (#29455). I have been a member of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration (SME)  since  1985,  and  a  Registered  Member  (#612514)  since  September  2006.  I  have  worked  as  a  mining  engineer  for  a  total  of  28  years  since  my graduation. My relevant experience for the purpose of the Technical Report is:

 

 



  Review  and  report  as  a  consultant  on  numerous  exploration,  development  and  production  mining  projects  around  the  world  for  due  diligence  and regulatory requirements;



  Mine engineering, mine management, mine operations and mine financial analyses, involving copper, gold, silver, nickel, cobalt, uranium, coal, and base metals located in the United States, Canada, Mexico, Turkey, Bolivia, Chile, Brazil, Costa Rica, Peru, Argentina, and Colombia.



  Engineering Manager for a number of mining-related companies;



  Business Development for a small, privately owned mining company in Colorado;



  Operations supervisor at a large gold mine in Nevada, USA;



  Involvement with the development and operation of a small underground gold mine in Arizona, USA.

 

   

   

   

   

   

4.

I have read the definition of “qualified person” set out in National Instrument 43-101 (NI 43-101) and certify that by reason of my education, affiliation with a professional association (as defined in NI 43-101) and past relevant work experience, I fulfill the requirements to be a “qualified person” for the purposes of NI 43-101.

 

5.

I visited the Cortez Operations on May 5-7, 2015.

 

6.

I am responsible for the open pit portions of Sections 15, 16, 18, 19, 21, and 22 and responsibility with my co-author for Sections 1, 2, 3, 24, 25, 26, and 27 of the Technical Report.

 

7.

I am independent of the Issuer applying the test set out in Section 1.5 of NI 43-101.

 

8.

I have had no prior involvement with the property that is the subject of the Technical Report.

 

9.

I have read NI 43-101, and the Technical Report has been prepared in compliance with NI 43-101 and Form 43-101F1.

 

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 29-5    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

10.

At the effective date of the Technical Report, to the best of my knowledge, information, and belief, the Technical Report contains all scientific and technical information that is required to be disclosed to make the Technical Report not misleading.

Dated this 21 st day of March, 2016 (Signed and Sealed) “ Stuart E. Collins ” Stuart E. Collins, P.E.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 29-6    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

CHESTER M. MOORE I, Chester M. Moore, P.Eng., as an author of this report entitled “Technical Report on the Cortez Operations, State of Nevada, U.S.A.” prepared for Barrick Gold Corporation and dated March 21, 2016, do hereby certify that:  

 

1.

I am Principal Geologist with Roscoe Postle Associates Inc. of Suite 501, 55 University Ave Toronto, ON, M5J 2H7.

2.

I am a graduate of the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada in 1972 with a Bachelor of Applied Science degree in Geological Engineering.

3.

I  am  registered  as  a  Professional  Engineer  in  the  Province  of  Ontario  (Reg.  #32455016).  I  have  worked  as  a  geologist  for  over  40  years  since  my graduation. My relevant experience for the purpose of the Technical Report is:

 

   

   

 



  Mineral  Resource  and Reserve  estimation,  feasibility  studies,  due diligence,  corporate  review  and audit  on exploration  projects  and mining operations world wide



  Various advanced exploration and mine geology positions at base metal and gold mining operations in Ontario, Manitoba and Saskatchewan



  Director, Mineral Reserve Estimation and Reporting at the corporate offices of a major Canadian base metal producer

 

   

   

4.

I  have  read  the  definition  of  “qualified  person”  set  out  in  National  Instrument  43-101  (NI  43-101)  and  certify  that  by  reason  of  my  education, affiliation  with a professional  association  (as defined  in NI 43-101) and past  relevant  work experience,  I fulfill  the  requirements  to be a “qualified person” for the purposes of NI 43-101.

5.

I visited the Cortez Operations on May 5-7, 2015.

6.

I am responsible for the underground portions of Sections 7 through 12 and 14 and share responsibility with my co-authors for Sections 1, 2, 3, 24, 25, 26, and 27 of the Technical Report.

7.

I am independent of the Issuer applying the test set out in Section 1.5 of NI 43-101.

8.

I have had no prior involvement with the property that is the subject of the Technical Report.

9.

I have read NI 43-101, and the Technical Report has been prepared in compliance with NI 43-101 and Form 43-101F1.

10.

At the effective date of the Technical Report, to the best of my knowledge, information, and belief, the Technical Report contains all scientific and technical information that is required to be disclosed to make the Technical Report not misleading.

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

Dated this 21 st day of March, 2016 (Signed and Sealed) “ Chester M. Moore ” Chester M. Moore, P.Eng.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 29-7    

  

 

www.rpacan.com

 

WAYNE W. VALLIANT I, Wayne W. Valliant, P.Geo., as an author of this report entitled “Technical Report on the Cortez Operations, State of Nevada, U.S.A.” prepared for Barrick Gold Corporation and dated March 21, 2016, do hereby certify that:  

 

1.

I am Principal Geologist with Roscoe Postle Associates Inc. of Suite 501, 55 University Ave Toronto, ON, M5J 2H7.

2.

I am a graduate of Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada in 1973 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Geology.

3.

I am registered as a Geologist in the Province of Ontario (Reg. #1175). I have worked as a geologist for a total of 40 years since my graduation. My relevant experience for the purpose of the Technical Report is:

 

   

   

 



  Review and report as a consultant on more than fifty mining operations and projects around the world for due diligence and resource/reserve estimation



  General Manager of Technical Services for corporation with operations and mine development projects in Canada and Latin America



  Superintendent of Technical Services at three mines in Canada and Mexico



  Chief Geologist at three Canadian mines, including two gold mines

 

   

   

   

4.

I  have  read  the  definition  of  “qualified  person”  set  out  in  National  Instrument  43-101  (NI  43-101)  and  certify  that  by  reason  of  my  education, affiliation  with a professional  association  (as defined  in NI 43-101) and past  relevant  work experience,  I fulfill  the  requirements  to be a “qualified person” for the purposes of NI 43-101.

5.

I visited the Cortez Operations on May 5-7, 2015.

6.

I am responsible for Sections 4, 5, 6, the open pit portions of Sections 7 through 12 and 14 and share responsibility with my co-authors for Sections 1, 2, 3, 24, 25, 26, and 27 of the Technical Report.

7.

I am independent of the Issuer applying the test set out in Section 1.5 of NI 43-101.

8.

I have had no prior involvement with the property that is the subject of the Technical Report.

9.

I have read NI 43-101, and the Technical Report has been prepared in compliance with NI 43-101 and Form 43-101F1.

10.

At the effective date of the Technical Report, to the best of my knowledge, information, and belief, the Technical Report contains all scientific and technical information that is required to be disclosed to make the Technical Report not misleading.

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

Dated this 21 st day of March, 2016 (Signed and Sealed) “ Wayne W. Valliant ” Wayne W. Valliant, P. Geo.  

      Barrick Gold Corporation – Cortez Operations, Project 2471     Technical Report NI 43-101 – March 21, 2016

  

Page 29-8