BEASLEY BROADCAST GROUP, INC.

BEASLEY BROADCAST GROUP, INC.

10-K 1 d647744d10k.htm FORM 10K Table of Contents UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Washington, D.C. 20549 FORM 10-K (Mark One)  AN...

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10-K 1 d647744d10k.htm FORM 10K Table of Contents

UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K (Mark One)

 ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2013 or

 TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 For the transition period from

to

Commission File Number: 000-29253

BEASLEY BROADCAST GROUP, INC. (Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware

65-0960915

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

3033 Riviera Drive, Suite 200 Naples, Florida 34103 (Address of principal executive offices and Zip Code)

(239) 263-5000

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Securities Registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: None Securities Registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: Class A Common Stock, $.001 par value

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes  No  Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 of Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes  No  Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes  No  Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes  No  Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10K.  Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a nonaccelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. Large accelerated filer 

Accelerated filer

Non-accelerated filer  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

Smaller reporting company 

Act).



Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Yes  No 

As of June 28, 2013, the aggregate market value of the Class A Common Stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant was $37,086,838 based on the number of shares outstanding as of such date and the closing price of $8.38 on NASDAQ’s National Market System on such date, the last business day of our most recently completed second fiscal quarter. Class A Common Stock, $.001 par value 6,368,032 Shares Outstanding as of February 4, 2014 Class B Common Stock, $.001 par value 16,662,743 Shares Outstanding as of February 4, 2014 Documents Incorporated by Reference

Certain information in the registrant’s Definitive Proxy Statement for its 2014 Annual Meeting of Stockholders pursuant to Regulation 14A, is incorporated by reference in Part III of this report.

Table of Contents BEASLEY BROADCAST GROUP, INC. FORM 10-K ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page

Part I—Financial Information Item 1. Item 1A. Item 1B. Item 2. Item 3. Item 4.

Business. Risk Factors. Unresolved Staff Comments. Properties. Legal Proceedings. Mine Safety Disclosures.

3 9 14 14 14 14

Part II—Other Information Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities. Item 6. Selected Financial Data. Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations. Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk. Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data. Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure. Item 9A. Controls and Procedures. Item 9B. Other Information. Item 5.

Part III Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance. Item 11. Executive Compensation. Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters. Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence. Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services.

15 16 16 22 23 41 41 42 43 43 43 43 43

Part IV Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules. Signatures

44 46

CERTAIN DEFINITIONS Unless the context requires otherwise, all references in this report to the “Company,” “we,” “us,” “our,” and similar terms refer to Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries. 2

Table of Contents PART I ITEM 1. BUSINESS Overview We are a radio broadcasting company whose primary business is operating radio stations throughout the United States. We own and operate 44 radio stations in the following markets: Atlanta, GA, Augusta, GA, Boston, MA, Fayetteville, NC, Fort Myers-Naples, FL, Greenville-New Bern-Jacksonville, NC, Las Vegas, NV, Miami-Fort Lauderdale, FL, Philadelphia, PA, West Palm Beach-Boca Raton, FL, and Wilmington, DE. We also operate one radio station in the expanded AM band in Augusta, GA (see “Federal Regulation of Radio Broadcasting” elsewhere in this Item). We refer to each group of radio stations in each radio market as a market cluster. Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc., a Delaware corporation, was formed in 1999. Strategy We seek to secure and maintain a leadership position in the markets we serve by developing market-leading clusters of radio stations in each of our markets. We operate our radio stations in clusters to capture a variety of demographic listener groups, which we believe enhances our radio stations’ appeal to a wide range of advertisers. In addition, we have been able to achieve operating efficiencies by consolidating office and studio space where possible to minimize duplicative management positions and reduce overhead expenses. Finally, we will consider opportunities to swap existing radio stations with other radio station owners in new or existing markets. Current FCC rules and regulations do not permit us to add any more radio stations to our existing clusters in the Fayetteville, NC and Augusta, GA radio markets. Competition The radio broadcasting industry is highly competitive. Our radio stations compete for listeners and advertising revenue with other radio stations within their respective markets. In addition, our radio stations compete with other media such as broadcast and cable television, newspapers and magazines, outdoor advertising, direct mail, internet radio, satellite radio, smart phones, tablets, and other wireless media, the internet, social media such as Facebook and Twitter, and other forms of advertising. The following are some of the factors that we believe are important to a radio station’s competitive position: (i) audience ratings; (ii) program content; (iii) management experience; (iv) sales experience; (v) audience characteristics; and (vi) the number and characteristics of other radio stations and other advertising media in the market area. We attempt to improve our competitive position with promotional campaigns aimed at the demographic groups targeted by our radio stations and by sales efforts designed to attract advertisers. We conduct extensive market research in an effort to enhance our audience ratings and, in certain circumstances, to identify opportunities to reformat radio stations to reach underserved demographic groups and increase advertising revenue. Federal Regulation of Radio Broadcasting The radio broadcasting industry is subject to extensive and changing federal regulations administered by the Federal Communications Commission, or FCC. Among other things, the FCC: •

assigns frequency bands for broadcasting;



determines the particular frequencies, locations, operating powers and other technical parameters of radio stations;



issues, renews, revokes, conditions and modifies radio station licenses;



determines whether to approve changes in ownership or control of radio station licenses;



regulates equipment used by radio stations; and



adopts and implements regulations and policies that directly or indirectly affect the ownership, operation, program content and employment practices of radio stations.

The FCC has the power to impose penalties for violations of its rules or the Communications Act of 1934 (“Communications Act”), as amended, including the imposition of monetary forfeitures, the issuance of short-term licenses, the imposition of a condition on the renewal of a license, and, in egregious cases, non-renewal of licenses and the revocation of licenses. The following is a brief summary of some provisions of the Communications Act and of certain specific FCC rules and policies. The summary is not a comprehensive listing of all of the regulations and policies affecting radio stations. For further information concerning the nature and extent of federal regulation of radio stations, you should refer to the Communications Act, FCC rules and FCC public notices and rulings. 3

Table of Contents FCC Licenses. Radio stations operate pursuant to broadcasting licenses that are ordinarily granted by the FCC for renewable terms of eight years. A radio station may continue to operate beyond the expiration date of its license if a timely filed license renewal application is pending. During the period following the filing of renewal applications, petitions to deny license renewals can be filed by interested parties, including members of the public. Generally, the FCC renews a broadcast license upon a finding that (i) the broadcast station has served the public interest, convenience and necessity; (ii) there have been no serious violations by the licensee of the Communications Act or the FCC’s rules; and (iii) there have been no other violations by the licensee of the Communications Act or other FCC rules which, taken together, indicate a pattern of abuse. Historically, FCC licenses have generally been renewed, and in the last renewal cycle, all of our licenses were renewed. The current renewal cycle started in April 2011, and will conclude in April 2014. Our timely-filed renewal applications for certain of our radio stations have not been granted by the FCC. Pursuant to FCC rules, our broadcast licenses for these stations remain in effect pending processing by the FCC of their timely-filed renewal applications. We have no reason to believe that our licenses will not be renewed, although there can be no assurance to that effect. The non-renewal of one or more of our licenses could have a material adverse effect on our business. The FCC classifies each AM and FM radio station. An AM radio station operates on either a clear channel, regional channel or local channel. A clear channel is one on which AM radio stations are assigned to serve wide areas, particularly at night. The minimum and maximum facilities requirements for an FM radio station are determined by its class. Possible FM class designations depend upon the geographic zone in which the transmitter of the FM radio station is located. In general, commercial FM radio stations are classified as follows, in order of increasing power and antenna height: Class A, B1, C3, B, C2, C1, C0, or C. The FCC has authorized an additional 100 kHz of bandwidth for the AM band and has allotted frequencies in this new band to certain existing AM radio station licensees that applied for migration to the expanded AM band, including one of our radio stations, subject to the requirement that at the end of a transition period, those licensees return to the FCC the license for one of the AM band radio stations. Upon the completion of the migration process, it is expected that some AM radio stations will have improved coverage because of reduced interference. We have not completed our evaluation of the impact of the migration process on our operations but believe that such impact will not be significant. We currently operate one radio station in the expanded AM band in Augusta, GA. Current FCC requirements call for surrender of either the expanded band license or the existing band license. This surrender obligation is currently suspended while the FCC evaluates third party proposals to allow for the sale rather than surrender of one of the two licenses, including a proposal to allow such a sale to a qualifying “small business.” The surrender of either license will have no material impact on our results of operations or financial condition.

The FCC also permits radio licensees to operate FM translator and FM booster stations. These are low power secondary stations that retransmit the programming of a radio station to portions of the station’s service area that the primary signal does not reach because of distance or terrain barriers. Boosters operate on the same frequency as the station being retransmitted and translators operate on a different frequency. The FCC recently authorized the use of FM translators to retransmit the signals of AM stations. The FCC has adopted rules establishing a low power radio service. Low power FM stations operate in the existing FM radio band with a maximum operating power of 100 watts. The FCC recently adopted regulations regarding eligibility for and licensing of low power FM radio stations that will expand licensing opportunities for low power FM radio stations. Implementation of a low power radio service provides an additional audio programming service that could compete with our radio stations for listeners. Indecency Regulation. The FCC’s rules prohibit the broadcast of obscene material at any time and indecent material between the hours of 6 am and 10 pm. Broadcasters’ risk of violating the prohibition on the broadcast of indecent material is increased by the vagueness of the FCC’s definition of indecent material, coupled with the spontaneity of live programming. The FCC has expanded the breadth of indecency regulation to include material that could be considered “blasphemy,” “personally reviling epithets,” “profanity” and vulgar or coarse words, amounting to a nuisance. The maximum permitted fine for an indecency violation is $325,000 per incident and $3,000,000 for any continuing violation arising from a single act or failure to act. Because the FCC may investigate indecency complaints prior to notifying a licensee of the existence of a complaint, a licensee may not have knowledge of a complaint unless and until the complaint results in the issuance of a formal FCC letter of inquiry or notice of apparent liability for forfeiture. In July 2010, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit issued a decision finding that the FCC’s indecency standard was too vague for broadcasters to interpret and therefore inconsistent with the First Amendment. In June 2012, the Supreme Court issued a decision which held that the FCC could not fine ABC and FOX for the specific broadcasts at issue in the case because the FCC had not provided them with sufficient notice of its intent to issue fines for the use of fleeting expletives. The Court did not specifically address whether the FCC’s indecency standard violates the First Amendment, which means that the FCC may continue to enforce the standard. In April 2013, the FCC issued a request for comments regarding its indecency policy and specifically requested parties to address whether it should adopt a policy that bans the use of fleeting expletives or whether it should only impose fines for broadcasts that involve repeated and deliberate use of expletives. The FCC has not issued any decisions regarding indecency enforcement since the Supreme Court’s decision was issued although it has advised that while it reviews its standards it will continue to issue enforcement actions in egregious cases. We cannot predict whether Congress will consider or adopt further legislation in this area. 4

Table of Contents Transfers or Assignment of License. The Communications Act prohibits the assignment of broadcast licenses or the transfer of control of a broadcast licensee without the prior approval of the FCC. In determining whether to grant such approval, the FCC considers, among other things: •

compliance with the various rules limiting common ownership of media properties in a given market;



the character of the proposed licensee and those persons holding attributable interests in the licensee; and



compliance with the Communications Act’s limitations on alien ownership as well as compliance with other FCC regulations and policies.

To obtain FCC consent to assign or transfer control of a broadcast license, appropriate applications must be filed with the FCC. Interested parties, including members of the public, have the opportunity to file objections against assignment and transfer of control applications.

Multiple and Cross-Ownership Rules. The Communications Act and FCC rules impose specific limits on the number of commercial radio stations an entity can own, directly or by attribution, in a single market and the combination of radio stations, television stations and newspapers that any entity can own, directly or by attribution, in a single market. Digital radio channels authorized for AM and FM stations do not count as separate “stations” for purposes of the ownership limits. The radio multiple-ownership rules may preclude us from acquiring certain radio stations we might otherwise seek to acquire. The ownership rules also effectively prevent us from selling radio stations in a market to a buyer that has reached its ownership limit in the market unless that buyer divests other radio stations. The FCC is required to review quadrennially the media ownership rules and to modify, repeal or retain any rules as it determines to be in the public interest. In December 2011, the FCC issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (“Ownership NPRM”) with respect to its 2010 quadrennial review of the media ownership rules. The Ownership NPRM proposes to modify the newspaper broadcast cross-ownership rule to apply a positive presumption to requests to own a daily newspaper and a broadcast station in the 20 largest Designated Market Areas (“DMAs”) if certain conditions are met and to repeal the radio television cross-ownership rule. The FCC has not yet released any orders with respect to the 2010 review. The FCC may decide to defer action with respect to the 2010 review and consider issues addressed in the Ownership NPRM as part of its 2014 quadrennial review. The FCC’s ownership rules that are currently in effect are briefly summarized below. Local Radio Ownership Rule. The local radio ownership rule establishes the following limits: •

in markets with 45 or more radio stations, ownership is limited to eight commercial radio stations, no more than five of which can be either AM or FM;



in markets with 30 to 44 radio stations, ownership is limited to seven commercial radio stations, no more than four of which can be either AM or FM;



in markets with 15 to 29 radio stations, ownership is limited to six commercial radio stations, no more than four of which can be either AM or FM; and



in markets with 14 or fewer radio stations, ownership is limited to five commercial radio stations or no more than 50% of the market’s total, whichever is lower, and no more than three of which can be either AM or FM.

For stations located in a market in which the Arbitron ratings service provides ratings, the definition of “radio market” is based on the radio market to which BIA Kelsey reports assign the affected radio stations. For stations that are not in an Arbitron market, the market definition is based on technical service areas, pending a further FCC rulemaking. The FCC’s rules also provide that parties which own groups of radio stations that comply with the previous multiple ownership rules, but do not comply with the new limits, will be allowed to retain those groups on a “grandfathered” basis, but will not be allowed to transfer or assign those groups intact. Under these rules, our ability to transfer or assign our radio stations as a group to a single buyer in one of our current markets may be limited. Radio-Television Cross-Ownership Rule. The FCC’s radio-television cross-ownership rule permits a single owner to own or control up to two television stations, consistent with the FCC’s rules on common ownership of television stations, together with one radio station in all markets. In addition, an owner will be permitted to own additional radio stations, not to exceed the local radio ownership limits for the market, as follows: •

in markets where 20 media voices will remain after the consummation of the proposed transaction, an owner may own an additional five radio stations, or, if the owner only has one television station, an additional six radio stations; and



in markets where 10 media voices will remain after the consummation of the proposed transaction, an owner may own an additional three radio stations. 5

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A media voice generally includes each independently-owned, full power television and radio station and each daily newspaper, plus one cable television system per market. The Ownership NPRM, among other things, proposes the repeal of the radio-television cross-ownership rule. Newspaper-Broadcast Cross-Ownership Rule. Under the currently effective newspaper-broadcast crossownership rule, unless grandfathered or subject to waiver, no party can have an attributable interest in both a daily English-language newspaper and either a television or radio station in the same market. The Ownership NPRM proposes to relax the newspaper-broadcast cross-ownership rule to apply a positive presumption to requests to own a daily newspaper and a broadcast station in the 20 largest DMAs if certain conditions are met. Ownership Attribution. The FCC generally applies its ownership limits to attributable interests held by an individual, corporation, partnership or other entity. An “attributable” interest for purposes of the FCC’s broadcast ownership rules generally includes: (i) equity and debt interests which combined exceed 33% of a licensee’s total assets, if the interest holder supplies more than 15% of the licensee’s total weekly programming, or has an attributable same-market media interest, whether television, radio, cable or newspaper; (ii) a 5% or greater direct or indirect voting stock interest, including certain interests held in trust, unless the holder is a qualified passive investor in which case the threshold is a 20% or greater voting stock interest; (iii) any equity interest in a limited liability company or a partnership, including a limited partnership, unless properly “insulated” from management activities; and (iv) any position as an officer or director of a licensee or its direct or indirect parent. In addition, the interests of minority shareholders in a corporation generally are not attributable if a single entity or individual controls 50% or more of that corporation’s voting stock. Foreign Ownership Rules. The Communications Act prohibits the issuance or holding of broadcast licenses by persons who are not U.S. citizens, whom the FCC rules refer to as “aliens,” including any corporation organized under the laws of a foreign country or of which more than 20% of its capital stock is owned or voted by aliens. In addition, the FCC may prohibit any corporation from holding a broadcast license if the corporation is controlled by any other corporation of which more than 25% of the capital stock is owned of record or voted by aliens. In the past, the FCC has interpreted the 25% foreign ownership limit for holding companies as an absolute prohibition. In November 2013, however, the FCC issued a Declaratory Ruling clarifying that it would review situations in which foreigners own more than 25% of a holding company of an entity that holds a broadcast license on a case by case basis. Our certificate of incorporation prohibits the ownership, voting and transfer of our capital stock in violation of the FCC restrictions, and prohibits the issuance of capital stock or the voting rights such capital stock represents to or for the account of aliens or corporations otherwise subject to domination or control by aliens in excess of the FCC limits. The certificate of incorporation authorizes our board of directors to enforce these prohibitions. For example, the certificate of incorporation provides for the redemption of shares of our capital stock by action of the board of directors to the extent necessary to comply with these alien ownership restrictions. Time Brokerage and Joint Sales Agreements. It is not uncommon for radio stations to enter into agreements under which separately owned and licensed radio stations agree to enter into cooperative arrangements of varying sorts, subject to compliance with the requirements of antitrust laws and with FCC’s rules and policies. Under these arrangements, separately-owned radio stations could agree to function cooperatively in programming, advertising sales and similar matters, subject to the requirement that the licensee of each radio station maintain independent control over the programming and operations of its own radio station. The FCC’s rules provide that a radio station that brokers more than 15% of the weekly broadcast time on another radio station serving the same market or sells more than 15% of the other station’s advertising time per week will be considered to have an attributable ownership interest in the other radio station for purposes of the FCC’s local radio ownership limits. FCC rules also prohibit a broadcast station from duplicating more than 25% of its programming on another radio station in the same broadcast service, that is AM-AM or FM-FM, either through common ownership of the two radio stations or through a time brokerage agreement, where the brokered and brokering radio stations which it owns or programs serve substantially the same area. Programming and Operations. The Communications Act requires broadcasters to serve the public interest. The FCC gradually has relaxed or eliminated many of the more formalized procedures it had developed in the past

to promote the broadcast of certain types of programming responsive to the needs of a radio station’s community of license, although there are pending rulemaking proceedings that propose to implement various requirements aimed at increasing local programming content and diversity. If adopted, these new requirements would impose new record-keeping and other burdens on our radio stations. Under the currently effective rules, a licensee is required to present programming that is responsive to issues of the radio station’s community of license and to maintain records demonstrating this responsiveness. Complaints from listeners concerning a radio station’s programming often will be considered by the FCC when it evaluates renewal applications of a licensee, although listener complaints may be filed and considered by the FCC at any time. Such complaints are required to be maintained in the radio station’s public file. Radio stations also must pay regulatory and application fees and follow various rules promulgated under the Communications Act. Those rules regulate, among other things, political advertising, sponsorship identifications, the advertisement of contests and lotteries, employment practices, broadcast of obscene and indecent content, and technical operations, including limits on human exposure to radio frequency radiation. The FCC’s rules on equal employment opportunities prohibit employment discrimination by radio stations on the basis of race, religion, color, national origin, and gender; and require broadcasters to implement programs to promote equal employment 6

Table of Contents opportunities at their radio stations. The rules generally require broadcasters to widely disseminate information about full-time job openings to all segments of the community to ensure that all qualified applicants have sufficient opportunity to apply for the job, to send job vacancy announcements to recruitment organizations and others in the community indicating an interest in all or some vacancies at the radio station, and to implement a number of specific longer-term recruitment outreach efforts, such as job fairs, internship programs, and interaction with educational and community groups from among a menu of approaches itemized by the FCC. Proposed and Recent Changes. Congress and the FCC are considering or may in the future consider and adopt new laws, regulations and policies regarding a wide variety of matters that could affect, directly or indirectly, the operation, ownership and profitability of our radio stations, including the loss of audience share and advertising revenues for our radio stations, and an inability to acquire additional radio stations or to finance those acquisitions. Such matters may include: •

changes in the FCC’s multiple-ownership, cross-ownership and attribution policies;



regulatory fees, spectrum use fees or other fees on FCC licenses;



recently approved increases in the royalties paid by radio stations with respect to internet streaming;



changes in laws with respect to foreign ownership of broadcast licenses;



revisions to the FCC’s rules relating to political broadcasting, including free airtime to candidates;



technical and frequency allocation matters;



proposals to restrict or prohibit the advertising of beer, wine and other alcoholic beverages on radio;



proposals to require radio broadcasters to pay royalties to musicians and record labels for the performance of music played on the stations;



proposals to limit the tax deductibility of or impose sales tax on advertising expenses by advertisers;



proposals to regulate or prohibit payments to stations by independent record promoters, record labels and others for the inclusion of specific content in broadcast programming;



proposals to require broadcast stations to operate studios in the communities to which they are licensed, which would require construction of the new studios, and to provide staffing on a 24 hour per day basis; and



proposals in legislation to strengthen protections against online infringement of intellectual property that would impose criminal penalties on content providers, including broadcasters, that fail to comply with legal requirements to file reports regarding internet streaming in a timely manner.

The FCC has recently launched an inquiry which proposes that television stations use a standardized issues/programming form, and has indicated that if the proposal is adopted it would consider requiring the use of the same or a similar form by radio stations. This form requests detailed information concerning what steps a station undertook to determine the issues of concern within its local market, and the amount and nature of news and public service programming which was presented to address those issues. The FCC has also adopted procedures for the auction of broadcast spectrum in circumstances where two or more parties have filed for new or major change applications that are mutually exclusive. Such procedures may limit our efforts to modify or expand the broadcast signals of our radio stations. In March 2010, the FCC delivered its national Broadband Plan to Congress. The Plan reviews the nation’s broadband infrastructure and recommends a number of initiatives designed to spur broadband deployment and use. In an effort to make available more spectrum for wireless broadband services, the Broadband Plan proposes to recapture and relocate certain spectrum including 120 megahertz of broadcast spectrum, by incentivizing current private-sector spectrum holders to return some of their spectrum to the government through such initiatives as voluntary spectrum auctions (with current licensees permitted to share in the auction proceeds) and “repacking” of television channel assignments to increase efficient spectrum usage. In November 2010, the FCC issued rulemakings containing proposals that would enable wireless providers to have equal access to broadcast spectrum that could be made available through spectrum auctions. In February 2012, Congress passed legislation authorizing the FCC to conduct a reverse incentive auction in which licensees of television stations may voluntarily relinquish their spectrum usage rights in exchange for a portion of the proceeds received from new licensees who successfully bid in a forward auction for the right to use the repurposed spectrum. The statute also authorizes the FCC to repack the spectrum now used by television broadcasters, subject to certain limitations, including the obligation to make all reasonable efforts to preserve the coverage area and population served by a television station. In October 2012, the FCC released a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking that includes proposals for the conduct of the reverse and forward spectrum auctions and the spectrum repacking process. The FCC has released additional general information regarding the spectrum repacking process, but has not yet released specific proposals regarding the implementation of repacking. In addition, the FCC has stated that the auctions will not occur until mid-2015 instead of during 2014 as it had originally proposed. At this time we cannot predict the outcome of implementation of the proposed incentive auction or whether it will have an impact on our radio stations. 7

Table of Contents We cannot predict what other matters might be considered in the future by the FCC or Congress, nor can we judge in advance what impact, if any, the implementation of any of these proposals or changes might have on our business. Federal Antitrust Laws. The agencies responsible for enforcing the federal antitrust laws, the Federal Trade Commission or the Department of Justice, may investigate certain acquisitions. We cannot predict the outcome of any specific FTC or Department of Justice investigation. Any decision by the FTC or the Department of Justice to challenge a proposed acquisition could affect our ability to consummate the acquisition or to consummate it on the proposed terms. For an acquisition meeting certain size thresholds, the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act of 1976 requires the parties to file Notification and Report Forms concerning antitrust issues with the FTC and the Department of Justice and to observe specified waiting period requirements before consummating the acquisition.

HD Radio The FCC selected In-Band On-Channel technology as the exclusive technology for introduction of terrestrial digital operations by AM and FM radio stations. The technology, developed by iBiquity Digital Corporation (“iBiquity”), is also known as “HD Radio.” We are also a member of the HD Digital Radio Alliance Association, which was formed to promote and develop HD Radio and its digital multicast operations. The advantages of digital audio broadcasting over traditional analog broadcasting technology include improved sound quality, the ability to broadcast additional channels, and the ability to offer a greater variety of auxiliary services. We currently utilize HD Radio digital technology on most of our stations. Seasonality Seasonal revenue fluctuations are common in the radio broadcasting industry and are due primarily to fluctuations in advertising expenditures. Our net revenues are typically lowest in the first calendar quarter of the year. Employees As of February 4, 2014, we had a staff of 417 full-time employees and 243 part-time employees. We are a party to a collective bargaining agreement with the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists. This agreement applies only to certain of our employees at one radio station in Philadelphia. The collective bargaining agreement automatically renews for successive one-year periods unless either party gives a notice of proposed termination at least sixty days before the termination date. We believe that our relations with our employees are good. Environmental As the owner, lessee or operator of various real properties and facilities, we are subject to federal, state and local environmental laws and regulations. Historically, compliance with these laws and regulations has not had a material adverse effect on our business. There can be no assurance, however, that compliance with existing or new environmental laws and regulations will not require us to make significant expenditures in the future. Available Information Our internet address is www.bbgi.com. You may obtain through our internet website, free of charge, copies of our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and any amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act. These reports will be available as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish such material to, the Securities and Exchange Commission. You may also read and copy any materials we file with the Commission at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, DC 20549, on official business days during the hours of 10am to 3pm. The public may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the Commission at 1-800-SEC-0330. The Commission maintains an internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the Commission, www.sec.gov. 8

Table of Contents ITEM 1A.RISK FACTORS CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

Our Form 10-K disclosure and analysis concerning our operations, cash flows and financial position, including, in particular, the likelihood of our success in developing and expanding our business, include forwardlooking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act and Section 21E of the Exchange Act. Statements that are predictive in nature, that depend upon or refer to future events or conditions, or that include words such as “guidance,” “may,” “will,” “could,” “should,” “forecasts,” “expects,” “intends,” “plans,” “anticipates,” “projects,” “outlook,” “believes,” “estimates,” “predicts,” “potential,” “continue,” “preliminary,” or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology are forward-looking statements. Although these statements are based upon assumptions we consider reasonable, they are subject to risks and uncertainties that are described more fully below. Accordingly, we can give no assurance that we will achieve the results anticipated or implied by our forward-looking statements. The radio broadcasting industry faces many unpredictable business risks and is sensitive to external economic forces that could have a material adverse effect on our advertising revenues and results of operations. Our future operations are subject to many business risks, including those risks that specifically influence the radio broadcasting industry, which could have a material adverse effect on our business. These risks include, but are not limited to: •

shifts in population, demographics or audience preferences;



increased competition for advertising revenues with other radio stations, broadcast and cable television, newspapers and magazines, outdoor advertising, direct mail, internet radio, satellite radio, smart phones, tablets, and other wireless media, the internet, social media such as Facebook and Twitter, and other forms of advertising; and



changes in government regulations and policies and actions of federal regulatory bodies, including the Federal Communications Commission, Internal Revenue Service, United States Department of Justice, and the Federal Trade Commission.

In addition, we believe that for most businesses advertising is a discretionary business expense, meaning that spending on advertising tends to decline disproportionately during an economic recession or downturn as compared to other types of business spending. Unfavorable changes in economic conditions as well as declining consumer confidence, recession and other factors could lead to decreased demand for advertising and negatively impact our advertising revenues and our results of operations. We cannot predict with accuracy the timing or duration of any economic downturn generally, or in the markets in which our advertisers operate. If the economic environment does worsen, there can be no assurance that we will not experience a decline in revenues, which may negatively impact our financial condition and results of operations. Our radio stations may not be able to compete effectively in their respective markets for advertising revenues, which could adversely affect our revenue and cash flow. We operate in a highly competitive business. A decline in our audience share or advertising rates in a particular market may cause a decline in the revenue and cash flow of our stations located in that market. Our radio stations compete for audiences and advertising revenues within their respective markets directly with other radio stations, as well as with other media outlets. These other media outlets include broadcast and cable television, newspapers and magazines, outdoor advertising, direct mail, internet radio, satellite radio, smart phones, tablets, and other wireless media, the internet, social media such as Facebook and Twitter, and other forms of advertising. Our radio stations could suffer a reduction in audience ratings or advertising revenue and could incur increased promotional and other expenses if: •

another radio station in a market was to convert its programming to a format similar to, and thereby compete more directly with, one of our radio stations; or



a new radio station was to adopt a comparable format or if an existing competitor were to improve its

audience share. •

a current or new advertising alternative increased its share of local and national advertising revenue.

Other radio broadcasting companies may enter into markets in which we operate or may operate in the future. These companies may be larger and have more financial resources than we have. Our radio stations may not be able to maintain or increase their current audience ratings and advertising revenues. 9

Table of Contents We may not remain competitive if we do not respond to changes in technology, standards and services that affect our industry. The radio broadcasting industry is subject to technological change, evolving industry standards and the emergence of other media technologies and services. We may not have the resources to acquire and deploy other technologies or to introduce new services that could compete with these other technologies. Competition arising from other technologies or regulatory change may have an adverse effect on the radio broadcasting industry or on our Company. Various other audio technologies and services that have been developed and introduced include: •

personal digital audio devices (e.g. smart phones, tablets);



satellite delivered digital audio radio services that offer numerous programming channels and the sound quality of compact discs;



audio programming by internet content providers, internet radio stations, cable systems, direct broadcast satellite systems, personal communications services and other digital audio broadcast formats;



HD Radio, which provides multi-channel, multi-format digital radio services in the same bandwidth currently occupied by traditional AM and FM radio services;



low power FM radio stations, which are non-commercial FM radio broadcast outlets that serve small, localized areas; and



portable digital devices and systems that permit users to listen to programming on a time-delayed basis and to fast-forward through programming and/or advertisements.

These new technologies have the potential to change the means by which advertisers can reach target audiences most effectively. We cannot predict the effect, if any, that competition arising from other technologies or regulatory change may have on the radio broadcasting industry or on our financial condition and results of operations. We have substantial debt that could have important consequences to you. We have debt that is substantial in relation to our stockholders’ equity. As of December 31, 2013, we had long-term debt of $106.9 million and stockholders’ equity of $93.6 million. Our long-term debt is substantial in amount and could have an impact on you. For example, it could: •

require us to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations to debt service, thereby reducing the availability of cash flow for other purposes, including ongoing capital expenditures and future acquisitions;



impair our ability to obtain additional financing for working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions and general corporate or other purposes;



limit our ability to compete, expand and make capital improvements;



increase our vulnerability to economic downturns, limit our ability to withstand competitive pressures and reduce our flexibility in responding to changing business and economic conditions; and



limit or prohibit our ability to pay dividends and make other distributions.

Our ability to reduce our total leverage ratio by increasing operating cash flow and/or decreasing long-term debt will determine how much, if any, of the remaining commitments under our credit facility will be available to us in the future. Poor financial results or unanticipated expenses could result in our failure to maintain or lower our total leverage ratio and we may not be permitted to make any additional borrowings under our credit facility. Any additional borrowings would further increase the amount of our debt and the associated risks. In addition, there can be no assurances that additional financing will be available or on terms that will be acceptable to us. We are subject to restrictive debt covenants, which may restrict our operational flexibility. Our credit facility contains various financial and operating covenants, including, among other things, restrictions on our ability to incur additional indebtedness, subject our assets to additional liens, enter into certain investments, consolidate, merge or effect asset sales, enter into sale and lease-back transactions, sell or discount accounts receivable, enter into transactions with our affiliates or stockholders, change the nature of our business, pay dividends on and redeem or repurchase capital stock, or make other restricted payments. These restrictions could limit our ability to take actions that require funds in excess of those available to us. 10

Table of Contents Our credit facility also requires us to maintain specified financial ratios and to satisfy financial condition tests. Our ability to meet those financial ratios and tests may be affected by events beyond our control and we cannot assure you that we will meet those ratios and tests. If our revenues were to decrease significantly it may become increasingly difficult for us to meet these financial covenants. In response we will continue to control costs and expenses in non-essential areas. Our breach of any of these covenants, ratios, tests or restrictions could result in an event of default under our credit facility. If an event of default exists under our credit facility, the lenders could elect to declare all amounts outstanding thereunder to be immediately due and payable. If the lenders accelerate the payment of the indebtedness, we cannot assure you that our assets would be sufficient to repay in full that indebtedness which could force us to seek protection under federal bankruptcy laws and could significantly or entirely reduce the value of our equity. We may also incur future debt obligations in addition to, or in lieu of, our credit facility. Such future debt obligations might subject us to additional and different restrictive covenants that could further limit our operational flexibility or subject us to other events of default. Our ability to pay regular dividends on our common stock is subject to the discretion of our Board of Directors and may be limited by our structure, statutory restrictions and restrictions imposed by our credit agreement as well as any future agreements. Our Board of Directors declared a quarterly dividend of $0.045 per share of common stock in the fourth quarter of 2013. While we intend to pay a regular quarterly cash dividend, future payments, if any, will be at the discretion of our Board of Directors. Future quarterly dividend payments can also be changed or discontinued at any time and will be subject to limitations under the terms of any existing credit agreements. The payment and timing of any future quarterly dividends will also depend upon, among other things, our future operations and earnings, capital requirements and surplus, general financial condition, contractual restrictions and other factors deemed relevant by our Board of Directors. We are dependent on federally-issued licenses to operate our radio stations and are subject to extensive federal regulation.

The radio broadcasting industry is subject to extensive regulation by the FCC under the Communications Act. We are required to obtain licenses from the FCC to operate our radio stations. Our business depends upon maintaining our broadcast licenses, which are issued by the FCC for a term of eight years and are renewable. Our timely-filed renewal applications for certain of our radio stations have not been granted by the FCC. Pursuant to FCC rules, our broadcast licenses for these stations remain in effect pending processing by the FCC of their timelyfiled renewal applications. Although the vast majority of FCC radio station licenses are routinely renewed, we cannot assure you that the FCC will approve our future renewal applications or that the renewals will be for full eight-year terms or will not include conditions or qualifications that could adversely affect our operations. The nonrenewal, or renewal with substantial conditions or modifications, of one or more of our licenses could have a material adverse effect on us. We must comply with extensive FCC regulations and policies in the ownership and operation of our radio stations. FCC regulations limit the number of radio stations that a licensee can own in a market, which could restrict our ability to consummate any future transactions and in certain circumstances could require us to divest one or more radio stations. The FCC also requires radio stations to comply with certain technical requirements to limit interference between two or more radio stations. If the FCC relaxes these technical requirements, it could impair the signals transmitted by our radio stations and could have a material adverse effect on us. Moreover, these FCC regulations and others may change over time and we cannot assure you that those changes would not have a material adverse effect on us. The FCC regulates FM translator stations as a secondary service, and in the event that an FM translator station causes actual interference to the signal of a radio or television station, FCC rules require the FM translator station to eliminate the interference and to suspend operations if the interference cannot be eliminated. If the FCC requires any FM translator station that we operate to modify its facilities to eliminate interference caused to another station or to cease broadcasting, it could materially impair the operations of the station that the FM translator rebroadcasts which could have a material adverse effect on us. A downturn in the performance of our radio stations in Miami-Ft. Lauderdale or Philadelphia could adversely affect our net revenue. A ratings decline or other operating difficulty in the performance of our radio stations in Miami- Ft. Lauderdale or Philadelphia could have a disproportionately adverse effect on our net revenue. These radio stations contributed 47.9% of our net revenue in 2013. Because of the large portion of our net revenue from Miami- Ft. Lauderdale and Philadelphia, we have greater exposure to adverse events or conditions affecting the economy in those markets than would be the case if we were more geographically diverse. A future impairment of our FCC broadcasting licenses and/or goodwill could adversely affect our operating results. As of December 31, 2013, our FCC broadcasting licenses and goodwill represented 75.6% of our total assets. We are required to test our FCC broadcasting licenses and goodwill for impairment on an annual basis, or more frequently if events or changes in 11

Table of Contents circumstances indicate that our FCC broadcasting licenses and goodwill might be impaired which may result in future impairment losses. For further discussion, see “Item 7 - Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations - Critical Accounting Estimates” of this report. Our corporate offices and several of our radio stations are located in Florida and other areas that could be affected by hurricanes.

Florida is susceptible to hurricanes and we have our corporate offices and eleven radio stations located there. These radio stations contributed 36.1% of our net revenue in 2013. Although the 2013 hurricane season did not have a material impact on our operations, our corporate offices and our radio stations located in Florida and along the east coast of the United States could be materially affected by hurricanes in the future, which could have an adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations. We carry property damage insurance on all of our properties and business interruption insurance on some of our properties, but there can be no assurance that such insurance would be adequate to cover all of our hurricane-related losses. The failure or destruction of satellite systems and transmitter facilities that we depend upon to distribute our programming could adversely affect our operating results. We use studios, satellite systems, transmitter facilities and the internet to originate and/or distribute our station programs and commercials. We rely on third-party contracts and services to operate our origination and distribution facilities. These third-party contracts and services include, but are not limited to, electrical power, satellite transponders, uplinks and downlinks and telecom circuits. Distribution may be disrupted due to one or more third parties losing their ability to provide particular services to us, which could adversely affect our distribution capabilities. A disruption can be caused as a result of any number of events such as local disasters (accidental or environmental), various acts of terrorism, power outages, major telecom connectivity failures or satellite failures. Our ability to distribute programming to station audiences may be disrupted for an undetermined period of time until alternate facilities are engaged and put on-line. Furthermore, until third-party services resume, the inability to originate or distribute programming could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operation. Vigorous enforcement of the FCC’s indecency rules could have a material adverse effect on our business. The FCC’s rules prohibit the broadcast of obscene material at any time and indecent material between the hours of 6am and 10pm. Broadcasters’ risk of violating the prohibition on the broadcast of indecent material is increased by the vagueness of the FCC’s definition of indecent material, coupled with the spontaneity of live programming. The FCC has expanded the breadth of indecency regulation to include material that could be considered “blasphemy,” “personally reviling epithets,” “profanity” and vulgar or coarse words amounting to a nuisance. As a result, in the event that we broadcast material falling within the expanded breadth of the FCC’s regulation, we could be subject to license revocation, renewal or qualifications proceedings, which would put the licenses that we depend on for our operations in jeopardy. In 2007, the monetary penalties for broadcasting indecent programming increased substantially. Other legislative proposals have been keyed to the number of violations found by the FCC and would potentially subject broadcasters to license revocation, renewal or qualifications proceedings in the event that they broadcast indecent material. Formerly, the maximum permitted fines for adjudicated violations of the FCC’s indecency rules were $32,500 per instance and $300,000 for each continuing violation. The current maximum permitted fines are $325,000 per incident and $3,000,000 for any continuing violation arising from a single act or failure to act. In a decision issued in June 2012, the Supreme Court did not find that the FCC’s indecency standards were inconsistent with the First Amendment, which means the FCC may continue to enforce the standards. Because the FCC may investigate indecency complaints prior to notifying a licensee of the existence of a complaint, a licensee may not have knowledge of a complaint unless and until the complaint results in the issuance of a formal FCC letter of inquiry or notice of apparent liability for forfeiture. We may in the future become subject to additional inquiries or proceedings related to our radio stations’ broadcast of indecent or obscene material. To the extent that these pending inquiries or other proceedings result in the imposition of fines, revocation of any of our radio station licenses or denials of license renewal applications, our results of operation and business could be materially adversely affected. 12

Table of Contents Proposed legislation could require radio broadcasters to pay royalties to record labels and recording artists.

Legislation has previously been introduced in Congress that would require radio broadcasters to pay a royalty to record labels and performing artists for use of their recorded songs. The legislation failed to pass but is expected to be reintroduced. Currently, we pay royalties to song composers and publishers through Broadcast Music, Inc. (“BMI”), the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (“ASCAP”) and SESAC, Inc. (“SESAC”). The proposed legislation would add an additional layer of royalties to be paid directly to the record labels and artists. It is currently unknown what proposed legislation, if any, will become law, whether industry groups will enter into an agreement with respect to fees, and what significance this royalty would have on our results from operations, cash flows or financial position. The FCC’s National Broadband Plan may result in a loss of spectrum for broadcast stations and potentially adversely impact our ability to compete. In March 2010, the FCC delivered its national Broadband Plan to Congress. The Plan reviews the nation’s broadband infrastructure and recommends a number of initiatives designed to spur broadband deployment and use. In an effort to make available more spectrum for wireless broadband services, the Broadband Plan proposes to recapture and relocate certain spectrum including 120 megahertz of broadcast spectrum, by incentivizing current private-sector spectrum holders to return some of their spectrum to the government by 2015 through such initiatives as voluntary spectrum auctions (with current licensees potentially sharing in the auction proceeds) and “repacking” of television channel assignments to increase efficient spectrum usage. If voluntary measures fail to provide the amount of spectrum the FCC considers necessary for wireless broadband deployment, the Broadband Plan proposes various mandates to reclaim spectrum, such as forced channel sharing. In November 2010, the FCC issued rulemakings containing proposals that would enable wireless providers to have equal access to broadcast spectrum that could be made available through spectrum auctions. In February 2012, Congress passed legislation authorizing the FCC to conduct a reverse incentive auction in which licensees of television stations may voluntarily relinquish their spectrum usage rights in exchange for a portion of the proceeds received from new licensees who successfully bid in a forward auction for the right to use the repurposed spectrum. The statute also authorizes the FCC to repack the spectrum now used by television broadcasters, subject to certain limitations, including the obligation to make all reasonable efforts to preserve the coverage area and population served by a television station. In October 2012, the FCC released a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking that includes proposals for the conduct of the reverse and forward spectrum auctions and the spectrum repacking process. In late 2013, the FCC indicated that the auctions would not occur prior to mid-2015. At this time we cannot predict the outcome of implementation of the Broadband Plan or whether it will have an impact on our radio stations. Our business depends on the efforts of key personnel and the loss of any one of them could have a material adverse effect on our business. Our business depends upon the continued efforts, abilities and expertise of our executive officers and other key employees, including George G. Beasley, our Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer. Mr. Beasley is 81 years old. We believe the unique combination of skills and experience possessed by Mr. Beasley would be difficult to replace and that the loss of Mr. Beasley’s or other key executives’ expertise could impair our ability to execute our operating and acquisition strategies. Our Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer controls Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc. and members of his immediate family own a substantial equity interest in Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc. Their interests may conflict with yours. George G. Beasley is generally able to control the vote on all matters submitted to a vote of stockholders. Without the approval of Mr. Beasley, we will be unable to consummate transactions involving an actual or potential change in control, including transactions in which you might otherwise receive a premium for your shares over then current market prices. Shares of Class B and Class A common stock that Mr. Beasley beneficially owns represent 61.5% of the total voting power of all classes of our common stock. Members of his immediate family also own significant amounts of Class B common stock. Mr. Beasley will be able to direct our management and policies, except with respect to those matters requiring a class vote under the provisions of our amended certificate of incorporation, third amended and restated bylaws or applicable law.

Historically, we have entered into certain transactions with George G. Beasley, members of his immediate family and affiliated entities that may conflict with the interests of our stockholders now or in the future. See “Item 7 – Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operation – Related Party Transactions” and Note 13 to the accompanying financial statements. Future sales by George G. Beasley or members of his family of our Class A common stock could adversely affect its market price. George G. Beasley and members of his family beneficially own the majority of all outstanding shares of Class B common stock, which is convertible to Class A common stock on a one-for-one basis. The market for our Class A common stock could change substantially if George G. Beasley and members of his family convert their shares of Class B common stock to shares of Class A common stock and then sell large amounts of shares of Class A common stock in the public market. These sales, or the possibility that these sales may occur, could make it more difficult for us to raise capital by selling equity or equity-related securities in the future. 13

Table of Contents The difficulties associated with any attempt to gain control of our Company may adversely affect the price of our Class A common stock. Due to his large holdings of our common stock, George G. Beasley controls the decision whether any change of control of the Company will occur. Moreover, some provisions of our certificate of incorporation, by-laws and Delaware law could make it more difficult for a third party to acquire control of us, even if a change of control could be beneficial to you. In addition, the Communications Act and FCC rules and policies limit the number of stations that one individual or entity can own, directly or by attribution, in a market. FCC approval for transfers of control of FCC licensees and assignments of FCC licenses are also required. Because of the limitations and restrictions imposed on us by these provisions and regulations, the trading price of our Class A common stock may be adversely affected. There may not be an active market for our Class A common stock, making it difficult for you to sell your stock. Our stock may not be actively traded in the future. An illiquid market for our stock may result in price volatility and poor execution of buy and sell orders for investors. Our stock price and trading volume have fluctuated widely for a number of reasons, including some reasons that may be unrelated to our business or results of operations. This market volatility could depress the price of our Class A common stock without regard to our operating performance. In addition, our operating results may be below expectations of public market analysts and investors. If this were to occur, the market price of our Class A common stock could decrease, perhaps significantly. ITEM 1B.UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS None. ITEM 2. PROPERTIES As of February 4, 2014, we own or lease studio and office space for our radio stations in the following locations: Location

Description

Owned/Leased

Atlanta, GA Augusta, GA

All radio stations in our Atlanta, GA market cluster All radio stations in our Augusta, GA market cluster

Third party lease Owned

Boca Raton, FL Boston, MA Camden, NJ Estero, FL Fayetteville, NC Greenville, NC Las Vegas, NV Miami, FL New Bern, NC Philadelphia, PA Wilmington, DE

Land for radio stations All radio stations in our West Palm Beach-Boca Raton, FL market cluster One radio station One radio station in our Philadelphia, PA market cluster Land for radio station All radio stations in our Ft. Myers-Naples, FL market cluster All radio stations in our Fayetteville, NC market cluster Two radio stations in our Greenville-New Bern-Jacksonville, NC market cluster All radio stations in our Las Vegas, NV market cluster All radio stations in our Miami-Fort Lauderdale, FL market cluster Four radio stations in our Greenville-New Bern-Jacksonville, NC market cluster Three radio stations in our Philadelphia, PA market cluster One radio station

Related party lease Third party lease Third party lease Owned Related party lease Related party lease Owned Related party lease Related party lease Owned Owned Third party lease Third party lease

We lease property in Augusta, GA and Estero, FL from George G. Beasley (our CEO), property in Camden, NJ from Beasley Family Towers, LLC which is owned by George G. Beasley, Bruce G. Beasley, Caroline Beasley, Brian E. Beasley and other family members, property in Las Vegas, NV from GGB Las Vegas, LLC, which is wholly-owned by George G. Beasley and property in Greenville, NC from Beasley Broadcasting of Greenville, Inc., which is owned by George G. Beasley, Bruce G. Beasley, Caroline Beasley, Brian E. Beasley and other family members. In addition, we lease our principal executive offices in Naples, FL from Beasley Broadcasting Management Corp., which is also wholly-owned by George G. Beasley. No one property is material to us. We believe that our properties are generally in good condition and suitable for our operations. However, we continually look for opportunities to upgrade our properties and may do so in the future. ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS We currently and from time to time are involved in litigation incidental to the conduct of our business including indecency claims and related proceedings at the FCC, but we are not a party to any lawsuit or other proceedings that, in the opinion of management, is likely to have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations. ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES Not applicable. 14

Table of Contents PART II ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES Market Information We have two authorized and outstanding classes of equity securities: Class A common stock, $.001 par value, and Class B common stock, $.001 par value. The only difference between the Class A and Class B common stock is that Class A is entitled to one vote per share and Class B is entitled to ten votes per share. Class B is convertible into Class A shares on a one-for-one share basis under certain circumstances. Our Class A common stock trades on NASDAQ’s National Market System under the symbol “BBGI.” There is no established public trading market for our Class B common stock. Quarterly high and low prices of our Class A common stock are shown below:

Fiscal 2013

First Quarter Second Quarter Third Quarter Fourth Quarter Fiscal 2012

First Quarter Second Quarter Third Quarter Fourth Quarter

High

Low

$ 6.90 9.14 10.00 9.47

$3.60 5.06 7.00 7.20

High

Low

$ 4.52 6.12 6.10 5.13

$3.02 3.99 4.34 3.53

Holders As of February 4, 2014, there were approximately 130 holders of record of our Class A common stock and 21 holders of record of our Class B common stock. The number of Class A common stock holders does not count separately the number of beneficial holders whose shares are held of record by a broker or clearing agency. Dividends Our credit agreement permits us to pay cash dividends and to repurchase additional shares of our common stock, subject to compliance with financial covenants, up to an aggregate amount of $4.0 million for 2013, $5.0 million for each of 2014 and 2015, and $6.0 million for each year thereafter. We paid cash dividends of $1.9 million in 2012 and paid no cash dividends in 2013. On December 6, 2013, our board of directors declared a cash dividend of $0.045 per share on our Class A and Class B common stock. The dividend of $1.0 million in the aggregate was paid on January 10, 2014, to stockholders of record on December 27, 2013. We intend to pay quarterly cash dividends in 2014, however the declaration and payment of any future dividends will be at the sole discretion of the board of directors. Repurchases of Equity Securities The following table presents information with respect to purchases we made of our Class A common stock during the three months ended December 31, 2013.

Period

October 1 – 31, 2013 November 1 – 30, 2013 December 1 – 31, 2013 Total

Total Number of Shares Purchased

Average Price Paid per Share

— — — —

$

— — —

Total Number of Shares Purchased as Part of Publicly Announced Program

— — —

Approximate Dollar Value That May Yet Be Purchased Under the Program

$

— — —

On March 27, 2007, our board of directors approved the Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc. 2007 Equity Incentive Award Plan (the “2007 Plan”) which was also approved by our stockholders at the Annual Meeting of Stockholders on June 7, 2007. The 2007 Plan permits us to purchase sufficient shares to fund withholding taxes in connection with the vesting of restricted stock and expires on 15

Table of Contents

March 27, 2017. Our credit agreement permits us to repurchase sufficient shares of our common stock to fund withholding taxes in connection with the vesting of restricted stock, subject to compliance with financial covenants, up to an aggregate amount of $2.0 million per year. There were no shares repurchased during the three months ended December 31, 2013. We currently have no publicly announced share purchase programs. Equity Compensation Plan Information The following table sets forth certain information with respect to our equity compensation plans as of December 31, 2013.

Plan Category

Number of Securities to be Issued Upon Exercise of Outstanding Options, Warrants and Rights (a)

Equity Compensation Plans Approved By Security Holders Equity Compensation Plans Not Approved By Security Holders Total

62,250 — 62,250

Weighted-Average Exercise Price of Outstanding Options, Warrants and Rights (b)

$

Number of Securities Remaining Available for Future Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plan (Excluding Securities Reflected in Column (a)) (c)

15.82

2,474,508



— 2,474,508

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA Not required for smaller reporting companies. ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS Overview We are a radio broadcasting company whose primary business is operating radio stations throughout the United States. We own and operate 44 radio stations in the following markets: Atlanta, GA, Augusta, GA, Boston, MA, Fayetteville, NC, Fort Myers-Naples, FL, Greenville-New Bern-Jacksonville, NC, Las Vegas, NV, Miami-Fort Lauderdale, FL, Philadelphia, PA, West Palm Beach-Boca Raton, FL, and Wilmington, DE. We also operate one radio station in the expanded AM band in Augusta, GA (see “Item 1 – Business – Federal Regulation of Radio Broadcasting”). We refer to each group of radio stations in each radio market as a market cluster. Recent Developments On December 6, 2013, our board of directors declared a cash dividend of $0.045 per share on our Class A and Class B common stock. The dividend of $1.0 million in the aggregate was paid on January 10, 2014, to stockholders of record on December 27, 2013. We intend to pay quarterly cash dividends in 2014, however the declaration and payment of any future dividends will be at the sole discretion of the board of directors. On November 7, 2013, we amended our credit agreement. The amendment permits us to repurchase sufficient shares of our common stock to fund withholding taxes in connection with the vesting of restricted stock, subject to compliance with financial covenants, up to an aggregate amount of $2.0 million per year. Previously, the aggregate amount was $0.5 million per year. On October 4, 2013, we acquired two FM translator licenses from Connor Media, Inc. for $86,154. The translator licenses allow us to rebroadcast the programming of two of our radio stations in Greenville-New BernJacksonville, NC on the FM band over an expanded area of coverage.

Financial Statement Presentation The following discussion provides a brief description of certain key items that appear in our financial statements and general factors that impact these items. Net Revenue. Our net revenue is primarily derived from the sale of advertising airtime to local and national advertisers. Net revenue is gross revenue less agency commissions, generally 15% of gross revenue. Local revenue generally consists of advertising airtime and digital sales to advertisers in a radio station’s local market either directly to the advertiser or through the advertiser’s agency. National revenue generally consists of advertising airtime sales to agencies purchasing advertising for multiple markets. National sales are generally facilitated by our national representation firm, which serves as our agent in these transactions. 16

Table of Contents Our net revenue is generally determined by the advertising rates that we are able to charge and the number of advertisements that we can broadcast without jeopardizing listener levels. Advertising rates are primarily based on the following factors: •

a radio station’s audience share in the demographic groups targeted by advertisers as measured principally by the Arbitron Ratings Company;



the number of radio stations, as well as other forms of media, in the market competing for the attention of the same demographic groups;



the supply of, and demand for, radio advertising time; and



the size of the market.

Our net revenue is affected by general economic conditions, competition and our ability to improve operations at our market clusters. Seasonal revenue fluctuations are also common in the radio broadcasting industry and are primarily due to variations in advertising expenditures by local and national advertisers. Net revenue is typically lowest in the first calendar quarter of the year. We use barter sales agreements to reduce cash paid for operating costs and expenses by exchanging advertising airtime for goods or services; however, we endeavor to minimize barter revenue in order to maximize cash revenue from our available airtime. We also continue to invest in digital support services to develop and promote our radio station websites. We derive revenue through the sale of advertiser promotions and advertising on our websites and the sale of advertising airtime during audio streaming of our radio stations over the internet. Operating Expenses. Our operating expenses consist primarily of (1) programming, engineering, sales, advertising and promotion, and general and administrative expenses incurred at our radio stations, (2) general and administrative expenses, including compensation and other expenses, incurred at our corporate offices, and (3) depreciation and amortization. We strive to control our operating expenses by centralizing certain functions at our corporate offices and consolidating certain functions in each of our market clusters. Critical Accounting Estimates The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect reported amounts and related disclosures. We consider an accounting estimate to be critical if: •

it requires assumptions to be made that were uncertain at the time the estimate was made; and



changes in the estimate or different estimates that could have been selected could have a material impact on our results of operations or financial condition.

FCC Broadcasting Licenses. As of December 31, 2013, FCC broadcasting licenses with an aggregate carrying amount of $186.2 million represented 70.5% of our total assets. We are required to test our licenses for impairment on an annual basis, or more frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicate that our licenses might be impaired. We assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that our licenses are impaired. If we determine it is more likely than not that our licenses are impaired then we are required to perform the quantitative impairment test. The quantitative impairment test compares the fair value of our licenses with their carrying amounts. If the carrying amounts of the licenses exceed their fair value, an impairment loss is recognized in an amount equal to that excess. For the purpose of testing our licenses for impairment, we combine our licenses into reporting units based on our market clusters. We assessed qualitative factors including cost factors, financial performance, industry and market conditions, and macroeconomic conditions during 2013 and determined that it was not more likely than not that the fair value of our licenses in any of our market clusters was less than their respective carrying amounts. Therefore we did not perform the quantitative impairment test for the licenses in any of our market clusters in 2013. No impairment losses related to our FCC broadcasting licenses were recorded in 2013, however there can be no assurance that impairments of our FCC broadcasting licenses will not occur in future periods. Goodwill. As of December 31, 2013, goodwill with an aggregate carrying amount of $13.6 million represented 5.2% of our total assets. We are required to test our goodwill for impairment on an annual basis, or more frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicate that our goodwill might be impaired. We assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount. If we determine it is more likely than not that the fair value of 17

Table of Contents a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount, then we are required to perform the first step of a two-step impairment test by calculating the fair value of the reporting unit and comparing the fair value with the carrying amount of the reporting unit. If the carrying amount of a reporting unit exceeds its fair value, then we are required to perform the second step of the two-step goodwill impairment test to measure the amount of the impairment loss. For the purpose of testing our goodwill for impairment, we have identified our market clusters as our reporting units. We assessed qualitative factors including macroeconomic conditions, industry and market conditions, cost factors, and overall financial performance in 2013 and determined that it was not more likely than not that the fair value of any of our reporting units was less than their respective carrying amounts. Therefore we did not perform the two-step impairment test for any of our reporting units in 2013. No impairment losses related to our goodwill were recorded in 2013, however there can be no assurance that impairments of our goodwill will not occur in future periods. Property and Equipment. We are required to assess the recoverability of our property and equipment whenever an event has occurred that may result in an impairment loss. If such an event occurs, we will compare estimates of related future undiscounted cash flows to the carrying amount of the asset. If the future undiscounted cash flow estimates are less than the carrying amount of the asset, we will reduce the carrying amount to the estimated fair value. The determination of when an event has occurred and estimates of future cash flows and fair value all require management judgment. The use of different assumptions or estimates may result in alternative assessments that could be materially different. We did not identify any events that may have resulted in an impairment loss on our property and equipment in 2013. However there can be no assurance that impairments of our property and equipment will not occur in future periods.

Accounts Receivable. We continually evaluate our ability to collect our accounts receivable. Our ongoing evaluation includes review of specific accounts at our radio stations, the current financial condition of our customers and our historical write-off experience. This ongoing evaluation requires management judgment and if we had made different assumptions about these factors, the allowance for doubtful accounts could have been materially different. Recent Accounting Pronouncements Recent accounting pronouncements are described in Note 2 to the accompanying financial statements. Results of Operations Year Ended December 31, 2013 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2012 The following summary table presents a comparison of our results of operations for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013 with respect to certain of our key financial measures. These changes illustrated in the table are discussed in greater detail below. This section should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and notes to financial statements included in Item 8 of this report. Year ended December 31, 2012 2013

Net revenue Station operating expenses Corporate general and administrative expenses Other operating expenses Interest expense Loss on extinguishment of long-term debt Income tax expense Net income

$100,240,597 62,528,795

$104,905,720 67,044,139

8,105,250 — 6,488,521 2,563,979 7,246,887 11,031,270

8,624,395 185,916 7,081,801 1,260,784 7,031,539 11,546,263

Change $

$ 4,665,123 4,515,344 519,145 185,916 593,280 (1,303,195) (215,348) 514,993

%

4.7% 7.2 6.4 — 9.1 (50.8) (3.0) 4.7

Net Revenue. Net revenue increased $4.7 million during the year ended December 31, 2013. Significant factors affecting net revenue included a $3.0 million increase in advertising revenue from our Philadelphia market cluster, a $1.8 million increase in advertising revenue at our Las Vegas market cluster, which included a $2.1 million increase in advertising revenue from KOAS-FM, which was acquired in the third quarter of 2012, and $0.7 million in additional advertising revenue from KVGS-FM, which was acquired in the third quarter of 2013, and a $0.6 million decrease in advertising revenue from our Greenville-New Bern-Jacksonville market cluster. Also, net revenue in 2012 included an additional $2.0 million in political advertising as a result of the 2012 elections. Net revenue for 2013 was comparable to net revenue for 2012 at our remaining market clusters. Station Operating Expenses. Station operating expenses increased $4.5 million during the year ended December 31, 2013. Significant factors affecting station operating expenses included a $1.6 million increase at our Las Vegas market cluster, which included a $1.0 million increase in station operating expenses from KOAS-FM, which was acquired in the third quarter of 2012, and $0.4 million in additional station operating expenses from KVGS-FM, which was acquired in the third quarter of 2013, a $1.2 million increase at our Philadelphia market cluster, a $0.6 million increase at our Fort Myers-Naples market cluster, and a $0.5 million 18

Table of Contents increase at our Miami-Fort Lauderdale market cluster. In addition, station operating expenses in 2012 were reduced $0.8 million as a result of a BMI fee settlement in the second quarter of 2012. Station operating expenses for 2013 were comparable to station operating expenses for 2012 at our remaining market clusters.

Corporate General and Administrative Expenses. The $0.5 million increase in corporate general and administrative expenses during the year ended December 31, 2013 was primarily due to an increase in cash compensation expense and stock-based compensation expense. Other Operating Expenses. An amount of $185,916 was paid to GGB Las Vegas, LLC during the year ended December 31, 2013 for unreimbursed management fee losses incurred by KVGS-FM during the term of the management agreement. Interest Expense. Interest expense increased $0.6 million during the year ended December 31, 2013. Significant factors affecting interest expense included a $1.0 million fee paid in the second quarter of 2013 in connection with the prepayment of the second lien facility and an increase in borrowing costs under the credit agreements we entered into in the third quarter of 2012, partially offset by a decrease in long-term debt outstanding including the prepayment of the second lien facility. Loss on Extinguishment of Long-Term Debt. In connection with the amended first lien credit agreement and the prepayment of the second lien facility we recorded a loss on extinguishment of long-term debt of $1.3 million during the year ended December 31, 2013. In connection with new credit agreements in 2012 we recorded a loss on extinguishment of long-term debt of $2.6 million during the year ended December 31, 2012. Income Tax Expense. Our effective tax rate was approximately 40% and 38% for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013, respectively, which differ from the federal statutory rate of 34% due to the effect of state income taxes and certain expenses that are not deductible for tax purposes. The effective tax rate for the year ended December 31, 2013, also reflects a $0.3 million decrease from a change to our state tax effective rate. Net Income. Net income during the year ended December 31, 2013 increased $0.5 million as a result of the factors described above. Liquidity and Capital Resources Overview. Our primary sources of liquidity are internally generated cash flow and our revolving credit loan. Our primary liquidity needs have been, and for the next twelve months and thereafter are expected to continue to be, for working capital, debt service, and other general corporate purposes, including capital expenditures and radio station acquisitions. Historically, our capital expenditures have not been significant. In addition to property and equipment associated with radio station acquisitions, our capital expenditures have generally been, and are expected to continue to be, related to the maintenance of our studio and office space and the technological improvement, including upgrades necessary to broadcast HD Radio, and maintenance of our broadcasting towers and equipment. We have also purchased or constructed office and studio space in some of our markets to facilitate the consolidation of our operations. Our credit agreement permits us to repurchase sufficient shares of our common stock to fund withholding taxes in connection with the vesting of restricted stock, subject to compliance with financial covenants, up to an aggregate amount of $2.0 million per year. We paid $0.2 million to repurchase 36,363 shares in 2013. Our credit agreement permits us to pay cash dividends and to repurchase additional shares of our common stock, subject to compliance with financial covenants, up to an aggregate amount of $4.0 million for 2013, $5.0 million for each of 2014 and 2015, and $6.0 million for each year thereafter. We paid no cash dividends in 2013. On December 6, 2013, our board of directors declared a cash dividend of $0.045 per share on our Class A and Class B common stock. The dividend of $1.0 million in the aggregate was paid on January 10, 2014, to stockholders of record on December 27, 2013. We expect to provide for future liquidity needs through one or a combination of the following sources of liquidity: •

internally generated cash flow;



our credit facilities;



additional borrowings, other than under our existing credit facilities, to the extent permitted thereunder; and



additional equity offerings. 19

Table of Contents We believe that we will have sufficient liquidity and capital resources to permit us to provide for our liquidity requirements and meet our financial obligations for the next twelve months. However, poor financial results or unanticipated expenses could give rise to defaults under our credit facilities, additional debt servicing requirements or other additional financing or liquidity requirements sooner than we expect and we may not secure financing when needed or on acceptable terms. Our ability to reduce our consolidated total debt ratio, as defined by our credit agreement, by increasing operating cash flow and/or decreasing long-term debt will determine how much, if any, of the remaining commitments under our revolving credit facility will be available to us in the future. Poor financial results or unanticipated expenses could result in our failure to maintain or lower our consolidated total debt ratio and we may not be permitted to make any additional borrowings under our revolving credit facility. The following summary table presents a comparison of our capital resources for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013 with respect to certain of our key measures affecting our liquidity. The changes set forth in the table are discussed in greater detail below. This section should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and notes to financial statements included in Item 8 of this report. Year ended December 31, 2012 2013

Net cash provided by operating activities Net cash used in investing activities Net cash used in financing activities Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

$ 20,404,535 (3,787,370) (18,566,586)

$ 19,913,684 (6,655,233) (10,620,086)

$ (1,949,421)

$ 2,638,365

Net Cash Provided By Operating Activities. Net cash provided by operating activities decreased $0.5 million during the year ended December 31, 2013. Significant factors affecting net cash provided by operating activities included a $4.0 million increase in cash paid for station operating expenses, a $0.5 million increase in income tax payments, and a $4.6 million increase in cash receipts from the sale of advertising airtime. Net Cash Used In Investing Activities. Net cash used in investing activities during the year ended December 31, 2013 included a payment of $4.0 million for the acquisition of KVGS-FM in Las Vegas, NV and payments of $2.8 million for capital expenditures. Net cash used in investing activities for the same period in 2012 included a payment of $2.0 million for the acquisition of KOAS-FM in Las Vegas, NV and payments of $1.7 million for capital expenditures. Net Cash Used In Financing Activities. Net cash used in financing activities during the year ended December 31, 2013 included repayments of $9.9 million under our credit facilities, and payments of $0.6 million for loan fees related to the amended first lien credit agreement. Net cash used in financing activities for the same period in 2012 included repayments of $10.0 million under our credit facility, payments of $4.0 million for loan fees related to new credit agreements, a repayment of $2.5 million under a note payable to a related party for the acquisition of KOAS-FM in Las Vegas, NV, and a $1.9 million special cash dividend. Credit Facilities. As of February 4, 2014, the aggregate outstanding balance of our credit facilities was $105.9 million. On April 3, 2013, we amended our first lien credit agreement. The amendment waived certain restrictions to

permit the prepayment of the $25.0 million second lien facility in full with $20.0 million of additional term loan borrowings and $2.0 million of additional revolving credit facility borrowings from the first lien facility and $3.0 million of cash on hand. The amendment also modified the interest rate margins on the term loan. In connection with the prepayment of the second lien facility, we recorded a prepayment fee of $1.0 million in interest expense during the second quarter of 2013. In connection with the amended first lien credit agreement and the prepayment of the second lien facility, we also recorded a loss on extinguishment of long-term debt of $1.3 million during the second quarter of 2013. As of December 31, 2013, the first lien facility consisted of a term loan with a remaining balance of $99.9 million and a revolving credit facility with a maximum commitment of $20.0 million. As of December 31, 2013, we had $13.0 million in remaining commitments available under our revolving credit facility. At our election, the first lien facility may bear interest at either (i) the adjusted LIBOR rate, as defined in the first lien credit agreement, plus a margin ranging from 3.5% to 5.0% that is determined by our consolidated total debt ratio, as defined in the first lien credit agreement or (ii) the base rate, as defined in the first lien credit agreement, plus a margin ranging from 2.5% to 4.0% that is determined by our consolidated total debt ratio. Interest on adjusted LIBOR rate loans is payable at the end of each applicable interest period and, for those interest periods with a duration in excess of three months, the three month anniversary of the beginning of such interest period. Interest on base rate loans is payable quarterly in arrears. The first lien facility carried interest, based on the adjusted LIBOR rate, at 4.17% as of December 31, 2013 and matures on August 9, 2017. The first lien credit agreement requires mandatory prepayments equal to 50% of consolidated excess cash flow, as defined in the first lien credit agreement, when our consolidated total debt is equal to or greater than three times our consolidated operating cash flow as defined in the first lien credit agreement. The mandatory prepayments decrease to 25% of excess cash flow when our consolidated total debt is less than three times our consolidated operating cash flow. Mandatory prepayments of consolidated excess cash flow are due 120 days after year end. The credit agreement also requires mandatory prepayments for defined amounts from net proceeds of asset sales, net insurance proceeds, and net proceeds of debt issuances. 20

Table of Contents The first lien facility requires us to comply with certain financial covenants which are defined in the first lien credit agreement. These financial covenants include: •

Consolidated Total Debt Ratio. Our consolidated total debt on the last day of each fiscal quarter through December 31, 2013 must not have exceeded 5.0 times our consolidated operating cash flow for the four quarters then ended. The maximum ratio is 4.5 times for 2014, 4.0 times for 2015, 3.5 times for 2016, and 3.0 times for 2017.



Interest Coverage Ratio. Our consolidated operating cash flow for the four quarters ending on the last day of each fiscal quarter through maturity must not be less than 2.0 times our consolidated cash interest expense for the four quarters then ended.

The first lien facility is secured by a first-priority lien on substantially all of the Company’s assets and the assets of substantially all of its subsidiaries and is guaranteed jointly and severally by the Company and substantially all of its subsidiaries. The guarantees were issued to our lenders for repayment of the outstanding balance of the first lien facility. If we default under the terms of the first lien credit agreement, the Company and its applicable subsidiaries may be required to perform under their guarantees. As of December 31, 2013, the maximum amount of undiscounted payments the Company and its applicable subsidiaries would have had to make in the event of default was $106.9 million. The guarantees for the first lien facility expire on August 9, 2017. The aggregate scheduled principal repayments of the credit facility for the next four years are as follows: Term

Revolving

Total

2014 2015 2016 2017 Total

loan

credit facility

$ 4,250,000 8,250,000 9,625,000 77,750,000 $99,875,000

— — — 7,000,000 $7,000,000

$

4,250,000 8,250,000 9,625,000 84,750,000 $106,875,000

Failure to comply with financial covenants, scheduled interest payments, scheduled principal repayments, or any other terms of our credit agreement could result in the acceleration of the maturity of our outstanding debt, which could have a material adverse effect on our business or results of operations. As of December 31, 2013, we were in compliance with all applicable financial covenants under our credit agreement; our consolidated total debt ratio was 3.26 times, and our interest coverage ratio was 4.61 times. Related Party Transactions On March 25, 2011, we contributed $250,000 to Digital PowerRadio, LLC in exchange for 25,000 units or approximately 20% of the outstanding units. We contributed an additional $62,500 on February 14, 2012, $104,167 on July 31, 2012, and $104,167 on April 12, 2013 which maintained our ownership interest at approximately 20% of the outstanding units. We may be called upon to make additional pro rata cash contributions to Digital PowerRadio, LLC in the future. Digital PowerRadio, LLC is managed by Fowler Radio Group, LLC which is partially-owned by Mark S. Fowler, an independent director of Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc. On May 28, 2010, we entered into an agreement to manage two radio stations in Las Vegas, NV for GGB Las Vegas, LLC, which is owned by George G. Beasley. The management agreement included an option to purchase the two managed radio stations. On August 10, 2012, we completed the acquisition of KOAS-FM for $4.5 million. The acquisition was financed with $2.0 million in cash and a $2.5 million note payable to GGB Las Vegas, LLC. The note carried interest at 3.5% and was repaid in full in the third quarter of 2012. On September 1, 2013, we completed the acquisition of KVGS-FM for $4.0 million in cash. Management fees were approximately $69,000 for the year ended December 31, 2013. An amount of $185,916 was paid to GGB Las Vegas, LLC for unreimbursed management fee losses incurred by KVGS-FM during the term of the management agreement and an amount of $99,483 was paid to GGB Las Vegas, LLC to purchase property and equipment acquired by GGB Las Vegas, LLC for KVGS-FM during the term of the management agreement in 2013. We lease radio towers for two radio stations under separate lease agreements from Beasley Family Towers, LLC (“BFT”), which is controlled by George G. Beasley, Bruce G. Beasley, Caroline Beasley, Brian E. Beasley, and other family members of George G. Beasley. The lease agreements expire on August 4, 2016. Lease payments are currently offset by the partial recognition of a deferred gain on sale from the sale of these towers to BFT in 2006, therefore no rental expense was reported for the year ended December 31, 2013. The lease agreements were approved by our Audit Committee. We believe that these lease agreements are on terms at least as favorable to us as could have been obtained from a third party. 21

Table of Contents We lease land for our radio stations in Augusta, GA from GGB Augusta, LLC which is controlled by George G. Beasley. The lease agreement expires on November 1, 2023. Rental expense was approximately $41,000 for the year ended December 31, 2013. The lease agreement was based on competitive bids from third parties and was reviewed by our Audit Committee. We believe that this lease agreement is on terms at least as favorable to us as could have been obtained from a third party.

The following related party transactions are based on agreements entered into prior to our initial public offering in 2000 at which time we did not have an Audit Committee. However, these agreements were evaluated by our board of directors at the time of entering the agreements and we believe that they are on terms at least as favorable to us as could have been obtained from a third party. In December 2000, we finalized the sale of most of our radio towers and related real estate assets to BFT for $5.1 million in unsecured notes. We sold these radio towers and related real estate assets primarily to focus on our core business of acquiring, developing and operating radio stations. On May 31, 2013, the interest rate on the notes receivable was discretionarily changed from 6.0% to 2.57%. The aggregate monthly payments of approximately $38,000 were unchanged, but due to the interest rate change the maturity date of the notes is now June 30, 2019. As of December 31, 2013, the aggregate outstanding balance of the notes receivable was $2.3 million. Interest income on the notes receivable from BFT was approximately $102,000 for the year ended December 31, 2013. We lease radio towers for 24 radio stations under separate lease agreements from BFT. The lease agreements expire on various dates through December 28, 2020. Rental expense was approximately $561,000 for the year ended December 31, 2013. We lease a radio tower in Augusta, GA from Wintersrun Communications, LLC, which is controlled by George G. Beasley, Bruce G. Beasley and Brian E. Beasley. The lease agreement expires on April 30, 2014. Rental expense was approximately $30,000 for the year ended December 31, 2013. We lease property for our radio stations in Ft. Myers, FL from GGB Estero, LLC which is controlled by George G. Beasley. The lease agreement expires on August 31, 2014. Rental expense was approximately $163,000 for the year ended December 31, 2013. We lease our principal executive offices in Naples, FL from Beasley Broadcasting Management Corp., which is controlled by George G. Beasley. Rental expense was approximately $174,000 for the year ended December 31, 2013. As of December 31, 2013, future minimum payments to related parties for the next five years and thereafter are summarized as follows: 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 Thereafter Total

$ 760,228 634,918 582,987 507,196 507,196 1,126,898 $4,119,423

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements We did not have any off-balance sheet arrangements as of December 31, 2013. Inflation For the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013, inflation has affected our performance in terms of higher costs for radio station operating expenses, however the exact impact cannot be reasonably determined. ITEM 7A.QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISKS Not required for smaller reporting companies. 22

Table of Contents ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

BEASLEY BROADCAST GROUP, INC. INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Page

Financial Statements Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2012 and 2013 Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income for the Years Ended December 31, 2012 and 2013 Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity for the Years Ended December 31, 2012 and 2013 Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Years Ended December 31, 2012 and 2013 Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements Financial Statement Schedule—Valuation and Qualifying Accounts

24 25 26 27 28 29 40

23

Table of Contents Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm The Board of Directors and Stockholders Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc. Naples, Florida We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc. as of December 31, 2013 and 2012, and the related consolidated statements of comprehensive income, stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for the years then ended. In connection with our audits of the consolidated financial statements, we also have audited the consolidated financial statement schedule listed in the accompanying index in Item 8. These consolidated financial statements and consolidated financial statement schedule are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements and consolidated financial statement schedule based on our audits. We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. Our audit included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion. In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc. as of December 31, 2013 and 2012, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for the years then ended in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Also, in our

opinion, the related consolidated financial statement schedule, when considered in relation to the basic consolidated financial statements taken as a whole, presents fairly, in all material respects, the information set forth therein. /s/ Crowe Horwath LLP Fort Lauderdale, Florida February 14, 2014 24

Table of Contents BEASLEY BROADCAST GROUP, INC. CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

ASSETS Current assets: Cash and cash equivalents Accounts receivable, less allowance for doubtful accounts of $637,860 in 2012 and $499,865 in 2013 Prepaid expenses Deferred tax assets Other current assets Total current assets Notes receivable from related parties Property and equipment, net FCC broadcasting licenses Goodwill Other assets Total assets LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY Current liabilities: Current portion of long-term debt Accounts payable Other current liabilities Total current liabilities Long-term debt, net of current portion Deferred tax liabilities Other long-term liabilities Total liabilities Commitments and contingencies Stockholders’ equity: Preferred stock, $0.001 par value; 10,000,000 shares authorized; none issued Class A common stock, $0.001 par value; 150,000,000 shares authorized; 8,897,440 issued and 6,145,195 outstanding in 2012; 9,073,940 issued and 6,285,332 outstanding in 2013 Class B common stock, $0.001 par value; 75,000,000 shares authorized; 16,662,743 issued and outstanding in 2012 and 2013 Additional paid-in capital Treasury stock, Class A common stock; 2,752,245 in 2012; 2,788,608 shares in

December 31, 2012

December 31, 2013

$ 11,660,648

$ 14,299,013

18,175,425 963,677 418,900 2,172,195 33,390,845 2,656,067 19,066,881 183,251,728 13,629,364 7,377,779 $259,372,664

17,195,453 1,459,757 374,660 2,522,797 35,851,680 2,305,502 20,136,777 186,174,864 13,629,364 6,110,702 $264,208,889

$

$

3,500,000 1,156,406 7,979,975 12,636,381 113,250,000 49,449,507 987,519 176,323,407

4,250,000 1,675,130 8,391,168 14,316,298 102,625,000 52,771,252 870,245 170,582,795





8,897

9,074

16,662 116,896,411 (14,539,533)

16,662 117,130,362 (14,729,984)

2013 Accumulated deficit Accumulated other comprehensive income Stockholders’ equity Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

(19,347,366) 14,186 83,049,257 $259,372,664

(8,824,642) 24,622 93,626,094 $264,208,889

25

Table of Contents BEASLEY BROADCAST GROUP, INC. CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

Net revenue Operating expenses: Station operating expenses (including stock-based compensation of $4,330 in 2012 and $21,371 in 2013 and excluding depreciation and amortization shown separately below) Corporate general and administrative expenses (including stock-based compensation of $429,739 in 2012 and $671,724 in 2013) Other operating expenses Depreciation and amortization Total operating expenses Operating income Non-operating income (expense): Interest expense Loss on extinguishment of long-term debt Other income (expense), net Income before income taxes Income tax expense Net income Other comprehensive income: Unrealized gain (loss) on securities (net of income tax benefit of $1,940 in 2012 and income tax expense of $6,396 in 2013) Comprehensive income Net income per share: Basic Diluted Dividends declared per common share Weighted average shares outstanding: Basic Diluted

Year Ended December 31, 2013

$100,240,597

$104,905,720

62,528,795

67,044,139

8,105,250 — 2,097,179 72,731,224 27,509,373

8,624,395 185,916 2,220,641 78,075,091 26,830,629

(6,488,521) (2,563,979) (178,716) 18,278,157 7,246,887 11,031,270

(7,081,801) (1,260,784) 89,758 18,577,802 7,031,539 11,546,263

(3,083) $ 11,028,187

10,436 $ 11,556,699

$ $ $

$ $ $

0.49 0.48 0.085 22,667,102 22,748,962

26

Table of Contents

Year Ended December 31, 2012

0.51 0.51 0.045 22,735,774 22,838,209

BEASLEY BROADCAST GROUP, INC. CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY Common Stock Class A Shares

Amou nt

Class B Shares

Amou nt

Additional Paid-In Capital

Treasury Stock Shares

Amount

Accumulate d Other Net Accumulate Comprehen Stockholde d sive rs’ Deficit Income Equity

Balances as of January 8,819,2 8,81 16,662,7 16,6 116,483, (2,719,6) (14,427,) (28,451,) 1, 2012 90 $ 9 43 $ 62 $ 223 58 $ 679 $ 072 $ 17,269 Stockbased compen sation 78,150 78 — — 433,991 — — — — Adjustment from related party acquisiti on — — — — 59,301 — — — — Tax shortfall from vesting of restricte ) d stock — — — — (80,104 — — — — Purchase of treasury ) ) stock — — — — — (32,587 (111,854 — — Net income 11,031,2 — — — — — — — 70 — Cash dividend s, $0.085 per common (1,927,5) share — — — — — — — 64 — Other compreh ensive ) income — — — — — — — — (3,083 Balances as of Decemb er 31, 8,897,4 8,89 16,662,7 16,6 116,896, (2,752,2) (14,539,) (19,347,) 2012 40 7 43 62 411 45 533 366 14,186 Stockbased compen 176,50 sation 0 177 — — 692,918 — — — — Adjustment — — — — (521,383) — — — —

73,647,2 $ 22

434,069

59,301

) (80,104 (111,85) 4 11,031,2 70

(1,927,5) 64

) (3,083

83,049,2 57

693,095 (521,38)

from related party acquisiti on Tax benefit from vesting of restricte d stock Purchase of treasury stock Net income

3

















62,416



— )



(36,363





) (190,451

— 11,546,2 63



62,416 (190,45) 1 11,546,2 63

— — — — — — — — Cash dividend s, $0.045 per common (1,023,5) (1,023,5) share — — — — — — — 39 — 39 Other compreh ensive income — — — — — — — — 10,436 10,436 Balances as of Decemb er 31, 9,073,9 9,07 16,662,7 16,6 117,130, (2,788,6) (14,729,) (8,824,6) 93,626,0 2013 40 $ 4 43 $ 62 $ 362 08 $ 984 $ 42 $ 24,622 $ 94 27

Table of Contents BEASLEY BROADCAST GROUP, INC. CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

Cash flows from operating activities: Net income Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities: Stock-based compensation Provision for bad debts BMI music license fee settlement Depreciation and amortization Amortization of loan fees Loss on extinguishment of long-term debt

Year Ended December 31, 2012

Year Ended December 31, 2013

$ 11,031,270

$ 11,546,263

434,069 1,219,698 (770,654) 2,097,179 362,160 2,563,979

693,095 801,619 — 2,220,641 463,711 1,260,784

Deferred income taxes Change in operating assets and liabilities: Accounts receivable Prepaid expenses Other assets Accounts payable Other liabilities Other operating activities Net cash provided by operating activities Cash flows from investing activities: Capital expenditures Payment for acquisitions of radio stations Payments for translator licenses Payments for investments Repayment of notes receivable from related parties Net cash used in investing activities Cash flows from financing activities: Principal payments on indebtedness Repayment of note payable to related party Payments of loan fees Tax benefit (shortfall) from vesting of restricted stock Dividends paid Payments for treasury stock Net cash used in financing activities Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period Cash and cash equivalents at end of period Cash paid for interest Cash paid for income taxes Supplement disclosure of non-cash investing and financing activities: Property and equipment acquired through placement of advertising airtime Note payable to related party to partially finance an acquisition of a radio station Dividends declared but unpaid

3,870,822

3,663,938

(1,635,513) 1,118,718 111,341 249,626 568,389 (816,549) 20,404,535

178,353 (496,080) 106,511 518,724 (788,689) (255,186) 19,913,684

(1,709,291) (2,000,000) (195,000) (166,667) 283,588 (3,787,370)

(2,785,477) (4,000,000) (116,154) (104,167) 350,565 (6,655,233)

(9,983,619) (2,500,000) (3,963,445) (80,104) (1,927,564) (111,854) (18,566,586) (1,949,421) 13,610,069 $ 11,660,648 $ 6,200,092

(9,875,000) — (617,051) 62,416 — (190,451) (10,620,086) 2,638,365 11,660,648 $ 14,299,013 $ 6,618,090

$ 3,319,500

$ 3,827,545

$

$

137,507

$ 2,500,000 $ —

160,110

$ — $ 1,023,539

28

Table of Contents BEASLEY BROADCAST GROUP, INC. NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (1) Nature of Business Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc. (the “Company”) is a radio broadcasting company operating one reportable business segment whose primary business is operating radio stations throughout the United States. The Company owns and operates 44 radio stations in the following markets: Atlanta, GA, Augusta, GA, Boston, MA, Fayetteville, NC, Fort Myers-Naples, FL, Greenville-New Bern-Jacksonville, NC, Las Vegas, NV, Miami-Fort Lauderdale, FL, Philadelphia, PA, West Palm Beach-Boca Raton, FL, and Wilmington, DE. The Company also operates one radio station in the expanded AM band in Augusta, GA.

(2) Summary of Significant Accounting Policies Principles of Consolidation The financial statements and accompanying notes are prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America and include the accounts of the Company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries. All significant inter-company transactions and balances have been eliminated. Use of Estimates Preparing financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the period. Such estimates include (i) fair values used for testing FCC broadcasting licenses and goodwill for impairment; (ii) future cash flows used for testing recoverability of property and equipment; (iii) the amount of allowance for doubtful accounts; and (iv) the realization of deferred tax assets. Actual results and outcomes may differ from management’s estimates and assumptions. Cash and Cash Equivalents All short-term investments with an original maturity of three months or less are considered to be cash equivalents. Accounts Receivable Accounts receivable consist primarily of uncollected amounts due from advertisers for the sale of advertising airtime. The amounts are net of advertising agency commissions and an allowance for doubtful accounts. The allowance for doubtful accounts reflects management’s estimate of probable losses in accounts receivable. Management determines the allowance based on historical information, relative improvements or deteriorations in the age of the accounts receivable and changes in current economic conditions. Interest is not accrued on accounts receivable. Property and Equipment Property and equipment is recorded at cost and depreciated using the straight-line method over the estimated useful life of the asset. If an event or change in circumstances were to indicate that the carrying amount of property and equipment is not recoverable, the carrying amount will be reduced to the estimated fair value. Repairs and maintenance are charged to expense as incurred. FCC Broadcasting Licenses FCC broadcasting licenses are generally granted for renewable terms of eight years. Renewal costs are generally minor and expensed as incurred. Licenses are tested for impairment on an annual basis, or more frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicate that the Company’s licenses might be impaired. The Company assesses qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that its licenses are impaired. If the Company determines it is more likely than not that its licenses are impaired then the Company is required to perform the quantitative impairment test. The quantitative impairment test compares the fair value of the Company’s licenses with their carrying amounts. If the carrying amounts of the licenses exceed their fair value, an impairment loss is recognized in an amount equal to that excess. For the purpose of testing its licenses for impairment, the Company combines its licenses into reporting units based on its market clusters. See Note 4 for changes in the carrying amount of FCC broadcasting licenses for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013. The weighted-average period before the next renewal of the Company’s FCC broadcasting licenses is 3.8 years. Goodwill

Goodwill is tested for impairment on an annual basis, or more frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicate that the Company’s goodwill might be impaired. The Company assesses qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that 29

Table of Contents the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount. If the Company determines it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount, then it is required to perform the first step of a two-step impairment test by calculating the fair value of the reporting unit and comparing the fair value with the carrying amount of the reporting unit. If the carrying amount of a reporting unit exceeds its fair value, then the Company is required to perform the second step of the two-step goodwill impairment test to measure the amount of the impairment loss. For the purpose of testing its goodwill for impairment, the Company has identified its market clusters as its reporting units. There were no changes in the carrying amount of goodwill for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013. Investment Other assets include a noncontrolling interest in Quu, Inc. which is accounted for under the cost method of accounting. Under the cost method of accounting, investments are carried at cost and only adjusted for distributions received in excess of earnings and other-than-temporary declines in fair value. The Company evaluates the investment on a quarterly basis and recognizes an impairment loss if a decline in value is determined to be otherthan-temporary. Such impairment evaluations include the current business environment, the investee’s competition, and the investee’s ability to obtain additional financing to achieve its business plan. If the Company has not identified events or changes in circumstances that may have a significant adverse effect on the fair value of the investment, then the fair value of the investment is not estimated, as it is impracticable to do so. As of December 31, 2012 and 2013, the carrying value of the investment in Quu, Inc. is $0.9 million. Loan Fees Debt issuance costs are capitalized and amortized over the life of the related debt as interest expense on a straight-line basis which approximates the effective interest method. Derivative Financial Instruments Derivative financial instruments are recognized at fair value on the balance sheet. Changes in fair value for any derivative financial instruments not designated as hedging instruments are reported in interest expense. The effective portion of the change in fair value for any derivative financial instruments designated as cash flow hedges would be reported in accumulated other comprehensive income. Treasury Stock Treasury stock is accounted for using the cost method whereby the entire cost of the acquired stock is recorded as treasury stock. Revenue Revenue from the sale of advertising airtime is recognized when commercials are broadcast and collection is reasonably assured. Revenues are reported net of advertising agency commissions, generally 15% of gross revenue, in the financial statements. An estimated allowance is recorded for uncollectible accounts. Payments received before commercials are broadcast are recorded as deferred revenue. Barter sales are recorded at the estimated fair value of the goods or services received. Revenue from barter sales is recognized when commercials are broadcast. Goods or services are recorded when received. If commercials are broadcast before the goods or services are received then a

barter sales receivable is recorded. If goods or services are received before the broadcast of commercials then a barter sales payable is recorded. Barter sales revenue was $3.7 million and $4.3 million for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013, respectively. Barter sales expenses were $3.3 million and $4.0 million for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013, respectively. Program Rights The total contract costs for sports programming rights are expensed on a straight-line basis in the periods in which the games are played and broadcast. Other payments are expensed when additional contract elements, such as post-season games, are played and broadcast. Stock-Based Compensation The Company measures the cost of employee services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments based on the grant-date fair value of the award. The cost is recognized in earnings over the period during which an employee is required to provide service. No compensation cost is recognized for equity instruments for which employees do not render the requisite services. Income Taxes The Company recorded income taxes under the liability method. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for all temporary differences between tax and financial reporting bases of the Company’s assets and liabilities using enacted tax rates applicable to the periods in which the differences are expected to affect taxable income. Tax benefits from an uncertain tax position 30

Table of Contents are only recognized if it is more likely than not that the tax position will be sustained on examination by the taxing authorities, based on the technical merits of the position. The tax benefits recognized in the financial statements from such a position are measured based on the largest benefit that has a greater than fifty percent likelihood of being realized upon ultimate resolution. Interest and penalties related to unrecognized tax benefits are recorded as incurred as a component of income tax expense. Comprehensive Income Comprehensive income consists of net income and other gains and losses affecting stockholders’ equity that, under accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America are excluded from net income, including unrealized gain (loss) on available-for-sale securities. Earnings per Share Basic net income per share is computed by dividing net income available to common stockholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the period. Common shares outstanding include shares of both Class A and Class B common stock, which have equal rights and privileges except with respect to voting. Diluted net income per share reflect the potential dilution that could occur if stock options, restricted stock or other contracts to issue common stock were exercised or converted into common stock and were not anti-dilutive. Concentrations of Risk Certain cash deposits with financial institutions may at times exceed FDIC insurance limits.

The radio stations located in Miami-Ft. Lauderdale, FL and Philadelphia, PA contributed 47.1% and 47.9% of the Company’s net revenue in 2012 and 2013, respectively. Fair Value Measurements Fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. Inputs refer broadly to the assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability, including assumptions about risk. Inputs may be observable or unobservable. Observable inputs are based on market data obtained from sources independent of the Company. Unobservable inputs reflect the Company’s own assumptions based on the best information available in the circumstances. The fair value hierarchy prioritizes the inputs used to measure fair value into three broad levels. The three levels of the fair value hierarchy are defined as follows: Level 1 – Inputs are quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities as of the reporting date. Level 2 – Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly, as of the reporting date. Level 3 – Unobservable inputs for the asset or liability that reflect management’s own assumptions about the assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability as of the reporting date. Recent Accounting Pronouncements In February 2013, the FASB issued guidance to improve the reporting of reclassifications out of accumulated other comprehensive income. The guidance requires an entity to report the effect of significant reclassifications out of accumulated other comprehensive income on the respective line items in net income if the amount being reclassified is required under U.S. generally accepted accounting principles to be reclassified in its entirety to net income. For other amounts that are that are not required under U.S. generally accepted accounting principles to be reclassified in their entirety to net income in the same reporting period, an entity is required to cross-reference other disclosures required under U.S. generally accepted accounting principles that provide additional detail about those amounts. The new guidance is effective prospectively for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2012, with early adoption permitted. The Company adopted the new guidance in the first quarter of 2013 with no material impact on its financial statements. 31

Table of Contents (3) Property and Equipment Property and equipment is comprised of the following:

December 31,

Land, buildings and improvements Broadcast equipment Transportation equipment Office equipment Construction in progress Less accumulated depreciation and amortization

2012

2013

$ 16,391,268 19,774,373 1,904,243 2,764,327 687,526 41,521,737

$ 17,418,088 21,264,508 1,954,984 2,673,573 569,774 43,880,927

(22,454,856) $ 19,066,881

(23,744,150) $ 20,136,777

Estimated useful lives (years)

15-30 5-15 5 5-10 —

The Company recorded depreciation and amortization expense of $2.1 million and $2.2 million for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013, respectively. (4) FCC Broadcasting Licenses The changes in the carrying amount of FCC broadcasting licenses for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013 are as follows: Balance as of January 1, 2012 Acquisition of translator licenses Acquisition of KOAS-FM license (see Note 13) Balance as of December 31, 2012 Acquisition of translator licenses Acquisition of KVGS-FM license (see Note 13) Balance as of December 31, 2013

$178,913,816 195,000 4,142,912 183,251,728 116,154 2,806,982 $186,174,864

On January 17, 2012, the Company acquired a translator license from Edgewater Broadcasting, Inc. for $45,000. The translator license allows the Company to rebroadcast the programming of one of its radio stations in Augusta, GA on the FM band over an expanded area of coverage. On October 1, 2012, the Company acquired three translator licenses from Reach Communications, Inc. for $150,000. The translator licenses allow the Company to rebroadcast the programming of one of its radio stations in Fort Myers-Naples, FL on the FM band over an expanded area of coverage. On January 11, 2013, the Company acquired two translator licenses from Reach Communications, Inc. for $30,000. The translator licenses allow the Company to rebroadcast the programming of one of its radio stations in Fort Myers-Naples, FL on the FM band over an expanded area of coverage. On October 4, 2013, the Company acquired two FM translator licenses from Connor Media, Inc. for $86,154. The translator licenses allow the Company to rebroadcast the programming of two of its radio stations in Greenville-New Bern-Jacksonville, NC on the FM band over an expanded area of coverage. Translator licenses are generally granted for renewable terms of eight years and are tested for impairment on an annual basis, or more frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicate that they might be impaired. (5) Derivative Financial Instruments The Company is a party to two interest rate cap agreements which limit its cost of variable rate debt on a portion of its term loans. The interest rate cap agreements have an aggregate notional amount of $57.5 million and cap LIBOR at 1% on an equivalent amount of the Company’s term loans. The interest rate cap agreements expire in the third quarter of 2014. The interest rate caps were not designated as hedging instruments. The fair value of the interest rate caps, reported in other assets, was approximately $19,000 and $1,000 as of December 31, 2012 and 2013, respectively. The fair values of the interest rate caps were determined using observable inputs (Level 2). The inputs were quotes from the counterparties to the interest rate cap agreements. The change in fair value, reported in interest expense, was approximately $69,000 and $18,000 for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013, respectively. 32

Table of Contents (6) Other Current Liabilities Other current liabilities are comprised of the following:

December 31, 2012 2013

Accrued payroll expenses Deferred rent Barter sales payable Dividends payable Deferred revenue Other accrued expenses

$2,345,175 1,274,726 1,015,248 — 912,733 2,432,093 $7,979,975

$2,444,952 1,277,909 1,074,317 1,023,539 823,533 1,746,918 $8,391,168

(7) Long-Term Debt Long-term debt is comprised of the following:

First lien facility: Term loan Revolving credit facility Second lien facility: Term loan Less current installments

December 31, 2012

December 31, 2013

$ 86,750,000 5,000,000

$ 99,875,000 7,000,000

25,000,000 116,750,000 (3,500,000) $113,250,000

— 106,875,000 (4,250,000) $102,625,000

As of December 31, 2012, the first lien facility consisted of a term loan with a remaining balance of $86.7 million and a revolving credit facility with a maximum commitment of $20.0 million. The first lien facility carried interest, based on the adjusted LIBOR rate, at 5.18% as of December 31, 2012. As of December 31, 2012, the second lien facility consisted of a term loan of $25.0 million. The second lien facility carried interest at 11.25% as of December 31, 2012. On April 3, 2013, the Company amended its first lien credit agreement. The amendment waived certain restrictions to permit the prepayment of the $25.0 million second lien facility in full with $20.0 million of additional term loan borrowings and $2.0 million of additional revolving credit facility borrowings from the first lien facility and $3.0 million of cash on hand. The amendment also modified the interest rate margins on the term loan. In connection with the prepayment of the second lien facility, the Company recorded a prepayment fee of $1.0 million in interest expense during the second quarter of 2013. In connection with the amended first lien credit agreement and the prepayment of the second lien facility, the Company also recorded a loss on extinguishment of long-term debt of $1.3 million during the second quarter of 2013. As of December 31, 2013, the first lien facility consisted of a term loan with a remaining balance of $99.9 million and a revolving credit facility with a maximum commitment of $20.0 million. As of December 31, 2013, the Company had $13.0 million in remaining commitments available under its revolving credit facility. At the Company’s election, the first lien facility may bear interest at either (i) the adjusted LIBOR rate, as defined in the first lien credit agreement, plus a margin ranging from 3.5% to 5.0% that is determined by the Company’s consolidated total debt ratio, as defined in the first lien credit agreement or (ii) the base rate, as defined in the first lien credit agreement, plus a margin ranging from 2.5% to 4.0% that is determined by the Company’s consolidated total debt ratio. Interest on adjusted LIBOR rate loans is payable at the end of each applicable interest period and, for those interest periods with a duration in excess of three months, the three month anniversary of the beginning of such interest period. Interest on base rate loans is payable quarterly in arrears. The first lien facility carried interest, based on the adjusted LIBOR rate, at 4.17% as of December 31, 2013 and matures on August 9, 2017. The first lien credit agreement requires mandatory prepayments equal to 50% of consolidated excess cash flow, as defined in the first lien credit agreement, when the Company’s consolidated total debt is equal to or greater than three times its consolidated operating cash flow, as defined in the first lien credit agreement. The mandatory

prepayments decrease to 25% of excess cash flow when the Company’s consolidated total debt is less than three times its consolidated operating cash flow. Mandatory prepayments of consolidated excess cash flow are due 120 days after year end. The credit agreement also requires mandatory prepayments for defined amounts from net proceeds of asset sales, net insurance proceeds, and net proceeds of debt issuances. The first lien facility requires the Company to comply with certain financial covenants which are defined in the first lien credit agreement. These financial covenants include: •

Consolidated Total Debt Ratio. The Company’s consolidated total debt on the last day of each fiscal quarter through December 31, 2013 must not have exceeded 5.0 times its consolidated operating cash flow for the four quarters then ended. The maximum ratio is 4.5 times for 2014, 4.0 times for 2015, 3.5 times for 2016, and 3.0 times for 2017.



Interest Coverage Ratio. The Company’s consolidated operating cash flow for the four quarters ending on the last day of each fiscal quarter through maturity must not be less than 2.0 times its consolidated cash interest expense for the four quarters then ended. 33

Table of Contents The first lien facility is secured by a first-priority lien on substantially all of the Company’s assets and the assets of substantially all of its subsidiaries and is guaranteed jointly and severally by the Company and substantially all of its subsidiaries. The guarantees were issued to the Company’s lenders for repayment of the outstanding balance of the first lien facility. If the Company defaults under the terms of the first lien credit agreement, the Company and its applicable subsidiaries may be required to perform under their guarantees. As of December 31, 2013, the maximum amount of undiscounted payments the Company and its applicable subsidiaries would have had to make in the event of default was $106.9 million. The guarantees for the first lien facility expire on August 9, 2017. The aggregate scheduled principal repayments of the credit facility for the next four years are as follows:

2014 2015 2016 2017 Total

Term loan

Revolving credit facility

$ 4,250,000 8,250,000 9,625,000 77,750,000 $99,875,000

— — — 7,000,000 $7,000,000

Total

$

4,250,000 8,250,000 9,625,000 84,750,000 $106,875,000

Failure to comply with financial covenants, scheduled interest payments, scheduled principal repayments, or any other terms of its credit agreement could result in the acceleration of the maturity of its outstanding debt. The Company believes that it will have sufficient liquidity and capital resources to permit it to meet its financial obligations for at least the next twelve months. As of December 31, 2013, the Company was in compliance with all applicable financial covenants under its credit agreement. (8) Stockholders’ Equity The Company has two classes of common stock: Class A common stock and Class B common stock. In the election of directors, the holders of Class A common stock are entitled by class vote, exclusive of other stockholders, to elect two of the Company’s directors, with each Class A share being entitled to one vote. In the election of the other six directors and all other matters submitted to the stockholders for a vote, the holders of Class A shares and Class B shares shall vote as a single class, with each Class A share being entitled to one vote and each Class B share entitled to ten votes.

The Company’s credit agreement permits it to repurchase sufficient shares of its common stock to fund withholding taxes in connection with the vesting of restricted stock, subject to compliance with financial covenants, up to an aggregate amount of $2.0 million per year. The Company paid $0.2 million to repurchase 36,363 shares in 2013. The Company’s credit agreement permits it to pay cash dividends and to repurchase additional shares of its common stock, subject to compliance with financial covenants, up to an aggregate amount of $4.0 million for 2013, $5.0 million for each of 2014 and 2015, and $6.0 million for each year thereafter. The Company paid $1.9 million for cash dividends in 2012 and paid no cash dividends in 2013. On December 6, 2013, the Company declared a cash dividend of $0.045 per share on its Class A and Class B common stock. The dividend of $1.0 million in the aggregate was paid on January 10, 2014, to stockholders of record on December 27, 2013. (9) Stock-Based Compensation The Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc. 2007 Equity Incentive Award Plan (the “2007 Plan”) permits the Company to issue up to 4.0 million shares of Class A common stock. The 2007 Plan allows for eligible employees, directors and certain consultants of the Company to receive shares of restricted stock, stock options or other stock-based awards. The restricted stock awards that have been granted under the 2007 Plan generally vest over one to five years of service. 34

Table of Contents A summary of restricted stock activity under the 2007 Plan is presented below:

Shares

Unvested as of January 1, 2012 Granted Vested Forfeited Unvested as of December 31, 2012 Granted Vested Forfeited Unvested as of December 31, 2013

148,584 80,000 (103,016) (1,850) 123,718 178,500 (104,451) (2,000) 195,767

WeightedAverage Grant-Date Fair Value

$

$

4.26 3.63 6.04 3.15 3.86 6.98 3.99 5.19 6.79

As of December 31, 2013, there was $0.8 million of total unrecognized compensation cost for restricted stock granted under the 2007 Plan. That cost is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of 1.8 years. The 2000 Equity Plan of Beasley Broadcast Group. Inc. (the “2000 Plan”) was terminated upon adoption of the 2007 Plan, except with respect to outstanding awards. The remaining stock options expire ten years from the date of grant. No new awards will be granted under the 2000 Plan. A summary of restricted stock activity under the 2000 Plan is presented below:

Shares

Unvested as of January 1, 2012

2,333

WeightedAverage Grant-Date Fair Value

$

5.99

Vested Unvested as of December 31, 2012

(2,333) —

$

5.99 —

A summary of stock option activity under the 2000 Plan is as follows:

Options

Outstanding as of January 1, 2012 Forfeited Outstanding as of December 31, 2012 Forfeited Outstanding and exercisable as of December 31, 2013

178,084 — 178,084 (115,834) 62,250

WeightedAverage Exercise Price

$ 13.92 — 13.92 12.90 $ 15.82

As of December 31, 2013, the weighted-average remaining contractual term was 0.7 years and the aggregate intrinsic value was zero for stock options granted under the 2000 Plan. (10) Income Taxes Income tax expense is as follows: Year ended December 31, 2012 2013

Federal: Current Deferred

$3,136,830 2,847,899 5,984,729

$2,852,342 3,452,912 6,305,254

358,533 903,625 1,262,158 $7,246,887

531,836 194,449 726,285 $7,031,539

State: Current Deferred

35

Table of Contents Income tax expense differs from the amounts that would result from applying the federal statutory rate of 34% to the Company’s income before taxes as follows: Year ended December 31, 2012 2013

Expected tax expense State income taxes, net of federal benefit Change in effective state income tax rate Change in valuation allowance Non-deductible items

$6,214,573 833,024 — (10,367) 209,657 $7,246,887

$6,316,453 818,480 (336,143) (9,444) 242,193 $7,031,539

Temporary differences that give rise to the components of deferred tax assets and liabilities are as follows:

December 31, 2012

Deferred tax assets: Allowance for doubtful accounts Other assets Accrued expenses Other long-term liabilities Stock-based compensation Net operating losses Subtotal Valuation allowance Total Deferred tax liabilities: Prepaid expenses Property and equipment Intangibles Total Net deferred tax liabilities

$

406,387 817,880 519,447 381,380 347,493 382,852 2,855,439 (643,552) 2,211,887

(506,933) (1,427,035) (49,308,526) (51,242,494) $(49,030,607)

2013

$

341,487 916,864 517,118 333,791 361,579 350,239 2,821,078 (634,108) 2,186,970

(483,944) (1,451,801) (52,647,817) (54,583,562) $(52,396,592)

As of December 31, 2013, the Company has state net operating losses of $7.5 million, which expire in various years through 2030. The valuation allowance relates to net operating losses and unrealized losses on investments which management has determined, more likely than not, that such losses will not be utilized. As of December 31, 2012 and 2013, the Company does not have any material unrecognized tax benefits and accordingly has not recorded any interest or penalties related to unrecognized tax benefits. The Company and its subsidiaries file a consolidated federal income tax return and various state returns. These returns remain subject to examination by taxing authorities for all years after 2009. (11) Earnings Per Share Net income per share calculation information is as follows: Year ended December 31, 2012 2013

Net income Weighted-average shares outstanding: Basic Effect of dilutive restricted stock Diluted Net income per basic share Net income per diluted share

$11,031,270

$11,546,263

22,667,102 81,860 22,748,962 $ 0.49 $ 0.48

22,735,774 102,435 22,838,209 $ 0.51 $ 0.51

36

Table of Contents (12) Non-Cash Operating and Investing Activities In the first quarter of 2012, the Company finalized the terms of a long-term lease agreement for a radio tower in Boston, MA. The terms of the agreement resulted in a $1.3 million reclassification of leasehold improvements previously reported in property and equipment to long-term prepaid rent in other assets.

(13) Related Party Transactions Notes receivable from related parties totaling $2.3 million as of December 31, 2013 are due from Beasley Family Towers, LLC (“BFT”), which is controlled by George G. Beasley, Bruce G. Beasley, Caroline Beasley, Brian E. Beasley and other family members of George G. Beasley. On May 31, 2013, the interest rate on the notes receivable was discretionarily changed from 6.0% to 2.57%. The aggregate monthly payments of approximately $38,000 were unchanged, but due to the interest rate change the maturity date of the notes is now June 30, 2019. Interest income on the notes receivable from BFT was approximately $169,000 and $102,000 for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013, respectively. The Company leases radio towers for 24 radio stations under separate lease agreements from BFT. The lease agreements expire on various dates through December 28, 2020. Rental expense was approximately $559,000 and $561,000 for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013, respectively. The Company leases radio towers for two radio stations under separate lease agreements from BFT. The lease agreements expire on August 4, 2016. Lease payments are currently offset by the partial recognition of a deferred gain on sale from the sale of these towers to BFT in 2006, therefore no rental expense was reported for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013. The Company leases a radio tower in Augusta, GA from Wintersrun Communications, LLC, which is controlled by George G. Beasley, Bruce G. Beasley and Brian E. Beasley. The lease agreement expires on April 30, 2014. Rental expense was approximately $30,000 for each of the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013. The Company leases property for its radio stations in Ft. Myers, FL from GGB Estero, LLC which is controlled by George G. Beasley. The lease agreement expires on August 31, 2014. Rental expense was approximately $163,000 for each of the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013. The Company leases land for its radio stations in Augusta, GA from GGB Augusta, LLC which is controlled by George G. Beasley. The lease agreement expires on November 1, 2023. Rental expense was approximately $40,000 and $41,000 for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013, respectively. The Company leases its principal executive offices in Naples, FL from Beasley Broadcasting Management Corp., which is controlled by George G. Beasley. Rental expense was approximately $174,000 for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013. On May 28, 2010, the Company entered into an agreement to manage two radio stations in Las Vegas, NV for GGB Las Vegas, LLC, which is owned by George G. Beasley. The management agreement included an option to purchase the two managed radio stations. Management fees, reported in net revenue in the accompanying statements of comprehensive income, were approximately $137,000 and $69,000 for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013, respectively. On August 10, 2012, the Company completed the acquisition of KOAS-FM for $4.5 million. The Company acquired KOAS-FM to complement its current market cluster in Las Vegas, NV. The acquisition was financed with $2.0 million in cash and a $2.5 million note payable to GGB Las Vegas, LLC. The note carried interest at 3.5% and was repaid in full in the third quarter of 2012. The acquisition was accounted for as a combination between businesses under common control therefore the Company recorded the assets acquired at their carrying amounts as of the date of acquisition. The difference between the purchase price and the carrying amounts of the assets acquired was recorded as an adjustment to additional paid-in capital. The Company did not retrospectively adjust the financial statements to furnish comparative information for the periods under which the Company and GGB Las Vegas, LLC were under common control as the adjustments were considered immaterial to the financial statements and earnings per share for all periods presented. The operations of KOAS-FM have been included in the Company’s results of operations from its acquisition date. A summary of the carrying amounts of assets acquired and the adjustment to additional paid-in capital is as follows:

Property and equipment FCC broadcasting license Carrying amount of assets acquired Purchase price Adjustment to additional paid-in capital

$ 416,389 4,142,912 4,559,301 4,500,000 $ 59,301

On September 1, 2013, the Company completed the acquisition of KVGS-FM in Las Vegas, NV from GGB Las Vegas, LLC, which is owned by George G. Beasley, for $4.0 million in cash. The Company acquired KVGSFM to complement its current market cluster in Las Vegas, NV. The acquisition was accounted for as a combination between businesses under common control therefore 37

Table of Contents the Company recorded the assets acquired at their carrying amounts as of the date of acquisition. The difference between the purchase price and the carrying amounts of the assets acquired was recorded as an adjustment, net of taxes, to additional paid-in capital. The Company did not retrospectively adjust the financial statements to furnish comparative information for the periods under which the Company and GGB Las Vegas, LLC were under common control as the adjustments were considered immaterial to all periods presented. The operations of KVGS-FM have been included in the Company’s results of operations from its acquisition date. A summary of the carrying amounts of assets acquired and the adjustment to additional paid-in capital is as follows: Property and equipment FCC broadcasting license Carrying amount of assets acquired Purchase price Adjustment to additional paid-in capital

$ 384,118 2,806,982 3,191,100 4,000,000 $ (808,900)

During the fourth quarter of 2013, an amount of $185,916 was paid to GGB Las Vegas, LLC for unreimbursed management fee losses incurred by KVGS-FM during the term of the management agreement and an amount of $99,483 was paid to GGB Las Vegas, LLC to purchase property and equipment acquired by GGB Las Vegas, LLC for KVGS-FM during the term of the management agreement. On March 25, 2011, the Company contributed $250,000 to Digital PowerRadio, LLC in exchange for 25,000 units or approximately 20% of the outstanding units. The Company contributed an additional $62,500 on February 14, 2012, $104,167 on July 31, 2012, and $104,167 on April 10, 2013 which maintained its ownership interest at approximately 20% of the outstanding units. The Company may be called upon to make additional pro rata cash contributions to Digital PowerRadio, LLC in the future. Digital PowerRadio, LLC is managed by Fowler Radio Group, LLC which is partly-owned by Mark S. Fowler, an independent director of the Company. As of December 31, 2013, future minimum lease payments to related parties for the next five years and thereafter are summarized as follows: 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 Thereafter

$ 760,228 634,918 582,987 507,196 507,196 1,126,898

Total

$4,119,423

(14) Commitments and Contingencies The Company leases property and equipment from third parties under five- to thirty-year operating leases. Lease expense was $2.5 million and $2.8 million for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013, respectively. The Company also has various commitments for rating services, on-air personalities not employed by us, consultants and sports programming rights. As of December 31, 2013, future minimum payments to third parties for the next five years and thereafter are summarized as follows: 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 Thereafter Total

$ 7,414,058 7,254,576 7,045,149 6,870,169 6,113,359 7,717,820 $42,415,131

In the normal course of business, the Company is party to various legal matters. The ultimate disposition of these matters will not, in management’s judgment, have a material adverse effect on the Company’s financial position. 38

Table of Contents (15) Financial Instruments The carrying amount of notes receivable from related parties with a fixed rate of interest of 2.57% was $2.3 million as of December 31, 2013, compared with a fair value of $2.2 million based on current market interest rates. The carrying amount of notes receivable from related parties was $2.7 million as of December 31, 2012, compared with a fair value of $2.9 million based on market rates at that time. The carrying amount of long term debt, including the current installments, was $106.9 million as of December 31, 2013 and approximated fair value based on current market interest rates. The carrying amount of long-term debt was $116.7 million as of December 31, 2012 and approximated fair value based on market rates at that time. (16) Defined Contribution Plan The Company has a defined contribution plan that conforms with Section 401(k) of the Internal Revenue Code. Under this plan, employees may contribute a minimum of 1% of their compensation (no maximum) to the Plan. However, the Internal Revenue Code limited contributions to $17,000 (or $22,500 if aged 50 years or older) in 2012 and $17,500 (or $23,000 if aged 50 years or older) in 2013. There were no employer matching contributions in 2012 and 2013. 39

Table of Contents BEASLEY BROADCAST GROUP, INC.

FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULE VALUATION AND QUALIFYING ACCOUNTS Years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013

Column A Description

Year ended December 31, 2012: Allowance for doubtful accounts (deducted from accounts receivable) Valuation allowance for deferred tax assets Year ended December 31, 2013: Allowance for doubtful accounts (deducted from accounts receivable) Valuation allowance for deferred tax assets

Column B Balance at Beginning of Period

Column C Charged to Costs and Expenses

Column D Deductions

Column E Balance at End of Period

454,632 653,919

1,219,698 1,940

1,036,470 12,307

637,860 643,552

637,860 643,552

801,619 —

939,614 9,444

499,865 634,108

40

Table of Contents ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE None. ITEM 9A.CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES Conclusion Regarding the Effectiveness of Disclosure Controls and Procedures We maintain disclosure controls and procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our Exchange Act reports is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate, to allow for timely decisions regarding required disclosure. In designing and evaluating the disclosure controls and procedures, management recognized that any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving the desired control objectives, and, management necessarily was required to apply its judgment in evaluating the cost-benefit relationship of possible controls and procedures. As required by Rule 13a-15(b) of the Exchange Act, we carried out an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined by Exchange Act Rule 13a-15(e)). Based upon the foregoing, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective at the reasonable assurance level as of December 31, 2013, the end of the period covered by this report. Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting Internal control over financial reporting refers to the process designed by, or under the supervision of, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, and effected by our board of directors, management and other personnel, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and includes those policies and procedures that:

(1) Pertain to the maintenance of records that in reasonable detail accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the Company; (2) Provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the Company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of managements and directors of the Company; and (3) Provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of the Company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements. Internal control over financial reporting cannot provide absolute assurance of achieving financial reporting objectives because of its inherent limitations. Internal control over financial reporting is a process that involves human diligence and compliance and is subject to lapses in judgment and breakdowns resulting from human failures. Internal control over financial reporting also can be circumvented by collusion or improper management override. Because of such limitations, there is a risk that material misstatements may not be prevented or detected on a timely basis by internal control over financial reporting. However, these inherent limitations are known features of the financial reporting process. Therefore, it is possible to design into the process safeguards to reduce, though not eliminate, this risk. Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting for the Company. Management has used the framework set forth in the 1992 report entitled “Internal Control Integrated Framework” published by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations (“COSO”) of the Treadway Commission to evaluate the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Management has concluded that the Company’s internal control over financial reporting was effective as of the end of the most recent fiscal year. This annual report does not include an attestation report of the Company’s registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting. Management’s report was not subject to attestation by the Company’s registered public accounting firm pursuant to Section 404(c) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act that permits the Company to provide only management’s report in this annual report. 41

Table of Contents There has been no significant change in our internal controls over financial reporting during the Company’s fourth fiscal quarter of 2013 that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting. ITEM 9B.OTHER INFORMATION None. 42

Table of Contents PART III ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE The information relating to directors and executive officers required by this Item 10 is incorporated in this report by reference to the information set forth under the caption “Proposal No. 1: Election of Directors,” “The

Board of Directors and its Committees” and “Named Executive Officers” in our Definitive Proxy Statement for our 2014 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, which will be filed with the Commission no later than April 30, 2014 (“2014 Proxy Statement”). The information relating to certain filings on Forms 3, 4 and 5 is incorporated in this report by reference to the information set forth under the caption “Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance” in our 2014 Proxy Statement. The information relating to our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics is incorporated in this report by reference to the information set forth under the caption “Code of Business Conduct and Ethics” in our 2014 Proxy Statement. ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION The information required by this Item 11 is incorporated in this report by reference to the information set forth under the caption “Executive Compensation” in our 2014 Proxy Statement. ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS The information required by this Item 12 is incorporated in this report by reference to the information set forth under the caption “Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters” in our 2014 Proxy Statement. ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE The information required by this Item 13 is incorporated in this report by reference to the information set forth under the caption “Certain Relationships and Related Transactions” in our 2014 Proxy Statement. ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES The information required by this Item 14 is incorporated in this report by reference to the information set forth under the caption “Relationship with Independent Registered Public Accountants” in our 2014 Proxy Statement. 43

Table of Contents PART IV ITEM 15. EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES (a) Financial Statements. A list of financial statements and schedules included herein is set forth in the Index to Financial Statements appearing in “ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA.” (b) Exhibits. Exhibit Number

Description

3.1

Amended and restated certificate of incorporation of the Registrant. (1)

3.2

Third amended and restated bylaws of the Registrant. (2)

10.1

First lien credit agreement between Beasley Mezzanine Holdings, LLC and a syndicate of financial institutions, dated August 9, 2012. (3)

10.2

Second lien credit agreement between Beasley Mezzanine Holdings, LLC and a syndicate of financial

institutions, dated August 9, 2012. (4) 10.3

Amendment and waiver to credit agreement, dated as of August 9, 2012, by and among Beasley Mezzanine Holdings, LLC, General Electric Capital Corporation, as administrative agent, and the lenders party thereto. (5)

10.4

Amendment no. 2 to credit agreement, dated as of August 9, 2012, by and among Beasley Mezzanine Holdings, LLC, General Electric Capital Corporation, as administrative agent, and the lenders party thereto. (6)

10.5

The 2000 Equity Plan of Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc. (7)

10.6

First amendment to the 2000 Equity Plan of Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc. (8)

10.7

The Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc. 2007 Equity Incentive Award Plan. (9)

10.8

Executive employment agreement by and between Beasley Mezzanine Holdings, LLC and George G. Beasley dated as of May 13, 2005. (10)

10.9

Executive employment agreement by and between Beasley Mezzanine Holdings, LLC and Bruce G. Beasley dated as of May 13, 2005. (11)

10.10

Executive employment agreement by and between Beasley Mezzanine Holdings, LLC and B. Caroline Beasley dated as of May 13, 2005. (12)

10.11

Executive employment agreement by and between Beasley Mezzanine Holdings, LLC and Brian E. Beasley dated as of May 13, 2005. (13)

10.12

Performance incentive plan of the Company. (14)

21.1

Subsidiaries of the Company. (15)

23.1

Consent of Crowe Horwath LLP.

31.1

Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Rule 15d-14(a) (17 CFR 240.15d-14(a)).

31.2

Certification of Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Secretary and Treasurer pursuant to Rule 15d14(a) (17 CFR 240.15d-14(a)).

32.1

Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Rule 15d-14(b) (17 CFR 240.15d-14(b)) and 18 U.S.C. Section 1350.

32.2

Certification of Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Secretary and Treasurer pursuant to Rule 15d14(b) (17 CFR 240.15d-14(b)) and 18 U.S.C. Section 1350.

101.INS

XBRL Instance Document.

101.SCH

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document.

101.CAL

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document.

101.DEF

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document.

101.LAB

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document.

101.PRE

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document.

(1)

Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated May 23, 2012. 44

Table of Contents

(2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15)

Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc.’s Annual Report on Form 10-K dated February 13, 2001. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated August 9, 2012. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated August 9, 2012. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated April 3, 2013. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated November 7, 2013. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.13 to Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc.’s Registration Statement on Form S-1/A dated February 11, 2000. (File No. 333-91683). Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc.’s Registration Statement on Form S-8 dated May 27, 2004. Incorporated by reference to Appendix A to Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc.’s Definitive Proxy Statement dated April 27, 2007. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 to Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated May 19, 2005. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 to Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated May 19, 2005. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.3 to Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated May 19, 2005. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.4 to Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated May 19, 2005 Incorporated by reference to Appendix A to Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc.’s Definitive Proxy Statement dated April 11, 2012. Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 21.1 to Beasley Broadcast Group, Inc.’s Annual Report on Form 10-K dated March 12, 2008. 45

Table of Contents SIGNATURES Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized. BEASLEY BROADCAST GROUP, INC. By:

/S/

GEORGE G. BEASLEY George G. Beasley

Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer Date:

February 14, 2014

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

/S/

Signature

Title

Date

GEORGE G. BEASLEY

Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer

February 14,

George G. Beasley

/S/

ALLEN B. SHAW

(principal executive officer) Vice-Chairman of the Board

February 14, 2014

President, Chief Operating Officer and Director

February 14, 2014

Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Secretary, Treasurer and Director (principal financial and accounting officer)

February 14, 2014

Vice President of Operations and Director

February 14, 2014

Director

February 14, 2014

Director

February 14, 2014

Director

February 14, 2014

Allen B. Shaw

/S/

BRUCE G. BEASLEY Bruce G. Beasley

/S/

CAROLINE BEASLEY Caroline Beasley

/S/

BRIAN E. BEASLEY Brian E. Beasley

/S/

JOE B. COX Joe B. Cox

/S/

MARK S. FOWLER Mark S. Fowler

/S/

HERBERT W. MCCORD

2014

Herbert W. McCord

46