Bond Projects - Pima County

Bond Projects - Pima County

2004/2006 and 1997 Bond Projects Completed as of June 2009 Special Bond Elections • May 16, 2006 (General Obligation Bonds) • May 18, 2004 (General...

3MB Sizes 0 Downloads 0 Views

2004/2006 and 1997

Bond Projects Completed

as of June 2009

Special Bond Elections • May 16, 2006 (General Obligation Bonds) • May 18, 2004 (General Obligation and Sewer Revenue Bonds) • November 4, 1997 (HURF Revenue Bonds) • May 20, 1997 (General Obligation and Sewer Revenue Bonds)

Pima County Board of Supervisors: Richard Elías, Chairman, Supervisor, District 5 Ann Day, Supervisor, District 1 Ramón Valadez, Supervisor, District 2 Sharon Bronson, Supervisor, District 3 Raymond J. Carroll, Supervisor, District 4 Pima County Administrator: C.H. Huckelberry

LISTING OF COMPLETED BOND PROJECTS 2004 Bond Projects Completed Question 1: Sonoran desert open space and habitat protection; preventing urban encroachment of davis-monthan air force base OS1.01 Sweetwater Preserve – Tucson Mountain Park OS1.02 Tucson Mountain Park – Camino de Oeste Project Area Matesich, Serr, Selective Marketing, Des Rochers, Route 606 Properties OS1.07 Canoa Ranch Parcels OS1.09 Carpenter Ranch – Tortolita Mountain Park OS1.14 Tucson Mountain Park – South Corridor Project Area Hiett, Heater, Berard, Hyntington, Firkins, and Pacheco Properties OS1.15 City of Tucson Agua Caliente – Doucette Property OS1.16 36th Street Corridor Jacobs Trust Property Belvedere Estates Habitat for Humanity OS1.20 Davis-Monthan Encroachment Prevention OS1.21 Southeast Project Area Baker, Cates, Knes, and Chess Properties Bar V Ranch Poteet Property Nunez Property Amadon Property Sands Ranch OS1.22 Santa Cruz Basin Project Area South Wilmot LLC Marley Ranch Phase I OS1.23 Altar Valley Project Area King 98 Ranch Rancho Seco Acquisition Madera Highlands Diamond Bell Ranch Sopori Ranch OS1.24 Avra Valley Sub Area Bee and Mordka Properties Buckelew Farms Continental Ranch Development LLC OS1.25 Tortolita Mountain Sub Area Linda Vista/Patrick Property Cochie Canyon Property OS1.27 San Pedro Sub Area A-7 Ranch Six Bar Ranch

Question 2: Public health and community facilities FM2.01 Kino Public Health Center FM2.02 New Psychiatric Hospital FM2.03 Teresa Lee Health Clinic FM2.06 Green Valley Performing Arts Center Phase 2 FM2.07 Mt. Lemmon Community Center FM2.08 Amado Food Bank Kitchen FM2.12 Arizona Sonora Desert Museum - Auditorium FM2.14 Pima Air and Space Museum - Hanger HR2.10 Neighborhood Reinvestment Affordable Housing Programs Casa Bonita Phases III, IV, V Corazon Del Pueblo Phase I Corazon Del Pueblo Phase II Corazon Del Pueblo Phase III Curley School Apartments Sylvester Drive Estates NR2.09 Pima County Neighborhood Reinvestment Project South Park Neighborhood Water Slide Miracle Manor Playground Equipment Miles School Oak Flower Neighborhood Alvernon Heights A Mountain Neighborhood Amado Community Marana Vista Estates Rillito Tucson Neighborhood Association South Tucson Parks Improvements Flowing Wells Neighborhood Santa Catalina Mountain Community Center Highland Vista Ajo Skate Park Julia Keen Neighborhood Street Lighting Flowing Wells Health Clinic Hedrick Acres Midvale Park Reinvestment Jefferson Park Rincon Heights Street Revitalization Miracle Manor II Neighborhood Cardinal Street Revitalization

Question 3: Public Safety aND JUSTICE FACILITIES SD3.01 Microwave Path-Childs Mountain to PCSD Ajo Office FM3.02 Pima County Justice Court/Municipal Court Complex FM3.04 Corrections Jail Security-Security Enhancements

FM3.05 Interagency Victim Advocacy Center FM3.06 Juvenile Court Buil-Out

Question 4: Parks and Recreational Facilities and historic preservation projects CR4.01 Empirita Ranch Buildings Rehabilitation CR4.02 Canoa Ranch Master Plan CR4.03 Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail Haven Bridge Abrego Trailhead Canoa Supplement Tuquison Campsite CR4.04 San Pedro Chapel CR4.07 Binghampton Historic Buildings Rehabilitation CR4.12 Performing Arts Center Rehabilitation CR4.13 Tumamoc Hill Acquisition CR4.14 Los Morteros Preservation FM4.44 Marana Continental Ranch New Library FM4.45 Oro Valley Library Expansion PR4.18 Flowing Wells Community Center PR4.19 Southeast Regional Park/Shooting Range - Phase II Tucson Mountain Park Shooting Range Ajo Shooting Range Southeast Regional Shooting Range Education Center Southeast Regional Shooting Range Berms PR4.20 Lighting of Existing and New Sports Fields Rillito Race Track Field Lighting McDonald Park Field Lighting 5&6 McDonald Park Field Lighting Upgrades Brandi Fenton Memorial Park Lighting PR4.21 Curtis Park - Flowing Wells East PR4.23 Dan Felix Memorial Park PR4.24 Brandi Fenton Memorial Park (River Bend) PR4.26 Rillito Race Track PR4.28 Feliz Paseos Universal Access Park PR4.29 Picture Rocks Pool PR4.41 Anamax Park Multi-Use Ball Field

Question 5: River Parks and Flood Control Improvements FC5.02 Urban Drainage Infrastructure Program Littletown Urban Drainage Ajo - Second Avenue Bridge Old Nogales Highway at Franco Wash Verde Meadows Crest Improvements

Ajo Curley School Detention Basin Columbus Wash Storm Drain Green Valley Erosion Control Phase 2 Columbus Wash Phase II Drainage Improvement FC5.05 Pasque Yaqui Tribe Black Wash Urban Drainage Flood Control Improvements FC5.07 Santa Cruz River, Grant Road to Camino del Cerro Silvercroft Wash Pedestrian Bridge FC5.08 Rillito River Linear Park, Alvernon to Craycroft FC5.09 Santa Cruz River Bank Protection in vicinity of Continental Ranch FC5.10 CDO Wash Bank Protection & Linear Park: Omni Golf Course

Question 6: sewer system revenue bonds SS6.01 Roger Road WWTP Infrastructure & Environmental Improvements Roger Road WWTP Headworks Compactors Roger Road Rehab Port Pack Thickener Roger Road Construction of New Stormwater Basin Roger Road Rehabilitation of Existing Storm Basin Roger Road WWTP Small JOC Rehabilitation Roger Road Rehabilitation Biosolids Handling Planning Variable Frequency Drive at Pump Station No. 4 Roger Road WWTP Biotower Arm Replacement Roger Road Odor Control Projects Roger Road WWTP Rehabilitation Structural Assessment Roger Road WWTP Rehabilitation Electrical Study Roger Road Rehabilitation Aeration Basins SS6.02 Miscellaneous Conveyance Rehabilitation Projects Old Nogales Hwy Barrio Anita Rehab Carrillo School/El Paso Street Sewer Rehabilitation Sabino Canyon Crossing Conveyance Rehabilitation 25th Street South to Cherry Avenue Santa Cruz Central & East at Miracle Mile Santa Cruz Central North & South of Grant 18th Street & I-10 Under I-19 South of Irvington Rd. Warren Avenue 8th to 9th Streets Duval Road Under I-19 West Orangewood Drive Rancho Del Lago I-10 and Drexel 36th Street Alignment East of Mission Road North Camino Cardenal West Camino SS6.03 Santa Cruz Interceptor, Prince to Franklin SS6.07 Ina Road WPCF Denitrification

1997 Bond Projects Completed Question 1: Juvenile Detention and Court Facilities JC-1

Juvenile Court Detention and Administrative Facilities

Question 2: Public Safety, Law Enforcement and Superior Court S-2 Sheriff Maximum Security Detention S-3 Sheriff’s New Substations Robles Ranch Substation Sheriff’s Central Administration Building S-5 Sheriff’s Substation Expansion Rincon and San Xavier Substation S-7 Sheriff’s Evidence Security S-8 Sheriff’s Communications Systems Upgrade S-9 Sheriff’s Communications Tower SC-8 Superior Court New Courtrooms SC-9 Superior Court Adult Probation

Question 3: Parks P-01 Miscellaneous Park System Renovations Three Points Veterans Memorial Park Denny Dunn Thomas Jay/Littletown Los Niños/Augie Acuña Sunset Pointe Neighborhood Park Arthur Pack Parking Lot Security Lighting Sopori Park Improvements Richardson Neighborhood Park and Wildwood Neighborhood Park Improvements Meadowbrook Neighborhood Park Improvements Ted Walker Regional Park Mission Ridge Neighborhood Park E.S. Bud Walker Neighborhood ADA Restroom Park Picnic Tables Cardinal Neighborhood Park Improvements Gibson Park Basketball Court Manzanita Park Improvements Dugout Roof Installations Anamax Neighborhood Park Tot Lot, Ramadas, Sidewalks Arthur Pack Field 6 Lighting Arthur Pack Parking Lot Renovation and Ramadas Manzanita Park Sewer Curtis Park Field Lighting P-02 Ajo Pool Renovations P-03 Anamax Neighborhood Park Renovations

P-04 Tucson Mountain Park Renovation Water System Improvements Arizona Sonora Desert Museum Parking Lot Lighting Gilbert Ray Campground Restroom Juan Santa Cruz Picnic Area Restroom Ironwood Picnic Area Paving Camino de Oeste Trailhead Tucson Mountain Park Renovations P-05 Tucson Athletic and Play Field Improvements Santa Cruz River Park Path Expansion Rillito River Park Path Expansion Mehl/Foothills District Park Lighting Little League Field of Dreams Amphi Softball Field Improvement Santa Cruz River Park Playground Dan Felix Memorial Park Soccer Fields Lighting Rudy Garcia Park Yes2Kids Handball Court Manuel Herrera Park Improvements Grijalva Park P-06 Colossal Cave Mountain Park Improvements P-07 Rillito Park Improvements P-08 Mehl-Foothills District Park P-09 James Kriegh Park (High School Lighting Improvements) P-10 Coronado School Ballfield Lighting P-12 South Tucson Playing Field Lighting Improvements P-13 Freedom Park Center Improvements P-14 Sahuarita District Park Improvements P-15 Augie Acuña-Los Niños Neighborhood Park P-16 Sam Lena Recreation Area Improvements P-17 Santa Rita Park Lighting Improvements P-18 Armory Park/Children’s Museum Improvements P-19 Linda Vista Park Improvements P-20 Three Points Veterans Memorial Park Lighting Improvements P-21 Picture Rocks Park Improvements P-22 Southeast Regional Park Improvements (Shooting Range) P-23 Lawrence District Park Lighting Improvements P-24 Vail Park/Cienega High School Park Improvements P-25 Udall Park Improvements P-26 Old Nogales Park Land Acquisition P-27 Catalina Park Land Acquisition P-28 Ryan Field Park Land Acquisition P-29 Rita Ranch District Park

P-30 P-31 P-32 P-33 P-34 P-38 P-39 P-40 P-41 P-42 P-44 P-46 P-47 P-48 P-49 P-52 P-55 P-56 P-57 P-58

Rillito River Park – La Cholla to I-10 Rillito River Park – Campbell to Alvernon Rillito Park at Columbus Boulevard District Park Rillito Park at River Bend (Land Purchase Only) Oro Valley CDO River Park Northwest Pool/Marana USD Cañada del Oro Riverfront Park Old Nogales Park Kino Community Field Lighting Improvements Flowing Wells Park Branding Iron Park Columbus Park Tanque Verde Community Center Roy P. Drachman – Agua Caliente Regional Park Visitor Center Arivaca Community Center Expansion Drexel Heights Community Center Clements Recreational Facility Thomas Jay Community Center Quincie Douglas Park Pool Northwest Community Center/Aquatic Center (YMCA)

Question 4: Sonoran Desert Open Space and Historic Preservation SD-00 Sonoran Desert Open Space SD-01 Tucson Mountain Park - General Diocese of Tucson L and F International Trading Company Saguaro Cliffs Las Lomas Holsclaw Property/Camino de Oeste and Gates Pass Road SD-02 Tucson Mountain Park - Painted Hills SD-03 Tucson Mountain Park - Robles Pass Perper Rollings Lefkowitz-Laika SD-04 Tucson Mountain - Los Morteros Baxter Joshua Tree Orach CA-32 Los Morteros University of Arizona Foundation Property Marana Unified School District Property SD-05 Tortolita Mountain Park Leef Carpenter Ranch Reid

Tang SD-08 Canoa Ranch SD-10 Tumamoc Hill Acquisition RW-11 Agua Caliente Creek Drewes Ruddick RW-12 Agua Verde Creek Akers/Bradley Alpher CH-24 Colossal Cave Rehabilitation (see P-06) CH-25 Agua Caliente Ranch Rehabilitation CH-26 Empirita Lower Ranch Buildings Rehabilitation CH-27 Robles Ranch House Rehabilitation CH-28 Mission San Agustin CH-29 Canoa Ranch Buildings Rehabilitation (Emerging Stabilization) CH-30 Anza National Trail and Campsites dskjflsdkf CA-31 Tumamoc Hill Acquisition CA-34 Pantano Townsite T-18 Central Arizona Project Trailhead (Tangerine and Avra Valley Roads) T-19 36th Street Trailhead T-20 Tortolita Mountain Park Trail System T-23 Various Trail Acquisitions

Question 5: Public Health, Safety, Recreational and Cultural Facilities and libraries CC-6 Green Valley Performing Arts Center CC-7 Las Artes Youth Learning Center CC-8 El Pueblo Adult Education and Child Care CC-9 El Rio Adult Education and Child Care L-01 Northwest (Oro Valley) Library L-02 City of Tucson Midtown Library L-03 Kino Youth Library and Resource Center L-04 Marana Library Expansion South Tucson Gateway Project L-5 South Tucson Library Expansion P-53 Ochoa-Lena Learning Center H-10 Kino Public Health Center H-12 Kino Hospital Repair FS-13 Improve Disabled Access FS-14 Legal Services Building Renovations FS-15 Downtown Complex FS-16 PBX Replacement (County Telephone System) NR-16 Neighborhood Reinvestment



Amphi Neighborhood Balboa Heights Neighborhood Dunbar Springs Neighborhood Silvercroft Neighborhood Miracle Manor Phase I and II Fairgrounds Neighborhood Wakefield Neighborhood Parkway Terrace Neighborhood Myers Neighborhood Corbett Neighborhood Bravo Park I Neighborhood Las Vistas Neighborhood Keeling Neighborhood South Park Neighborhood Pueblo Gardens Neighborhood/Cavett Elementary School Barrio Blue Moon Western Hills Chantlalli Estates Pio Decimo Corbett Neighborhood Pedestrian Bridge Elvira Iron Horse Jefferson Park Challenger Little League Rose Sunland Vista Old Pascua National City La Pilita High Sierra Estates El Cortez Heights El Rio Menlo Park Copper Vista West Ochoa We-Chij Estates Colonia Libre Bravo Park II Julian Wash South Tucson Basketball Court & Community Garden Sunnyside Wakefield Art Project West Ochoa Project



City Parkside (Julia Keen Neighborhood) Pueblo Gardens Elementary Santa Rita Skate Park Sunset Villa

Question 6: Flood Control Improvements FC-01 Santa Cruz River, Grant Road to Fort Lowell Road FC-03 Lower Santa Cruz Levee FC-04 Mission View Wash FC-05 City of Tucson Earp Wash Drainage Improvements FC-06 City of South Tucson FC-11 South Tucson 4th Avenue FC-07 Town of Sahuarita Drainage Improvements (see DOT-51) – La Cañada Dr.: Duval Mine Rd. to El Toro – Sahuarita Drainage Improvement FC-08 Oro Valley Drainage Improvements (Mutterers Wash) FC-09 Green Valley Drainageway No. 9 FC-10 Continental Vista Erosion Protection FC-11 South Tucson 4th Avenue Drainage Improvements FC-12 Fairview and Limberlost Drainage Improvements FC-13 Holladay and Forrest Drainage Improvements FC-14 Tucson Diversion Channel Drainage Inprovements

Question 7: Solid Waste Improvements SW-03 Sahuarita Expansion

Question 8: Sewer System Revenue Bonds SS-01 Ina Road Treatment Plant Outfall Headworks WPCF Process Change SS-02 Green Valley Wastewater Treatment Plant Upgrade & Expansion SS-03 Santa Cruz Interceptor – Prince to Franklin SS-07 North Rillito Interceptor SS-08 Marana Wastewater Treatment Facility SS-09 Roger Road Sewer Rehabilitation SS-10 Roger Road Odor Control (Phase I, II and III) SS-11 Arivaca Junction Wastewater Treatment Facility Relief Sewer Phase I SS-14 Randolph Park Wastewater Reclamation Facility Restoration, Expansion and Modification SS-15 Ed Pastor Environmental Restoration Project

TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENTS DOT-01 River Road, First Avenue to Campbell Avenue DOT-02 Sunrise Drive, Swan Road to Craycroft Road DOT-03 River Road, La Cholla Boulevard to La Cañanda Drive DOT-04 River Road, Campbell Avenue to Alvernon Way

DOT-05 Alvernon Way, Ft Lowell Road to River Road DOT-08/09 Skyline Drive, Campbell Avenue to Chula Vista DOT-10 La Cañada Drive, Ina Road to Lambert Lane DOT-12 Country Club Road, 36th Street to Milber DOT-13 Ajo Way, Country Club Road to Alvernon Way DOT-14 Wetmore and Ruthrauff Roads, La Cholla Boulevard to Fairview Avenue DOT-15 River Road, Thornydale Road to Shannon Road DOT-16 River Road, Shannon Road to La Cholla Boulevard DOT-17 Valencia Road: Mark Road to Camino de la Tierra DOT-18 Cortaro Farms Road: UPRR crossing to Thornydale Road DOT-19 Hartman Lane North of Cortaro Farms Road (Design Only) DOT-21 Thornydale Road, Orange Grove Road to Ina Road DOT-22 Thornydale Road, Ina Road to Cortaro Farms Road DOT-25 I-19 SB Frontage Road at Continental Road DOT-26 Abrego Drive at I-19 Northbound Frontage Road DOT-30 Catalina Highway, Tanque Verde Road to Houghton Road DOT-33 Kolb Road at Sabino Canyon Road DOT-35 Abrego Drive at Drainageway No. 1/Box Culvert DOT-38 Pistol Hill Road, Colossal Cave Road to Old Spanish Trail DOT-39 Valencia Road, I-19 to South 12th Avenue DOT-41 Neighborhood Transportation Improvements DOT-42 South Tucson, 6th Avenue and Various Locations DOT-43 12th Avenue, 38th Street to Los Reales Road DOT-45 La Cholla Boulevard, River Road to Magee Road DOT-46 Craycroft, River Road to Sunrise Drive DOT-47 Sunrise Drive: Craycroft to Kolb (Intersection Only) DOT-49 Valencia Road/Mission Road to I-19 DOT-51 La Cañada/Las Quintas Highway Drainage Improvement (see FC-07) DOT-52 Palo Verde Road, Gas Road to 44th Street DOT-54 Mt. Lemmon Shuttle DOT-55 Golf Links Road, Bonanza Avenue to Houghton Road DOT-57 Safety Improvements Jensen Road - Magee Turn Lanes Conestoga/Tanque Verde East Bound Left Turn Lane La Cañada/Trader Lane Pedestrian Crossing Flashing Beacons & Signs Lumber Street/Union Pacific Railroad Crossing Roadway Improvement Curtis Road & La Cholla Blvd. Traffic Signals La Cholla/Sonoran Terrace Apartments Turn Lanes Magee/Mona Lisa West Bound Left Turn Lane River Road to Swan Road Geometry & Traffic Signal Modifications Safety Managment Systems and Program Development Ina Road/Shannon Road Geometry & Traffic Signal Modifications Kolb Road to Valencia Road Geometry & Traffic Signal Modifications



Alvernon/Hughes Access Road Drexel Road & Mission Road Upgrade Traffic Signal Installation La Cholla Blvd. and Rudasill Road Traffic Signal Palo Verde Lighting Project Sunrise - Sabino Canyon Traffic Signal Drexel - Palo Verde Intersection Traffic Signal Camino de Oeste, Tetakusim to Los Reales/Pascua Yaqui to Camino de Oeste Realignment Ajo Intersection Lighting Ina Road and Camino de la Tierra - Additional Traffic Control Appurtenances Ina Road and Mona Lisa Road - Additional Traffic Control Appurtenances Sandario Road at Emigh Road Skyline Drive Widening Improvement Camino de la Tierra at Valencia Traffic Signal Kinney Road and Sandario Road Drainage and Straightening Silverbell Road and Sweetwater Intersection Signal Square Tube Breakaway Sign Posts River Rd. at Pontatoc Rd. Signal and Realignment Picture Rocks at Van Ark Intersection Analysis Cardinal-Drexel Intersection Improvements Magee & Thornydale Traffic Signal Abrego Drive – Continental Road Geometry and Traffic Signal Installation Campbell Avenue Lighting/Sidewalk Improvements Duval Mine Road/Rio Altar Left Turn Lane Ina Road - Silverbell Road (Town of Marana) Geometry & Traffic Signal Installation Pima County Transportation Illumination Project Mark Road & Valencia Road Traffic Signal Tanque Verde Road/Tanque Verde Loop Left Turn Lane Gates Pass Rock Removal Shannon Road & Overton Road Traffic Signal La Cholla/Hospital Drive Traffic Signal Camino Casa Verde & La Cañada Traffic Signal Nogales Highway and Hughes Access Road Traffic Signal Railroad Crossing: Contractors Way and Illinois Street Orange Grove/Silverbell Intersection Improvements Sunset/Sunray Intersection Improvements

Summary This report highlights the completed bond projects of the 2004 and 1997 bond programs. These programs provide a total of $1.4 billion in bond funding combined with an additional potential of $657 million in other funding sources.

2004 Bond Program On January 20, 2004, the Pima County Board of Supervisors adopted Resolution Number 2004-18, ordering and calling for a special bond election that was held in Pima County, Arizona, on May 18, 2004, and approved a list of bond categories and specific programs and projects. Included in the resolution were six questions to be submitted to the electors. At the May 18, 2004 special election, voters authorized the sale of a total of $732.25 million in bonds for the programs and projects. The first five questions authorized general obligation bonds of the County in the amount of $582.25 million for various purposes. The sixth question authorized sewer system revenue bonds in the amount of $150 million. The Bond Implementation Plan adopted by the Board of Supervisors on April 13, 2004 set forth the particulars regarding each project proposed to be constructed or acquired in each question, setting forth the amount of bond funds and the estimated time frame for each project. As of June 2009, $422 million has been spent of the $732.25 million and 95 site-specific projects and subprojects of the 2004 bond program have been completed or are in construction.

1997 BOND PROGRAM In two special elections in 1997 voters authorized the sale of a total of $711.98 million in bonds for expenditure on projects that were identified in two Bond Improvement Plans (Ordinances No. 1997-35 and No. 1997-80). On May 20, 1997, Pima County voters authorized the sale of $256.98 million in General Obligation bonds and $105 million in Sewer Revenue bonds. On November 4, 1997, Pima County voters authorized the sale of $350 million in Highway User Revenue Fund (HURF) bonds. This report documents the 1997 General Obligation, Sewer Revenue, and HURF Bond projects that have been completed. As of June 2009, $561 million has been spent of the $711.98 million and 174 site-specific projects and subprojects of the 1997 bond program have been completed or are in construction.

2004 General Obligation and Sewer Revenue Bonds Completed Projects

Question 1

Sonoran Desert Open Space and Habitat Protection; Preventing Urban Encroachment of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base At the May 18, 2004 bond election, Pima County voters approved bond funding in the amount of $174.3 million for the acquisition of land in fee or for the purchase of conservation easements, to protect wildlife habitat, scenic landscapes, riparian areas, and water quality, and to preserve lands in the vicinity of Davis Monthan Open Space. Within Question 1 of the Bond Implementation Ordinance there are four categories of properties: Community Open Space Parcels, Urban Open Space Requested by Jurisdictions, Habitat Protection Priorities, and Davis-Monthan Open Space. The following completed acquisitions are broken out by these categories.

Community Open Space Parcels OS 1.01 SWEETWATER PRESERVE – TUCSON MOUNTAIN PARK ACQUISITION COSTS: $11,742,000 On June 25, 2004 Pima County acquired the Sweetwater Preserve located in the eastern foothills of the Tucson Mountains. Acquisition of this 695-acre property protects a key segment of the Sweetwater Wash that connects Tucson Mountain Park to the Santa Cruz River, as well as habitat for numerous species, saguaro studded slopes, and a recreational area for hikers and horseback riders.

Sweetwater Preserve, Photo by Debbie Hecht

OS 1.02 TUCSON MOUNTAIN PARK – CAMINO DE OESTE PROJECT AREA MATESICH, SERR, SELECTIVE MARKETING, DES ROCHERS, ROUTE 606 PROPERTIES ACQUISITION COSTS: $885,000 Pima County acquired the Selective Marketing, Matesich, and Serr properties during the Fall of 2005, for an addition of 38 acres to the eastern boundary of Tucson Mountain Park, south of Gates Pass. Since then, the County has acquired an additional 41 acres by acquiring the Des Rochers and Route 606 properties, contributing to the protection of the scenic views from Gates Pass, boundary expansion, and the protection of both cultural resources and biological values.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 1

Question 1 • Sonoran Desert Open Space and Habitat Protection; Preventing Urban Encroachment of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base OS 1.07 CANOA RANCH PARCELS ACQUISITION COSTS: $3,046,000 On August 31, 2005, the County purchased 83 acres of inholdings within the County’s historic Canoa Ranch property. This was Phase 1 of a two-phase acquisition. Phase 2 was completed in December 2006, where the County acquired the remaining 52 acres. Acquisition costs included $1,200,000 from 2004 Flood Control District Bond Funds.

Canoa Ranch, Photo by Robie Pardee, NRPR

OS 1.09 CARPENTER RANCH – TORTOLITA MOUNTAIN PARK ACQUISITION COSTS: $1,100,000 On August 29, 2005, the County purchased the remaining 360 acres associated with the Carpenter Ranch totaling 560 acres. This completed the Carpenter Ranch acquisitions that Pima County began in 1999 with the purchase of 200 acres. The acquisition will contribute to the expansion of Tortolita Mountain Park and will provide additional protections to the watershed that drains into Pima County to the south.

Carpenter Ranch, Photo by Vanessa Bechtol from AOLT

2

Question 1 • Sonoran Desert Open Space and Habitat Protection; Preventing Urban Encroachment of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base OS 1.14 TUCSON MOUNTAIN PARK – SOUTH CORRIDOR PROJECT AREA HIETT, HEATER, BERARD, HYNTINGTON, FIRKINS, AND PACHECO PROPERTIES ACQUISITION COSTS: $2,236,000 Pima County acquired the Hiett, Heater, Berard, Hyntington, Firkins, and Pacheco properties between August 2005 and March 2006, for a total addition of 107 acres to the Robles Pass/South Corridor portion of Tucson Mountain Park. Acquisitions in this project area are now complete. These recent acquisitions, along with 860 acres added to the Park previously with 1997 bond funds, protect this scenic gateway into Tucson, conserve saguaro-studded hillsides characteristic of the Tucson Mountains, and will provide locations for new recreational trails in this southern end of the Tucson Mountains.

Photo by Michael Berard

Urban Open Space Requested by Jurisdictions OS 1.15 CITY OF TUCSON AGUA CALIENTE–Doucette Property ACQUISITION COSTS: $573,000 On December 28, 2004, Pima County purchased the 21-acre Doucette Property. This property is located near the confluence of Tanque Verde Creek and Agua Caliente Wash, and was purchased to preserve important riparian habitat and natural floodplain conditions, as well as habitat for priority vulnerable species.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 3

Question 1 • Sonoran Desert Open Space and Habitat Protection; Preventing Urban Encroachment of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base OS 1.16 36TH STREET CORRIDOR Jacobs Trust Property Acquisition Costs: $607,000 On March 10, 2004 Pima County purchased the Jacobs Trust property at the west end of 36th Street, along a corridor included in the City of Tucson’s jurisdictional requests to ultimately link Tucson Mountain Park to the West Branch of the Santa Cruz. The Conservation Acquisition Commission approved the use of 2004 bond funds as a reimbursement for this previous 80-acre purchase. Belvedere Estates Acquisition Costs: $632,000 On June 7, 2005, the Board of Supervisors approved purchase of the Belvedere Estates property. This 72-acre property is located along the west end of 36th Street and borders Tucson Mountain Park. Purchase of Arizona Open Land Trust, Photo by this property will expand Tucson Mountain Park, protect a scenic hillside, Trilby Dupont and provide a location for a connector trail from a planned trailhead on 36th Street to Tucson Mountain Park. Habitat for Humanity Acquisition Costs: $1,000,000 The County acquired the 80-acre Habitat for Humanity property, located at the northeast corner of West 36th Street and La Cholla Boulevard. The property contains an important tributary to the West Branch of the Santa Cruz River, and also contributes to the wildlife corridor from the West Branch to other Countyacquired properties along the 36th Street corridor connecting to Tucson Mountain Park. The property also serves as a recreation area for neighbors.

DAVIS-MONTHAN OPEN SPACE OS 1.20 DAVIS-MONTHAN ENCROACHMENT PREVENTION TOTAL FUNDING: $10,000,000 Prevent urban encroachment in the approach/departure corridor to the southeast of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base through acquisition and preservation of open space through any legal means available to Pima County including acquisition in fee simple or conservation easements on and development rights to currently undeveloped property to preserve the existing and future mission capability of the Davis-Monthan Air Force Base. Acquisition of property rights is to be guided by the recently completed Arizona Military Regional Compatibility Project Joint Land Use Study for Davis-Monthan Air Force Base. Acquisition of property rights to undeveloped land is one of several strategies for achieving land use compatibility that are being developed by Pima County and other local governmental entities, including strengthening land use controls and protections. Any properties acquired through this bond program could be designated as urban open space, allowing passive recreational uses if these 4

Question 1 • Sonoran Desert Open Space and Habitat Protection; Preventing Urban Encroachment of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base are deemed to be compatible with the mission of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base. Large parcels in the highest risk areas are to receive priority consideration for acquisition. Sub Projects Projects Completed to Date: Hermitage No-Kill Cat Shelter Property, Baumer Property, Fisher Trust Property, Tres Piedras LLC Property, Morrison & Shaffer Trusts Property, Tri-Tronics Property, Brown Family/Fidelity Trust Property, Parsons Property, Kaufman Property, Dos Perros, LLC Milane & Rendon Property Acquisition Costs: $7,653,000 Acres: 129

Habitat Protection Priorities OS 1.21 SOUTHEAST PROJECT AREA Baker, Cates, Knez, and Chess Properties Acquisition Costs: $785,000 Pima County acquired the 155-acre Baker property in October 2004, the 39-acre Cates property in May 2006, and the 80-acre Knez property in August 2006. These properties conserve a link between Colossal Cave Mountain Park and Cienega Creek Natural Preserve, and conserve habitat for numerous priority vulnerable species. In February 2007, the County acquired the 37-acre Chess property, expanding a buffer around Cienega Creek to the west. Bar V Ranch Acquisition Costs: $8,746,000 On February 17, 2005 the County purchased the Bar V Ranch. This Ranch is located south of I-10 and east of Sonoita Highway, and includes 1,763 acres of fee land and 12,674 acres of State grazing leases that adjoin the County’s Cienega Creek Natural Preserve. This purchase will protect an important wildlife corridor under I-10, rare riparian habitat for numerous priority vulnerable species, drainage that flows into the Cienega Creek and Tucson Basin, areas with high archaeological potential, a planned equestrian route for the 800-mile long Arizona Trail, and scenic views of Davidson Canyon and the Empire Mountains.

Baker property, Photo by Linwood Smith,EPG

Bar V Ranch, Photo by Gloria Browne

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 5

Question 1 • Sonoran Desert Open Space and Habitat Protection; Preventing Urban Encroachment of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base Poteet Property Acquisition Costs: $304,000 On August 31, 2005, the County purchased the Poteet property. This acquisition will secure a half-mile segment of the Agua Verde Creek and its associated floodplain, which supports a well-developed mesquite-dominated riparian woodland habitat for at least seven priority vulnerable species.

Poteet property, Photo by Linwood Smith, EPG

Nunez Property Acquisition Costs: $76,000 Pima County acquired the 19-acre Nunez property in May 2006. This property was a private inholding within the Sonoita Valley Acquisition Planning District – a district formed to conserve additional natural areas surrounding the Las Cienegas National Conservation Area. Pima County is seeking to acquire additional inholdings in this area.

Amadon Property Acquisition Costs: $122,000 In December 2006, Pima County acquired the 39-acre Amadon property, located west of the Las Cienegas National Conservation Area. This property, like the County-owned Nunez property, was a private inholding within the Sonoita Valley Acquisition Planning District – a district formed to conserve additional natural areas surrounding the NCA. Sands Ranch Acquisition Costs: $21,000,000 The County acquired the Sands Ranch on December 31, 2008. The ranch is located in the far southeast corner of Pima County, east of Las Cienegas National Conservation Area, and the purchase includes 5,040 acres of fee land. Conservation of this ranch not only expands the system of conserved lands in the far southeast corridor area, including the Coronado National Forest and the Las Cienegas National Conservation Area, but it also projects wildlife movement corridors between the Santa Rita Mountains and the Whetstone Mountains. It also conserves a direct connection to significant riparian areas such as Sonoita Creek, Babocomari River and Cienega Creek.

Sands Ranch

6

Question 1 • Sonoran Desert Open Space and Habitat Protection; Preventing Urban Encroachment of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base OS 1.22 SANTA CRUZ BASIN PROJECT AREA South Wilmot LLC Acquisition Costs: $124,000 Pima County acquired the 36-acre South Wilmot LLC property in July 2006. This property expands on previously acquired parcels in the area of Elephant Head, which have now become part of Pima County’s Pima Pineapple Cactus Mitigation Bank, located east of I-19 and the County’s Canoa Ranch holdings. Marley Ranch Phase I Acquisition Costs: $20,000,000 Pima County negotiated an agreement to acquire in three phases the 114,000-acre Marley Ranch, which spans the area west of Green Valley and the Sierrita Mine, to the Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge, north to the County’s Diamond Bell Ranch and south to the County’s Rancho Seco and Sopori ranches. The County acquired Phase I on April 30, 2009, which consisted of 6,300 acres of fee lands, located on the western portion of the ranch, and options to purchase the latter two phases, which will include another 18,000 acres of fee lands, 86,000 acres of State grazing leases, 2,800 acres of a Federal grazing permit on BLM land, conservation easements on 1,700 acres of land retained by the sellers, and water rights. Considered one of the largest intact ranches in Southern Arizona, acquisition of the Marley Ranch will greatly expand several existing County and Federal reserves in this area, preserve significant wildlife movement corridors between numerous sky islands and under Interstate 19, and supports habitat for the endangered Pima pineapple cactus and about half of the County-identified Priority Vulnerable Species.

OS 1.23 ALTAR VALLEY PROJECT AREA King 98 Ranch Acquisition Costs: $2,146,000 On February 22, 2005 the County purchased the King 98 Ranch. This Ranch is located in the Altar Valley, south of Ajo Highway and west of Sassabe Highway near Three Points. The purchase includes 1,034 acres of fee land, 3,096 acres of State grazing lease land, and 410 acres of State agricultural lease land. Acquisition of this property will prevent development of the property, provide the potential for restoration opportunities along the Brawley Wash, expand existing County investments in the area, and will assist in preventing the movement of development south along the Sassabe Highway corridor.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 7

Question 1 • Sonoran Desert Open Space and Habitat Protection; Preventing Urban Encroachment of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base Rancho Seco Acquisition Acquisition Costs: $18,615,000 The County acquired the Rancho Seco property on May 19, 2005. Rancho Seco is located just north of Arivaca, between I-19 and the Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge. The purchase includes 9,553 acres of fee lands, 27,000 acres of federal and state grazing leases, and a conservation easement over 480 acres retained by the sellers. Conservation of this ranch will preserve a very large, unfragmented landscape within Altar Valley, containing high biological values, habitat for numerous priority vulnerable species, and cultural and historic resources.

Rancho Seco, Photo by Trilby Dupont, AOLT

Madera Highlands Acquisition Costs: $446,000 On August 12, 2005, the County purchased the Madera Highlands property. This 366-acre property is located on the east side of Sassabe Highway in Altar Valley, and borders the Buenos Aires National Wildlife refuge. Purchase of this property will protect a portion of the Brawley Wash as well as habitat for numerous priority vulnerable species, including the Pima Pineapple Cactus.

Madera Highlands, Photo by Vanessa Bechtol, AOLT

8

Question 1 • Sonoran Desert Open Space and Habitat Protection; Preventing Urban Encroachment of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base Diamond Bell Ranch Acquisition Costs: $897,700 The County acquired the Diamond Bell Ranch property on March 14, 2008. Diamond Bell Ranch is located between the County’s Buckelew Farm and King 98 Ranch to the north and east of Sasabe Highway, with 191 acres of fee lands and 30,600 acres of federal and state grazing leases. Acquisition of this property means an area of over 35,000 acres, from Buckelew Farm in Three Points to the north, to the northern boundary of the Marley and Palo Alto Ranches to the south, is now under County management for conservation. Aside from conserving a vast area of largely unfragmented land and conserving a working ranch, purchase of this ranch also includes lands within the endangered Pima Pineapple Cactus (PPC) Priority Conservation Area, and contains actual surveyed locations of PPC, furthering the County’s goals for conserving PPC lands. Sopori Ranch Acquisition Costs: $18,600,000 The County acquired the Sopori Ranch, located south of Green Valley and northeast of Arivaca, on December 31, 2008. The acquisition is for a total of 4,000 acres of fee land, and over 10,000 acres of state grazing and agricultural leases. Acquisition of the Sopori not only expands the system on conserved lands in the area, including the County’s Rancho Seco, the Coronado National Forest, and the Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge, it also projects wildlife movement corridors between the Cerro Colorado, Tumacacori, and Santa Rita Mountains. Conservation of this ranch also reduces the threat of groundwater pumping along this reach of Sopori Wash, which is one of a few shallow groundwater dependent riparian areas left in Pima County.

OS 1.24 Avra Valley Sub Area Bee and Mordka Properties Acquisition Costs: $96,600 On February 4, 2005 the County purchased the Bee and Mordka properties totaling 160 acres. The properties are located west of the Tucson Mountains and south of the Garcia Strip. The acquisition preserves a portion of a critical landscape linkage by providing landscape connectivity via a tributary to the west branch of the Brawley Wash that continues north across Tohono O’odham land to ultimately link up with the Santa Cruz. Buckelew Farms Acquisition Costs: $5,093,000 On October 13, 2006, Pima County acquired the Buckelew Farms property, including 505 acres of fee lands and 2,200 acres of lease lands. The property is located west of Robles Junction, along Ajo Highway and the Brawley Wash. This acquisition builds on the County’s previous acquisitions of King 98 Ranch, Buckelew Ranch, and the Bee/Mordka properties. It will expand upon a reserve system along the Brawley Wash of thousands of acres owned and managed by several public agencies, provide opportunities to work cooperatively with these agencies and private land owners to restore the biological integrity and natural floodplain functions of the Brawley Wash, and provide an opportunity to enhance habitat for wildlife on farmlands, while also providing significant water rights for habitat restoration opportunities. The popular Pumpkin Festival held for the past 18 years will be allowed to continue under the Management Agreement.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 9

Question 1 • Sonoran Desert Open Space and Habitat Protection; Preventing Urban Encroachment of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base Continental Ranch Development LLC Acquisition Costs: $750,000 Pima County acquired this 15-acre property in July 2007. The site is a key element to maintaining a wildlife corridor between the Tucson and Tortolita Mountains, via the Avra Valley Road and I-10 underpass in this area. This underpass represents the only one undeveloped under I-10 from that point north to the County line. Properties in this area represent a necessary piece in one of the last remaining potential linkages between the Tucson Mountains, Santa Cruz River, and the Tortolita Mountains. The County will continue to work on maintaining and developing a feasible wildlife corridor.

OS 1.25 TORTOLITA MOUNTAIN SUB AREA Linda Vista/Patrick Property Total Project Costs: $452,000 On February 9, 2007, the County purchased the 9-acre Linda Vista/Patrick property, located one half mile west of Camino de Oeste and Arthur Pack Park. The property is adjacent to other conserved properties, and likely to provide habitat for the Cactus Ferruginous Pygmy Owl, among other priority vulnerable species. Cochie Canyon Property Acquisition Costs: $2,901,000 The County closed on the Cochie Canyon property on June 18, 2008. The 290-acre Cochie Canyon property is located south of the Pima/Pinal County line and west of Tortolita Mountain Park. This property contains valuable saguaro palo verde, old growth ironwood plant communities in the Tortolita Alluvial Fan, including a large area of canyon bottom supporting a large wash with several riparian communities, and provides habitat connectivity for wildlife. The property also contains the Cochie Canyon trail, which is one of two primary public access locations to Tortolita Mountain Park, as identified in the Tortolita Mountain Park Master Plan.

OS 1.27 SAN PEDRO SUB AREA A-7 Ranch Acquisition Costs: $2,069,000 On September 13, 2004 Pima County purchased the A-7 Ranch. The Ranch is located in the Redington Pass/San Pedro River area and was purchased to protect a large natural landscape and wildlife corridor from the Galiuro Mountains to the Catalina Mountains, as well as potential habitat for numerous priority vulnerable species. The Ranch includes 6,828 acres of A-7 Ranch, Photo by John Sullivan fee land, plus 34,195 acres of State and 80 acres BLM lease land. This acquisition also included the purchase of cattle, houses, equipment and other improvements. Six Bar Ranch Acquisition Costs: $11,557,000 In August 2006, Pima County acquired the Six Bar Ranch, located east of the Catalina Mountains along tributaries to the San Pedro River. The acquisition included 3,330 acres of fee lands and a 9,000-acre State grazing lease. This acquisition further protects a key tributary to the San Pedro River, and expands the emerging reserve system in the San Pedro watershed. 10

Question 2

Public Health and Community Facilities FM 2.01 KINO PUBLIC HEALTH CENTER Total Project Costs: $28,829,000 This project constructed a public building on the Kino Health Campus. The facility is approximately 187,000 square feet in area. Occupants include Pima Health Systems and Services, Health Department, Institutional Health and other health providers. Design of the building shell was completed as part of the 1997 Bond Program. Reprogramming and design of tenant improvements were undertaken prior to bidding the project. A separate $300,000 Flood Control project (FC-14) has been constructed in conjuction with this project. This project was completed in January 2007.

FM 2.02 NEW PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL (TO DATE) Kino Health Campus PAD Rezoning Total Project Costs: $250,000 The Kino Health Campus is envisioned to be a healthcare workforce development campus. In addition to its full service hospital, the campus will provide a one of a kind setting in Southern Arizona for training workers in the higher paying healthcare fields, as well as address the critical existing and growing shortage of trained workers needed at every level throughout the continuum of care. The County owns land parcels within the City of Tucson which includes the Kino/UPH Hospital and surrounding County owned facilities. This land is planned to be rezoned to a Planned Area Development (PAD) District to help with future site development. The provisions within the PAD constitute the primary tools for use by the County, City of Tucson, UPH and subsequent developers to ensure that the Kino Health Campus develops in conformance with the design intent.

FM 2.03 TERESA LEE HEALTH CLINIC 17 N Linda Adaptive Reuse

Total Project Costs: $131,000 This project involved exterior stabilization of a bungalow and rear building to mitigate further deterioration of the structures. Repair work included a new roof, gutters and downspouts, stucco repair work, painting, termite treatment, asbestos abatement, added security lighting, and a new electrical service. Project was completed in June 2007.

FM 2.06 GREEN VALLEY PERFORMING ARTS CENTER PHASE 2 Total Project Costs: $4,250,000

This project constructed a multimedia performing arts facility for musical theater, dance, drama and other fine arts uses. The facility is approximately 11,000 square feet in area and includes a 150-seat multipurpose performance studio, visual arts gallery, lobby, and concessions, dressing rooms, and other support spaces. The facility is designed with superior acoustics and appropriate spaces that meet the needs of an aging population. Phase Two consisted of a 150-seat performance studio, lobby, dressing rooms, set construction area, and temporary art gallery. This project was completed in December 2008. Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 11

Question 2 • Public Health and Community Facilities FM 2.07 MT. LEMMON COMMUNITY CENTER Total Project Costs: $1,296,000 The recently drafted collaborative master plan for rebuilding fire ravaged Summerhaven called for development of new private and public improvements and facilities. The master plan was created within the context of the environmental, socio-cultural, functional, and economic factors affecting Summerhaven. Public improvements in this project included new public paths, public parking, roadway improvements, pedestrian and vehicular bridges where required and rehabilitation of portions of Sabino Creek. The public buildings included a new community center with meeting room space and public restrooms, library, public plaza, Sheriff’s substation and other public facilities as identified through a public planning process and as available funding allows. A phased approach for building of public facilities recognizes that planning is an on-going process best done with public input. An additional $1.3 million 1997 HURF bonds (DOT-54) was used with this project. This project was completed in August 2008.

FM 2.08 AMADO FOOD BANK KITCHEN Total Project Costs: $558,000 This proejct constructed an addition to the Amado Food Bank. This addition is approximately 3,800 square feet in area and will provide a commercial kitchen, multipurpose rooms for dining, meetings, programs and other community uses as well as public restrooms. This project is the second phase of development planned for this facility. Phase One, consisting of the food bank distribution facility, was constructed in 2001. Design for Phase Two has been completed. This project was completed in August 2008.

FM 2.12 ARIZONA SONORA DESERT MUSEUM AUDITORIUM Total Project Costs: $1,000,000 A new education complex was planned for the Desert Museum. Phase I has been funded with private donations. Phase II included a 200 seat auditorium that will be available for both Museum and public use, and Phase III included offices and docent space. This project was completed in March 2007.

FM 2.14 PIMA AIR AND SPACE MUSEUM - HANGAR Total Project Costs: $1,000,000 Bond funds were combined with Museum funds to expand Hanger 1, increasing the exhibit area by 19,000 square feet and providing special housing for rare vintage aircraft currently displayed outdoors. Funds were also used to double the size of the existing visitor center/gift store, add 5,000 square feet of public meeting space, a changing exhibit gallery, outdoor lighting to expand public access to the museum, new exhibitory enhancement and development of commissary for onsite catering. This project was completed in April 2007. 12

Question 2 • Public Health and Community Facilities HR 2.10 NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROGRAMS This program will consist of several projects. As projects are completed, they will be included in future reports. The program provides funds to non-profit corporations, units of government, or licensed builders in the private sector for the development of affordable housing. Casa Bonita Phases III, IV, V Total Project Cost: $185,000 This is a 60 unit multifamily rental project located on three separate sites (20 units on each site). The units will provide housing to the seriously mentally ill (SMI) and other special needs population that are very low income. Bond funds were used for the off site infrastructure, landscaping and sidewalks. The project was completed in May 2006. Corazon Del Pueblo Phase I Total Project Costs: $353,000 Habitat For Humanity Tucson, (HFHT) has partnered with local builders (i.e. Ducati, AmericaBuild, Doucette, and TJ Bednar), engineers, and various banking institutions to include affordable housing in the 74.2 acre, 393-unit, Corazon Del Pueblo Subdivision located in southeast Tucson. The mixed-income Project combines market rate detached homes constructed by private residential homebuilders and affordable detached homes built by HFHT. In addition, a linear park, pedestrian walking paths, and community/common areas designated for pocket parks are included in the plan. HFHT is the owner/developer of the Corazon Del Pueblo Subdivision. This project represents the development of public infrastructure improvements that will serve the 20 affordable Habitat units for first-time low-income homebuyers in District #2. These 20 affordable homes represent Phase 1 of a two-phase HFHT project. This project was completed in June 2007. Corazon Del Pueblo Phase II Total Project Costs: $395,000 Habitat For Humanity Tucson, (HFHT) has partnered with local builders (i.e. Ducati, AmericaBuild, Doucette, and TJ Bednar), engineers, and various banking institutions to include affordable housing in the 74.2 acre, 393-unit, Corazon Del Pueblo Subdivision located in southeast Tucson. The mixed-income Project combines market rate detached homes constructed by private residential homebuilders and affordable detached homes built by HFHT. In addition, a linear park, pedestrian walking paths, and community/common areas designated for pocket parks are included in the plat. This project represents the development of public infrastructure improvements that will serve the 20 affordable Habitat units for first-time low-income homebuyers in District #2. These 20 affordable homes represent Phase II of a three-phase HFHT project at CDP. This project was completed in June 2008. Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 13

Question 2 • Public Health and Community Facilities Corazon Del Pueblo Phase III Total Project Costs: $403,000 This project included infrastructure improvements in public right-of-way to serve 20 newly constructed single-family homes that will be affordable to low-income homebuyers earning at or below 80 percent of area median income. Curley School Apartments Total Project Costs: $350,000 The main Curley School building was constructed in 1919 with additions built in 1926 and 1937. The school is a prominent feature of Ajo, occupying a central location in the town’s historic district. In addition to the development of 30 affordable apartments for artisans, they have a newly renovated school auditorium, which will serve as a tenant community room and will also remain accessible for uses by the Ajo community. The 30-unit project contains four studio, nine one-bedroom, twelve two-bedroom and five three-bedroom apartments, with rents ranging from $255 to $595 per month. The Curley School Apartments represents 30 units of affordable housing serving low-income artists, artisans and creative home businesses. These units are fully accessible and appropriately zoned for live-work space. The Historic Tax Credits will assure that all national and state historic preservation guidelines are met in order to assure that the property remains on the National Register of Historic Places. This project was completed in June 2007. Sylvester Drive Estates Total Project Costs: $485,000 This project represents the development of 13 affordable, single-family, detached residential homes for the first-time homebuyers in District 5. Pima County Housing Bonds have funded the offsite infrastructure and improvements in the public right-of-way that are now complete and ready to serve these 13 new homes. The targeted populations include 11 households with incomes at or below 80 percent of the area median income (AMI) and two households with incomes at or below 50 percent of AMI. Each three-bedroom, two-bath single family unit will have approximately 1,250 square feet of living space and are being constructed in a re-subdivision of the Hiram Banks Acres Subdivision located south of San Juan Trail and west of Mission Road on South Sylvester Drive in the City of Tucson. This project was completed in August 2008.

14

Question 2 • Public Health and Community Facilities NR 2.09 PIMA COUNTY NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT PROJECTS This program will consist of several projects. As projects are completed, they will be included in future reports. The program provides funding for small scale capital improvement projects in neighborhoods throughout Pima County characterized by indicators of high stress (poverty and unemployment, substandard housing, high rate of crime, teenage pregnancies, et al.) for revitalization including, but not limited to demolition of abandoned and unsafe buildings; construction and/or conversion of structures to serve as neighborhood resource and community centers; construction of recreational facilities and park improvements; and construction of public safety improvements such as street lighting, curbing, paving, bus stop benches and shelters, and traffic mitigation improvements such as speed humps, traffic circles, and traffic control devices. South Park Neighborhood Water Slide Total Project Cost: $157,000 This project consisted of the purchase and installation of a large water slide at the newly constructed Quincie Douglas Swimming Pool, a collaboration of Pima County, City of Tucson, South Park Neighborhood Association, and Kino Weed and Seed Coalition. The project was completed in April 2006. Miracle Manor Playground Equipment Total Project Cost: $209,000 Jacobs Park is the site of this project, a universally accessible playground for children with and without disabilities. The project was a collaboration of Pima County, the City of Tucson, and the Catalina Rotary Club. The project was completed in May 2006. Miles School Total Project Costs: $488,000 Improvements to the school grounds at the Miles Exploratory Learning Center included a pedestrian pathway, ball fields upgrades, landscaping, and lighting. These enhancements will serve as recreational and wellness amenities for the children who attend the school in addition to the individuals and families of the Miles Neighborhood and Barrio San Antonio during non-school hours. This project was completed in November 2006. Oak Flower Neighborhood Total Project Costs: $497,000 This project involved the installation of 63 streetlights in the Oak Flower neighborhood for purposes of public safety and crime prevention. This project was completed in June 2007. Alvernon Heights Total Project Costs: $38,000 This project involved the installation of 17 speed humps for the purpose of slowing pass-through and local traffic. This project was completed in September 2007. Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 15

Question 2 • Public Health and Community Facilities A Mountain Neighborhood Total Project Costs: $500,000 Construction of sidewalks, concrete ADA aprons, and speed humps in this neighborhood of heavy pedestrian traffic, including students, elderly, and families. This project was completed in March 2008. Amado Community Total Project Costs: $500,000 3,300 square foot Family Learning Center building constructed on the property of Sahuarita Unified School District’s Sopori School in unincorporated Amado. The Center will be used for youth and community programs and activities, including recreational programs; health services; elderly programs; drug, alcohol and teen pregnancy prevention; English language classes; and parenting skills. This project was completed in October 2007. Marana Vista Estates Total Project Costs: $444,000 This neighborhood revitalization project consists of installation of 5’ wide sidewalks and 16 street lights in Marana’s oldest established neighborhood. This project was completed in March 2008. Rillito Tucson Neighborhood Association Total Project Costs: $500,000 The project was constructed on the grounds of TUSD’s Davidson School and offers recreational and learning opportunities for youth and neighborhood residents. It includes an ADA playground unit, a 1/8 mile fitness course, and an outdoor natural resources classroom. This project was completed in March 2007. South Tucson Parks Improvements Total Project Costs: $500,000 The first two park facilities in South Tucson include ramada picnic areas, barbecue grills, basketball courts, softball play areas, and age appropriate play equipment. This project was completed in June 2007. Flowing Wells Neighborhood Total Project Costs: $456,000 This project consisted of Flowing Wells District Park improvements including 5 ramadas; walking path improvements; grills; picnic tables; and ball field fencing, scoreboard, and snack bar. This project was completed in March 2008. Santa Catalina Mountain Community Center Total Project Costs: $500,000 This project is a community and visitors center for residents and visitors of Mount Lemmon. The Visitor Center component includes exhibit space, public restrooms, and storage, and the Community Center component includes a large meeting room, 16

Question 2 • Public Health and Community Facilities storage area, and food preparation area. This project was completed in July 2007. Highland Vista Total Project Costs: $75,000 The neighborhood park improvements included walking path landscaping, irrigation system, benches, playground equipment, redesign of parking lot, and ADA accessibility ramps. This project was completed in August 2008. Ajo Skate Park Total Project Costs: $548,000 The skate park consists of a 23,000 square foot concrete floor with twelve modular skating obstacles ranging from beginners to advanced skill levels and lighting and fencing around the skate park. This project was completed in May 2008. Julia Keen Neighborhood Street Lighting Total Project Costs: $500,000 This project included street lights located strategically throughout this one square mile neighborhood. The project was completed in February 2009. Flowing Wells Health Clinic Total Project Costs: $492,000 This project constructed a neighborhood health clinic building. The project was completed in September 2008. Hedrick Acres Total Project Costs: $21,000 This project included traffic mitigation and flood control improvements. The project was completed in May 2008. Midvale Park Reinvestment Total Project Costs: $396,000 The Midvale public safety project consisted of 80 residential street lights and supportive infrastructure on Midvale Park Road and Oaktree Road, and two primary roadways within the Midvale Park community. The project was completed in February 2009. Jefferson Park Total Project Costs: $402,000 The Jefferson Park Neighborhood public safety project consisted of sidewalks, ADA ramps, and driveway aprons on Hampton Street and Seneca Street, and four traffic circles at neighborhood intersections with a history of speeding traffic. The project was completed in November 2008.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 17

Question 2 • Public Health and Community Facilities Rincon Heights Street Revitalization Total Project Costs: $500,000 The Rincon Heights Neighborhood public safety project included 30 feet long chicanes (bumpouts) on Ninth and Tenth Streets, incorporating pedestrian walkways, sustainable vegetation, shade trees and public art. The chicanes will slow traffic while continuing to permit on-street parking and will provide an aesthetically pleasing, low water use public landscape for the neighborhood. The project was completed in June 2009. Miracle Manor II Neighborhood Total Project Costs: $233,000 The Miracle Manor II project consisted of playground equipment, multi-purpose games court, basketball hoop and backboard, walking/jogging path, ramada, tables and barbecue grills providing a safe neighborhood recreation and exercise facility. The project was completed in May 2009. Cardinal Street Revitalization Total Project Costs: $11,000 The Cardinal Neighborhood public safety project includes ten speed tables at key intersections to reduce the incidence of speeding vehicles and create a safer environment for pedestrians. The project was completed in February 2009.

18

Question 3 • Public Safety and Justice Facilities SD 3.01 Microwave Path-Childs mountain to PCSD Ajo Office Total Project Costs: $188,000 This project installed a microwave path between Childs Mountain and the PCSD Ajo District Office. This included microwave equipment for both locations. This project was completed in August 2008.

FM 3.02 PIMA COUNTY JUSTICE COURT/MUNICIPAL COURT COMPLEX (TO DATE) Total Project Costs: $4,615,000

This project will design, construct and co-locate a new Pima County Justice Court and City of Tucson Municipal Court in the downtown core. The building design is 413,000 square feet containing 42 courtrooms, 9 hearing rooms, public service areas, chambers, records areas, conference/training facilities and security operations center. By co-locating the Justice Court and Municipal Court, Pima County and the City of Tucson can construct and operate shared spaces, functions and activities, such as central plant, mechanical and electric spaces; a building entrance lobby; security screening stations; jury assembly space; public restrooms. Extensive archeology exploration has recovered over 1,000 burials from the area which was the National Cemetary of Tucson in 1864. These graves shall be re-intered for proper eternal and perpetual care in a local cemetary. Major utilities have been relocated, preparing the site for construction clearance.

FM 3.04 CORRECTIONS JAIL SECURITY - SECURITY ENHANCEMENTS Total Project Costs: $3,063,000

The project extended the security and useful life of existing jail facilities, primarily the 20-year old Main Jail Tower by reconditioning or upgrading in 3 interrelated categories: Jail Security — Security upgrades and enhancements include cell door lock replacement and enhancement, installing feeding windows on the Main Jail third floor to expand high-security capacity, replacing Main Jail sliding security doors, purchasing security screening technology to combat contraband and renovating existing internal space; Risk Management — Replacing the antiquated Main Jail elevator system; Environmental — Installation of evaporative cooling and smoke-evacuation systems, heating systems, and restoration of Main Jail housing units that have been in constant use since 1984. This project was completed in June 2009.

FM 3.05 INTERAGENCY VICTIM ADVOCACY CENTER Total Project Costs: $5,606,000

This project constructed an Interagency Victim Advocacy Center on County-owned property. The center was built in phases with Phase One specializing in services focused on children. This facility will house various agencies and community partners responsible for victim response, investigation, and litigation, including human service providers, victim advocates, medical personnel, law enforcement and prosecuting attorneys. The concept for the Center was developed by the Pima County InterAgency Council (IAC), a collaboration of over 20 local victims’ service providers founded in 1998. The Center will be open 7 days per week and 24 hours per day. This project was completed in September 2008.

FM 3.06 JUVENILE COURT BUILD-OUT Total Project Costs: $1,982,000

This project completes the build-out of the Juvenile Court Center. The project involved construction of new courtrooms, chambers and offices in existing “shell space”, remodeling the old court building as a training center, central plant improvements to add cooling capacity by adding a third chiller and automate the central plant. This project was completed in August 2008. Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 19

Question 4 • Parks and Recreational Facilities and Historic Preservation Projects CR 4.01 EMPIRITA RANCH BUILDINGS REHABILITATION Total Project Costs: $400,000 Historic buildings associated with Empirita Ranch have been approved for listing on the National Register of Historic Places and the Arizona State Register of Historic Places as a significant example of cattle ranching in Pima County. Efforts included cultural resources inventory, building condition assessments, and stabilization of three historic ranch buildings, as well as future design, planning and reconstruction of the original homestead. The project was completed in June 2008.

CR 4.02 CANOA RANCH MASTER PLAN Total Project Costs: $1,392,000 This plan proposes adaptive use and rehabilitation of the residences and buildings within the historic Canoa Ranch, owned by Pima County, together with new compatible construction of a heritage education center, restaurant and conference center, and overnight accommodations. Pastures, corrals, and stables would be used to exhibit heritage breeds of livestock and for horseback trail rides. The historic pond will be refilled using effluent to create habitat for wildlife and birding. This project was adopted by the Board of Supervisors in May 2007.

CR 4.03 JUAN BAUTISTA DE ANZA NATIONAL HISTORIC TRAIL This project will be constructed in several phases. As the phases are completed, they will be included in future reports. Overall, this project will acquire land for the trail, construct new segments of the trail, provide additional access to the trail, and commemorate three Anza Expedition campsite locations; Llano Grande in Sahuarita, Tuquison in Tucson, and Oit Pars near Marana. Trail segments and trail access nodes will be designed and constructed. Campsite commemoration will include acquisition at Llano Grande, dedication of City of Tucson land at Tuquison, and dedication of Pima County land at Oit Pars. Public Interpretation of the Anza Expedition will be achieved at the campsites through educational signage and other aids. This project will continue the work started with a 1997 bond project, CH-30, that began the planning, acquisition, improvement, and public education process for the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail. Haven Bridge Total Project Cost: $126,000 The completion of the pedestrian bridge at the Haven golf course will allow two sections of the Anza Trail to be joined at a wash crossing, thereby providing the public with a longer, continuous trail experience. This effort furthers the goal of this bond project to establish a continuous 60 mile trail along the west bank of the Santa Cruz River to commemorate the Anza Trail in Pima County. This project will incrementally acquire land for the trail, construct new segments of the trail, provide additional access to the trail, and commemorate three Anza Expedition campsite locations; Llano Grande in Sahuarita, Tuquison in Tucson, and Oit Pars near Marana. The Haven Bridge was completed in January 2006. 20

Question 4 • Parks and Recreational Facilities and Historic Preservation Projects

Abrego Trailhead Total Project Costs: $732,000 This project acquired land for the trail, constructed new segments of the trail, provided additional access to the trail, and commemorated three Anza Expedition campsite locations; Llano Grande in Sahuarita, Tuquison in Tucson, and Oit Pars near Marana. Trail segments and trail access nodes were designed and constructed. Campsite commemoration included acquisition at Llano Grande, dedication of City of Tucson land at Tuquison, and dedication of Pima County land at Oit Pars. Public Interpretation of the Anza Expedition was achieved at the campsites through educational signage and other aids. This project continues the work started with a 1997 bond project, CH-30, that began the planning, acquisition, improvement, and public education process for the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail. This project was completed in May 2007. Canoa Supplement Total Project Costs: $316,000 This project provided for the completion of the 5.3 mile Anza Multi Use Trail through the County owned Canoa Ranch. The facility includes the trail, shade ramadas, signage, a staging area, and a pedestrian bridge. This project was completed in July 2007. Tuquison Campsite Total Project Costs: $202,000 The Tuquison Trailhead at Columbus Park is part of the Anza Trial development. The trailhead commemorates the October 27, 1775 campsite of the Anza Expedition. It consists of vehicle and horse trailer parking, hitching rails, a horse trough, a shaded ramada, a drinking fountain and barbeque grill. The project was completed in December 2008.

CR 4.04 SAN PEDRO CHAPEL Total Project Costs: $474,000 This project included the repairs, rehabilitation, and upgrades at the San Pedro Chapel complex. The San Pedro Chapel is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The project was completed in July 2008.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 21

Question 4 • Parks and Recreational Facilities and Historic Preservation Projects CR 4.07 BINGHAMPTON HISTORIC BUILDINGS REHABILITATION Total Project Costs: $960,000 Rehabilitation of various buildings within the Binghampton National Register Historic District was planned, designed, and constructed in conjunction with the Brandi Fenton Memorial Riverbend Park (Question 4, Project 4.24). This project was completed in April 2007. The historic buildings at Binghampton range in date from the late 1890s to the 1950s. Each forms an important visual link within the revised historic landscape. The buildings and structures underwent extensive repairs, upgrades to meet code, and restoration of existing elements to make them useable again. Perhaps the most dramatic transformations occurred at the Davidson House and the Barracks building, both located on the north side of the property along River Road. The 1890s adobe Davidson House had been adversely changed over the years with the result that many original features had been covered over or were missing. Original window locations were discovered and appropriate reproduction windows and doors were custom-made locally for the project. The severely dilapidated 1940s wooden Barracks building was rehabilitated into offices and meeting space for the Pima County Parks and Recreation. The main ranch house (Garcia Residence) has become the Visitors’ Center with public use spaces, meeting rooms, offices, and visitor information. Other buildings were rehabilitated for a variety of uses including caretaker residence, park offices and meeting spaces.

CR 4.12 PERFOMRING ARTS CENTER REHABILITATION - PHASE I Total Project Costs: $682,000 This project included structural and other repairs to this 1921 historic building that was converted from the All Saints Church to the Tucson Performing Arts Center as determined by available funding. This project was completed in December 2008.

CR 4.13 Tumamoc Hill Acquisition Total Project Costs: $1,137,000 Tumamoc Hill and the Desert Laboratory have unique and significant value as open space that is critically important to the citizens of Pima County. The 320 acres on the west slope of Tumamoc Hill has been an integral part of the 869-acre Tumamoc Hill Preserve, which has been in continuous use as an ecological research facility since 1903. The project was completed in June 2009.

CR 4.14 Los Morteros Preservation Total Project Costs: $250,000 This project included the development of public access, preservation planning, and interpretation for the County-owned prehistoric and historic cultural resources at Los Morteros. The project was completed in June 2009.

22

Question 4 • Parks and Recreational Facilities and Historic Preservation Projects FM 4.44 MARANA CONTINENTAL RANCH NEW LIBRARY Total Project Costs: $6,400,000

The project designed and constructed a new 20,000 square foot library to serve the Town of Marana/Continental Ranch area. The library was constructed to house an eventual 100,000 volume book collection, state-of-the art technology, computer lab, large meeting room and small study rooms, and a parking lot. This project was completed in November 2008. The facility has been named the Wheeler Taft Abbett, Sr. Library honoring Mr. Abbett, a major contributor to the library collection.

FM 4.45 ORO VALLEY PUBLIC LIBRARY EXPANSION TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $1,100,000

The new 25,000 square foot library opened August 2002 with 15,000 square feet of finished space and an additional 10,000 square foot unfinished shell for future expansion. The scope of this project was to finish out the shell. The project was completed in January 2006.

PR 4.18 Flowing Wells Community Center Total Project Costs: $3,500,000

This project included the development of a new 18,000 square foot community center. The center included office space, multi-purpose room, game room, teen, youth, and senior rooms, exercise room, craft room, social services offices, and landscaping. This project was constructed on Pima County property adjacent to a scheduled Pima County Transportation highway improvement project on Wetmore and Romero Roads. The project was completed in September 2007.

PR 4.19 SOUTHEAST REGIONAL PARK/SHOOTING RANGE - PHASE II

This Phase II project includes numerous improvements at Pima County’s Southeast Regional Park’s shooting range. Scope items may include the construction of a trap and skeet shotgun sports shooting area, an archery range, additional improvements to the pistol and rifle range, an instruction range, and support facilities. The park’s concept plan has been approved by the Pima County Parks and Recreation Commission. This project was completed in June 2007. Sub Projects Projects Completed to Date: Tucson Mountain Park Shooting Range Total Project Costs: $65,000 Ajo Shooting Range Total Project Costs: $23,000

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 23

Question 4 • Parks and Recreational Facilities and Historic Preservation Projects Southeast Regional Shooting Range Education Center Total Project Costs: $224,000 Southeast Regional Shooting Range Berms Total Project Costs: $220,000

PR 4.20 LIGHTING OF EXISTING AND NEW SPORTS FIELDS TOTAL FUNDING: $3,000,000 This project entails the installation of new lights at parks that do not currently have them and the upgrading of light fixtures at existing facilities. Sub Projects Projects Completed to Date: Rillito Race Track Field Lighting Total Project Cost: $970,000 McDonald Park Field Lighting 5 & 6 Total Project Costs: $403,000 McDonald Park Field Lighting Upgrades Total Project Costs: $170,000 Brandi Fenton Memorial Park Lighting Total Project Costs: $159,000

PR 4.21 CURTIS PARK - FLOWING WELLS EAST Total Project Costs: $2,800,000

This project developed a new community park. Improvements included 2 little league fields, 1 senior league field, restroom, walkways, riparian restoration, free-play turf area, large group ramada, picnic facilities, playground, landscaping, parking, security lighting and connections to the Rillito River Park. The park’s concept plan was approved by the Pima County Parks and Recreation Commission. This project was completed in May 2007.

PR 4.23 Dan Felix Memorial Park Total Project Costs: $556,000

The improvement of this park included the development of one soccer field, lighting for three soccer fields, security lighting, playground, free-play turf area, restroom, walking/jogging path, ramadas, picnic facilities, parking, two basketball courts, landscaping, connections to the Rillito River Park and water fountains. The park’s concept plan was approved by the Pima County Parks and Recreation Commission. The project was completed in June 2009.

24

Question 4 • Parks and Recreational Facilities and Historic Preservation Projects PR 4.24 BRANDI FENTON MEMORIAL PARK (RIVER BEND) Total Project Costs: $5,729,000

This project, which is a partnership between public and private sectors, proposed the development of a unique park within the Binghampton National Historic Landscape. Improvements included an equestrian center with arenas and staging area, a breast cancer boot camp exercise course, and recreation facilities with open pastures/soccer fields, covered basketball courts, play structures, and splash/water park, and a dog park. The existing historic residences and structures were adaptively restored and utilized as a visitor center, caretaker residences, recreation center, restrooms, ramadas, and maintenance facilities. The park also incorporated multi-use trails, public art, a memorial garden, and parking facilities. This project was designed and constructed in conjunction with bond project CR4.07, Binghampton Historic Buildings Rehabilitation. The park’s concept plan was approved by the Pima County Parks and Recreation Commission. This project was completed in December 2006.

PR 4.26 RILLITO RACE TRACK Total Project Costs: $2,427,000 This project included the relocation of two stables, construction of two soccer fields, security lighting, entry and parking lot, ramadas, picnic facilities, lighting for four soccer fields, maintenance compound, landscaping, expanded and improved parking and trail connections to the Rillito River Park and the acquisition of adjacent land. The park’s concept plan was approved by the Pima County Parks and Recreation Commission. Phase I of this project was completed in January 2007. Phase II was completed in April 2008.

PR 4.28 FELIZ PASEOS UNIVERSAL ACCESS PARK TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $1,143,000 The project site is incorporated into the foothills of Tucson Mountain Park and included the development of approximately 1.5 miles of universal accessible trails within a natural environmental setting. Feliz Paseos features a universally accessible trail system enhanced by interpretive signs, and includes a parking area and a small plaza with a ramada. The park also includes over a mile of native soil tread trails and over a quarter of a mile of hard surface trails, and wildlife observation points overlooking Camino de Oeste Wash. Shade ramadas and other rest stations are located along the paths. All trails are signed to show maximum trail grades, cross slopes, surface conditions, and obstacles. The project was completed in October 2005.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 25

Question 4 • Parks and Recreational Facilities and Historic Preservation Projects PR 4.29 PICTURE ROCKS POOL Total Project Costs: $1,952,000 This project involved the construction of a 4,250 sq. ft. pool with a “zero-depth” edge that allows for gradual entry into the pool. The 4 foot depth will create a safe area for children to play and adults to swim. Both the nearby splash pad and the pool contain water toys. Shade cabanas and large shade umbrellas provide a colorful and practical respite. A turf picnic area with trees is home to three interactive sculptures whose petroglyph forms house touch-sensitive activators that will play prerecorded sounds ranging from a giggle to a perhaps a story of long ago.

PR 4.41 Anamax Park Multi-Use Ball Field Total Project Costs: $502,000 The project included design and construction of two multi-use ballfields, parking, and restroom facilities on 22 acres of newly acquired land adjacent to the existing Anamax Park. The Town completed a Masterplan for this park facility that detailed more extensive improvements than was financed by this bond project. This project is a critical first phase of this Masterplan. The project was completed in December 2007.

26

Question 5

River Parks and Flood Control Improvements FC 5.02 URBAN DRAINAGE INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM This project provides evaluation, design, and construction of drainage improvements that protect public safety through a combination of nonstructural and structural improvements that provide flood and erosion control. It also developed solutions to urban areas that have experienced repetitive flooding in residential and commercial areas. Sub Projects Projects Completed to Date: Littletown Urban Drainage Project Cost: $248,000 Ajo - Second Avenue Bridge Total Project Costs: $529,000 This project included the demolition of the existing Second Avenue Bridge in Ajo, Arizona and the construction of a concrete arch culvert. During the July 29, 2003 flood event, the bridge became clogged with sediment and debris causing stormwater to overflow the banks of the Gibson Arroyo, flooding adjacent subdivisions. A later flood study identified the structure as being undersized and a potential obstruction for future flood events, and recommended replacement. A concrete arch, sized to convey a 100-year flood event was designed by Sacra Engineering and included in the improvement plans completed by Pima County Flood Control District. The project was constructed by Hunter Contracting Company under the District’s Job Order Contract in under fourteen weeks, and includes amenities such as paved multi-use paths, concrete curbing and sidewalks while also providing improved visibility for approaching drivers. This project was completed in November 2006. Old Nogales Highway at Franco Wash Total Project Costs: $102,000 This project consisted of 250 linear feet of Gabion Bank Protection on the north bank of the Franco Wash west of the Nogales Highway. The construction project will prevent the breakout of flow to the northwest preventing flooding of the adjacent properties. This project was completed in September of 2006. Verde Meadows Crest Improvements Total Project Costs: $22,000 This project was to provide positive surface drainage within several key intersections adjacent to the Verde Meadows Subdivision. Ponding in these intersections had caused surface flow backup which inundated several residents adjacent to the intersections. Existing asphalt in the areas of ponding was removed and replaced with new asphalt that had positive drainage, allowing stormwater to be removed from the site and reducing potential damages from future storm events. The project, directed by the District, was completed by Hunter Contracting Company under the District’s Job Order Contract. This project was completed in September 2006. Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 27

Question 5 • River Parks and Flood Control Improvements Ajo Curley School Detention Basin Total Project Costs: $1,440,000 The town of Ajo experienced a severe flood on July 29, 2003 that flooded homes and businesses along Gibson Arroyo and the tributaries located South of Gibson Arroyo. To reduce future flood problems in the town of Ajo, the Curley School Detention Basin has been developed and constructed on the largest sub-water shed to the tributaries. The 4 acre site was undeveloped lands that had previously served as the football field for the old and now abandon Curley School. The Curley School detention basin reduces a peak flow of flood waters during a 100 year event. Construction of the project was by Rummell Construction at a cost of approximately $875,000. Work begin in Feb 2008, and was completed ahead of schedule on May 1, 2008. Project was design by DMJM Harris. This project was completed in May 2008. Columbus Wash Storm Drain Total Project Costs: $11,000,000 The Columbus Wash Storm Drain project Phase II consisted of constructing a major storm drain between Speedway Blvd and 5th Street. City of Tucson started construction of Phase II in February 2007 and the construction was completed in May 2008 at a total construction cost of $11 million, of which $4.4 million was from the 2004 General Obligation Bonds FC5.02 Urban Drainage and $2.0 million from the Flood Control District Tax Levy. The remainder of the funds came from the City of Tucson Drainage Bonds. This project was completed in May 2008. Green Valley Erosion Control Phase 2 Total Project Costs: $442,000 Utilizing the 2004 General Obligation Bonds FC5.02 Urban Infrastructure, Pima County Regional Flood Control District has developed a repair and improvement program for the community of Green Valley. Green Valley has been growing steadily since the 1960 when the first subdivisions and drainage improvements were installed. Phase 2 is the second year of small localized improvement to the aging Green Valley drainage way system, to prevent erosion of existing banks, culvert and other drainage structures. Projects completed this year include bank protection on Drainage way #3 at the Santa Cruz River, channel and bank improvements on Drainage way #4 at the Fire Station, downstream culvert and bank stabilization on Drainage ways #13 and #9 at Abrego Drive, and bank protection repairs at drainage ways #13 and #9 at Portillo. Cost of these improvement total $442,000. This project was completed in March 2008. Columbus Wash Phase II Drainage Improvement Total Project Costs: $6,400,000 An Intergovernmental Agreement for the transfer of funds to the City of Tucson for the construction of a major storm drain system between Grant Road and Pima Street on the Columbus Wash alignment. This project was completed in May 2008.

FC 5.05 Pascua Yaqui Tribe Black Wash Urban Drainage Flood Control Improvements Total Project Costs: $1,000,000

This project addresses deficiencies related to stormwater flooding within developed areas of the Reservation and in particular Black Wash. It upgraded existing culverts, channels, and other drainage facilities experiencing erosion damage. The project was completed in December 2007. 28

Question 5 • River Parks and Flood Control Improvements FC 5.07 SANTA CRUZ RIVER, GRANT ROAD TO CAMINO DEL CERRO TOTAL FUNDING: $5,270,000

In 2003, the Pima County Flood Control District, Pima County Wastewater Management, and the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) completed soil cement bank protection along the Santa Cruz River from Grant Road to the Ft. Lowell Road alignment. This project connected the bank protection south of Grant Road, and north of Ft. Lowell Road. Pima County desires a linear park to connect into the upstream stream system, and to set the stage for future linear park development at the Silverbell Golf Course and Christopher Columbus Park along the west bank of the Santa Cruz River. The linear park and river pathways follow and further establish the San Juan Bautista National Historic Trail on the west side of the Santa Cruz River. The project included a parking node at Grant Road, a connection to the City of Tucson’s Julian Park, and a pedestrian bridge across the Santa Cruz River to connect the linear park to the Sweetwater Wetlands Park and future linear park improvements along the east bank of the Santa Cruz River. Sub Projects Projects Completed to Date: Silvercroft Wash Pedestrian Bridge Project Cost: $275,000

FC 5.08 Rillito River Linear Park, Alvernon to Craycroft Total Project Costs: $5,082,000

In 1996, the Army Corps of Engineers (ACOE) and Pima County Flood Control District completed soil cement bank protection along the Rillito River from Alvernon Way to Craycroft Road. In 2000, the ACOE and Flood Control District completed the paved pathway on the north bank, a decomposed granite pathway on the south bank, pedestrian bridges over the major washes, installation of an irrigation supply system, and provided landscape improvements. In 2009, the ACOE and Flood Control District completed an environmental restoration project called the Swan Wetlands Project along the south bank of the Rillito from Craycroft to Columbus Boulevard. This project included re-shaping of the existing drainage channels entering the Rillito River to enhance water harvesting as well as an extensive native plant restoration effort. Parking on the north bank at Craycroft Road and south bank at Paradise Falls Road and Columbus Boulevard was undertaken through the 2004 river park bond project. Access to the linear park system was also provided at Mehl Foothills Park. In addition to parking; restrooms, ramada, and public art pieces were installed throughout the AlvernonWay to Craycroft Road corridor. The project was completed in May 2009.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 29

Question 5 • River Parks and Flood Control Improvements FC 5.09 Santa Cruz River Bank Protection in vicinity of Continental Ranch Total Project Costs: $6,220,000 The Town of Marana developed plans for bank protection on the west bank of this segment of the Santa Cruz River between the Yuma Mine Wash and Cortaro Road as part of the development of a regional park that was authorized in Pima County’s 1997 General Obligation Bond election. The project included the construction of approximately 1.3 miles of soil cement bank protection between Ina Road and Cortaro Road. The County provided bond funding and flood control funds for the park and bank protection, respectively. The District secured all right-of-ways for this project. The project was completed in July 2007.

FC 5.10 CDO Wash Bank Protection & Linear Park: Omni Golf Course Total Project Costs: $4,355,000 This section of the Cañada del Oro Wash is bank protected from the Union Pacific Railroad on the south bank and from just west of Thornydale on the north bank to the Omni Tucson National Golf Resort. The proposed project provided a river linear park on the south bank between Thornydale Road and the north end of Omni Tucson National Golf Resort plus a paved bike path connection to the Rillito River Park via Thornydale Road. It included a paved pathway on the south bank, landscaping, irrigation, and 6 pedestrian bridges. It also included underpass ramps at Thornydale, Ina Road and Magee Road, a parking node at Magee Road with ramadas and a restroom, a parking easement at Thornydale, as well as a reclaimed water irrigation system. The project was completed in March 2009.

30

Question 6

Sewer System Revenue Bonds SS 6.01 ROGER RD. WWTP INFRASTRUCTURE & ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENTS This project will be completed in phases. As phases are completed, they will be included in future reports. Portions of the Roger Road WWTP site have been in service since the early 1950s. The plant has been expanded and improved a number of times. Staff and consultant evaluations indicate that older elements of the plant are in need of either significant rehabilitation and/or replacement to maintain the existing capacity of the plant and to meet water quality permit requirements. Plant process modifications and environmental upgrades have also been recommended. Because of the limited life cycle of the plant and the scheduled plant replacement in January 2015, the Roger Road Rehabilitation plan was comprised of rehabilitation, system upgrades, and process optimization projects. Certain variable frequency drives and equipment installations optimized the plant performance while also reducing energy costs. Methane gas systems improvements reduced plant dependency on electrical demand during peak hours while reducing overall electric utility rates. The Roger Road Odor Control projects have minimized odor issues and the Department has become a better neighbor within the community. Roger Road WWTP Headworks Compactors Project Costs: $738,000 This project was completed in January 2007. Roger Road Rehab Port Pack Thickener Project Costs: $1,590,000 This project was completed in May 2007. Roger Road Const Of New Stormwater Basin Project Costs: $1,766,000 This project was completed in May 2007. Roger Road Rehabilitation of Existing Storm Basin Project Costs: $519,000 This project was completed in May 2007. Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 31

Question 6

Sewer System Revenue Bonds Roger Road WWTP Small JOC Rehabilitations Project Costs: $726,000 This project was completed in October 2007. Roger Road Rehabilitation Biosolids Handling Planning Project Costs: $1,070,000 This project was completed in January 2008. Variable Frequency Drive at Pump Station No. 4 Project Costs: $365,000 This project was completed in January 2008. Roger Road WWTP Biotower Arm Replacement Project Costs: $827,000 This project was completed in August 2008. Roger Road Odor Control Projects Project Costs: $7,227,000 This project was completed in August 2008. Roger Road WWTP Rehabilitation Structural Assessment Project Costs: $739,000 This project was completed in April 2009. Roger Road WWTP Rehabilitation Electrical Study Project Costs: $1,632,000 This project was completed in June 2009. Roger Road Rehabilitation Aeration Basins Project Costs: $1,839,000 This project was completed in February 2009.

SS 6.02 MISCELLANEOUS CONVEYANCE REHABILITATION PROJECTS This is a program that is comprised of many smaller projects. As projects are completed, they will be included in future reports. Overall, the current conveyance condition assessment projects – both the Closed Circuit TV (CCTV) and the Sanitary Sewer Inspection and Identification Program (SSIIP) – are identifying areas within the regional sewage conveyance system in need of repair, rehabilitation or replacement. It is estimated that re-lining will cost between $200 and $300 per linear foot to rehabilitate the larger sewers. These projects will be completed based on order of need identified by the CCTV and SSIIP evaluation projects. This funding will allow for the re-lining/ replacement of approximately 5 to 6 miles of gravity conveyance lines and rehabilitation of miscellaneous associated siphon inlet and outlet chambers and manholes/junction chambers. Old Nogales Hwy (MCP>15) Project Cost: $332,000 This project was completed in June 2006. Barrio Anita Rehab (MCP>15) Project Cost: $640,000 This project was completed in June 2006. Carrillo School/El Paso Street Sewer Rehabilitation Project Cost: $3,645,000 This project was completed in June 2007.

32

Question 6

Sewer System Revenue Bonds Sabino Canyon Crossing Project Costs: $478,000 This project was completed in February 2007. Conveyance Rehabilitation Greater than or Equal to 15 in SUB PROJECTS Project Cost: $1,760,000 This project was completed in June 2007. Subprojects Completed to Date: 25th Street South to Cherry Avenue This project was completed in September 2008. Santa Cruz Central & East at Miracle Mile This project was completed in December 2005. Santa Cruz Central North and South of Grant This project was completed in December 2005. 18th Street & I-10 This project was completed in November 2007. Under I-19 South of Irvington Road This project was completed in September 2008. Warren Avenue 8th to 9th Streets This project was completed in July 2008.

SS 6.03 SANTA CRUZ INTERCEPTOR, PRINCE TO FRANKLIN Total Project Costs: $25,000,000 This project constructed a new, large diameter (66inch and 72-inch) gravity interceptor sewer north from downtown near Franklin Street to Prince Road where it connected to the 78-inch diameter interceptor tributary to the Roger Road WWTP. A section of the interceptor, between Grant Road and Miracle Mile (Phase I), has been constructed in conjunction with a Flood Control bank stabilization project. This bond project provides for the installation of Phase II, approximately 11,000 linear feet, and Phase III, approximately 8,000 linear feet, and the associated construction administration. This project was completed in February 2009.

SS 6.07 INA ROAD WPCFDENITRIFICATION (TO DATE) Total Project Costs: $5,536,000 The project will provide the planning and initial design for the implementation of the Regional Optimization Master Plan (ROMP).

Duval Road Under I-19 This project was completed in July 2008. West Orangewood Drive This project was completed in June 2008. Rancho Del Lago This project was completed in October 2008. I-10 and Drexel This project was completed in December 2008. 36th Street Alignment East of Mission Road This project was completed in December 2008. North Camino Cardenal This project was completed in December 2008. West Camino This project was completed in April 2009.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 33

1997 General Obligation Bonds Completed Projects

34

Question 1

Juvenile Detention and Courts Facilities JC-1 Juvenile Court Detention and Administrative Facilities Total project costs: $44,205,000 The Juvenile Court Detention and Administrative Facilities project is the single largest project supported by the 1997 General Obligation Bond Program. With 1997 bond funds of $42 million, Pima County constructed 210,000 square feet of building space on an 11-acre parcel adjacent to the existing Juvenile Court center, increasing juvenile detention capacity by an additional 220 beds and adding ten new courtrooms, with capacity for an additional four courtrooms. With a state grant of just over $2 million, Pima County remodeled 65,000 square feet of existing facilities, including 86 beds in an upgraded detention pod, and additional space for training, an expanded kitchen, laundry and warehouse space. The project was completed in March 2001.

36

Question 2

Public Safety, Law Enforcement and Superior Court S-2, 1, 4, 6 SHERIFF MAXIMUM SECURITY DETENTION TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $40,587,000 The project constructed a new maximum security adult detention facility. This facility was designed to house 365 adult inmates with double-bunking capacity for a total of 730 inmates. Planning, design, and construction for this project was integrated with S-1, Sheriff Adult Remanded Juvenile Detention, S-4, Sheriff Criminal Convictions and S-6, Sheriff Jail Security. Construction of this facility required relocation, design and construction of new headquarters for the Department of Natural Resources, Parks and Recreation at 3500 W. River Road. The project was completed in June 2005.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 37

Question 2 • Public Safety, Law Enforcement and Superior Court

S-3 Sheriff’s New Substations Total project costs: $628,000

S-7 SHERIFF’S EVIDENCE SECURITY total project costs: $2,909,000

Robles Ranch Substation Pima County constructed a new 1,500 square foot Sheriff substation adjacent to the historic Robles Ranch House in Robles Junction, southwest of Tucson. This project was developed in conjunction with bond project CH-27, Robles Ranch House Rehabilitation. This facility was constructed to better provide law enforcement service for the residents of Robles Junction and the surrounding area. The project was completed in June 2002.

Pima County constructed a new Property and Evidence Storage Facility, which included a 25,000 square foot warehouse building, 7,600 square foot bulk storage addition, secured parking of approximately 263,000 square feet, and covered storage for approximately 75 vehicles. The facility will be used for maintaining, storing, and ensuring the integrity of secured property and evidence. This facility will replace the old Motor Vehicle Building on Ajo Road presently used for this function. The project was completed in July of 2002.

Sheriff’s Central Administration Building Pima County completed re-flooring, electrical improvements and work station improvements at the Sheriff’s Administration Building that increased the functionality of the building.

S-5 SHERIFF’S SUBSTATION EXPANSION total project costs: $56,000 Rincon and San Xavier Substations Pima County upgraded, remodeled and expanded the existing Rincon and San Xavier substations and replaced the roof at the Rincon Substation. These improvements reduced staff crowding and improved the efficiency of operations. The project was completed in July 2002.

38

S-8 Sheriff’s Communications Systems Upgrade total project costs: $2,745,000 Pima County replaced the Sheriff’s Department radio system, primarily the IMC multisite controller, consoles and software required for Y2K system compliance and operation and uninterrupted emergency radio communications. The manufacturer reported the existing equipment was not Y2K compliant and did not intend to support older technology. New equipment increased channel capacity for use opportunities by other Pima County Departments. The project was completed in Marchy 2002.

Question 2 • Public Safety, Law Enforcement and Superior Court

S-9 Sheriff’s Communications Tower total project costs: $20,000 Pima County acquired and paid legal and related costs associated with establishing two easements for the existing Summit Ridge Radio Site, which were required to provide access to the site to service the Sheriff’s Department radio equipment. This equipment provides radio coverage critical to Sheriff’s deputies serving the northeast Tucson metro area. The project was completed in April 2000.

SC-8 SUPERIOR COURT NEW COURTROOMS SUPERIOR COURT - NEW COURTROOMS, FIRE ALARM UPGRADE, PUBLIC ADDRESS SYSTEM TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $10,386,000 This project entailed building out the vacant third floor for six new courtrooms and judge’s chambers; remodeling portions of the second floor for additional hearing rooms and expansion of the law library; remodeling and expansion of the first floor to accommodate jury assembly function and new security station; remodeling and expansion of the BLevel prisoner holding area to house more prisoners and separate remanded juveniles, male and female prisoners; make building infrastructure improvements supporting court functions. Completed projects include: floors one, two and three, B-level, elevator modernization, fire alarm modernization and installation of a new building wide public address system for public safety. These projects were completed in June 2005.

SC-9 SUPERIOR COURT ADULT PROBATION total project costs: $561,000 Pima County completed the build out of 10,000 square feet of existing space in the Thomas “Tom” Meehan Building on East Ajo Way for the Pima County Adult Probation Department. This expansion provides additional office space for probation officers to relieve overcrowded conditions. The project was completed in July 1999.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 39

Question 3

Parks P-01 Miscellaneous Park System Renovations Pima County is funding minor renovations and upgrades to 26 existing parks and recreational facilities. These projects were implemented as part of the department’s strategic plan to review existing park and playground facilities, to improve conditions and therefore render value to the community, by replacing facilities when necessitated by public need, ADA accessibility issues and age appropriateness and by upgrading facilities that are not cost-effective. Three Points Veterans Memorial Park Project Cost: $2,000 Pima County purchased and installed two swing sets, which were completed in December 1999.

Denny Dunn Project Cost: $62,000 Pima County replaced the original deteriorated tot lot with two new tot lots, both of which are ADA accessible with rubber and engineered wood chips, and installed pipe railing around the north and east portion of the project area. The project was completed in February 2000.

Thomas Jay/Littletown Project Cost: $100,000 Pima County installed landscape irrigation, upgraded the paved parking lot and installed decomposed granite. The project was completed in March 2000.

40

Question 3 • Parks P-01 Miscellaneous Park System Renovations (CON’T) Los Niños/Augie Acuña Project Cost: $112,000 Pima County completed this project in two phases. In Phase 1, the County replastered the wading pool, installed cardinal red safety tile, and replaced the waterline tile. Pima County completed Phase 1 in March 2000. In Phase 2, Pima County completed improvements to the main pool phase, including resurfacing of the decking and installation of a diving board stand, safety tiles, and a non-slip floor surface in the bath house. Phase 2 of the project was completed in October 2002.

Arthur Pack Parking Lot Security Lighting Project Cost: $79,000 Pima County installed additional security lights at the rear parking lot. The project was completed in September 2000. Sopori Park Improvements Project Cost: $42,000 Pima County paved and striped a parking lot and installed landscaping and irrigation. Pima County completed this project in April 2001, at a total cost of $22,000. In a second phase, Pima County constructed a 16’x16’ ramada and concrete slab. The project was completed in April 2001. Richardson Neighborhood Park Improvements and Wildwood Neighborhood Park Improvements Project Cost: $236,000 Pima County completed identical improvements at both parks. In Phase 1, Pima County designed and installed an ADA compliant utility track around the parks and ball fields and ADA compliant drinking fountains. In Phase 2, Pima County replaced outdated playground structures with new structures, relocating swing sets, and replacing all of the extruded curbing with poured in place curbing. Phase 1 of the project was completed in April of 2001 and Phase 2 was completed in October 2001.

Sunset Pointe Neighborhood Park Project Cost: $33,000 Pima County paved and striped a parking lot and installed landscaping and irrigation. The project was completed in December 2001.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 41

Question 3 • Parks P-01 Miscellaneous Park System Renovations (CON’T) Meadowbrook Neighborhood Park Improvements Project Cost: $98,000 Pima County designed and installed an ADA drinking fountain and ADA compliant concrete walk from restrooms to the baseball field; installation of an ADA compliant ramp into the park; the design and replacement of an outdated playground structure with new structure, relocating a swing set, and replacing a damaged curb with poured in place curbing. The project was completed in January 2002.

Cardinal Neighborhood Park Improvements Project Cost: $95,000 Pima County designed and installed new playground structures to replace outdated units. The new playground structures are designed for youths from ages 5 – 12 years and enhance the usability of the park. The project was completed in September 2002.

Ted Walker Regional Park Project Cost: $37,000 Pima County constructed 20’x 28’ ramadas and a walkway. The project was completed in October 2002.

Gibson Park Basketball Court Project Cost: $60,000 Pima County provided all labor, materials, equipment, tools, and transportation for the demolition and replacement of the Gibson Park Basketball Court in Ajo, Arizona. The basketball court meets all qualifications as a regulation basketball court with regulation basketball goals on either end of the court. The project was completed in November 2002.

Mission Ridge Neighborhood Park Project Cost: $9,000 Pima County paved and striped the parking lot. The project was completed in June 2002.

Manzanita Park Improvements Project Cost: $113,000 Pima County constructed ramadas and a tot lot. The project was completed in October 2002.

E.S. Bud Walker Neighborhood Park ADA Restroom Project Cost: $74,000 Pima County purchased and installed a pre-fabricated ADA compliant restroom. The project was completed in October 2000. Park Picnic Tables Project Cost: $41,000 Pima County purchased and installed 41 concrete picnic tables at various parks. The project was completed in June 2000.

42

Question 3 • Parks P-01 Miscellaneous Park System Renovations (CON’T) Dugout Roof Installations Project Cost: $62,000 The project installed new all-weather dugout roofs to existing ball fields in several parks throughout Pima County as listed: Arthur Pack Regional Park – Fields 1-5; Manzanita District Park – Fields 1-4; McDonald District Park – Fields 2-4; Sam Lena District Park – Fields 1-2; Thomas Jay/ Littletown District Park – Field 1; Three Points Neighborhood Park – Fields 1-2 for a total of 17 fields upgraded. The project was completed in June 2003.

Arthur Pack Field 6 Lighting Project Cost: $179,000 This project was completed in February 2005. Arthur Pack Parking Lot Renovation and Ramadas Project Cost: $10,000 This project was completed in May 2002. Manzanita Park Sewer Project Cost: $39,000 This project was completed in November 2004. Curtis Park Field Lighting Total Project Costs: $300,000 This project constructed sports filed lighting for one senior baseball field and two junior baseball fields. The project included the development of certain electrical infrastructure required for sports field lighting. This projet was completed in 2007

P-02 Ajo Pool RENOVATIONS Total Project costs: $1,726,000

Anamax Neighborhood Park Tot Lot, Ramadas, Sidewalks Project Cost: $131,000 The project installed an ADA accessible playground, 1-1/2 basketball courts with ADA access, sidewalks and new ADA picnic tables/benches in the existing ramadas. This project was to upgrade the existing Anamax park to be ADA compliant and was completed as Phase I of the Anamax Neighborhood Park Community Center/Parking Improvements project. This project is a Town of Sahuarita park and was completed in December 2003.

Pima County designed and constructed a new community swimming pool located in Bud Walker Park in Ajo, with six 25-yard lanes, a zero depth entry, new bath and guard house buildings as well as a new entry drive and parking lot. Pima County opened and dedicated the new pool on May 27, 2000.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 43

Question 3 • Parks P-03 ANAMAX NEIGHBORHOOD PARK RENOVATIONS TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $572,000 The project included the replacement of the existing recreation center and renovation of the existing parking area, one and one-half basketball courts, playground, ADA sidewalk and picnic tables. The replacement and renovation accommodate the public demand for a facility of larger size, broader function, and improved accessibility. The Town of Sahuarita completed this project in February 2004 as part of an Intergovernmental Agreement with Pima County.

P-04 Tucson Mountain Park Renovation Pima County has completed seven separate improvements to facilities serving Tucson Mountain Park. Water System Improvements Project Cost: $335,000 Pima County replaced a 30 year old well system that had collapsed with a new well at a depth of 735 feet, and new storage tanks needed to ensure a sufficient supply to the Arizona State Desert Museum, Old Tucson and the Gilbert Ray Campground. The project was completed in March 2002. Arizona Desert Museum Parking Lot Lighting Project Cost: $112,000 In the second project, Pima County purchased new lighting for the parking lot at the Arizona Desert Museum, which the Museum installed. The project was completed in June 2001.

44

Gilbert Ray Campground Restrooms Project Cost: $147,000 Pima County installed two prefabricated concrete restroom buildings and septic systems to provide modern facilities at the Gilbert Ray Campground for the public’s use. Juan Santa Cruz Picnic Area Restroom Project Cost: $85,000 Pima County demolished and replaced a 30 year old restroom and replaced it with a prefabricated concrete restroom to better serve the park users. Departmental staff also installed a new waterline to the new restroom. Ironwood Picnic Area Paving Project Cost: $63,000 Pima County improvements included improving sight distances at the entry and repaving the entire roadway serving the multiple picnic sites. Speed bumps were installed to reduce speeding in and out of the site. Camino de Oeste Trailhead Project Cost: $21,000 This project relocated an informal parking area from private property to within the County right-of-way for Camino de Oeste for trail access into Tucson Mountain Park. Tucson Mountain Park Renovations Project Cost: $410,000 The portion of Tucson Mountain Park renovation consisted of general utility upgrades, new and renovated construction of campgrounds, parking and picnic facilities including pedestrian and vehicular circulation. Work also included the installation of two separate restrooms for Gilbert Ray Campground and associated upgrades to the septic system serving the campgrounds and utility connections. The project was completed in August 2005.

Question 3 • Parks P-05 Tucson Athletic and Play Field Improvements With this bond authorization, Pima County is constructing play field improvements on public property in neighborhoods with high negative stress factors. The projects constructed by Pima County consist of upgraded accommodations for athletic fields, courts, turf areas, walking/running asphalt paths, and nighttime lighting. Santa Cruz River Park Path Expansion Project Cost: $159,000 Pima County completed repair and renovation of 6-3/4 miles of a 12’ wide asphalt path and two parking lots and constructed 500’ of new asphalt path to improve access for the physically impaired from the 22nd Street parking lot to the river park path and to allow accessibility to the ADA compliant restroom located near the parking area. The project was completed in July 2001. Rillito River Park Path Expansion Project Cost: $145,000 Pima County completed repair and renovation of 9-1/2 miles of a 10-inch wide asphalt path, using either seal coating or 1” asphalt overlay, and restriping, and added shoulders to areas of the path or constructed a concrete cut wall to mitigate erosion drop-offs adjacent to the path. The project was completed in October 2001. Mehl/Foothills District Park Lighting Project Cost: $300,000 Pima County installed lighting for a softball field and a soccer field, which are configured in a multiuse field layout. The softball field is the only lighted softball field serving the foothills area and the soccer field is the second lit soccer field in the park. By lighting the fields, Pima County extended use of the fields and can accommodate more teams to use

the facilities. The Foothills Futbol Club contributed $25,000 toward the costs of lighting the soccer field. Pima County completed the project in September 2001. This project complements improvements Pima County completed at the park under bond project P-08. Little League Field of Dreams Project Cost: $176,000 Pima County funded development of a little league baseball field complex at the Quincie Douglas Park, with funding also contributed from bond project P57, Quincie Douglas Park Expansion. The project was completed in January 2001. Amphi Softball Field Improvement Project Cost: $100,000 Pima County, in partnership with the Amphitheater School District and the City of Tucson, renovated and relocated existing turf play fields including baseball fields and soccer fields, west of the Amphitheater High School complex. Santa Cruz River Park Playground Project Costs: $123,000 Two accessible playgrounds were constructed along the Santa Cruz River Park south of Speedway Blvd. One of these playground appeals to 5-12 year olds, while the other shaded play structure is designed for smaller children ages 2-5. This project was completed in March 2007.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 45

Question 3 • Parks P-05 Tucson Athletic and Play Field Improvements (CON’T) Dan Felix Memorial Park Soccer Fields Lighting Project Cost: $239,000 The project installed lights on two existing soccer fields at Dan Felix Memorial Park, which greatly increases the hours of use for the fields in the rapidly growing northwest area of Pima County. The project was completed in January 2003. Rudy Garcia Park Total Project Costs: $64,000 The Project is defined as improvements to Rudy Garcia Park and included design and construction services to install two Little League-provided scoreboards at fields number 2 and 3, plus removal of an existing scoreboard from field 3. This project was completed in January 2008. Yes2Kids Handball Court Total Project Costs: $150,000 The project included construction of accessible hanball courts on existing property within the Amphi Middle School campus. The City of Tucson will be responsible for operation and maintenance while Pima County will provide funding and design/ construction adminsitration for development. The project was completed in June 2008.

46

Question 3 • Parks P-05 Tucson Athletic and Play Field Improvements (CON’T) Manuel Herrera Park Improvements Total Project Costs: $150,000 Improvements to Manuel Herrara Park included installation of park lighting and a playground shade structure. The project was completed in October 2008.

Grijalva Park Total Project Costs: $150,000 This project was constructed on public property in neighborhoods with high negative stress factors to be defined by using existing census or other reliable databases within city of Tucson. Work consisted of installation of an accessible children’s playground within a project funding limit of $150,000. The project was completed in June 2009.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 47

Question 3 • Parks P-06 COLOSSAL CAVE MOUNTAIN PARK IMPROVEMENTS (see CH-24) TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $434,000 (Parks Portion) Work consisted of renovation of historical structures, ADA improvements, and improvements to rest rooms, sidewalks, drinking fountains, picnic tables and benches, and installation of security lighting. Work included remodeling of the headquarters, office quarters, La Selvilla ramada, repair of park service adobe building, snack bar, reconstruction of the main ramada and construction of new rest rooms. The project was completed in June 2005.

P-07 Rillito Park Improvements total project costs: $1,617,000 Under the original scope for this project, Pima County completed installation of turf areas for soccer fields in the racetrack infield and lighted soccer fields northwest of the track facilities and water conversion for irrigation from groundwater to reclaimed water. Pima County completed the original scope in January 2000 and completed the additional improvements in fiscal year 2003/04. The Scope was amended to include phase two that included the construction of one soccer field on the west side of the race track infield, snack bar with restrooms, drinking fountains, additional parking, security lighting and a paved entrance road from River Road. The additional cost for this amended scope is $600,000.

48

Question 3 • Parks P-08 Mehl-Foothills Park improvements total project costs: $432,000

P-10 Coronado School Ballfield Lighting total project costs: $570,000

Pima County constructed a lighted soccer field, lighting and electrical accommodations to existing ramadas, an addition of 60 parking lot spaces, sidewalks, bleachers and entry drive improvements. Pima County completed this project in September 2000. This project complements improvements to the park Pima County constructed under bond project P-05. The Catalina Futbol Club contributed $6,300 to completion of this project.

In partnership, Pima County and the Amphitheater School District designed and installed lighting for several athletic fields including two little league fields, a multi-use field configured with a senior league ball field, a softball field, and a soccer field. With this lighting project, Pima County and the Amphitheater School District significantly increased the hours the fields are available for use by residents of Northwest Tucson. Pima County and the District completed the project in February 2000.

P-09 JAMES KRIEGH PARK (HIGH SCHOOL LIGHTING IMPROVEMENTS) TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $198,000 The project installed lighting improvements to the football stadium on Canyon del Oro High School property at the request of the school district. The project was completed in May 2006.

P-12 South Tucson Playing Field Lighting Improvements total project costs: $52,000 Pima County identified, engineered and constructed lighting improvements to existing play fields along the Lupe de Eckstrom Trail in the South Tucson community. Pima County upgraded the play field lighting to industry and little league standards, expanding the opportunity for safe nighttime use of the play fields. The project was completed in December 2001.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 49

Question 3 • Parks P-13 FREEDOM PARK CENTER IMPROVEMENTS TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $1,642,000 The project improvements consisted of the design and construction of an approximately 11,650 square foot building that includes the following: (1) Educational Facility —one classroom, a library/study/resources room, two tutor rooms. (2) A social services facility—a music/teen room and weight room. (3) A multi-purpose room—a multi-purpose space that can accommodate 150 people and is served by a kitchen and restrooms. (4) A public and administration space—an entry lobby with a reception desk and restrooms, an outdoor courtyard, a center supervisor’s office, two staff offices, a staff work room and a conference room. The project was completed in April 2005.

P-14 SAHUARITA DISTRICT PARK IMPROVEMENTS TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $702,000 Construction included a new 200 foot little league ballfield and lighting improvements to existing little league fields, maintenance building, and utility upgrades. The project was completed in November 2005.

P-15 Augie Acuña - Los Niños neighborhood Park and P-16 Sam Lena Recreation Area Improvements total project costs: $180,000 Pima County designed and developed concrete concession buildings with storage rooms at these neighborhood parks. Both projects were completed in February 2000.

50

Question 3 • Parks P-17 santa rita park lighting improvements total project costs: $201,000 (COUNTY PORTION) Pima County and the City of Tucson jointly funded and the City of Tucson designed and installed lighting for an existing baseball field in the park. The project increases field usage for an expanding little league organization. The City of Tucson completed this project in September 2002.

P-18 Armory Park/Children’s Museum Improvements Total Project Costs: $234,000 This was a joint project with Children’s Museum to improve historical integrity of Carnegie Library building and tots adventure/educational play area. An existing brick screen wall was demolished to expose the historic façade of the original Carnegie Library Building, the entry courtyard was enclosed by an historically compatible wrought iron fence and gate, and ADA and landscape improvements were completed. This project was completed in June 2009.

P-19 LINDA VISTA PARK IMPROVEMENTS TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $333,000 Work consisted of design development and construction of amenities, all new construction, including rest rooms, irrigation, basketball court, sidewalks, turf development, ramada and picnic sites. Initial scope was completed in March 2004. Linda Vista Board contacted the Pima County Administration Office requesting a playground structure for the park. Natural Resources, Parks and Recreation has completed design and amended the contract to purchase and install playground, not to exceed $40,000. The project was completed in June 2004.

P-20 Three Points Veterans Memorial Park Lighting Improvements total project costs: $481,000 Pima County developed sports lighting for two existing little league fields with a multi-use configuration soccer/football field and lighting of the 340-foot senior field. The project will facilitate and maximize the use of existing athletic fields through nighttime games for the growing Three Points population. The project was completed in May 2001. Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 51

Question 3 • Parks P-21 PICTURE ROCKS PARK IMPROVEMENTS TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $1,259,000

P-23 Lawrence District Park Lighting Improvements total project costs: $362,000

Work consisted of design development and new construction in association with the existing community center, with a basketball court, playground, volleyball court, and horseshoes, plus two little league/soccer fields, restroom, maintenance building, playground, parking, security lighting, ramadas and picnic areas. The project was completed in June 2005.

Pima County completed construction of new sport lighting for two 350 foot senior league ball fields with a soccer field multi-use configuration, redesigned irrigation at the park, and completed utility upgrades. The project will facilitate and maximize use of the fields in an area of growing community and league demand. The project was completed in May 2002.

P-24 Vail Park/Cienega High School Park Improvements total project costs: $2,638,000

P-22 SOUTHEAST REGIONAL PARK IMPROVEMENTS (SHOOTING RANGE) TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $1,327,000 The first phase of the Shooting Range, located within the County’s Southeast Regional park included an entry drive into the site, a parking lot, maintenance building, shooting line ramada, an ADA restroom, and Shooting Range with targets at 50, 100 and 200 yards. This project was completed in August 2004.

52

In a partnership, Pima County and the Vail Unified School District jointly funded and the District designed and constructed a shared public community and high school park, which included recreation and competition fields for soccer, baseball and softball, child play area, basketball courts, tennis courts, sand volleyball, ramadas, restrooms, drinking fountains, picnic areas, and parking. The District contributed $2,138,000 and Pima County $500,046 to the project. The District completed this project.

Question 3 • Parks P-25 UDALL PARK IMPROVEMENTS TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $490,000 This project designed and constructed lights for an existing little league field, 60,000 square feet of youth soccer fields, and 30,000 square feet of related parking. The City of Tucson funded additional parking, a dog run, a unisex comfort station, four lighted tennis courts and a new west entrance to the park. The project was completed in September 2005.

P-27 Catalina Park Land Acquisition Acquisition Costs: $7,000 The Catalina Park Land Acquisition was completed with the purchase of land along the Cañada del Oro Wash. This purchase set aside significant riparian land to be used for regional park purposes. This project was completed in July 2006.

P-28 Ryan Field Park Land Acquisition Acquisition costs: $62,000 Under the Recreation and Public Purpose Act, Pima County secured the donation of an 80-acre parcel of land from the Bureau of Land Management as a site for a future district park. With the donation of land, Pima County used bond funds to complete a master plan for the district park, which will be developed as funding becomes available. The master plan was completed in October 2002.

P-29 Rita Ranch District Park total project costs: $340,000

P-26 Old Nogales Park Land Acquisition Acquisition costs: $100,000

In partnership with the City of Tucson, Pima County funded design and construction of a lighted 10,000 square foot skateboard and in-line skating facility, including a public art installation. Pima County completed the design portion and the City of Tucson managed the construction of the facility. The County and City completed the project in October 2000.

Pima County acquired 10 acres adjacent to the Summit School in the Sahuarita Unified School District as the site for its companion bond project P-40, Old Nogales Park. The District will coordinate the park’s design, construction and use with Pima County. The County completed the land purchase in October 1999.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 53

Question 3 • Parks P-30 RILLITO RIVER PARK – LA CHOLLA TO I-10 TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $658,000 The project was a two-mile extension of the Rillito River Park, with Phase 1 being completed with restrooms at adjacent Dan Felix Memorial Park and a one-mile extension of the 6-inch reclaimed water line to serve future recreation development within the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, including irrigation, walking paths, and landscaping. Phase 2 includes the Rillito River corridor. The project was completed in July 2005.

P-31 RILLITO RIVER PARK - CAMPBELL TO ALVERNON TOTAL FUNDING: $2,397,000 This project is separated into south bank and north bank segments. The project is a 2.5 mile extension of the Rillito River Park including irrigation, bike and walking paths, parking, erosion control walls, and landscaping. Sub Projects Projects completed to date: Rillito River Park – Campbell to Alvernon (South Bank) Project Costs: $1,039,000

P-32 Rillito Park at Columbus Boulevard District Park Total Project Costs: $501,000 The Project Scope and funding was coordinated with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Swan Road wetlands project along the Rillito River linear park and was in agreement with how the City of Tucson decided to develop Columbus District Park. This project was completed in November 2008.

P-33 Rillito Park at River Bend (Land Purchase Only) Acquisition costs: $1,007,000 Pima County used $1,000,000 in bond funds to purchase land for the Rillito River Park at Riverbend. Pima County envisions development of an equestrian facility with staging area, internal equestrian trails, pool complex, athletic fields, soccer fields, and general park facilities including ramadas, rest rooms, picnic areas, maintenance buildings, parking lots, and preservation of historic buildings. Pima County will design and construct the park improvements in conjunction with two transportation bond projects - River Road, Campbell to Alvernon and Alvernon, Fort Lowell to River Road. Pima County will begin design of the park when design of the roadway projects are 30% completed. Advanced acquisition of the park site saved County taxpayers money and facilitates construction of the transportation projects in a manner sensitive to the historical and environmental values of the area. When constructed, this park will meet the high demand for such park elements along the Rillito River Park at River Bend.

54

Question 3 • Parks P-34 Oro Valley CDO River Park Total Project Costs: $1,000,000 Pima County Flood Control District executed an intergovernmental agreement with the Town of Oro Valley to design and construct a 3-mile river park (public linear park) system along the south bank of the Cañada del Oro Wash, including bike path, walking path, pedestrian/bicycle bridges. The Town administered construction contracts for the project and constructed other amenities at no cost to the County or District. The project was completed in August 2008.

P-38 NORTHWEST POOL/MARANA USD TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $2,094,000 The project constructed a pool and bathhouse at the site of the Marana High School for joint use by public and high school. The project provides a swimming pool facility for the residents of northwest Pima County. The project was completed in August 2003.

P-39 CañADA del Oro Riverfront Park total project costs: $1,254,000 Through an intergovernmental agreement, Pima County and the Town of Oro Valley jointly funded this project, with the town managing design and construction. The Cañada del Oro Riverfront Park project incorporates a variety of facilities to serve the Oro Valley community while preserving approximately 50 percent of the site as undisturbed natural open space. Park facilities include an outdoor performance and community events center with an estimated seating capacity of 500; lighted fields for softball, little league baseball and soccer; picnic ramadas; equestrian and pedestrian staging and trails access to the Cañada del Oro; a pedestrian promenade; and parking for 230 vehicles. The Town of Oro Valley completed the project in June 2000. Pima County contributed $1,254,200 and Oro Valley $1,245,800 of the total costs of the project.

P-40 OLD NOGALES PARK TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $1,009,000 Work consisted of development of a neighborhood park facility of all new construction, including athletic fields, parking, fencing, restrooms, maintenance building, ramadas, picnic areas, playgrounds, lighting, and landscape. The project was completed in October 2004. Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 55

Question 3 • Parks P-41 Kino Community Field Lighting Improvement total project costs: $317,000 Pima County lighted three regulation size soccer fields, located just east of the Tucson Electric Ball Park Complex and south of Kino Hospital. The project was completed in June 2000.

P-42 FLOWING WELLS PARK TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $2,295,000 Work consisted of development of park elements and sports fields, community recreational park amenities on a district scale use, including athletic fields, restrooms, ramadas, picnic areas, playground, jogging path, basketball courts, volleyball courts, lighting, and parking. Cost increases were due to issues specific to the site such as: unforeseen preexisting site conditions (former trailer park on individual septic systems/ dump site), additional soccer/playfield development for Carden School, design upgrades to the softball field standard details, change to sewer connection for park restroom that facilitated future sewer connection for Carden School, additional SWPP design items to coordinate with a concurrent DOT/FC project at an adjacent site and other more typical change order items). The project was completed in December 2003.

P-44 Branding Iron Park total project costs: $287,000 Pima County constructed a lighted basketball court, large group ramada, restroom, fenced community garden and parking lot. Future plans include installing an accessible modular play structure to serve the needs of the younger park users. The new neighborhood park serves the residents of the southwestern area.

P-46 COLUMBUS PARK Total Project Costs: $2,000,000 Work consisted of development of newly constructed park facilities within an existing 300-acre park, including lighted soccer field, little league fields, dog training area, river park staging area, family picnic areas, ramadas, maintenance building, archeological mitigation, new park entrance, irrigation, rest rooms, parking, and landscaping. This project was completed in December 2008. 56

Question 3 • Parks P-47 Tanque Verde Community Center total project costs: $810,000 In partnership with the Tanque Verde Unified School District, Pima County funded the project and renovated approximately 19,000 square feet, while the District renovated at least an additional 11,000 square feet of the District’s community center. The renovated community center provides space for multiple uses, including a monthly antique fair; a weekly farmer’s market; programs for seniors, youth, teens, and pre-schoolers; craft and fine art classes such as ceramics, weaving and painting; a charter school; and some Pima College classes. Pima County and the District completed the project in August 1998.

P-48 ROY P. DRACHMAN – AGUA CALIENTE REGIONAL PARK VISITOR CENTER TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $721,000 The project was combined with the Cultural Resources ranch buildings rehabilitation project and consisted of rehabbing the historic ranch house to serve as a visitors’ center with a small gift/book shop, reading area, meeting room, kitchen, and new enclosed patio for outdoor activities. The old guest house, historically referred to as the Rose Cottage, was rehabbed to serve as an environmental education building and meeting space within the 101 acre natural resource park. The project meets the need for historic and environmental interpretive education. The Natural Resources, Parks & Recreation portion of this project is $582,000. The project was completed in March 2004.

P-49 Arivaca Community Center Expansion total project costs: $199,000 Pima County completed upgrades to an existing community center facility, including a new storage building, new commercial kitchen, improve building security, new meeting room flooring, parking lot ADA improvements and other miscellaneous work.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 57

Question 3 • Parks P-52 Drexel Heights Community Center Total Project Costs: $590,000 Pima County designed and constructed a new recreation center within an existing district park, including meeting and programming rooms, access, parking, signage, landscaping, and benches. The project meets the demands for a community center facility within a high use area. The project was completed in November 2003.

P-55 CLEMENTS RECREATIONAL FACILITY TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $2,500,000 Work consisted of development of a recreational center, infrastructure, and park amenities, including improvements to roadway, parking, lighting, landscaping, irrigation, and picnic facilities. The project was completed in August 2005.

P-56 THOMAS JAY COMMUNITY CENTER/LOS NINOS POOL UPGRADES TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $858,000 Work consisted of development of an addition to the existing building, upgrades to the existing center, including meeting and programming rooms, access, signage and benches. The project also consisted of improvements to the pool shell and upgrades to the pool pumphouse equipment. This project was completed in February 2009. 58

Question 3 • Parks

P-57 Quincie Douglas Park Pool TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $2,050,000 Work on this project consisted of the new construction of a swimming pool. The project was completed in April 2006.

P-58 Northwest Community Center/AQUATIC CENTER (YMCA) Total Project Costs: $8,724,000 This project is a collaboration between Pima County, the YMCA of Metropolitan Tucson, and Pima Community College District to bring recreational and educational services to the underserved and rapidly growing northwest side of the metropolitan area. The project included construction of a community center building, two community pools, a bathhouse, athletic fields, parking lots, ramadas, picnic areas, a playground, and landscaping. The project has been designed and will be constructed and operated in cooperation with the new northwest campus of Pima College located at the same site. Since the facility opened in December 2002, 6,022 members have joined the YMCA, 92 percent of which were part of a family membership. Pima County contributed $5,205,908 to this project, matched by contributions of $2,768,000 from the YMCA and $750,000 from Pima College.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 59

Question 4

Sonoran Desert Open Space Acquisition and Historic Preservation Protecting and Preserving the Sonoran Desert At the May 20, 1997 bond election, Pima County voters approved bond funding in the amount of $36.3 million for open space acquisition, trails acquisitions and development, and cultural/archaeological acquisitions and rehabilitation. Since 1997, Pima County has acquired open space and cultural/archaeological parcels encompassing 7,700 acres, for a total acquisition cost of $20,431,686.

SD-00 SONORAN DESERT OPEN SPACE ACQUISITION COSTS: $1,520,000 (to date) This consolidates the remaining authorization for Question 4, Sonoran Desert Open Space. This specific purchase was for Walden Ranch, 477 acres northeast of Marsh Station Road, purchased in August 2004.

tucson mountain park ACQUISITION costs: $12,040,000 SD-01 Tucson Mountain Park - General sd-02 tucson mountain park - painted hills SD-03 Tucson Mountain Park - Robles Pass The Bond Improvement Plan for Question 4 included three projects for acquisition of open space in the vicinity of Tucson Mountain Park. Under these three programs, seven properties, with a total of 1,586 acres, have been acquired at a total cost of approximately $10,766,000 an average of $6,788 per acre. These acquisitions significantly expanded the southern and eastern boundaries of the Park, protecting these boundaries from encroaching urbanization. Diocese of Tucson Acquisition Cost: $637,000 The Trust for Public Land negotiated this acquisition, which was completed in FY 1998/99. The acquisition allowed for a 216-acre addition to TMP, in Section 11, R12E/T14S, completing the boundary in this section, and protected a scenic slope that is part of the Gates Pass “Gateway” into Tucson Mountain Park. L and F International Trading Company Acquisition Cost: $1,422,000 With this acquisition, Pima County acquired three parcels, comprising 294 acres. The acquisition significantly expands Tucson Mountain Park to the 60

Question 4 • Sonoran Desert Open Space Acquisition and Historic Preservation Protecting and Preserving the Sonoran Desert north, essentially bringing all of Section 2 into the park. The acquisition also complements the Saguaro Cliffs acquisition described below. Saguaro Cliffs Acquisition Cost: $1,548,000 Pima County completed the Saguaro Cliffs as part of the development agreement for Starr Pass. The acquisition brought in 155 acres for $1,550,000 or approximately $10,000 per acre. In combination with the L and F International acquisition, the Saguaro Cliffs acquisition significantly expands Tucson Mountain Park in a critical corridor and provides links to vital biological corridors, including the Las Lomas acquisition and the Camino de Oeste Wash. Las Lomas Acquisition Cost: $748,000 The Las Lomas acquisition covers 50 acres in Section 6, R13E/T14S. Residents in the Tucson Mountains who had a vision of creating a universal access open space and trail park brought the Las Lomas acquisition to the County. The acquisition helps to solidify links to biological corridors advanced by the L and F International and Saguaro Cliffs acquisitions. The acquisition has been completed in two phases, with an original 20 acres acquired in September 1998 and the remaining 30 acres acquired in June 1999.

acquisition and enhance the biological linkage to open space east of Camino de Oeste. Perper-Rollings Acquisition Cost: $5,975,000 These three parcels, which total 746 acres, are located along the Ajo Highway immediately south of Tucson Mountain Park. Acquisition of the property will help protect a key scenic gateway into the Tucson metropolitan area, one of five such principal gateways identified in the Pima County Comprehensive Plan. Acquiring this property will also help preserve significant wildlife habitat and a wildlife migration corridor in a rapidly growing area, and provide additional trails-based recreation opportunities for southwest-side residents. The protection of the property will also help link Pima County’s nearby Manzanita Park, located south of Irvington Road, to Tucson Mountain Park. Lefkowitz-Laika Acquisition Cost: $276,000 Pima County acquired 115 acres to expand Tucson Mountain Park at its southeastern most point. Pima County acquired this property with two-thirds of its value donated and one-third acquired for $275,825, the equivalent of $2,380 per acre.

Holsclaw Property/Camino de Oeste and Gates Pass Road Acquisition Cost: $160,000 Pima County acquired two parcels, with a total of approximately 10.4 acres at the intersection of Camino de Oeste and Gates Pass Road. The value of this acquisition is to complete the Saguaro Cliffs

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 61

Question 4 • Sonoran Desert Open Space Acquisition and Historic Preservation Protecting and Preserving the Sonoran Desert SD-04 Tucson Mountain - Los Morteros CA-32 Los morteros ACQUISITION costs: $1,217,000 Los Morteros, an area near Silverbell Road and the north end of the Tucson Mountains near Marana, has great significance because of its archaeological resources. Los Morteros and the archaeological remains in the vicinity of the Point of the Mountain at the north end of the Tucson Mountains have long been recognized as a highly significant prehistoric and historic site in Pima County. The area is growing rapidly, and includes the Continental Ranch development, one of the largest residential projects in Eastern Pima County. Question 4 contained two programs to address Los Morteros – SD-04 and CA-32 – that will help protect the scenic and viewshed values of several key peaks and ridges that make up the northernmost reaches of the Tucson Mountains, and the highly significant and irreplaceable archeological resources on each property, including several undisturbed Hohokam trincheras, and permit creation of an archaeological park for public enjoyment and interpretation and education. Pima County has acquired a total of 180 acres, for a total of $762,935, or $7,064 per acre. Acquisitions under SD-04 include:

Acquisition under CA-32 includes:

Baxter Acquisition Cost: $275,000 The 33-acre Baxter parcel is the most significant of the parcels in this area. The parcel is due north of the intersection of West Twin Peaks Road and North Silverbell Road, in unincorporated Pima County. Under current zoning, this parcel had a potential yield of seventy-eight lots. It has protected peaks and ridges, but there are no floodplain or riparian habitat constraints.

University of Arizona Foundation Property Acquisition Cost: $297,000 Pima County acquired a 32-acre parcel with very high cultural resource values from the University of Arizona Foundation for $297,000.

Joshua Tree Acquisition Cost: $130,000 Pima County acquired 40 acres at the northern end of the Los Morteros target area. Acquisition of this parcel realized three benefits: (1) protection of critical habitat for the pygmy-owl, (2) valuable cultural and archaeological features, and (3) significant viewsheds and a northern landmark to Los Morteros. Orach Acquisition Cost: $61,000 Orach is a three-acre parcel that fronts along Silverbell and is across the street from the University of Arizona Foundation acquisition. 62

Marana Unified School District Property Acquisition Cost: $430,000 A purchase agreement between Marana Unified School District and Pima County was approved in September 2004 and a sale was concluded by the end of the calendar year.

Question 4 • Sonoran Desert Open Space Acquisition and Historic Preservation Protecting and Preserving the Sonoran Desert SD-05 Tortolita Mountain Park ACQUISITION costs: $3,500,000 Pima County has acquired three properties, with a total of 687 acres, for $3,5 million plus administrative costs. The four acquisitions provide valuable additions to Tortolita Mountain Park. Leef Acquisition Cost: $280,000 Pima County acquired the Leef property, at $280,000 for 80 acres. This property provides a valuable addition to the Tortolita Mountain Park. The addition of the Leef property to Tortolita Mountain Park will help protect the scenic viewshed of the front range of the Tortolita Mountains and provide a critical urban fringe public access point that was identified during the park’s master planning process (the proposed “Vulture Peak” trailhead). Carpenter Ranch Acquisition Cost: $547,000 In 1999, Pima County acquired the 200-acre Carpenter Ranch for $445,000. Subsequently, in August 2005, the County was able to acquire the remaining 360 acres for $1,202,000, of which $102,000 came from the 1997 Open Space Bond monies appropriated for the Tortolita Mountain Park area. The ranch is within the official planning boundary of Tortolita Mountain Park, and the Board approved it for acquisition in the Tortolita Mountain Park Master Plan. The ranch contains a rare natural spring that produces a significant amount of water, boasts outstanding scenic values, and can provide much-needed access into the county’s existing Tortolita Mountain Park holdings. The property is also bordered on two sides (west and south) by U.S. Bureau of Land Management owned property that will soon become a part of Tortolita Mountain Park.

Reid Acquisition Cost: $317,000 In March 2007, Pima County acquired 3 acres in fee and 4 acres via conservation easement on the Reid Property located one half mile west of Camino de Oeste and Arthur Pack Park. This acquisition expands existing conserved lands in the area, and likely to provide habitat for the Cactus Ferruginous Pygmy Owl and other priority vulnerable species. Tang Acquisition Costs: $2,356,000 Pima County acquired the 40-acre Tang property in July 2007. This property expands existing conserved lands in the area that contribute to habitat for several Priority Vulnerable Species in Pima County.

SD-08 Canoa Ranch ACQUISITION costs: $6,624,000 At its meeting of March 20, 2001, the Board of Supervisors approved acquisition of over 4,000 acres of the historic Canoa Ranch, for $6.6 million. This is one of the oldest ranches in the Santa Cruz River Valley, originally established as the 17,000-acre San Ignacio de la Canoa Spanish land grant in 1820. Its historical values reflect a native Piman settlement, early Spanish exploration, and its continuous use as a working ranch from 1820 to the 1970s. Between 1912 and 1951, Canoa Ranch operated as a small village and had become the social and economic hub of the middle Santa Cruz Valley.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 63

Question 4 • Sonoran Desert Open Space Acquisition and Historic Preservation Protecting and Preserving the Sonoran Desert SD-10 TUMAMOC HILL ACQUISITION COSTS: $184,000 The 320 acres of State Trust land on Tumamoc Hill was acquired in June 2009. The majority of County funding for the acquisition came from the Cultural Resources portion of the 1997 bond program, and therefore a more detailed description of the acquisition can be found in CA-31 Tumamoc Hill.

RW-11 Agua Caliente Creek ACQUISITION costs: $758,000 Pima County has completed two acquisitions in the vicinity of Agua Caliente Creek, with a total of 24 acres, for a total of $757,993, or $31,583 per acre, plus administrative costs. Drewes Acquisition Cost: $388,000 Pima County acquired the Drewes property, 11 acres, for $388,000. This acquisition will help protect a segment of the La Milagrosa Wash, as well as a key segment of the La Milagrosa Ridge Trail, which has been in use by the public for more than four decades. The acquisition will also help buffer the Santa Catalina Ranger District of the Coronado National Forest from the effects of advancing urbanization.

Ruddick Acquisition Cost: $370,000 Pima County acquired the Ruddick property, 13 acres, to the northeast of the Drewes property, for $369,993. The County bought the property for a variety of reasons: to protect the portions of La Milagrosa and Agua Caliente Canyons that extend beyond the boundary of the Coronado National Forest; to protect La Milagrosa and Agua Caliente Canyons, popular hiking destinations and to secure public access to La Milagrosa and the Coronado National Forest and to protect the La Milgrosa Ridge Trail, an old and very popular hiking route located on the northern edge of the La Milagrosa Canyon.

RW-12 Agua Verde Creek ACQUISITION costs: $2,003,000 Project RW-12 of the Open Space Bond Program facilitates the protection of a key segment of the Agua Verde Creek, a sensitive riparian corridor that drains the southern foothills of the Rincon Mountains and ultimately flows into the nearby Cienega Creek. The Agua Verde acquisitions, a total of five parcels, add 355 acres to the boundaries of Colossal Cave Mountain Park. Pima County acquired these five parcels for a total of $2,003,178, or $5,806 per acre, plus administrative costs. Akers/Bradley Acquisition Cost: $1,489,000 Pima County acquired three separate parcels, a total of 198 acres, for $1,488,766. This is a strategic acquisition that links the Cienega Creek Natural Preserve with Colossal Cave Mountain Park. Ben-

64

Question 4 • Sonoran Desert Open Space Acquisition and Historic Preservation Protecting and Preserving the Sonoran Desert efits of the acquisitions include the protection of an important riparian corridor, improved flood control, enhanced natural aquifer recharge potential, and the provision of critical trail access (including a future Arizona Trail link). Alpher Acquisition Cost: $514,000 Pima County acquired the Alpher property, two parcels with a total of 157 acres, for $514,412. This acquisition is considered by Parks and Recreation and the Parklands Foundation to be a critical missing link to the park. Protection of this parcel provides critical upstream water and riparian protection to the park proper. This acquisition will also provide a key link in the Arizona Trail, which passes through Colossal Cave Mountain Park and protect the park’s outstanding scenic values.

CH-24 COLOSSAL CAVE REHABILITATION (See P-06) TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $400,000 (Cultural Resources Portion) Colossal Cave Park, with its 1930s complex of Civilian Conservation Corps buildings and landscape features, has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places and the Arizona State Register of Historic Places as a significant historic site in Pima County. Rehabilitation plans included roof reconstruction with heavy, peeled pole timbers on the ramada, replacement of damaged beams and window lintels and a new roof on the headquarters building and the office and garage, termite treatment, stone masonry repairs, painting and refinishing of building interiors, repairs to windows and doors, new electrical and heating and cooling throughout the complex, replacement of roofs on picnic area ramadas, stabilization of the National Park Service adobe building and pump house, and drainage and site improvements. The project was completed in June 2005.

CH-25 AGUA CALIENTE RANCH REHABILITATION TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $421,000 Agua Caliente Ranch, with its permanent spring, is a true desert oasis that has attracted human settlement for thousands of years. The historic Agua Caliente Ranch constructed incrementally between 1873 and the 1930s has been approved for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. Rehabilitation for adaptive use as a visitor center, education center and staff office is now complete on the Ranch Headquarters, Rose Cottage, and Bunkhouse. Rehabilitation included roof reconstruction, replacement and repair of damaged structural elements, new floors where necessary, masonry and concrete repairs, window repair, painting, heating and cooling, and redesign of some interior rooms to accommodate park classes, offices, ADA accessibility, and a caretaker’s studio apartment. These restored buildings are now open and accessible and allow utilization of the ranch buildings for a variety of activities in an authentic historic setting. The project was completed in November 2003.

CH-26 EMPIRITA LOWER RANCH BUIDINGS REHABILITATION Total Project Costs: $320,000 The project rehabilitated the original ranch homestead building at the historic Empirita Ranch for use as a caretaker house. An Arizona Heritage Fund Grant was awarded to supplement the bond funds. This project was substantially completed in June 2008. Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 65

Question 4 • Sonoran Desert Open Space Acquisition and Historic Preservation Protecting and Preserving the Sonoran Desert CH-27 ROBLES RANCH house REHABILITATION TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $1,290,000 The historic Robles Ranch was approved for listing on the National Register of Historic Places and the Arizona State Register of Historic Places as a significant example of regional vernacular architecture and as an important site representing large-scale cattle ranching in Pima County. The rehabilitation provides for adaptive reuse of the ranch house for a community center and the stable and arenas are used for a 4-H facility. Rehabilitation included replacement of damaged structural elements, windows, and some flooring, termite treatment, masonry and concrete repairs, refinishing of building interiors, new electrical and heating and cooling, and other improvements. Grant funds in the amount of $459,300 were obtained to supplement the bond funds. Pima County completed this project in December 2002. Robles Ranch House was approved for listing on the National Register of Historic Places in March 2004. This project allowed for acquisition and restoration of the actual building in which Robles Junction or Three Points was founded and allows the residents to use the restored structure as a community center, meeting place, 4-H center, and Sheriff’s substation. The project was completed in February 2003.

CH-28 MISSION SAN AGUSTIN total project costs: $262,000 Known as the “Birthplace of Tucson,” this site at the base of Sentinel Peak was occupied by 1000 B.C. by Archaic and later Hohokam peoples, followed by Pima Indians who called their village “stjukshon.” Acquisition of the Mission Gardens parcel of approximately five acres has been completed and will be incorporated into the Rio Nuevo Mission San Agustin complex. The City of Tucson is acquiring the Convento parcel. Acquisition of the key parcels that comprise the Mission San Agustin site is a critical first step to protecting this site for the future benefit of the Tucson community. The acquisition was completed in April 2002.

66

Question 4 • Sonoran Desert Open Space Acquisition and Historic Preservation Protecting and Preserving the Sonoran Desert CH-29 CANOA RANCH BUILDINGS REHABILITATION (EMERGING STABILIZATION) TOTAL PROJECT COSTS (to date): $1,280,000 This project will be constructed in phases. As phases are completed, they will be included in future reports. Overall, the historic Canoa Ranch complex, constructed between the 1870’s and 1930’s, was approved for listing on the National Register of Historic Places and the Arizona State Register of Historic Places as a significant histroic site in Pima County. Canoa Ranch was officially listed in the National Register in June 2007. Today, the ranch complex includes 10 to 12 buildings constructed of adobe and wood framing that have deteriorated. Rehabilitation of the buildings will follow preparation of a site management plan for the adaptive reuse of the complex and preparation of rehabilitation plans and construction documents. Rehabilitation of adobe buildings 103 and 105 occurred between August 2006 and June 2007, and represent the first elements to be completed at Canoa. Building 103 will be used as an office and docent center, while 105 will first serve as a caretaker’s residence. Both buildings required new services and upgrades, and 105 required extensive stabilization of the foundation. Excellent work by the project architect and contractors ensured that historic elements were properly treated. The future uses of these and the other structures at Canoa are clarified in the Master Plan that was accepted by the Board of Superviors in 2007.

CH-30 ANZA NATIONAL TRAIL AND CAMPSITES TOTAL PROJECT COSTS $1,265,000 This project acquired trail segments, campsite improvements and historic interpretation along the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail, which commemorates the route taken by the Anza Expedition of 1775-76 when he led a group of some 250 colonists and 1200 head of livestock from Sonora to found a presidio and mission for Spain at San Francisco bay. The trail extends from Nogales, Arizona, to San Francisco, California, a distance of 1200 miles. There are approximately 60 miles of trail in Pima County along the west bank of the Santa Cruz River, with six campsites at Canoa, Llano Grande (south of Sahuarita), San Xavier del Bac, Tucquison (north of downtown Tucson), Llano del Azotado (at the north end of the Tucson Mountains), and Oitipars (near the Pinal County line).

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 67

Question 4 • Sonoran Desert Open Space Acquisition and Historic Preservation Protecting and Preserving the Sonoran Desert CA-31 Tumamoc Hill Total Project Costs: $3,688,000 Tumamoc Hill and the Desert Laboratory have unique and significant value as open space that is critically important to the citizens of Pima County. The 320 acres on the west slope of Tumamoc Hill have been an integral part of the 869 acre Tumamoc Hill Preserve, which has been in continuous use as an ecological research facility since 1903. This site is currently owned by the Arizona State Land Department and may be endangered by future sale and inappropriate development. The sale by ASLD was protested and cancelled. Congressional legislation was introducted in July 2004 to condemn Tumamoc property by Department of Interior. Note: $100,000 of the original bond authorization is reallocated to CH-27, Robles Ranch House Rehabilitation. The remaining allocation is $400,000. This project was completed in June 2009.

CA-34 Pantano Townsite total project costs: $43,000 The historic Pantano townsite is associated with the Southern Pacific Railroad at two locations, the “old Pantano” on the south bank of Cienega Creek and the “new Pantano” located on the north bank. The Pantano townsite was located on two parcels of land totaling approximately 33 acres. The largest, approximately 31.5 acres, was privately owned, and a smaller parcel of some 1+ acres was owned by the Vail School District. In December 1999, a 31.57 acre parcel of private land containing the bulk of the townsite was purchased by Pima County for $75,557. In April, 2000 the Vail School District sold their parcel to Pima County for $10,000. Additional funding came from the Pima County Flood Prone Land Acquisition Program.

68

Question 4 • Sonoran Desert Open Space Acquisition and Historic Preservation Protecting and Preserving the Sonoran Desert T-18 CENTRAL ARIZONA PROJECT (CAP) TRAILHEAD (TANGERINE & AVRA VALLEY ROADS) TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $139,000

This project included the development of the second parking/staging facility for the CAP trail near the CAP intersection with Tangerine Road, including constructing a trailhead parking facility for the CAP, capacity for approximately 25 cars and 5 horse rigs near the CAP/ Tangerine intersection, a gate system, fencing, signage, and a solar-powered 911 emergency telephone.

T-20 TORTOLITA MOUNTAIN PARK TRAIL SYSTEM Total Project Costs: $130,000

Work consisted of constructing approximately 20 miles of natural surface multi-use recreational trails in Tortolita Mountain Park, which is the first phase of the Tortolita Mountain Park recreational trail system, in accordance with the adopted Tortolita Mountain Park Master Plan. This project was completed in June 2009.

T-19 36TH STREET TRAILHEAD Total Project Costs: $200,000

This project included the development of a trailhead parking area for the Tucson Mountain Park trail system at the western end of 36th Street for use by pedestrian, equestrian, and bicyclist, including a trailhead parking area for Tucson Mountain Park with capacity for approximately 25 cars and 5 horse rigs, parking areas, a gate system, fencing, and signage. Entry roadway improvements were also provided through this project in conjunction with the City of Tucson to secure access to the trailhead. This project was completed in April 2007.

T-23 VARIOUS TRAIL ACQUISITIONS Acquisition COSTS: $225,000

Acquired various trail corridors along the following trails: Arizona Trail, Agua Caliente Hill North Trail Access, Wild Burro Wash Trail, Shurban Wash Trail, Rincon Creek Trail, Camino Loma Alta Trail, Spanish Trail, Anza National Historical Trail, Houghton Road Trail, Colossal Cave Mountain Park Trail System, Central Arizona Project Trail – Phase II, Ventana Canyon Trailhead. The project was completed in May 2005.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 69

Question 5

Public Health, Safety, Recreational and Cultural Facilities and Libraries CC-6 GREEN VALLEY PERFORMING ARTS CENTER TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $3,747,000 This projected consisted of phase one of the multi-media public arts center. Phase one included master planning and preliminary design for the entire facility, construction of a rehearsal studio, and construction of a Pima County Community College District adult learning center on the site. Total size for phase one facilities is 14,000 square feet. The facility is designed to be easily expanded in phase two, which will include the main theater hall, a second rehearsal studio and theater support spaces. The project was completed in December 2003.

CC-7 Las Artes Youth Learning Center total project costs: $1,537,000 Pima County constructed an educational facility to house a vocational instruction model for youth aged 14 to 21 in an applied academics setting. The project will help provide an intense curriculum combined with a planned program of vocational instruction and career exploration and post-secondary learning. The project was completed in July 2001.

70

Question 5 • Public Health, Safety, Recreational and Cultural Facilities and Libraries CC-8 El Pueblo Adult Education and Child care total project costs: $750,000 This project was a cooperative endeavor of Pima County, City of Tucson and Pima County Adult Education. Through an IGA, the City was responsible for design and construction of the facilities. This project expands the El Pueblo Center with a 13,250 square foot adult education facility and a 1,000 square foot expansion of the childcare center. The adult education buildings include eleven classrooms, two computer labs, a G.E.D. testing room and a teacher/staff resource center, all organized around a courtyard with fabric canopies. The childcare expansion provides infant and toddler classrooms. Pima County contributed $750,000 to the project. The City of Tucson and Adult Education also provided funding to the project. The parties completed this project in July 1999.

CC-9 El Rio Adult Education and Child Care total project costs: $1,476,000 This project was also a cooperative endeavor of Pima County, the City of Tucson, and Pima County Adult Education. Through an IGA, it was structured like the El Pueblo project. This project built a 11,700 square foot, two story structure containing 9 classrooms, administrative offices, counseling and tutoring rooms, an open plaza space, computer education facilities, GED testing facilities and a student lounge. This adult education facility was integrated with an existing community center, taking advantage of an existing City of Tucson Library and other facilities, such as childcare. Part of the project was to enhance the childcare space, providing a much needed service to the community and the users of the adult education facility, lengthening the hours available to the users of these services. Pima County contributed $1,475,597; the City of Tucson $545,000; and Adult Education $100,000. The parties completed this project in the Fall 2002.

L-01 NORTHWEST (ORO VALLEY) LIBRARY TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $2,002,000 The project consisted of construction, furnishings and opening collections for a library located on a site adjacent to the Oro Valley Town Hall. A separate intergovernmental agreement governing the funding of design and construction of the facility was agreed upon by both Pima County and the Town of Oro Valley. This project provides library services for a rapidly growing area in metropolitan Pima County. Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 71

Question 5 • Public Health, Safety, Recreational and Cultural Facilities and Libraries L-02 CITY OF TUCSON MIDTOWN LIBRARY Total Project Costs: $2,089,000 This project included site purchase, design, construction, and furnishings for a 7,700 square foot library, with capacity for expansion to 12,000 square feet. It was constructed as a component of a future learning center/neighborhood center. The location is the southwest corner of Fairmont Street and Catalina Avenue; a site chosen by the City of Tucson and area residents. This project was completed in December 2006.

L-03 KINO YOUTH LIBRARY AND RESOURCE CENTER TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $3,332,000 The project consisted of construction of a 29,000 square foot office building adjacent to Kino Teen Center, 2801 E. Ajo Way to house Community Services functions, a library, a vocational high school and adult education components, and career training programs. The facility provides public access to library services and materials and an informal classroom setting for introduction to and instruction in technology, as well as co-location with other Pima County health, recreational, and educational services. The project was completed in December 2003.

L-04 MARANA LIBRARY EXPANSION Total Project Costs: $76,000 The project provided funds for refurbishing and upgrading the existing Marana Branch Library, including improving the present parking lot, expanding into the former Sheriff sub-station, rewiring the facility to accommodate new library technologies, and selected interior upgrades to improve services for youth. The project was completed in May 2008.

72

South Tucson Gateway Project total project costs: $1,163,000 L-5 south tucson library expansion p-53 ochoa-lena learning center Pima County and the Library District jointly funded this project, which was funded in conjunction with L-5, South Tucson Library Expansion and a project funded under Question 3 – P-53, Ochoa-Lena Learning Center. Pima County constructed a 900 square foot expansion of the John A. Valenzuela Youth Center to provide new program space and added 4,000 square feet of space to the Sam Lena/South Tucson Branch Library, including a new computer lab, children’s reading room, meeting rooms, office space for program partnerships with the John A. Valenzuela Youth Center and miscellaneous renovation work in the existing library. This project provides additional facilities for youth oriented academic and vocational training programs and general improvements to the library facility. The overall project will also include a pedestrian crosswalk on South 6th Avenue, facilitating safe passage between the two facilities. The Library and Valenzuela Center improvements were completed in June 2002.

Question 5 • Public Health, Safety, Recreational and Cultural Facilities and Libraries H-10 Kino Public Health Center Total Project Costs: $3,089,000 Pima County completed design of the Kino Public Health Center to accommodate and consolidate public health and medical services administrative functions on site at the Kino Campus in a new 180,000 square foot facility. The County also reconstructed and expanded the public parking lot as well as provide for additional repairs at Kino Community Hospital. Construction has started; funded as part of the 2004 General Obligation Bond Program. The project was completed in September 2003.

H-12 KINO HOSPITAL REPAIR TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $8,857,000 Repairs and capital improvements were made to Kino Hospital, including the following specific projects: 1) Emergency Department Security Enhancement / Consolidation of Emergency and Urgent Care Services. The Emergency Department originally designed for Kino Community Hospital has become dated by lack of security, accommodations for psychiatric patients, separation of ambulance traffic, and working space for staff. This redesign enhanced security and created efficiencies at the same time. Urgent Care services provided by the clinics were relocated to the Emergency Department area providing economies of scale for triage, registration and treatment functions. The project cost was $900,000. 2) Computed Tomography Scanners. Current equipment is several generations behind. The cost of replacement was $630,000. 3) Surgical Instrument Washer/Sterilizer/Decontamination and High Vacuum Steam Sterilizer. Current equipment for sterilizing surgical instruments is aged and subject to frequent repair. Replacement parts are difficult to obtain, unavailable or must be manufactured. As a result, current equipment works at 50 percent capacity. The cost of replacement was $76,000. 4) Conversion to Digital Image Radiology was $110,000. 5) Various repairs and capital improvements upgrades are under-

way, including mold remediation and build-back. The project was completed in March 2001.

FS-13 IMPROVE DISABLED ACCESS TOTAL PROJECT COSTS (TO DATE): $804,000 This project modifies various County buildings to correct remaining deficiencies of accessibility to accommodate the public and employees as mandated by the Americans with Disabilities Act. This program addresses those areas not previously modified to Americans with Disabilities Act standards at the following facilities: Downtown Governmental Center, outlying governmental centers, libraries, health clinics, Kino Hospital, Posada del Sol Health Care Center, Sheriff’s facilities, and additional parks and recreational facilities. The following modifications are completed: Ajo Courthouse Restrooms, Downtown Restrooms, Kino COPE, Kino Hospital Patient Rooms, Lee and Rogers Health Clinics, Pima Animal Care and Kino Hospital public restrooms.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 73

Question 5 • Public Health, Safety, Recreational and Cultural Facilities and Libraries FS-14 LEGAL SERVICES BUILDING RENOVATIONS TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $5,221,000

FS-16 PBX Replacement (County Telephone System) Total Project Costs: $2,001,000

Projects completed include floors 2, 8, 16 & 19, elevator modernization, fire alarm improvements and reroofing. Floors 18-21 were funded by asbestos recovery funds. These projects included the demolition and complete asbestos abatement, fire sprinkler and alarm system of floors indicated. New efficient office space was provided on each remodeled floor for the relocation of building tenants to allow continuation of abatement and fire sprinklering of successive floors.

Pima County replaced its obsolete telephone switches (PBXs) in the Downtown Complex (Main 1 and 2, Legal Services Building, and Public Works Building) and at the Mission Road Complex. Funding for this project was divided between general obligation bonds and from departments benefitting from the new equipment. The projcet was completed in August 2000.

FS-15 DOWNTOWN COMPLEX TOTAL PROJECT COSTS (TO DATE): $4,839,000 Projects completed at this point are: Elevator moderization of Administration and Health & Welfare Buildings; Cooling tower replacement; Central chiller replacement; Print shop conversion to Recorder’s office; Remodling of Health & Welfare building – floor one West; Demolition, abatement and tenant improvements to the Administration Building 3rd floor for the Procurement Department; Demolition, abatement and tenant improvements to the Administration Building 6th floor for the Finance Department; and design of the demolition, abatement and tenant improvement for the 7th floor Administration Building for the Finance Department. This project was completed in June 2007.

74

Question 5 • Public Health, Safety, Recreational and Cultural Facilities and Libraries NR-16 Neighborhood REINVESTMENT The Neighborhood Reinvestment program is intended to provided for strategic investments in infrastructure improvements within high stress areas of the community, helping neighborhood groups to increase the cohesion, stability and safety of their communities. The projects have significant cooperation with the City of Tucson. The City of Tucson has contributed approximately $7.7 million to these projects. Amphi Neighborhood Project Cost: $150,000 The project entailed design and construction of facilities at Amphi Neighborhood Park with the following improvements that directly affect children, youth and families within the neighborhood; install new playground equipment, new turf irrigation, fence renovation, asphalt pathway, backstop, picnic tables, water fountains, and dusk to dawn lights. Pima County contributed $150,000 and the City of Tucson $125,000 to this project, which was completed in June 2001. Balboa Heights Neighborhood Project Cost: $122,000 The project consisted of improvements to the Balboa Heights Neighborhood Center, including concrete work, tree grating, bicycle racks, picnic tables, trash containers, barbeque grills, irrigation, fencing, foliage, lighting, and public art among other costs. Pima County contributed $122,000 and the City of Tucson $85,000 to this project, which was completed in May 2001.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 75

Question 5 • Public Health, Safety, Recreational and Cultural Facilities and Libraries NR-16 Neighborhood REINVESTMENT (CON’T) Dunbar Springs Neighborhood Project Cost: $19,000 The project consisted of traffic mitigation improvements including construction of four traffic circles, eight speed humps, trees and landscaping for the traffic circles and public art for the traffic circles. Pima County contributed $18,800 and the City of Tucson $20,000 to this project, which was completed in August 2001.

Silvercroft Neighborhood Project Cost: $150,000 The project consists of 55 streetlights around the entire neighborhood. Pima County contributed $150,000 to this project. The City, in response to a petition submitted by the neighborhood residents, established an improvement district, allowing $175,000 in costs of improvements to be bought down by the neighborhood residents. The project was completed in March 2002.

Miracle Manor Phase I and II Project Cost: $214,000 The Miracle Manor neighborhood received two Neighborhood Reinvestment grants. Miracle Manor I consisted of sidewalk construction on nine neighborhood streets to improve pedestrian safety and quality of life for neighborhood residents, at a cost of $1,750,000. Miracle Manor II consisted of construction of sidewalks on Laguna Street and Florence Street, at a cost of $1,664,000. Pima County contributed $214,000 and the City of Tucson $3,200,000 to these projects, which were completed in March 2002.

76

Question 5 • Public Health, Safety, Recreational and Cultural Facilities and Libraries NR-16 Neighborhood REINVESTMENT (CON’T) Fairgrounds Neighborhood Project Cost: $136,000 The project consisted of construction of a park, including playground equipment, walkways, lighting, water fountains, ramada, band area and basketball improvements. Pima County contributed $136,000 and the City of Tucson $140,000 to this project, which was completed in October 2000.

Wakefield Neighborhood Project Cost: $115,000 The project consisted of construction of twenty-one landscaped traffic circles, one alley closure, twentytwo speed humps and four speed tables. Pima County contributed $115,000 and the City of Tucson $800,000 to this project, which was completed in March 2001.

Parkway Terrace Neighborhood Project Cost: $147,000 The project consisted of design and construction of thirty-three streetlights at selected locations to foster a safe nighttime environment for residents and their visitors. The neighborhood contributed $750 to this project. The project was completed in July 2000.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 77

Question 5 • Public Health, Safety, Recreational and Cultural Facilities and Libraries NR-16 Neighborhood REINVESTMENT (CON’T) Myers Neighborhood Project Cost: $150,000 The project consisted of neighborhood safety improvements, including curbs, sidewalks and streetlights. Pima County and the City of Tucson each contributed $150,000 to this project, which was completed in December 2000.

Corbett Neighborhood Project Cost: $75,000 This project constructed sidewalks along Sahuaro Street. Pima County contributed $75,000 to the project. The project was completed in August 2002.

Bravo Park I Neighborhood Project Cost: $120,000 The project consisted of playground equipment, drinking fountains, lighting, walking path and basketball courts. Pima County contributed $120,000 and the City of Tucson $1,600,000 to this project. The project was completed in December 2002.

78

Question 5 • Public Health, Safety, Recreational and Cultural Facilities and Libraries NR-16 Neighborhood REINVESTMENT (CON’T)

Las Vistas Neighborhood Project Cost: $46,000 The project consisted of sidewalks, curbs and paving on Campbell Ave between 36th street and Sunland Vista. Only Pima County funding was used for the project. The project was completed in January 2003.

Keeling Neighborhood Project Cost: $150,000 This project consisted of installing sidewalks in the neighborhood. Pima County contributed $150,000 to the project. The project was completed in February 2003.

South Park Neighborhood Project Cost: $150,000 The project consisted of installing sidewalks, lighting, bus shelter, landscaping and seating walls. Pima County contributed $150,000 to the project. The project was completed in December 2003.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 79

Question 5 • Public Health, Safety, Recreational and Cultural Facilities and Libraries NR-16 Neighborhood REINVESTMENT (CON’T)

Pueblo Gardens Neighborhood/Cavett Elementary School Project Cost: $55,000 The project consisted of median lighting. Pima County contributed $55,000 to the project. The project was completed in September 2006.

Barrio Blue Moon Project Cost: $150,000 The project consisted of park improvements including a ramada, lighting, gated access to the Tucson House, walking path, picnic tables, BBQs, turf area, drinking fountains, sidewalks and public art at the new entrance. Pima County contributed $150,000, and the City of Tucson contributed $123,034.

Western Hills Project Cost: $150,000 This project consisted of traffic mitigation, bus shelters, infill sidewalks and neighborhood identification markers. Pima County fully funded this project which was completed in September 2003.

80

Question 5 • Public Health, Safety, Recreational and Cultural Facilities and Libraries NR-16 Neighborhood REINVESTMENT (CON’T) Chantlalli Estates Project Cost: $300,000 Bond funds were used for this project for public right of way infrastructure, including water lines, sewer lines, utility trenching, drainage culverts, streets, paving, sidewalks, curbs, street lights, signs, street landscaping, clean up, engineering, surveying. This is a mixed income development, and when the homes are complete, there will be 60 single-family units, of which 37 will be affordable housing. Bond funds will be used only on the affordable units. This project has received funds from different sources to use as leverage: $75,000 CDBG; $460,000 Home CHDO funding; $386,000 Fannie Mae Foundation; $88,980 Tucson Electric Power. Land used for the project was equivalent to $197,000 from Pima County and $394,000 from City of Tucson. The infrastructure, financed using $300,000 of bond funds, was completed in December 2003.

Pio Decimo Project Cost: $28,000 The project included the installation of new playground equipment, irrigation repair, basketball court repair and security upgrades. The project was completed in March 2000.

Corbett Neighborhood Pedestrian Bridge Project Cost: $9,000 This project was completed in September 2004.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 81

Question 5 • Public Health, Safety, Recreational and Cultural Facilities and Libraries NR-16 Neighborhood/REINVESTMENT (CON’T) Elvira Project Cost: $150,000 The project consisted of the design and installation of street lighting. Pima County contributed $150,000 to the project and City of Tucson Back to Basics contributed $485,000. The project was completed in October 2002.

Iron Horse Project Cost: $143,000 The project consisted of design and installation of a 20’ x 20’ group ramada with electricity, artwork, picnic tables, single globe historic light poles with fixtures, benches, trash containers, concrete pavement, landscaping and irrigation. The project was completed in June 2003.

Jefferson Park Project Cost: $150,000 This project constructed a total of approximately 3.2 miles of contiguous sidewalks, and ADA-accessible ramps on Edison, Seneca, Hampton and Warren Streets in the Jefferson Park Neighborhood. The project was completed in October 2004.

82

Challenger Little League Project Cost: $50,000 Bond funds contributed $50,000 to the Challenger Little League for the completion of lighting at league facility. The project was completed in March 2002.

Question 5 • Public Health, Safety, Recreational and Cultural Facilities and Libraries NR-16 Neighborhood/REINVESTMENT (CON’T) Rose Project Cost: $150,000 The project consisted of improvements, including earthwork/grading, asphalt pavement walking path, handicap ramps, handicap parking space/stripping/sign, two ramadas, irrigation, landscaping, picnic tables, electrical service, turf sod, drinking fountains, pole lights for path security, benches, portable water lines, barbeque grills, bicycle racks, trash containers and water meters. Pima County contributed $150,000 and the Pima Association of Governments contributed $66,500. The project was completed in October 2002. Sunland Vista Project Cost: $765,000 Bond funds were used for this project for public right of way infrastructure, including water lines, sewer lines, utility trenching, drainage culverts, streets, paving, sidewalks, curbs, street lights, signs, street landscaping, clean up, engineering, surveying. The infrastructure, financed using bond funds, was completed in September 2003. When the homes are complete, there will be 65 single-family units of affordable housing. Other funds used for this project include private bank financing and Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC).

Old Pascua Project Cost: $150,000 This project included the expansion of the Community Recreation Building, installation of sidewalks and traffic mitigation features, and a retaining wall on Calle Sur to provide walkways for residents in the historic Pascua Yacqui community. The project was completed in May 2007.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 83

Question 5 • Public Health, Safety, Recreational and Cultural Facilities and Libraries NR-16 Neighborhood/REINVESTMENT (CON’T)

National City Project Cost: $112,000 This project included traffic mitigation and park improvements. It was completed in June 2006.

La Pilita Project Cost: $122,000 This project restored the La Pilita historical barrio site, including sundial, water fountain, sidewalks, and landscaping. It will be utilized as a learning center by the neighborhood and students from nearby Carillo School.

High Sierra Estates Project Cost: $435,000 Bond funds were used for the infrastructure construction in the public right of way for a mixed income 20-unit subdivision. The funds allowed the builder to reduce the price of 15 homes that were sold to first time low and moderate income homebuyers by an average of $22,916.00

El Rio Project Cost: $150,000 This project consisted of playground equipment, ramada, drinking fountain, resurfacing of the park basketball court, and vehicle barriers to protect the improvements. The project was completed in June 2006.

El Cortez Heights Project Cost: $146,000 The project designed and constructed traffic circles, speed humps, landscaping for traffic circles, sidewalk access ramps, a pathway around the park, playground equipment, irrigation system and concrete benches.

Menlo Park Project Cost: $150,000 This traffic mitigation project included speed humps, street bump-outs, signs, and traffic circles. The project was completed in June 2006.

84

Question 5 • Public Health, Safety, Recreational and Cultural Facilities and Libraries NR-16 Neighborhood/REINVESTMENT (CON’T)

Copper Vista Total Project Costs: $435,000 New off-site improvements have been installed to serve a 29-unit residential housing subdivision located in the City of Tucson’s South Park Avenue corridor, just south of the Drexel Park neighborhood. Chicanos Por La Causa (CPLC), a non-profit housing agency and developer, will construct new, detached, single-family residences (SFR) that will be affordable to low-income homebuyers under HUD income guidelines. Bond funded improvements included new underground utilities, site drainage structures, curbs, sidewalks and one new street. This project was completed in June 2006. West Ochoa Total Project Costs: $148,000 This project consisted of a pocket park within the neighborhood. The park is being reconstructed after an arson fire burned the play structure down. This park was constructed to provide a place for children in the neighborhood to play. The nearest park is the Santa Rosa park, and access to the park would force children to cross a major and dangerous roadway. This project was completed in September 2006.

We-Chij Estates Total Project Costs: $445,000 County Housing Bonds funded the off-site improvements in public right of way for 21 single family homes that will be affordable to low-income homebuyers. The Improvements include a new paved street, curbs, portion of sidewalks, new underground utilities and sewer services. The project was completed in October 2007. Colonia Libre Project Cost: $274,000 The project is a 60-unit rent-to-own town home complex located in the City of South Tucson and is being developed by Development Design Group, a non-profit housing agency and developer. All of the units will be single-family town homes that will incorporate high-density design with zero-lot lines designed to help promote affordability for very low-income lease-purchasers meeting HUD income guidelines. The project was completed in February 2006. Bravo Park II Project Cost: $21,000 This project consisted of traffic mitigation, park lighting, and a neighborhood identification marker. Julian Wash Project Cost: $5,000 This project was a traffic mitigation project at the only entrance/exit to the neighborhood, consisting of two speed humps. The project was completed in March 2006.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 85

Question 5 • Public Health, Safety, Recreational and Cultural Facilities and Libraries NR-16 Neighborhood/REINVESTMENT (CON’T) South Tucson Basketball Court & Community Garden Total Project Costs: $150,000 Design and construction of two small community parks. The parks include playground equipment for all ages, half courts for basketball, ramadas, lighting, and security walls. The parks are located at 2020 South 5th Avenue and 2400 South 2nd Avenue. This project was completed in June 2007. Sunnyside Total Project Costs: $150,000 This project consisted of three components: traffic mitigation, park improvements, and a community garden. Traffic mitgation included two traffic circles and multiple speed bumps and tables. Park improvements included resurfacing of a basketball court, connecting sidewalk, and development of a community garden. The garden includes fencing, storage locker, irrigation system, and decomposed granite paths. This project was completed in June 2007. Wakefield Art Project Total Project Costs: $35,000 This project was part of another 1997 project (Wakefield 1618) which consisted of primarily traffic mitigation. The neighborhood made a decision to reserve $35,000 of their $150,000 NR allocation. The “Art Project” was designed, built, and installed at the 12th Avenue Gateway Intersection. The artwork consisted of two large pieces intertwined into a 14 foot high sculpture. It was installed at the Gateway Intersection when that roadwork was completed in May of 2007. This project was completed in May 2007.

86

West Ochoa Project Total Project Costs: $120,000 Chicanos Por La Causa Tucson (CPLC) developed what was previously a blighted vacant lot located in the West Ochoa Neighborhood into 5 single family homes. The parcel, located at 9th Avenue and 25th Street, was vacant for years, creating major problems for the neighborhood, such as illegal trash dumping, homeless camps and Police Officers were constantly called to the property due to fights among the homeless people. The West Ochoa Neighborhood Association studied the problem and approved of plans to develop the site for homeownership in 1999. The City of Tucson, who previously owned the site, donated it to CPLC in order to develop land and build 5 single family homes. This project represents the development of public infrastructure improvements necessary to serve 5 single homes for low-income first-time homebuyers in District 5. All five homes were sold well before the infrastructure improvements were completed and the houses have now been constructed. This project was completed in June 2008.

Question 5 • Public Health, Safety, Recreational and Cultural Facilities and Libraries NR-16 Neighborhood/REINVESTMENT (CON’T) City Parkside (Julia Keen Neighborhood) Project Costs: $150,000 This project included streetlights located strategically throughout this one square mile neighborhood. The project was completed in February 2009. Pueblo Gardens Elementary Total Project Costs: $138,000 The project involved park improvement including ramadas, awnings and a wall. This project was completed in December 2008. Santa Rita Skate Park Total Project Costs: $400,000 The Santa Rita Neighborhood youth skate park consists of skate bowls, fencing, lighting, ramada and signage. This project was completed in February 2009. Sunset Villa Total Project Costs: $150,000 The Sunset Villa Neighborhood Pedestrian Enhancement Project consists of new sidewalks, shade landscaping and beautification improvements, and public art. This project was completed in March 2009.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 87

Question 6

Flood Control Improvements FC-01 Santa Cruz River, Grant Road to Fort Lowell Road Total Project Costs: $6,867,000 Pima County constructed one and a-half miles of new soil cement bank stabilization, which will fully contain the 100-year flow of the Santa Cruz River, with sufficient toedown to protect the bank stabilization from channel bottom scour and with three feet of freeboard above the 100-year water surface elevation to satisfy Federal Emergency Management Agency requirements. This improvement ties into existing bank stabilization at the upstream and downstream ends. This area of the Santa Cruz River is subject to extensive lateral bank erosion. During the October 1983 Flood, approximately 300 feet of bank eroded; during the January 1993 Flood, up to 130 feet of bank eroded. Properties protected include the I-10/Miracle Mile interchange; Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) maintenance yard; land, buildings and crops at the University of Arizona Agricultural Research Center; land owned by the City of Tucson, the Flowing Wells Irrigation District and private property owners; and a Tucson Electric Power (TEP) transmission line, a Tucson Water mainline, two Santa Fe-Pacific petroleum pipelines, and two Southwest Gas mains. Pima County contributed general obligation bonds and Flood Control district tax levy to the project, which was matched by contributions from the Natural Resources Conservation Service, the University of Arizona, and the City of Tucson. The project was completed in Decemeber 2002.

FC-03 Lower Santa Cruz Levee total project costs: $17,750,000 Pima County constructed a 7.36-mile earthen levee with soil cement face on the river side along the east bank of the Santa Cruz River from the Continental Ranch Subdivision to Sanders Road. The levee will provide 100 year flood protection to a large area of the Town of Marana. The Bureau of Reclamation and the State of Arizona contributed funding to the project. The project was completed in February 2001.

FC-04 Mission View Wash Total Project Costs: $8,276,000 Few drainage facilities exist in downstream areas, which include portions of the City of Tucson and the City of South Tucson. Therefore, most flows are conveyed in the streets. As the streets have insufficient capacity to contain all but the smallest of flows, adjacent commercial and residential areas experience repeated flooding. This project included design and construction of a regional detention/retention basin east of Park Avenue and south of 36th Street. Preliminary design of this new basin included providing up to 43 acre-feet of floodwater storage, inlet structures to collect and concentrate sheet flow, and outlet works as needed to prevent adverse impacts downstream of the basin. This project was completed in May 2009. 88

Question 6 • Flood Control Improvements FC-05 CITY OF TUCSON EARP WASH DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENTS TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $2,432,000 The Flood Control District, in cooperation with the City of Tucson, mitigated flooding problems along Earp Wash. The District designed and constructed detention basins upstream of Alvord Road. The project was completed in May 2006.

city of south tucson drainage improvements total project costs: $2,800,000 FC-06 South Tucson Drainage Improvements project costs: $1,800,000 FC-11 South Tucson 4th Avenue project costs: $1,000,000 Pima County and the City of South Tucson both contributed $1,400,000 to complete these two drainage improvements. Under FC-06, the parties constructed drainage improvements located north of 36th Street and west of 6th Avenue. Under FC-11, the parties constructed storm drain improvements, in conjunction with the City of South Tucson’s 4th Avenue project. The parties completed both projects in September 1998.

FC-07 TOWN OF SAHUARITA DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENTS (FC-07/DOT-51) LA CAñADA drive: DUVAL MINE RD. TO EL TORO - SAHUARITA DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENT TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $502,000 (Flood Control Portion) Drainage crossings were improved along La Cañada Drive and Camino de las Quintas, south of El Toro Road, located in the most populous parts of town. Washes draining from the west toward the Santa Cruz River on the east cross both of these roads and were creating safety hazards and making them nearly impassable during summer monsoons. Five drainage crossings at each road were improved. Pipe culverts were constructed under both roads, and the drainageways between La Cañada Drive and the downstream Camino de las Quintas were improved. The project was completed in July 2005. Note: The planning and construction of this project was combined with DOT-51, La Cañada/Las Quintas Highway Drainage Improvements. The project was constructed by the Town of Sahuarita. Refer to DOT-51 for more project details.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 89

Question 6 • Flood Control Improvements FC-08 ORO VALLEY DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENTS (MUTTERERS WASH) TOTAL PROJECT COSTs: $162,000 The Town of Oro Valley managed the construction of this project, through an intergovernmental agreement with the County. The project improved a portion of Mutterers Wash south of Greennock Drive. The project improved drainage conditions for Oro Valley residents and safer driving conditions. The project was completed in October 2003.

FC-09 Green Valley Drainageway No. 9 Total Project Costs: $1,239,000 Town homes along the north bank of this watercourse have long been susceptible to flooding and to rectify these problems Pima County completed several improvements to this drainageway. In the upstream reach, Pima County added two new three barrel 8’ x 5’ vcells to the existing four-cell box culvert under Camino Portillo and Holgado, to allow the 100-year flow to pass through the culverts. The County installed a new 400-foot long earthen dike protected by gabion on the north bank upstream of Camino Holgado, and a new 600-foot long earthen dike with gabion protection on the north bank downstream of the 400-foot long dike, to help keep floodwater in the main channel. In the downstream reach, the County constructed new gabion bank stabilization along the balance of the unprotected banks and a new grade control structure that will prevent erosion from undermining the bank stabilization. The project was completed in February 2002.

FC-10 CONTINENTAL VISTA EROSION PROTECTION TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $872,000 Subdivisions located northwest of Continental Rd. and La Cañada Dr. are traversed by three drainageways. Bank erosion and over-bank flooding threatened residential structures, and bank erosion threatened Continental Road. Bank stabilization at four locations was proposed to reduce the erosion and flood hazard in this subdivision. Along the north wash, approximately 200 linear feet of placed rock riprap slope mattress protection covering an earthen berm has diverted flows away from this vulnerable area. Downstream approximately 625 linear feet of rock gabions has been placed along the channel bank. Along the middle wash, approximately 150 linear feet of placed rock riprap or gabions were needed to reinforce the bank in this area. On the south wash, approximately 600 linear feet of stacked gabions were needed to protect this steep bank. Further downstream, across La Cañada Blvd. approximately 570 feet of rock slope mattress was needed to reduce the bank erosion. The project was completed in April 2004.

90

Question 6 • Flood Control Improvements FC-11 SOUTH TUCSON 4TH AVENUE DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENTS TOTAL PROJECT COSTs: $1,000,000 Matching funds were provided for construction of storm drain improvements, in conjunction with the City of South Tucson 4th Avenue project. These projects reduced flooding in the streets and surrounding neighborhoods and improve the safety of vehicular travel. Construction of the storm drains in conjunction with the roadway improvements reduced costs and lessened the disruption in the community due to construction. The Flood Control District portion of this project was $500,000. The project was completed in November 1998.

FC-12 Fairview and Limberlost Drainage Improvements Total Project Costs: $1,991,000 Following significant upstream development in the mid-1970’s, the Fairview/Limberlost area has experienced repeated residential and roadway flooding. To address these problems, Pima County and the City of Tucson collaborated on flood control improvements that included construction of approximately 1,100 linear feet of new two barrel 8’ x 4’ box culvert storm drain along the east side of Fairview Avenue to collect and convey flows from Limberlost Drive to just south of Wetmore Road and the storm drain was extended upstream from Fairview along Limberlost and 14th Street. The new box culvert joins the existing two barrel 8’ x 4’ box culvert underneath the Tucson Auto Mall. The improvements will reduce flooding of residential structures, including single family residences and manufactured homes and travel on roadways downstream (northwest) of the intersection of Fairview and Limberlost would be made safer during rainfall events. The parties completed the project in December 2002.

FC-13 HOLLADAY AND FORREST DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENTS TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $1,331,000 Drainage improvements were needed to eliminate repeated flooding of homes in this neighborhood, located northwest of the intersection of Mission and Drexel Roads. Due to the absence of conveyance facilities, most flow occurs over the land surface and concentrates in the streets. New improvements included constructing 1) a 2-ft high, 200-ft long berm on the south side of Canada St. at Westover Ave; 2) a 25-ft wide, 1.5 ft deep, 700-ft long swale north of Canada St. and west of Westover Ave., draining east to the Dakota Wash; 3) a berm along the west side of Westover Ave. north of Drexel Rd.; and 4) a 15-ft wide, 1.5-ft deep, and 500-ft long concrete drainage channel between Westover Ave. and Forrest Ave. Other improvements included lowering the elevation of the intersection of Forrest Ave. and Holladay St.; and Holladay St. from Forrest Ave. to the Dakota Wash (approx 600 ft). Holladay St. was reconstructed as an inverted crown street, approx 36-ft wide with 8-inch high curbs. The project was completed in July 2005.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 91

Question 6 • Flood Control Improvements FC-14 TUCSON DIVERSION CHANNEL DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENTS Total Project Costs: $ 340,000 The project is located along the Tucson Diversion Channel, which extends from Wilmot Road on the east to the channel outfall at the Santa Cruz River on the west. The Tucson Diversion Channel traverses the northern boundary of Davis Monthan Air Force Base, and extends through the City of Tucson and the City of South Tucson, intercepting flows draining from the southeast and delivering them to the Santa Cruz River. Improvements to the Tucson Diversion Channel and its associated tributary drainage systems were needed to alleviate flood damage in surrounding areas. The project was constructed with Facility Management’s Kino Public Health Building. This project was completed in February 2007.

92

Question 7

Solid Waste Improvements SW-03 SAHUARITA EXPANSION Total Project Costs: $8,844,000 This project expanded the existing landfill disposal area. Work included construction of a lined disposal cell, relocated facility entrance, new entrance facilities, access road, perimeter stormwater drainage channels and retention ponds, public dropoff and recycling area, household hazardous waste station, chain link fence encompassing entire property, landscaping and screening vegetation in property buffer zone, groundwater compliance and production wells and landfill gas monitoring probes. This project was completed in September 2007.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 93

1997 Sewer System Revenue Bonds Completed Projects

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 95

Question 8

Sewer System Revenue Bonds SS-01 INA ROAD TREATMENT PLANT – Outfall Total Project Costs: $3,814,000

SS-01 INA ROAD treatment plant – WPCF Process Change TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $62,678,000

This project consisted of the design, construction and construction management of a new 66-inch diameter outfall line to replace the existing outfall line because of visual signs of structural distress and the potential for failure and the addition of emergency overflow basins for the influent flow and improvements to existing basins. The emergency overflow basins in place before this construction contract were not lined. The existing effluent discharge line passed under the Ina Road Landfill. Also, the horizontal and vertical routing of the existing outfall line had to be changed because of potential future conflicts with planned facilities. The project was completed in March 1999.

This project included the construction of facilities at the existing Ina Road Water Pollution Control Facility to increase the plant’s treatment capacity by 50 percent, from 25 million gallons/day to 37.5 million gallons/day and to enhance treatment to comply with water quality regulations and permit requirements. Subsequent to the initial Bond Improvement Plan, the following major elements were added to this Scope: a new effluent outfall pipeline to the Santa Cruz River; installation of a third centrifuge at the solid handling facility; design and construction changes in response to changing regulatory environments requiring updated and/or increased treatment capabilities (odor control, nitrogen removal and other features and associated instrumentation and controls); and on-site supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system to provide better monitoring/control of the overall treatment plant processes. Due to the magnitude of undertaking, the project was separated into three separate construction projects: Phase One – new plant Outfall; Phase Two – new headworks; and Phase Three – Process changes. The project was completed in June 2006.

SS-01 INA ROAD TREATMENT PLANT – Headworks Total Project Costs: $19,127,000 This project included the design and construction of a new Headworks. The new Headworks are capable of handling the increased design flows of 37.5 mgd. The age and hydrogen sulfide damage, and the elevation of the existing facility, made expansion of the existing Headworks not economically feasible. The new Headworks includes coarse screens, screw pumps, fine screens, grit chambers and a comprehensive odor control system. The new Headworks inlet was set at a lower elevation to relieve the surcharge from the influent interceptors. Provisions to accommodate a future expansion of the Headworks to handle 50 mgd were included in the construction. The project was completed in June 2002.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 97

Question 8 • Sewer System Revenue Bonds SS-02 GREEN VALLEY WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT UPGRADE & EXPANSION TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $17,877,000 The construction of additional facilities at the existing Green Valley wastewater treatment facility increased the capacity from 2.1 million gallons/ day to 4.1 million gallons/day. The expansion also included enhanced treatment allowing the treated effluent to be reused, recharged or discharged to the Santa Cruz River and to comply with state regulations. Subsequent to the initial Bond Improvement Plan, the following major components were added to the project: process improvements, the inclusion of solids handling facilities, odor control provisions, infrastructure to accommodate the next 2.0 mgd expansion module, and a new headworks. The original plant design envisioned that the Quail Creek development would construct off-site facilities for reclaimed water. For flexibility and economy, the Department combined the proposed off-site facilities with the treatment plant expansion, utilizing a $1.2 million contribution from Quail Creek. The new treatment train produces Class A+ water suitable for turf irrigation. The project was completed in December 2005.

SS-03 SANTA CRUZ INTERCEPTOR – PRINCE TO FRANKLIN TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $4,803,000 This project involved the planning, design and easement acquisitions for a new public sanitary interceptor sewer from Prince Road to Franklin to relieve the overcapacity Northwest Outfall Interceptor and to allow for future flow demand. The design of 21,600 feet of new 66-inch diameter and 1,525 feet of new 60-inch diameter sewer was updated based on these planning and easement acquisitions. The project relieved an existing 30-inch sewer. Subsequent to the Bond Improvement Plan, a first phase of construction—Fort Lowell Road to Grant Road—was added to the scope of this project. The project was completed in June 2005.

98

Question 8 • Sewer System Revenue Bonds SS-07 North Rillito Interceptor Total Project Costs: $390,000 The initial project phase was to evaluate the existing 10.1 miles of 21-inch to 54-inch diameter interceptor sewer, and, based on this evaluation, determine the scope of the subsequent project, along with priority reaches to receive initial design and construction attention (when additional funding is available) by either rehabilitation or augmentation. Pima County completed these detailed investigations of this interceptor, which demonstrated that the needed capacity could be obtained by reconstruction and rehabilitation work rather than augmentation. Therefore, the design and easement acquisition process has been cancelled, with remaining project funds ($2,300,000) being reallocated to SS-14: Miscellaneous Reclamation Facilities/Randolph Park.

SS-08 MARANA WASTEWATER TREATMENT FACILITY Total Project Costs: $2,501,000 The original allocation of $2 million in the 1997 Bond Authorization envisioned a smaller facility than the requirements developed in the May 2000 Marana 208 Plan Amendment. The 1997 Bond Authorization provided $2,050,000 along with System Development Funds (SDF) for; Design, Right-ofWay acquisition, and Construction. The design and construction of a new BNROD facility is being completed with an additional $10 million from the 2004 Sewer Revenue Bond Authorization and additional System Development Funds. The facility will utilize an oxidation ditch treatment process and the effluent would be suitable for reuse.

SS-09 Roger Road Sewer Rehabilitation Total project costs: $3,267,000 The Roger Road Sewer is an existing sewer interceptor that was deteriorated and was in danger of collapsing. Pima County completed rehabilitation of approximately 21,000 feet of 30-inch diameter

reinforced concrete sewer utilizing Cured-in-Place lining. This avoids the potential collapse of the existing sewer and possibly a resulting sink hole, thus averting property damage or release of untreated sewage. Annual maintenance costs will also be reduced. The project was completed in March 2001.

SS-10 ROGER ROAD ODOR CONTROL (PHASE I, II and III) TOTAL PROJECT COSTs: $4,732,000 The project activities to mitigate odors include construction of conveyance system facilities and installation of permanent dosing facilities at strategic locations to minimize the off-gassing of offensive odors. The project was divided into three phases. Phase I consisted of improvements to the existing Headworks. Phase II consisted of the design and construction of chemical dosing stations located at strategic points along the conveyance system. Phases I and II were completed in June 2004.

SS-11 ARIVACA JUNCTION WASTEWATER TREATMENT FACILITY RELIEF SEWER PHASE I TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $900,000 Total this project consists of the design and construction of a new sanitary public sewer to convey wastewater from the Arivaca Junction wastewater treatment facility to the existing Green Valley wastewater treatment facility conveyance system. The project also includes closure of the Arivaca Junction wastewater treatment facility. The project is divided into two phases. Work on phase I included 1.6 miles of new 12-inch diameter gravity sewer. The next portion to be completed is 4.5 miles of new conveyance line and the closure of Arivaca Junction wastewater treatment plant. Phase II sewer construction is dependent upon a private developer completing their portion of the construction agreement pertaining to this portion of the extension. Phase I was completed in June 2000. Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 99

Question 8 • Sewer System Revenue Bonds SS-14 RANDOLPH PARK WASTEWATER RECLAMATION FACILITY RESTORATION EXPANSION AND MODIFICATION TOTAL PROJECT COSTs: $40,358,000 This project consists of the redesign and reconstruction of the Randolph Park WWTF, increasing the treatment capacity from 1.5 mgd to 3.0 mgd. The initial Randolph Park WWTF produced Class B effluent. The new facility will produce Denitrified Class A reclaimed water. The project will provide reclaimed water for the City of Tucson Randolph Park golf course as well as County parks and facilities. In addition, construction of the new Randolph Park WRF resulted in the cancellation of a $1.6 million claim for damages by the City and an annual savings of $1.175 million by eliminating the purchase of reclaimed water from the City at $570 per acre-foot. In May 2004, during final stages of construction and while under warranty, an accident caused flooding damage. The project was completed in December 2005.

SS-15 ed pastor environmental restoration project Total project costs: $11,283,000 The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, with Wastewater Management and the Pima County Flood Control District as local sponsors, constructed an ecosystem restoration project at the Ajo Detention Basin project with 20 acres of wetlands for effluent treatment, seven acres of lakes for storage/recharge to provide reclaimed water for uses at the Kino Sports Complex, other purposes and a golf course. This project beneficially reuses effluent, thereby contributing to groundwater conservation goals and improved aquifer water quality. The effluent wetland recharge project was constructed within an existing flood control detention basin originally constructed by the Corps of Engineers in the 1960s. The Corps of Engineers contributed $5,000,000, matched by $5,000,000 in Sewer Revenue Bonds and $1,282,459 in other funding from Wastewater Management and the Flood Control District. The parties completed this project in November 2001.

100

1997 HURF Revenue Bonds Completed Projects

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 101

Transportation Improvements River Road/Thornydale Corridor: Campbell Avenue to Cortaro Farms Road Pima County constructed seven projects that complete a continuous travel corridor from River and Alvernon to Thornydale and Cortaro Farms Road. The improvements increase capacity, reduce congestion and increase safety along the corridor, and provide alternate routes to Orange Grove Road and Ina Road for east and west travel north of the Rillito River under the 1997 HURF Bond Program. The County will continue the corridor north to Linda Vista.

DOT-01 River Road, First Avenue to Campbell Avenue Total Project Costs: $21,969,000

DOT-02 Sunrise Drive, Swan Road to Craycroft Road Total Project Costs: $15,305,000

Pima County widened and realigned the existing River Road between First Avenue and just east of Campbell Avenue, with a four-lane divided roadway with landscape median, multi-use lanes, outside curbs, storm drains, pedestrian facilities, noise barriers where warranted and additional landscaping. The right-of-way will support future expansion to six lanes, if warranted. In addition, Pima County reconstructed traffic signals at Via Entrada and Campbell Avenue, installed new culverts and extended existing culverts under River Road to carry drainage from the foothills to the Rillito River. The project was completed in November 2002.

Pima County widened Sunrise Drive along its existing alignment from the Swan Road intersection to west of Craycroft Road, including two travel lanes in each direction, multi-use lanes, outside curbs and storm drains, landscaping, provision for pedestrian facilities and noise barriers where warranted. The project will reduce congestion and enhance safety along Sunrise Drive. The project was completed in June 2003.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 103

Transportation Improvements DOT-03 River Road, La Cholla Boulevard to La Cañada Drive Total Project Costs: $4,630,000

DOT-04 River Road, Campbell Avenue to Alvernon Way Total Project Costs: $25,588,000

Pima County replaced the existing two-lane road with a four-lane divided roadway, including a raised landscape median, two travel lanes in each direction, multi-use lanes, outside curbs, storm drains, pedestrian facilities, and landscaping. The existing box culverts were lengthened to accommodate the widened cross section and at least one additional drainage structure was built east of La Cholla Boulevard to accommodate the Citrus Wash drainage. The right-of-way and alignment supports future expansion to six lanes, if warranted. The project was completed in December 1999.

The project consisted of widening and realignment of River Road from east of Campbell Ave to the extension of Alvernon Way, east of Dodge Blvd (see DOT-5). The road cross section consisted of two through lanes in each direction with landscaped medians, left turning lanes, multi-use lanes, storm drains and landscaping. The project included improvements for transverse drainage for the Camino Real and Finger Rock Washes, as well as other smaller drainages that currently cross River Road. The project included acquisition of an open space and mitigation area between the improved River Road and the Rillito River, through the River Bend area. The project was completed in May 2007.

104

Transportation Improvements DOT-05 Alvernon Way, Ft Lowell Road to River Road Total Project Costs: $8,810,000 The project extends Alvernon Way from its existing intersection of Fort Lowell Road north and west across the Rillito River to connect to River Road at the intersection of Dodge Boulevard and Alvernon Way. The project consisted of a four-lane cross section with a median from Dodge Boulevard going east to south of the Rillito River. North of Ft. Lowell the cross section changed to a median twoway left-turn lane similar to Alvernon Way south of Fort Lowell Road. The new road includes multi-use lanes, outside curbs, storm drains, landscaping and pedestrian facilities. The project also included a new bridge across the Rillito River. Right-of-way for the project was acquired with proceeds from the 1986 Transportation bond issue. The project was completed in May 2007.

DOT-08/09 SKYLINE DRIVE, CAMPBELL AVENUE TO CHULA VISTA TOTAL PROJECT COSTs: $22,791,000 The project consisted of the reconstruction of Skyline Dr. to a more contemporary four-lane divided roadway from Chula Vista Rd to Orange Grove Rd and a six-lane roadway from Orange Grove Rd to Campbell Ave with landscape medians, paved shoulders, outside curbs and storm drains, edge landscaping, pedestrian facilities and roadway noise mitigation where warranted. The improvements enhance the safety, level of service and visual quality of Skyline Drive. Significant intersection improvements at the intersection of Skyline and Campbell are part of the construction. The project was the first in Pima County to use the design-build alternate project delivery method. Primary benefits for this project include increased capacity, improved drainage and alternate mode facilities. Safety benefits from the improvements to the alignment and sight were included in the project. The project was completed in January 2004.

DOT-10 LA CAñADA DRIVE, INA ROAD TO LAMBERT LANE TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $8,349,000 The project consisted of reconstruction and widening of La Cañada Drive between Ina Road and Lambert Lane. A cross section included a raised landscape median, two travel lanes in each direction, multi-use lanes for transit and bicycle use, outside curbs and storm drains. Right-of-way was also improved with outside landscaping and noise mitigation where warranted. Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 105

Transportation Improvements DOT-12 COUNTRY CLUB ROAD, 36TH STREET TO MILBER Total Project Costs: $12,459,000 The improvements consisted of reconstruction and widening of Country Club Road to a five-lane roadway from Ajo Way to Milber and a three-lane roadway from Ajo Way to 36th Street with multi-use lanes, outside curbs, storm drains, landscaping, and a two-way median left-turn lane and a new bridge at the Tucson Diversion Channel. Country Club Road provides access to Kino Hospital, Sam Lena Park, Kino Sports Park, and the Tucson Electric Park. The intersection of Country Club Road and Irvington Road was improved in 1996 as part of a joint City of Tucson - Pima County project to widen and reconstruct Irvington Road, Benson Highway to I-10. The project was completed in February 2008.

DOT-13 Ajo Way, Country Club Road to Alvernon Way Total Project Costs: $6,758,000 Pima County completed reconstruction and widening of existing Ajo Way from Country Club Road to Alvernon Way to a six-lane divided roadway. The project provides many benefits, including additional roadway capacity and enhanced safety, as well as new facilities such as multi-use lanes for alternate modes, storm drains, roadside and median landscaping, pedestrian facilities, improved drainage, and increased access control along Ajo Way as well as to the Kino Public Service Center. The project completes the Ajo Way corridor, from Alvernon west. The project was completed in May 2003.

DOT-14 WETMORE AND RUTHRAUFF ROADS, LA CHOLLA BLVD TO FAIRVIEW AVE TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $25,000,000 This project included the construction of four through traffic lanes, multi-use lanes, outside curbs, storm drains, landscaping, noise mitigation, utility relocation, public art and a two-way left-turn median lane. This project also included area drainage improvements and construction of one or more conveyance channels from Wetmore Road, north to the Rillito River. The project was completed in September 2005. 106

Transportation Improvements DOT-15 River Road, Thornydale Road to Shannon road Total Project Costs: $9,254,000 Pima County extended River Road from La Cholla Boulevard, west to Thornydale Road, as a four-lane divided roadway with landscape medians, multi-use lanes, outside curbs, storm drains and landscaping, neighborhood noise mitigation, and box culverts or bridge structures to carry the Pegler Wash under River Road and into the Rillito River. The right-of-way supports future expansion to six lanes, when warranted. The project was completed in November 2001.

DOT-16 River Road, Shannon Road to La Cholla Boulevard Total Project Costs: $4,947,000 Pima County extended River Road from its former terminus at La Cholla Boulevard to approximately Shannon Road, linking with the River Road, Thornydale Road to Shannon Road extension. Pima County constructed a four-lane divided roadway with landscape median, multi-use lane, outside curbs, storm drains, box culverts to carry the Nanini Wash drainage under River Road into the Rillito River, landscaping and neighborhood noise mitigation. The right-of-way supports widening to six lanes in the future, when warranted. The project was completed in May 2001.

DOT-17 VALENCIA ROAD: MARK ROAD TO CAMINO DE LA TIERRA Total Project Costs: $20,188,000 ‘This project widened Valencia Road to increase capacity and enhance safety. The roadway has four travel lanes, multi-use lanes and raised landscape median, storm drains, edge landscaping and provision for pedestrians. The project was completed in May 2008.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 107

Transportation Improvements DOT-18 CORTARO FARMS RD: UPRR CROSSING TO THORNYDALE ROAD Total Project Costs: $11,582,000 The project consisted of improving Cortaro Farms Road from the Union Pacific Railroad through the Camino De Oeste intersection by widening to four traffic lanes with paved shoulders, outside curb, gutter and sidewalk, storm drains, culverts for cross drainage and landscaping. The median treatment consisted of a raised landscape median. This project was completed in May 2007.

DOT-19 HARTMAN LANE NORTH OF CORTARO FARMS ROAD (DESIGN ONLY) TOTAL PROJECT COSTs: $127,000 The project included the design for reconstructing Hartman Lane at the Hardy Wash to provide an allweather crossing. The project design was completed in January 2003. The balance of bond allocation was transferred to DOT-18, Cortaro Farms, UPRR to Thornydale per the Town of Marana’s request.

DOT-21 Thornydale Road, Orange Grove Road to Ina Road Total Project Costs: $3,052,000 Pima County completed reconstruction and widening of Thornydale from Orange Grove to Ina to a six-lane divided road with raised median, multiuse lanes, outside curbs, landscaping, pedestrian facilities, and noise and screening walls adjacent to the residential areas east of the road This project connects with the recently completed six-lane bridge over the Cañada del Oro Wash to provide for widening of the existing box culvert carrying the Carmack Wash under Thornydale Road. The project was completed in December 1999.

108

Transportation Improvements DOT-22 Thornydale Road, Ina Road to Cortaro Farms Road Total Project Costs: $16,773,000 With the Thornydale Road project, Pima County completed the first roadway in Pima County to be constructed using environmentally sensitive design elements. Pima County reconstructed and widened the roadway to a four-lane divided roadway with multi-use lanes, sidewalks, curbs, storm drains, and culvert structures to carry drainage under Thornydale Road. This project also included the construction of a major trunk sewer. Improvements on design during construction resulted in revisions to the County’s Roadway Design Manual and development of Environmentally Sensitive Roadway Design Guidelines. A native plant preservation and salvage program, developed for this project, has become a requirement for all roadway projects. Several innovations implemented during this project reduced adverse impacts to surrounding businesses and residents by improving traffic circulation patterns and public information during construction. The project was completed in June 2003.

DOT-25 I-19 SB FRONTAGE ROAD AT CONTINENTAL ROAD Total Project Costs: $3,195,000 The project realigned the west side Frontage Road to connect with the intersection of Continental Road at Continental Plaza. The project provided additional separation between the west side frontage road and the I-19 on and off ramps in order to improve safety and allow for future signalization of the ramp intersections. The project consisted of a new two-lane frontage road heading south from Continental Road on a new alignment and connecting with the existing frontage road approximately 1,000 feet south of Continental Road. Provision for the connection was included in the design as well as upgrades to the traffic signal at Continental Plaza. This project was completed in April 2007.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 109

Transportation Improvements DOT-26 ABREGO DRIVE AT I-19 NORTHBOUND FRONTAGE ROAD TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: completed by adot This project was completed by Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT). The project was connected with a developer-delegated project to extend Abrego Drive south from Nogales Highway (B-19) to Duval Road. This project provided additional funding for the revision of the existing Frontage Road intersection with Abrego Drive to allow for a greater operational flexibility of the I-19 Duval Mine Road interchange. ADOT completed the project in March 2006.

DOT-30 CATALINA HIGHWAY, TANQUE VERDE ROAD TO HOUGHTON ROAD TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $9,076,000 This project consisted of the widening of Catalina Highway between the Tucson City Limits and Houghton Road to a three-lane section. The roadway section consists of a single 12-foot wide travel lane in each direction, a 14-foot wide two-way left turn lane in the center, plus a 6-foot wide paved shoulder and a 4-foot to 8-foot wide graded shoulder on each side. The project also consisted of a 1700-foot long realignment of Harrison Road, a 1500-foot long realignment of Prince Road and intersection improvements at the remaining side streets. In addition to the above, the project included drainage upgrades, landscaping, public art, roadway and intersection striping, Tucson Water modifications and other incidental work.

DOT-33 Kolb Road at Sabino Canyon Road Total Project Costs: $6,403,000 Pima County completed widening and realignment of the Sabino Canyon Road/Kolb Road intersection, including widening Sabino Canyon Road from north of Old Sabino Canyon Road, the current end of the fourlane roadway, through the Kolb Road intersection, and signalization of the intersection. Pima County also reconstructed and lengthened the culvert carrying Ventana Wash under Kolb Road north of Sabino Canyon Road and completed improvements to the Ventana Wash channel to retain the 100 year flow. The project will reduce congestion and enhance safety along Kolb and Sabino Canyon Roads. The project was completed in March 2002.

110

Transportation Improvements DOT-35 Abrego Drive at Drainageway No. 1/Box Culvert Total Project Costs: $150,000 With this project, Pima County provided additional funding to the Town of Sahuarita for the construction of a box culvert to carry Abrego Drive over Drainageway No. 1 north of existing Duval Road. The box culvert allows for the connection of Abrego Drive all the way north to Nogales Highway (B-19). The connections of Abrego Drive north and south of the Drainageway allows for the existing northbound I-19 frontage road north of Duval Road to be relocated or abandoned as this new connection provides access to all existing development south of Duval Road that currently has access via the frontage road. The Town completed this project in December 1998.

DOT-38 Pistol Hill Road, Colossal Cave Road to Old Spanish Trail Total Project Costs: $1,713,000 Pima County constructed Pistol Hill Road as a twolane road with improved shoulders, on right-of-way the County acquired from the State Land Department. The new roadway provides for additional connections in the east end of the Rincon Valley, allowing traffic to detour around the Colossal Cave Park area and providing an alternate to the most seriously geometrically constrained sections of Colossal Cave Road and Old Spanish Trail. The project was completed in May 1999.

DOT-39 Valencia Road, I -19 to South 12th Avenue Total Project Costs: $1,262,000 The original project scope in the bond ordinance included the widening of Valencia Road at South 12th Avenue, provision of multi-use lanes, drainage improvements, sidewalks, arterial street lighting and safety improvements. At the request of the City of Tucson and Arizona Department of Transportation, Pima County reduced the project scope to the widening of the intersection of Valencia Road and South 12th Avenue to tie into the City’s project to the north and ADOT’s project to the west. The project was completed in December 2001.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 111

Transportation Improvements DOT-41 NEIGHBORHOOD TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENTS TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $678,000 Constructed improvements to neighborhood streets, including but not limited to sidewalks, street lighting, neighborhood traffic mitigation measures, street paving and ADA pedestrian improvements. The project was completed in November 2008.

DOT-42 South Tucson, 6th Avenue and Various Locations Total Project Costs: $5,191,000 Under an intergovernmental agreement with the City of South Tucson, Pima County reconstructed existing roadways, improved area drainage and improved connections to the 6th Avenue corridor. The project provided multiple benefits, including improvements to the street frontage to enhance alternate modes use as well as improve the urban design features of this main roadway through South Tucson; improved circulation and access within South Tucson particularly during wet weather; and reduced maintenance costs on many of the streets in the community. The project was completed in December 2002.

DOT-43 12th Avenue, 38th Street to Los Reales Road Total Project Costs: $10,741,000 Pima County is completing this project in phases, at the request of the City of Tucson. In the first phase, completed in May 2003, Pima County widened the existing roadway from Los Reales Rd. to Valencia Lerdo to four lanes with a raised landscaped median, multi-use lanes, curb and gutter, storm drains, pedestrian facilities, public art and street lights. The second phase, completed in May 2007, was the construction of the 44th Street Gateway Intersection.

DOT-45 La Cholla Boulevard, river road to Magee Road Total Project Costs: $26,242,000 Pima County has completed construction on La Cholla Blvd: River Road to Magee Road, widening the existing roadway to six-lanes with a raised landscaped median, multi-use lanes, curb and gutter, storm drains, pedestrian facilities, public art and noise mitigation. The project was completed in September 2005.

112

Transportation Improvements DOT-46 CRAYCROFT ROAD: RIVER ROAD TO SUNRISE DRIVE Total Project Costs: $31,944,000 The project improved the old two-lane roadway to a four-lane divided roadway with paved shoulders, bicycle travel accommodations, a continuous ADA pedestrian pathway, and equestrian access to the Craycroft Wash and the Rillito River. It includes landscaped medians and shoulders and also public art features at various locations along the corridor. The improvements start just south of River Road and continue north thru Sunrise Drive including the two major intersections at River Road and Sunrise Drive. This project has eliminated a number of unsafe conditions that existed with the old roadway, improved drainage, and was built using Pima County’s Environmentally Sensitive Roadway Design Guidelines. It was funded by 1997 Transportation Bond Funds, local Impact Fees, and both County and regional HURF monies. The project was completed in May 2008 and dedicated on June 4, 2008.

DOT-47 Sunrise Drive: Craycroft to Kolb (Intersection Only) Total Project Costs: $6,995,000 The project completed the intersection of Sunrise Drive and Craycroft Road. This is a portion of the larger, Sunrise: Craycroft to Kolb project to widen Sunrise Drive to four lanes with multi-use lanes, drainage improvements, landscaping and neighborhood screening and noise mitigation as warranted. The intersection portion of the project was completed in December 2007.

DOT-49 Valencia Road / Mission Rd. to I-19 Total Project Costs: $12,528,000 The project widened Valencia Road from four to six lanes between Mission Road and the freeway interchange. The interchange was widened under a separate project by Arizona Department of Transportation. The existing Santa Cruz River bridge was built to accommodate a six-lane roadway and was retained with this project. Project included multi-use lanes, curbs, storm drains, landscaping and provisions for pedestrians. The project was completed in November 2007.

DOT-51 LA CAñADA/LAS QUINTAS HIGHWAY DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENTS (FC-07) TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $1,527,000 (DOT portion) The project consisted of transverse and parallel drainage improvements along La Cañada Drive and Las Quintas Highway to provide improved roadway drainage, to alleviate ponding and drainage diversions within existing neighborhoods and to increase roadway safety. The project was completed in November 2005. Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 113

Transportation Improvements DOT-52 PALO VERDE RD, GAS ROAD TO 44TH STREET TOTAL PROJECT COSTS: $1,459,000 The project overlayed the existing Palo Verde Road including multi-use lanes and bus stop pull outs. It provided an improved ride for the motorist. The project was completed in January 2006.

DOT-54 MT. LEMMON SHUTTLE Total Project Costs: $2,354,000 The project was developed to support future public transportation facilities at Summerhaven, including a proposed tram system and local shuttle service, and to accommodate the anticipated traffic at the new Village Center, Sabino Canyon Parkway. Improvements included roadway realignment, drainage facilities, environmental mitigation, improved pedestrian access and parking. This project was completed in December 2006.

DOT-55 Golf Links Road, Bonanza Avenue to Houghton Road Total Project Costs: $2,701,000 Under an intergovernmental agreement with the City of Tucson, Pima County funded design and construction of widening 0.5 miles of Golf Links Road to four lanes with a raised landscape median, multi-use lanes, curbs, storm drains, outside landscaping and other urban street features. This project links with improvements recently completed by the City of Tucson on Golf Links from Pantano to Bonanza. The improvements increase capacity and safety of the roadway, define and better control access to abutting properties, and reduce congestion and enhance safety along Golf Links Road. The project was completed in July 2002.

114

Transportation Improvements DOT-57 Safety Improvements The HURF Revenue Bonds include $19 million for presently undesignated safety improvements that would be implemented over the course of the bond program. Projects to be funded under this category are traffic safety improvements. The Department of Transportation publishes annual reports on the traffic accident and safety condition of the unincorporated roadway system. Improvements to be funded with bonds could include traffic signal installations, corrections of offset intersections, installation of left turn lanes, minor improvements to horizontal and vertical alignments to improve sight distance and maintain vehicle control, and similar types of specifically targeted safety projects. Safety projects will be proposed to the Board of Supervisors biannually to be funded from the sale of bonds. Specific projects will be selected by the Board of Supervisors for incorporation into the annual Capital Improvement Program. Jensen Road - Magee Turn Lanes (4TJENM) Project Cost: $333,000 The project aligned Jensen Road (north/south) and widened Magee Road for a center lane and was completed in January 2000. Conestoga/Tanque Verde East Bound Left Turn Lane (4TCNGA) Project Cost: $131,000 The project widened the roadway to install a left turn lane and was completed in January 1999. La Cañada/Trader Lane Pedestrian Crossing Flashing Beacons & Signs (4LCTLN) Project Cost: $36,000 The project installed a pedestrian flashing beacon and was completed in January 1999. Lumber Street/Union Pacific Railroad Crossing Roadway Improvement (4LSUPR) Project Cost: $38,000 The project rebuilt a short roadway segment and installed gate flashers and bells and was completed in March 2000.

Curtis Road & La Cholla Blvd Traffic Signals (4CULCB) Project Cost: $280,000 The project installed a traffic signal and added a right turn lane on Curtis Road and was completed in April 2001. La Cholla/Sonoran Terrace Apartments Turn Lanes (4LCBST) Project Cost: $110,000 The project added a center turn lane on La Cholla Boulevard and was completed in February 2001. Magee/Mona Lisa West Bound Left Turn Lane (4MAMLR) Project Cost: $172,000 The project added a left turn lane on Magee Road and was completed in June 2001. River Road to Swan Road Geometry & Traffic Signal Modifications (4RISWA) Project Cost: $271,000 The project widened the west leg of River Road to provide a right turn lane and was completed in February 2001.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 115

Transportation Improvements DOT-57 Safety Improvements (con’t) Safety Management Systems and Program Development (4SMSPD) Project Cost: $799,000 The project planned and designed procedures and guidelines to establish priority-driven projects based on certain safety criteria and was completed in June 2001. Ina Road/Shannon Road Geometry & Traffic Signal Modifications (4INSHA) Project Cost: $19,000 The project improved the traffic signal at this intersection and was completed in April 2002. Kolb Road to Valencia Road Geometry & Traffic Signal Modifications (4KOVAL) Project Cost: $604,000 The project modified the southbound right turn lane signal and was completed in March 2002. Alvernon/Hughes Access Road (4ALHGS) Project Cost: $176,000 The project widened the road at the curve (Hughes access/Alvernon) and installed traffic control devices, and was completed in March 2002. Drexel Road & Mission Road Upgrade Traffic Signal Installation (4DRMIS) Project Cost: $128,000 The project reconstructed a traffic signal at this intersection and was completed in February 2003. La Cholla Blvd and Rudasill Road Traffic Signal (4LCBRR) Project Cost: $117,000 The project installed a temporary traffic signal to control traffic flow at this intersection and was completed in September 2002.

116

Palo Verde Lighting Project (4PVLTS) Project Cost: $298,000 The project installed street lights on Palo Verde from Irvington to Ajo (phase I) and street lights on Palo Verde from Benson Hwy to Mossman (phase II). The project was completed in April 2003. Sunrise - Sabino Canyon Traffic Signal (4SUNSC) Project Cost: $150,000 The project installed a traffic signal at the intersection and was completed in July 2003. Drexel - Palo Verde Intersection Traffic Signal (4DRPVR) Project Cost: $191,000 The project constructed a traffic signal at the intersection of Drexel and Palo Verde. The project was completed in April 2003. Camino de Oeste, Tetakusim to Los Reales/Pascua Yaqui to Camino de Oeste Realignment & Turn Lane (4PYCDO) Project Cost: $543,000 The project widened and added turn lanes for Camino de Oeste and was completed in December 2003. Ajo Intersection Lighting (4ASARR) Project Cost: $15,000 The project installed dusk to dawn lights to improve safety and was completed in January 2004.

Transportation Improvements DOT-57 Safety Improvements (con’t) Ina Road and Camino de la Tierra – Additional Traffic Control Appurtenances (4ICATR) Project Cost: $2,000 The project improved the visibility of the existing traffic signal by installing additional signal heads and was completed in July 2003.

Silverbell Road and Sweetwater Intersection Signal (4SVSWT) Project Cost: $247,000 The project consisted of installing a traffic signal at the intersection and modifying signing and striping. The project was completed in December 2004.

Ina Road and Mona Lisa Road - Additional Traffic Control Appurtenances (4INAML) Project Cost: $2,000 The project improved the visibility of the existing traffic signal by installing additional signal heads and was completed in July 2003.

Square Tube Breakaway Sign Posts (4STBSP) Project Cost: $331,000 The project replaced existing U-channels signposts with the new Square Tube Breakaway Posts County wide. PC Sign Shop will perform the work on a routine basis as they maintain and install signs in the field. The project was completed in June 2005.

Sandario Road at Emigh Road (4SANEM) Project Cost: $51,000 Exclusive turn lanes were constructed to improve traffic flow. The project was built in coordination with an IGA with the Town of Marana for cost sharing. The project was completed in March 2002. Skyline Drive Widening Improvement (4DBSAF) Project Cost: $1,500,000 The project improved the traffic flow in conjunction with the Skyline Road project, DOT-09. This portion of the project was completed in June 2003.

River Rd at Pontatoc Rd Signal and Realignment (4RVTOC) Project Cost: $920,000 The project installed a traffic signal and realigned the intersection’s approaches. The improvement included the widening of River Rd and Pontatoc Rd to provide for turning movement lanes as well as constructing about 300 feet of roadway into Mehl Foothills Park. The project was completed in June 2005.

Camino de la Tierra at Valencia Traffic Signal (4CDLTV) Project Cost: $84,000 The project installed a traffic signal and was completed in February of 2004. Kinney Road and Sanderio Road Drainage and Straightening (4KNSAN) Project Cost: $441,000 The project consisted of constructing a box culvert for drainage and straightening a dip section in the roadway. The project was completed in November 2004. Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 117

Transportation Improvements DOT-57 Safety Improvements (con’t) Picture Rocks at Van Ark Intersection Analysis (4PICAK) Project Cost: $8,000 The project widened the roadway at this location to deter speeding drivers from running off the road while negotiating a horizontal curve at the intersection. The project was completed in June 2005. blank page Cardinal-Drexel Intersection Improvements (4CADRX) Project Cost: $751,000 The project installed a traffic signal and provided turn lanes for all four approaches. Also, the improvement to the intersection included the realignment of the north-south Cardinal Avenue approaches. The project was completed in July 2005.

Abrego Drive – Continental Road Geometry & Traffic Signal Installation (4ABCON) Project Cost: $1,275,000 The project was completed in February 2005. Campbell Avenue Lighting/Sidewalk Improvements (4CASLS) Project Cost: $35,000 The project was completed in January 2005. Duval Mine Road/Rio Altar Left Turn Lane (4DMRRA) Project Cost: $190,000 The project was completed in September 2004. Ina Road – Silverbell Road (Town of Marana) Geometry & Traffic Signal Installation (4INSIL) Project Cost: $65,000 The project was completed in March 2002. Pima County Transportation Illumination Project (4LIGHT) Project Cost: $40,000 The project was completed in October 2003.

Magee & Thornydale Traffic Signal (4MAGTH) Project Cost: $297,000 The project installed a traffic signal at the intersection with all the needed turning lanes. The project was completed in August 2005.

118

Mark Road & Valencia Road Traffic Signal (4MRVAL) Project Cost: $100,000 The project was completed in November 2003.

Transportation Improvements DOT-57 Safety Improvements (con’t) Tanque Verde Road/Tanque Verde Loop Left Turn Lane (4TVDLP) Project Cost: $577,000 The project involved the widening of Tanque Verde Road to a three-lane cross section between Tanque Verde Loop Road and Rebecca Avenue. The widening included the installation of a westbound left turn lane at Tanque Verde Loop Road and the reconstruction of two drainage facilities. The project was completed in January 2006.

Shannon Road & Overton Road Traffic Signal (4SHAOV) Project Cost: $744,000 This project widened all 4 lanes to include left turn lanes, and installed a new traffic signal. The project was completed in February 2006. La Cholla/Hospital Drive Traffic Signal (4LCHOS) Project Cost: $130,000 This project installed a new traffic signal and was completed in May 2005. Camino Casa Verde & La Cañada Traffic Signal (4CCVLC) Total Project Costs: $947,000 This project was completed in December 2006.

Gates Pass Rock Removal (4GATES) Project Cost: $674,000 The project included the removal of two sections of rock outcroppings and a 4-foot widening of Gates Pass Road for a length of 2,400 feet. The project was completed in December 2005. Nogales Highway and Hughes Access Road Traffic Signal (4NOGHU) Total Project Costs: $228,000 This project was completed in May 2007.

Completed Projects Report June 2009 • 119

Transportation Improvements DOT-57 Safety Improvements (con’t) Railroad Crossing: Contractors Way and Illinois Street (4CWIRX) Total Project Costs: $6,000 This project was completed in September 2007. Orange Grove/Silverbell Intersection Improvements (4OGSBI) Total Project Costs: $1,358,000 The project improved the safety of this intersection realigning Orange Grove Road to be perpendicular to Silverbell Road and cutting the adjacent hill in order to provide the appropriate sight distance for both safety and operational benefit. This project was completed in November 2008. Sunset/Sunray Intersection Improvements (4SSSRI) Total Project Costs: $1,355,000 The project improved the safety of the intersection by lowering the crest vertical curve on Sunset Road in order to provide the appropriate sight distance for both safety and operational benefit. This project was completed in February 2009.

120