C I T Y O F O S K A L O O S A

C I T Y O F O S K A L O O S A

          C I T Y   O F   O S K A L O O S A   FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT    TABLE OF CONTENTS:  CITY OFFICIALS  3  CLERK/FINANCE  4  EDMUNDSO...

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          C I T Y   O F   O S K A L O O S A   FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

  TABLE OF CONTENTS:  CITY OFFICIALS 



CLERK/FINANCE 



EDMUNDSON GOLF 

18 

FIRE 

19 

PARKS MAINTENANCE 

27 

POLICE 

28 

PUBLIC WORKS 

42 

PUBLIC LIBRARY  

48 

WASTEWATER 

57 

 

 

The City of Oskaloosa is the county seat of Mahaska County, Iowa, United States of America.  Oskaloosa derives its name from Ousca‐ loosa who according to town lore was a Creek princess who married Seminole chief Osceola. It means "last of the beautiful."  According  to  the  2010  census  the  city’s  population  increased  to  11,436,  a 500  person  increase  since  2000  and  one  of  the  rural  communities  in  Iowa to see an increase in population.  The City of Oskaloosa has a Mayor‐City Council‐City Manager form of government under a Home  Rule Charter. The Mayor and City Council are elected. The City Council is composed of seven members who have the responsibility of  making policy decisions regarding rules and regulations pertaining to Oskaloosa.      The Mayor is elected for a two‐year term and Council Members are elected to serve for four years. The City Manager, City Attorney and  City Clerk/Finance Director  are appointed by the City Council.  

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 2 

CITY OFFICIALS CONTACT LIST ‐ CITY COUNCIL  January 2010   

         Name 

Position 

Term Ends        Home Address 

            Telephone  

   Email 

David Krutzfeldt 

Mayor 

Dec. 2011 

2415 McMullin Dr. 

673‐7909(H) 

673‐5000(W) 

[email protected] 

Aaron Ver Steeg 

1st Ward 

Dec. 2013 

412 North C Street 

672‐2132(H) 

 

[email protected] 

Tom Jimenez  

2nd Ward  

Dec. 2011 

1903 Edmundson Dr. 

676‐1753(H) 

673‐4151(W) 

[email protected] 

Doug Yates 

3rd Ward 

Dec. 2013 

2015 South 5th 

676‐3214(H) 

673‐2905(W) 

[email protected] 

 

Pamela J. Blomgren*     4th Ward       Dec. 2011 

305 North 10th Street      673‐3802(H)      673‐7533(W)        [email protected] 

Scottie Moore 

Dec. 2013 

1902 North Park 

673‐6150(H) 

 

[email protected] 

th

At Large 

Lori Smith 

At Large 

Dec. 2011 

1406 15  Avenue West 

673‐9906(H) 

673‐3100(W) 

[email protected] 

Tom Walling 

At Large 

Dec. 2013 

1604 Carbonado Rd. 

673‐4966(H) 

673‐8479(W) 

[email protected] 

  City Council Committees  Finance: Blomgren (Chairperson), Ver Steeg, Jimenez  Public Safety: Smith (Chairperson), Walling, Moore  Planning: Yates (Chairperson), Moore, Blomgren  Public Projects: Jimenez (Chairperson), Walling, Yates    * Mayor Pro Tem 

CITY OFFICIALS CONTACT LIST ‐ CITY STAFF   

Michael Schrock   City Manager 

        673‐9431(W) 

[email protected] 

Amy Miller 

City Clerk 

        673‐9431(W)  

[email protected] 

David Dixon 

City Attorney 

        673‐9481(W) 

[email protected]   

Akhilesh Pal 

City Engineer 

        673‐7472(W) 

[email protected] 

Laura Russell 

Interim CD Director      673‐8361(W) 

[email protected] 

Mark Neff 

Fire Chief 

        673‐3541(W) 

[email protected] 

John McGee 

Police Chief 

        672‐2559(W)                     [email protected] 

Wanda Gardner 

Library Director          673‐0441(W) 

David Neubert

Wastewater Director   673‐5433(W)                     [email protected] 

   

[email protected] 

INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT & MAINTENANCE

ITEM DESCRIPTION/STATUS

a. Pavement Preservation Program

ISU contract should be sent to staff in May. Work would be completed and forwarded to the City in January/February 2011.

b. Green Street Improvements

$100K contract with Garden to design and manage construction. Working to resolve recreation trail alignment with design. +$1 million in FY2011 budget for construction.

c. Mable Street Project

Council consensus to remove street improvements and focus on drainage only. City Manager to follow up on funding source.

d. Public Works - Street Shop Improvements

Grant awarded to the city, will begin to make improvements to the shop in July 2010.

COMMUNITY PLANNING & REDEVELOPMENT

ITEM DESCRIPTION/STATUS

a. Annexation of Lacey Complex Area

Council directed City Manager to initiate the annexation process. Staff is meeting on 04/22 to discuss next steps and assignments.

b. Skate & Bike Park

Public Projects Committee recommended MCRF seek public input. Input meeting scheduled for May 4th @ 6:30 - Smokey Row.

c. Comprehensive Plan Update

Staff to report on implementation plan. Council requested to review the Comp Plan during work sessions and see if the Plan is still workable - readopt sections as necessary.

d. 3rd Avenue East & Early Childhood Learning Center

Council adopted resolution of support to plan 3rd Avenue East. City Manager to contact University Park.

e. Sanitiation Service Providers

Study options for sanitation services in Oskaloosa. Will require a lot of work and contact with the public. Get to this if possible.

f. Highway 63 Bypass Coalition

Phase I DRAFT completed, application submitted for federal earmark. NEPA study = $400K. Trip scheduled for May 4th - 5th.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

ITEM STATUS/DESCRIPTION

a. Economic Development Policies & Strategies

Develop a more comprehensive policy agenda to sit down and review with the Chamber, and Development Groups (MCDG, ODD).

b. Mall Redevelopment Plan

To be discussed at a future Planning Committee meeting. Date to be determined.

INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELATIONSHIPS (CITY/COUNTY/SCHOOL DISTRICT)

ITEM STATUS/DESCRIPTION

a. Inventory ALL 28E Agreements

Staff is currently reviewing existing files. Will report back to Council by end of Fiscal Year 2010.

b. Leverage Local, State and Federal Representatives

Set legislative agenda in advance of next year's Legislative Session.

c. Identify and Examine Areas to Share Resources

Includes: Information Technology, Public Works, Equipment, Office Space - use 3rd party consultant to perform review (ICMA).

PUBLIC SAFETY & AWARENESS a. Residential Rental Inspection Program

ITEM STATUS/DESCRIPTION Model program to maintain the public's safety and to enhance the level of residential rental properties within Oskaloosa.

FINANCE & HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

ITEM STATUS/DESCRIPTION

a. Franchise Fee Review – Gas & Electric

Current rate is .2%. Law allows an increase up to 5%. $850,000 of unrealized revenue could be achieved. What would public think?

b. Local Option Sales Tax Review & Discussion

Meeting held with parties, reports to be created & distributed. Payoff in 2013.

c. Information Technology Plan

Work underway by staff. Quick steps for change due on the 15th, but this is just the beginning of the review citywide. Use volunteer committee for input

d. Develop Capital Improvement Plan

Determine priority projects, needs and funding sources.

e. Financial Management System Update

Consultants pushed "go live" date back to September. Currently the install is beginning to take place.

f. Revised Budget Book

Create an easy to use budget document. Information not readily accessible in current financial management system.

g. Procurement Policy

More than just the simple 3-4 levels of authority - more specificity.

h. Sucession Planning

Review existing staffing and projected retirements across the organization. Identify where cross training can occur. DEVELOP A PLAN.

i. Compensation and Salary Plan

Not funded in FY2011, but this needs to be done within the next 1-3 years.

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 4 

CITY CLERK/FINANCE DEPARTMENT 

The  City  Clerk‐Finance  Department  is  located  in  the  Oskaloosa  City  Hall.    The  Department  is  responsible  for  maintaining  the  official  records  and  finance  records  of  the  City  under  the  direction  of  the  City  Clerk‐Finance  Director.  The Deputy City Clerk, is responsible for General Ledger, Accounts Payable and Accounts Receivable.   The Payroll/HR Clerk is responsible for Payroll and Human Resource support and services for the city.    The  department  maintains  the  central  accounting  system  for  the  City.    Payments  and  receipts  for  all  depart‐ ments, projects and grants are processed through this department.  This includes the Library and Airport which  have their own boards.  Payroll for all departments is also prepared along with human resource functions. 

Oskaloosa City Hall 

 

In  addition,  the  department  is  responsible  for  preserving  the  public  record,  such  as  ordinances,  resolutions,  contracts, deeds and easements.  They coordinate and update the City Code, issue license and permits, main‐ tain insurance files and publish notices.  Maintaining accurate records is a vital function of this office. 

CITY CLERK/FINANCE DEPARTMENT ‐ FULL TIME STAFF   

EMPLOYEE 

 

POSITION 

 

HIRE DATE 

Amy Miller 

 

City Clerk/Finance Director   

09/09/1992 

Pamela Nimitz 

 

Deputy City Clerk   

01/25/2010 

               Kim Weiss   

 

               Payroll/HR Clerk       

 

               05/04/2009 

As all employees in the City Clerk/Finance Department have been in their current positions for two years or less, training remains a vital  factor.  During FY 2011 the following training was completed by the department:  Amy Miller:  Courses through the Iowa Municipal Professionals Institute:  Iowa City Budgeting System, Capital Planning and Budgeting,  Public Funds Investing, Bonding Administration, Accounting, Auditing and Other Fiscal Responsibilities and General Ledger Accounting.   

     Certifications received:  Designated as Iowa Certified Municipal Clerk (September 2010) 

 

 

 

              Iowa Certified Municipal Finance Director (February 2011) 

  Pamela Nimtz:  Courses through the Iowa Municipal Professionals Institute:  Elements of a City Financial System, Working with Public  Officials and Working with Citizens.    Kim Weiss:  Courses through the Iowa Municipal Professionals Institute:  Risk Management, Administrative Law and Procedures, Negoti‐ ating Strategies, and Basics of a City Personnel System.   

     Courses through Indian Hills Community College:  Essentials of Human Resource Management (Developed by SHRM) 

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 5 

CITY CLERK/FINANCE DEPARTMENT ‐ RECORD KEEPING 

Minutes, resolutions, ordinances, agreements and other legal documents are maintained  in the City Clerk’s office.  There were 24 regular City Council meetings, two special City  Council Meetings, eight Council Work Sessions, seven Finance Committee meetings, one  Public  Project  Meetings,  and  two  Enterprise  Zone  Committee  meetings  last  fiscal  year.   The City Council adopted 19 ordinances and 91 resolutions. 

The City Clerk/Finance Department is also responsible for publication of City Council  minutes, ordinances, required financial reporting and public hearings in the Oskaloosa  Herald.  In FY 2011 the City Clerk/Finance Department submitted 19 ordinances and 30  public hearing notices for publications.  The department also submitted budgeting and  fiscal year end reporting to the Oskaloosa Herald for publication.  Records of these publi‐ cations are maintained in the department. 

This fiscal year the City Clerk/Finance Department continued to scan agendas, minutes and resolutions for secure storage via  Imagetek on the Radix Portal.  Radix is a web‐based service that allows content storage and versioning as well as secure and  audited retrieval.  The City Council minutes and resolutions can be publically accessed via the City’s website  (www.oskaloosaiowa.org) back to the year 1947; council agendas are available for 2009, 2010 and 2011.  Council agendas are  posted the Friday before the Monday City Council meeting and can be accessed for five years on‐line.  Current minutes and  resolutions are scanned and uploaded following receipt after each Council meeting and various committee meetings.  Newly  adopted  ordinances are also scanned to the website and maintained there until the supplemental pages are published for the  City’s Municipal Code.   The department also began using Radix  to store forms for employees’ use.  City employees are  able to access  federal  and state forms, as well as the employee handbook.  A training session  was held by Pamela Nimtz, which instructed City employees on the use of the Radix system on  the web.  Future uses for  Radix include tracking Capital Improvement projects through the City  Clerk/Finance Department  and the Engineering Department.  The  City’s  Municipal  Code  is  also  located  on  the  City’s  website  for  public  access  via  the  Muni‐ code.com web service.  The on‐line City Code is updated three times a year following adoption of  ordinances by the City Council. 

CITY CLERK/FINANCE DEPARTMENT ‐ PUBLIC RECORDS REQUEST  In June 2010 the City Council passed Resolution 10‐06‐34 to adopt a Public Records Request policy.  The City Clerk/ Finance Department processed 17 Public Record Requests this fiscal year.  The policy and request form can be found on  the City’s website at www.oskaloosaiowa.org.   

 

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 6 

CITY CLERK/FINANCE DEPARTMENT ‐ EMPLOYEE NEWSLETTER  On January 7, 2011 the first City of Oskaloosa Employee newsletter was dis‐ tributed to all employees with their paychecks.  The quarterly newsletter is a  tool used to communicate regularly with employees.  As our departments are  spread throughout the city, this helps all departments understand  how we all  work together.  Each  newsletter includes quarterly anniversaries for all full  and part‐time employees, a department spotlight feature and highlights vari‐ ous city activities.  Some activities included in the newsletter this year were  Bike to Work Week, the Annual Toy Drive through the Police Department and  the up‐coming  Library Garden project. 

CITY CLERK/FINANCE DEPARTMENT ‐ TECHNOLOGY  Beginning in September 2010, the City Clerk/Finance Department upgraded their  computer equipment to begin use of new financial software.  Tyler Technology VX is  a windows‐based program that offers better reporting capabilities, project manage‐ ment programs and more flexible access to account and financial information.  After  converting prior fiscal year  information and training on the new software, the City  Clerk/Finance Department has begun to utilize the new features of this program.    Working through several growing pains, the department  has learned much about   this new software and hopes to make the most of all  features of VX.  The goal for FY 2012 is to utilize the on‐line Purchasing program in VX throughout all  departments in the city.  This will entail a new purchasing program and training of  departments.  This new process should streamline the purchasing process and help  departments track expenses more closely. 

CITY CLERK/FINANCE DEPARTMENT ‐ PARK SHELTER RESERVATIONS  The  City  Clerk/Finance  Department  assumed  responsibility  for  Park  Shelter  reservations  in  the  Spring  of  2011.    From  January  1,  2011  through  June  30,  2011  118  shelter  reservations  were  made  through  the  department.    Total  park  shelter  rentals  for  FY  2011  were  $4,235.   The office also follows up on reservation payments and prepares the information for posting   in the shelters.  The City Clerk/Finance Department is reviewing  options for using a comput‐ erized reservation program, as well as reducing the amount of paperwork  required to com‐ plete a reservation.   

 

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 7 

CITY CLERK/FINANCE DEPARTMENT ‐ LICENSING  During  the  fiscal  year  12  transient  merchant  licenses,   five  solicitor’s  permits,  seven solid  waste hauler's  licenses,    43  beer and liquor licenses and 20 cigarette permits were issued.  The chart below shows the revenue from these licenses/ permits for the past five fiscal years. 

License/Permit Types 

FY 2011 

FY 2010 

FY 2009 

FY 2008 

FY 2007 

Transient Merchant/Solicitors/Peddler's Licenses 

$857 

$599 

$925 

$482 

$321 

Solid Waste Licenses 

$900 

$950 

$800 

$1,300 

$400 

$14,280 

$15,258 

$11,155 

$18,553 

$1,433 

$1,350 

$1,500 

$1,500 

$2,175 

$1,669 

Alcohol Permits  Cigarette Permits 

CITY CLERK/FINANCE DEPARTMENT ‐ TAX ABATEMENT  City Council approved nine applications for residential tax abatements.  No applications were filed for indus‐ trial tax abatement.  Due to tax value and rollback information not yet available, the City Clerk/Finance De‐ partment currently does not know the total dollar amount of tax abatements for FY 2011.  The chart below  shows the total tax abatements for the past four years. 

Tax Abatements  Total Urban  Revitalization Amount 

FY 2007 

44.08% 

FY 2010 

45.59% 

46.91% 

48.53% 

 $     3,409,901    $     3,913,195    $     3,820,022    $     3,910,675  

City Tax Rate (per $1,000 of Value)  Taxes Abated 

FY 2009 

 $     7,735,710    $     8,583,450    $     8,143,300    $     8,058,430  

Rollback  Gross Taxable Value Abated 

FY 2008 

$15.03522   $          51,269  

$14.35817  

14.97533 

$56,186    $          54,837    $          58,564  

CITY CLERK/FINANCE DEPARTMENT ‐ AUDIT  The  financial  records  of  the  City  are  audited  annually  with  a  Financial  and  Compliance  Report  given  to  the  City  Council.    If  federal  grants  exceeding  $500,000  are  received  during  the  fiscal  year,  a  more  comprehensive  audit  is  required.  Federal Grants did not exceed $500,000 this fiscal year.  Office staff  gathers and compiles financial information before the arrival of the auditors.   After  closing  the  end  of  the  fiscal  year,  the  financial  reports  are  e‐mailed  to  the auditors enabling them to run tests and generate their reports.    

Two  auditors  from  Martens  &  Company,  CPA,  LLC  will  be  in  the  office  the  week of August 22, 2010 to perform the audit for FY2011.  

$14.35519 

 

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 8 

CITY CLERK/FINANCE DEPARTMENT ‐ PAYROLL & PERSONNEL  The City of Oskaloosa values employees who deliver high quality and innovative services to the community.    Our employees will be accountable to the public and will be recognized for their integrity and dedication as public servants.  During FY 2011 the City employed 58 full‐time, 23 part‐time, 59 seasonal and 67 city band members for a total of 207 employees in the  summer months.  There were five full‐time and two part‐time employees who terminated this year with five full‐time, three reserves  and three part‐time employees hired.  The city has a low turn over of full‐time employees which is illustrated by the following chart:  Department 

Full Time Employees 

Average Years of Service 

Police Department 

18 

12 

Fire Department 



13 

Library 



16 

Parks 



29 

Wastewater 



22 

Housing 



18 

Streets 



10 

City Manager 





City Clerk‐Finance 



17 

Engineering 





Building Inspector 





The following employees were recognized for their years of service at the January 3, 2011 City Council meeting:  Tim Nance (Fire Department) ‐ 30 years                Steve Watts (Streets Department)‐  30 years     Troy Boston (Police Department) ‐ 25 years  Laura Russell (Housing Department) ‐ 25 years     Marilyn Johannes (City Manager’s Office) ‐ 25 years 

Payroll is issued bi‐weekly with most employees taking advantage of automatic deposit, which is required of new employees.  The gross  payroll for the fiscal year was $ 3,016,330.  Employee benefit costs totaling $ 1,540,756 are shown below, along with two past fiscal years  for comparison.  Employee Costs 

FY 2011 

FY 2010 

FY 2009 

FICA 

$141,374  

$149,285  

$149,399  

Health Insurance                           

$870,823  

$720,925  

$882,339  

Police and Fire Retirement 

$234,058  

$189,292  

$203,506  

IPERS & ICMA 

$151,509  

$148,112  

$143,886  

Medicare 

$47,952  

$48,829  

$48,202  

Worker’s Compensation 

$41,939  

$39,816  

$48,203  

Clothing Allowances/Cell Phones  

$18,754  

$24,057  

$20,494  

Injury Insurance (Police & Fire not covered by Worker’s Compensation) 

$11,449  

$11,040  

$11,500  

Injuries (Police & Fire active and disabled member’s medical expenses) 

$7,310  

$5,092  

$12,060  

$13,255  

$1,766  

$5,904  

Life Insurance 

$1,173  

$1,198  

$1,530  

Employee Asst. Program        

$1,159  

$1,178  

$1,159  

$1,540,756   $1,340,588  

$1,528,182  

Unemployment Insurance 

Totals 

 

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 9 

The Employee Health Insurance Fund had a balance of $620,333.95  at the end of the fiscal year which is an increase of $71,833.88.  The  premiums for fiscal year 2011 increased $63 for single and $152 for family.  Single premiums were $483/month and family premiums were  $1,162/month.  Below is a five‐year comparison of the Employee Health Insurance Fund: 

Fiscal 

Single 

Year 

Premiums 

Increase/Decrease 

Family 

Increase/Decrease 

End of the Year 

Increase/Decrease 

from Previous Year 

Premiums 

from Previous Year 

Fund Balance 

from Previous Year 

FY 2011 

$483 

$63 

$1,162 

$152 

$620,334 

$71,834 

FY 2010 

$420 

‐$103 

$1,010 

‐$253 

$548,500 

‐$64,638 

FY 2009 

$523 

$48 

$1,263 

$115 

$613,138 

$182,586 

FY 2008 

$475 

$43 

$1,148 

$105 

$430,551 

‐$6,429 

FY 2007 

$432 

$39 

$1,043 

$94 

$436,980 

NA 

CITY CLERK/FINANCE DEPARTMENT ‐ SICK LEAVE  As noted below, the employees on the city’s payroll used nearly one week of sick leave on average during fiscal year  2011.    The  Police  Department  employees  utilized  the  most  sick  leave  of  any  department,  over  1,100  hours  for  an  average of more than 61 hours per employee. 

Hours Used 

# of FTE in the Dept. 

Average Number of Hour Used per Employee 

Police 

Department 

1,104 

18 

61.33 

Fire  

287.5 



35.94 

Library         

185.5 



23.19 

Parks 

16 



16 

Building Official        







Waste Water   

147 



21 

Housing 

124 



41.33 

Streets 

344.75 



49.25 

17.5 

1.75 

10 

80 



26.67 

City Manager  City Clerk  Engineer 







Totals      

2,318.25 

58.75 

39.46 

CITY CLERK/FINANCE DEPARTMENT ‐ ADMINISTRATIVE UPDATES  In FY 2011, the City Clerk/Finance Department focused on updating forms and processes.  Administrative forms  up‐ dated were the Employee Evaluation Form and the Employment Application form.  The department also developed  an Exit Interview Process that will be effective July 1, 2011. 

 

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 10 

CITY CLERK/FINANCE DEPARTMENT ‐ CITY FUNDS  The accounts of the City are organized on the basis of funds which are considered to be separate accounting entities.  The list of  funds for the City of Oskaloosa include: 

GENERAL FUNDS   

SPECIAL REVENUE PROGRAM  

DEBT SERVICE FUNDS 

ENTERPRISE FUNDS 

 

 

 

 

General Fund  Insurance Fund  Capital Equipment Fund  Library Copier Fund   Band Fund  LOST Fund 

Road Use Tax Fund    Employee Benefit Fund  I‐Jobs Fund  Emergency Fund  Local Option Sales Tax Fund    Hotel/Motel Tax Fund    Tax Increment Financing Funds  Housing Trust Funds   Library Memorial Funds    Miscellaneous Gift Funds  Drug Control Safety Program Fund  Wooden Playground Maintenance Fund  Police Forfeiture Fund  Library Maintenance Fund  Fire Department FEMA Grant Fund  Miscellaneous Grants Fund  Disaster Relief Grant Fund  Preserve America Grant Fund  Low Rent Housing & TBRA Funds  

Debt Service Fund 

Airport Fund  Edmundson Golf Funds  Sanitary Sewer Funds  Sanitary Sewer Project Funds  Storm Sewer Fund  Water Fund  RACI Main Street Loan Fund 

CAPITAL PROJECT FUND    Park Shelter Fund  City Hall Improvement Fund  Child Care Center Fund  High Avenue West Revitalization Fund  Energy Efficiency Grant Fund  Highway 63 Underpass Funds  2008 Bond‐Green Street Fund  Downtown Streetscape Fund  Pavement Management Fund  Sidewalk Improvement Project Fund  North I & M Ave W Project Fund  US 63 NEPA Road Study Fund  2008 GO Bond Fund 

INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS   

Copier/FAX Revolving Fund  Employee Health Self Insur‐ ance Fund 

CITY CLERK/FINANCE DEPARTMENT ‐ YEAR END BUDGET INFORMATION  During the fiscal year total revenues for all funds were $19,226,690 and $18,622,621 was expended.  Year end balance for the General  Fund  was  $2,053,265  with  $8,273  reserved  for insurance,  $267,914  for  capital  equipment,  $1,713  for  library  copier,  and  $51,458  for  LOST reimbursement.  The remaining balance for the General Fund is $1,723,876.95 which increased $343,740.34 this fiscal year.  Road  Use Tax year end balance was $654,563 which increased $176,284 and Sanitary Sewer Revenue Fund balance was $ 932,572 which in‐ creased $ 116,5689..

 

Local Option Sales & Service Tax revenue was $941,551 which was paid to the Oskaloosa School District.  A change in the 28E Agree‐ ment  with  the  Oskaloosa  Community  School  District  resulted  in  $51,482  returned  to  the  City.    Hotel/Motel  Tax  in  the  amount  of  $86,769 was paid to the Mahaska Community Recreation Foundation. 

 

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 11 

Total investments on earnings were $83,097.  A breakdown of the interest earnings is:  General Fund 

$10,731 

 Employee Benefit Funds 

$732 

TIF Funds 

$686 

 Housing Funds 

Library Memorial Funds 

$471 

 Misc. Special Revenue Funds 

$316 

$47,582 

 Project Funds 

$148 

Debt Service Funds 

$8,351 

 Airport Funds 

$2,222 

Sanitary Sewer Funds 

$5,259 

 Storm Water Utility Funds 

$1,952 

Internal Service Funds 

$2,491 

 RACI Main Street Loan Fund 

Library Maintenance Fund 

 

I Jobs Fund 

$1,838 

$50  $268 

CITY CLERK/FINANCE DEPARTMENT ‐ BOND ISSUANCE AND OTHER DEBT  The debt schedule for the past five fiscal years is: 

GO Bonds  FY 2011  FY 2010  FY 2009  FY 2008  FY 2007  GO Notes  FY 2011  FY 2010  FY 2009  FY 2008  FY 2007  Revenue Bonds/Notes  FY 2011  FY 2010  FY 2009  FY 2008  FY 2007  Capital Leases  FY 2011  FY 2010  FY 2009  FY 2008  FY 2007  Other Finance Sources  FY 2008  FY 2007  TOTAL  FY 2011  FY 2010  FY 2009  FY 2008  FY 2007 

Balance Beginning of FY  Amount Issued  Amount Redeemed  Balance End of FY  Interest Paid     $                              1,585,000   $                          ‐    $                        170,000   $                1,415,000   $            59,746    $                              3,385,000   $                          ‐    $                     1,800,000   $                1,585,000   $          123,174    $                              3,790,000   $                          ‐    $                        405,000   $                3,385,000   $          137,807    $                              5,760,000   $                          ‐    $                     1,970,000   $                3,790,000   $          231,432    $                              4,640,000   $            1,955,000   $                        835,000   $                5,760,000   $          229,031      $                              5,015,000   $                          ‐    $                        755,000   $                4,260,000   $          155,937    $                              4,105,000   $            1,405,000   $                        495,000   $                5,015,000   $          145,710    $                              4,775,000   $                          ‐    $                        670,000   $                4,105,000   $          182,574    $                              1,095,000   $            4,065,000   $                        385,000   $                4,775,000   $            41,318    $                              1,455,000   $                          ‐    $                        360,000   $                1,095,000   $            53,681      $                              4,804,000   $                          ‐    $                        554,000   $                4,250,000   $          148,335    $                              5,342,000   $                          ‐    $                        538,000   $                4,804,000   $          166,225    $                              5,824,000   $                          ‐    $                        482,000   $                5,342,000   $          181,939    $                              6,773,000   $                          ‐    $                        949,000   $                5,824,000   $          210,509    $                              6,767,727   $               527,273   $                        527,000   $                6,773,000   $          213,123      $                                   43,426   $                          ‐    $                          42,097   $                       1,329   $                 505    $                                   76,059   $                          ‐    $                          32,243   $                     43,816   $              3,451    $                                   89,866   $                 16,689   $                          30,496   $                     76,059   $              4,932    $                                 114,019   $                          ‐    $                          24,153   $                     89,866   $              6,331    $                                 177,864   $                          ‐    $                          63,845   $                   114,019   $              8,639      $                                 140,088   $                          ‐    $                        140,088   $                               ‐    $              1,515    $                                   69,640   $               172,047   $                        101,599   $                   140,088   $              4,068      $                            11,447,426   $                          ‐    $                     1,521,097   $                9,926,329   $          364,523    $                            12,908,059   $            1,405,000   $                     2,865,243   $              11,447,816   $          438,560    $                            14,478,866   $                 16,689   $                     1,587,496   $              12,908,059   $          507,252    $                            13,882,107   $            4,065,000   $                     3,468,241   $              14,478,866   $          491,105    $                            13,110,231   $            2,654,320   $                     1,887,444   $              13,882,107   $          508,542  

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 12 

CITY CLERK/FINANCE DEPARTMENT ‐ REPORTING  The following pages include reports run by the City Clerk /Finance Department  and are used by the department directors, city man‐ ager and city council to manage day to day budget and expense activities.  The chart below shows the ending fund balance each of the  last  five fiscal years.  Fund Name  General Fund  Road Use Tax Fund  Employee Benefit Fund 

FY 2011 

FY 2009 

FY 2008 

$2,053,265 

FY 2010  $1,709,525 

$1,564,680 

$1,513,638 

FY 2007  $1,633,122 

$654,563 

$478,278 

$456,574 

$795,528 

$822,824 

$18,944 

$106,375 

$98,326 

$84,293 

$29,582 

I Jobs 

$0 

$283 

$0 

$0 

$0 

PCM Parking Lot Improvement Fund 

$0 

$0 

$0 

$0 

‐$566 

$4,696 

$39,904 

$20,312 

$15,239 

$117,511 

Housing Trust Funds 

$317,842 

$356,287 

$322,231 

$169,050 

$98,337 

Library Memorial Funds 

$517,659 

$475,483 

$400,088 

$422,486 

$420,409 

$38,213 

$54,705 

$48,636 

$39,599 

$35,940 

$56 

$788 

$759 

$664 

$493 

Tax Increment Financing Funds 

Gift Funds  Drug Control Safety Program Fund  Wooden Playground Maintenance Fund 

$5,721 

$784 

$1,846 

$2,377 

$3,362 

Police Forfeiture Fund 

$4,062 

$5,708 

$10,766 

$834 

$5,923 

$1,150,094 

$1,198,345 

$1,230,248 

$1,210,424 

$1,197,358 

Library Maintenance Fund  Fire Dept FEMA Grant Fund 

$0 

$7,411 

$0 

$0 

$0 

Miscellaneous Grants Fund 

‐$5,954 

$10,863 

$6,255 

$9,645 

$15,632 

$0 

$0 

$0 

$0 

‐$117,161 

2010 Disaster Relief‐Floods 

$26,034 

$0 

$0 

$0 

$0 

2008 Disaster Relief‐Floods 

$0 

$0 

$0 

‐$4,906 

$0 

Low Rent Housing 

$99,639 

$96,128 

$123,206 

$136,425 

$113,156 

Debt Service Fund 

$271,559 

$69,804 

$150,593 

$126,450 

$113,524 

Park Shelter Fund 

$7,440 

$4,990 

$4,729 

$4,373 

$14,848 

City Hall Improvement Fund 

2007 Disaster Relief 

$7,478 

$3,414 

$2,637 

$295 

$16,908 

High Avenue West Revitalization 

$0 

$0 

$0 

‐$7 

$0 

Downtown Streetscape Fund 

$0 

$138,758 

$267,574 

$565,792 

$0 

Industrial Park Street Project 

$0 

$0 

$0 

$138,611 

$0 

Railroad Crossings Project 

$0 

$0 

$13,229 

$22,263 

$4,385 

$16,098 

$14,060 

$11,834 

$8,863 

$5,802 

Sidewalk Improvement Project Fund  2006 GO Bond 

$0 

$0 

$0 

$0 

$1,667,526 

$1,364,750 

$1,397,985 

$2,411,493 

$2,968,688 

$0 

$0 

$0 

$0 

$0 

$128,683 

Water Funds 

$1,769,498 

$1,653,803 

$1,193,880 

$1,153,980 

$1,287,090 

Sanitary Sewer Funds 

$1,469,468 

$1,369,728 

$1,244,417 

$1,470,690 

$1,970,449 

Airport Funds 

$104,327 

$134,093 

$53,834 

$19,966 

$11,779 

Storm Sewer Utility Fund 

$368,060 

$335,821 

$168,104 

$52,716 

‐$41,637 

Edmundson Golf Course Funds 

‐$63,125 

‐$5,725 

$22,038 

$23,515 

‐$10,110 

$16,167 

$16,116 

$16,061 

$15,351 

$12,833 

$84 

$243 

‐$1,363 

$324 

‐$233 

$620,334 

$548,500 

$613,138 

$430,551 

$436,980 

$2,570 

$4,027 

$3,447 

$0 

$0 

2008 GO Bond Fund  2004 GO Bonds 

RACI Main Street Loan Fund  Copier/Fax Revolving Fund  Employee Health Self Insurance  Employee Flex Plan Fund 

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 13 

CITY CLERK/FINANCE DEPARTMENT ‐ REVENUE REPORT 

General Fund  Taxes‐‐Property Taxes  Licenses & Permits‐‐Engineering/City General Licenses and Permits  Use of Money and Property‐‐Interest/Rent 

FY2011 Budget  $2,426,875  $226,700  $9,175 

FY2011 Actual  $2,442,166  $258,480  $11,594 

Variance  $15,291  $31,780  $2,419 

$188,920  $144,440  $545,027  $1,025,202  $4,566,339  

$197,158  $129,745  $101,540  $1,017,346  $4,158,031  

$8,238  ‐$14,695  ‐$443,487  ‐$7,856  ‐$408,308 

Intergovernmental‐‐State Grants/County, Townships, and Cities Contributions  Charges for Services‐‐Police, Fire, Pool and other service fees  Miscellaneous Revenues‐‐Merchandise Sales and Fines  Other Financing Sources‐‐Transfer Ins, Sale of Personal Property  Total General Fund  GENERAL FUND REVENUE BY SOURCE 

Other Financing  Sources

Miscellaneous  Revenues

Charges for Services Taxes Intergovernmental Use of Money  and  Property Licenses & Permits

Road Use Tax Fund 

FY2011 Budget 

Intergovernmental‐Road Use Taxes 

$985,998 

FY2011 Actual 

Variance 

$1,015,778 

$29,780 

FY2011 Actual 

Variance 

$5,500 

$5,259 

‐$241 

Charges for Services                                                                        $1,600,674 

$1,593,700 

‐$6,974 

$8,733 

$4,937 

Miscellaneous Revenues                                                                            $857 

$857 

$0 

Other Financing Sources                                                                     $28,228 

$28,228 

$0 

Total Sanitary Sewer Fund                                                             $1,639,055 

$1,636,776 

‐$2,279 

  Sanitary Sewer Fund 

FY2011 Budget 

Use of Money & Property                                                         Special Assessments                                                                           

$3,796 

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 14 

CITY CLERK/FINANCE DEPARTMENT ‐ EXPENSE REPORT 

General Fund 

Budget 

Actual 

Police Department 

$1,531,448 

$1,498,470 

$32,978 

$24,132 

$18,582 

$5,550 

$638,230 

$623,245 

$14,985 

$66,701 

$57,314 

$9,387 

Emergency Management  Fire Department    Building Inspections     Animal Control 

Variance 

$35,000 

$35,000 

$0 

911 Dispatch 

$117,355 

$117,355 

$0 

Roads, Bridges, Sidewalks 

$489,000 

$8,030 

$480,970 

Street Lighting 

$132,000 

$118,196 

$13,804 

Library Services 

$520,212 

$514,419 

$5,793 

Park 

$140,898 

$137,039 

$3,859 

Pool 

$108,264 

$103,382 

$4,882 

Economic Development  

$32,500 

$31,103 

$1,397 

Housing & Urban Renewal  

$65,998 

$69,091 

‐$3,093 

$650 

$607 

$43 

$182,024 

$157,763 

$24,261 

$40,846 

$34,689 

$6,157 

Planning & Zoning  City Manger  City Council & Mayor   Clerk, Treasurer & Financial Administration 

$235,371 

$231,092 

$4,279 

Legal Services & City Attorney 

$112,500 

$64,496 

$48,004 

City Hall and General Buildings 

$40,793 

$32,586 

$8,207 

$4,513,922 

$3,852,459 

$661,463 

Total General Fund 

Road Use Tax Fund 

Roads, Bridges, Sidewalks 

Budget 

Actual 

Variance 

$859,490 

$724,156 

$135,334 

Traffic Control & Safety             

$27,869 

$17,616 

$10,253 

Snow Removal 

$89,360 

$69,649 

$19,711 

Street Cleaning 

$33,974 

$28,073 

$5,901 

Total Road Use Tax Fund 

$1,010,693 

$839,494 

$171,199 

Sanitary Sewer Fund 

Budget 

Actual 

Variance 

Operation & Maintenance‐Treatment 

$682,975 

$583,079 

$99,896 

Operation & Maintenance‐Collection 

$345,012 

$208,420 

$136,592 

Storm Sewer 

$275,061 

$195,321 

$79,740 

Debt Payment 

$711,117 

$711,117 

$0 

$20,000 

$0 

$20,000 

$2,034,165 

$1,697,937 

$336,228 

Sanitary Sewer Improvements  Total Sanitary Sewer Fund 

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 15 

CITY CLERK/FINANCE DEPARTMENT ‐ GENERAL FUND EXPENDITURES 

City Council & Clerk, Mayor Treasurer & City Manager Financial Planning & Zoning Administration

Legal Services & City Attorney City Hall and General Buildings

Housing & Urban Renewal Economic Development Pool Park Police Department Library Services

Street Lighting

Fire Department Emergency Management

Roads, Bridges, Sidewalks 911 Dispatch Animal Co ntrol

Building Inspections

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 16 

CITY CLERK/FINANCE DEPARTMENT ‐ FIVE YEAR COMPARISON  

  

FY2007 

FY2008 

FY2009 

FY2010 

FY2011 

Taxable Value 

$252,415,852  

$251,499,654  

$275,275,249  

$286,830,246  

$299,000,764  

Taxable TIF Value 

$11,500,000  

$12,750,000  

$14,600,000  

$10,000,000  

$7,000,000  

Ag Land Value 

$1,605,900  

$1,575,920  

$1,531,518  

$1,561,489  

$1,155,003  

Tax Rate 

$15.94894  

$16.09303  

$15.25909  

$14.35817  

$14.35519  

  

 

  

 

     

General 

$8.10000 

$8.10000 

$8.10000 

$8.10000 

$8.10000 

Insurance 

$0.37350 

$0.28658 

$0.34868 

$0.29820 

$0.34596 

Band 

$0.05724 

$0.06297 

$0.07896 

$0.07553 

$0.07245 

Emergency 

$0.27000 

$0.01193 

$0.27000 

$0.27000 

$0.27000 

Employee Benefits 

$3.34959 

$3.61626 

$3.16075 

$2.66643 

$2.69863 

Debt Service 

$3.79861 

$4.01529 

$3.30070 

$2.94801 

$2.86815 

$15.94894 

$16.09303 

$15.25909 

$14.35817 

$14.35519 

Total Tax Rate 

Ag Land  Total Asking       

$3.00375 

$3.00375 

$3.00375 

$3.00375 

$4,103,323  

$4,253,238  

$4,152,527  

$4,519,692     

 

Tax Receipts  TIF Receipts 

$3.03375  $4,073,378   $4,044,793  

$4,610,698  

$4,816,100  

$4,536,748  

$4,614,435  

$465,025  

$472,544  

$557,391  

$370,172  

$244,588  

  

 

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 17 

CITY CLERK/FINANCE DEPARTMENT ‐ SIX YEAR COMPARISON  

Property Values $350,000,000

$300,000,000

$250,000,000

$200,000,000

$150,000,000

$100,000,000

$50,000,000

$0 2005-2006

2006-2007

2007-2008

Taxable TIF Value

2008-2009 Ag Land Value

2009-2010

2010-2011

Taxable Value

Property Tax Rate $17.00000

$16.50000

$16.00000

$15.50000

$15.00000

$14.50000

$14.00000

$13.50000

$13.00000 2005-2006

2006-2007

2007-2008

2008-2009 Tax…

2009-2010

2010-2011

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 18

EDMUNDSON GOLF Season Overview: Last season was again another wet year. A total of 6 days the course was completely closed due to wet conditions. There were five tournaments that were postponed and had to be rescheduled. Heavy rains in August resulted in damages to the field tiles used for drainage. A claim through FEMA was submitted for $7,412.63 which was approved. Revenues at the course dropped for the fifth season in succession. Overall in FY 2011, expenses exceeded revenues by $58,948.22.

Below is a list of Edmundson Golf employees.

The following is a breakdown of revenues for FY 2011:

*Contract Employee

Employee

Position

Jeff Peterson*

PGA Pro

Mike Roozeboom

Greens Superintendent

Green Fees: $56,486 - Season Passes: $60,927 (153 passes, a drop of 17 members from the previous FY) - Cart Rental: $53,655 Shed Rental: $7,209 -Trail Fees: $7,148.

GREENS MAINTENANCE Greens maintenance is under the direction of Mike Roozeboom. In FY 2011 a total of 5 trees were removed, and with the assistance of Trees Forever, 4 new trees were planted. Due to the frequent rain events, only 1.615 million gallon of water was used for irrigation. A total of 6 seasonal employees were hired during the summer. The following is a breakdown of green maintenance for the year. Equipment Maintenance: 507 hrs. Cart Maintenance: 107 hrs. Mowing: 2,250 hrs. Spraying/Fertilizing: 410 hrs. Snow Removal: 311 hrs. Misc.: 1,381.70 Paid Time Off: 220 hrs.

Following directives from the City Council, the position of Greens Superintendent was eliminated in April and duties combined with the Parks Superintendent. One extra seasonal worker was hired and now have 7 seasonal employees on staff. In May of 2011 the City started to explore the option of leasing out the full operations of Edmundson Golf. A number of “request for proposals” were sent to groups who lease operations of other courses. The city received one proposal from Harvest Point Golf Course that is currently being considered.

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 19 

OSKALOOSA FIRE DEPARTMENT  The Oskaloosa Fire Department was established in 1871 as a paid fire department when city lead‐ ers determined that the need for fire protection for the citizens related directly to public safety  and security. These early firefighters utilized horse drawn steam fired water pump wagons. In  1909 a new fire station was built. This station has been staffed 24‐7 for the past 102 years and is  still the primary fire station for the City of Oskaloosa.

 

In 1976 the State of Iowa realized that fire protection was needed for rural areas of the state as  well as the incorporated areas and subsequently passed legislation that required townships to  either provide fire protection by creating a fire department or contract with an entity that already  had fire protection services available.

 

Currently, the Oskaloosa Fire Department provides fire protection for the City of Oskaloosa, Bea‐ con, University Park, Keomah Village and all or parts of the following eight (8) townships, Adams,  Garfield, Harrison, Jefferson, Lincoln, Madison, Spring Creek, and Scott. The total area protected  by the Oskaloosa Fire Department is approximately one hundred forty six (146) square miles. 

Oskaloosa Fire Station at City Hall 

 

Day to day operations of the fire department are conducted by regular staff working a rotating  schedule consisting of a Shift Officer and one (1) shift firefighter both working a twenty four (24)  hour shift and two (2) dayshift firefighters working a nine (9) hour  schedule from 7:30am until  4:30 pm Monday thru Friday. After 4:30 pm Monday thru Friday the station decreases staffing to  the two shift employees. Holidays and weekends are staffed by two (2) employees as well. 

“The Oskaloosa Fire 

Some of the daily duties of the fire department staff include responding to routine and emer‐

Department is dedicated 

gency calls, cleaning and inspecting the department vehicles and equipment, completing any 

to protect the lives, 

 

repairs needed to vehicles and equipment that is within the capability of the department mem‐ bers, cleaning and maintaining the fire station building, mowing and snow removal to the areas 

property, and quality of 

around the fire station and city hall, conducting fire code inspections, scheduling and conducting 

life of the citizens we 

department training, completing incident reports, completing daily activity reports, conducting  public safety education programs, and issuing of burn permits. 

OSKALOOSA FIRE DEPARTMENT ‐ FULL TIME STAFF  EMPLOYEE 

 

 

 

POSITION  

 

HIRE DATE 

Mark Neff  

 

 

 

Chief  

 

 

 

05/12/1998 

David Christenson   

 

 

Captain    

 

 

10/04/1982 

Timothy Nance 

 

 

 

Captain    

 

 

08/04/1980 

Scott Howard 

 

 

 

Firefighter  

 

 

09/13/1982 

Mark Tennison 

 

 

 

Firefighter  

 

 

10/20/2008 

James Gillespie 

 

 

 

Firefighter  

 

 

10/21/2008 

Shane Glandon 

 

 

 

Firefighter  

 

 

12/07/2009 

Adam Haroldson 

 

 

 

Firefighter  

 

 

12/28/2009 

serve .” 

 

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 20 

OSKALOOSA FIRE DEPARTMENT ‐ RESERVE FIREFIGHTER PROGRAM  The Oskaloosa Fire Department Reserve Program was organized in November of 1996. This program was implemented by the  Oskaloosa  City  Council  and  city  management  in  an  attempt  to  reduce  overall  department  costs  while  continuing  to  provide  quality fire and emergency services to the citizens.   

Currently the Oskaloosa Fire Department has fourteen (14) reserve firefighters with full staffing being twenty (20). The role of  these reserve firefighters is to supplement regular staff providing assistance with firefighting and other emergency’s that may  arise.  These  activities  include  but  are  not  limited  to;  interior  and  exterior  fire  attacks,  ventilation  procedures,  rescue  opera‐ tions, vehicle accidents, hazardous weather conditions, mutual aid requests, hazardous material incidents, working as replace‐ ment firefighters when regular staff are sick, injured, or on vacation, and for public safety education programs.  Recruitment: 

Successful  reserve  firefighters  must  complete  and  certify  na‐ tionally  to  the  Firefighter  I  and  Hazardous  Material  Operation  level.  This  training  is  a  comprehensive  eighty  four  (84)  hour  course for the Firefighter I and an additional sixteen (16) hours  for  the  hazardous  materials  segment.  This  training  must  be  completed  during  the  first  year  of  being  a  reserve  member.  This training is mandated by the State of Iowa and is essential  for  the  safety  of  the  new  recruits.  Finding  quality  individuals  who are willing to sacrifice this initial time commitment in addi‐ tion to the bi‐monthly department training and emergency call  in is becoming more difficult every year. Reserve membership  is down but he department anticipates hiring five (5) or six (6)  new members this fall. 

 

Retention: 

Retention is not as difficult as the recruitment aspect; however  lives change as do priorities. Job changes in addition to family  matters  are  the  most  common  reasons  given  when  a  reserve  member resigns.  

OSKALOOSA FIRE DEPARTMENT ‐ RESERVE STAFF  DATE OF HIRE 

EMPLOYEE 

 

DATE OF HIRE 

Van Der Pol, Jerry   

01/03/1998 

Brom, T.J. 

 

12/11/2008 

Brooks, Keith 

 

01/15/1998  

Gorman, Jerry 

 

09/15/2009 

Eklofe, Cheryl 

 

08/11/1998  

Brown, Quinten 

 

10/06/2009 

Grubb, Kurtis 

 

10/04/1999 

Hoy, Daniel 

 

09/17/2009 

Robinson, Jamey   

06/02/2005 

Bond, Carrie 

 

10/27/2010 

Martin, Robert 

06/13/2005 

Nance, Michael 

 

11/03/2011 

06/17/08 

Besco, Mark 

 

11/12/2010 

EMPLOYEE 

 

 

Nathaniel Stirgus   

 

 

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 21 

OSKALOOSA FIRE DEPARTMENT ‐ TRAINING  Course Title 

 

Course Hours 

Members Attending 

Total Hours 

1.   EVDT   

          

          16   

               25 

 

      400 

2.   FF I   

          

          84   

                 3 

 

      252 

3.   FF II   

          

          32   

                 9              

      288 

4.   Haz‐Mat  

          

          16   

                 9 

 

      144 

5.   Inspector I 

          

          40   

                 7 

 

      280 

6.   ICS – 100 

  

           4   

                 3  

 

        12 

7.   ICS –200 

 

           4                                       3                                          12 

Oskaloosa Professional Firefighters  are members of IAFF Local 636 

8.  NIMS                                                 4                                       3                                          12  9. Water Rescue                                  24   

 

15 

 

     360   

10. Haz‐Mat 

 

22 

 

     176 

 

           8   

11. Search and Rescue 

           8                                       18                                     144 

12. Live Fire Skills   

         16    

 

15 

 

     240 

               TOTAL HOURS: 

 

 

 

 

    2100 

 

 

OSKALOOSA FIRE DEPARTMENT ‐ IN SERVICE TRAINING  Course Title 

 

 Course Hours 

Members Attending 

Total Hours 

1.   EMS   

          

          24   

                9 

 

      216 

2.   CPR/AED 

          

            2   

              20 

 

        40 

3.   Daily Shift Training                      1.5  

                8            

 

      260 

4.   Monthly Reserve          

          72   

              12 

 

      864 

                TOTAL HOURS: 

 

 

 

    1380 

 

Pictured  at  right  (above):  Actual  Des  Moines  River  res‐ cue. Our training paying off.  Pictured at right (below): GSTC training fire. 

 

 

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 22 

OSKALOOSA FIRE DEPARTMENT ‐ PUBLIC SERVICE    On May 22, 2011 Joplin, Missouri  was hit by an EF5 multiple vortex tornado. Over the 2011 Memorial Day weekend Oskaloosa Fire Department  members along with members of the New Sharon and Montezuma Fire Departments were tasked out to assist with search and rescue opera‐ tions  in  Joplin.  This team spent four days on a voluntary basis working 12 hour shifts  with dog teams performing body recovery from across  the United States. While Oskaloosa was not directly affected by this disaster the department felt compelled to assist. The experience and knowl‐ edge acquired by working in a disaster area cannot be duplicated in training drills. Since the Joplin trip, Oskaloosa Fire Department members  again on a volunteer basis, have assisted the New Sharon Community who experienced an EF1 tornado in June  and recently went to Benton  County to help clear debris caused by straight line winds.  One thing that OFD members brought home from Joplin  was the need for a curb marking system. Homes and business’ were completely de‐ stroyed by the tornado  and locating specific properties without the curb numbering system was nearly impossible and caused unnecessary  delay in search and rescue operations. With some volunteer labor and donated materials , the Oskaloosa Fire Department has begun imple‐ menting a curb numbering system.   The Oskaloosa Fire Department is also taking part in the “100 years, 100 percent” Smoke Detector Project . As the 100 year anniversary of the  Office of the State Fire Marshal approaches, it is the goal of the fire service to install at least two working smoke detectors in 100% of the homes  in Pre‐K and elementary student in the State of Iowa. Oskaloosa received the first 100 of nearly 300 requested and has began installing them.        

Left Photo: The start of the curb numbering system  Right Photo: Firefighter Haroldson installing a smoke detector 

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 23 

OSKALOOSA FIRE DEPARTMENT ‐ GRANTS & DONATIONS  ASSISTANCE TO FIREFIGHTERS GRANT:          Assistance to Firefighters Grant:   

In  April  2010  the  Oskaloosa  Fire  Depart‐ ment  received  information  that  we  had 

      Total Requested                          Amount Awarded                       Local Match 

been awarded an Assistance to Firefight‐ $54,900   

ers  Grant.  This  money  will  be  used  to 

 

    $51,400 

purchase  needed  equipment  for  fire 

 

    $2,750 

 

department  operations  and  the  fire  sta‐

The department will be purchasing or has already acquired the following: 

tion. This grant has a 5% local match.   

Re‐Hab equipment: 

 

Purchased and in‐service 

 

Vehicle Exhaust Extraction System:  

Installed and operational 

 

Large Diameter Hose: 

 

Purchased and in‐service. 

 

SCBA face pieces:   

 

Purchased and in‐service. 

 

Washer/Extractor and Dryer: 

Purchased and in‐service. 

ASSISTANCE TO FIREFIGHTERS GRANT  FOR FY2010:  The  Oskaloosa  Fire  Department  applied  for  a  2010  Assistance  to  Firefighters  Grant in hopes of acquiring funding for a  backup  generator  for  the  fire  station,  hand  held  radio  replacement,  pagers,  and  a  gas  powered  high  pressure  air  compressor.  Unfortunately  we  were  not  awarded  a  grant  for  2010,  however  the  2011  AFG  application  period  will  be  opening  soon  and  the  fire  department  will again apply for funding. 

DONATIONS  During the flooding in August 2010 MCEMA  requisitioned  a  flat  bottom  boat  with  a  25hp  engine  for  water  rescue.  FEMA  allo‐ cated funding for this purchase. The boat is  housed  at  the  Oskaloosa  Fire  Department   and  responded  to  all  water  rescue  calls  in  the  surrounding  area.  Through  donations  from  area  business’  and  organizations  we  were  able  to  purchase  additional  equip‐ ment  in  the  form  of  life  vests,  ropes,  hel‐ mets, lighting and a depth finder.  

Same area 1 year later  with the proper  Water rescue prior to the boat. 

equipment 

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 24 

OSKALOOSA FIRE DEPARTMENT ‐ ALARM INCIDENTS BY TYPE  Incidents the staff responded to are summarized below.  The Oskaloosa Fire Department responded to 411 alarm calls during  FY2011.  The total number of alarm incidents increased from the previous year, and is up from the five year historical average.   The majority of calls the staff responded to were service calls.  Service calls are classified as;  burning complaints, unauthorized  burning, motor vehicle accidents with property damage only, smoke odors, natural gas odors and/or leaks,  carbon monoxide  detectors activation, residential smoke detector activation .  The second and third highest incidents are “false” and “fire”  These  include commercial fire alarm systems sounding, wildland fires, vehicle fires, and structure fires.  The 61 calls for “fire” is up from the previous year of 35 and is above average for a five year period..  All of these  61 calls were  working fires where department apparatus and personnel were used to extinguish the fire. These fires resulted losses of 727,159  dollars. There were zero deaths from structure fires during FY2011 and only one structure was a total loss. Both of the preceding  statistics can be credited to quick response, continued training, and dedication of the members of the Oskaloosa Fire Depart‐ ment. 

2 61

76

7

14

25

Fire Rescue Haz‐Mat Service Good Intent

226

False Severe Weather

CALLS FOR SERVICE  Fire: 

 

61 calls   14.8% of call volume 

 

$727,159 in total losses 

Rescue:   

7 calls 

1.7% of call volume  

 

$300 revenue generated 

Haz‐Mat:  

25 calls  6% of call volume   

 

$ revenue generated 

Service:   

226 calls  54.9% of call volume 

 

 

Good Intent: 

14 calls  3.4% of call volume  

 

False: 

76 calls  18.5% of call volume 

 

 

Severe Weather:  2 calls 

.04% of call volume  

 

 

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 25 

OSKALOOSA FIRE DEPARTMENT ‐ ALARM INCIDENTS BY HOUR 

Alarm Incidents by Hour  Alarm Hour 

 

 

              Count 

 

 

 

Percent   

00:00 

 

 

 

 

10 

 

 

 

2.43% 

01:00 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

1.45% 

02:00 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

1.45% 

03:00 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

1.94% 

04:00 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

2.18% 

05:00 

 

 

 

 

10 

 

 

 

2.43% 

06:00 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

2.18% 

07:00 

 

 

 

 

11 

 

 

 

2.67% 

08:00 

 

 

 

 

13 

 

 

 

3.16% 

09:00 

 

 

 

 

17 

 

 

 

4.13% 

10:00 

 

 

 

 

25 

 

 

 

6.08% 

11:00 

 

 

 

 

23 

 

 

 

5.59% 

12:00 

 

 

 

 

31 

 

 

 

7.54% 

13:00 

 

 

 

 

21 

 

 

 

5.11% 

14:00 

 

 

 

 

17 

 

 

 

4.13% 

15:00 

 

 

 

 

24 

 

 

 

5.84% 

16:00 

 

 

 

 

32 

 

 

 

7.79% 

17:00 

 

 

 

 

30 

 

 

 

7.30% 

18:00 

 

 

 

 

30 

 

 

 

7.30% 

19:00 

 

 

 

 

23 

 

 

 

5.59% 

20:00 

 

 

 

 

25 

 

 

 

6.08% 

21:00 

 

 

 

 

13 

 

 

 

3.16% 

22:00 

 

 

 

 

 8 

 

 

 

1.94% 

23:00 

 

 

 

 

10 

 

 

 

2.43% 

 

 

 

411 

 

 

 

100% 

Calls between 08:00 and 17:00  

 

203 

 

 

 

49.75% 

Calls between 17:00 and 08:00 

 

208 

 

 

 

50.25% 

TOTAL CALLS   

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 26 

OSKALOOSA FIRE DEPARTMENT ‐ ALARM INCIDENTS BY SERVICE AREA 

The Oskaloosa Fire Department currently provides fire protection to the cities of Oskaloosa, Beacon, University Park, and Keomah  Village.  In addition to theses cities we provide fire protection to all or part of Adams, Garfield, Harrison, Jefferson, Lincoln, Madi‐ son, Scott and Spring Creek Townships.    Funding from these entities is as follows:  Townships: 

$90,356 

Beacon:   

$9,609 

Keomah Village: 

$5075 

University Park: 

$13,641 

INCIDENTS BY SERVICE AREA 

SERVICE AREA 

 

COUNT   

 

PERCENT  

 

LOSS 

 ADAMS   

 

     4 

 

 

.028% 

 

 

$0 

BEACON   

 

     1 

 

 

.084% 

 

 

$0 

EAST DES MOINES 

 

     4 

 

 

.028% 

 

 

$0 

GARFIELD   

 

   30 

 

 

3.92% 

 

 

$9,500 

HARRISON   

 

     9 

 

 

.028% 

 

 

$0 

JEFFERSON  

 

     1 

 

 

.056% 

 

 

$0 

KEOMAH VILLAGE 

 

     0 

 

 

.028 

 

 

$0 

LINCOLN   

 

     7 

 

 

1.96% 

 

 

$0 

MADISON   

 

     5 

 

 

.056% 

 

 

$0 

OSKALOOSA 

 

312 

 

 

83.75%   

 

$586,659 

PRAIRIE 

 

     0 

 

 



 

 

$0 

SPRING CREEK 

 

   26 

 

 

4.48% 

 

 

$78,500 

SCOTT 

 

     7 

 

 

1.40% 

 

 

$45,000 

UNIVERSITY PARK 

 

     3 

 

 

.056% 

 

 

$7,500 

WEST DES MOINES 

 

     1 

 

 

.028% 

 

 

$0 

 

 

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT  PARKS DEPARTMENT TRANSITION Due to a change in personnel, Mike Roozeboom became Parks Superintendent early in April. Mike’s time is temporarily being split between Edmundson Golf and Parks. Glen Steiger and John Parker again returned as seasonal summer employees.

PARKS DEPARTMENT PROJECTS Throughout the year the Parks Department helps with many community activities. Working closely with the Chamber of Commerce the Parks Superintendent helped organize the following events: Art on the Square, Sweet Corn Serenade, Friday after Five, Relay for Life, and the Lighted Christmas Parade. The department also worked closely with Musco Lighting on the new lighting in the city

square. Pella Tree Service was contracted to remove three trees and trim a number of others in the square. The department is also responsible for maintaining 60 acres in Edmundson Park including 5 shelters as well as 10 acres in Vanderwilt Park. The grounds on three small neighborhood parks and the Oskaloosa Public Library are also

maintained. Winter months, the department is responsible for snow removal and repair/maintenance of all equipment. This time is also used for painting picnic tables, trash receptacles and signage.

SWIMMING POOL The number of patrons at the pool in FY 2011 totaled 19,402; an increase of 2843 from the previous year. This was mainly due to an increase in the average temperature on operating days. The average temperature increased from 79 to 85. The day to day maintenance of the pool was performed by Kevin Bork from the Wastewater Department. Kevin received the necessary training and testing to become a state-certified pool operator. Gladys Genskow was again hired to manage daily operations.

During FY 2011, expenses exceeded revenues by a total of $18,451.

Page 27

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 28 

OSKALOOSA POLICE DEPARTMENT—MISSION & VALUES STATEMENTS  MISSION  STATEMENT:   The Oskaloosa Police Department exists to provide safety and service to every citizen, recognizing of  primary importance the protection of the constitutional rights of all.   

The agency is committed to establishing excellence in delivering services through teamwork; partici‐ pation of every employee; community policing; problem oriented approaches; planning; and creation  of a vision for the future.   

Employees  are  encouraged  to  be  diversified,  striving  for  individual  development;  continuous  im‐ provement; serving as an example of leadership and contributing to a high quality of life.  Oskaloosa Police Department  Patch 

EMPLOYEE VALUES STATEMENT:   “The City of Oskaloosa values employees who deliver high quality and innovative services to the com‐ munity.  Our employees will be accountable to the public and will be recognized for their integrity  and dedication as public servants.” 

OSKALOOSA POLICE DEPARTMENT ‐ FULL TIME STAFF   

 

POSITION 

 

 

HIRE DATE 

John R. “Jake” McGee 

 

 

Chief  

 

 

11/06/1987 

Troy Boston 

 

 

Lieutenant 

 

 

06/22/1985 

Russ Van Renterghem 

 

 

Lieutenant 

 

 

03/23/1987 

Craig Alexander 

 

 

 

Lieutenant 

 

 

10/24/1988 

John Plumb 

 

 

 

Lieutenant 

 

 

01/03/1994 

Gary McClun 

 

 

 

Lieutenant 

 

 

07/06/1999 

Barb Saville 

 

 

 

Sr. Officer 

 

 

11/14/1988 

Gary Kutcher 

 

 

 

Sr. Officer 

 

 

05/18/1989 

Justin Rice  

 

 

 

Sr. Officer 

 

 

10/23/2008 

Charlie Valentine   

 

 

Officer     

 

 

01/06/2003 

Garrett Matson 

 

 

 

Officer     

 

 

09/15/2003 

Brent DeRonde 

 

 

 

Officer 

   

 

 

04/02/2007 

Matt Montavon 

 

 

 

Officer 

   

 

 

01/02/2008 

Jacob Vanderpol 

 

 

 

Officer 

   

 

 

06/02/2008 

Brian Rainey 

 

 

 

Officer 

   

 

 

06/02/2008 

Ben Johnston 

 

 

 

Officer 

 

 

 

06/21/2010 

Mary Barnard  

 

 

 

Administrative Assistant 

 

09/26/1994 

Heather Blommers   

 

 

Records   

 

11/01/2010 

EMPLOYEE 

 

 

 

 

 

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 29 

OSKALOOSA POLICE DEPARTMENT ‐ PATROL OPERATIONS  Patrol Operations consist of the Patrol and Investigations Divisions of the Oskaloosa Police Department.  Patrol officers work  four different shifts rotating every three months.  Officers work a rotation that allows them to have different days off each  week.  Investigations officers work Monday through Friday during regular business hours, as well as being on call for any ma‐ jor event that might happen.   

Twelve officers are assigned to patrol duties.  Four officers are normally assigned to work as Investigators (2), Drug Task Force  Officer (1), and a School Resource Officer (1).  However, this past year we did not have a second officer assigned to Investiga‐ tions due to manpower shortages.   

In FY2011 the Oskaloosa Police Department responded to 12,260 calls for service.  Of those calls 1,442 originated as 911 calls.   Officers also initiated traffic stops which accounted for an additional 3,892 calls.   These numbers do not include phone calls  that officers return, as well as walk‐in traffic that does not require generating a Calls for Service.     

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 30 

OSKALOOSA POLICE DEPARTMENT ‐ CALLS FOR SERVICE DAY/HOUR 

CFS by Day of Week Sunday

Saturday

Monday Friday

Sunday 2,122 13.1% Monday 2,280 14.1% Tuesday 2,143 13.3% Wednesday 2,188 13.5% Thursday 2,223 13.8% Friday 2,590 16.0% Saturday 2,606 16.1% Total: 16,152 100.0%

Tuesday Thursday Wednesday

CFS by Hour of Day 23

0

22

1 2

21

3 4 5 6 7

20

19

8 9

18 10

17 11 16

12 15

14

13

0 890 5.5% 1 749 4.6% 2 680 4.2% 3 389 2.4% 4 312 1.9% 5 224 1.4% 6 238 1.5% 7 324 2.0% 8 551 3.4% 9 602 3.7% 10 707 4.4% 11 745 4.6% 12 658 4.1% 13 742 4.6% 14 630 3.9% 15 757 4.7% 16 1,001 6.2% 17 883 5.5% 18 769 4.8% 19 791 4.9% 20 950 5.9% 21 987 6.1% 22 842 5.2% 23 731 4.5% Total: 16,152 100.0%

 

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 31 

OSKALOOSA POLICE DEPARTMENT ‐ CALLS FOR SERVICE  Calls for Service

20,000 10,000 0

07-08

08-09

09-10

10-11

10,447

11,666

13,578

12,260

Calls for Service decreased 9%  in FY2011 compared to the previous fiscal year.   

While most calls to the E911 Center generate a call for service, not all calls require documentation.  Any calls for service that in‐ volves some sort of alleged criminal conduct requiring investigation and/or documentation or accidents that were either hit and  run or involved personal injury or damages estimated at over $1,500.00 total require an incident report be filed.  These numbers  do not include arrest reports that are written by officers each day. 

Incident Reports Written 1,500 1,000 500 0

06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

10-11

1,286

1,253

1,231

922

853

Incident reports decreased by 9% compared to FY2010. 

Robberies 10

5

0

06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

10-11

3

4

6

3

4

Robberies increased by 25% compared to FY2010. 

 

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 32 

OSKALOOSA POLICE DEPARTMENT ‐ CALLS FOR SERVICE (continued) 

Sex Crimes 30 20 10 0

06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

10-11

20

19

19

17

23

Sex Crimes increased  by 26% compared to FY2010. 

Arson 5

0

06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

10-11

1

2

2

1

4

Arson increased by 400% compared to FY2010. 

Assault 300 200 100 0

06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

10-11

167

141

199

170

125

Assaults decreased by 27% compared to FY2010.  

 

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 33 

OSKALOOSA POLICE DEPARTMENT ‐ CALLS FOR SERVICE (continued) 

Vehicle Thefts 40 30 20 10 0

06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

10-11

17

29

18

13

7

Vehicle Thefts decreased by 47% compared to FY2010. 

Burglary 150 100 50 0

06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

10-11

87

138

122

84

94

Burglaries increased 11% compared to FY2010. 

All Other Thefts 400 200 0

06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

10-11

350

369

352

248

213

All other thefts decreased by 15% compared to FY2010. 

 

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 34 

OSKALOOSA POLICE DEPARTMENT ‐ CALLS FOR SERVICE (continued) 

Criminal Mischief 200 100 0

06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

40827

148

122

119

74

69

Criminal Mischief decreased by 7% compared to FY2010. 

Operating While Intoxicated 200 100 0

06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

10-11

145

113

165

113

107

O.W.I. decreased by 6% compared to FY2010. 

OSKALOOSA POLICE DEPARTMENT ‐ TRAFFIC SAFETY  During the 2010‐2011 fiscal year, the Oskaloosa Police Department responded to 412 calls for service where an accident had been   reported, 166 of those accidents were reportable under the newest guidelines set by the state, which upped the amount of dam‐ age that was reported from $1,000 to $1,500. This, as well as increased traffic safety and enforcement, caused our accidents re‐ ports to decrease significantly.  Of the reportable accidents responded to, 13 were personal injury accidents, 122 were property  damage only, and 31 were hit and run.  While the total number of accidents reported to our department declined by 57, hit and  run accidents increased by a total of five, personal injury accidents decreased by 12, and property damage accidents decreased by  50 for the fiscal year.  

Reportable Accidents During Five Year Period 400 300 200 100 0

06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

10-11

263

313

253

233

166

 

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 35 

OSKALOOSA POLICE DEPARTMENT ‐ TRAFFIC SAFETY (continued)  With an eye toward reducing the number of reportable accidents and injuries the depart‐ ment has instituted a policy of increased visibility in high traffic risk areas with an empha‐ sis on enforcement of existing traffic laws.  A total of 1,332 citations and 1,209 warnings  were  written  during  the  year.    Numerous  verbal  warnings  were  also  given  and  are  not  included in these totals.  The following graphs demonstrate citations and warnings given  during the previous five‐year period. 

Written Citations and Warnings for Five Year Period 3,000 2,000 1,000 0

06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

10-11

Citations

1,772

1,388

1,489

1,365

1,332

Warnings

2,211

1,786

1,177

1,074

1209

A breakdown of the different types of citations is listed below. 

WARNING

The top five traffic violations are:  Speed   

 

Proof of Insurance 

 

267 

 

194 

Driving while license suspended:  185  Seat belt violations 

 

Operation w/o Registration 

176  100 

ALCOHOL VIOLATION EQUIPMENT VIOLATION FTY 1/2 ROADWAY LICENSE OTHER PASSING VIOLATION PROOF OF INSURANCE REGISTRATION

SCHOOL BUS VIOLATION SEAT BELT VIOLATION SPEED STOP/YIELD OFFENSE TOBACCO VIOLATION Traffic

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 36 

OSKALOOSA POLICE DEPARTMENT ‐ K9 TEAM  The department graduated its’ second canine officer in December of 2003.  Nash, an 9 year‐old German Shepherd, along with his  handler, Lieutenant Gary McClun, began working the streets of Oskaloosa in mid‐December of that year.  Nash, like his prede‐ cessor  Quest,  is  trained  in  building  and  vehicle  searches,  criminal  apprehension,  officer  protection,  and  drug  searches.    Both  officer and dog work routine patrol as well.  Nash is certified through the United States Police Canine Association (USPCA) as a narcotic detection dog as well as being certi‐ fied as a patrol dog.  Nash placed third at the 2006 USPCA Region 21 Narcotic Detection Trials.  In 2009, Nash placed first overall  as the Region 21 champion at the USPCA Region 21 Police Dog 1 certification trials and competed at the national Field Trials that  same year where he obtained national certification.   At the 2010 PD1 trials Nash placed second in criminal apprehension and in   2011 Narcotic Trials Nash placed second in room searches.   Nash has been deployed for drug searches, building searches, tracking and search warrants.  Lt. McClun and Nash have assisted  the  Iowa  State  Patrol,  Iowa  Department  of  Transportation,  United  States  Postal  Inspections,  Mahaska  County  Sheriff’s  Office,  Marion County Sheriff’s Office, Pella Police Department, Ottumwa Police Department, Wapello County Sheriff’s Office, the De‐ partment  of  Narcotics  Enforcement,  the  8th  Judicial  Department  of  Corrections,  William  Penn  University  security  and  the  Mahaska County Conservation Officers with investigations.     

He  has given various demonstrations to both civic and school groups, including William Penn University; Oskaloosa High, Mid‐ dle,  and  Elementary  Schools;  as  well  as  several  local  church  youth  groups;  boy  and  girl  scout  troops;  and  various  day  cares  around Oskaloosa.     Lt. Gary McClun and Nash at Police Dog Trials 2011

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 37 

OSKALOOSA POLICE DEPARTMENT ‐ CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS UNIT  The Criminal Investigations Unit of the Oskaloosa Police Department is comprised of a supervising lieutenant, one crimes against  person and property investigator, and a department drug investigator.  Due to manpower shortages the investigations unit has  been operating at less than full strength because one of the investigators is now covering patrol duties and the other two are  filling in as needed.     

The Investigations Unit is primarily responsible for crimes against persons and property including working financial crimes, sex  crimes,  computer  crimes,  identity  thefts,  and  burglaries  to  businesses  and  residential  property.    The  Investigations  Unit  also  works closely with local business in the areas of drug investigations and general crime.  Throughout the year, Investigators pro‐ vide presentations in these areas to educate businesses of what new crime trends are and what they need to do to lessen their  chance of becoming a victim of crime.  The Investigations Unit is also responsible for any and all special investigations that are  required by the Chief of Police, City of Oskaloosa Attorney’s office, and the Mahaska County Attorney’s office.    During the past year, the Investigations Unit completed an ongoing investigation into a local chiropractor who was subsequently  convicted of the crimes and is currently serving his sentence in an Iowa Prison.  Recently the unit worked closely with the DCI in  gathering  information  and  evidence  in  a  murder  investigation.      An  armed  robbery  of  Medicap  Pharmacy  in  Oskaloosa  was  solved and the unit is currently investigating several crimes against dependant adults.     They continue to investigate sexual abuse allegations working closely with the Department of Human Resources.  

 

Over the past year, the Investigations Unit has been recognized by the Internet Crimes Against Children Division (I.C.A.C.) located  at the State Lab in Ankeny, Iowa. Along with this recognition two investigators have been chosen to receive special training in  the areas’ of computer forensics and peer to peer investigations. Upon the completion of this training, these officers will be  assisting other law enforcement agencies in Southeast Iowa with crimes against children. 

Detective Valentine superglues a purse looking for fingerprints.

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 38 

OSKALOOSA POLICE DEPARTMENT ‐ CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS   SEX CRIMES:  Over the past year, the Investigations Unit investigated twenty‐one sex related crimes.  Of these, case investigated were possession  of  child pornography  and sexual abuse against children.   Four of the cases including sexual abuse against adult females.  COMPUTER CRIMES:  The  Investigations  Unit  over  the  past  several  years  has  seen  a  steady increase of crimes involving computers.  As people increas‐ ingly use the internet for personal and business use the chance of  them becoming victims of crime dramatically increase.  During the  past year, the Investigations Unit has looked into several identity  thefts  involving  people  from  all  facets  of  life.    The  unit  investi‐ gates several thefts involving the following internet entities, Ebay,  MySpace, FaceBook, and  Craig’s list.  Computer crimes are on the  rise all over the country and it is the goal of the Oskaloosa Police  Department  to  stay  on  top  of  new  investigative  techniques  and  training in this area. 

OSKALOOSA POLICE DEPARTMENT ‐ DRUG TASK FORCE   In FY2011, Officer Charlie Valentine, who works as the drug enforcement officer for  the Oskaloosa Police Department, closed a total  of  13 cases.  Stemming from those cases, detectives made or assisted in making 26 felony arrests, 8 misdemeanor arrests, and exe‐ cuted a total of seven drug related search warrants.   

 

Of the cases investigated, two cases resulted in federal indictments—one for illegally purchasing firearms by a felon and one for drug  distribution and possession of firearms as a felon.  Five weapons consisting of assault rifles and handguns were seized. Two clandes‐ tine methamphetamine lab was found and disposed of by officers.    Eight drug‐endangered children cases were investigated as detectives worked closely with Child Protection Workers from the Depart‐ ment of Human Services who would conduct home visits where it was suspected that parents were using illegal drugs in the presence  of their children or while caring for their children.   Four of those cases resulted in the removal of the children from their residence.    It should be noted that the officer that serves in that position was moved back to the street for most of the first six months of the  fiscal year due to manpower shortages on the street.      It

FISCAL YEAR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 

Page 39 

OSKALOOSA POLICE DEPARTMENT ‐ COMMUNITY SERVICE & SCHOOL RESOURCE OFFICER  COMMUNITY SERVICE CONTRACTS:  The Community Service office was contacted by various groups and organizations that requested presentations, law center tours and  demonstrations be given.  These groups included school age children, pre‐school children, boy and girls scouts, church groups and civic  organizations.   

The Community Service Officer is responsible for the Halloween parade each year in the city square.  He helps organize and then pro‐ vides safe passage for youngsters as they travel the event parade route.  

SCHOOL RESOURCE OFFICER:  The School Resource Officer (SRO) spends the majority of his time at the schools interacting with students, teachers, counselors, ad‐ ministrators and parents.  While at school he was involved in a wide range of issues and programs including: 



Teaching D.A.R.E. to all second and fifth grade classes 



Teaching “Keep’n It Real”, a new drug prevention program, to all seventh grade students 



Teaching all ninth grade students about having a minor school license 



Teaching high school health classes about alcohol using “Fatal vision Goggles” while driving golf carts 



Teaching high school science classes about crime scene investigations 



Building positive relationships with students, staff and parents by being involved in their day‐to‐day schedule 



Deterring and investigating criminal incidents such as harassments, bullying, threats, assaults, thefts and bus stop complain‐ ants.  Fifty‐two criminal charges and 10 tobacco citations were filed during the school year. 



Enforcing traffic laws and addressing school safety issues.  Twelve citations were issued for unlawfully passing a school bus 



Reduced and investigated truancy.  Truancy has deceased since the start of this program by 40%. 



Provide a safe learning environment by being present and available to the students during the school day. 

The department feels having an SRO in the schools does not mean the schools are unsafe, it means the community is taking a positive,  proactive step to create orderly, safe and secure schools.  Many incidents can be minimized or dealt with, with a positive outcome, if  the situation is reported.  Having an SRO available to the students is an important first step in keeping our schools safe. 

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OSKALOOSA POLICE DEPARTMENT ‐ GRANTS  GTSB Grant 

Juvenile Alcohol Grant 

 

 

Amount Received: 

Amount Received: 

$26,300   

$3,964 

 

 

Received From: 

Received From: 

Governor’s Traffic Safety Bureau 

8th Judicial Juvenile Court Services 

 

 

Purpose: 

Purpose: 

Overtime for Operating While Intoxi‐

To provide training and enforcement 

cated (OWI) enforcement and training. 

for juvenile alcohol programs (i.e.  under age drinking checks at events). 

Tobacco Enforcement Grant 

Vest Grant 

   

Amount Received:  $50/per check 

Amount Received:   

 

Received From:  Iowa Alcohol Beverages   

Purpose: 

$1,747.50   

Received From:  Bureau of Justice Assistance   

Purpose: 

Compliance checks to ensure estab‐

Used to provide vests for new officers  

lishments w/tobacco licenses do not 

and to replace existing vests that have 

sell to minors, or to provide training 

expired. 

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OSKALOOSA POLICE DEPARTMENT ‐ FIELD TRAINING PROGRAM   In 1987 the Oskaloosa Police Department began its Field Training Program.  This program was designed to give newly hired police  recruits the training needed to perform their numerous duties as police officers for the City of Oskaloosa.   

Over the years this program has evolved into a twelve‐week training process.  During the Field Training Program, newly hired officers  receive  training  in  every  facet  of  law  enforcement.    Areas  of  law  enforcement  training  covered  during  the  Field  Training  Program  include, but are not limited to,: legal issues, domestic abuse investigations, alcohol and drug violations, police ethics, thefts, juvenile  offenders, assaults and traffic enforcement.   

Three officers have been chosen to work as the department’s Field Training Officers (FTO).  They work side‐by‐side with the new offi‐ cers.  Officers use a FTO manual to teach from and after each section is completed the officers give feed back to the new officer and  how the training is going.     

Specialized aspects of law enforcement training, such as defensive tactics, firearms, O.C. spray, ASP Police Baton, CPR, etc. are also  included  in  the  Field  Training  Program.    These  specialized  areas  of  training  are  taught  by  state  certified  instructors  on  the  depart‐ ment. 

OSKALOOSA POLICE DEPARTMENT ‐ TECHNOLOGY ON ROAD    Officers patrol the city in cars that can do so much more than in past years.  It is literally the officer’s office space.  Here you  see the typical set‐up of a squad car.  In the upper right‐hand corner of the picture, near the rear view mirror) is the mobile  video camera that records all traffic stops and calls.  In the middle of the picture is the computer system for the cars.  This  allows officers to issue citations and warnings and to write reports.  In the left‐hand corner of the picture is the radar system  used for speeding violations.  Not seen, but located next to the officer’s right elbow, are the switches that run the light bar  and sirens and the printer for the computer system. 

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PUBLIC WORKS & ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT

ABOUT THE PUBLIC WORKS & ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT The Public Works Department is organized into three integrated divisions for the implementation of the goals and objectives relating to basic environmental services and infrastructure. The departments three divisions are the Streets Division, the Engineering Division, and the Building Safety Division and is under the direction of Public Works Director, Akhilesh Pal. The Engineering Division is responsible for design and construction of the city’s public works infrastructure, maintaining city maps and plats, and operation and maintenance of the streetlight and traffic signal systems. The Building Safety Division handles all permits necessary for construction on private property, building inspection, planning and zoning activities, subdivision development, and nuisance complaints.

Public Works and Engineering Department Office

The Street Division is responsible for the maintenance of the city’s street and alley system, and right-of-ways, in addition to maintenance of the city’s vehicle and equipment fleet.

ENGINEERING DIVISION The Oskaloosa Engineering Department's primary function is to plan, design and direct public works projects. The Department is responsible for all contract construction work performed, both maintenance and new construction, dealing with streets, storm and sanitary sewers, signals, parking lots, public buildings, and other public facilities as required. This includes both in-house and consultant engineering work. The Engineering Division provides organization, direction and coordination of the three operating divisions of the department including policies and procedures, personnel management, planning programs, budgeting, management of records and reporting.

Engineering of most projects is performed by the Engineering Division and includes surveying, design, plan and specification preparation, bidding, staking, contract administration, and inspection. Engineering for projects of larger magnitude, such as wastewater treatment plant improvements and building projects, are generally performed by consultants and their work is monitored by the engineering staff. Street and sanitary sewer construction are the main design and construction projects of the engineering staff. The division is also responsible for traffic signals, traffic signing, street lighting, sidewalks, City plats and maps, monitoring utility companies, subdivision and site development review, and providing engineering expertise to other city departments and the public.

C APL R   YOE V A RE M 2 0E1N1 T  AN S T R E E TF I IS M P NRUOAJLE  RCETPSO R T  

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ENGINEERING DIVISION STAFF The Engineering and Building Safety Division has three full-time employees and one part-time employee as listed below. Name

Position

Date of Hire

Akhilesh Pal Vacant Dan Bolt Amie Roberts

Public Works Director Engineering Technician Building Official Secretary

9/18/2010 NA 5/16/2011 7/12/2010

An abatement notice was sent to clean up solid waste on the property.

BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT AND PLANNING & ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT— The Board of Adjustment has the authority to allow special exceptions and to hear appeals to decisions made in the enforcement of the zoning chapter of the municipal code. The duties include holding appeals on land use zoning, building permits, sign permits, certificate of zoning compliance, etc. The Board of Adjustment met six times during the year. The Board of Adjustment issued variances for zoning regulations of on-street parking, setback of new garage, expansion of existing garage, accessory structure roof height and one land use conditional permit. PLANNING & ZONING—The Planning and Zoning Commission reviews and comments on plats, streets/parks improvement, comprehensive plan, zoning, proposed street names, vacate street or alley, etc. The Planning & Zoning Commission met nine times during the year. Recommendations were made to the City Council for four alley vacations, two rezoning requests, two final plat approvals, three site plans, one on-street parking restriction, one temporary land use permit, two changes to zoning ordinance of Oskaloosa Municipal Code.

2010 IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS Improvements on North Green Street— This improvement project is designed for sanitary sewer and road construction. The sanitary sewer improvement on North Green Street was completed this fiscal year and involved installation of a pumping station with 4039 feet of 8” sewer pipes, 1757 feet of 6” force main and 15 manholes. The design for the road construction has been reviewed and finalized. It will be completed in the next fiscal year. The road construction project is designed for the construction of approximately 2500 linear feet of new 2-traffic lane road on North Green Street north of M Avenue West.

Property requesting variance for roof height of accessory structure.

Improvements on Public Works Building— Staff applied and received Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant for a 1:1 matching fund to receive $13,293 to provide energy efficiency retrofits for the existing facility of the Public Works Department. The building retrofit project included replacement and installation of insulated windows, weather-sealed doors, heating system, ceiling insulation, efficient lighting with occupancy sensors, efficient water heaters, and exit sign retrofits. The department has noticed savings in its energy bills. New retrofits in Public Works Building to conserve energy.

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BUILDING SAFETY & CONSTRUCTION FY 2010-2011 building activity remained strong during the period. However, total permit activity went down from $95,275.00 to $66,881.30. New residential construction has grown slightly with 8 single-family homes and 3 townhouses, from 10 single-family homes in the previous period. The major projects during this period were Nazarene Church, First Christian Reformed Church, Walmart remodel, and crematory equipment at Van Arkel Langkamp Funeral Chapel. Building safety responsibilities also include processing nuisance complaints. During the 2010-2011 Fiscal Year, several nuisance abatement notices were sent out by the Department. The growing trend in complaints primarily involve residents accumulating sig-

nificant quantities of garbage and debris, rather than using the services of commercial sanitation services. The city staff sent out several notices to repair, reconstruct or demolish dilapidated or unsafe structures. Dan Bolt started as the City Building Official on May 16, 2011. Dan Bolt comes to Oskaloosa after being the Building Official for The Building Inspectors in Huxley, IA. The City has also used the services of The Building Inspectors from Huxley, IA for approximately two months after Glen Dempsey, Building Official, resigned on January 2011 and moved to a new job at Michigan.

Significant projects during this period were Storage Building Construction

Construction of Townhouses

Church, the First

BUILDING PERMITS BREAKDOWN The 2010-2011 building permit fees decreased by $28,393.70 during this period. The primary reason for the decrease in permit fees is because the larger projects this period were lower in value when compared to last period.

the Nazarene

The yearly permits issued are broken down as follows:

Christian Reformed Church,

Electrical

98 issued

$8,490.00 collected

Plumbing

62 issued

$2,975.50 collected

and Wal-mart

Sewer Conn.

2 issued

$450.00 collected

remodel.

Mechanical

97 issued

$13,417.00 collected

Building

129 issued

$41,018.80 collected

Demolition

19 issued

$530.00 collected

Totals

407 issued

$66,881.30 collected

Nazarene Church

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STREET DIVISION The City of Oskaloosa contains approximately 67 miles of streets. This includes 35 miles of hard surface (PCC & ACC paving), 29 miles of seal-coated surface, and 3 miles of gravel surface. Maintaining the city’s infrastructure is accomplished by a staff which includes the Public Works Director, one Street Superintendent, one mechanic, six equipment operators, and two temporary summer employees. There was a total of 64 blocks or 3.7 miles of public streets that were seal-coated in this period. Street and pothole patching is the most labor intensive activity we have. The major expense in FY-2011 for the material in the seal coating was $70,000 for 24,000 gallons of medium cure liquid asphalt and $12,700 for 1500 tons of washed chip rocks and $2,700 for 150 tons of pea gravel. Streets Division has used approximately 92 tons of asphalt to fix potholes, using approximately $12,000. They have used $22,000 using 170 cubic yards of concrete and 22 tons of hot mix asphalt for pavement repairs. More than 4,200 man-hours were used this year in repairing and maintaining the streets. The Streets has seven full-time employees and two part-time seasonal employees. The full-time employees area as listed below.

Fill pot holes with asphalt

Name

Position

Date of Hire

Rex Osborn

Street Supervisor

07/01/96

Joe Richards

Mechanic

09/30/91

Steve Watts

Lead Operator

08/20/80

Gary Vroegh

Lead Operator

09/08/08

Ryan Humphrey

Operator 1

05/01/00

Leland Sams

Operator 1

03/09/04

Matt Saville

Operator 1

06/09/08

Seal-coating

SNOW AND ICE REMOVAL Over the past year, Oskaloosa has received constant snow and ice storms. 1400 man-hours were winter operations . The Street Division put down approximately 400 tons of salt, 1200 tons of sand and 100 loads (110,000 gallons) of brine ahead of predicted storms. They have removed approximately 900 loads of snow from the downtown area.

Street condition after snow removal by Public Works Employees.

Downtown snow removal

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ASSISTING OTHER DEPARTMENTS Street Division employees spend time helping other departments where needed. Time is spent assisting the Engineering Division with surveying and inspection work and helping with utility locates. Other agencies that were assisted include the Oskaloosa Area Chamber and Development Group with Christmas decorations, parade set-up, hanging and removing banners in the spring and fall, and hanging & removal of 42 flags four times a year. There were also various Wastewater and Water Department projects the Street Division helped with throughout the year. Street Division personnel assisted the Wastewater Division with various storm sewer intake and manhole maintenance projects, ditching, street repair, and hauling fuel. Street Division personnel assist other groups having events by supplying barricades and/or traffic cones if the event requires a street to be closed for a short period of time.

STREET SWEEPING Street sweeping is a valuable part of street maintenance. It is also an important part of storm sewer maintenance. The more debris that is cleaned up with the street sweeper, the smaller the amount of debris that goes into the storm sewer system. The smaller the amount of debris in the storm sewer system, the fewer problems concerning clogging there are.

Elgin Mechanical Sweeper

The street sweeper ran for 1000 hours this year. The Streets Division has purchased a new mechanical sweeper that replaced a 2002 vacuum sweeper. Mechanical Sweeper

TRAFFIC CONTROL AND PAVEMENT MARKINGS During FY-2010, the crosswalks and parking stalls in the downtown area and city-owned parking lots were given a fresh coat of paint. Other crosswalks and parking stalls throughout Oskaloosa were painted. There were several locations where traffic control signs were repaired, installed, replaced, or refaced. Some of the reasons for these activities are general maintenance, traffic accidents, or vandalism. The staff applied and received Federal Aid for a 100% matching fund of $18,515 to repair traffic signals that were damaged due to lightning and thunderstorms. The signals that were affected were on Hwy 92/North 3rd St and Hwy 92/Hwy 21. Signalized Traffic Control

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EQUIPMENT & FLEET MAINTENANCE The city mechanic coordinates the routine maintenance and repair of the entire department’s vehicle fleet and all major specialized units of equipment. The mechanic also provides technical assistance in evaluating specifications and bidding documents for the purchase and replacement of all vehicles and equipment.

In this period the city mechanic performed repairs and routine maintenance on a total of 72 different pieces of equipment. The mechanic spent 851 hours (53%) of time on vehicle repairs, 252 hours (16%) of time on preventive maintenance, 106 hours (7%) of time on modifying new equipment, and 380 hours (24%) on miscellaneous activity.

Preventive maintenance of loader

FLEET FUEL—12,350 gallons of diesel and 4,600 gallons of unleaded fuel were consumed in this fiscal year. The average unit price on diesel was $2.83 per gallon and on unleaded fuel was $2.62 per gallon in this period. The total amount expended on this period was $37,100.

City mechanic in shop area

NEW PUBLIC WORKS EQUIPMENT During FY-2011, the Streets Division purchased two pieces of equipment. The first was a new mechanical sweeper for $157,000. This new sweeper has replaced the 2002 vacuum sweeper and can be used in all weather conditions. The second is a used snow push box for $4,950. The snow push box is 16 feet wide and is extremely efficient in plowing snow from downtown.

New sweeper for public works department that can be used to sweep to clean streets.

Sixteen feet wide snow box for public works department that can be used to plow snow.

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OSKALOOSA PUBLIC LIBRARY  BOARD OF TRUSTEES:                       Term Expires  Mike Sytsma, President                            2013  Darren Dykstra, Vice‐president               2011  Diane VanWyngarden                               2011  Jane Ireland                                                2013  Peggy Grafke                                              2015  Judy Bishop                                                 2013  Candace Slobe                                            2011  Kathy Rothfus                                             2015  Bryan Johnson                                            2015   

Oskaloosa Public Library 

In 1902 the citizens of Oskaloosa petitioned Andrew Carnegie, asking for $20,000 to construct a City library.  The funds were granted with  the agreement that a site be provided and the city contribute at least $2,000 annually to support the library.  The library opened in 1903.  In 1994, funds to expand the library were raised through a one‐cent local option sales tax approved by voters.  The expanded and refur‐ bished library was dedicated on September 14, 1997. 

OSKALOOSA PUBLIC LIBRARY ‐ STAFF 

DATE HIRED

EMPLOYEE 

 

 

 

POSITION 

 

 

FULL TIME 

PART TIME 

Wanda Gardner 

 

 

 

Director   

 

 

10‐13‐10 

Paulette Groet  

 

 

 

Library Technician   

 

04‐17‐89  

Linda Fox  

 

 

 

Youth Librarian 

 

 

09‐01‐82  

Susan Hasso  

 

 

 

Admin. Assistant   

 

03‐20‐00                  06‐16‐97  

Marion Gaughan    

 

 

Cataloger  

 

 

04‐11‐01                  01‐03‐00  

Mike Calzaretta 

 

 

 

Building Manager   

 

01‐09‐06   

Cindy Godlove 

 

 

 

Library Assistant 

 

 

03‐07‐88                  07‐01‐85    

Nancy Jones 

 

 

 

Library Assistant 

 

 

01‐01‐79                  07‐28‐78    

Amanda Ver Ploeg   

 

 

Library Assistant 

 

 

 

 

10‐18‐05  

Nancy Hall 

 

 

 

Library Assistant 

 

 

 

 

02‐11‐09  

Aiyanna Looney 

 

 

 

Library Assistant 

 

 

 

 

10‐21‐09  

Devon Sutton 

 

 

 

Page 

 

 

 

 

 

09‐07‐10 

Gale Drier 

 

 

 

Page 

                                   resigned 01‐07‐11   

06‐03‐10  

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OSKALOOSA PUBLIC LIBRARY  LIBRARY FOUNDATION 2010/2011 

FRIENDS OF THE OSKALOOSA PUBLIC LIBRARY 2010/2011 

The  Oskaloosa  Public  Library  Foundation  is  a  501c3  non‐profit 

The Friends of the Oskaloosa Public Library is a volunteer organiza‐

corporation.  Donated funds managed by the Foundation trustees 

tion  established  to  raise  funds  for  expansion  of  library  programs 

are invested to provide for the future security and growth of the 

and services, or to purchase materials that are outside the normal 

Library,  with  growth  funds  available  to  supplement  the  Library’s 

library operating budget.  Most of the group’s funds are raised by 

budget on a yearly basis for special projects, programs or capital 

selling  individual,  family  and  business  memberships,  and  the  sale 

improvements.  Donations are tax deductible. 

of reusable book bags. 

FOUNDATION BOARD OF TRUSTEES:

FRIENDS BOARD MEMBERS: 

 

Keith Miller, President 

Jake Roberts, Vice‐president 

Nancy Brown, Treasurer 

Karen Adams, Secretary 

 

Dianne VanGorp, President  Perry Lund, Vice‐president  David Dixon, Treasurer  Terri Nielsen 

Joan Benscoter 

Carrie Bunnell 

Chris Van Wyk 

Kate Hite 

Carla Malloy 

Bill Akason 

Diana Pearson 

Mike Sytsma, Library Trustee  Peggy Grafke, Library Trustee  Amanda VerPloeg assists the Friends of 

Registered agent of Foundation: Jim Hansen 

the Library by preparing monthly slide 

CPA for the Foundation: Doug Hunt 

shows of activities, membership & donor  forms, table top displays, and research‐ ing purchases for the Friends and direc‐ tor. Amanda also facilitates a weekly 

FOUNDATION FUNDS PROVIDED 2010/2011: 

meeting of writers who share their work. 

Polishing and repair machine for CD and DVD discs;   two 55” flat‐screen TVs for 3rd floor meeting room  and children’s program room;   ALA membership for  Library Director;  Mad Science Summer Reading Finale  Program; and $2,000 donation for The Reading Gar‐ den.  

FRIENDS FUNDING 2010/2011:    Adult Bestsellers; Teen book; Career materials; 2011 World Book  Encyclopedia set;  Board Books for Babies;  advance payment of  color photocopies jointly used by Library and Friends;  set‐up fee  and introduction of downloadable audio books and E‐books, 

CONTRIBUTED FUNDS: $9,200 

4/1/11‐6/30/11;  annual online subscription for Heritage Quest  and Ancestry.com genealogy programs 3/1/11‐3/1/12;  expanded  issues and 2011/2012 subscription to “Book Page” review newspa‐ per;  $500 for the Summer Reading Program and $4,000 for The 

Nancy Jones uses her exceptional graphic talents in signs, displays, photos and library publishing. Along with keeping our supply cupboards stocked, Nancy compiles and posts “Staff Picks”, and uses the library’s new disc equipment to repair and clean DVDs and music and audio CDs.

Reading Garden project. 

TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS: $9,794  The 501c3 non‐profit status of the Friends allowed the Library  Director to apply and receive $1,200 of grant funds to purchase  and expand offerings of popular fiction and series books geared for  8‐12 year olds.  Those funds were provided by the Mahaska County  United Way in 2010. 

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About Your Library  The Oskaloosa Public Library is one of 453 public libraries in the State of Iowa. The State Library established  new standards in 2010, setting out 79 criteria to rank the service quality provided by local libraries. The  Oskaloosa Public Library meets or exceeds the required minimum in 78 of those areas. The standard our Library  did not choose to meet is providing service on Sunday.    Most Library funding comes from city taxes. But because our Library is accredited by the State, the Oskaloosa  Public Library receives annual state funds to enrich, but not replace local funding. How much a library receives  from the state depends upon the volume and quality of your service. Our library is ranked in the top service  category, Tier 3, and in 2010 received state funds for: resource sharing with other libraries: $720.20; serving  library visitors from other Iowa communities: $4,418.55; and Direct Aid to libraries: $3,309.42.    The Oskaloosa Public Library serves a large audience from Mahaska and surrounding counties.  This year the  Mahaska County Board of Supervisors provided $45,000 of funding to the library for serving rural residents. The  six towns of Beacon, Fremont, Keomah Village, Leighton, University Park and Rose Hill contracted service for  their residents, contributing $16,342 to the library’s budget.    To assist school and public libraries with the technology expenses of telephone and Internet, the federal  government provides E‐rate reimbursements. This year the library received $1,111.40 of federal funds. MCG,  our local phone and Internet provider, donates free Internet and WI‐FI service  to the library and its outdoor courtyard area. 

Paulette Groet is the library’s technical and circulation manager. Paulette’s skills are  essential since every aspect of today’s library demands current and highly‐functioning  technology: from identifying and entering patron data, cataloging materials, and  filling hold requests, to generating circulation statistics, state reports and filing claims  for federal reimbursements. 

The People at Your Library  The Oskaloosa Public Library has a veteran staff that works together like a well‐oiled machine! They are  committed to providing quality service, new technologies, and literature/media to educate and enrich the lives  of local residents.  Their combined experience within the Oskaloosa Library totals 150 years!    Library Director Wanda Gardner is new to Oskaloosa. She started her position in Mid‐October, 2010, after a  three‐month candidate search that involved members of the Library Board, staff, Library Foundation and  Library Friends. Gardner has found the staff helpful as she melded into the library’s established routines. And  the community was cordial, inviting Gardner to speak at local service groups  and professional organizations. While new to Osky, Gardner is not new to Iowa  libraries. She has a decade of experience as a school librarian and nearly two  decades as a public library director, grant writer, writer and historian. Before  Gardner’s arrival, Paulette Groet and Linda Fox served as library interim  directors from mid‐June to mid‐October. Working as a team, these two moved  the library forward, addressed budget issues, and spurred action on building  maintenance during their tenure.  Library goals discussed during this interim  included maintaining a balanced budget, repairing the building, increasing the  materials budget and staying abreast with new technologies.  Library Director Wanda Gardner confers with Dennis Shankster about his recent  inspection of the building and maintenance of the library’s limestone trim. 

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Immediate Library Concerns  This year, the Oskaloosa Public Library had 100,000 visitors to our building. Maintaining a safe environment is a  key concern since our clientele is a cross‐section that ranges from infants to the elderly.  A city safety inspection  in January spurred library staff to complete a self‐study that resulted in a safer building; CPR and first aid classes  for all employees; an expanded system of restricting sexual offenders who might apply for library use; and  increased awareness and safety procedures in the event of severe summer weather. A defibrillator, donated by  the Oskaloosa Police Department, was added to the second floor, and retired library AV equipment was donated  to Mahaska County Emergency Coordinator, Jamey Robinson, for use in group presentations. Two panic buttons  were installed in the library to soundlessly summon police assistance, and an additional monitoring camera was  added to the children’s program room.    FY 2010/2011 was a year of belt‐tightening for the library. The responsibility of being good stewards of the  building left library coffers short. From June through December, new materials were rarely added to the  collection. Library staff hours were shuffled, making maximum use of full‐time employees and utilizing part‐time  employees only as necessary. And all contracts, standing orders, and purchasing patterns were evaluated for cost ‐effectiveness.    Adjustments made included: Cancellation of OCLC cataloging that cost approximately $500 per month, replaced  by MARC records from our book wholesaler at 35 cents per book; switch to locally‐owned Certified Pest Control,  saving $6 per month; all ink and toner supplies purchased locally through The Office Center at discount prices;  and recycling used toner cartridges for office supply credit at Staples.  Additionally,  the Library made optimum use of State‐negotiated discounts for library and  janitorial supplies; found a new vendor for energy‐efficient bulbs and ballasts to  provide savings in purchase costs and operation for both the Library and City Hall;  reduced the purchase of trash bags by 40% by recycling paper and cardboard; and  used the Library Friends 501c3 designation to register with techsoup.com, a  software clearing house for non‐profits, that will save the library 80‐90% on most of  their computer program and anti‐virus software purchases.  Mike Calzaretta spent a lot of time on ladders while he changed 60 ballasts  and 230 fluorescent lamps this year! Mike streamlined supply purchasing and  found discounts to provide substantial savings. Survey respondents praised  the building’s cleanliness, but Mike just says he treats the library with the  care you’d expect from “an owner, not a renter”. 

Maintaining the Historic Library Building  The Oskaloosa Public Library is considered one of Iowa’s most beautiful, historic libraries. Local  residents are proud of this architectural gem that has been in the community for 107 years.   In 2011, OPN, the architectural firm responsible for designing and overseeing the library’s  expansion, signed a no‐cost, 10 year contract with the Library Board.  Under the contract  terms, on an annual basis OPN will: inspect, report, and recommend maintenance and repairs  that will assist the Library Board to address structural concerns.  Using funds from the endowed library maintenance fund, two substantial projects took place  in October and November 2010: replacement of the library’s four boilers with two new ones at  $31,380; and roof repair which required removal and replacement of stones, installation of  metal flashing, re‐sealing stone joints, and repair of the rubber roof membrane. This project  cost $33,379. The library also replaced two compressors on air conditioning units.    Since 1997, the library has utilized a “constant‐volume reheat air terminal system” for heating and cooling: a high ‐tech program utilizing boilers and air conditioning on a year‐round basis to electronically create a precise  humidity level. While this is a commendable HVAC system for archival libraries and museums, our system is  expensive to run and maintain, and is susceptible to break‐down and costly electronic replacement bills. Yearly  energy costs for the Oskaloosa library average $1.67 per square foot, while national guidelines indicate utility  costs for similar‐sized public buildings range from $1.18 to $1.25 per square foot. 

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Maintaining the Historic Library Building cont.    Discussions by staff and library board mentioned: items within the library spend much of their shelf‐life in the  homes of Oskaloosa library‐users, not within the library; a reliable, stable and comfortable temperature is desired  for people in the library; humidity levels should be kept in a safe range so that excess moisture does not harm  materials and static electricity does not cause personal and electronic problems; but the library should attempt to  reduce its energy usage and utility costs.    A business consultant from MidAmerican Energy met with library representatives in June 2011 to examine the  HVAC system. He will compare library MidAmerican bills from the previous four years with the timing of work and  replacements on the system, and study current energy‐saving measures used by the library. He is preparing a  report outlining alternatives and best practices that will assist the library board as they seek ways to address  climate concerns. 

Our Role in the Community    Preserving the Past:  Our history and genealogy archive maintains and assists researchers who seek local information. For the past two  years, The Oskaloosa Herald has provided microfilm prints of their newspaper to aid permanent research. Both  the Library Foundation and the Friends of the Library have funded programs for online genealogy searches. This  year Ancestry.com was used for 9,170 searches and Heritage Quest was used in 2,014 searches.    After several years, Linda Eliason retired from her volunteer genealogy research  position. Margaret Ademeit took over research duties in March, and heads the  “reminisce society”, volunteers who clip and preserve newspaper articles while  they enjoy reflecting on the past. Ila Ruby and Jan Palmer also assist. Genealogy  reference questions were answered 250 times by archivist Cindy Godlove; and  Godlove, Eliason and Ademeit provided responses to 88 research requests received  on‐line or through the mail.  A total of $1,795 was collected in fees and donations  for genealogical services.    Because of her library role, Cindy Godlove maintains membership in the Keo‐mah  Genealogical Society and the Mahaska County Historical Society. This year Godlove  was elected to serve on the board of the Historical Society.  Cindy Godlove maintains the library’s local history and genealogy archives, handles loan transactions with other libraries, and obtains and  shares book sets used by reading and discussion groups.  Cindy and Margaret Ademeit, a volunteer researcher, use historic newspapers, books,  county records and on‐line sources to answer questions on local history and genealogy. 

Meeting Rooms:  The third floor of the Library provides meeting space for clubs, groups, families, counseling, education and  presentations. This past year 631 meetings with 4,102 in attendance were held here. Some who use the rooms  regularly include: Altrusa, Brown Bag Book Club, Friends of the Library, Oskaloosa Library Foundation, Oskaloosa  Community Theatre, Stamp Club, TOPS 398, Mahaska Pioneer Cemetery Association, Oskaloosa Disc Golf Club,  Daughters of the American Revolution, and liaisons to Congressman Leonard Boswell.    This April the local Questers organization celebrated their 40th anniversary by inviting members and guests from  the region to a reception in our historic Library’s meeting rooms. As a tie‐in, Questers also displayed antique  collections in the Library’s main floor display case. City‐wide employee meetings, large Chamber of Commerce  events, and occasionally City Council meetings are held in the Library.    MCG uses Library meeting rooms one evening each month to offer two, informative computer sessions of high‐ interest to the public. This year some of those classes included: Selling on e‐Bay; Intro to MS Excel; On‐line Scams;  Social Networking; Web‐cams and Video Chatting. 

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Our Role in the Community cont.    Assisting Others:   During February, Building Manager Mike Calzaretta collected over 50 phones  and additional phone hardware for donation to “Cell Phone for Soldiers”, a  nonprofit program that gives prepaid phone cards to soldiers overseas so they  can call their families in the U.S. To date, Calzaretta has collected over 400  phones at the Library and also expanded his service project with a drop‐off  location at Indian Hills Community College.    During February, the Library accepted donations of non‐perishable food items in lieu of overdue fines. A total of  856 food and hygiene items were collected at the Library and given to the Ecumenical Cupboard for distribution  to those in need.    Book and media donations received by the Library are frequently added to our collections or sold on our sale  shelf with funds used for new purchases. Some of our more unusual donations are given to AAUW for their  annual fall book sale.    The archives of the local DAR chapter moved to the Library archives, allowing researchers access to their Lineage  books. The Library assisted the Chapter to have new and accurate spines attached to 78 volumes of their  reference collection without cost.    Susan Hasso, administrative assistant, is in charge of proctoring services at the            Library. This allows students taking on‐line and correspondence courses to take  college exams in Oskaloosa. The use of this service grows as more training and  education is required by employers.    Susan Hasso serves as secretary to the Library Board of Trustees, maintains library files  and financial records, and proctors student exams. Susan draws on her 26‐year back‐ ground as a junior high English teacher as she selects quality teen materials. 

Twice a month, the library tech‐team of Paulette Groet and Marion Gaughan provide “help sessions”, informal  assistance for individuals who have a specific computer problem or need a little tutoring on software  applications. 

Marion Gaughan catalogs new materials, matches new books  with those who have requested them, designs and updates the  library website, and provides helpful computer assistance. This  year Marion tallied and compiled responses to the library’s  annual survey. 

THE YEAR IN NUMBERS    Check outs        Reference questions answered    Materials owned  Adult and Teen: 119, 769      In person: 4,209        Adult: 42,707  Children: 87,229        Via phone: 638        Teen: 2,618  Total: 206,998        Online: 1,650        Children: 24,143                      Total Collection: 69,468  Library materials purchased  2,335 items, expending $38,895.42                                                                              New library cards registered: 1,560                                        Computer use provided to Library visitors: 15,714                         

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Our Role in the Community cont.    Youth Services:   Linda Fox, Youth Librarian, is recognized across Iowa as a leading force in  library service to children. In October the State Library presented their  Summer Reading Workshop here in Oskaloosa.  In the spring, Linda Fox was a  forum member and a presenter at the State Library’s two‐day “Kids First”  conference in Des Moines.    During the school year Mrs. Fox visited preschools and the elementary school,  Emma DeBoef shares some quality  meeting 50 classes each month, delivering 25 books and sharing book talks  time with Mrs. Fox, the youth services  with each class.  Outreach attendance at programs was 8,552. She also did  librarian. Emma was the 2011 grand  story‐telling segments bi‐weekly, produced and aired on CRI to reach children  prize winner at the “Read to Me” level  in their homes.  of the summer reading program Mrs.    Fox has provided a warm and friendly  Within the Library, Mrs. Fox presented seven programs each week for infants,  introduction to the library for two  generations of Oskaloosa children.  preschoolers and school‐age children. Total in‐house attendance   was 7,355. The Library’s youth summer reading  program was held for six weeks in June and July. It registered 763 and reported 13,235  books read. The theme “One World: Many Stories” brought daily cultural adventures  and activities for all ages with funding, supplies, volunteers and reading incentive  rewards coming from throughout the community.  Because our programs have a history  of reaching so many youngsters, the assistance and support received is also  outstanding.    The teen theme, “Take a Bite of a Good Book and Taste the World” brought  weekly gourmet samplings of international foods and a cook‐off that  Washington Pearce won. The Teen Advisory Board held their annual Cemetery  Walk in September; built and entered a float in the Christmas Parade; held a  rummage sale to raise funds; and planned teen programs throughout the year.    Teen Board members Kaylee and Emilee Morris show one of    the new flat screen TVs the Library Foundation purchased.    Kaylee and Emilee helped coordinate children’s summer     movies by making popcorn and distributing soft drinks.        “I’m always on the lookout for opportunities to bring books “to life” for my students. I came across  Tumblebooks on your website last month. This is an amazing tool to help students get excited about reading by  combining technology and books. Thank you for supporting our students, teachers, and community with such a  fantastic library and ALL the services OUR public library offers! Top notch!”   Tracy Klucas, 3rd grade teacher 

Devon Sutton (left) is a library page who shelves and  organizes materials. Devon was selected from 58  applicants for his position, and this year he also helped in  moving shelves, magazines and new books to update the  adult reading lounge. College students Justin Keller and  Dana Korell worked full‐time in the children’s department  of the library this summer. They were kept busy registering  participants, assisting with programs and distributing  reading prizes. This was Justin’s third year and Dana’s first  year at the library, with their placement and wages  provided as a community service by Musco, a value of  approximately $9,500. 

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New at the library this year:  This year the Library conducted a survey to gain information and opinions about Library service. Two hundred  library users responded to the first annual survey. The top four uses of the Library were: check‐out of adult fiction  and non‐fiction books; check‐out of DVD movies; use of adult computer lab; check‐out of children’s materials.  Comments and suggestions will be used as the Library considers its collections, services and projects for the  coming year.    The Friends of the Library provided the initial set‐up fees so the Library could begin offering E‐books and  downloadable audio books in April 2011. We now hold membership in WILBOR, an Iowa library consortium  bringing cost‐effective technology to rural libraries.  During April, May and June, local residents downloaded 418  items to their computers or hand‐held devices via the Library’s website. Next year this service will continue,  funded from the library’s general material budget.      Nancy Hall says that 75‐80% of    “When I built my 3,100 square foot  the library’s inspirational books    are part of a series, so she  house, it took me two years and I did    makes sure they are shelved  78% of the building solo. Assisting me  together and the latest volumes    were 210 audio books on CD from the  are ordered. Nancy used home‐   Oskaloosa Library that I listened to  spun artifacts and her interest in    while I was doing the work.”     rural topics to make two autumn    Paul F. Callahan  book displays to attract readers.          Our library offerings follow societal trends but are tempered by local demand. For example, in May 2011,  Amazon.com reported that for the first time, the sale of print books was surpassed by the sale of E‐books. Here in  Oskaloosa, however, most of our local users continue to request print books, so that is where more funds are  directed for purchases. Likewise, the library continues to purchase movies in DVD and rarely in Blu‐Ray high  definition, since nationally less than 15% of households own Blu‐Ray equipment.  Similarly, due to their fragile  nature and limited circulation life, last year it was decided the Library would not acquire more Playaways. This  year the small, compact audio units (the size of a pack of playing  cards with headphones) were ordered only when a donor provided  funding and requested their purchase.  Our library philosophy is  “current yet thoughtful” in purchasing to serve our clientele.    In hard economic times public libraries are essential, and they   need to be comfortable and inviting places. This spring the   Library’s adult reading lounge was revamped without cost,   using shelving and furniture that had been in storage or   under‐utilized. New adult fiction and non‐fiction collections   were moved to the lounge, comfortable seating was increased,   and a jig‐saw puzzle found a spot on a table where it invites   visitors to test their cooperative skills.  The number of magazine  subscriptions is increasing by 35%, using bargain‐basement   shopping; and their display area will soon resemble a news   Aiyanna Looney designed a popular adult summer  stand with current titles arranged by fields of interest. Back issues   reading program, “Read the Book, See the Movie”  of newspapers are now stored at eye‐level, so searchers, often  that encouraged the comparison of written  elderly, do not need to stoop and bend.  literature to its visual component. The Peppertree    and Penn Centre Theatre provided the grand    prize. Aiyanna also aided the selection of    resources for first‐time job applicants and created    new publicity materials for expanding the library’s  outreach to the elderly.     

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New at the Library This Year cont.    Plans and progress are underway on “The Reading Garden”, a perennial garden for reading and wireless  computer use with a gazebo for outdoor programs.  Gridco LLC provided the green space south of the library and  memorial funds from the late Barbara Campbell launched the project. The Friends of the Library have spear‐ headed 2011 fundraising, selling engraved paving bricks for $50 each. Dan Brice of DB Landscape and Suzette  Streigel, an ISU horticulturist, provided landscape design and plant selection. Other initial funding has come from  Mahaska County Community Foundation, Elks Lodge #304, Friends of the Library, and the Library Foundation.  Clow Valve Company will provide cast iron park benches it manufactures, and “Beyond Borders” will provide and  install landscape edging. “The Reading Garden” will be a true community project, using donated plants and  materials as well as volunteer labor. 

“The Reading Garden” will be  an added attraction to the  already inviting environment of  the Oskaloosa Public Library.  

INCOME GENERATED 2010‐2011    Adult Donations and Memorials: $962          Leonard James Bequest: $30,094      Children’s Grants and Memorials:       Mahaska/Wapello Empowerment Grant $8,514  Hannah Johnston Tjarks Memorial $2,000    Lacey Trust  $4,423                     

 

Fines, fees, damages and book sales: $24,000 

       

Summer Reading Program Donations:  Cash $3,600  In Kind $4,700   

 

 

 

 

 

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WASTEWATER DIVISION The Wastewater Division is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the City’s two wastewater treatment facilities which are staffed seven days a week This includes the operation and maintenance of seven lift stations and storm water lagoon system, operation of industrial pretreatment system at Oskaloosa Food Products, performing laboratory analysis for treatment facilities plus industrial and commercial contributors, operation and maintenance of sanitary and storm sewer collection systems, performing roadside mowing of city-owned property and private lots, maintaining right-of-way trees and receiving ten to twenty required contact hours of training per state certified operator. In FY-2011 the Wastewater Division treated over 869,901,000 gallons of wastewater with a treatment efficiency of 91% on average, at both plants and a treatment efficiency of better than 99% at OFPC. IDNR requires 85% treatment efficiency.

Below is a list of Wastewater Division employees. Employee David Neubert

Wastewater Director Grade IV

Monte Johnson

SW Plant Operator Grade III

Kevin Bork

Collection Operator Grade III

Bruce VanderMeyden

NE Plant Operator Grade 1

Nicky Witt

Wastewater Operator

Bill Almond

Digester Operator Grade I

Gina McMains

Laboratory Manager Grade III

LIFTSTATIONS The City of Oskaloosa owns and operates seven lift stations located in the outlying areas of Oskaloosa. The new lift station that will serve the Lacey Complex went into operation in late June. Lift stations are designed to pump sewage up hill where a gravity sewer cannot be used. In FY-2011 1,008 man-hours were spent maintaining and operating the lift stations. Some of the maintenance activities include general pump maintenance, cleaning of the lift station buildings, and mowing and trimming of the lift station grounds. All lift stations are checked daily to ensure proper operations. The lift stations were inspected by the IDNR in September. The inspection is part of the routine inspections of the treatment plants, collection system, lab, and the Oskaloosa Food Products pre-treatment facility.

Position

New Lacey Lift Station

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COLLECTION SYSTEM Two wastewater employees maintain the storm and sanitary system throughout the city. Most man-hours are used for cleaning the lines and catch basins as part of a preventative maintenance program. Wastewater personnel also repair the system as needed. This year city personnel replaced or repaired 7 intakes and contracted repairs on 5 others. Another maintenance activity is the 30/60/90 cleaning program. This program was designed to help alleviate the building up of solids in flat sewer lines by cleaning these sewers every 30, 60, or 90 days depending on how fast each individual sewer was filling up. This year we continued inspecting restaurants and their grease traps. If the traps are not functioning properly, the grease will flow into the sanitary sewer system causing many problems. If a restaurant does not pass the inspection, they are sent an abatement notice and are required to make the necessary repairs to their system. A total of 7 food preparers were sent notices and all have complied. wastewater personnel will recheck each facility at least annually to ensure the traps are being maintained. In FY 2011, a total of 14,507 lineal feet of sewer pipe was cleaned mainly in the northeast quadrant of the City. The number of feet cleaned was much lower than usual. This was due to an extremely wet summer. This year over 1255.75 man-hours were used cleaning sanitary sewers and storm sewer catch basins and intakes. The manhours spent cleaning sewers accounted for over 56% of the total man-hours spent on the collection system. In addition to 5 pipe repair or replacements, there were 2 manholes built or repaired.

Sandbagging operations at Northeast Plant In August of 2010 due to flooding.

of 5 private sewer lines were televised finding 2 illegal connections. Property owners were notified of the illegal connections and have disconnected from the city main. Televising private lines in search of illegal connections is something we will do more of in the winter.

Using the Seeker camera, the Wastewater Department televised sanitary sewer services in problem areas. A total

FEMA The City of Oskaloosa was included in FEMA Disaster #1930. Numerous storm and sanitary sewer issues were caused by the flooding as well as damages to equipment at both the north and south plants. A total of 7 projects were approved for payment from FEMA totaling $96,795.54 in damages. The federal payment covered 75% of the cost with the state covering 10%. Exposed sewer line after flood

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SOUTHWEST PLANT The Southwest Treatment Facility uses the activated sludge process for the decomposition of wastes. Treatment equipment includes an automatic bar screen, grit removal system, one primary settling tank, six aeration tanks, two final settling tanks, two chlorine contact tanks, two digesters for sludge handling, and two storm water storage lagoons with over 16.5 million gallons of storage capacity. This year, 422,239,000 gallons of raw sewage were treated at the Southwest Plant. This computes to 1,156,191 gallons per day. Treatment efficiency was 92% in FY-2011. The IDNR requires facilities remove 85% of the pollutants to remain in compliance with discharge limitations. There were no permit violations for pollutants in FY-2011. Treated effluent from the SW Plant is chlorinated to kill bacteria and pumped to Edmundson Golf Course to be used for irrigation. In FY-2011, 1,615,000 gallons of effluent were pumped to the holding pond at the golf course. Sludge hauling from the digester was done during September, October and November. A total of 667,800 gallons were sub-surface injected in agricultural ground at five separate locations. The total gallons hauled increased by 240,000 gallons in 2011 due to the fact that wastewater personnel completely emptied, cleaned and inspected the inside of #1 tank. The laboratory facilities are located at the Southwest Plant where all analysis for the North and South plants, as well as

Southwest Wastewater Treatment Plant

Oskaloosa Food Products is performed. Since 1999 the laboratory facilities have been state certified by the IDNR. This allows the lab to perform analysis for other agencies. During FY-2011 work was done for Oskaloosa Food Products, City of Blakesburg, City of University Park, MCH, Mr. Rooter, Lynndana Acres, Mahaska County and Meland Septic Service. Revenue of $860.00 was generated from analysis of the above-mentioned agencies. The city received additional revenues of $7,197.80 for accepting septic waste from haulers. Vehicle maintenance is an important part of any operation. The Wastewater Division spent 267.75 man-hours maintaining the wide ranging variety of equipment used on a frequent basis. Approximately 14,632.5 hours were used for operating and maintenance at the southwest plant.

NORTHEAST PLANT The northeast plant is a trickling filter facility, which involves “trickling” the wastewater over a rock media that contains organisms that feed on and remove wastes. Treatment equipment include an automatic bar screen, grit removal system, one primary settling tank, two final settling tanks, one covered trickling filter, and one storm water storage lagoon with over 9 million gallon capacity. This year, 447,662,000 gallons of raw sewage were treated at the north plant. This averages out to

1,226,471 gallons of raw sewage treated per day. The treatment efficiency for the northeast treatment facility for this same time period was 91%. The IDNR requires facilities remove 85% of the pollutants. In FY-2011, 2,426 working hours were recorded at the northeast treatment plant for operation and maintenance.

Northeast Wastewater Treatment Plant

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OSKALOOSA FOOD PRODUCTS Oskaloosa Food Products’ pre-treatment plant is operated by city personnel. This facility is a Sequencing Batch Reactor, which operates similar to the SW plant except all functions of treatment are performed in one tank. The waste sludge received from the plant is hauled to the south plant digester for treatment. The city charges $.25/pound of waste solids. The south plant received 158 loads (approx. 948,000 gallons) from Oskaloosa Food Products, which led to a revenue of $31,494.06 in sludge handling fees. A total of 15,483,655 gallons of wastewater were pre-treated at the facility before flowing to the south plant. This is an average daily flow of 42,420 gallons with an efficiency of 99%. This flow total resulted in $67,277.53 in sewer rental charges. This completed the 11th year of a pre-treatment agreement between the city and Oskaloosa Food Products. The new agreement which began on January 1 has the city receiving $725/month to operate the facility.

Oskaloosa Food Products Pre-Treatment Plant

The agreement also states all maintenance work and materials (except laboratory supplies) are the responsibility of Oskaloosa Food Products. Approximately 207 hours were spent on Oskaloosa Food Products’ operations during FY-2011.

MOWING In addition to mowing city-owned property, the Wastewater Division also takes care of complaints concerning mowing and weeds. In FY-2011 wastewater employees mowed 31 privately-owned lots, resulting in $8,425.00 of mowing charges being billed to property owners. Wastewater employees spent 157 hours mowing private lots, while 377.75 hours were spent mowing the recreation trail and roadsides.

URBAN FORESTRY The purpose of the Urban Forestry is to maintain and control Oskaloosa’s growing and aging trees. This is done by enforcing the city’s tree ordinance. In FY 2011 a total of 56 tree trimming notices were sent to property owners. Five damaged trees were removed (two as part of the FEMA disaster) and three bushes were removed to improve sight lines. Wastewater personnel trimmed numerous trees to improve visibility around signage. A total of 389 hours were used for urban forestry.