camouflage - American Radio History

camouflage - American Radio History

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Billboard Publication

The International Newsweekly Of Music

2% Discount To Be Offered For Open Display SUTHERLAND

LOS ANGELES -In a precedental move aimed at accelerating sales growth for cassettes, WEA Corp. will promote open merchandising for their cassette product by awarding a 2% discount on all titles to those accounts who've taken their tape out of lock

WASHINGTON, D.C. -The House Subcommittee on Courts, Civil Liberties and the Administration of Justice, in legislative markup sessions Thursday (15), voted to move ahead on the proposed bill that would increase penalties and jail terms for record, tape and film piracy and counterfeiting. The maximum penalties would go to

and key and into open displays. That program, slated to begin in 1982, is just one of three outlined in separate letters to the trade dated Oct. 9. Together, the controversial package seeks to tackle the shifting prerecorded tape market head -on by guiding cassette sales growth while attempting to curb rising 8 -track tape returns in the face of a diminishing market for that configuration. Merchandisers in both the rack jobbing and retail sectors were still digesting the trio of letters at mid -week, but early response indicates WEA's 8 -track returns formula adjustment and a dramatic discount program on 8 -track catalog titles could prove as unpopular as its pro- cassette move is attractive. The new revision of WEA's 8 -track return policy is its second since first unveiling an overall returns credit /charge formula devised to stem the flow of returned product. That

(Continued on page 78)

(Continued on page 86)

Stiffer Pirate Bill Gains In Congress

$3 (U.S.)

Oct. 24, 1981

Home Entertainment

CONTROVERSIAL MOVE

WEA `Unlocks' Cassettes By SAM

&

Sony Tape To Sponsor Stewart American Tour

By ROMAN NEW YORK -Record industry efforts to disassociate its artists from promoting blank tape suffer a sharp setback with the disclosure that Sony Tape will sponsor Rod Stewart's 55date "Le Grand Tour of America and Canada 1981 -82," which begins Nov. 11 and runs through Feb. 16. The tour, to promote Stewart's new "Tonight I'm Yours" LP on Warner Bros. Records, will include a live FM stereo /television simulcast from the Los Angeles Forum, Dec. 18, which will also be aired in Canada, Australia /New Zealand, and Europe. "Sony Tape feels Rod Stewart's worldwide following fully complements the target audience for all our audio tape products," says Eiji Tanaka, vice president of Sony's tape division. "His nationwide tour will give our dealers an opportunity to merchandise our tape

KOZAK

products in every major city of the U.S. and Canada with our customers receiving many special benefits." (Continued on page 15)

U.S. Pirates Find

Rosy Canada Climate By IS HOROWITZ NEW YORK -The fast rise of record and tape piracy in Canada, currently at an annual level of $50 million, is being traced in part to stepped -up inroads by illegal duplicators fleeing a tougher penalty and enforcement climate in the U.S. Best estimates now place the rate of in-

(Continued on page

78)

Compromise Is Hinted In Mechanicals Dispute

Natalie dynamic Capitol': presents Watch fi

le's sensational album Happy Love (ST- 12165) features the single "Nothin' But A Fool" (A5045), now hot on the charts. marketplace support for the record includes a two -song video lion available soon for all formats of visual media and club use. r the marketing muscle from Capitol Records and Cassettes. (Advertisement)

By BILL HOLLAND ment on the question of which orWASHINGTON -In a surprise ganization made the first move to move strongly hinting of give -andsuggest private meetings, nor would take between the Recording Industhey offer any opinion as to the toptry Assn. of America and publisher ics to be discussed at the meetings. and composer organizations on aspects of the controversial new 4-cent The joint request for a postmechanical royalty, the Copyright ponement came at the very beginRoyalty Tribunal granted a joint ning of the morning meeting, and request Wednesday (14) to extend the request was granted without dethe deadline for comments on posbate within minutes. sible Tribunal rate adjustment proThe postponement and the upceedings to Nov. 3. coming talks between the organizaAttorneys on both sides were extions come shortly after the U.S. tremely guarded in their comments Court of Appeals for the District of after the meeting, saying only that Columbia dismissed the petitions by there would be talks between RIAA RIAA, CBS Inc. and the Amuseand the National Music Publishers ment and Music Operators Assn. to Assn., the American Guild of Aurehear the mechanical royalty rate thors and Composers and the Nashcase (Billboard, Oct. 17), which it ville Songwriters Assn. Interoriginally affirmed in late June. national. None of the officials (Continued on page 9) present at the meeting would corn-

Part poet, part picker, part philosopher, EARL THOMAS CONLEY is easily one of the most gifted singer /songwriters to emerge in Country Music lately. His debut album on RCA Records, "FIRE AND SMOKE," is the kind of album Nashville released in the days of Mickey Newbury and Kris Kristofferson. Included are the hit singles, "Fire and Smoke," "Silent Treatment" and the current single "Tell Me Why." RCA AHL1 -4135.

The hot single

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General News MANY NON -COMMITTAL

Labels Questioning NARM `Gift' Outline By IRV LICHTMAN

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MOMENT OF VICTORY -A tearful Barbara Mandrel!, left, clutches her Country Music Assn. trophy for entertainer of the year. It's the second consecutive year that the MCA artist has won the honor. At right, the four members of RCA act Alabama accept their CMA award as vocal group of the year from presenter Jerry Clower, first right.

Country Week: Buoyant As Ever Several `Firsts' During Meetings, Seminars, Parties By KIP KIRBY

NASHVILLE -As the smoke

unofficially as "country music

cleared from the festivities of the 56th annual DJ Convention /Grand Ole Opry Birthday Celebration, it appeared that if it wasn't a record breaking year for attendance here, it suffered no loss of events to claim the attention of the nearly 3,000 participants. The week that's become known

week" wound to a halt Sunday (18) after completing the usual marathon of combined social and business sessions, corporate meetings, roasts and toasts, banquets and awards. There were even a few showcases scattered around town, though fewer than in previous years due to the loss of several popular nightspots on the local scene in recent months. The 10 -day week that thrusts country into the forefront of national media attention included several "firsts," including a precedent shattering attendance figure of more than 500 country buyers and representatives at the 1981 Talent Buyers Seminar (a 38% increase over last year), and Barbara Mandrell's second consecutive win as CMA's entertainer of the year during the 15th annual CMA Awards Show telecast live Monday (12) on CBS-TV. At the same event, Grant Turner was named into the Country Music Hall of Fame (along with Vernon Dalhart), making him the first disk jockey to earn such an honor in this category. Roy Acuff became the 19th recipient of the CMA's prestigious Connie B. Gay Founding Presi-

Music Millions Go To UNICEF NEW try has million children CEF.

YORK -The music indusgenerated more than $5.2 to help the world's needy through Music For UNI-

The organization, founded in 1978 by the Bee Gees, Robert Stig-

wood and David Frost, was launched January, 1979 via a "Music For UNICEF" television special, a 2 -LP spin -off of which was sold worldwide through Polydor. According to Music For UNICEF, the sale of the album produced revenues of $3 million, while music publishing royalties, administered (Continued on page 4)

dent's Award at the organization's 23rd annual board and membership meeting held at the Opryland Hotel Thursday (15). At the meeting, current CMA president Tandy Rice announced the presentation of three special President's Awards, given from time to time to recognize deserving and dedicated contributions to the CMA.

Named to receive this award by Rice were David Lieberman of Lieberman Enterprises; Norm Anderson of CBS Recording Studios; and (Continued on page 86)

Warner Offers Revisions On Rent -Only Video Plan By

RCA SelectaVision launched its European standard videodisk system at VIDCOM, details page 61. Also that page, a report from the International Tape-Disc Assn. seminar held in Cannes.

mechanical royalties plus the rentals- versus -sales battle. In the words of James Jimirro, president of. Walt Disney Telecommunications: "The gold rush mentality of the video industry has seen many people going out of business." Noting that 36 retailers alone had gone out of business last month in

down and watch what they're doing really carefully, we'll be in real trouble. If someone wants that halfcent, they'll have to make a hell of a case." While another executive believes the basic idea to be "a very positive one" in terms of recapturing "that older demographic group," as far as the mechanics are concerned, he adds, "I don't know that there's any one proposal that all the manufacturers have seen and accepted." Here, he notes that legal restrictions frustrate careful, coordinated concept planning within NARM's man (Continued on page 9)

Labels Weigh Home Music

Store Plan By LAURA FOTI NEW YORK -The Home Music Store, a cable service offering subscribers the opportunity for licensed home taping of digitally encoded music, plans to be operating in five test markets by April, 1982. The program has been in development for close to a year, but no record labels have openly committed themselves

William Von Meister, president of Digital Music Co. (DMC) of Washington, D.C., who designed the Home Music Store, claims that six record labels, including one "ma-

JIM McCULLAUGH

LOS ANGELES -Warner Home Video has made two minor alterations to its still controversial market by market roll out to a rental -only program, according to a senior WEA Distribution official. Both revisions, the source points out, come as a result of feedback

By MIKE HENNESSEY

predominate among those thronging the Palais each day, in meeting rooms elsewhere on the Croisette, the elder statesmen of the new industry were locked in dour and largely unproductive debate about the staggering complexity of the problems confronting the video business, not only piracy and home taping but also the vexed question of

feels. "Right now, the way things are, I'm not giving up one -eighth of a cent. Inflation is just killing us. In 1982, if people don't really buckle

to it yet.

Boom, Some Gloom, At VIDCOM CANNES -With the Palais des Festivals here teeming with thousands of people and its five floors crammed with a multiplicity of hardware and a veritable mountain of software, the seventh VIDCOM Oct. 9 -13 seemed to show that the much -heralded video boom is finally under way. Video recorders are expected to be in 17 million homes around the world by the end of this year and with the growing demand for hardware outstripping supply, there appeared every justification for the high level of excitement and optimism which prevailed in and around the Palais throughout the five days. But while many people were jubilantly talking about "booms," "explosions" and "fortunes being made" in the months and years to come, a more cautious and sceptical minority was predicting a considerable number of fortunes being lost when the market finally settles down after the initial burst of Euphoria. While a Klondike spirit seemed to

NEW YORK -Broad manufacturer funding of a $2.4 million institutional "Gift Of Music" campaign appears questionable under present guidelines proposed by NARM. Although advanced in general terms by Joe Cohen, NARM executive vice president, over the past year or so, the concept has reached a formal stage through a 35 -page document that manufacturers began to receive last week. Basically, NARM hopes to achieve funding through a voluntary payment by labels of 'hcent for each album and tape they distribute starting Jan. 1. Admittedly, many labels stress they are in the process of digesting NARM's proposal, but preliminary assessments by a number of manufacturers (all of whom prefer anonymity) either seek further clarification or challenge the method by which they are being asked to kick in their share. Another matter raised is whether it was prudent on NARM's part to publicly reveal the formalized proposal rather than attempt to achieve funding in private NARM /label settings. On this issue, Cohen replies, "The media is helpful, since it can force the manufacturer to consider a decision rather than defer it." One label chief terms the funding proposal "less than acceptable" because the entire cost burden is being passed to manufacturers. "It's our cost for everything that goes on in this business. I always call us 'the bank,' " another executive

the United States, Jimirro predicted

there will "continue to be a major fallout in the U.S." He blamed an over -abundance of software, coupled with high interest rates and the concentration of promotion on "hit title" business. He warned that more bankruptcies would arise and said "this situation can't go on." Jimirro added that he hoped "the rest of the world would learn from America's experience." Unquestionably the most heavily supported VIDCOM organizer Bernard Chevry claims participation by 601 companies from 32 countries this year's event was completely dominated by software exhibitors. More than 450 of them were looking to place program material round the world. Dag Haeggqvist, general manager of the new Sonet group offshoot Sonet Video of Stockholm, agreed that it was a buyer's market, but noted that prices being asked for really top quality product were sometimes extortionate. And more

-

(Continued on page 78)

www.americanradiohistory.com

(Continued on page 76)

from the field as the program continues, for the most part, as previously

announced. One revision involves the wholesaler or "master licensor." Previously, the master licensor had to send back his Warner software inventory for replacement but they now have the option of selling off inventory rather than going through the take -back process. "Let's say a master licensor has 50 copies of `Superman II'," explains the WEA source. "He can sell them off. But eventually that sale inventory will dry up." Secondly, stores that have multiple locations won't be required now to have all locations in the plan. If a three store chain, for example, wants to rent Warner software at two outlets, not the third, it can. Previously it was an "all in or all out approach." Meanwhile, these comments last week from the beleagured Texas battleground, site of the first Warner rental -only market: Risa Solomon, buyer, Video Land with four stores in Dallas: "Warner offered us the option to test the rental program in some of the stores, and we felt they deserved a chance, so we were willing to try the program on that basis. The decision was just made. Warner has not made any changes in price structure or administration-the two major areas of complaint, however." J.C. Smith, owner, U.S. Video, Houston and Galveston: "Last Friday Warner sales executives came to see us and offered an alternative to (Continued on page 6)

In This Issue CLASSICAL CLASSIFIED MART COMMENTARY COUNTRY DISCO BUSINESS INTERNATIONAL

67 48, 50 16 52

65 71

GOSPEL JAZZ

39 39

PUBLISHING

68

RADIO SOUND BUSINESS TALENT VIDEO

20 63

32 61

FEATURES

Chartbeat Counterpoint Inside Track Lifelines Mike Harrison

6 35 86 84 25

New LP & Tape Releases

41 10 9 31

Rock'n'Rolling Stock Market Quotations VoxJox CHARTS Top LP's Singles Radio

83, 85

Action Chart ...22, 24, 26, 28, 29 Rock Albums /Top Tracks 30 Boxscore 34 Bubbling Under Top LPs /Hot 100 84 Disco Top 80 66 Jazz LPs 39 Hits Of The World 73 Hot Soul Singles 35 Latin LPs 67 Soul LPs 37 Hot Country Singles 54 Hot Country LPs 60 Hot 100 80 Top 50 Adult Contemporary 31 Top 40 Videocassettes 62 RECORD REVIEWS

Audiophile Recordings Album Reviews Singles Reviews

63 76 79

4

General News Reno & Metz

Execulive Turnloble

Back To RCA With TV Acts By ED HARRISON LOS ANGELES -Stephen Metz and Bob Reno, whose Midsong label was distributed by RCA during the mid '70s, are returning to RCA with their newly formed Beverly Hills Recording Corp., which will concentrate on signing "dual career artists." "RCA has given us the leeway to be total talent scouts and to bring to the label dual career artists-those already established in one area who can be established in another," says Metz. Reno /Metz, claiming to be the largest administrators of television music in the world, plan to use their tv, film and stage resources in getting initial crackat those developed personalities whom they feel have the charisma to translate their popularity onto vinyl. The concept of making recording stars out of television and film personalities isn't new, though the Reno /Metz plan of building a vi-

Record Companies Billy Bass is vice president of pop promotion for Motown Records, Hollywood. He moves over from a post with WMOT Records, and was previously senior vice president of promotion and creative services for Chrysalis.... David Benjamin is the new vice president for business affairs, East Coast, for CBS Records, New York. He was director of business affairs for CBS Records International. ... Jim Yates moves to director of commercial sales for the southwestern region for RCA Records. To be located in Dallas. Yates was RCA's branch office manager there until accepting the new position. Jennifer S. Cohen is promoted to director

of product development at WEA International, New York. She was product manQUARTER BACKING -Rick James receives a few tips and congratulations following his Philadelphia concert from Kal Rudman, right, publisher of the

Friday Morning Quarterback tip sheet and Bruce Greenberg, Motown promotion.

HAS DUAL ROLE

Coury Leaves RSO For Network-Almost

By PAUL GREIN LOS ANGELES -Usually when the name Network two weeks ago an executive leaves one company to and didn't have time to select artable and sustaining roster of talent start his own, he makes a clean work for his own logo. drawn entirely from other mediums break. But Al Coury is staying with "The Del Shannon album was is considered novel. RSO on a non -exclusive finished basis even two months before I left Metz and Reno are well aware of as he launches his new Elektra /AsyRSO," Coury says. "Del and Tom the sales potential of the "right" perlum- distributed Network Records. were very frustrated that the album sonality, as evidenced by their Coury says he agreed to supervise signing of John Travolta to Midsong (Continued on page 84) the sales, marketing and promotion at a time when Travolta was just beof the Bee Gees' forthcoming album ginning to emerge as the star of and singles as part of his settlement "Welcome Back Kotter." to disengage from RSO. Both men believe that a "strong The exclusion was written into his personality, one that jumps out at contract with E /A, though Coury you" can guarantee as much as says any other outside assignments 150,000 units in sales without the would have to be cleared with Joe benefit of airplay. Smith, E/A chairman. Reno says that RCA understands "RSO would like me to work with their concept since the label has exthem on `Grease II' and further Bee perienced first -hand the success of Gees projects," Coury says. "I told By IS HOROWITZ Travolta and now Rick Springfield, them I'd be happy to discuss it with who's appearance on the "General NEW YORK -The Hungarian them, but all I'm contractually comHospital" soap opera has contribgovernment is considering a 20% mitted to is to work this Bee Gees uted to the success of his recording levy on the sale of blank tape to project to the end. career. reimburse those injured by the prac"Then if I have any other major Reno /Metz have exclusive adtice of home dubbing. consultancy projects I have an unministration deals with the television Regulations have already been derstanding with Joe that I'll discuss production firms of Spelling /Golddrafted, says Jeno Bors, managing them with him. If both he and I (Continued on page 6) director of Hungariton, the Hunagree that they wouldn't interfere garian recording authority, and are with my label, I'll go ahead." currently being circulated for comThe Network deal is E /A's fifth ment among concerned government custom or inhouse label agreement, agencies. Continued from page 3 following Solar, Light, Richard Winding up a month -long visit to by Chappell Music, amounted to $1 Perry's Planet Records and Bruce the U.S. last week, Bors reported million. The W concert itself brought Lundvall's Elektra/Musician. The sharp increases in the sales of recin an additional $200,000. deal is for the U.S. and Canada and ords and tapes in his country despite More recently, Music For UNIcalls for at least five albums per year. home taping inroads, the launch of a CEF benefitted to the tune of $ I milCoury says the term is between three digital recording program, and lion from "Concerts For The People and five years, plus options. stepped -up efforts to promote HunCoury's new label venture was Of Kampuchea," a 2 -LP set on Atgarian pop acts abroad. lantic Records featuring Paul given a rather tepid blessing from Bors puts the effective date of a McCartney & Wings, the Who, Robert Stigwood, who said in a Hungarian levy on blank tape a Queen, Elvis Costello, Rockpile and statement last week: "RSO Records year, "or at most two," away. But the the Pretenders. It's too soon, says a continues to operate fully, utilizing Music For UNICEF spokesman, to the PolyGram marketing and pro(Continued on page 71) motion staffs. As a result, I regret determine monies due on "Rock For Kampuchea," a concert film being that we do not have the need to use Al Coury's full-time services, but my distributed by EMI and Mirimax respect for him ... is reflected in my Films. Music For UNICEF hopes to benassigning to him three former RSO efit from other music industry assoartists-Irene Cara, Del Shannon and Shot in the Dark." ciations ih the year ahead, including LOS ANGELES -BillShannon's "Drop Down And Get cable tv concerts, recordings, films, board has relocated its offices T- shirts, posters and an annual rock Me" LP, produced by Tom Petty, here, effective Monday (12). will be Network's first release this calendar. The magazine's new West Recently put in charge of develFriday (23). The first run of the alCoast quarters will be at 9107 oping these projects is Peter Hansen, bum- 30,000 to 50,000 copies -will Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills, who joined Music For UNICEF last feature E /A's logo and label. Coury Calif. 90210, where its editosays this was necessitated by the fact January after a stint with Headliners rial, chart research and adverTalent Agency in New York. that he only received clearance on tising sales operations will occupy the seventh floor. All Billboard (ISSN 0006 -2510) Vol. 93 No. 42 is published weekly by Billboard Pubmagazine departments and lications, Inc., One Astor Plaza, 1515 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 10036. Subrelated services previously sitscription rate: annual rate, Continental U.S. $110. Second class postage paid at uated at 9000 Sunset Blvd. New York, N.Y. and at additional mailing office. Current and back copies of Billwill be included in the move. board are available on microfilm from KTO Microform, Rte 100, Millwood, N.Y. The phone number is un10546 or Xerox University Microfilms, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, Mich. changed, and remains (213) 48106. Postmaster, please send changes of address to Billboard, P.O. Box 13808, Philadelphia, Pa. 19101, (609) 786 -1669. 273 -7040.

Blank Tape

Levy Eyed In Hungary

UNICEF $

New L.A. Home For Billboard

ager for the organization. Benjamin At Capitol Records, Clare Baren is named director of film and video production; Maureen O'Connor is promoted to senior manager of East Coast press and artist relations; and Doreen D'Agostino moves to East Coast press and publicity manager. Baren, who formerly headed her own production company, will be based in Hollywood. O'Connor and D'Agostino, upped from other Capitol posts, will work in New York. Larry Offsey is director of finance and administration for PolyGram Classics, New York. He was a financial analyst for the division.... Greg Dodd is named vice president of pop promotion and Alonzo King vice president of special markets promotion by Erect Records, Merrillville, Ind. Dodd has been Midwest sales manager for Inner City Records. King was formerly Midwest promotion manager for Motown Records. Michael Matthews is national marketing director for Regency Records, Los Angeles. ... John Brown moves to the post of Northeast regional promotion director for A&M Records. Based in New York, Brown comes from PolyGram, where he held a similar position. ... At Destiny Records, Los Angeles, Tony D'Anna is named vice president of fiYates nance and administration. He was comptroller of Boardwalk Records. ... Chuck Williams has been appointed WEA regional black music marketing director, West Coast. With WEA since 1975, Williams will be based in Los Angeles.... AI Edmondson is upped to vice president of Venture Records, Hollywood. He was national promotion director there.... Frank Bisbano is new national sales manager at Vanguard Records, New York. He was Northeast regional sales manager for Pickwick Records.... Dorothy Shelley is promoted to sales rep for PolyGram Distribution. A former air personality, she will work in the Houston area. Bass

Marketing At the Hegewisch Records chain, Calumet City, Ill., Allen Strug is now

general manager and buyer for all the Hegewisch stores, up from manager of the

D'Anna

Merrillville, Ind. store; Ken Zurek moves to post of director of advertising and promotion, up from manager of the Calumet City store; Richard Ottomanelli is promoted from warehouse manager to manager of the Calumet City store; and Don Golden shifts into the slot of manager of the Merrillville outlet. after having served there as assistant man ager.

Labovitz

Publishing At Hal Leonard Publishing, John Herman has been named to handle all sales in the Canadian market. He has been doing Latin American sales for the company. Also at Leonard, Silvia Feicht is named export manager for Latin America. Both Herman and Feicht will work from the company's Milwaukee headquarters.... Don Cason has been upped from director of music publishing, West Coast, Word Records, to director of music publishing, performance division. He will be based at the Word office in Los Angeles.

Related Fields Laurence B. Labovitz is named executive vice president and general counsel for Management Three, Beverly Hills. He did practice law in Century City.... Jim Raynak is appointed director of human resources, Western division, for Warner Amex Cable Communications. He was vice president of personnel for the Acceleration Corp. and will be based in Columbus, Ohio. ... Ken Weinstock, most recently president of his own production and packaging firm, moves to vice president of special programming for Home Box Office. He will be headquartered in New York.... Dennis K. Gillespie is named senior vice president, domestic, for Viacom Ents., New York. He was with Peters, Griffin, Woodward, a television rep firm. The Sony Corp. of America has named Tsuneo Taida to the post of treasurer. He will be located in New York and has been with Sony since 1967.... At TDK Electronics, Garden City, N.Y., Donald Bruce Kopp is named northeast territorial manager and Don MacNair mid -Atlantic territorial manager. Both men will be based in Garden City. Kopp was in consumer electronic sales for Sam Goody; MacNair has managed and operated audio and video stores in New Jersey. Tom Anderson, sales promotion manager for Kenwood Electronics, Carson, Calif., has taken on the additional duties of advertising manager. He was marketing services manager for Kenwood. ... Tony Zuravel, previously national sales manager for Walt Disney Home Video, is named director of marketing for Select -A-Tape, Los Angeles. ... George P. Petetin is upped to vice president at KM Laboratories, New York. He was director of marketing there. .. American Creative Entertainment, Farmington Hills, Mich., names Michael J. McCarthy and Anthony Kandel to head their new promotional merchandising dept. and Carol Porter to vice president of video programming.... Susan Tick joins Michael Gershman Communications, Los Angeles, as publicist, specializing in radio and tv placements. She was a freelance reporter for the NBC radio network.

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6

General News

Bonaparte Expands To L.A. & Joins With Stiff In N.Y.

Signings Songwriter /guitarist

By ROMAN KOZAK

NEW YORK -Bonaparte Records, the English import /export company which has retail store in New York's Greenwich Village, is expanding its operation, opening a new 7,000 square foot warehouse in Los Angeles and moving into Stiff Records' new headquarters in New York. There it's putting together a distribution company with Stiff. According to Guy Melhuish, president of Bonaparte U.S., the new California facility will enable his company to deliver English product anywhere in the U.S. within a week. Bonaparte specializes in repertoire released in Britain, and also imports U.K. music papers. "We will be ordering directly from Los Angeles and flying from London directly to L.A. on Thursday afternoons, which means we can have Wednesday's London papers in Los Angeles Friday mornings. And we can do it as fast with records," says Melhuish.

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The move represents the latest in the growth of Bonaparte in the U.S., which until this spring was tied to the Metro Records store in Queens, with whom it formed Skydisk Records, a distributing company. The two have since split up, says Melhuish. Bonaparte, he says, imports into the U.S. releases on both major and independent labels. Among his hottest current titles are a 12 -inch Bruce Springsteen single, and a Pat Benatar picture disk. But, he adds, he also keeps his eye peeled for new artists. To help promote the new music in the U.S., Bonaparte will be sponsoring regular nights at New York's Peppermint Lounge, where English disk jockeys and visiting bands will spin new records and requests. The series begins at the Peppermint Lounge Sunday (18), and Melhuish also expects to have regular nights at the Whiskey in Los Angeles.

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o U O

Marshall

Crenshaw, who performed the role of John Lennon in the national production of "Beatlemania," to Warner Bros. with LP release set for early 1982. ... Bobby Short to Elektra /Asylum Records with album tentatively titled "After Mid-

RELEASE TALK -Ron Alexenburg, right, president of Handshake Records, talks about the forthcoming release of the group Sneaker, produced by Jeff Baxter, with Rich Kudolla, CBS Distribution, West Coast region, during a recent listening party in Los Angeles.

ChorEbeoE Live LPs Far From Dead; Bee Gees Are Only Mortal By PAUL LOS ANGELES -Bob Seger's "Nine Tonight" (Capitol) and Billy Joel's "Songs In The Attic" (Columbia) hold tight at numbers three and eight this week, marking the first time so far in the '80s that two live albums have been in the top 10 simultaneously. The LPs are followups to studio acts which were No. 1 in succession last summer: Seger's "Against The Wind" and Joel's "Glass Houses." Both live albums have spawned current top 20 singles: Seger's "Tryin' To Live My Life Without You" is up to number 11 this week; Joel's "Say Goodbye To Hollywood" is up to 19. The live album market isn't nearly what it was in the boom years of 1976 -78, as the following list will demonstrate, but it's still an important part of the overall sales picture. Here are the live albums that have hit the top 10 in the past five years, ranked by their peak positions. Ties are broken based on weeks at that peak spot and then weeks in the top

GREIN Browne, Asylum, 1978/ #3. 10. "Commodores Live!," Motown,

1977/#3. 11.

"Nine Tonight," Bob Seger & the Silver Bullet Band, Capitol,

12.

"Cheap Trick At Budokan,"

1981/#3. Epic, 1979/ #4. In L.A.," George Benson, Warner Bros., 1978/

13. "Weekend

#5. 14. "Love

You Live," Rolling Stones, Rolling Stones, 1977/

#5. "Elvis In Concert," Elvis Presley, RCA, l977/#5. 16. "Eagles Live," Asylum, 1980/ 15.

#6. "Alive II," Kiss, Casablanca, 1977/ #7. 18. "Love At The Greek," Neil Diamond, Columbia, 1977/ 17.

#8.

19.

"The Kids Are Alright," The Who, MCA, 1979/ #8. (Continued on page 50)

night" due out in January, 1982... . Carmine Appice, former drummer with Rod Stewart, to Pasha /CBS, with LP "Carmine Appice And The Rockers," scheduled for release in January, 1982.... Jackie English to the Creative Music Group with songwriting agreement. . Horn player Ernie Watts to Qwest Records with Quincy Jones producing. He's currently touring with the Rolling Stones and is a member of "The Tonight Show" orchestra.... Reggae foursome the Tony Brown Band to Mountain Railroad Records, with LP "Prisoners In Paradise" out this month. ... Bill Schustik to Columbia Artists Festival Corp. for bookings.... Diana Moore and Monte to Lazer Records.... Tony Walker to Ce Rock Music. ... Australian singer Kamahl to Blue Star Records for the U.S. A major star in Australia and Europe, Kamahl's first single release is "Hey There, Lord," with an album to follow.

Return To RCA Continued from page

4

berg Productions, Aaron Spelling Productions, TAT Communications, Pierre Cossette Productions and others.

Because of the disappearance of music oriented television shows, Metz and Reno plan to pull talent from situation comedies and dramatic series. Reno/Metz's first venture into television production as executive producers (with Tandem Productions) will be "Borrowed Time," the story of Bobby Darin. The cast LP will be released on Beverly Hills Recording as will any other Reno/ Metz music property.

10.

I. "Frampton Comes Alive," Peter Frampton, A &M, 1976/ #1.

In

Donna Summer, Casablanca, 1978/

2. "Live And More,"

#1.

Memory of

"Wings Over America," Capitol, 1977/#1. 4. "Barry Manilow Live," Arista, 3.

1977/#1. 5.

ARRIVING

6.

8.

managed by

Roy Cicala

Nick Schiralli

Record Plant, N.Y.C.

18 E. 48 St.,

N.Y., N.Y. 10017

ELIF OLESEN 1906-1981

1976/#2. 7.

produced by

"Just One Night," Eric Clapton, RSO, 1980/ # 2. "The Song Remain The Same," Led Zeppelin, Swan Song,

9.

"The Beatles At The Hollywood Bowl," Capitol, 1977/ #2. "Marvin Gaye Live At The London Palladium," Tamla,

1977/#3. "Running On Empty," Jackson

Warner Eases Video Rentals

RETAIL RECORD SALES DOWN? TRY TV!

Continued from page 3

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Financial

MorkeE QuoEalions

Labels Still

As of closing, October 15, 1981

Annual High Low 1Y.

%

38

26%

45% 4%

2e1

P -E

NAME

Altec Corporation ABC

6

821

American Can Automatic Radio 401 CBS 311 Columbia Pictures 41 Craig Corporation 43% Disney, Walt 3% Electrosound Group 3% Filmways, Inc. 14% Gulf + Western 11% Handleman 71 K -Tel 39 Matsushita Electronics

59

38%

7%

67% 8% 9

22% 19%

15'6

14/

8%

65

48'6 56% 36% 6%

901 59% 20 39%

211

32'/.

17%

26% 43 6% 32%

141

581

33%

23% 3%

29'/.

OVER THE COUNTER

8 4 8 8

13

Low

Close

67 15/16 1084 33% 740 34

%

%

-

4 8 4 11

7

-

Memorex 3M

9

Motorola North American Phillips Orrox Corporation Pioneer Electronics RCA Sony Storer Broadcasting Superscope Taft Broadcasting Warner Communications Bld

33'/.

331/2

-

33%

-

33%

131

54%.

38'/.

52% 37% 6%

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242 114 964

491

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173

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(Sales

1759 2402 343 3 60

3280

OVER THE COUNTER

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29'/. 53'/.

-

29 51

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ABKCO '4 13 Koss Corp. 220 6'% 7% Certron Corp. 920 '/ 15/16 Kustom Elec. 180 2% 2% Data Packaging 100 6 7 M. Josephson 600 %. 1% First Artists Recoton 200 2% 3 Productions 6 5% 5% Reeves Comm. 440 25% 26 Integrity Ent. 170 7 7% Schwartz Brothers 100 2'/. 31 Over -the-Counter prices shown may or may not represent actual transactions. Rather, they are a guide to the range within which these securities could have been sold or bought at the time of compilation. The above information contributed to Billboard by Douglas J. Vollmer, Associate Vice President, Los Angeles Region, Dean Witter Reynolds, Inc., 4001 West Alameda, Suite 100, Toluca Lake, Burbank, California 91503, (213) 841 -3761, member New York Stock Exchange, Inc.

Compromise Is Hinted In Mechanicals Dispute

i

Continued from page

That decision affirmed the 4-cent rate hike of the Tribunal, which called for an effective date of July 1, 1981. It also remanded the section on possible annual adjustments back to the Tribunal for possible alternative methods of devising an interim rate schedule. In the comments received by the Tribunal last month on the possibility of holding new meetings concerning interim adjustments, the RIAA not only stressed the need for lengthy hearings -a minimum of 90 to 120 days notice in order to allow for suitable preparation -but also stated that the new 4-cent rate would not be in effect until the `judicial review process" was completed. The Appeals Court dismissal of the petition for rehearing was seen as a setback for the recording industry, but

MOON WOW WN.t-6ESOID IN N

RIAA suggested that it would move to present the case to the Supreme Court. Both the NMPA and the AGAC/ NSAI feel the 4-cent rate is presently in effect, and several publishers have gone on record to say they would sue any record company that does not abide by the new royalty rate. In their comments to the Tribunal concerning rate adjustment proceedings, the publisher and songwriter organizations said that delays in further hearings on the adjustment schedule were unnecessary, pointing to the facts already on record, and suggested a schedule of hearings that would conclude in late November-as opposed to the RIAA recommendations that could stall the first possibility for a rate adjustment into 1983.

Tax Speakers Set By RIAA For Symposium NEW YORK -Howard Young stein and Robert Maas, two British entertainment tax experts, will be featured speakers at the RIAA -sponsored symposium here Nov. 4 on the subject of "Current Developments In U.K. Taxation Of U.S. And Resi-

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dent Entertainers & Entertainment Companies." Also at the meet, to be held at the Plaza Hotel, there'll be an overview of current U.S. tax law related to the entertainment industry. This will be offered by RIAA tax committee members Walter Seltzer, international tax manager of Warner Communications Inc., and Peter Dordal, tax vice president at Poly Gram Corp. The program will run from 9:30 to 4:30 p.m. in the White & Gold Suite of the Plaza, with the registration fee of $75, including morning and afternoon coffee, and luncheon with RIAA tax committee members as table hosts. The fee can be sent to RIAA, 888 7th Ave., New York, N.Y. 10106. For registration by phone, the number is (212) 765-

Uncertain On NARM Plan Continued from page 3

ufacturer advisory committee, so that labels can only vote on finished proposals, rather than work together from the ground up. NARM's Cohen, however, is optimistic, as he prepares to set out in the next few weeks to meet with label decision -makers. He anticipates that Assistance on this story provided by Sam Sutherland in Los Angeles.

by the second week in November "we'll know where we are" in terms of funding the campaign. "My biggest concern is that manufacturers not make premature judgment, since they are now just being exposed formally to the campaign's rationale and thought processes." One label, if it makes a commitment, has promised Cohen that it would make funds available based on its fourth quarter 1981 movement of records and tapes, although dollars under the proposal are to be calculated on shipments starting Jan. 1. A spokesman for RIAA says that under its by -laws and legal restrictions, the association could not corn ment on the proposal, although he notes that RIAA has "supported from the beginning" the "Gift Of Music" idea. As presented in the NARM document, the proposal draws heart from institutional campaigns conducted by other industries, particularly FTD, the florist trade association, which spends about $6 million a year for media use. "It is recommended that, as FTD did, we concentrate on specific holidays and special occasions in order to develop and create the highest level of campaign impact," NARM states. "In 1982, the plan is to capitalize on the very fertile opportunities in May and June which cover -in addition to daily gift-giving for birthdays and anniversaries- Mother's Day, Graduation and Father's Day." The media plan places heavy emphasis on television, with about twothirds of the budget ($1,633,000) going for network tv spots. Radio would account for $413,000, while print would cover the remaining $394,000 of the total budget of $2,440,000. Also, a "Gift Of Music" advisory committee, made up of representatives from all industry segments, would be the decision -making body for expenditures and control.

CBS Records Profits Rise, Despite Exchange Losses NEW YORK- Despite currency exchange losses on its international operations, the CBS Records Group posted a profits gain on a 1% increase in revenues for the third quarter, the company reports. Overall, CBS Inc. third quarter revenues rose, while income and earnings per share declined from the year earlier period. Third quarter earnings per share were $1.95, a decrease of 3% from the $2 earned in the third quarter of 1980. The per share earnings were reduced by 25c through foreign exchange losses suffered because of the strong dollar, compared to a 2c per share gain in 1980. CBS Records encompasses the largest area of international business activity at CBS, the company says. Third quarter net income was $54.3 million, a decrease of 3% from 1980 third quarter net income of $55.7 million. Revenues for the third

quarter rose 5% to $955.1 million from the $951.1 million reported in the third quarter of 1980. Revenues also rose for the first nine months of the year, though earnings were less than a year ago, the company says. Earnings per share for the nine months were $3.95, a 10% decrease from the $4.41 earned in the first nine months of 1980. Net income for the nine months was $110.3 million on revenues of $2.99 billion. These figures represent a 10% decreases from the net income of $123.0 million for the first nine months of 1980 and a gain of 3% over 1980 first nine months revenues of $2.89 billion. CBS says that increases in its domestic record revenues "more than offset" a continued planned reduction in sales for its Columbia House Division, "resulting from the elimination of low margin sales in its record and tape club operations." It also cites "sharply higher" expenditures in cable and home video.

WCI Music Revenues Dip

\I

/MM \I

,

NEW YORK -Net income and revenues for the recorded music and music publishing divisions of Warner Communications Inc. declined for the three-month period ending Sept. 30. The third quarter declines reflect slightly lower revenues from both domestic and foreign operations, according to Steven J. Ross, WCI chairman, in reporting the highest overall third quarter profits and revenues in the company's history. The company's record /publishing operating income for the third quarter amounted to $16,304,000, down from $17,251,000 last year. Revenues were $187,653,000, compared to $199,761,000 for the third quarter of 1980. For the nine month period of 1981, record /publishing showed gains in both earnings and revenues.

Operating

income

reached

$52,358,000, up from $48,222,000 a

DeVorzon Scores LOS ANGELES-Barry DeVorzon has been signed to score the forthcoming Paramount film "Jekyll And Hyde ... Together Again." DeVorzon's previous film commitments include "Tattoo," "The Warriors," "Xanadu," "Hard Times" and "Bless The Beasts And Children."

year before, while revenues were $569,765,000, compared to $538,146,000 in a similar 1980 period. For the company as a whole, net income for the three month period ending Sept. 30 reached $58,584,000, O a rise of 84% from $31,900,000. For the nine month period, net co income rose 63%, from $92,499,000 to

(

$150,656,000. Revenues were $2,150,667,000, up from

á

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Definitive History of Billboard's Charts!

General News FBI Takes Antipiracy Action Rock'n'Rolling In 2 States; Product Seized Petitioning For Elvis Date;

NEW YORK -Oregon and Virginia were the scene of recent FBI antipiracy raids, while in Kentucky a convicted tape pirate was sentenced. Agents assigned to the Bristol, Va. resident FBI office and officers of the Tazewell County Sheriff's office confiscated some 8,000 allegedly pirate 8 -track and cassette tapes Sept. 21 from vendors at the Tazewell Flea Market. The seizure was a joint operation between the two law enforcement agencies and resulted in the destruction of the product.

On Sept. 24, agents of the Portland, Ore. FBI office raided Django Records, 1111 S.W. Stark, executing a search warrant issued by the U.S. District Court for the Oregon District. Following purchase of cassettes

which were verified as unlicensed recordings of live concerts by Bruce Springsteen and AC /DC, the agents seized allegedly pirate cassettes and

bootleg record albums from the shop. Among the other artists whose

performances and compositions were being said to be unlawfully reproduced were The Grateful Dead, the Beatles, Bob Dylan, John Lennon and Yoko Ono. In Kentucky, Herbert Buntain of Frankfort was given a 30 -day sentence Sept. 29 on his conviction in Leitchfield, Ky, for the sale and distribution of pirate tapes. The conviction was based on the Sept. 16 seizure by officers of the Kentucky State Police of 6000 pirate 8 -track and cassette tapes which were being sold by Buntain at the Leitchfield Flea Market in Grayson, Ky.

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Joel Whitburn's Pop Annual A Complete, Year -by -Year Listing of Every Artist & Single to Hit Any of Billboard's Pop Charts from January '55 Through December '77! Record Research Inc. P.O. Box 200 Menomonee Falls, WI 53051

Mail check or money order for full amount in U.S. dollars to: Record Research Inc., P.O. Box 200 Menomonee Falls. WI 53051

Ga. Retailer Generates $ With `Wall Of Hits' By JOHN SIPPEL LOS ANGELES -Because the

three small neighborhood Rock n -Easy record /tape /accessories stores in Southeastern Georgia have done so well in less than four years, founder Dick Gardner has decided to frame a franchise concept before year's end. Located in Brunswick, Hines ville and Valdosta, Gardner and his family, wife Barbara and sons, Rick and Stuart, will probably top the $1 million mark for the stores which average under 3,000 square feet are located in towns under 30,000 population. Quite an achievement in the face of a lagging industry and an environment that favors the larger chain store entity? Yes, and Gardener, a former Brunswick plant worker who moonlit as a small local record shop owner before opening more stores, points to his "Wall Of Hits" as the answer. For several years prior to going into retail, Gardner doubled between his local plant job and the industry as a smalltime rackjobber. From the trunk of his car, he serviced small racks in a variety of retail locations. Based upon his rack experience, Gardner placed his top priority on having pertinent album product at times when it was hottest. Being situated where he

rarely saw a sales person and buying from one- stops, he subscribed to Billboard and candidly points to the best -selling albums chart as his success formula. Above his album risers, where he stocked his catalog albums and tapes, he built his first top 50 album slots. Since that time, all three stores have eight -high, floor -to- ceiling album racks, with hand -printed numbered signs indicating album title and current Billboard position. Dick Gardner and his store managers commit every employe to changing positions and entering new chart contenders early each week when the new weekly arrives. Gardner credits the current charted album wall of 200 albums with building and retaining a steady flow of weekly customers. Some of his diehard album customers attempt to keep up with all new chart entries, and have developed in their chums a similar interest. Even today and when he goes into franchising, Gardner views buying from one-stops as continuing. He is able through using a number of suppliers in Atlanta and in the East to obtain hard -toget new albums overnight if necessary to keep his "album wall" complete.

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phone has been ringing off the hook with people asking what they can do. We have a bill in Congress and this book is working against us. It doesn't just knock Elvis, but the whole entertainment business. People will believe this trash," says Patricia Ann Emanuele, a "journalist, mother, hairdresser, and administrative assistant," who also runs a nationwide campaign to establish "Elvis Presley Day." She says she has collected 2.2 million signatures on a petition to have a "day of recognition, not a holiday," in honor of Elvis. She says that Congressman Harold Ford of Tennessee has introduced a bill in the House to that affect, which has 15 cosponsors. Also, 11 states already have their own "Elvis Presley Day," she adds. One of the states that doesn't is New York. But a rally is scheduled for Saturday (24) in Albany to pressure lawmakers there, sponsored by the Elvis Presley Foundation of New York, a non -profit organization of fans which also wants busts of Elvis at such venues as Madison Square Garden, Nassau Coliseum and others, and a greater recognition of Elvis' music and "the humor and love that glowed forth from Elvis as well as his compassion and concern for the human condition." The organization gets involved with charity events, recently raising $900 during "WalkAmerica '81" for the March of Dimes. The Albany rally will be the third such event this year. The last one was in Washington on Sept. 19, but the 200 Elvis fans who gathered in front of the White House were overshadowed by the 250,000 who arrived for the massive Solidarity Day union rally. The New York Foundation is one of "thousands" such organizations. "There are as many of them as there are Elvis imitators," says Emanuele,

who adds that she coordinates their activities in getting Elvis recognition, but, she notes, she has no ties with either Col. Parker or Elvis' estate. She does write a column for the Garden State Nightlife weekly in New Jersey, titled "Elvis Campaign Dairy," where she chronicles her efforts for Elvis. "It's time the American people stood up for American entertainers," she declares. "Nobody really knew what Elvis really did, except one man, and he is dead. Nobody spent every minute of the day with him. And it's nobody's business what he did. He was a very sick man. He had cancer and was on prescribed medication. If they go after anyone it should be his doctors and hangerson." * * * Latest promotion from MTV, the cable music network, is a "one night stand" trip for a contest winner and three friends to see the Rolling Stones at the Superdome in New Orleans, Dec. 5. The winner, picked from self- addressed post cards sent (Continued on page 84)

Atlantic Gets Detroit's Cherie LOS ANGELES -Atlantic Rec-

ords has signed Detroit -based Cherie Records to a five -year custom label agreement. Cherie has already issued Jerry Carr and Shelley Quayle on an independent basis, with future releases set by Barrett Strong, New York Express, Carol Anderson and Scott Stem. Originally, the plan was to be an r &b label. "But there's a lot of other talent in Detroit that is not explored," says president Norton Stern. Can is an r &b /disco artist, while Quayle is pop. "We're encouraging rock acts to see us, but basically we are pop and r&b," explains Stern, who heads a staff of four at the label. Albums by five of the artists on the roster are expected by Christmas. All acts are Detroit-based. The idea for Cherie began two years ago. "We were doing nothing

but getting our product together," says Stern. The recent release of Can's "This Must Be Heaven" track independently garnered play in East Coast discos, which Stern says led to attention from Atlantic.

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State

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HIT WALL -Rick Gardner changes LPs on the Rock -n -Easy "Wall Of Hits" in Brunswick, Ga. His father and three -store chain founder, Dick Gardner, credits the weekly changing top 200 best -selling albums from Billboard with bolstering the good sales fortunes of the stores.

City

YORK -Though

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Presenting Greg Lake.

Featuring the forthcoming single "Let Me Love You Once." The legend continues ... Greg Lake begins an extensive nationwide tour on November 23rd.

The voice behind Emerson Lake & Palmer and King Crimson steps forward with his first solo album.

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Records and Tapes The album CHR 1357 Produced by Greg Lake

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ith a spec e with 3 u c 1e n tailored Etin;s sports S Uiiks builds they're ABC of g eyant. And kind gaes`, orts-thebi the young aiwa'js there's of Then irreverent News aSports-the ABCest, the oast. Klub fro+n charismost Supper the quic` r adjO's will It:ee° Dahl from after "Sieve zaniness ersrality. ..Steve week back suc as weklycomic p end corning matic Notes" aJd1er a!o beeatures °esmusic, plus 0 3 élines; eek. oll More. & and tUre. Net"Rock features, Radio nev3 tfl a lífestyl Rock and movie Portant t and eX ,c pr°ç rarn Most your listened-to best is work biggest and the King Biscuit go: R,s We've H5 git on its biggest ook features.

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THE OAK RIDGE Bars' GREATEST HITS JUST WON THEM OUR GREATEST AWARD. The Oak Ridge Boys have taken their country charm and four -part harmony and made it work for just about everyone. They've won a lot of fans, over the years. And now they've won a Scotty Award, too. We're proud of our association with

their album, "Oak Ridge Boys' Greatest Hits :' and we tip our hats to Duane, Joe, Bill, Richard and all the other members of the team who made this album possible: Ron Chancey, producer; Les Ladd,

engineer; and Woodland Sound Studios. The album has already gone gold. But it's much more than a sales success. And that's why the Scotty Award judges gave it our highest honor. These judges don't hand out Scotty Awards every day. They award only six a year to super achievers in any category

of music. Just to qualify, you have to go gold or platinum by RIAA standards. And you have to master on Scotch® Recording Tape. For all that, we give a strong pat on the back to our winners, the Oak Ridge Boys. It's tough to win a Scotty Award. But when you win one, it means something. And you can share that something with someone less fortunate, because we'll award $1000 in your name to the Muscular Dystrophy Association. We'll also award a $5000 music scholarship to a promising new artist chosen by the top Scotty winner.

donate $100 to Muscular Dystrophy for each qualified nomination. So contact your 3M Field Representative for details and nomination forms. Join the Oak Ridge Boys and go for a Scotty. It's got success written all over it.

If you think you know a super achiever, you can enter that artist in this year's Scotty Awards. We're now accepting nominations for recordings that reach gold or platinum status in 1981. And we'll

c A V Products Division 3M hears you...

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15

Geneiol News

Sony Blank Tape Sponsor Of Rod Stewart's Tour Continued from page I

While recognizing that its sponsorship of the tour may be a controversial move, a Sony spokesman says the company feels the tour is a "key opportunity to reach a lot of prospective customers," for its blank tape line, which "needs more visibility. The Walkman doesn't need it. We are selling those via word of mouth, with almost no advertising." Says Bob Regehr, Warner vice president of artist development and publicity: "I thought it was Sony hardware not software. Beyond that I have no comment." The Sony Tape /Stewart deal was set up by the Rockbill marketing company, which recently put together the Jovan sponsorship of the Rolling Stones tour (Billboard, Oct.

bought one page in your publication. But, for an artist of Rod Stewart's stature, I think that's criminal. We did a nine -album deal with them for $18 million, and we recouped that in four LPs. We made a lot of

money for them, and now they are doing nothing for us." "I do not feel offended at all by blank tape," Gaff continues, "I encourage taping. The more they tape, the more they listen, and the more

likely they are to go out to buy records. I made a study of it, and I found that the richer they are and the more records they buy, the more likely they are to tape. They tape for their friends, or they buy an album,

and make a tape for the car, and I see nothing wrong with that. "If we are doing anything with Sony Tape," he continues, "I hope we are to bring the attention of the (Continued on page 86)

17).

In all the cities that Stewart will play, the concerts will be billed as "Sony Tape Presents Rod Stewart," with Sony's name appearing on all the tickets and T- shirts. There will be extensive print and radio advertising for the concerts, featuring the Sony name. At selected concerts, 300,000 Sony- sponsored Rockbill booklet /posters will be distributed free. Other promotional and merchandising plans are still being worked out. It is expected that, in some cities, Stewart will host press /industry receptions for Sony Tape. "Nothing could please me more than to have a quality product like Sony Tape as the tour sponsor," says Stewart in a statement. "I've been a Sony fan for many years and enjoy using their products." Sony will not reveal how much it will pay Stewart to sponsor his tour. It is believed to be a "substantial" six figure number, though "somewhat less," say sources, than the $ I million the Rolling Stones reportedly asked of Sony for their tour, before getting a deal with Jovan. Sony notes that even though Stewart will be closely involved in the promotion of its blank tape, he will not actually be endorsing it. That is, no advertisments are planned where Stewart would be urging consumers to record music using Sony Tape. At this time, neither is Sony an advertiser in the Stewart tv special, but both the Sony spokesman, and Billy Gaff, Stew art's manager say that is a likelihood. The tv special, which was arranged by Gaff and Wold Entertainment, a satellite communications company, will be seen live on about 87 stations, reaching 85% of the U.S. market, says Gaff. It will also be simulcast on local FM radio stations. He says details for Europe and Australia are still being worked out, but because of time differences the show there may be shown via tape delay. The two -hour event, which appears to be the most ambitious live music concert on worldwide tv since the Elvis in Hawaii special in 1973, may possibly be shown via cable or close circuit in Britain, adds Gaff. He says he did the deal with Sony to help defray the high cost of touring. "Providing it is done with good taste," he sees nothing wrong with having a corporate sponsor. He says he did similar deals previously in Britain for Gloria Vanderbilt jeans and Woolworths, and both worked out fine. Moreover, he says, the Sony deal compensates for lack of record company support. "I did it so I could buy billboards on Sunset Strip to advertise a Warner Bros. product," says Gaff. "We are getting nothing from the record company. Warners contributed not one cent. Well, maybe they

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The Radio Programming, Music /Record International Newsweekly

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ment Business; London: World Radio-TV Handbook, The Artists Book Club.

Vol. 93 No. 42

1

Commenkory

To The New Reality By SID BERNSTEIN

-

new acts are over. No longer do they pay for all the goodies It's no secret that business as usual in the music business is no tour support, advertising, showcases, etc. longer business as usual. By necessity, the artist of the '80s has to become more selfAs a long-time manager of talent and promoter of major sufficient. He will need an organization that can keep him events, one thing is clearer than ever to me, Marketing and artworking even if he never hooks up with ist development methods that worked in a label. He will need to develop a longthe past fall woefully short of the artist's term marketing plan utilizing all the needs in the '80s. tools available in this electronic age. ToTraditionally, an artist who feels he morrow's artist will be much more in has star potential will rehearse his best touch with his own career that his material, record a demo, send his tape predecessors. to record companies, managers, or other There are many acts who can make a industry heavies, and possibly schedule good living on a local or regional basis. a local showcase where he can be seen This is likely to continue and grow. If a by anyone he can drag in. group is playing steadily and keeping A "showcase" is usually synonymous industry people aware of these appearwith "No one gets paid." But you still ances with flyers and phone calls, their need enough money to rehearse, pay chance of being seen improves dramatiback -up musicians, rent and move cally. Cutting a record for local sale can equipment. A showcase is almost alhelp groups gain national notice. Howways a financial loss to everyone but the ever, with record company support at club where it is staged. Developing a an all -time low, the new age of electronnew act involves tremendous amounts ics seems to offer the next best hope. of time and money. The proliferation of cable television Just recently, we signed one of our will provide a growing showcase for acts, Alliance (out of Detroit), with Ron new acts as an increasing number of Alexenburg of Handshake Records. shows need more and more talent to The group had been working Michigan keep them going. Commercial tv defor over a year, creating a stir in every Sid Bernstein: "The new artist must have pends on names to draw an audience. venue they played. But nothing much a stomach of steel." Cable, with its less stringent time rehappened in the way of a career. More quirements, localized character and the gigs, better paying gigs, but no real need to provide something different, break. will offer many more opportunities for exposure. The same Alliance decided to invest in a tape. They spent $1,600 promay also be true of videodisks and videocassettes as the techducing their own tape with five original tunes. They mailed 20 nology continues to develop. cassettes to 20 managers and agents. It is entirely possible, thanks to the video revolution, for a group to become an electronic success without doing any of the things that were commonplace in the past. Today a group can cut its demo for video ... design its act to utilize lasers and other visual technology ... produce its album for videodisk and videocassette ... make local appearances via cable outlets ... and play its concerts to millions of people We heard it first, and flipped. But it took three months to get around the world on closed circuit tv without ever having to go a record executive to fly out to see the group. on the road or make a live appearance. The time it takes even when the material, the lead singer, and the band are outstanding, is nerve-wracking. But if you truly believe, you stay on the case. The key factor today is time. In these days of tight budgets, getting a record company interested is a tough job. It takes time. Even after the record company commits itself, and the record is But one thing won't change. The new artist must have a stommade, the traditional problems of getting airplay and creating ach of steel and the ability to stand up to one of the toughest excitement are just beginning. businesses known to man, a business where every week you're A few years back, a record company knew that it generally looking for a job. The apparent glamor of the rock star quickly took two or three LPs to establish an act. Today, you have to wears off for even the most successful. take your best shot the first time. Unless something favorable The new artist must run his career like a business. He must happens, you don't often get a second chance. Everyone is realize that the odds are overwhelmingly against him. He must reaching for the brass ring and only a few lucky ones grab it. really be honest and ask himself, "Is my talent potential strong Time and patience are as important as the talent. You need an enough to shine above the competition ?" If the answer is an abundance of all three. emphatic Yes, then he should go for it all. in the I see it changing The system being what it is, and can't Sid Bernstein is president of Sid Bernstein Associates, New foreseeable future, the new artist or manager had better look York based personal manager/concert promoter enterprise. for alternatives. The days when the record companies mothered

`Today you must take your

best shot the first time'

`The artist of the '80s will

become more self- sufficient'

Articles appearing on this weekly page are designed as a forum for the expression of views of general interest. Contributions should be submitted to Is Horowitz, Commentary Editor, Billboard, 1515 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 10036.

LetEers ToThe Editor Dear Sic I wish the industry, including Billboard, would stop referring to albums as LPs. The term "album" denotes a collection of separate pieces, whereas "LP" properly

As for Ms. Halper, she might consider taking issue with those who categorize popular music rather than putting down the artists who are arbitrarily placed in the categories. Or, perhaps she should go read a book.

denotes a long- playing "single " -at least that was its original meaning, I believe. Normally, especially in country music, you expect an album to play longer than a single, so the use of the adjective "long playing" in reference to an album appears unnecessary. William R. Etheridge Arlington, Va.

Donna M. Katz Rochester, N.Y.

Dear Sir: I have one simple question to ask the major record companies. When will you quit wrapping records so

tight that they warp? Dear Sir: Re: the commentary by Donna Halper in the October 10th issue, why is it that whenever anyone wants to say something derogatory about what is termed

"adult oriented" music they spit out the name Barry Manilow as if it were a four letter word? -

To begin with, Manilow has had top 40 hits (11 of them in the top 10). Secondly, in the May 2, is-

I work at the record department of a department store, and the bulk of our business comes from the sales of top hits. However, it is difficult to sell them when half or all of each shipment is warped. Last week I counted 50 warped albums that were received in one week's time. These 50 albums were

never sold. That is 50 lost sales at $7.99 each -a $400 loss.

Dear Sic

Atlantic Records is to be congratulated on having three out of the top four albums during the week of Sept. 19. Obviously the company is doing something right when it comes to the marketing of pop albums. However, given this success, it becomes even more difficult to understand why Atlantic has not undertaken a more ambitious jazz reissue series. The Atlan-

tic catalog contains some of the finest jazz of the last 30 years. Having so much of it unavailable is a disservice to consumers as well as to the company. A company so successful would seemingly feel some responsibility to their catalog. Now would be an appropriate time to make a meaningful commitment in this

direction. Jack L. Frieden

Norfolk, Va.

Dear Sic I wholeheartedly endorse the position of Donna Hal per in her recent commentary (Billboard, Oct. 10). I'm 29. I like good, uptempo pop /rock and wish someone in Houston would give us a top 40 station with a good

his act toward "the adolescents on hand." Now he is

step in the right direction by using a loose wrap on new releases by the Who, Eddie Rabbitt, the Pointer Sisters, Joe Walsh and Van Halen. In the

being put down for appealing to the adult listening aduience. Perhaps Manilow should accept all of this as a compliment since it is obvious his following is so di-

months these albums have been out I've had only two exchanges involving them. Mike Filion

verse that it is next to impossible to identify his music

Foleys, Record & Tape Dept.

John Kier

Houston

Houston

review of his performance at the Riviera in Las Vegas, Manilow was chided for aiming sue of Billboard in

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Radio Programming TURNER TO HALL OF FAME

DJs Collect Kudos; Four Are Triumphani

COUNTRY HONOR -Grant Turner, right, dean of Grand Ole Opry announcers, is inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame during the televising of the Country Music Assn. awards show. Hall of Fame member Roy Acuff congratulates

Turner after unveiling plaque that

will

hang

in

the Nashville museum.

CMA DEEJAYS OF THE YEAR

West, Wilson, Waggoner Feted In Small, Medium, Major Marts NASHVILLE -Winning the Country Music Assn. DJ of the Year award for major markets was "a combination of a lot of things," according to Lynn Waggoner, this year's winner and program director of KEBC -FM Oklahoma City. Waggoner himself is far down on this list of "lots of things" modestly compiled by Waggoner. "This reflects the conditions in the market, the station. We've been promoting country music for 12 years and we've enjoyed good success." As for his own on -air work, Waggoner says, "I'm not the best. I've heard a lot better." Waggoner has spent his entire radio career at KEBC, beginning 10 years ago as a weekend part- timer. After nine months he went to fulltime. He was production director for awile, then became music director and program director two and a half years ago. He also does the morning program from 6 to 9 a.m. His approach to programming includes "trying to inject a lot of personality. We're an information and news station. We have IO people on the news staff. We also give the jocks a lot of leeway, a lot of freedom to plan their shows and pick their music." Waggoner notes that all but one of his on -air staff have been program directors or music directors at other stations. "They're all professionals," he says. Waggoner also believes in "giving a lot of new artists exposure." The Billboard reporting station runs a weekly playlist of 90 records, "plus a lot of oldies. Al Hamilton (the music director) and I use a lot of gut feel to pick the music. We feel we know country. We don't use any tricks. We're honest. We're ourselves. Country is honest music and we take the same approach." Waggoner points with pride to his st ation for "coming a long way. re've worked hard. We pioneered country and personality on FM. Now we're No. in our market." 1

NASHVILLE -Tim Wilson, winner of the Country Music Assn. DJ of the Year award for medium markets, thinks he's "not done anything exceptional or outstanding to win. I just concentrate on basics." he says of his duties as program director and late morning man at WAXX-FM Eau Claire, Wisc. Wilson, in town for Country Music Week. has been on the air for eight years, the last four and a half at WAXX, where he began in afternoon drive. He switched to mornings when he became program director two and a half years ago. He's on the air from 9 a.m. to noon. He began his on -air career at KWBG -AM Boone, Iowa and was at WLVH -AM Mattoon, Ill:, before joining WAXX. Wilson modestly says he succeeds by "eliminating what doesn't work for me. I'm not a great humorist, so I (Continued on page 31)

More Talk, Less Music On WSIX NASHVILLE -WSIX -AM is moving away from its adult contemporary format to more talk. Al Voecks, morning newscaster, begins a two -hour call -in talk show Monday (19) from 9 to 11 a.m. Jim Bocock, WSIX general manager, says more talk programming will be added within the next few weeks to fill out the afternoon and evening hours. A "Sports Nuts" call -in show will be added from 5:30 p.m. for an hour and Teddy Bart, will be given a slot on the station as soon as he gets settied into his new evening news anchor on WNGE -TV. WNGE and WSIX are both owned by General Electric. While WSIX may eventually be all talk after 9 a.m., Bocock says that Gerry House and Paul Randall will continue to do their music and news (Continued on page 25)

NASHVILLE -Jacki West, the first woman to win a Country Music Assn. DJ of the Year award, takes pride in interjecting a woman's point of view into the music mix of her station, WGTO -AM Cypress Gardens, Fla. West, who won in the small market category, credits her win to the "help of all the guys at the station. It's a combination of all of the people I work with and the fact that it's a good station." While acting music director Henry Jay is in charge of the station's playlist, music selection is a

joint effort of informal music meetings that West enjoys participating in. "We all listen to the music. We all have input. I give a woman's point of

view picking the ballads versus the

honking stuff." She notes that among the important adds she voted for before coming up here for Country Music Week, included Ronnie Milsap's "I Wouldn't Miss It For The World" on RCA, Alabama's "Love In The First Degree" and "Ride The Train" on RCA, the Bellamy Bros.' "You're My Favorite Star" on Warner Bros. and Anne Murray's "It's All I Can Do" on Capitol. West has been on WGTO for three and a half years, half the time she's been a DJ. Before joining WGTO she worked in Tallahassee and began her career at WTNT-AM Tallahassee. She gives credit to WGTO management for putting "a woman on in the daytime. Some station's think that women won't listen to a woman," but West has proved that theory wrong. Her noon to 4 p.m. shift is No. in the Lakeland Winter Haven, Fla. Arbitron book (which includes Cypress Gardens), she says, and notes the station is No. overall in the market too. She says her approach to being a DJ is to be "a friend to the people and enjoy the music right along with 1

1

them it'c imnnrtant to cnund natn-

rai and not be an announcer, but a real live human being."

www.americanradiohistory.com

By DOUGLAS E. HALL NASHVILLE -As the 56th anthe Country Music Hall of Fame in nual Grand Ole Opry Birthday cele1966. bration got underway last week, a seWhile Turner was elected DJ of lect few DJs were singled out for the year for major markets in 1974, special honors among the 400-plus Lynn Waggoner of KEBC -FM 0kattending the week's activities. lahoma City was elected to that title this year. He beat out Bob Hooper of The awards began at the 15th anWESC -AM Greenville, S.C., nual Country Music Assn. awards Sammy Jackson of KLAC -AM Los show, which was televised by CBS Angeles, Chuck Morgan of WSM Monday (12) (see related story). AM Nashville, Chris Taylor of Along with the music and record laKYNN -AM Omaha and John bel winners, four DJs were cited for Trimble of WRVA -AM Richmond. their work. Last year this award was won by Given highest honors was Grant Larry Scott of KRLD-AM, which Turner, dean of Grand Ole Opry anhas since dropped its country format nouncers since 1945, who was in favor of MOR. elected to the Country Music Hall of Tim Wilson of WAXX -AM Eau Fame. He began his radio career at Claire, Wisc. was the winner of the the age of 16 in his hometown of DJ of the Year award for medium Abilene, Tex. at a station he helped markets and Jacki West was the winbuild. He worked at various stations ner for small markets. throughout the South before joining Wilson bested Sam Faulk of WSM -AM Nashville in 1944. A proWLWI -FM Montgomery, Ala.; tege of the first Opry announcer Buddy Raye of WWVA -AM WheelGeorge D. Hay, Turner was ining, W. Va.; the late King Edward ducted into the CMA DJ Hall of Fame in 1974. Hay was elected to (Continued on page 27)

Out Of The Box

l

HOT 100 /AC

BOSTON -Sunny Joe White, program director at WXKS -FM says he added George Benson's "Turn Your Love Around" (Warner Bros.) out of the box because "it's just the kind of record we need and it's great." The Kinks' single "Destroyer" (Arista) got an extra push by the group's two sellout concerts in Boston recently and their appearance on NBC's "Saturday Night Live." White notes that Foreigner's "4" LP sold exceptionally well in Boston so he's added "Waiting For A Girl Like You" (Atlantic), also attributing its popularity in the market to the record's more mass appeal, softer sound. "We've been watching Chilliwack's'My Girl' (Millennium) for a while and have seen it grow," White points out. "The time was right to add it." Kim Carnes'"Mistaken Identity" fills out this week's additions at WXKS. Commenting on that. White says, "We just love her, period."

AOR PHILADELPHIA -"The Romantics are a Philly favorite," says Charle Kendall, program director at WMMR -FM where the band's "Strictly Personal" (Nemperor) was added this week. "Their last album did extremely well. In fact, this is one of the markets they broke in last time, and this album's even better." Kendall also added Greg Lake's new self-titled Chrysalis LP, noting that name value alone prompts him to give it play. "Pure ears and instinct" got Ultravox's "Rage In Eden" (Chrysalis) added, according to Kendall, who also says that they "liked the synthesized '80s sound of the record. Vic Vergat's "Down To The Bone" (Capitol) also fits the bill this week at WMMR. "We needed a good loud rock'n'roll record and this is a great one," the p.d. says. "We couldn't ignore Quarterflash's 'Harden My Heart' (Geffen) either. They're getting played everywhere."

BLACK /URBAN MEMPHIS -"Hit And Run" by the Bar -Kays ( Mercury) tops the list of adds at WDIA -AM. "They're a hometown group, so they always do well," notes music director Tinanell Rogers. Jermaine Jackson's track record and the "smooth sound" of his new ballad "I'm Just Too Shy" (Motown) garnered him a spot on the add list along with Aretha Franklin whose "It's My Turn," from her new Arista LP, was also included. Rogers says the old Aretha-style treatment of this Diana Ross tune appeals to her listeners. She topped off this week's adds with George Benson's "Turn Your Love Around" (Warner Bros.) also noting the mass appeal of this Benson outing.

COUNTRY AUSTIN -Steve Gary, music director at KOKE -FM, says that Alabama's "Love In The First Degree" (RCA) is another strong effort from a group that's definitely proven itself. "The production on 'Your My Bestest Friend' by Mac Davis really knocked me out," he notes of the singer's newest Casablanca single added this week. "We played 'I Wish You Could Have Turned My Head And Left My Heart Alone' when the writer, Sonny Throckmorton, had it out on an album," Gary says. "Our audience really liked the song so we're playing Forman's version on Dimension." The identification factor of Leona Williams'"Always Late With Your Kisses" (Elektra) helped bring it on KOKE's list this week. "It's an old Lefty Frizzell song," Gary points out, "so people are familiar with it, and she did a good job on it." Michael Ballew, an artist that developed a strong following in Austin playing live and releasing singles on his own label, has been picked up by Liberty Records and his single "Your Daddy Don't Live In Heaven (He'c In Hnuctnnl" tnnneri not the aridc this week. "I think this record will do real well for him if stations will give it a chance," Gary contends. "He's got a strong rockabilly style."

Per

1

THE MAC"

SESSION' ^T CRITERIA!

(The Best Recording Studios in the

RECORDED IN RECORD TIME A TRUE MASTERPIECE LP ...

-A

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WORLD

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MASTERPIECE

TRUE

RECORD

1-ecorc1ng studlos

ROOKS BROOKS

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by TERRY

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FLYER" fl C' "HIGH Studio Her album the Critarie's note to et recorded ed racordad first complet was he yes troc t and Dressing "magical" days Plating

First to Play "High Flyer" LP WAIF

Betel P late Records. Alpha ne %rbY at

final

--

"Now 6 Songs on our Top 20"... Roy Dorenkemper. MD. Cincinnati, Ohio

min'

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CO mDletad " f overdubs fpR THE RECORD tracks Basic 26th eikdorn completed z4 track 27th lay nY 1ac4ua "S cut feted raster comb May 25th plating final record) nay 29th The pressed 1st June Brooks

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KLTF

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by Terry

Produced by Bruce

Engineered

Hensel

engineer Hike Fuller nasterin9 engineer alpha Records Smith, by Dick Pressed

Assistant

THE RECORD

SPEAKS

FOR ITSELF n to be

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STAR PEOPLE

released 61!]05, OarD. 3J,

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Production on the album

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Ted Nugent ... Here comes Terry Brooks!!!" Gary Block. MD. "A very powerful Album both Musically and Lyrically"

1

Billboard's Top Recommended LPs Sept. 12, 1981 TERRY BROOKS & STRANGE -High Flyer. Star People (Tone). Produced by Terry R. Brooks. Basically a one-take LP. that was mixed the next day. and mastered the day after that. "High Flyer" belies its quickie production with some dense su-

burban hard rock featuring Brooks on vocals and guitar. Behind him are bass. drums and keyboards. This LP is good. guitar -heave AOR rock. that need not take a back seat to anything released by the majors. Best cuts: "Child In The City." "High Flyer." "What Kind Of Man."

ROCKS OFF! MAGAZINE "Terry is capable of the most devastating heavy metal on vinyl

..."

Ken Hall

TOM BINGHAM

songs published by AURA LOVE PUBLISHING (BMI) All

Space Side

Earth Side 1.

You Will Be Loved (Terry

2. Child of The City (Terry

R.

(BM.I) (5:30)

2. My

(Terry

R.

(BMI) (4:26)

Brooks)

3.

R

R

R.

All vocals & guitar

....

Bass

Drums All keyboards Newscaster voice

...

TERRY R. BROOKS

DONNIE CAPPETTA MARK BISHOP LISA GLASCOCK JENNIFER WALLACE

R

(BMI) (4:42)

Brooks)

4. High Flyer (Terry

(BMI) (3:50)

Brooks)

Love of the Ages (Terry

(BMI) (2:47)

Brooks)

Lady and Me

(Terry

Brooks)

and Roll Woman

3. Rock (Terry

1.

Brooks)

R.

What Kind of Man

(BMI) (5:24)

(BMI)

)3 50)

Brooks)

See MR. STRANGE video starring TERRY BROOKS taped at Arthur Jones spectacular

NAUTILUS VIDEO STUDIOS in Lake Helen, Florida

All songs written, produced and arranged by TERRY R. BROOKS All songs recorded and mastered at the best studio in the world -CRITERIA STUDIOS, Miami, Florida Engineer, BRUCE HENSAL - the best engineer in the universe. Mastered by MIKE FULLER

Photos by J.G. GLEEN, JR. and RICK PFAENDER Pressed by ALPHA RECORDS, INC., Plantation, Florida, DICK SMITH Printing by SEMINOLE PRINTERS, Sanford, Florida, AL ADEN Thanks to all at CRITERIA; PA TRICK ERNST, DANNY KING Pirate DJ's of the World (F.F.F R.); C.G.D. RECORDS in Italy, LANFRANCO GAMBINI; PETER GOOCH in Spain; and IMAVOX in Portugal. Terry Brooks' Strange Guitar custom built by MICHAEL TOBIAS, Orlando, Florida ,

(305) 331 -4453 STAR PEOPLE RECORDS, Inc. 1981 c P, P.O. Box 553, Casselberry, Florida 32707 Richard Schultz, V.P. www.americanradiohistory.com

-

22

Radio Action.

Sîn9Ies Billboard. :i . vuylia

Top Add Ons

ewyr

Prime Movers

(10/13/81)

Based on station playlists through Tuesday

TOP ADD ONS - NATIONAL

PRIME MOVERS- NATIONAL DAN FOGELBERG

-Hard

To Say (Epic /Full Moon)

FOREIGNER- Waiting For

A

PRIME MOVERS -The

two products registering the greatest proportionate upward movement on the station's playlist as determined by station personnel are marked * *. ADD ONS-The two key products added at the radio stations listed as determined by station personnel are marked BREAKOUTS- Billboard Chart Department summary of Add On and Prime Mover information to reflect greatest product activity at Regional and National levels.

DIANA ROSS

.

*

**

(Doug Ericson -MD) BLUE OYSTER CULT- Burnin' For You

12-

9

**

BOB SEGER -Tryin' To Live My Life

Without You 14-11

* * *

COMMODORES -Oh No 27-24 ROLLING STONES-Start Me Up 11.8

FOREIGNER- Waiting For

A

PRIME MOVERS

BOB SEGER &THE SILVER BULLET BAND- Tryin' Live My Life Without You (Capitol)

To

RICK SPRINGFIELD -I've Done Everything For You

INGRAM -lust Once

DIANA ROSS -Why Do Fools Fall In Love

*

*

TOP ADD ONS

Little Thing

-We're

In This Love

Am 28

KOPA-FM- Phoenix

MIKE POST-The Theme From Hill Street Blues 23

**

**

RICK SPRINGFIELD

Done Everything

For You 22-13

**

AL JARREAU

-We're

In This Love

Together

*

*

*

*

MARTY BALIN -Atlanta Lady 17 -14

DIESEL -Sausalito Summer Night 22-18

ALJARREAU -Wire In This Love Together

2622

26 -19

*

*

SHEENA EASTON -For Your Eyes Only 11.8 LITTLE RIVER BAND

QUARTERFLASH- Harden My Heart LINDSAY BUCKINGHAM -Trouble

-The Night Owls 4.2

THE FOUR TOPS -When

She Was My Girl 24-

STEVIE NICKS -Leather And Lace

ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCHESTRA- Twilight

18

QUARTERFLASH- Harden My Heart KCPX -AM

ROD STEWART -Young Turks

It For The

(Bob Hamilton -MD) 7 -2

LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls 18

* * *

-I Wouldn't

JOHNNY LEE -Bet Your Heart On Me

JERMAINE JACKSON -I'm Just Too Shy

-Castles

In The Air

BOB DYLAN

Love You

2927

15 EARTH, WIND & FIRE -Let's Groove

GEORGE BENSON

-Turn Your Love Around

-Heart

Of Mine

KGB -FM -San Diego

(Jeff Lucifer

**

Magic 26 -20

-I've Done

Everything

DAN FOGELBERG

-Hard

FOREIGNER -Waiting For A Girl Like You 1.1

-Alien

ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCHESTRA-

**

Twilight

* *

* *

ROLLING STONES -Start Me Up

*

QUINCY JONES FEATURING JAMES

-lust

Once 5-4

THE GO GO'S -Our Lips

*

AL JARREAU -Were In This Love

Together

This Love Together

In

-No Reply

*

KINKS- Destroyer DONNY IRIS -Sweet Merrilee

*

**

*

AL JARREAU

*

BARRY MANILOW -The Old Songs 18.12

-We're

BOB SEGER- Tryin' To Live My Life Without You 4-2

*

THE POLICE -Every Little Thing She Does Is RICK SPRINGFIELD -I've Done Everything

Me

-I

Want You

I

Need You

Night

r_*

PRIME

MOVERS

ROLLING STONES-Start Me Up (Rolling Stn, QUINCY JONES FEATURING DIMES INGRAM

-Every Little Thing

*

AL JARREAU

In This Love Together

r_

She Does Is Magic

-A

Lucky Guy (WB)

BREAKOUTS TOURNEY -Don't Stop

** **

-MD)

LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls 1.1 ALJARREAU -Were In This Love Together

* *

DAVID GATES -Take Me Now 25-18

*

FOREIGNER -Waiting For A Girl Like You 19-

BARRY MANILOW -The Old Songs 27 -23

13 THE GO GO'S

-Our

Lips Are Sealed

-When

She Was My Girl

(Continued on page 24)

(UM)

-Hard To Say (Epic/Full Moon) -The Sweetest Thing (Capitol)

Believin' (Columbia)

LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM- Trouble (Elektra) CRYSTAL GAYLE

-We're

LINDSAY BUCKINGHAM -Trouble KIOY -FM- Fresno

THE FOUR TOPS

-lust Once

DAN FOGELBERG

RICKIE LEE IONES

22-18

Girl

9 -4

Pacific Northwest Region

11

KENNY ROGERS-Share Your Love With Me

-My

(Tom Saville

JUICE NEWTON

DARYL HALL /JOHN OATES- Private Eyes

Everything

COMMODORES -Oh No 15 -12

18

LUTHER VANDROSS -Never Too Much 29-

21-19

*

BENATAR- Promises In The Dark 20-16

Am 26 -13

-I've Done

-Don't Stop Believin' STEVIE NICKS -Leather And Lace THE KNACK -Pay The Devil

Together

In This Love

TOP ADD ONS I

RICK SPRINGFIELD

8-6

POLICE

AIR SUPPLY -Here

She Does Is

JOURNEY

I

(Steve O'Neil-MD)

**

Little Thing

THE POLICE -Every

CHILLIWACK

-Hard To Say 6-1 AIR SUPPLY -Here Am 5-3 KENNY ROGERS-Share Your Love With DAN FOGELBERG

(A &M)

99-1-FM-Riverside

2 -1

BOB SEGER-Tryin' To Live My Life

For You 22 -17

AM- Tucson

STEVIE WOODS -Steal The

THE

ROLLING STONES-Start Me Up

**

At All

CHRIS CHRISTIAN

GENESIS-No Reply At All

-Turn Your Love Around

Jose

Magic 7-5

TRIUMPH -Magic Power GENESIS

-San

(Bob Harlow -MD)

** *

Believe'

THE FOUR TOPS -When She Was My Girl 21.

10 -7

KEZR -FM

Without You 12-9

JOURNEY -Don't Stop

Am 24.15

NILS LOFGREN-Night Fades Away

Stop Believin

GEORGE BENSON

27 -22

**

1

JUICE NEWTON -The Sweetest Thing

She Does

(Bobby Rivers -MD)

DIANA ROSS -Why Do Fools Fall In Love

Twilight

BILLYJOEL -Say Goodbye To Hollywood

PAT

-Every Little Thing

FOREIGNER -Waiting For A Girl Like You 22-

**

11 8

ROLLING STONES-Start Me Up 4

Magic 21-15

QUARTERFLASH- Harden My Heart

For You 14 -11

*

I

INGRAM -lust Once

RICKIE LEE JONES-A Lucky Guy

22-16

(Lorraine Windgar-MD)

**

*

*

Al JARREAU -We're

Ne Sealed 3,2

KRSP -FM (FM- 103) -Salt Lake City

* Little Thing She Does

AIR SUPPLY -Here

QUINCY JONES FEATURING JAMES

**

11

LINDSAY BUCKINGHAM -Troulde

**

(Tracy Mitchell -MD)

**

18

FOREIGNER -Waiting For A Girl Like You

DIESEL -Sausalito Summer Night 7-5

-Don't

*

You

KIR -AM- Seattle

The Devil

DIESEL -Sausalito Summer Night 14.5

Bakersfield

15-8

ATLANTA RHYTHM SECTION-Alien 20-15

INGRAM

THE POLICE

**

-Save Your Love

RICK SPRINGFIELD-I've Done Everything

**

-Mesa

-Pay

-Hard To Say -Waiting For A Girl Like

NICKS- Leather And Lace STEVIE WOODS -Steal The Night

(Dave Vanstone -MD)

Is

Heard It Through The Grapevine

STEVIE

I

KRQQ -FM- Tucson

**

-I

5 -3

DAN FOGELBERG

29 -19

ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCHESTRA- Twilight

Girl Like You

For You 12-7

(Steve Goddard -MD)

*

A

(Doug DeRoo -MD)

QUARTERFLASH- Harden My Heart

ROGER

She Does Is

JOURNEY -Don't Stop Believin'

KTKT-

*

COMMODORES -Oh No 28 -19

FOREIGNER

-Hard To Say SUPPLY -Here Am 17-13

AIR

JOHN DENVER -The Cowboy And The Lady KKXX-FM-

* *

COMMODORES-Oh No 26

ROD STEWART-Young Turks

To Say 6-3

Little Thing

QUARTERFLASH- Harden My Heart

JEFFERSON STARSHIP

Magic 16-12

-MD)

THE POUCE-Every Is

DEVO- Working In The Coal Mine 35-22

FOREIGNER-Waiting For

DIESEL -Sausalito Summer Night 10-6

** **

*

Blues

BILLY JOEL -Say Goodbye To Hollywood 3-2

Have Missed

KIM CARNES- Mistaken Identity

I

She Does Is

OLIVIA NEWTON -JOHN- Physical 28-13

ATLANTA RHYTHM SECTION

For You 19-12

JOURNEY

INGRAM -Just Once 22 -17 THE FOUR TOPS -When She Was My Girl 17

* *

*

The Devil

QUINCY JONES FEATURING JAMES

TIERRA-La La Means

Little Thing

Magic 30,15

ROD STEWART -Young Turks

World

DON McLEAN

14

THE POLICE -Every

CHRISTOPHER CROSS-Arthur's Theme

Magic 22-17

MIKE POST -The Theme From Hill Street

ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCHESTRA-

ATLANTA RHYTHM SECTION-Alien

ROLLING STONES-Start Me Up

BOB SEGER -Tryin' To Live My Life

-Young Turks

RICK SPRINGFIELD

KZZP -FM

DAN FOGELBERG

- Private Eyes

10-3

Without You 15-7

*

EARTH, WIND & FIRE -Let's Groove 17-9

*

LUTHER VANDROSS -Never Too Much

DARYL HALL /JOHN OATES

**

BARRY MANILOW -The Old Songs

Lake City

RONNIE MILSAP

KRTH -FM -Los Angeles

** **

-Salt

THE KNACK -Pay

KIM CARNES- Mistaken Identity

Without

AL JARREAU -We're In This Love Together

(Gary Waldron -MD)

JUICE NEWTON -The Sweetest Thing

**

Am 21-16

STREEK -One More Night

20 -5

-Eve

I

Magic 20-10

24-16

*

(Bean Reyes -MD)

ATLANTA RHYTHM SECTION -Alien

FOREIGNER -Waiting For A Girl Like You

62

THE KNACK

BOB SEGER -Tryin' To Live My Life

** **

DARYL HALL /JOHN OATES- Private Eyes

THE POLICE -Every

KENNY ROGERS-Share Your Love With Me LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls 6-5

OLIVIA NEWTON- JOHN -Physical 28 -18

*

KERN -Bakersfield

KENNY ROGERS -Share Your Love With

18-15

*

(Craig Jackson-MD)

(Roger Collins -MD)

12 -10

** **

UNDSAY BUCKINGHAM -Trouble

(Randy Lundquist -MD)

-Trouble (Elektra)

-Los Angeles

*

KLUC -AM -Las Vegas

BURTON CUMMINGS -You Saved My Soul

(Capitol)

-lust Once

DIESEL -Sausalito Summer Night I

STREEK -One More Night

** I

*

To Say 7-4

9-6

You 11 -7

Together

ROD STEWART-Young Turks

GEORGE BENSON-Turn Your Love Around (WB)

*

-Hard

3

QUINCY JONES FEATURING JAMES

DARYL HALL /JOHN OATES- Private Eyes

AIR SUPPLY -Here

She Does Is

DAN FOGELBERG

INGRAM

(Q103)- Denver

ROD STEWART

AIR SUPPLY -Here

BREAKOUTSIr_

KF

*

1814

STEWART -Young Turks (WB)

THE KNACK -Pav The Devil

**

2820

AL JARREAU

*

ROD STEWART-Young Turks KOAQ -FM

ROLLING STONES -Start Me UP 9-7

QUARTERFUSH- Harden My Heart (Geffen ELO- Twilight (let)

LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM

Are Sealed 12.5

THE FOUR TOPS -When She Was My Girl

Magic

JOURNEY -Don't Stop Believin'

DIANA ROSS -Why Do Fools Fall In Love

SHEENA EASTON-For Your Eyes Only 4

POLICE -Every Little Thing She Does Is

**

(Jason McQueen -MD)

(Glen McCartney -MD)

GENESIS -No Reply At All

(1. Peterson -MD)

**

KFMX-AM -San Bernardino

KFMB-FM -San Diego

** **

KFRC -San Francisco

COMMODORES -Oh No

ROD STEWART -Young Turks

To Say 20-17

LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls 24-22

s

*

-Our Lips

THE POLICE -Every

-Hard

Me96

24-16

*

EARTH, WIND & FIRE -Let's Groove 28

DARYL HALL /JOHN OATES- Private Eyes

**

-Los Angeles

THE GO GO'S

RICKIE LEE JONES -A Lucky Guy

JOURNEY -Don't Stop Believin'

8-5

(Rick Stancatto -MD)

** **

ATLANTA RHYTHM SECTION -Alien

DAN FOGELBERG

-Trouble (Elektra)

ELO- Twilight cet)

Hospi-Tale 6 -1

(Allan Sledge -MD)

JOURNEY-Don't Stop Believin'

iRCAi ROILING STONES -Start Me Up (Rolling Stones)

*

-Don't Stop Believin' (Columbia)

LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM

THE AFTERNOON DELIGHTS- General

1713

22

ROD STEWART-Young Turks

Pacific Southwest Region

* *

Girl Like You 28-

QUINCY JONES FEATURING JAMES

KRLA -AM

JOURNEY

Love (RCA)

QUARTERFLASH- Harden My Heart (Geffen)

KIMN -AM- Denver

**

-Young Turks (WB) -Why Do Fools Fall In

BREAKOUTS- NATIONAL

ROD STEWART

Girl Like You (Atlantic)

DARYL HALL & JOHN OATES- Private Eyes (RCA)

*

Breakouts

-The Woman In Me (Columbia)

t Copyright 1981, Billboard Publications, Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher.

10.7

Run with a Billboard RADIO ACTION DECISION AD on your single (or singles!) and you'll be running in the right place at the right time! You'll hit Monday and Tuesday -those final playlist decision days for radio! It's the time to effectively present your up -to- the -minute play action facts to the 5500 radio

To Record Promotion Executives _From: Billboard Re Radio Action Decision Ads :

:

Radio's final playlist decision is the bottom line!

stations that get Billboard -a reach that is greater than any other industry publication. Recent AdSell Studies clearly indicate that Billboard's reach is a real reach with radio readership. For example, the Billboard ads reported on, received an 83% "preferential treatment" rating ( "convinced radio that manufacturers were promotionally supporting the product advertised "). Billboard RADIO ACTION DECISION ADS could be the beginning of something really big for your singles -and for radio! Right now is the time to back your promotion team with direct ad support... in the right place! More than 33.0001 radio professionals read Billboard each week.

1

Based upon a study by McGraw -Hill Laboratory of Advertising Research

Billboard Ads move records -and now we're making space for even

better moves! www.americanradiohistory.com

One fife, "The laws governing man's action in society are non-

specific when dealing with concern for the suffering of our fellow man. There is no court to direct us as we consider the alternatives for charity and commitment, and it is unlikely that any one cause will command our full attention. "In asking you to join me in support of the AMC Cancer Research Center, am calling for resource to aid in the fight against a disease that must be conquered. am encouraged by the knowledge that our contribution will be directed by the Staff and Scientists of one of the great centers in the field of oncology. "Let us hope that through the participation of you and your friends and associates, we will provide the funds necessary to extend one life." I

I

-Robert Summer

-

981 Honoree Robert Summer President, RCA Records

i COMMITTEE

National Chairmen

FRANK OLSON Honorary Chairman

GIL FRIESEN West Coast Chairman

WALTER YETNIKOFF

STANLEY GORTIKOV Event Chairman

TOM COLLINS Nashville Chairman

HARVEY SCHEIN NESUHI ERTEGUN

KENNETH GAMBLE Dinner Chairman

MONTI LUEFTNER International Chairman

JACK GROSSMAN

DAVID BRAUN East Coast Chairman

JACK CRAIGO Executive Dinner Chairman

MORTIMER BERL

CY

LESLIE

PAUL SHORE

dinner reservations for am enclosing my check for $ listing in the Commemorative Program. and a I

Program Listing

Seating ROBERT D. SUMMER FELLOWSHIP FUND Includes: preferred table of ten, dais recognition, full page in program

$5000

PLATINUM Table of 10 and platinum listing

53500

GOLD

$3000

Table

of 10 and gold listing

SILVER

Table

of 10 and silver listing

TICKET

54000

(listing only)

$2500 52000

CITABLE OF 10

ROBERT D. SUMMER FELLOWSHIP FUND

S

200

PLATINUM

51800

GOLD

$

1200

SILVER

S

600

as a cannot attend, but I am enclosing $ contribution to help support the cancer research and patient care programs of the AMC Cancer Research Center and Hospital. i

Please make checks payable to: AMC Cancer Research Center 24 West 57th Street -Suite 603 New York, N.Y. 10019 (212) 757 -6460

My Name

Memorial Name My Address Telephone

1981

ANNUAL HUMANITARIAN AWARD DINNER in honor of ROBERT SUMMER, President /RCA Records December 5, 1981 The New York Hilton, Grand Ballroom, New York City

24

Billboard Singles

Ploylist Prime Movers

(10/13/81)

Based on station playlists through Tuesday

**

Continued from page 22

* *

(Steve MadeMie -MO)

FOREIGNER- Waiting For

A

Girl Like You

1813

* *

JOHNNY LEE-Bet Your Heart On Me 2925 THE POLICE -Every

Little Thing She I

*

s

UNDSAY BUCKINGHAM

14

DONNY IRIS-Sweet Merrilee

**

KENNY Me 9-6

*

KGW -AM- Portland

QUINCY JONES FEATURING JAMES INGRAM -Just Once 16 -12

DARYL HALUJOHN OATES- Private Eyes

*

THE FOUR TOPS -When She Was My Girl 10-

AL JARREAU -We're In This

Am

love Together

1713

KENNY ROGERS-Share Your Love With Me LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls 13.9

BAUN-Atlanta Lady 20 BARRY MANILOW-The Old Songs MIKE POST -The Theme From Hill Street

FOREIGNER- Waiting For

Girl Like You (Atlantic)

Girl Like You

BREAKOUTS

THE POLICE -Every

PAT BENATAR

LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM

LRTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls 9 -6

*

BILLY JOEL -Say Goodbye To Hollywood 22-

*

KENNY ROGERS -Share Your Love With Me

12.8

-Trouble (Elektra)

**

CHILLIWACK- My Girl 18-15

DARYL HALL/JOHN OATES- Private Eyes

*

55

DONNY IRIS -Sweet Marrilee THE GO'S -Our Lips Are Sealed ELECTRIC UGHT ORCHESTRA-

ROLLING STONES-Start Me Up 2-2

I

Need You

Twilight

DIANA ROSS -Why Do Fools Fall In Love

BOB SEGER-Tryin' To Live My Life Without

-Snake

-Pay The Devil

JEFFERSON STARSHIP

* *

-Save Your Love

BENNYHESTER- Nobody Knows Me Like You

188 RICK SPRINGFIELD -I've Done Everything

** **

LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls 9 -6 AL JARREAU-We're In This Love Together

11.9

*

You 22-16

*

JOURNEY-Don't Stop Believin'

-Young Turks

2

BILLY JOEL-Say Goodbye To Hollywood 1615

STREAK -One More Night

MIKE POST-The Theme From Hill Street

BARRY MANILOW -The Old Songs

WDRQ-FM- Detroit

-Rome

(Steve Summers-MD)

(Larry Irons -MD)

**

THE POUCE -Every

Little Thing She Does

Magic 21 -12

* * DAN FOGEIBERG -Hard To Say 13-7 * BILLY JOEL -Say Goodbye To Hollywood

16

*

LULU

-I Could Never Miss You 7 -6

AL JARREAU-We're In This Love Together

BARRY MANILOW -The Old Songs 17

FOREIGNER -Waiting For A Girl Like You 11

JARREAU-We're In This Love Together

COMMODORES-Oh No STEVIE WOODS

Heart

MIKE

GENESIS -No Reply At All

Blues 22

-Snake

Eyes

JOURNEY-Don't Stop Believin'

*

KS FM- FM- Sacramento

(Mark Preston -MD) DAN FOGELBERG-Hard To Say 15-10 DARYL HALL/JOHN OATES- Private Eyes

QUINCY JONES FEATURING JAMES

* *

-I Could

Never Miss You 13 -9

COMMODORES-Oh No 21 -17 BARRY MANILOW-The Old Songs 28-23

MOVERS

-Our Lips

ONS

JOHN DENVER -The Cowboy And The Lady (RCA)

KVIL- FM- Dallas

(Chuck Rhodes -MD)

KEGL -FM -Fort Worth

FOREIGNER- Waiting For

A

Girl Like You 20-

** ** * *

WXKX-FM

18

BOB SEGER -Tryin' To Live My Life

Without

You 24 ROD STEWART -Young Turks 30 PAT BENATAR- Promises In The Dark

** ** *

7

4

ROWNGSTONES -Start Me Up 1.1

- Destroyer 23-19

POLICE -Every Little Thing She Does Is

BILLY SQUIER-In The Dark 15 -13 DONNY IRIS -Sweet Merrilee

GENESIS -Abacab 9.4 TARNEY AND SPENCER BAND-No Time

FOREIGNER- Waiting For 20

A

STEVIE NICKS -Leather And Lace

KRBE- Houston (Dan y a ceswis_Mn)

Girl Like You 26No List

In The Air 29

I

*

LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls 9-7

-MD)

THE FOUR TOPS -When She Was My Girl

-

Hooked On Classics 26.17

INGRAM -Just Once 2/-22 DARYL HALL/JOHN OATES- Private Eyes

*

GARY WRIGHT -Really Wanna Know You 16-

1210

BILLY JOEL -Say Goodbye To Hollywood 2219

s

19.10

KSTP- FM)KS95) -St. Paul

(Chick Napp -MD)

**

Me 5.3 AL JARREAU

-We're

In This Love

Togett er

9.6

*

QUINCY JONES FEATURING JAMES

-Hard To Say DIANA ROSS -Why Do Fools Fall In Love BEE GEES -He's A Liar FOREIGNER -Waiting For A Girl like You DAN FOGELBERG

-Indianapolis

(Mike Tinnes -MD)

**

LITTLE RIVER BAND-The Night Owls

1

7-

12

**

FOREIGNER -Waiting For A Girl Like You

151

*

DAN FOGELBERG

-Hard

To Say 13 -8

*

RICK SPRINGFIELD-I've Done Everything

*

JOURNEY -Don't Stop Believin' 18 -15

For You 8.4

TRIUMPH -Magic Power UNDSAY BUCKINGHAM

-Trouble

GENESIS -No Reply At All SURVIVOR

-Poor Man's Son

I

COMMODORES -Oh No 23 -23 FOREIGNER -Waiting For A Girl Like You 30LUTHER VANDROSS -Never Too Much

Midwest Region

KBEQ

ram*

** **

PRIME MOVERS

FOGELBERG -Hard To Say (Epic /Full Moon)

OUVIA NEWTON-JOHN-Physical

DARYL HALL d JOHN OATES- Private Eyes (RCA)

KRFM- McAllen- Brownsville

LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls) (Capitol)

(Steve Owens-MD)

**

DARYL HALL/JOHN OATES- Private Eyes

TOP ADD ONSaata CHRIS CHRISTIAN -I Want You. Need You (Boardwalk)

* * DEVO- Working In The Coal Mine 17-11 * ATLANTA RHYTHM SECTION -Alien 25 -18 * PAT BENATAR- Promises In The Dark 29 -23

* *

*

(Atlantic) MANILOW -The Old Songs (Arista)

TRIUMPH -Magic Power (RCA)

14

DON

MdEAN- Castles In The Air (Millennium) -Leather A Lace (Modern)

STEVIE WOODS-Steal The

Night

WQUE-FM -New Orleans

(Chris Bryan -MD)

** **

COMMODORES -Oh No 23-16 FOREIGNER -Waiting For A Girl Like You

32-28 OLIVIA NEWTON -JOHN- Physical 29-20 BARRY MANILOW-The Old Songs 31.25

DIANA ROSS-Why Do Fools Fall In Love STEVIE NICKS -Leather And Lace

KOFM -FM- Oklahoma City

(Tim

** ** * *

**

I

nil II

-I Cmdd

Never Micc You 26 -23

OLIVIA NEWTON-JOHN -Physical 25 -15

AIR SUPPLY -Here

I

Am 19 -13

www.americanradiohistory.com

For You 32 -28

LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls 2819

BILLY SQUIER -In The Dark 13-11 7

*

DEVO- Working In The Coal Mine 16.13

FOREIGNER -Waiting For A Girl Like You 21-

Likely 28

NICKS- Leather And Lace 25 ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCHESTRA- Twilight 2; LINDSAY BUCKINGHAM -Trouble STEVIE

WISH -AM- Madison

(Bob Starr -MD)

* * *

s

MARTY BALIN -Atlanta Lady 12 -8 BARRY MANILOW-The Old Songs 29 -1

7

-Hard To Say 3 -1 COMMODORES -Oh No 13 -11 STEVIE NICKS -Leather And Lace 28 -23 DAN FOGELBERG

CHRIS CHRISTIAN-1 Want You,

I

Need

Y Yi

(Continued on page 2 6)

DARYL HALL/JOHN OATES- Private Eyes 9-

BILLY JOEL -Say Goodbye To Hollywood 2320

WLS-FM -Chicago

(Tim Kelly -MD)

(Chuck Morgan -MD)

**

RICK SPRINGFIELD -I've Done Everything

Does

THE GO GO'S -Our Lips Are Sealed 17.14

** **

Kelly-MD)

Little Thing She

Magic 15.11

GENESIS-No Reply At All 19-15

STEVIE NICKS

WLS- Chicago

Is

GREG KIHN -The Girl Most

BREAKOUTS

FOREIGNER -Waiting For A Girl Like You 20-

THE POLICE -Every

17

FOREIGNER -Wading For A Girl Like You BARRY

-FM- Kansas City

(Mike Schmidt -MD)

I

2 -1

*

KENNY ROGERS-Share Your Love With

**

AIR SUPPLY -Here Am 13 -9

22

* *

5 -3

No List

WIKS-FM

*

*

**

*

THETUBES -Don't Wanna Wait

Am 20 -15

QUINCY JONES FEATURING JAMES

12

ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

QUARTERFLASH- Harden My Heart

To Lose 8 -3

BILLY JOEL -Say Goodbye To Hollywood 14-

-Castles

AIR SUPPLY -Here

In Me 32

**

LINDSAY BUCKINGHAM -Trouble

i0

(Kris Mitchell -MD)

*

-The Woman

You 31

*

KENNY ROGERS -Share Your Love With M

INGRAM -Just Once 19-12

(Charlie Brown -MD)

**

3-1

IAm 15-12

(Tan Stone -MD) Is

DEBBIE HARRY -The lam Was Moving

**

LINDSAY BUCKINGHAM -Trouble

ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCHESTRA- Twilight

(951(X)- Pittsburgh

(Clark Ingram -MD)

*

KXQA-FM- Sacramento

-Trouble 30

Little Thing She Does

JOURNEY -Don't Stop Believin'

GO GO'S -Our Lips Are Sealed 20 -12

THE KINKS

18 -15

DIESEL -Sausalito Summer Night 29 -25

This Love Together 8-

JUICE NEWTON -The Sweetest Thing

Magic 24-18

UNDSAY BUCKINGHAM

THE FOUR TOPS -When She Was My Girl 19-

In

DIANA ROSS /LIONEL RICHIE- Dreaming Of

(Sandra Bobek -MD)

THE ROLLING STONES-Start Me Up 2-1

THE POLICE -Every

-Hard To Say

AIR SUPPLY -Here

BARRY MANILOW -The Old Songs 27 -23

QUARTERFIASH- Harden My Heart

CARLY SIMON -Blue Of Blue 30-23

ROD STEWART -Young Turks (WB)

-Trouble (Elektra)

IAm

DAN FOGELBERG

*

KTSA -AM -San Antonio

CRYSTAL GAYLE

* *

(Pam Ahresch -MD)

KSLQ- FM -St. Louis

DIANA ROSS -Why Do Fools Fall In Love

4

*

DIANA ROSS -Why Do Fools Fall In Love (RCA)

LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM

AIR SUPPLY -Here

-Atlanta Lady

KIWB -AM- Minneapolis

*

JUICE NEWTON -The Sweetest Thing

-We're

Together

AL JARREAU-We're In This Love

16 -14

I

LUTHER VANDROSS-Never Too Much (Epic)

BREAKOUTS

-Young Turks 39

11

AL JARREAU

To Say 7-3

LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls 8-6

JOURNEY-Don't Stop Believin'

* * DAN FOGELBERG -Hard To Say 2 -2 * CHRIS CHRISTIAN -I Want You, Need You

-Hard

DARYL HALUJOHN OATES- Private Eyes

** **

QUARTERFLASH- Harden My Heart 40

STEVIE WOODS -Steal The Night

/Full Moon)

Are Sealed (IRS)

TOP ADD

Girl Like You 26-

A

22

CHRISTOPHER CROSS- Arthur's Theme

(Jerry Steele

PRIME

FOREIGNER- Waiting For

Magic 26-22

(Gary Hamilton-MD)

-1

DAN FOGELBERG

THE FOUR TOPS -When She Was My Girl

KVOL- Lafayette (Phil Ranken -MD)

*

KFMK -FM- Houston

QUINCY JONES FEATURING JAMES INGRAM -lust Once

3 -2

- Leather And Lace

CHRISTOPHER CROSS -Arthur's Theme

FOREIGNER -Waiting For A Girl Like You

I

DIESEL-Sausalito Summer Night 23-19

KNUS-FM- Dallas

DON McLEAN

Southwest Region

AIR

SURVIVOR -Poor Man's Son

*

UNDSAY BUCKINGHAM- Trouble

*

FOREIGNER -Waiting For A Girl Like You

BARRY MANILOW -The Old Songs

OUVIA NEWTON-JOHN-Physical 21 -18

** **

A1118-13

OUVIA NEWTON-JOHN -Physical 28-21 STEVIE NICKS

ROD STEWART -Young Turks

GO GO'S

Little Thing She Does

CHILUWACK -My Girl 19-15

-No Reply At

COMMODORES-Oh No

10 -7

* *

10-7

TIERRA-La La Means I Love You

Magic 15 -0

GENESIS

Blues 19 -15

MARTY BALIN

-Hard To Say SUPPLY -Here Am 19-15

ROD STEWART

THE POLICE -Every

MIKE POST-The Theme From Hill Street

16.12

4

UNDSAY BUCKINGHAM -Trouble

*

s

BLUE OYSTER CULT-Burnin' For You 10-

**

KIM CARNES- Mistaken Idenity

CHRISTOPHER CROSS- Arthur's Theme

COMMODORES-Oh No 18-10

EARTH, WIND A FIRE -Let's Groove 22 -17

*

(Ed Volkman -MD)

STEVIE NICKS -Leather and Lace

14

To Say

LULU

No List

* GENESIS -No Reply At All 25 -15

INGRAM -Just Once 23 -22

-Hard

*

-I Wouldn't Have Missed It

DAN FOGELBERG

** *

KHFI -FM- Austin

* * *

*

(Scott Taylor -MD)

*

22-18

94)- Pittsburgh (Mark Kowalski -MD)

** ** * *

9.3

DAN FOGELBERG

BARRY MANILOW -The Old Songs 21 -14

**

15-11

KILE-Galveston

To Say 5 -3

**

WBZZ-FM (B-

KIM CARNES- Mistaken'Identity

**

-Trouble -Turn Your Love Around

LINDSAY BUCHINGHAM GEORGE BENSON

THE FOUR TOPS -When She Was My Girl

CRYSTAL GAYLE -The Woman In Me (Columbia)

-Steal The Night POST-The Theme From Hill Street

QUARTERFLASH HARDEN- Harden My

OUVIA NEWTON-JOHN -Physical 25

Once 18-14

10.9

JUICE NEWTON -The Sweetest Thing

*

-Just

You 5 -4

THE ALAN PARSONS PROJECT

*

QUINCY JONES FEATURING JAMES

BOB SEGER -Tryin' To Live My Life Without

30-23

*

(Jack Armstrong -MD)

(ACM)

Endless Love 2-1

** *

For The World

DARYL HALL/JOHN OATES- Private Eyes 3-

**

-AM-Wheeling

DAN FOGELBERG -Hard To Say (Epic

DIANA ROSS AND LIONEL RICHIE-

INGRAM

11

** **

*

RONNIE MILSAP

Am 16 -12

I

KENNY ROGERS-Share Your Love With M e

1

LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls 20-

13 -10

20.13 AIR SUPPLY -Here

**

-Don't Stop- elievin'

INGRAM -Just Once 25 -18

-Hard To Say

DAN FOGELBERG

THE FOUR TOPS -When She Was My Gil

(Bill Sharron -MD)

SAVOY BROWN -Run To Me

-Hard

OLIVIA NEWTON-JOHN- Physical 20

**

Can Do

I

DON McLEAN -Castles In The Air 22

WZUU -FM- Milwaukee

THE KNACK -Pay The Devil

ANNE MURRAY -It's All

Need Yc

I

21

JOHN DENVER -The Cowboy And The Lady

KOOL A THE GANG -Take My Heart

JOURNEY

*

Means I Love You 23-18

COMMODORES -Oh No 21-16

To Me

CHRIS CHRISTIAN-1 Want You,

(Rick Brown -MD)

s s

13

JIM STEINMAN -Dance In My Pants

**

*

La

KIM CARNES- Mistaken Identity

DAN FOGELBERG

NICKS- Leather and Lace

JEFFERSONSTARSHIP -Save Your Love

DARYL HALL/JOHN OATES- Private Eyes 6-

THE GO GO'S-Our Lips Are Sealed

AL

*

ROD STEWART -Young Turks STEVIE

MARTY BALIN -Atlanta Lady 17-16

Blues

*

TARNEY AND SPENCER BAND-No Time To

TIERRA-La

QUINCY JONES FEATURING JAMES

Is

18

24-19

(Bob McKay-MD)

*

BOB SEGER-Tryin' To Live My Life Without

Is

FOREIGNER-Waiting For A Girl Like You 22-

**

WZZP- FM-Cleveland

For You 23-19

DIESEL -Sausalito Summer Night 27 -21

RICK SPRINGFIELD-I've Done Everything

WKWK

JOEY SCARBURY -When She Dances

FOREIGNER- Waiting For A Girl Like You

-Hard To Say 15-10

CHRISTOPHER CROSS- Arthur's Theme 3 -2

DIESEL- Sausalito Summer Night

OUVIA NEWTON- JOHN -Physical 19 -11

DAN FOGELBERG

JOURNEY -Don't Stop Believin'

THE FOUR TOPS -When She Was My Girl 10-

(Brian Gregory-MD)

**

*

LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls 14-10

KM-AM- Spokane

-Run

STEVIE WOODS -Steal The Night

Lose 19 -15

8

KC BN-AM

*

* * LULU -I Could Never Miss You 8-6 * * EDDIE RABBITT -Step By Step 15-13 * PRINCE -Controversy 19-9

UNDSAY BUCKINGHAM- Trouble

ROD STEWART

**

Need You

For You 11.5

(Rosalee Trombley -MD)

Eyes

KOOL AND THE GANG-Take My Heart

You

ROD STEWART-Young Turks

**

*

CKLW-AM- Detroit

THE ALAN PARSONS PROJECT

* *

-I Want You

CHRIS CHRISTIAN

-Physical 30 -22

-I Want You, I Need

CHRIS CHRISTIAN-1 Want You

**

ROD STEWART -Young Turks

2216

You 11.8

*

SAVOY BROWN

**

BENATAR- Promises In The Dark 18-

I

THE ALAN PARSONS PROJECT -Snake Eyes

ATLANTA RHYTHM SECTION -Alien 35

I

PAT

e

BARRY MANILOW -The Old Songs 22 -12

** *

* * JUICE NEWTON -The Sweetest Thing 22 * AIR SUPPLY -Here Am 19-16 *

ATLANTA RHYTHM SECTION -Alien

(Bobby Hatfield -MD)

FOREIGNER- Waiting For A Girl Like You

OLIVIA NEWTON-JOHN

**

CHRIS CHRISTIAN

WU- FM- Louisville

You 6 -3

11

BENATAR- Promises In The Dark JOHN DENVER-The Cowboy And The Lady PAT

STEEK -One More Night

BOB SEGER -Tryin' To Live My Life Without

**

s s s

*

13

JOHNNY LEE-Bet Your Heart On Me

2

CHRISTOPHER CROSS-Arthur's Theme

**

LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls 4-4

DARYL HALL/JOHN OATES- Private Eyes 4-

*

(Chet Rogers -MD)

THE KNACK

*

DIANA ROSS-Why Do Fools Fall In Love

(Jini Cliffo -MD)

BOB SEGER -Tryin' To Live My Lite Without

KENNY ROGERS-Share Your Love With M

**

KINT -FM -EI Paso

1- I

I

Km -FM- Seattle

* * *

-Hard To Say 2-2 ROGERS-Share Your Love With Me

DAN FOGELBERG

KENNY

- Physical 31-26

RONNIE LAWS -Stay Awake 35.29

s

Without

JOURNEY -Don't Stop Believin'

(Mary Johnson -MD)

INGRAM -lust Once 13 -10

BOB SEGER- Tryin' To Live My Life

BILLY JOEL -Say Goodbye To Hollywood

To Say 9 -3

WOKY -AM- Milwaukee

COMMODORES- Oh No 23 -16

To Say 12-5

KEEL -AM- Shreveport

QUINCY JONES FEATURING JAMES

GENESIS- No Reply At All 20-17

You 10 -6

-Hard

OUVIA NEWTON-JOHN

*

Watkins- MD)

FOREIGNER -Waiting For A Girl Like You

You 22 -15

NICKS- Leather And Lace 26

WAKY -AM- Louisville

* *

DIANA ROSS-Why Do Fools Fall In Love

**

In The Dark 18-15

53

-Cleveland (lay Stone -MD)

WGCL-FM

* * GENESIS -No Reply At All 2-14 * AIR SUPPLY -Here Am 13-12

**

Does Is

DIANA ROSS -Why Do Fools Fall In Love 25

**

CRYSTAL GAYLE -The Woman In Me

Blues 20 13

-Promises

* * *

-Hard

DAN FOGELBERG

COMMODORES-Oh No 21 -8 14.7

2719

-New Orleans

DAN FOGELBERG

(Bob Moody-MD)

ELO- Twilight (let)

**

MIKE POST-The Theme From Hill Street

Little Thing She

* * *

BARRY MANILOW -The Old Songs 24

16

*

Girl Like You

DEVO- Working In The Coal Mine 11.9

DONNY IRK -Sweet Marrilee (MCA)

Could Never Miss You 6-3

A

*

4-2

Lips Are Sealed

10-6

Magic 25-19

DIESEL- Sausalito Summernight (Regency) JOEY SCARBURY -When She Dances (Elektra)

-Our

(Gary Franklin -MD)

**

FOREIGNER- Waiting For

*

DARYL HALUJOHN OATES- Private Eyes

**

WTHER VANDROSS-Never Too Much

**

DAN FOGELBERG -Hard To Say 4 -1

(Wayne

**

SHEENA EASTON -For Your Eyes Only 6

**

WFMF -FM- Baton Rouge

DIESEL -Sausalito Summer Night 20 -14

WTIX-AM

1713

* *

FOREIGNER- Waiting For A Girl Like You

LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls

WXGT-FM- Columbus

**

13 -9

DIANA ROSS -Why Do Fools Fall In Love 30

ROD STEWART -Young Turks (WB)

(left Ring -MD)

-I

A

ALJA RREAU -We're In This Love Together

THE GO GO'S

STEVIE

KPUI- FM-Seattle

LULU

*

19 -14

JOURNEY-Don't Stop Believing 28 ROD STEWART -Young Turks 29

*

Blues

DARYL HALUJOHN OATES- Private Eyes 6-

TRIUMPH -Magic Power

(Tom Land -MD)

Can Do

I

MIKE POST-The Theme From Hill Street

5-4

OUNANEWTON- JOHN-Physical 26-16

DARYL HALL/JOHN OATES- Private Eyes 6.

** **

-I Surrender

ANNE MURRAY -It's All

Bad Mama Jama

LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls 28.1

WHB -AM- Kansas City

ARLAN DAY

-Shé s A

5

To Say 8 -5

(Buddy Scott -MD)

North Central Region PRIME MOVERS.

TOP ADD ONS

Blues

** **

In New York

(Atlantic) CHILLRVACK -My Girl (Millennium)

MARTY

A

-A Heart

* *

3

GENESIS -No Reply At All

ATLANTA RHYTHM SECTION -Alien 19

FOREIGNER- Waiting For

*

ART GARFUNKEL

1411

*

*

* *

-Hard COMMODORES -Oh No DAN FOGELBERG

7

127

*

-Alien 14-9

ATLANTA RHYTHM SECTION

FOREIGNER -Waiting For A Girl Like You

20.12

*

CARL CARLTON

**

LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls 4 -1

1510

(Janice Wojniak-MD)

I

-Hard To Say 8 -5 ROGERS-Share Your Love With

DAN FOGELBERG

ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCHESTRA- Twilight

AIR SUPPLY -Here

** **

Carter -MD)

DIANA ROSS -Why Do Fools Fall In Love

(Jerry Loesteau -MD)

WNCI -FM- Columbus

s

BARRY MANILOW -The Old Songs

WEIB -FM -New Orleans

**

(Steve Edwards-MD)

(Sean

**

DONNY IRIS -Sweet Merrilee

-Trouble

RICK SPRINGFIELD -Fve Done Everything For You 32-28

*

27-24 No List

BARRY MANILOW -The Old Songs

MIKE POST-The Theme From Hill Street

BURTON CUMMINGS -You Saved My Soul

Twilight 30

THE FOUR TOPS -When She Was My Girl 19-

*

COMMODORES-Oh No 16 -12

*

(Blake Lawrence -MD)

To Say 27

KENNY ROGERS-Share Your Love With Me

KTAC-AM -Tacoma

-Pay The Devil

-Hard

ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCHESTRA-

i *

KRLY-FM- Houston

INGRAM -Just Once 16-10

UNDSAY BUCKINGHAM -Trouble

*

DAN FOGELBERG

Am 10 -6

STEVIE NICKS -Leather And Lace

**

JOURNEY-Stone In Love 1713

QUARTERFLASH- Harden My Heart

Does Is

BARRY MANILOW-The Old Songs

**

*

Blues

AIR SUPPLY -Here

THE KNACK

This Love Together

QUINCY JONES FEATURING JAMES

Magic 14-10

*

In

AIR SUPPLY -Here IAm 15-9

DON FELDER -Heavy Metal 4 -1

**

-We're

8 -5

KRIC- AM- Lewiston

**

AL JARREAU

Ploylist Top Add Ons

TM

R)

*

**

**

BILLYSOUIER

-

In The

Dark 13-11

DARYL HALL/JOHN OATES- Private Eyes

97

Copyright 1981, Billboard Pub Iications, Inc. No part of this pubi cation may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or tram smitted, in any form or by aan means, electronic, mechanica photocopying, recording, or othe rwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher.

25

Radio Ptoamming

Mike Harrison My Recurring Number One Dream LOS ANGELES -A perusal of the recently released L.A. Summer Arbitron compels me to share a very personal perspective on some very

Billboanl photo by Chuck Pulin NEW REMOTE -Les Davis, nighttime jazz host on WVNJ -FM Newark, settles into his new studio at the Green Street Cafe in SoHo in Manhattan as club owner Tony Goldman leans across the control board.

RadioRadio To Produce Concerts For Affiliates -

NEW YORK RadioRadio, the new young -adult oriented CBS radio network, has contracted with

GK Productions of Nashua, N.H., to produce a series of eight concerts to be taped for broadcast by affiliates May through December, 1982. RadioRadio vice president and general manager Bob Kipperman points out that "this is the first programming to be firmed up by the network, outside of the broadcasts that will be provided by CBS News. We feel confident that it (the concerts) will create excitement and attract a large number of the 18 -34 age

group." These specials will each run 90 minutes and will be presented, in stereo on a monthly basis. The concerts will be produced by Patrick Griffin. Griffin is the "G" in GK. The "K" stands for Kevin Kalunian. Leslie Corn, director of program-

Multi -Week Cumes Studied By Arbitron NEW YORK -In response to a request from Arbitron's Radio Advisory Council and the Radio Advertising Bureau, Arbitron will fund research in the development of multi week cumes (measurement of cumulative audience) for radio research next year. The study will test the feasibility of obtaining listening information from respondents for a period of longer than a week. This means Arbitron, for the first time, will ask diary keepers to keep track of their listening for two- and four -week periods. Until now, diary keepers had kept records for only week -long periods. Some observers question whether diary keepers will be as diligent if they are asked to keep track of listening for more than a week's time. Arbitron will watch for this potential problem in its experimentation with longer cumes. Longer cumes are attractive to stations, because presumably cumulative audience measurement for longer periods would produce higher numbers. Whether these numbers would double for a two week period over a one-week period is not known, but many feel a doubling is unlikely.

ming for RadioRadio, will supervise all of these programs. RadioRadio will begin operations next spring, presenting two- minute news broadcasts on the hour, produced by a new team of writers and reporters at CBS News, plus two music specials or concerts per month, and 90-second features four times a day.

public numbers. For me, the story goes back about eight years, during my term as program director /morning man at KPRI -FM in San Diego (the first station in America to "go AOR," but that's a whole 'nuther story). An interviewer from a local college paper asked me what my ultimate job goal in radio was. My reply was immediate; a rather succinct synthesis of a variety of my personal radio, media and cultural interests at the time.

"I would like to be the weekend talk show host and part -time disk jockey at a big city FM rock station that was rated No. 1." Taken a bit off guard by my answer, the student reporter asked, "Do you mean a progressive rocker (as they were known in those days) that's No. among the other FM stations ?" "No," I answered. "I mean No. among all stations in the market." I'm sure he thought I was joking, or at least being unrealistic. Besides the strangeness of one striving to achieve a "part- time ". job in radio, 1

1

the idea

of an FM "underground"

stations killing AM," says Bocock, "especially in midday. We spent quite a lot of money doing research. There's definitely a market for interesting talk programming."

radio station dominating a major market was considered as unlikely back in 1973 as the idea of an AFL team winning the Superbowl prior to 1969. Back in the early '70s, the only No. 1 niches available to FM rockers were within their own frames -of- reference and very specific and limited demographic target audiences such as men 18 -24. Now, of course, that's different. "Why not full -time ?," he asked. "Well, it's sort of like having your cake and eating it too," I replied. "There are a number of other things both in this business and on the outside that I would like to do in my life. But being involved with such a sta -. tion in the way I described would be like getting to play baseball with the Dodgers on the weekends. You know, sort of the ultimate hobby ... getting to `play' on a great team of which you are a fan! You see, no matter what I do in life ... if I become a brain surgeon, a corporate president, the Governor of California or a Nobel Prize winning journalist, I would still be compelled to `do' radio at least' once or twice a week." A couple of years later, upon leaving day -to -day radio as a full-time member of one station to move to Los Angeles and kick off the phase of my career that led to publishing, editing, writing columns, producing and hosting syndicated radio programs, organizing conventions and symposiums, consulting, teaching and assuming the directorship of an international communications firm (Goodphone), I had the opportunity to take the first step in realizing my "dream." I became the weekend talk show host and part -time disk jockey at KMET -FM, a station that, at the time, was beginning to start a slow but steady transition from the underground to the mainstream. Perfect timing on my part. And I never stopped! For the past

WSIX follows WLAC -AM, which went all -talk almost a year ago. Bocock promises WSIX will be "a little bit different in content."

six years, my weekend "job" has been the only constant ritual in my otherwise eclectic existence. It's been a position and experience that has

Kipperman says of the GK series, "We had been looking for something really special to present that would provide an edge for Radio Radio in the competitive marketplace." How will the GK series differ from, say, the concerts they taped for ABC? "We're going a little older," says Rob Dollinger. "There will be no serious head bangers," he adds, ruling out Ted Nugent and the Blue Oyster Cult. He also notes that a better grade of vinyl will be used then is generally specified for radio show pressings.

2 Stations Sold

For $6.2 Million CLEVELAND -Embrescia Communications Corp. is selling radio stations WBBG -AM and WWWMFM (M 105) here to Robinson Communications for $6.2 million pending FCC approval. It is the first ac-

quisition for Robinson Communications, whose major stockholder is W.R. Grace executive and jeweler Larry J.B. Robinson. Ownership transfer is not anticipated before the end of the year. Embrescia Communications will continue to operate the stations, to let Robinson concentrate on running his 65 jewelry stores in eight states.

Less Music On WSIX Continued from page 20 programming weekdays from 5:30 to 9 a.m. "We're not touching that," says Bocock. WSIX will also maintain its music format on weekends. The switch to talk is due to "FM

www.americanradiohistory.com

not only afforded me an immense amount of personal pleasure and professional challenges (that's right, challenges -working at KMET is a never- ending challenge for all its members from the g.m. on down to little of me), but has also given me the opportunity to play a highly involved and significant role within the community in which I live -perhaps, the ultimate benefit attached to working in local radio. As a media journalist and researcher, it has given me a bird's eye view of day -today radio and its relationship with a listening audience from the most marvelous of perspectives- behind

the glass at KMET, one

of the great-

radio stations of all time. Which is a rather lengthy intro to the major point of this piece. During the years I've been at KMET and have simultaneously participated as one of the industry's most active radio "viewers," I have seen outside imitators of the station (and there have been hordes of them) latch on to only one or two aspects of what makes the station click and duplicate it in excess at their own facility only to fail. This, of course, can be compared to watching the chef work in a fine restaurant and then going (Continued on page 27) est

Goodphone Commentaries Samurai Management By NILS VON VEH SEATTLE -The book that did me in last year was David Halberstam's masterful account of the development and interaction of several of America's preeminent original media families in "The Powers That Be." It provides you with

excellent perspective on how media has both affected and been affected by the of this century. This year, my information needs have changed drastically. It's a tougher, much more apocalyptic time for everyone. This year, the books that have been the magic transformers for me are Alvin Toffler's "Third Wave," which should be required reading for everyone in any way involved in the entertainment business, and most recently -"Positioning -The Battle For Your Mind" by Al Ries and Jack Trout. Following my attendance at a recent George Burns seminar on "Positioning," I was reminded of a book I read several years ago when I first began to practice the Chinese art of exercise /self-defense, Tai Chi. Although this book centered on "Kendo," which is a Japnese fòrm of sword -fighting, it had a lot of relevance to other forms of martial arts as well. The book was written around the time described in "Shogun" and is written by one of Japan's most renowned Samurai warriors, Miyamoto Musashi. Recently there has been a tremendous wave of interest in Japanese theories of management. (Although one of the principle tenets of "Theory Z" would have a little trouble being put into effect in radio-that being that people stay their whole lifetime with one company!) Trout and Ries have remarked that "positioning" has a lot in common with military strategy. Here together in one book entitled "A Book Of Five Rings" by Miyamoto Musashi (Overlook Press) is a "guide for men who want to learn strategy." which manifests none of the bad habits infecting our current generation of military "thinkers." When Trout and Ries wrote "Positioning," it is said they had no idea the stir they would cause in radio. Even more unlikely is trying to imagine a Samurai sitting in a cave in 1645 writing a guide for competitive radio programmers in the rough and tumble 1980s. In his introduction to the "Five Rings," translator Victor Harris has this to say about the relevance of this work today: "Musashi writes about the various aspects of Kendo in such a way that it is possible for the beginner to study at beginner's level, and for Kendo masters to study the same words on a higher level. This applies not just to military strategy, but to any situation where plans and tactics are used. Japanese businessmen have used `Go Rin No Sho' as a guide for business practice, making sales campaigns like military operations, using the same energetic methods. In the same way that Musashi seems to have been a horribly cruel man, yet was following logically an honest ideal, so successful business seems to most people to be without conscience. "Musashi's life study is thus as relevant in the 20th century as it was on the medieval battleground, and applies not just to the Japanese race but to all nations. I suppose you could sum up his inspiration as 'humility and hard work'." The obvious relevance of Musashi's thoughts on strategy to much of what we do in radio (and in record promotion for that matter) will be obvious if you are receptive to his metaphors: The Mountain -Sea Change: "The `mountain -sea' spirit means that it is bad to repeat the same thing several times when fighting the enemy. There may be no help but to do something twice, but do not try it a third time. If you once make an attack and fail, there is little chance of success if you use the same approach again. If you attempt a technique which you have previously tried unsuccessfully and fail yet again, then you must change your attacking method. "If the enemy thinks of the mountains, attack like the sea; and if he thinks of the sea, attack like the mountains. You must research this deeply." George Burns quoted Louis Pasteur during his recent "Thinking Points" seminar as saying that "chance favors only the prepared mind." I would go one step further and share with you a quote attributed to Don Juan by Carlos Castaneda in "Tales Of Power ": "The basic difference between an ordinary man and a warrior is that a warrior takes everything as a challenge, while an ordinary man takes everything either as a blessing or a curse." The next move is up to you. (Nils von Veh is program director of KZOK -AM-FM Seattle. Previously he was national marketing and promotion manager for ECM Records in New York.) events

26

Billboard

Radio

(10/13/81)

Continued from page 24 -Slip

*

JUICE NEWTON-The Sweetest Thing

OLIVIA NEWTON -JOHN -Physical 24.16 DARYL HALL/JOHN OATES- Private Eyes 8 -4

*

THE POUCE-Every

Little Thing She

Does Is

Magic 21-15

* *

-Super Freak

STEVIE NICKS

Promotion Executives

:

BARRY MANILOW

(Ron Nenni

THE FOUR TOPS -When She Was My Girl

AIR SUPPLY -Here

**

BILLY JOEL-Say Goodbye To Hollywood 28-

MARTY

**

-I Want

You, Need You I

Quick_look at this impact advertising perfect sp aCe! It's the that place to increase action on y our

Girl Like You

2917

* *

*

AIR SUPPLY -Here

Am 18.13

I

Can Do 28

I

_*

THE FOUR TOPS -When She Was My Girl 28-

FOUR TOPS

-When

STARS ON 45 -More Stars On 45

ROD STEWART -Young Turks (WB)

-A Heart

-Omaha

OLIVIA NEWTON -JOHN- Physical 16 -11 GEORGE BENSON -Turn Your Love Around

LINDSAY BUCKINGHAM -Trouble

DEBBIE HARRY

p riority singles!

SHEENA EASTON

WICC-AM -Bridgeport

Identity (EMI America)

(Bob Mitchell -MD) No List

-For Your

Eyes Only 5-3

RICK SPRINGFIELD-I've Done Everything

WTIC -FM- Hartford

WOKS-FM- Boston

DARYL HALL/JOHN OATES- Private Eyes

(Rick Donahue -MD)

(Vinnie Peruzzi -MD)

**

DARYL HALL/JOHN OATES- Private Eyes 15-7

For You 14-10

*

AL JARREAU

*

THE FOUR TOPS -When She Was My Girl 16-

-We're

Together

In This Love

**

SHEENA EASTON-For Your Eyes Only 12

13

*

* *

ROD STEWART -Young Turks

Tuesday ... Those critical days when radio stations make their decisions on what new singles they'll add for the remainder of the week how they'll play them ... what's going up .. down ... dropped ...increasing in rotation! These are the decisions that will certainly affect you... Now you've got the flexible advertising vehicle designed to influence those decisions! If you run with a Billboard RADIO ACTION DECISION AD, you'll be running with the most up -to -date information anyone can offer on that big Monday and Tuesday! Information that will reach 5,500 radio stations -a reach that is bigger than any other industry publication! This could be the beginning of something really big* for your singles -and for radio! Right now is the time to back your promotion team with direct ad support. .. in the right place!

-

*

a

study by McGraw -Hill Laboratory of Advertising Research

*

-

for even better moves!

I

KOOL 8 THE

DARYL HALL/JOHN OATES- Private Eyes BARRY MANILOW -The Old Songs

* *

- Stevens Point RICK SPRINGFIELD-I've Done

POLICE-Every

AIR SUPPLY -Here Am 22 -16

*

DIESEL-Sausalito Summer Night

*

BILLY JOEL -Say Goodbye To Hollywood 15-

5

OLIVIA NEWTON- JOHN -Physical 30 BARRY MANILOW -The Old Songs

-Oh No CRUISE -Slip Away

Without

Once 12-8

5 -1

LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls 14.11 AL JARREAU -We're In This Love

7

-4

JOURNEY -Who's Crying Now 16,10

-Here IAm

AIR SUPPLY

15-13

DARYL HALL /JOHN OATES- Private Eyes

BURTON CUMMINGS -You Saved My Soul

*

*

*

*

STEVIE NICKS- Leather And Lace

LINDSAY BUCKINGHAM

INGRAM -lust Once

*

*

THE POLICE Is

Together

113

-Atlanta Lady 25 -22 KENNY ROGERS -Share Your Love With 24 -21 STEVIE WOODS-Steal The

-It's All

I

Night 30-25

Can Do

42 Without You 12-6

-Every Little Thing

She Does

Magic 14.9 I

*

KENNY ROGERS-Share Your Love With Me

11

5.4 DIANA ROSS-Why Do Fools Fall In Love WPRO -FM- Providence

(Gary Berkowitz -MD)

**

**

DENIECE WILLIAMS -Silly 4-3

**

GWEN McCRAE-Funky

* *

Sensation 22.1

-Super Freak 8-5 LINE -Walking In Sunshine 16-13

Need You

-I

Heard It Through The Grapevine

CONQUEST

-Give

TEDDY PENDERGRASS

-I

-She's A Bad Mama Jama

**

AL JARREAU-We're In This Love Together

2110

* *

AIR SUPPLY

-Here

I

Am 17.9

QUINCY JONES FEATURING JAMES INGRAM -Just Once 22 -14

It To Me

*

KAREN SILVER- Nobody Else

-MD)

CARL CARLTON

20-11

RICK JAMES

CENTRAL

-10

JOURNEY-Don't Stop Believin'

WKTU -FM -New York City

WNAP-FM- Indianapolis

Can't Live Without

DARYL HALL/JOHN OATES- Private Eyes 13-8

(Continued on page 28)

Your Love WEEKS & CO. -Rock Your World

No List

WFLY -FM- Albany

-Wichita

(Jack Lawrence

(Terri Springs -MD) AIR SUPPLY- Here

I

CHRISTOPHER CROSS- Arthur's Theme

**

RICK SPRINGFIELD -I've Done Everything

1.1

You 26 -20

OUVIA NEWTON-JOHN- Physical

For You 12 -7

2925

BARRY MANILOW- The Old Songs 30 -26

www.americanradiohistory.com

-MD)

** Am 14-11

BOB SEGER- Tryin' To Live My Life

Without

* *

DARYL HALL/JOHN OATES- Private Eyes

Am 9 -6

CHILUWACK -My Girl 31

ROGER I

BOB SEGER -Tryin' To Live My Life

*

BARRY MANILOW -The Old Songs 17 -8

ROD STEWART -Young Turks

-I Want You.

CHRISTOPHER CROSS- Arthur's Theme

**

(Michael Ellis -MD) Me

(Mike Waite-MD)

**

2017

AIR SUPPLY -Here

MARTY BALIN

-Trouble

*FM-FM- Providence

OLIVIA NEWTON-JOHN-Physical 31-10

SHEENA EASTON-For Your Eyes Only 6-1 DARYL HALL /JOHN OATES- Private Eyes

FOREIGNER-Waiting For A Girl Like You

Street Blues 12-9

QUINCY JONES FEATURING JAMES

**

(kW. Pantoja -MD)

** **

BILLY JOEL -Say Goodbye To Hollywood 21-

MIKE POST -The Theme From The Hill

16- 13

**

KIOA -AM -Des Moines

KEYN-FM

COMMODORES-Oh No 25 -20

To Say 14 -11

(Roger Christian-MD)

NICKS- Leather And Lace

(Chab Hunt

DIANA ROSS -Why Do Fools Fall In Love

EARTH, WIND & FIRE -Let's Groove

-Hard

DAN FOGELBERG

AL JARREAU-We're In This Love

ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCHESTRA- Twilight

ANNE MURRAY

OLIVIA NEWTON-JOHN-Physical 29-21

17

BART MANILOW -The Old Songs 28-24

PABLO CRUISE -Slip Away

s

(Danny Lyons -MD)

** **

30 -22

WREN -FM -Buffalo

COMMODORES -Oh No

*

WKCI -FM -New Haven

*

18 -4

*

16 -12

ROD STEWART-Young Turks

LUTHER VANDROSS -Never Too Much

** **

Together

13 -10

*

AL JARREAU-We're In This Love Together

(Tom Connerly -MD)

DARYL HALL /JOHN OATES- Private Eyes

**

*

MARTY BALIN -Atlanta Lady

WVBF -FM- Boston

QUINCY JONES FEATURING JAMES

**

To Say 21.13

DARYL HALL /JOHN OATES- Private Eyes

1COMMODORES-Oh No

COMMODORES -Oh No 19

(Dan Brannan -MD)

STEVIE

-Hard

*

-Oh No

10 -6

KFYR- AM- Bismarck

*

** ** * *

COMMODORES

* *

-The Night Owls 10-6

DAN FOGELBERG

(Sonia Jones -MD)

-4

11

-Just

KENNY ROGERS-Share Your Love With Me 1411

*

WABC -AM -New York City

I

INGRAM

RICK SPRINGFIELD-I've Done Everything

BOB SEGER -Tryin' To Live My Life

INGRAM -Just Once 12 -4

**

20-16

LITTLE RIVER BAND

QUINCY JONES FEATURING JAMES

DIANA ROSS-Why Do Fools Fall In Love

*

**

THE FOUR TOPS -When She Was My Girl

ROD STEWART -Young Turks

4 -1

**

(Bill Terry-MD)

**

Am 19.13

I

DIANA ROSS -Why Do Fools Fall In Love

DARYL HALL/JOHN OATES- Private Eyes

PABLO

AIR SUPPLY -Here

COMMODORES

For You 8 -3

s

Magic 29 WBLI -FM -Long Island

You 9.1

Everything

-Waiting For A Girl Like You 28 Little Thing She Does Is

FOREIGNER

GEORGE BENSON

(John Summers -MD)

*

A Bad Mama Jama 9-

ROD STEWART-Young Turks 30

THE KINKS

** **

-She's

BARRY MANILOW -The Old Songs 31

Girl Like You

A

For You 16.10

(Brad Fuhr -MD)

**

CARL CARLTON

LUTHER VANDROSS -Never Too Much 27

WKBW -AM- Buffalo

9

**

EARTH, WIND & FIRE -Let's Groove 20 -16

*

-Hard To Say 20.13 GANG -Take My Heart 24.19

-Destroyer -Turn Your Love Around RAY PARKER JR.8 RAYDIO -It's Your Night

To Say 11 -6

Am 12 -5

THE FOUR TOPS -When She Was My Girl 13-

WSPT

*

-Controversy 22.18

DAN FOGELBERG

AL JARREAU -We're In This Love Together

CHRIS CHRISTIAN

Billboard ads move records and now we're making space

-Hard

18-16

More than 33,0001 radio professionals read Billboard each week. Based upon

DAN FOGELBERG

AIR SUPPLY -Here

INGRAM -lust Once 17 -15

.

f

PRINCE

FOREIGNER- Waiting For

QUINCY JONES FEATURING JAMES

*

RICK JAMES -Super Freak 5-3

DIANA ROSS /UONEL RICHIE- Endless Love

KIM CARNES- Mistaken Identity

(Lee Douglas -MD)

**

*

DIESEL -Sausalito Summernight 7-4

CHILUWACK -My Girl

KX0K-AM -St. Louis

**

** **

11

3

12 -7

Monday...

Jam Was Moving

JOURNEY -Don't Stop Believin' (Columbia)

7.4

*

-The

ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCHESTRA -Twilight

(Jim Corcoran-MD)

** **

Mama lama

BLUE OYSTER CULT -Burnin' For You 13 -8

ELO- Twilight (let) WOW -AM

A Bad

RONNIE LAWS -Stay Awake 32-20

BREAKOUTS KIM CARNES- Mistaken

In New York

*

Fall In Loue (RCA)

COMMODORES -Oh No (Motown)

30

-She's

CARL CARLTON

OATES- Private Eyes (RCA)

Blues 29 BURTON CUMMINGS -You Saved My Soul

She Does Is

Magic 21-16

*

She Was My Girl (Casablanca)

D IANA ROSS -WWhy Do Fools

-Every Little Thing

THE POUCE

20 -17

MIKE POST-The Theme From Hill Street

ART GARFUNKEL

*

TOP ADD ONS

Need You

I

WGUY- Bangor

Am (Arista)

I

DARYL HALL A JOHN

24

You,

-Young Turks

ROD STEWART

In N.Y.

PRIME MOVERS

AIR SUPPLY -Here

-I Want

-A Heart

BARRY MANILOW -The Old Songs 29

s

Northeast Region

THE MOODY BLUES -The Voice 16 -11

CHRIS CHRISTIAN

THE FOUR TOPS -When She Was My Girl 30-

(Jim Randall -MD)

BALIN-Atlanta Lady 21-15 A

*

26

ANNE MURRAY -It's All ART GARFUNKEL

FOREIGNER- Waiting For

-Sausalito Summer Night 22-18

FOREIGNER -Waiting For A Girl Like You 2120

(Phil Huston -MD)

**

DIESEL

29

FM- Minneapolis

WLOL

Am 9.4

I

LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls 12-9

*

24

Dark

In The

*

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-MD)

AIR SUPPLY -Here

**

Am 19 -15

I

-The Olds Songs

WTRY-AM- Albany

DIANA ROSS -Why Do Fools Fall In Love 30

:

radio

QUARTERFLASH-Harden My Heart

BARRY MANILOW-The Old Songs 25-20

LINDSAY BUCKINGHAM -Trouble

Twilight

EARTH, WIND 8 FIRE -Let's Groove

CHRIS CHRISTIAN

BENATAR- Promises

Am 18 -14

DIANA ROSS -Why Do Fools Fall In Love 30

** ** * *

4-1

- Leather And Lace

I

ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCHESTRA-

(Scott Shores-MD)

ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCHESTRA- Twilight

PAT

DIESEL -Sausalito Summer Night 26 -21

FOREIGNER- Waiting For A Girl Like You

COMMODORES -Oh No

To Record From: Billboard Re Radio Action Decision Ads

AIR SUPPLY -Here

*

KWKN- Wichita

*

Am 26.26

I

*

ATLANTA RHYTHM SECTION-Alien

18 13

AIR SUPPLY -Here

RICK JAMES

Was My Girl

DIESEL -Sausalito Summer Night

(Matt Hudson -MD)

**

TOPS- When She

THE FOUR

26-23

Away

WZEE -FM- Madison

**

Ploylist Top Add Ons

(TM

Based on station playlists through Tuesday

PABLO CRUISE

*

Ploylist Prime Movers

*

THE POLICE -Every

Magic 24 -19

Little Thing She

Does Is

c Copyright 1981, Billboard Publications, Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher.

27

Radio Programming

New On The (harEs

QUARTERFLASH

"Harden My Heart" Rindy and Mary Ross, the mainstays of Geffen Records' six -member band Quarterflash, traded in teaching certificates for music careers and worked their way up through the Portland, Oregon club circuit to obtain a regional single release, first as a group called Seafood Mama, on Whitefire Records. The single, "Harden My Heart," became so popular in the Northwest that their manager and owner of the label Jay Isaac, was able to get into major record label doors in L.A. Carol Childs with Geffen heard the tape, liked the video from a one -hour tv /radio simulcast they did in Portland and Quarterflash was signed. "Harden My Heart," re- recorded for the Geffen album, was written by Mary Ross, as were four other tunes. Jack Charles, vocalist and guitarist for the band also contributed a ballad "Critical Times." Quarterflash's stage presence is heightened by Rindy Ross' saxophone work. Quarterflash is the first release by an unknown group on Geffen Records. The LP was produced by John Boylan whose credits include Boston, Linda Ronstadt, Charlie Daniels and the Little River Band. Rick DiGiallonardo on keyboards, Rich Gooch on bass, and Brian David Willis round out the band. Information regarding Quarterflash may be obtained from Jay Isaac, P.O. Box 8231, Portland, Ore. 97207 (503) 231 -7227.

Continued front page 25 home and attempting to duplicate the recipe by only using its most obvious ingredient ... or worse, the ingredient that was most obvious only to you. Our industry (and world, for that matter) suffers from a case of "black or white" thinking. In the case of KMET, that most obvious -but overwhelmingly misleading- ingredient has been hard rock. Ask 10 people in this business what they think KMET's "format" is and 9.7 of them will respond, "Hard

rock"

When you talk to record people, they're always bitchin' that KMET has a nerve playing only the music it wants to play without regard for what "other stations doing the same format" are playing and they invariably predict its imminent ratings demise. Talk to the good folks at competitor KLOS -FM (another very fine radio station) and they'll tell you that KMET is on the verge of "being beaten" because they "do the format" better than KMET. They even research it. Talk to programmers and managers from stations in other markets who monitor KMET and they tell you they cannot understand why the station is doing so well. After all, they don't really play the standard national AOR "hits" and their disk jockeys break the cardinal radio rule -they don't all sound alike! They, too, predict KMET's got to fail. There is no doubt, KMET is more than hard rock. As a matter of fact, KMET's success is not based upon its hard rock ... there are other musical genres that are just as popular in Southern California. If KMET were to play any number of them and leave everything else basically intact, it would still be a dominant station. KMET is a Southern California cultural center. It is a station upon

Mike Harrison which each and every air personality /programmer is a unique and dazzlingly -cut gem (including the newspeople). It is a consistent attitude with a spectrum of moods and faces. It is colorful upside -down billboards on every other corner. It is a non -stop merchandising blitz. It is an omnipresent series of movie screenings, live nightclub broadcasts, political activism and social debate. It is a harmonious blend of in -house and outside -syndicated programming. It is a program director who is not a dictator, but, rather, an organizer, director (as the title implies) and, most importantly, an objective and concerned set of offthe-air ears. It is a general manager who -regardless of whether he is sincere or not -has each and every member of a sensitive and egotistical staff absolutely convinced that he/ she is vitally important to the success and well -being of the station and loved by management. It is a station with a promotions director. It is a station of stars (radio's ultimate "secret" weapon). It is a station with an air staff that's been there mostly between five and ten years. I could go on ... but the point is made. KMET is what all truly great stations through history have been:

`City Rhythm' Debuts On N.J,'s WSSJ-AM By MAURIE ORODENKER CAMDEN, N.J. -In a move to WDAS, black music station in Philacarve out a piece of the South Jersey delphia, who is the WSSJ program Philadelphia market, WSSJ-AM here manager, describes the new sound as is developing a new sound that seeks "urban contemporary" that attracts to cross ethnic, demographic and white listeners along with the blacks age barriers. Called "City Rhythm," and Hispanics. The station's playlist, the format replaces the adult conhe notes, ranges from white crosstemporary music played when the over r &b artists such as Boz Scaggs, station was known as WCAM, a muto salsa. In addition, he programs nicipally owned station still located more jazz than any other commerin the city's City Hall and with limcial station in the market. ited audience. The lineup of disk jockeys show The station was purchased last credits from the disco and black muApril for $850,000 by Wade Broadsic stations in Philadelpnia. Nikki casting Ltd., headed by James Duval came over from WCAU -FM, Wade, of Philadelphia, across the which had been dedicated to the river. The new format was introdisco sound. Leigh Hamilton is also duced earlier this summer and is ala WCAU -FM alumnus. "Doctor" ready showing signs of catching on. Perry Johnson was a heavy at black After investing an additional oriented WDAS -FM before switch$65,000 in the kw station, Wade is ing to WCAU -FM. Also spinning now looking for WSSJ to make its the "City Rhythm" records are debut among the top 20 in the next Mitch Ryder, E.A. Wood, Carlos Arbitron ratings. For years, WCAM Cruz, and expected to start shortly is had been missing from the listings. Hy Lit, who pioneered "underThe "City Rhythm," which seeks ground music" at WDAS-FM in to reflect the sound of Camden earlier years. which has a heavy black and Hispanic population, is a mix of everything from rhythm and blues to mel.lowjazz, and during the late hours, a lot of funky music with street rap. There's the upbeat post -disco black pop music with a lot of mellow, jazzy ballads. NEW YORK -Viacom InterGary Shepherd. formerly at national Inc. has entered into an agreement in principle to purchase WLAK -FM, Chicago from Storer Broadcasting Co. for $8 million in cash. The transaction is subject to certain conditions including the exean audio repertory company, a free cution of a definitive agreement and flowing gestalt, a synergistic whole, the approval of the FCC. an obstacle to definition. Not a forAl Greenfield, president of the Vimat. It is people. acorn Radio Group points out that But, for me, the grand finale to the acquisition further diversifies this radio story came the other night the Group in terms of format, addwhen the phone rang at an unusuing beautiful music FM to the adult ally late hour. It was a radio friend contemporary, black and country who delights in spreading radio data, formats of Viacom's present eight both hard and soft, to fellow media stations. freaks. With the addition of WLAK -FM, "Michael!" the gregarious voice Viacom will own five FM and four boomed. "Did 'ya see the new AM radio stations, including book?" WKHK -FM and WWRL-AM New "Yeah, the station sure did well." York; KIKK -FM Houston and KMET had gone up over a whole KIKK -AM Pasadena, Texas; point and was among the top three WMZQ-FM Washington, D.C.; stations in town in the all- important WRVR-FM and WDIA -AM Memmetro survey area. phis; and KDIA -AM Oakland, "Congratulations to you!" he Calif. replied, already knowing the aforementioned story of my fetish to be a part-timer on a No. 1 station and using it as a creative lead in to break good news to me. "Have you looked at the figures for the tsa (total survey WASHINGTON, D.C. -"I never area)?" thought I'd see an FCC Chairman I pulled out my newly arrived more unregulatory than I," Comlaundry-list of numbers and sure missioner James H. Quello told 90 enough -KMET was, for the first members of the New Jersey Associtime, actually No. in the total reation of Broadcasters Monday (5) at gion in both quarter hour and cume. the Golden Nugget in Atlantic City. 'I've made it! I've made it! Radio "I tell you he has the smarts for dreams do come true. Chairman." Quello said deregulation wasn't being undertaken to benefit broadcasters. "The constitutional freedoms were instituted for the benefit before, making WGTO a two -time of the citizenry," he explained, "the winner in three years. total public ... rather than the media. It is the public that stands to These awards were only the start gain from an all media freedom of for this week, which was capped by the press." the Federation of Country Air PerHe added that his proposals for sonalities awards banquet on Friday freedom from program regulation (16). Full details of this event will be "are meant to establish a climate in the Oct. 31 issue of Billboard. whereby the American public can After a FICAP golf and tennis receive more, freer and better broadouting on Thursday (15), many DJs casting service. I believe it is a spent Friday taping artists during an proper goal of the Communications all -day taping session so that they Act of 1934," he noted, "and of the can present custom interviews on First Amendment to the Constitutheir local stations when they return tion and I believe it is a proper goal for any new Communications Act." home.

WLAK Bought By Viacom For $8 Million

Quello Boosts Deregulation

1

DJs Collect Kudos Continued from page 20 IV of WSLC -AM Roanoke, Va.; and Don Walton of KFDI -AM -FM Wichita, Kan. Last year Bob Cole of KOKE -AM -FM Austin, Tex., won.

West beat out Dandelion of

WIOV -FM Ephrata, Pa.; Billy Dilworth of WLET -AM Toccoa, Ga.; Jay Larry James of KHUT -FM Hutchinson, Kan.; and Tom Reeder of WKCW -AM Warrenton, Va. West is the third Florida DJ to win the small market award in as many years. Lee Shannon of WCCF -AM Punta Gorda, Fla., won last year and Terry Slane of WGTO won the year

www.americanradiohistory.com

Radio Specials A weekly calendar of upcoming network and syndicated music specials. Shows with multiple dates indicate local stations have option of broadcast time and dates. Oct. 19, Loretta Lynn, Live From Gilley's, Westwood One, one hour. Oct. 23 -25, Millie Jackson, O'Jays, Concert of the Month, Westwood One, one hour. Oct. 23 -25, Utopia, Concert Encore, NBC Source, 90 minutes. Oct. 24, Little River Band, MusicStar Special, RKO Two, one hour. Oct. 24, Bellamy Bros., Country Sessions, NBC, one hour. Oct. 24, Johnnie Taylor, Special Edition, Westwood One, one hour. Oct. 24 -25, Ronnie Milsap, Robert W. Morgan Special of the Week, Watermark, one hour. Oct. 25, Party At The Palladium, featuring Rick Derringer, Ellen Foley, Hall & Oates, Ian Hunter, Dr. John, Todd Rundgren, Southside Johnny, King Biscuit Flower Hour, ABC -FM, one hour. Oct. 26, Keith Richard, part one, Mary Turner Off The Record, Westwood One, one hour. Oct. 26, Dottie West, Live From Gilley's, Westwood One, one hour. Oct. 30-Nov. I, Vern Gosdin, Sylvia, Jamboree U.S.A., Starfleet Blair,

one hour. Oct. 30 -Nov. 1, Nazareth, In Concert, Westwood One, one hour. Oct. 31, Rolling Stones, Super Group Special, ABC FM, two hours. Oct. 31, Billy Preston, Special Edition, Westwood One, one hour. Oct. 31, Leroy Van Dyke, Country Sessions, NBC, one hour. Oct. 31 -Nov. I, Manhattan Transfer, Robert W. Morgan Special of the Week, Watermark, one hour. Oct. 31, Anne Murray, MusicStar Special, RKO Two, one hour. Nov. 1, Ted Nugent, in interview; Doug and the Slugs, in performance; Best of Robert Klein Show, Froben Enterprises, one hour. Nov. 2, Keith Richard, part two, Mary Turner Off The Record, Westwood One, one hour. Nov. 6-8, Blackfoot, NBC Source, one hour. Nov. 7, Syreeta Wright, Special Edition, Westwood One, one hour. Nov. 7, Mickey Gilley and Johnny Lee, Country Sessions, NBC, one hour. Nov. 7 -8, Journey, Robert W. Morgan Special of the Week, Watermark, one hour. Nov. 9, Stevie Nicks, Mary Turner Off The Record, Westwood One, one hour. Nov. 13 -15, Billy Joel, Special NBC Source, two hours. Nov. 14, Jeanne Pruett, Country Sessions, NBC, one hour. Nov. 14 -15, Marty Balin, Robert W. Morgan Special of the Week, Watermark, one hour. Nov. 16, REO Speedwagon, Mary Turner Off The Record, Westwood One, one hour. Nov. 20-22, Donnie Iris, Concert, NBC Source, one hour. Nov. 21, Jacky Ward, Country Sessions, NBC, one hour. Nov. 21 -22, Sheena Easton, Robert W. Morgan Special of the Week,

Watermark, one hour. Nov. 22, Neil Diamond, ABC Contemporary, three hours. Nov. 23, George Thorogood, Mary Turner Off The Record, Westwood One, one hour. Nov. 27-29, Allman Bros., Special, NBC Source, two hours.

28

Billboard Singles Radio J

Continued from page 26

*

MIKE POST -The Theme From Hill Street

-Hard

*

JOEL -Say Goodbye To Hollywood

BILLY JOEL-Say Goodbye To Hollywood 17-

(Kelly McCann -MD)

**

FOREIGNER- Waiting For A Girl Like You Want You, I Need You CHRIS CHRISTIAN

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LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls 11 -7

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(Tom Taylor

AIR SUPPLY

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Am 16-13

DARYL HALUJOHN OATES- Private Eyes 7BARRY MANILOW-The Old Songs 26-23

*

JOHNNY LEE-Bet Your Heart On Me ARLAN DAY-1 Surrender

Little Thing She Does

THE POUCE -Every

Is

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** **

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*

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* *

AIR SUPPLY

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DIESEL -Sausalito Summer Night 20-16 THE FOUR TOPS -When

She Was My Girl 22

10

DEBBIE HARRY-The Jam Was Moving ELECTRIC UGHT ORCHESTRA- Twilight STEVIE NICKS- Leather And Lace

SQUEEZE-Mess Around

JOURNEY -Don't Stop Believin' 34

FOREIGNER- Waiting For A Girl

7

*

* *

*

- Physical

PRIME MOVERS

LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls (Capitol)

S

KIM CARNES- Mistaken Identity (EMI -America)

CHILLIWACK-My Girl (Millennium)

BREAK OUT

CHRIS CHRISTIAN

-I Want You,

(Jim Sebastian -MD)

-Alien 9 -6

* * DAN FOGELBERG -Hard To Say 2-2 * SHEENA EASTON -For Your Eyes Only 13-9 *

KENNY ROGERS -Share Your Love With Me

*

LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls 14.10

19-7

QUARTERFLASH- Harden My Heart

**

* *

LINDSAY BUCKINGHAM -Trouble

My Soul

*

QUINCY JONES FEATURING JAMES

*

THE FOUR TOPS -When She Was My Girl

107

For The World

FOREIGNER- Waiting For A Girl Like You

OLIVIA NEWTON-JOHN -Physical 25 -19 BURTON CUMMINGS-You Saved My Soul

18-13 BOB SEGER -Tryin' To Live My Life

Without You 20-16 l

*

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AL JARREAU-We're In This Love Together

107 KIM CARNES- Mistaken Identity LINDSAY BUCKINGHAM -Trouble

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BILLY JOEL -Say Goodbye To Hollywood 17COMMODORES -Oh No FOREIGNER-Waiting For A Girl Like You

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I

Need You

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* * *

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Need You

OLNIANEWTON- JOHN -Physical 13 -7 FOREIGNER- Waiting For A Girl Like You 15-

** ** * * *

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14 -10

OLIVIANEWTON-JOHN -Physical 19-16 PAT

BENATAR- Promises In The Dark 16 -13

FOREIGNER -Waiting For A Girl Like You 18-

Md Lace -Turn Your Love Around

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-When She Was My Girl

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27 -20

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BOB SEGER -Tryin' To Live My Life Without You 22 -17 STEVIE NICKS -Leather And Lace

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* * *

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(Atlantic)

THE FOUR TOPS -When She Was My Girl

25-18 FOREIGNER -Waiting For A Girl Like You 2624

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To Say 24 -21

QUINCY JONES FEATURING JAMES

JOURNEY -Don't Stop Believin' 34

TOP ADD ONS

TIERRA-La STREEK

DIANA ROSS -Why Do Fools Fall In Love (RCA)

QUARTERMSH- Harden My Heart (Geffen)

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I

Love You

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I

(Continued on page 29)

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BURTON CUMMINGS -You Saved My Soul

11

32

www.americanradiohistory.com

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GENESIS -No Reply At All

WIRY -FM- Jacksonville

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THE FOUR TOPS -When She Was My Girl 15-

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THE FOUR TOPS -When She Was My Girl

I

BOB SEGER- Tryin' To Live My Life Without

QUARTERFLASH- Harden My Heart

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5-4

Am 9-5

11

GEORGE BENSON -Turn Your Love Around

3-2

I

KENNY ROGERS -Share Your Love With

OLIVIANEWTON- JOHN- Physical20-15

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DARYL HALUJOHN OATES- Private Eyes

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Me 8 -4

* *

GENESIS-No Reply At All ROD STEWART -Young Turks

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QUARTERFLASH- Harden My Heart

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WMAK- FM- Nashville

*

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(Charles Duvall -MD)

* *

Magic 25 -22

* *

UNDSAY BUCKINGHAM

COMMODORES-Oh No 18 -12 FOREIGNER -Waiting For A Girl Like You

(Jim Kendricks

QUARTERFLASH- Harden My Heart

*

The Train

-MD)

COMMODORES -Oh No 25 -21

Southeast Region

(Jan Jeffries -MD) DARYL HALL /JOHN OATES

ALABAMA -Love In The First Degree /Ride WFLB-AM- Fayetteville

Blues

BOB SEGER -Tryin' To Live My Life Without

** **

ROD STEWART-Young Turks

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STEVIE NICKS

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**

ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCHESTRA- Twilight

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17

THE FOUR TOPS -When She Was My Girl 17-

QUARTERFLASH- Harden My Heart

MIKE POST -The Theme From Hill Street

CHRISTOPHER CROSS- Arthur's Theme 4 -1

FOREIGNER- Waiting For A Girl Like You 22-

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KOOL 8 THE GANG -Take My Heart 14

22-18

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No List

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THE FOUR TOPS -When She Was My Girl

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BURTON CUMMINGS-You Saved My

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AIR SUPPLY -Here

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COMMODORES-Oh No 15

* *

Wouldn't Have Missed

(Bruce Carraway-MD)

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WBBF-FM- Rochester

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Does Is

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* * EDDIE RABBITT -Step By Step 16 -6 * TRIUMPH -Magic Power 20-18 * BOB SEGER-Tryin' To Live My Life Without

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GEORGE BENSON -Turn

MARTY BALIN

WRQX- FM- Washington, D.C.

(Dave Mason -MD) AIR SUPPLY-Here

*

-Hard

12-6

** *

* * BARRY MANILOW -The Old Songs 18.13 * CHRIS CHRISTIAN -I Want You, Need You

KIM CARNES- Mistaken Identity

FOREIGNER- Waiting For A Girl Like You

Lose 19-16

INGRAM -Just Once 13-10

**

*

Little Thing She Does

DARYL HALL/JOHN GATES- Private Eyes

14

**

ROD STEWART-Young Turks

Am 17-15

QUINCY JONES FEATURING JAMES

**

**

**

8

Magic 24-19

ATLANTA RHYTHM SECTION-Alien 19-15

Is

BILLY JOEL -Say Goodbye To Hollywood

AIR SUPPLY -Here

-Trouble

Wouldn't Have Missed It

AIR SUPPLY -Here

28.21

**

(Rick Dean -MD)

**

-I

Without

AIR SUPPLY -Here

(Lou Simon -MD)

(Chuck Bradley -MD)

**

COMMODORES -Oh No 12-8

(Al Karrh

QUARTERFIASH- Harden My Heart 29 -24 BARRY MANILOW -The Old Songs 30 -25

*

**

Missed It

Magic 23 -16

DAN FOGELBERG

WQRK-FM- Norfolk

WHEB-FM -Portsmouth

*

DARYL HALUJOHN OATES- Private Eyes 5-

JOURNEY -Don't Stop Believin'

UNDSAY BUCKINGHAM -Trouble

* *

RONNIE MILSAP

JUICE

DIANA ROSS-Why Do Fools Fall In Love

*

UNDSAY BUCKINGHAM

BRUN- Atlanta Lady KOOL d THE GANG -Take My Heart THE KNACK -Pay The Devil

* *

For You 8-4

BARRY MANILOW -The Old Songs 20-16

or

OLNIANEWFON-JOHN -Physical 23 -18 RICK JAMES -Super Freak 14-8

LUTHER VANDROSS -Never Too Much 29-25

29 -25

Once 13.9

MARTY

*

**

(Johnny Dolan -MD)

She Does

WERC-AM -Birmingham

THE POUCE -Every Is

73

ELECTRIC UGHT ORCHESTRA- Twilight

WIR -FM- Philadelphia (Liz Kiley -MD)

-I Wouldn't Have

(Mark Thompson -MD)

*

Little Thing

Magic 14-6

DIANA ROSS -Why Do Fools Fall In Love

WKXX -FM- Birmingham

RICK SPRINGFIELD -I've Done Everything For You

**

-Magic Power

WINI-FM (I -95) -Miami

ROD STEWART -Young Turks 28

I

DARYL HALUJOHN OATES- Private Eyes

Blues 18 -15 THEALAN PARSONS PROJECT-Snake Eyes

You

* * LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls 6-3 * AIR SUPPLY -Here Am 10 -6

Am 6-2

I

11

MIKE POST-The Theme From Hill Street

JOURNEY -Who's Crying Now

THE POLICE -Every

1.1

AIR SUPPLY -Here

BILLY JOEL -Say Goodbye To Hollywood IS

TRIUMPH

(Jeff McCartney -MD)

Is

JARREAU-We're In This Love Together

INGRAM -Just Once 12-8

WQXI-AM -Atlanta

**

For You 16-12 ILL

QUINCY JONES FEATURING JAMES

*

STEVIE NICKS -Leather And Lace

In The Air

RICK SPRINGFIELD-I've Done Everything

** **

Manchester (Keith Lemire-MD)

WF EA-AM-

**

McLEAN- Castles

*

*

McLEAN- Castles In The Air

RICK SPRINGFIELD -I've Done Everything

13-9

LINDSAY BUCKINGHAM -Trouble

Bad Mama Jama

LINDSAY BUCKINGHAM -Trouble

-Being With You Tonite CUFF RICHARD -Wired For Sound JOURNEY -Don't Stop Believin'

Without You 16 -8

BURTON CUMMINGS -You Saved My Soul

WAYS-AM- Charlotte

GENE COTTON

BOB SEGER -Tryin' To Live My Life

8

BOB SEGER -Tryin' To Live My Life

WYRE-AM -Annapolis

-Run To Me BURTON CUMMINGS -You Saved STEVIE NICKS -Leather And Lace

-Just

*

THE FOUR TOPS -When She Was My Girl 15-

19

2

SAVOY BROWN

INGRAM

LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls 12 -7

** *

*

RICKIE LEE IONES -A Lucky Guy 31-26

** **

THE ALAN PARSONS PROJECT -Snake Eyes

-She's A

For The World

*

(Michael York -MD)

QUARTERFLASH-Harden My Heart

FOREIGNER- Waiting For A Girl Like You 22-

-MD)

BAIN- Atlanta Lady

JOHN DENVER -The Cowboy And The Lady

*

No List

*

KLPQ -FM- Little Rock

Together

AL JARREAU-We're In This Love

ROD STEWART -Young Turks

SURVIVOR -Poor Man's Son

2.1

WCAO-AM- Baltimore (Scott Richards -MD)

WTSN- AM- Dover

ATLANTA RHYTHM SECTION

DON

Need You

I

* *

-Trouble

LINDSAY BUCKINGHAM

MARTY BALIN- Atlanta Lady 22.16

DON

COMMODORES-Oh No 21.18

*

(Deborah Maloughney MARTY

DIANA ROSS-Why Do Fools Fall In Love

33-29

GENESIS-No Reply At All 26-21

WRVQ -FM- Richmond

** **

(Jim Elliott-MD)

JUICE NEWTON-The Sweetest Thing

**

For The World

(Tony Booth -MD)

QUARTERFUSH- Harden My Heart

**

-I

WFBG- AM- Altoona

WPGC -FM-Washington, D.C.

* *

-

BARRY MANILOW -The Old Songs

21-12

*

THE FOUR TOPS -When She Was My Girl

**

TIERRA-La La Means I Love You Wouldn't Have Missed It RONNIE MILSAP

10 -7

12 -5

RONNIE MILSAP

KIM CARNES- Mistaken Identity

Stop Believin' (Columbia) GEORGE BENSON -Turn Your love Around (WB)

** **

- Augusta

CARL CARLTON

**

Once 10.7

Blues 1510

JOURNEY -Don't

BARRY MANILOW-The Old Songs

Believin

-Just

* * BARRY MANILOW-The Old Songs 20 -19 * STARS ON 45 -More Stars On 45 21 -17 * MIKE POST -The Theme From Hill Street

like You (Atlantic)

Girl

OLIVIA NEWTON- JOHN -Physical 27-20 DIESEL-Sausalito Summer Night 26-22 DIANA ROSS-Why Do Fools Fall In Love

QUINCY JONES FEATURING JEAMES INGRAM

BOB SEGER & THE SILVER BULLET BAND- Tryin' To Live My Life Without You (Capitol) A

THE POLICE -Every Little Thing She Does Is

(Bob Canada -MD)

**

Mid - Atlantic Region

FOREIGNER- Waiting For A Girl Like You 23-13

WGH -AM- Norfolk

STEVIE NICKS -Leather K Lace (Modern)

JOURNEY-Don't Stop

Can Do 19

I

STEVIE NICKS -Leather And Lace

-5

DIESEL- Sausalito Summer Night 21 -15 LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls 10 -6

-It's All

BURTON CUMMINGS -You Saved My Soul

OLIVIA NEWTON-JOHN

For You 14-28

13-9

ANNE MURRAY

DARYL HALL/JOHN OATES-Private

DAN FOGELBERG -Hard To Say 11 -9

Need You

QUARTERFLASH- Harden My Heart

COMMODORES -Oh No (Motown)

Eyes 2-1

I

20

TOP ADD ONSaaa

RICK SPRINGFIELD-I've Done Everything For You

You 28-

-I Want You,

19

FOREIGNER-Waiting For

(Wilie Mltchella-MD)

**

like

CHRIS CHRISTIAN

You 28-22

-Trouble

(Ray Williams -MD)

(Bruce Stevens-MD)

ATLANTA RHYTHM SECTION-Alien 21

-Super Freak 15-11

THE FOUR TOPS- When She Was My Girl

ROD STEWART -Young Turks

RICK SPRINGFIELD-I've Done Everything

**

(11m Burns -MD)

*

WISE -Asheville

(Jeff McCartney -MD)

WBBQ-FM

WKBO -AM-Harrisburg

13 -0

BOB SEGER- Tryin' To Live My Life Withou

GENESIS -No Reply At All

UNDSAY BUCKINGHAM-Trouble

BOB SEGER-Tryin' To Live My Life

*

WQXI-FM -Atlanta

ROLLING STONES-Start Me Up 3 -1

3-1

WIGY -FM -Bath

**

*

DIANA ROSS-Why Do Fools Fall In Love

No List

* *

FOREIGNER -Waiting For AGirl Like You

30-29

BOBSEGER- Tryin' To Live My Life Without

(Steve Davis -MD)

*

AIR SUPPLY -Here I Am 20-12

**

24 -19

QUARTERFLASH- Harden My Heart

Magic 23-15

127

LINDSAY BUCKINGHAM -Trouble

21 -15

27 -17

DARYL HALUJOHN OATES- Private Eyes

CHILLIWACK -My Girl 36

RICK JAMES

(Michael O'Hara -MD) OUVIANEWTON- JOHN -Physical 29-21 FOREIGNER -Waiting For A Girl Like You

* * CUFF RICHARD -Wired For Sound * TRIUMPH -Magic Power 20 -14

13

* *

WACI -AM- Bangor

GENESIS-No Reply At All 13-8

BILLY JOEL-Say Goodbye To Hollywood 18-

BURTON CUMMINGS -You Saved My Soul

ANNE MURRAY-It's All I Can Do

**

DARYL HALUJOHN OATES- Private Eyes

Without You

CARL

**

You 10-6

** **

WCCK -FM (K- 104) -Erie

*

Mills

(Jim Reitz -MD)

WFTQ(14Q)- Worcester

-I Wouldn't Have Missed It

(Bill Shannon -MD)

Say 14-11

DIESEL-Sausalito Summer Night 19 -15

WRCK -FM- Washington

No List

RONNIE MILSAP For The World

UNDSEY BUCKINHAM-Trouble

(Andy Carey-MD)

** **

ROD STEWART -Young Turks 25

Little Thing She Does

-Just Once Il -12 CARLTON -She's A Bad Mama Jama

LINDSAY BUCKINGHAM

ELECTRIC UGHT ORCHESTRA-Twilight 30

-Hard To

*

NICKS- Leather 8 Lace (Modern)

WZGC -FM- Atlanta

- leather And Lace

(Bill Evans -MD)

QUINCY JONES FEATURING JAMES

*

FOREIGNER -Waiting For A Girl Like You 9-5

i

WNOX-FM -Knoxville

RICK JAMES -Super Freak 2-2

INGRAM

COMMODORES-Oh No 14 -9

LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls 11-6

DAN FOGELBERG

Magic WHYN -Springfield

*

-MD)

BLUE OYSTER CULT- Burnin' For You 12-4

* *

STEVIE

3

Magic 17.13

Is

1l

STEVIE NICKS

THE POUCE -Every

**

4

*

**

GEORGE BENSON -Turn Your Love Around (WB)

DARYL HALUJOHN OATES- Private Eyes 5-

WPST -FM- Trenton

19 -15

* *

*

-Trouble (Elektra)

CHRISTOPHER CROSS- Arthur's Theme

OUVIA NEWTON -JOHN -Physical 23-16

*

COMMODORES-Oh No

WH FM -FM- Rochester

** *

16

LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM

**

**

BREAKOUTS

-MD)

(Andy Szulinski

To Say 4 -2

DARYL HALUJOHN OATES- Private Eyes 10 -8

FOREIGNER -Waiting For A Girl Like You B ILLY

WFBR -AM- Baltimore

DAN FOGELBERG

*

Blues

Ploylist Top Add Ons

(10/13/81)

Based on station playlists through Tuesday

19-15

*

Ploylist Prime Movers

Copyright 1981, Billboard Publications, Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher. ©

29

BiIIboardSin 9 les Rodio

Ploylist Top Add Ons

(10/13/81)

Based on station playlists through Tuesday

WSEZ-

Continued from page 28

*

THE POUCE Every

** **

Little Thing She Does Is

Magic 21 -16

*

ARETHAFRANKLUN/GEORGE BENSON

*

Love All The Hurt Away 14.11

*

DIESEL

Sausalito Summer Night 1814

STEVIE NICKS

Leather And Lace

I'm

15 -16

ATLANTA RHYTHM SECTION

Alien

BALINAtlanta

16 13

I'm

The Old Songs JUICE NEWTON The Sweetest Thing DIANA ROSS Why Do Fools Fall In Love BARRY MANILOW

ROD STEWART Young Turks

RONNIE MILSAP

(Pat McKayMD)

** ** * *

CARL CARLTON

She s A Bad Mama

Love Around

12 -6

** **

Blues 13 10 24-18 OLIVIA NEWTON -JOHN Physical 16BILLY JOEL Say Goodbye To Hollywood

* *

Waiting For A Girl Like You 22-

Wouldn't Missed It For

I

*

Am 23

ROD STEWART Young Turks

COMMODORES

EARTH, WIND 3

I

Am 30-20

BOB SEGER Tryin' To Live My

Life Without

THE GO GO'S I

No Reply

WJDX-

At All

Young Turks

ALJARREAU We re In This Love Together 11-8

I

Oh

Our

* *

**

WOKI-FM Knoxville

Without You 16-13

Physical 39-31

Trouble

Love RONNIE MILSAP

Loved

I

By The One You

Wouldn't Have Missed It

For The World

LUTHER VANDROSS Never Too Much 26-21

THE KNACK Pay The Devil

GENESIS

No

Physical 22 -17

Reply At All 34-37

BILLY JOEL Say Goodbye To Hollywood LITTLE RIVER BAND

The Night

Bet Your Heart

Owls

27-19

QUARTERFLASH Harden My Heart I

Am 19 -13

I've

TEDDY BAKER

Done Everything

JOURNEY

139

I

The

CHRIS CHRISTIAN

Physical 15.8

DEBBIE

Old Songs I

It's Over Leather And Lace

Pay The Devil HARRY The Jam Was Moving

THE KNACK

Believin'

Want You,

On Me

Don't Stop Believin'

STEVIE NICKS

OLIVIA NEWTON-JOHN

ROD STEWART

Young Turks

JOHNNY ENTWHISTLE Too Late The Hero

Need You

WSGA -AM Savannah

** ** * *

*

Copyright 1981, Billboard Publications, Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher. ©

Oh No 15 -11

COMMODORES

Physical 21-17

OLIVIA NEWTON-JOHN

LUTHER VANDROSS Never Too Much 30-27 FOREIGNER

Waiting For A Girl Like You 28-

DIANA ROSSWhy Do Fools Fall In Love 3229

Magic 22 -22

Oh No 29 -22

OLIVIA NEWTON- JOHN

JOHNNY LEE

(Ron Fredricks MD) 37 -29

COMMODORES

FOREIGNER Waiting For A Girl Like You

BARRY MANILOW

BOB SEGER Tryin' To Live My Life

RUPERT HOLMES

Little Thing She Does

JOURNEY Don't Stop

*

* * *

Magic 23 -14

For You

*

DAVID GATESTake Me Now 28-22

No 22 -13

Is

RICK SPRINGFIELD

MO)

OUVIA NEWTON-JOHN

** **

-AMSarasota

AIR SUPPLY Here

Lakeland

IITOPLeila 17 -14 STREEK One More Night

(Gary AdkinsMD)

THE POLICE Every

** *

Lips Are Sealed

(George McGovern

** **

ROD STEWART Young Turku

Rock

(Tony Wiliam MD)

*

Can Do

Reply At All

Am 10-8

* THE POUCE Every Little Thing She Does Is *

I

UNDSAY BUCKINGHAM

Here

COMMODORES

WONN

*

AM Jackson

(Lee Adams MD) AIR SUPPLY

It's All

Am 15 -12

Blues 24 -20

** **

No

19.11

QUARTERFLASH Harden My Heart

28 -16

ANNE MURRAY

18-7

OLNlANEWTON- JOHN Physical 22 -19 MIKE POSTThe Theme From Hill Street

FOREIGNER Waiting For A Girl Like You

AIR SUPPLY Here

DON FELDER Heavy Metal

Oh No

GENESIS

ROD STEWART

Let's Groove 26-18

Without

ROD STEWART Young Turks

FOREIGNER Waiting For A Girl Like You

GENESIS

FIRE

WKXY

You

Love Around

Chattanooga

MR SUPPLYHere

Charleston

You 10-7

19

AIR SUPPLY -Here

* *

(Chris Bailey MD)

MIKE POSTTheme From Hill Street

Turn Your

(David Carroll MD)

** **

The World

WCSC

FOREIGNER

Turn Your

BOB SEGER Tryin' To Live My Life

Trouble

FM Little

(Rhonda Audis MD) No List

Night

Still

KOOL 8 THE GANG Take My Heart

Pay The Devil

KLAZ-

Need You

DIANA ROSS Why Do Fools Fall In Love

Jama

13

*

I

GEORGE BENSON

WRBQ -FM (Q- 105) Tampa

JOHN SCHNEIDER

WSKZ-FM

QUARTERFLASH Harden My Heart Just Too Shy JERMAINE JACKSON

KIM CARNES Mistaken Identity

RONNIE LAWSStay Awake

GEORGE BENSON

I

Girl

CHILLIWACK

STEVIE WOODSSteal The

LINDSAY BUCKINGHAM

Lady 19-14

Physical 29 -19

Want You,

LUTHER VANDROSS Never Too Much

THE KNACK

18 -15

KENNY ROGERSShare Your Love With Me

JOURNEY Don't Stop Believin'

CHRIS CHRISTIAN

I'm Just Too Shy

Wé re In This Love Together

MARTY

Just Too Shy

I My

OLIVIA NEWTON- JOHN

On Me

JERMAINE JACKSON

DAN FOGELBERG Hard To Say 14-9

ALJARREAU

Bet Your Heart

QUARTERFLASH Harden My Heart

*

Controversy

JERMAINE JACKSON

JOHNNY LEE

*

UNDSAY BUCKINGHAMTrouble PRINCE

FM Winston Salem

(Bob Siegler MD)

*

Ploylist Prime Movers

STEVIE NICKS -Leather And Lace 33

Rules For Entering 1981 Competition For Air Personalities, Program Directors, Radio Stations And Record Promotion Executives numbered one to 30, 31 to 100, and below Awards will be presented according to market size in three categories: markets year, and personality of the year, as well of the director program year, of the 100 in the following formats for radio station these instructions: follow Just can enter. Anyone categories. other in awards as other

The Year

AOR; b. Top 40 /Adult Contemporary; c. Country; d. Black; a.

AOR: b. Top 40 /Adult Contemporary; c. Country; d. Black; a. e.

e.

Miscellaneous.

AOR; b. Top 40 /Adult Contemporary; c. Country; d. Black; e. Miscellaneous.

Miscellaneous.

DEADLINE ALL ENTRIES -Nov.

Station produced; b. Syndicator or network produced a.

a.

Requirements: A written presentation which must include a documented ratings history of the station under the entrant's program directorship. a description of the station's programming, a summary of station activities and composite tape of the station's sound of no more than 30 minutes in length.

Requirements: A written presentation which uqt include a description of the station's programming and summaries of its community involvement, promotional and advertising activities. A tape presentation and other related materials also may be submitted but are not mandatory.

IV. Category: Special Programming

Category: Personality Of The Year

III.

II. Category: Program Director Of

L Category: Radio Station Of The Year

Requirements: A telescoped tape of the program together with a written summary description and documentation of airing including stations and dates.

Requirements: An aircheck of an actual broadcast aired between Jan. I and Sept. 30, 1981. The aircheck must be on cassette or reel to reel at 71/2 i.p.s. with music telescoped. representing one hour of air time. The aircheck must be accompanied by an official entry form, here included.

1, 1981

V. Category: Music Industry a. Chief Executive in Charge of Promotion; b. National Promotion Person; c. Regional Promotion Person; d. Local Promotion

Person; e. Independent Promotion Person Requirements: Nomination by of-

ficial nominating ballot. VI. Category: Military Air Personality Of The Year International Air Personality Of The Year Requirements: Same as for U.S. and Canadian air personalities. Submit all entries to: Doug Hall. Radio Programming Editor. Billboard, 1515 Broadway. New York. N.Y. 10036.

ENTRY FORM AIR PERSONALITY COMPETITION Please affix this label to your air personality's air check

RECORD PROMOTION PERSON

NOMINATING BALLOT Annual competition for the International Radio Programming Forum Awards

PLEASE PRINT:

l nominate of the following record promotion persons for the annual competition in the following categories: ,

CHIEF EXECUTIVE IN CHARGE OF PROMOTION

Yes

Personality has been with station

since-

-

Company

yr.

total in each category wins. Please rate on a scale of zero (0) to ten (10). The highest point Use ONLY one

-_ Name of Person

-

JUDGES:

City

Company NATIONAL

No-

Does air personality select music?

mo.

Name of Person

Format

City

Station

Air Personality

column. Leave rest blank for future judging.

City FINAL RATING

REGIONAL RATING

REGIONAL Name of Person

Voice

Timing

City

Company

Music selection

LOCAL

Salesmanship

Name of Person

Personality definition

Company INDEPENDENT Name of Person

Interest stimulation

City

Computability with format Ability to relate to audience Presentation

City

Company Please send to Attn:

Content Imagination

Nominations

Creativity

Doug Hall

Originality

Billboard 1515 Broadway New York, N.Y. 10036

TOTAL

TOTAL

from All entries, including tapes become the property of Billboard. It is the intention of Billboard to create a composite tape said composite for tapes submitted to reproduce to Billboard granted permission constitutes contest winning entries. Entry in this tapes to be distributed at cost within the industry.

ALL ENTRIES MUST BE POSTMARKED NO LATER THAN NOV. 1, 1981 www.americanradiohistory.com

Survey For Week Ending

Billboard

R

R

10/24/81

ck i bums &Top Trackt T

Copyright 1981. Billboard Publications. Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system. or transmitted. in any form or by any meins. electronic. mechanical photocopying. recording, or otherwise. without the prior wrihen permission of the publisher c

Rock Albums This Week

Last Weeks On Week

Chart

Top Tracks This

ARTIST -Title, Label THE ROLLING

Week

Last Weeks Week

Chart

10

ROLLING STONES -Start Me .Up, Rolling Stones Records

5

THE ROLLING STONES -Hangfire, Rolling Stone Records

3

7

BOB SEGER -Tryin' To Live My Life Without You, Capitol

5

14

5

4

4

6

6

13

STONES- Tattoo You, Rolling Stones Records

1

1

8

1

1

2

3

15

FOREIGNER -4, Atlantic

2

2

3

2

13

JOURNEY- Escape, Columbia

3

4

4

5

BOB SEGER AND THE SILVER BULLET BAND -Nine Tonight, Capitol

4

THE KINKS -Give The People What They Want, Arista

5

5

8

6

6

13

STEVIE NICKS -Bella Donna, Modern Records

ARTIST -Title, Label

FOREIGNER -Juke Box Hero, Atlantic

THE KINKS -Destroyer, Arista STEVIE NICKS /TOM PETTY -Stop Draggin' My Heart Around. Modern Records

7

7

15

PAT BENATAR- Precious Time, Chrysalis

7

8

5

8

8

12

HEAVY METAL -Soundtrack, Full Moon /Asylum

8

7

15

9

26

BILLY SQUIER -Don't Say No, Capitol

FOREIGNER- Urgent, Atlantic

9

9

9

11

JOURNEY -Don't Stop Believing, Columbia

10

11

6

DAN FOGELBERG- Innocent Age Full Moon /Epic

10

11

12

10

9

11

10

21

12

12

13

LITTLE RIVER BAND -Exposure, Capitol ZZ TOP -El Loco, Warner Bros.

STEVIE NICKS -Edge Of Seventeen, Modern Records

11

THE MOODY BLUES -The Voice, Threshold

12

13

4

13

14

9

13

12

14

13

10

15

BILLY JOEL -Say Goodbye To Hollywood, Columbia PAT BENATAR -Fire and Ice, Chrysalis

15

17

4

14

14

13

DON FELDER -Heavy Metal, Full Moon /Asylum

15

17

10

THE KINKS -Better Things, Arista

BLUE OYSTER CULT -Fire Of Unknown Origin, Columbia

16

15

10

THE PRETENDERS

ATLANTA RHYTHM SECTION- Ouinella, Columbia

17

16

5

THE MOODY BLUES -Long Distance Voyager, Threshold

18

19

4

CHRISTOPHER CROSS- Arthur's Theme, Warner Brothers TRIUMPH -Magic Power, RCA

SHOOTING STAR -Hang On For Your Life, Virgin /Epic

19

20

3

THE ROLLING STONES -Little T and A

HALL & OATES- Private Eyes, RCA

20

18

8

LITTLE RIVER BAND -The Night Owls, Capitol

21

21

8

DAN FOGELBERG -Hard To Say, Full Moon /Epic

16 17

18

16 15

11

18

19

4

19

18

21

20

20

9

21

21

5

RED RIDER -As Far As Siam, Capitol

PRETENDERS -Pretenders BILLY JOEL -Songs

In

II,

Sire

The Attic, Columbia

ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCHESTRA -Time, Jet

GENESIS -No Reply At All, Atlantic

-The Adultress, Sire

22

22

6

DONNY IRIS -King Kool MCA

23

25

6

NILS LOFGREN -Night Fades Away Backstreet /MCA

22

23

17

TRIUMPH -Allied Forces, RCA

23

22

13

FOREIGNER -Night Life, Atlantic

24

13

JOURNEY -Who's Crying Now, Columbia

24

24

7

BLUE OYSTER CULT -Burning For You, Columbia

25

23

24

TOM PETTY & THE HEARTBREAKERS -Hard Promises, Backstreet /MCA

24 25

26

11

THE GO -GO'S -Our Lips Are Sealed, IRS

26 27 28 29 30

26 28

28

26

25

26

BILLY SQUIER -In The Dark, Capitol

27

27

11

ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCHESTRA -Hold On Tight, Jet

27

13

28

28

12

ZZ

30 32 29

4

29

37

12

BILLY SQUIER- Lonély Is The Night, Capitol

30

29

13

JOURNEY -Stone

31

7

JEFFERSON STARSHIP- Modern Times, RCA /Grunt THE ALLMAN BROTHERS- Brothers of the Road, Arista THE MICHAEL STANLEY BAND -Northcoast, EMI /America THE GO -GO'S- Beauty And the Beat, IRS GENESIS -Abacab, Atlantic JON AND VANGELIS -The Friends Of Mr. Cairo, Polydor CHILLIWACK -Wanna Be A Star, Millennium

31

30

14

PAT BENATAR- Promises

34

11

32

32

7

33

31

15

34

35

10

35

33

13

36

34

8

PAT BENATAR -Just Like Me, Chrysalis MOODY BLUES -Meanwhile, Threshold THE MICHAEL STANLEY BAND -Heartland, EMI /America ATLANTA RHYTHM SECTION -Alien, Columbia

37

40

5

THE POLICE -Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic, A &M

38

36

15

39

38

5

31

32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41

42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

33 36 35 37 39 38 43 40

11

2 8

3

10 5 7

2

10 2

10

41

17

42 46 45 44 48

17 2 3 10 2

Kw kTU

NFMIEll

49

0' -Gary 0', Capitol JOHN ENTWISTLE -Too Late, The Hero, Atco THE DIRT BAND -Jealousy, Liberty KIX -Kix, Atlantic NOVO COMBO -Novo Combo, Polydor GARY

HACKETT- Cured, Epic RICKIE LEE JONES- Pirates, Warner Bros. SCHON & HAMMER -Untold Passion, Columbia STEVE

4 5 6 7 8

9 10

Columbia In The Dark,

Chrysalis

RED RIDER -Lunitic Fringe, Capitol

DIESEL -Sausalito Summer Night, Regency

CHILLIWACK -My Girl, Millennium THE ALLMAN BROTHERS- Straight From the Heart, Arista

40

39

11

41

2

GENESIS -Abacab, Atlantic

42

46

2

HALL & OATES- Private Eyes, RCA

43

42

24

TOM PETTY & THE HEARTBREAKERS -A Woman Backstreet /MCA

44 45

43

19

44

10

SQUEEZE- Tempted, A &M TOM PETTY & THE HEARTBREAKERS -Nightwatchman,

MICHAEL SCHENKER-MSG, Chrysalis

46

50

2

RIOT -Fire Down Below, Elektra

47

14

PABLO CRUISE

6 19

DONNY IRIS -Sweet Marilee, MCA

50

45 47 49 48

24

BILLY SQUIER -The Stroke, Capitol

51

53

3

52

52

10

53

51

6

DAN FOGELBERG -Lost In The Sun, Full Moon /Epic

LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM-Trouble, Electra Need Your Love, Chrysalis IAN HUNTER

ROSSINGTON COLLINS -This Is The Way, MCA LITTLE FEAT -Hoy -Hoy, Warner Bros. BENNY MARDONES -Too Much To Lose, Polydor

GREG LAKE -Greg Lake, Chrysalis ROMANTICS -Strictly Personal, Epic

KING CRIMSON -Discipline, Warner Brothers

LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM -Law And Order, Electra NAZARETH -Snaz, A &M SURVIVOR- Premonition, Scotti Brothers JACK GREEN -Reverse Logic, RCA

MINKDeVILLE -Coup De Grace, Atlantic VIC VERGAT-Down To The Bone, Capitol DEVO -New Traditionalists, Warner Brothers

A

In

Love,

Backstreet MCA

THE POLICE -Ghost In The Machine, A &M

Top Adds 2 3

In Love,

41

IAN HUNTER -Short Back 'N' Sides, Chrysalis ICEHOUSE- Icehouse, Chrysalis DIESEL -Watts In A Tank, Regency ROSE TATTOO -Assault And Battery, Mirage

48

1

TOP- Tubesnake Boogie, Warner Bros.

49

54

=MO

NOVO COMBO -Up Periscope, Polydor

-Cool

Love, A &M

POINT BLANK -Nicole, MCA JEFFERSON STARSHIP -Save Your Love, Grunt JON AND VANGELIS- Friends Of Mr. Cairo, Polydor

-I

55

54

7

56

56

11

ZZ TOP -Pearl Necklace, Warner Bros.

57

55

12

THE TUBES

58

58

15

59

CO

GARY WRIGHT

60

59

10

-I

Don't Want To Wait Anymore, Capitol Really Want To Know You, Warner Bros.

-I

TRIUMPH -Allied Forces, RCA LITTLE FEAT -Rock 'N' Roll Doctor, Warner Bros.

Track stations. compilation of Rock Radio Airplay as indicated by the nations leading Album oriented and Top

www.americanradiohistory.com

Radio Programming

31

Billboard

Survey For Week Ending 10 24.81

R

Copyright 1981, Billboard Publications. Inc No part of this publication may be reproduced. stored in a retrieval system. or transmitted. In any form or by any means, electronic. mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise. C

Vox lox NEW YORK -Jack Casey has been flamed program director of WMJX -FM Boston, formerly WBZFM, effective with the transfer of the station's ownership from Group W to Greater Media which is expected to take place the first of the year. Casey was most recently program director of Cleveland's WZZP-FM, and also held that post at WRNL-

AM/WRXL-FM Richmond, Va. *

*

*

Fred Moore, a 15 -year radio veteran, has been appointed program director of WLTH-AM Gary, Ind. ... Jim Taszarek joins the Pulitzer Broadcast group of stations as vice

president and general manager of KTAR-AM and KBBC -FM Phoenix. ... Thom O'Hair has moved from KQFM -FM Portland, Ore., where he was program director, to Audio Independents of San Francisco to be director of professional development and training. O'Hair was a Billboard winner as Major Market AOR Program Director of the Year in 1975. * * * Golden has been named to James the newly created post of director of music and music research at WABCAM New York. Golden joined the station in January as music researcher. ... Scott Kummer, most recently at KENR -AM Houston, has joined TM Programming as a consultant. He'll be assisting music director Steve Penny in consulting the TM Country stations. O'Connor Creative Services in offer-

...

ing broadcasters eight one -hour Rolling Stones radio specials. Hosted by Dave McCormick, deejay on CFMI -FM Vancouver, Canada, each show is 46 minutes in length and broken into four program segments, with 10 minutes commercial time allotted as well as a slot for local or network news. * * * KPSM-FM Brownwood, Texas has been on the air since April programming contemporary christian music 18 hours a day and would like to solicit better record service. Their address is P.O. Box 602, 76801.... WRIF-FM Detroit and 8,000 of its listeners helped raise $25,000 for the city's public radio station WDETFM by supporting the WRIF's Mo-

RATES:

president and general manager of Station Research Systems, a company specializing in computer based call out research. He was formerly music consultant for TM Programming. ... WPLR -FM hosted a listening party for Billy Joel's new "Songs In The Attic" album and featured a brand new Joel video. Chris Ryan has been promoted to the position of administrative assistant to the program director, Mike Scalzi, at WHBQ-AM. Ryan will also continue as music coordinator, morning show producer, and parttime air personality.... Glen Campbell has been set to host "Country Closeup," the weekly series of one hour specials produced by Narwood Productions, Inc. The syndicated series which debuts January, 1982 will feature such artists as Loretta Lynn, Mickey Gilley, Tammy Wynette, the Bellamy Brothers, Emmylou Harris, T.G. Sheppard and Alabama. * * *

WPLJ -FM New York will air a two -hour Rolling Stones special Oct. 29. The show features exclusive interview segments conducted by the station's rock critic Lisa Robinson at the Stones' Massachusetts retreat, where the group stayed while preparing for their current tour.... The new on -air lineup at WEEL -AM Fairfax, Va. includes Ron Smith hosting the morning drive show; Mike Frazier from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. with his "Lunchtime In The Country" show; Frank Drew from 3 to 7 p.m. and Ron Kirsh on the 7 p.m. to midnight shift. ... Karen Aylor has moved to WSUX-FM Seaford, Del. * * * Radio Caroline, the legendary pirate radioship, has had to delay its intended broadcast debut- possibly as much as 30 days. According to its captain, the ship was on course when

D

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ADDRESS ALL ADS:

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Help Wanted

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Radio Programming

Billboard Job Man. 1515 Broadway. New York. N Y. 10036. Phone: (212) 764 -7388 (locally) or (800) 2237524 (Out of State). Ilse any mals' credit card when calling in your advertisement

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$40.00 per

without the prior written permission of the publisher.

tor City Jam. The all -day fundraiser was co- sponsored by Dr Pepper and featured eight local rock bands. Detroit's own rocker, Mitch Ryder, headlined the event.... Steve Gary and Tim Williams are now sharing the music director duties at KOKEFM Austin, and Steve Sever is at the helm as operations manager. * * * Don Hagen has been named vice

jjQARD RADIO

_

Zip

Telephone

Signature

POSITIONS WANTED

POSITIONS WANTED

PROFESSIONAL 30 year old announcer looking to settle down. 12 years experience. Rock to Country, uptempo delivery. Would like full time air and production. Salary open. For tape

and resume contact:

GARY SHAFFER (216) 967 -7494 or 620 South Shore Ct. Zermilion, OH 44089

PROFESSIONAL DISC JOCKEY'S years experience, is seeking a position with Discotheques, Rock Clubs, Skating 5

Rinks. Please notify me at:

(212) 383 -6686 Ask tor Mr. C.

.

ôntemporary

a storm caused severe shifting from port to starboard. The unbalance in

the ship was due to the 300 foot mast which carries Radio Caroline's AM and shortwave antennae. The captain decided to head for a safe port where construction is now underway to add an additional 150 tons of ballast to the vessel. After the ship becomes seaworthy, it will take from one to five days to arrive at the

TITLE, Artist, Label

predetermined anchor-point and begin broadcasting. Wolfman Jack,

11

7

6

4

9

i

from

Number (Dist. Label) (Publisher, Licensee)

SHARE YOUR LOVE WITH ME

I

COULD NEVER MISS YOU Lulu, Alfa 7006 (Abesongs, BMI)

HERE I AM

/Turtle, BMI)

HARD TO SAY Dan

Fogelberg, Epic 1402488 (Hickory Grove /April /Blackwood, ASCAP)

10

ARTHUR'S THEME Christopher Cross, Warner Bros. 49787 ( Irving /Woolnough /Unichappell /Begonia, BMI /Hidden Valley, ASCAP)

3

13

STEP BY STEP Eddie Rabbitt, Elektra 47174 (Briarpatch /DebDave, BMI)

8

11

WE'RE IN THIS LOVE TOGETHER Al Jarreau, Warner Bros. 49746 (Blackwood /Magic Castle, BMI)

10

6

6

14

11

6

13

7

WHEN SHE WAS MY GIRL The Four Tops. Casablanca 2338 (MCA, ASCAP)

23

3

THE OLD SONGS

18

4

14

15

6

W

17

5

16

12

16

22

s

21

7

19

9

17

NO GETTIN' OVER ME Ronnie Milsap. RCA 12264 (Rick Hall, ASCAP)

20

14

11

WHO'S CRYING NOW

24

5

34

2

27

5

31

3

I

28

4

YOU SAVED MY SOUL

26

6

32

3

28

16

IO

29

30

7

6

THE THEME FROM HILL STREET BLUES Mike Post, Elektra 47186 (MGM, ASCAP) FOR YOUR EYES ONLY

Sheena Easton, Liberty 1418 (United

Mists,

ASCAP)

JUST ONCE

Quincy Jones Featuring James Ingram, A &M 2357 (ATV /Mann & Weill. BMI)

Barry Manilow, Arista 0633 (WB /Upward Spiral, ASCAP) OH NO

Commodores, Motown 1527 (Jobete /Commodores Entertainment, ASCAP) BACK IN MY LIFE AGAIN The Carpenters, A &M 2370 (Duchess, MCA/Home Sweet Home, ASCAP) TAKE ME NOW

David Gates. Arista 0615 (Kipahulu, ASCAP) ENDLESS LOVE Diana Ross And Lionel Richie, Motown

1510 (PGP /Brockman /Intersong, ASCAP,

ATLANTA LADY

Marty Balin, EMI-America 8093 (Mercury Shoes /Great Pyramid, BMI) IT'S ALL I CAN DO Anne Murray, Capitol 5023 (Chess. ASCAP)

Journey. Columbia 1802241 (Weed High Nightmare, BMI) AUEN

Atlanta Rhythm Section, Columbia 18 -02471 (Low Sal, BMI)

Rege Cordic has joined KRLAAM Los Angeles in the 5 a.m. -9 a.m. morning spot, the time slot helmed by Art Laboe until now. Laboe will remain with -the station in another time period until the end of the year, when he is rumored to be departing the oldies- oriented station. Cordic gained national attention at KDKAAM Pittsburgh in the early '60s before moving to KNX -AM in Los Angeles in 1965. He'd been doing made-for -television films before his appointment to KRLA.

WAITING FOR A GIRL UKE YOU

Foreigner, Atlantic 3858 (Somerset /Evensongs, ASCAP) STEAL THE NIGHT

Stevie Woods, Cotillion 46018 (Atlantic) (Sunrise, BMI) WANT YOU I NEED YOU Chris Christian, Boardwalk 7 -11 -126 (Marvin Gardens /Home Sweet Home /Bug And Bear, ASCAP/John Charles Crowley, BMI)

Burton Cummings, Alfa 7008 (Shillelagh, BMI) 26

FANCY FREE Oak Ridge Boys, MCA 51169 (Goldline /Silverline, ASCAP /BMI)

THE WOMAN IN ME Crystal Gayle, Columbia 02523 (OAS, ASCAP) THE VOICE The Moody Blues, Threshold

cc*

602 (Polygram) (W8, ASCAP)

MEMPHIS Fred Knoblock, Scotti Bros. 502434 (CBS) (Arc, BMI) WHY DO FOOLS FALL IN LOVE Diana Ross, RCA 12349 (Patricia, BMI) A HEART IN NEW YORK

25

12

35

3

33

5

THE NIGHT OWLS Little River Band. Capitol 5033 (Colgems -EMI, ASCAP)

38

3

I

35

20

20

QUEEN OF HEARTS Juice Newton, Capitol 4997 (Drunk Monkey, ASCAP)

36

19

14

THAT OLD SONG

31

Tim Wilson

www.americanradiohistory.com

2

5

*

Continued from page 20 concentrate on the flow of the show." Wilson puts a great emphasis on music. "I go for a consistent sound through the day and the week, a really smooth sound. We concentrate on the music. We maintain our country image. We're not traditional, but modern. We try to go for a really good flow between stop sets and keep the good music going." How does he do this? "We fit what the jock has to say around the music rather than fit the music around the jock," he says. WAXX has a playlist of 65 records and is a Billboard reporter. "We're noted for breaking records," he says. Thinking over the records he added last week before coming to Nashville, Wilson says, "Obviously ( Ronnie) Milsap's "I Wouldn't Have Missed It For The World" (on RCA) is a killer." What does Wilson look for in a jock? "A great voice is not the first consideration," he says. "He's got to he a one -to -one communicator and sound like a human being rather than a DJ." This year is the first time Wilson made it into the finalist category, although he has been nominated in the past.

8

Air Supply, Arista 0626 (Al Gallico

For the first time in over 20 years, a live network radio drama will be aired on the NBC Radio Network when John Carradine, John Clark, John Houseman, Casey Kasem, Jean Kasem, June Lockhart, Gary Owens, Vincent Price and Lynn Redgrave join together in a benefit for UNICEF. The show will be broadcast on Halloween live from Hollywood's Magic Castle. *

5

compiled

Kenny Rogers, Liberty 1430 (Duchess, BMI) 2

who was set to premiere on Radio Caroline Oct. 3, will return to Europe when a new date has been set for the broadcast debut. * * * At country KAYO -AM Seattle, Chuck Urban is the new program director, Hal Murry is music director and Mike Shannon is promotion director. The on -air personalities are Murry, 6 a.m. to 10 a.m.; Gary Mitchell, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Urban, 2 p.m. to 6 p.m.; Delilah Rene, 6 p.m. to midnight; and Bob Kelley, midnight to 6 p.m. Rockey Shea, Vickie Lynn and Kelly Stevens are on weekends. * * *

*

are best selling middle -of- the -road singles radio station air play listed in rank order. These

'Fs

Art Garfunkel, Columbia 1802307 (Irving, BMI)

STILL John Schneider, Scotti Bros. 7.1289 (Epic) (Jobete /Commodores Entertainment,

ASCAP) 33

SURRENDER Arlan Day, Pasha 5.02480 (CBS) (WB /Pasha /Hovona, ASCAP)

Ray

Parker Jr.

&

Raydio, Arista 0616 (Raydiola, ASCAP)

THE SWEETEST THING Juice Newton, Capitol 5046 (Sterling /Addison Street, ASCAP) CASTLES IN THE AIR Don McLean,

Millennium 11819 (RCA) (Mayday /Benny Bird, BMI)

SAY GOODBYE TO HOLLYWOOD

Billy Joel, Columbia 1802518 (Blackwood, BMI) 40

29

19

SLOW HAND

Pointer Sisters. Planet 47929 (Elektra) (Warner -Tamerlane, ASCAP /Flying Dutchman /Sweet Harmony, BMI) 41

42

2

42

37

14

43

40

19

44

43

8

ALL I NEED Dan Hartman. Blue Sky 02472 (Epic) YOU DON'T KNOW ME

Mickey Gilley. Epic 1402172 (Rightsong, BMI) FEELS SO RIGHT

Alabama, RCA 12246 (Maypop, BMI)

45

*

CI=1,

YOU'RE NOT EASY TO FORGET Michael Johnson, EMI -America 8086 (Snow /Braintree /ATV, BMI) HOOKED ON CLASSICS Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, RCA 12304 (Chappell, ASCAP) MORE TO UVE Jim Photoglo, 20th Century 2498 (RCA) (Nearytunes /Diamond Mine /W8, ASCAP /Fos Fanfare /Nearysong, BMI)

46

36

4

47

39

18

SOME DAYS ARE DIAMONDS John Denver, RCA 12246 (Tree, BMI)

48

41

10

ALL I HAVE TO DO IS DREAM Andy Gibb And Victoria Principal, RSO 1065 (Polygram) (House Of Bryant, BMI)

49

45

16

COOL LOVE Pablo Cruise, A&M 2349 (Irving /Pablo Cruise, BMI /Almo, ASCAP)

50

48

13

ITS JUST THE SUN Don McClean, Millennium 11809 (RCA) (Benny Bird. BMI)

Stars are awarded to those products showing greatest airplay strength. Superstars are awarded to those products showing greatest upward movement on the current week's chart (Prime Movers). Recording Industry Recording Industry Assn. of America Assn. Of America seal for sales of 1,000,000 units. (Seal indicated by dot.) seal of certification for sales of 2,000,000 units. (Seal indicated by triangle.)

32

bienE IDENTITY CRISIS LONG GONE

Hall & Oates Modify Routine, Turn To Simpler Music Style LOS ANGELES -Simplicity is the key to Daryl Hall and John Oates these days. The duo now produces itself, believes in doing straightforward r&b /pop and to the point hit-oriented live shows. This is a far cry from the time when the band, going through an iden-

By CARY DARLING However, even on its initial hit

John Oates" and "Bigger Than Both Of

side producers in the past. They have used many in their 10 -year career including Todd Rundgren,

Us" in 1975 and 1976 -there is a marked dichotomy of commercial material on side one and experimental music on side two. This is less apparent on "Voices" and "Private Eyes." "We've integrated our various styles and made it all one," states Oates.

David Foster and Christopher Bond. "By producing ourselves, we don't have to bother trying to communicate to other people. We just go do it. I haven't really met any producers who understand what we want to do. We always had a problem with it. That's one reason

albums -"Daryl Hall

&

tity crisis, experimented with avant-garde touches and chased each other onstage with oversize hypodermic needles. "I like to write short pieces now," asserts Hall, the more talkative of the twosome. "We're not in the mood to stretch out. We're editing ourselves all the time. We're chopping all of what we consider dead wood out of songs and making them tight. That's what we happen to be into right now." The approach seems to have paid off, as the last RCA album, "Voices," produced four hit singles, including the number one "Kiss On My List." The latest album, "Private Eyes," is a chart fixture and has produced a hit single in the title track. Of course, Hall and Oates had a brush with success in 1976 and 1977 when "Sara Billboard photo by Lee Salem Smile," "She's Gone" and "Rich Girl" went top 10. Following this, Live Voices: Daryl Hall and John Oates sing one of their hits at a recent two -day engagement at Los Angeles' Greek Theatre. the next albums -"Beauty On A Back Street," "Along The Red Previously, the group had utiour sound kept changing so much, Ledge" and "X- Static " -proved a lized folk and heavy metal on three because the production style was bit too adventuresome for some albums for Atlantic. "We reflect changing so much," explains Hall. fans and did not produce big hit our environment and time," says "There are more ideas floating singles. Oates. "Coming from Philadelphia around," adds Oates. "The pro"That was a conscious effort to with the first album and the end of ducers don't want to just sit there. do something," Hall explains. "We the 1960s with that get back to the They had their input and we would have been happy if people earth feeling, we were unscram- couldn't ignore that. So, we had had accepted that immediately bling our brains from what went much more of a dense sound. We and everybody said 'sure, let 'em on in the 1960s. We had a lot of were putting more on the records do it.' But we really needed the different kinds of musical styles we than we wanted to put." change. We didn't feel the material had to get out of our systems. It If the twosome was having probwe were becoming popular for was took us three albums to experiment lems with its sound, it was also the silthe way we wanted to sound. We and get them all down. On having problems with image. The wanted to get it right. So, we fig- ver album ( "Daryl Hall & John inner sleeve of "Daryl Hall & John ured we would do some more ex- Oates") for the first time it began Oates" looks like a Playgirl center perimenting. We didn't feel we we to come together in a unified fold done in garish pink. In addiwere ready to just do 'Rich Girl Jr.' sound." tion, Hall's alleged comments We did a lot of things that probStill, it was not until the self-proabout white and black images in ably weren't that commercial but I duced "Voices" that both felt the music in the pages of a national think it was necessary in order to Hall and Oates sound was right. (Continued on page 33) get to where we are now" They blame this on the use of out-

N.Y.

i

Buildings Strictly For Musicians

NEW YORK -"We rent out the rooms as if they were office spaces, only we rent them to musicians," says real estate developer Jack P. Lerner, who owns the Music Building in Eighth Ave., Midtown Manhattan, and who has just opened a second, larger facility in Jamaica, Queens. "Our only restriction is that they cannot live in the rooms. Also if they get too creative and write on the walls, and we catch them, then it is either instant expulsion or they have the paint the whole floor," he continues. The Music Building in Manhattan has 55 units. It opened July, 1979 and was full within four months, says Lerner. With rents going for $400 a month and up, Lerner says he has a two -year waiting list. In Queens, Lerner opened his new Music Building II in September and though it is not yet finished, Lerner says he has already rented more than 25 units. Ultimately the building in Queens will contain 130 units, with

rents starting at $295 a month for larger rooms. What costs you $700 in Manhattan costs $295 in Queens," he says. The units range in size from 14ft. x 16ft. to 20ft. x 40ft. Among the tenants at the Music Building in Manhattan are such acts as Platinum Hook, the Saturday Night Live house band, Tycoon; the Fleshtones, Lenny Kaye and others. "We don't discriminate," says Lerner. "We don't care if you are famous. We had Gloria Gaynor and Kool & the Gang who wanted to rent, but we just didn't have the room." Leases are from three months to a year, with an across the board increase of 12.5% for renewals. Once an act rents a room, it can do with it what it wants," says Lerner. Many are shared among bands, and some are sublet. Both music buildings are open 24 hours a day, and although the Manhattan Music Building is used by some 400 musicians daily, there has never been an outside theft says Lerner.

The Manhattan building is 12 stories high, with an average of five units to a floor. In the evenings, when everybody is rehearsing at full blast, the hallways can get noisy. But, says Lerner, nobody complains. The walls in the halls and rooms are covered with sound retardant and the individual rooms are quiet enough.

Haber Active LOS ANGELES -Les Haber Productions, recently reactivated, is set to take over the administration of all Haber /Weinstock materials, including the Marvin Hamlisch special, "Marvin Hamlisch: They're Playing Our Song," with guests Liza Min nelli, Johnny Mathis, Carly Simon, Gladys Knight, Priscilla Lopez and the L.A. Philharmonic Orchestra. The firm also will be expanding to include distribution and production for cable, videocassette and theatrical releases.

www.americanradiohistory.com

Billboard photo by Chuck Pulin

STUDIO 54 PARTY -Talking Heads' David Byrne chats with Lene Lovich at a Studio 54 party for "The Catherine Wheel," a Twyla Tharp dance program with music by Byrne.

In The San Diego Area, Reggae Rears Its Head By THOMAS K. ARNOLD

SAN DIEGO -Largely through the efforts of promoter Marianne Makeda Cheatom, San Diego appears to be on the verge of a reggae boom. In past years, there were rarely more than one or two reggae

concerts here a year; today, the number has increased to one or two a month. Such top reggae names as Peter Tosh, Toots & the Maytals and Dennis Brown -as well as popular regional talent, including Jack Miller and the Rebel Rockers -have played several local houses whose capacities range from 250 to almost 2,000. And nearly all the Cheatom- produced shows have been sellouts. "I believe people are finally ready to hear the truth; they've become interested in music that has a meaning," Cheatom says. "Reggae is not just another trend, like psychedelic music or punk rock, which came up quickly, caused a lot of commotion, and then faded. "Reggae is constant. It's built around the beat of the heart. It's also positive, which I'm sure a lot of people see as a welcome relief from the negativism of some other music." A quick scan of the audience at any one of Cheatom's shows reveals a good sized portion of every crowd consists of new wave transplants still wearing their trademark black leather motorcycle jackets and multi -colored hair but mingling, and often dancing, with everyone else.

"The crowds at our shows simply

can't be categorized," Cheatom states. "They're black and white, young and old. Some dance like crazy the moment the beat starts, while others sit absolutely still throughout the entire show. But they all come out in droves. I see new faces at every show." The success of the 39- year -old

Cheatom's productions -she's put on about a dozen concerts in 1981 is all the more surprising when one considers that her background in concert promoting is nil.

-

"I learned everything through trial and error," she says, laughing. "All I ever had going for me was a love and understanding of the music." Her devotion to reggae music is more a help than a hindrance, though, she states. "On the rare occasions when reggae acts played San Diego in the past," she says, "they were booked into regular nightclubs by promoters who didn't know the first thing about the music. As a result, most of

the shows did poorly. Reggae needs clean environment," she claims. "The promoter has to know what the people want as much as the musicians do." No alcohol is served at any of her shows, nor is an age limit imposed. Refreshments consist solely of authentic Jamaican snacks and drinks

a

prepared at the Prophet International Vegetarian Restaurant, an East San Diego establishment she's owned for 10 years. Cheatom, who says she entered the concert promoting field here "because nobody else was putting on reggae shows," produced her first concert a year ago with Laguna Beach's Rebel Rockers at the 250 seat International Blend Coffeehouse. "Until that time, the International Blend had featured primarily jazz and salsa acts, and I had to convince the owners that there was, indeed, an audience for reggae music in San Diego," she says. "They remained skeptical, but after the concert soldout, they agreed to let me produce more shows." Four more concerts -featuring Earl Zero and the Rebel Rockers followed in the latter part of 1980, and did well. Cheatom says she was more convinced than ever of the stability of reggae's future in San Diego and began looking for a larger, more permanent facility. In January, 1981, she happened upon an abandoned movie theatre in Normal Heights, a community just north of downtown San Diego, and signed a five -year, $1,600 -amonth lease. After two weeks of remodeling, the 600-seat Adams Avenue Theatre opened its doors Feb. 28 with a show by the Rastafarians. From that point on the theatre has hosted nearly all Cheatom's shows. The sole exception was a Peter Tosh concert in August which was moved to the 1,750seat California Theatre downtown when the demand for tickets exceeded the Adams Avenue Theatre's capacity. Concerts at the theatre, says its manager, Cynthia Morris, are now being augmented by dance concerts and showings of reggae films. But its emphasis remains on concerts by some of the top names in the genre. "We used to get cut out whenever a reggae act toured the West Coast," Cheatom states. "They used to start their tours in Los Angeles and head north. But after a while, the agents started noticing us, and we began getting all kinds of offers."

-

I

33

Talent

Live Entertainment Still Potent In Sluggish Atlantic City Season By

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -AIthough the state Casino Control Commission has formally repealed requirements for nightly entertainment at thz gambling casino /hotels here in spite of objections from the local musicians' union, entertainment will still figure prominently at the now eight hotels during the sluggish fall and winter months. There may not be the heavy barrage of big names offered during the summer season, but there will be a generous sprinkling of attractions on weekends with bigger names for the holidays. In addition, each hotel will continue with its in -house revue plus musical groups in the lounges. The Claridge Hotel, the newest of

MAURIE ORODENKER

the casino hotels to open, marked the start of headline entertainment on weekends with Aretha Franklin and Gene Baylos (Sept. 18 -20), followed by the Mills Brothers and Patti Page (Sept. 27 -29); and Red Buttons with Linda Hopkins (Oct. 24). The house revue, "Les Folies Burlesque," opened Aug. 18 and is secheduled to continue weekday nights through the winter season. Jack Carter, who headlines the show, will be succeeded in November by Morey Amsterdam. Connie Jungers, the new entertainment manager at Caesars Boardwalk Regency, will bring in names for the weekends. For October, Caesars has Jerry

Hall & Oates In Switch Continued from page 32 music magazine did not win any prize for race relations. "Our humor backfired around that time," reminisces Hall. "We were immature enough not to take ourselves seriously. We didn't realize people would take us seriously. The silver album was pretty much tongue in cheek. I didn't realize how surfacey (sic) some people are. I think people got a misunderstanding of where we were coming from. "When we first saw the inner sleeve, we thought `what is this?' Then, we said, `yeah, sure. Let's go for it.' A lot of people didn't get the joke." As for the remarks, Hall claims he was misquoted. "What I'm trying to say was that there was this big thing about blue-eyed soul at the time," he recalls, talking of an era when Boz Scaggs, Average White Band and the lesser known Sons of Champlin and Kokomo were garnering press for "blue -eyed soul." "I was saying that I felt blue-eyed soul to be a negative term. It implied Al Jolson 'let's copy the blacks' type of music. That's not where we are coming from. We are white people and no race has a lock on soul. Soul music is something that transcends all that kind of stuff. We as white people have soul and our lyrics have white sensibilities because we are white people. That's what I was trying to say." Ironically, one of its biggest hits of its recent comeback is a remake of the Righteous Bros. "You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling," considered to be one of the best "blue-eyed soul" ittiTOP

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songs of all time. "I thought it was a good song," says Hall. "I was never a big fan of the Righteous Bros. But I always liked that song. I thought it had potential outside the Phil Spector production. People always associated the song with the sound and people forgot what a good song it is on its own." While Hall and Oates plan to expand on the current sound for duo efforts, solo albums may go in any direction. Hall has already released one Robert Fripp -produced, noncommercial album called "Sacred Songs." It wasn't a big commercial success though it did hit the top 50. "It was received exactly the way I wanted," claims Hall. "The people I wrote it for seemed to get it and it wasn't Meant to sell a lot of records. That was probably why it wasn't released in the beginning." Because RCA held up the project, rumors surfaced that the duo was unhappy with the label and may move to another. "We've got a great

relationship but nothing's forever," says Hall of his dealings with RCA. "I've got an eight solo album deal with RCA so I ain't going nowhere. As a group, we have two more albums with them until the contract runs out." In the period from late 1977 to 1980, when the duo was going through a slack commercial period, some thought the end was near as Hall and Oates made appearances at clubs and high schools. "It was the best thing we ever did in our lives," Hall says. "We were trying to figure out different kinds of ways to alter our touring monotony. We were taking anything that seemed interesting." "We were able to rearrange our performing style," throws in Oates. "The style you see now onstage came from that experience we got in the high schools and clubs." "We have a very clublike presentation. It's looser. It's more of a natural feeling. It's not the pretentious big concert feel," adds Hall. The duo is doing some dates with ELO on its current tour. "We're going places with them we couldn't normally go," states Oates. "The heart of the Midwest has never been a strong point for us and ELO is going to all of those places." Though the twosome has been together for a decade now, they insist that retirement, or at least cutting back on hectic touring and recording schedules, is far in the future. "In a strange way, this is only our second album," laughs Oates. "We haven't stopped growing yet."

Vale with comic Lou Cary (2 -4); Billy Daniels for five nights (9 -13); Paul Williams in concert for five nights (16 -20); return of Milton Berle (23 -25); and Alan King with singer Cynthia White (30 -Nov. 1).

November bookings include Jack Carter (6 -8); Frank Gorshin with singer Kelly Garrett (13 -15); Florence Henderson with comic Stewie Stone (20-22), and David Brenner with singer Julie Budd (26 -29) for the Thanksgiving holiday. Set for the New Year's weekend is Shecky Greene (Dec. 30 -Jan. 5). Other bookings for the new year include Marilyn Michaels (Jan. 6 -10) and Róbert Goulet (Feb. 12 -15). Atlantic City's longest running inhouse revue; "Outrageous!," has been extended through Feb. 1, 1982 at Bally's Park Place Casino Hotel. With the smallest of the casino showrooms, seating less than 300, Bally's experimented when it first opened with jazz- oriented name acts during the off-season. But the experiment with performers like Mel Torme, Buddy Greco and Bobby Short was less than successful. The Sands, which played names like Tony Bennett, Steve Lawrence & Eydie Gorme, Charo, Bobby Vinton, Joel Grey and Juliet Prowse in its 850-seat Sands Theatre last summer, is expected to bring in weekend headliners for the fall and winter with a musical revue for weekday evenings. The house show will be an off-Broadway musical, "Broadway Jukebox," playing Sunday through Wednesday evenings. Resorts International Casino Hotel, where vice -president H. Steven Norton handles the entertainment, continues to have the biggest talent budget. Its 1,750 -seat Superstar Theatre played the biggest names this summer -Dolly Parton, Barry Manilow, Frank Sinatra, Diana Ross, Donna Summer and others. For the fall and winter, it will be weekend names. Anthony Newley came in Oct. 2 -4; Melba Moore and Foster Brooks for Oct. 9 -11; Buddy Hackett returning with Jame§ Darren, Oct. 16 -18; Peter Allen for Oct. 23 -25; and Lou Rawls with Byron Allen, Oct. 30 -Nov. 1. The Superstar Theatre is also used for special concerts with famous ballet companies and symphony orchestras. A special matinee Oct. 25 will feature the Washington Ballet. Norton is ready to bring in any type of attraction that will bring in people. For four weeks starting Nov. 3, "Beatlemania in Concert" is coming in on a "four- wall" deal. Calls for the producer of the rock revue to pocket all money taken in by the sale of tickets while Resorts International gets the money spent on drinks. Norton also plans to book rock concerts and other special events, but not until the hotel builds its proposed 1,500 -room addition and convention center facility. Upcoming this winter is the anticipated opening of the $300 million Tropicana, where its main showroom to be called the Tiffany is being designed to seat 1,800 persons. Leon Berezow, entertainment director, plans to present a lavish production show dubbed "Monte Carlo Carnivale Spectacular." Simmy Monet has been engaged to choreograph and costume the show. There is also a possibility that Berezow will sign top names a minimum of four times during the year for certain holiday periods. www.americanradiohistory.com

Billboard photo by Chuck Pulin

TIED UP-Stiff Records' John Otway gets tangled up in his microphone cords during a recent performance with Wild Willy Barrett at Max's Kansas City in New York.

Talent Talk

"Circle of Love," the first Steve Miller LP containing new material since "Book Of Dreams" came out in May, 1977, is being released by Capitol Friday (23). First single is "Heart Like A Wheel," a different song than Linda Ronstadt did. ... The Rolling Stones will play in the New York area Nov. 5, 6 and 7 at the Byrne Arena in the Meadowlands, and at Madison Square Garden Nov. 12 and 13. Tickets are via a mail lottery.

The Stargate Theatre in Wood cliffe Lake, N.J., opened Wednesday (14) with a concert by Southside Johnny. The 2,000- capacity theatre has removable seating in the orchestra allowing for dance concerts, and 650 reserved seats in the balcony. It is owned by Richard Rossi and booked by Tim Drake.

Former Santana keyboard player Tom Coster has a new solo LP, "T.C." on Fantasy Records. ... Former Monkee Peter Tort, early Beatle drummer Pete Best, and onetime teen idol Bobby Sherman, are among those who will be featured on "Whatever Became Of ...," a Dick Clark Productions special on ABC TV Sunday (25). ... Capitol group Pages is backing Al Jarreau on his two concerts at Radio City Music

and Rod Stewart & the Faces with Keith Richards. For the first time in the history of L.A.'s Greek Theatre, the facility is offering five, free -to- the -public, Sunday afternoon Pop concerts featuring college orchestras. The series kicked off Oct. 11 and concludes Nov. 8.

Paul Stookey of Peter Paul & Mary is taking part in the group's reunion at New York's Savoy (14 -17) despite a broken leg. Stookey wanted a biodegradable rather than a metal pin in his leg, but the doctors turned him down, the press release reads. ... Siouxie & the Banshees back for a U.S. tour, starting on the West Coast and moving east. Coming country jazz, country and rock acts now being featured at the Colbeh Club 56, a Middle Eastern restaurant in New York every Tuesday night.... Triumph refused to get involved with an anti -drug program in Toronto believing the organization sponsoring it was entirely composed of Scientologists. "I don't want to run into some kid in a few years who says, `I used to be messed up on drugs. Now I'm all messed up on Scientology,'' says Triumph's Rik Emmet.

ROMAN KOZAK

Hall (20 & 21).

After returning from Japan, the Ventures are going back on the road in the U.S. . A &M's Brothers Johnson helping Nigeria celebrate its 25th year of independence with two shows, one for VIPs, and visiting dignitaries, the other for the general public at the National Stadium in Lagos.

John Denver duets with acclaimed . tenor Placido Domingo on Domingo's first pop LP of love songs. "Perhaps Love." In addition to singing together on the title track, Denver accompanies Domingo on guitar for a new rendition of Denver's "Annie's Song." The LP will be released on CBS Masterworks. ... Among the concerts lined up for All Video's "Night Flight," the music -oriented cable tv program are: "Devovision;" "Take Off" with Al Stewart, Split Enz, Tom Robinson and Gary Numan; Alice Cooper, "Welcome To My Nightmare :" "Take Off:" featuring B.B. King, John Lee Hooker

and George Thorogood; "Journey Through The Past" starring Neil Young; "Take Off," featuring Toni Basil, Talking Heads and Todd Rundgren; Fleetwood Mac and their "Tusk" tour; "Reggae Sunsplash." featuring Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, Third World and Burning Spear;

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34

ToIenI

Survey For Week Ending

TaIenI In Action DARYL HALL & JOHN OATES PAGES

with

a

blur, lead singer Annabelle Lwin managed to compensate with her uncompromising energy.

bizarre tape recording of an EST -like rap:

"I'm o.k., you're o.k." Accompanying themselves throughout on acoustic guitar and, sometimes,

The sound quality was so poor though that no

cappella), Maggie,

one in the packed house seemed to care that

Terre and Suzzy proceeded effortlessly. from

Bow Wow Wow performed for only 50 minutes,

including two encores. It was a relief just to get out of such claustrophobic quarters and wonder what Bow Wow Wow can possibly do as a followup to its splashy but one -dimensional debut. With McLaren at the helm, the answer may not

on an entertaining performance that showcases

there through 17 wonderfully original songs. Humor is as important to the Roches' music as their unique sibling harmony. As Suzzy introduced "This Feminine Position," she took off a light coat revealing herself to be pregnant. Terre's slight posturing and delicate mockery-

much of their hit material. They give the people

in lines such as

Greek Theatre, Los Angeles Admission: $12.95, $10.95, $7.50 The reason for Daryl Hall and John Oates'

ample popularity was demonstrated Oct. 6, the

first of

a

two -night engagement. The duo,

backed by a solid as nails four -piece band, puts

what they want but they could be giving

a

lot

more. Just when the set was beginning to take off,

Hall and Oates bid farewell after an hour to be

called back for two brief encores. Still, the 14song set shone like a brightly polished apple because when Hall and Oates are good -as they were here -they are very good. Hall's fluid vocals can make even rather ordinary numbers like

"Kiss On My List" seem like something special. Their best material, such as "Wait For Me," "She's Gone" and "Private Eyes" really sizzle live. The low -key Oates was upstaged by guitarist G.E. Smith whose comic book mugging and casual way with the guitar spiced the show with humor. Of course, a Hall and Oates show would be nothing without saxophonist Charlie Dechant. His Clarence Clemmons-like way with his instrument may be a bit derivative and old hat by now but it is fun. Hall and Oates play a slick brand of r &b /pop but they exemplify the good points of the genre. Opening Capitol act Pages, while working in a similar vein, is a good example of why new wave was born. Technically competent, the duo of singer Richard Page and keyboards player Steve George who are backed by a superb quintet, give new meaning to the term faceless. Still, judging

piano (and sometimes

a

his sophisticated and catchy pop tunes.

sets by these two veteran bands. While neither

act is the kind that overpowers with its passion, nor do they do anything not tried before, they

entertain in

a

mellow, subtle way.

and comprised about 14 tunes -all instrumen-

a

member Kenny

Moore, whose talents on keyboards are sura

To see the Roches in concert is an enormously rewarding experience: certainly foremost because of their extraordinary songs and intricate three -part harmonies, but also because

they do not often perform in public. Appearing for a total of four shows on two successive nights, they opened the first show of their Sept. 26 performance to an SRO crowd

fort. All four nights were SRO. Another year or two of steady work and the McConnell troupe may attain the Count Basie -Woody Herman arDAVE DEXTER JR. tistic level.

most enjoyable solo number in this show. Turner opened with a hard- rocking "I'm Go-

predator in a skimpy red outfit. The Vegas -style entertainment continued with the entrance of her two dancers. Besides such perennial Turner tunes as "Acid Queen" and "Proud Mary," this show featured a gospel -laced cover of "Help" that laid to rest any doubts about Turner's vocal abilities and presented a whole new way of looking at a Beatles classic. "Proud Mary" also sounded hotter than ever -a fact that Turner made clear to her au-

TOM VERLAINE Left Bank, Mt. Vernon, N.Y. Admission: $7 New wave pioneer Tom Verlaine took

ence of Television. The current backup boasts long time Verlaine associates Fred Smith on bass, Jay Dee Daugherty on drums and Richie Klieger on rhythm guitar. The topnotch trio admirably supported Verlaine, who showed himself to be truly one of the great guitar heroes. Verlaine seemed to invest a new, almost spir-

itual commitment to his always thoughtful guitar playing. Because Verlaine is a fine poet as well, it was unfortunate that his trademarked frail vocals didn't often survive the bass heavy

Roxy, Los Angeles Admission: $8.50 Malcolm McLaren, the British manager /impresario behind the Sex Pistols and the original Adam & the Ants, has a knack for the flam-

singer, and two female dancers who look as if they escaped from some long lost go -go cage in a

1960s nightspot. To top it off, this troupe's

first British "record" was issued

on a cassette

and lyrically endorsed home taping.

Playing three nights at the trend -conscious Roxy, Bow Wow Wow -signed to RCA here -ac-

tually lived up to much of its hype. Unlike Adam & the Ants, Bow Wow Wow managed to have fun

with the unlikely mix of tribal drumming and heavy metal guitar rifling. While the sound became numbing after awhile, with song after song in the 14 -tune set running into each other in a

hike

Although a reluctant performer, an amiable Verlaine clearly enjoyed being back in the limelight. His eager stage demeanor proved a pleasant contrast to the former demonic pres-

BOW WOW WOW

boyant. His latest sensation, Bow Wow Wow, consists of three British musicians playing "African" music, a Burmese 14- year-old female lead

a

to the suburbs Oct. 2 for his first show since the demise of Television more than two years ago.

dience in the middle of the song. "I've been singing this song for a long time," she said,

LAURA FO11

Bottom Line, New York Admission: $8.50

But perhaps that's carping. McConnell and men had the patrons applauding their every ef-

passed only by his ability to carry Turner's vo-

first groups to merge country and

FRANKLIN MICARE

with all 21 musicians wearing different garb, the Boss Brass is anything but visually attractive.

est.

rock, Poco may never have reached superstar

THE ROCHES

the 1940s. Nor are McConnell's trumpet and saxophone soloists particularly exciting. And

even when surrounded by the best and bright-

"and the more I sing it the better it gets." We'll vouch for that. One note: Turner is without a record label, a situation that should be rectified without delay.

CARY DARLING

For all its 12 brass (when the leader is blowing) the band didn't reach the awesome "wall of sound" effect first achieved by Stan Kenton in

mendously. Turner herself was not to be outdone, however, as she proved she can shine

a

to be entertaining.

Blue Mitchell's "Blue Silver."

Two breathtaking models joined Turner on

stage for the majority of her act. Not only did they look good, but they sang and danced tre-

a

ing "Heart Of The Night," Poco proved an act doesn't have to be breaking new musical ground

tar, were others whose solos bagged applause in a program that included Paul Desmond's "Wendy," Charlie Parker's "Confirmation" and

off.

Of special note was band

Sam

Guido Basso, trumpets; Ian McDougall, slide trombone, and Ed Bickert, gui-

Moto and

ity of the musicians with whom she surrounds herself added an excitement that a less secure performer would never have been able to pull

red satin noose and stalked the stage like

status despite the occassional hit single yet still has an engaging quality. The 45- minute, 10song set featuring the notable guitar playing of Rusty Young, is commendable for its spirit. While the quintet may be walking on worn ground, it nevertheless plays its material well. From the opening "Under The Gun" to the clos-

Moe Koffman and Jerry Toth, reeds;

She has always

show, but the high qual-

ing To Kill His Wife," during which she swung

One of the

A Latinized "Street Of Dreams" emphasized the deft playing of Marty Morell and Terry Clarke, percussionists. Clarke just may be the band's most consistently excellent musician. Throughout the evening, he drove the Boss Brass madly, skillfully and with taste.

Admission: $11

a

a

couple of minutes too long.

Tina Turner is better than ever, as illustrated

Equipped with perfect sound and tasteful lighting, the seven -piece band's 90- minute, 16song set Sept. 23 covered the entire repertoire

become even more apparent.

his long solos, but, for an opener, the chart ran

The Ritz, New York

job of playing its many hits.

The group's one flaw -that keeps it from becoming a better respected force in the soft rock genre is its lyrics. If it weren't for the exquisite harmonies, the banalities of their songs would

Whiteman long before McConnell was born. Big Mac demonstrated superior 'bone technique in

TINA TURNER

cals through some rough spots. Moore also did

cianship with a rock edge that should be put to use in the studio. Lead singer Glenn Shorrock even got into the spirit of things by the end by dancing near the edge of the stage.

The leader led off with a 50- year -old title, "Louisiana," originally popularized by Paul

lightweight. But he

for an apt description for not being pretentious, they might as well just say "Little River Band." While new guitarist Steven Housden, clad in black, affects some of the standard rock star grimaces, the rest of the group gets on with its

Onstage, LRB rounds out its perfect three and four part harmonies and exemplary musi-

tals -and each reaped ebullient reaction.

writes the kinds of songs that top 40 radio lionizes and that millions of pop music lovers crave. Micare is a consummate performer and, with his wealth of material, he will no doubt wind up in the top 10- sooner or later. THOMAS GABRIEL

If the writers of dictionaries are ever looking

from the early "It's A Long Way There" to the new The Night Owls."

all. The Sept. 24 performance ran 70 minutes

.

-

the record industry) as

were lines

McConnell is an amiable, articulate Canadian who plays brilliant valve trombone. His Toronto based ensemble is big and powerful, 21 men in

With one album to his credit on a now defunct label, Micare has been passed over (by

known how to put on

Precision is the word that best sums up the

of patrons outdoors patiently awaiting admittance to this 100 -seat neighborhood nitery all four nights of the Boss Brass' engagement. Those who made it inside were fortunate.

singer -songwriter who has been a popular club performer in New York for years, opened the show with a 30- minute set of

by her Sept. 30 performance.

Greek Theatre, Los Angeles Tickets: $12.75. $10.75, $7.50

Admission: $10 There

a

made for radio rock.

LITTLE RIVER BAND POCO

Carmelo's, Sherman Oaks, Calif.

(or Jerks On The Loose)" and "Hammond." Franklin Micare,

CARY DARLING

ROB McCONNELL AND THE BOSS BRASS

last three songs: "Keep On Doing What You Do

from the positive response to the 35- minute, 7song set, there is a market for this type of tailorCARY DARLING

be too long in coming.

"Lord Of Lords" and "Kings Of Kings " -rendered an otherwise straight version of the "Hallelujah Chorus" hilarious. Whatever their themes -social inadequacy and klutziness, a saga of star treatment in the laundromat, or splendidly goofy, yet despairing self- examination -the Roches write songs as remarkable and endearing as they themselves are. Robert Fripp, who produced their first Warner Bros. album, joined them on stage and provided some acoustic guitar "Frippisms" on two of their

mix.

_

The sweat- shirted band led off the full 90minute set with a superior (to David Bowie's cover) version of "Kingdom Come." Host of the other set pieces were similarly from his just -released Warners debut, "Dreamtime," blended in seamlessly. "Always" was surprisingly even stronger live than on vinyl. Something was missing, however, and that something was found when Fred Smith plucked out the intro line to Television's tour de force

"Marquee Moon." The whole place was on a flying carpet as the group seemed to defy gravity all through the brilliant extended guitar duel between Verlaine and Klieger. The energy never let up through three rapturous encores, including a craftsman like "Wild Thing."

PETER KRASILOVSKY

www.americanradiohistory.com

10/24/81

Boxscore ROLLING STONES, GEORGE THOROGOOD & THE DESTROYERS, J. GEILS BAND -$1,050,000, 70,000, $15, Avalon Attractions, San Diego (Calif.) Stadium, sellout, Oct. 7. JACKSONS, STACY LATTISAW- $633,029, 55,000, $13.50, $11.50, & $9.50, Dick Griffey Prods. /Clyde Wasson, the Forum, Los Angeles, four sellouts, Sept. 18-19, 25 -26. OAK RIDGE BOYS, CHARLIE DANIELS BAND, ALABAMA, SYLVIA, DELBERT McCLINTON -$272,128, 30,000, $12.75, & $10.75, Family Affairs Concerts, Brewton (Ala.) Airport grounds, "Harvest Jam '81," sellout, Oct. 10. KINKS, RED RIDER -$219,281, 24,013 (28,000 capacity), $9.50 & $8, Electric Factory Concerts, the Spectrum, Philadelphia, two shows, one sellout, Oct. 4 & 6. RICK JAMES, TEENA MARIE, LUTHER VAN DROSS -$187,447, 15,928, $12.50 & $10.50, Alan Haymon Prods./ Tiger Flower & Co., the Spectrum. Philadelphia, sellout, Oct. 10. COMMODORES, CARL CARLTON, MAZE -$183,000, 19,012, $11.75 & $10.75, Imperial Prods., Reunion Arena, Dallas, sellout, Oct. 10. JOURNEY, GREG KIHN BAND -$179,726, 17,652, $11.25 & $9.25, Jam Prods. /Stellar Ent., Rupp Arena, Lexington, Ky., sellout, Oct. 3. JOURNEY, LOVERBOY- $171,975, 16,198, $11.50 & $9.50, Cross Country Concerts, Hartford (Conn.) Civic Center, sellout, Oct. 8. COMMODORES, CARL CARLTON, MAZE-$168,286, 12,639 (17,048), $15.65, $12.65, & $10.65, Pace Concerts /Imperial Prods., the Summit, Houston, Oct. 8. COMMODORES, OTHER ACTS -$159,631, 16,744, $10.50 & $9.50, Imperial Prods. /in -house promotion, Univ. of Texas Frank C. Erwin Jr. Special Events Center, Austin, sellout, Oct. 7. KENNY ROGERS, DOTTIE WEST-$149,592, 10,092, $15 & $12.50, C.K. Spurlock, Jacksonville (Fla.) Veterans Memorial Coliseum, sellout, Oct. 6. VAN HALEN, GFORCE- $123,576, 13,223, $9.50. Pace Concerts / Stardate Prods., San Antonio Arena, sellout, Oct. 7. RICK JAMES, TEENA MARIE, THE REDDINGS -$113,150, 11,512, $10 & $9, Sun Song Prods./ Al Haymon Prods., Richmond (Va.) Coliseum, sellout, Oct. 9.

FOREIGNER, BILLY SQUIER- $110,646, 11,647, $9.50, MidSouth Con certs /in -house promotion, Mid -South Coliseum, Memphis, sellout, Oct. 1. PAT BENATAR, DAVID JOHANSEN- $104,580, 11,880 (19,012), $9 & $8, Pace Concerts, Reunion Arena, Dallas, Oct. 6. PAT BENATAR, DAVID JOHANSEN-$100,982, 11,768, $9.50 & $8.50. Contemporary Prods./ New West Presentations, Omaha Civic Auditorium, sellout, Oct. 9. ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCHESTRA, ELLEN FOLEY- $98,891, 11,100 (15,000), $10 & $9, Contemporary Prods. /Celebration Prods. /Sunshine Promotions, Richfield Coliseum, Cleveland, Oct. 11. FOREIGNER, OTHER ACTS -$94,960, 9,496 (14,000), $10, Beaver Prods., the Centroplex, Baton Rouge, La., Oct. 6. FOREIGNER, BILLY SQUIER -$80,814, 10,098, $9 & $8, Mid -South Concerts /Ark. State Fair, Barton Coliseum, Little Rock, sellout, Oct. 2. RICK JAMES, TEENA MARIE, THE REDDINGS -$76,990, 7,749, $10 & $9, Sun Song Prods. /AI Haymon Prods., Savannah (Ga.) Civic Center, Oct. 8. IAN HUNTER, SHOOTING STAR -$76,779, 7,320 (10,000), $10.50 & $9.50, Brass Ring Prods., Cobo Arena, Detroit, Oct. 10. TRIUMPH, POINT BLANK -$73,993, 9,128, $9 & $8, Sunshine Promotions, Market Square Arena, Indianapolis, sellout, Oct. 10. ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCHESTRA, ELLEN FOLEY -$73,287, 7,244 (16,267), $10.50 & $8.50, Cross Country Concerts, Hartford (Conn.) Civic Center, Oct. -

7.

FOREIGNER, BILLY SQUIER -$69,692, 7,336 (10,000), $9.50, Mid -South Concerts, State Fair Coliseum. Jackson, Miss., Sept. 29. COMMODORES, JOHN WITHERSPOON- $65,535, 7,472, $11, $10, & $8, in -house promotion /MSC Town Hall, Grollie White Coliseum, Texas A &M Univ., College Station, sellout, Oct. 9. TRIUMPH, POINT BLANK-$64,571, 7,813, $9 & $8, Sunshine Promotions, Freedom Hall, Louisville, Ky., sellout, Oct. 2. FOGHAT, BLUE OYSTER CULT, WHITFORD ST. HOLMES BAND -$59,508, 7,001 (7,500), $9, Fantasma Prods., Hollywood (Fla.) Sportatorium, Oct. 9. FOGHAT, BLUE OYSTER CULT, WHITFORD ST. HOLMES BAND -$56,125, 6,603 (9,000), $8.50, Fantasma Prods., Lee Country Arena, Ft. Myers, Fla., Oct. 11. LITTLE RIVER BAND, POCO- $41,997, 5,720 (9,500), $9.65, Pace Concerts, the Summit, Houston, Oct. 7. MICKEY GILLEY, JOHNNY LEE, URBAN COWBOY BAND -$40,853, 4,611 (6,290), $9.50 & $8.50, C.K. Spurlock, Greenville (S.C.) Memorial Auditorium, Oct. 8. TRIUMPH, POINT BLANK-$40,541, 4,945 (6,000), $9 & $8, Sunshine Promotions /Jam Prods., Hara Arena, Dayton, Ohio, Oct. 8. TRIUMPH, POINT BLANK-$35,295, 4,358 (5,200), $8.75 & $7.75, Fantasy Concerts, Erie County Fieldhouse, Erie, Pa., Oct. 6. FOGHAT, BLUE OYSTER CULT, WHITFORD ST. HOLMES BAND -$35,253, 3,917 (5,000), $9, Fantasma Prods., St. Lucie County Civic Center, Ft. Pierce, Fla., Oct. 8. GORDON LIGHTFOOT- $33,245, 3,125 (4,177), $11, $10, & $9, Brass Ring Prods., Hill Auditorium, Ann Arbor, Mich., Oct. 10. ALICE COOPER- $33,201, 3,162 (3,347), $11 & $10, Monarch Entertainment Bureau, Capitol Theatre, Passaic, N.J., Oct. 10. TUBES-$31,708, 3,500, $9.50 & $8.50, Blue Suede Shows, Welsh Auditorium, Grand Rapids, Mich., sellout, Oct. 10. KINKS -$31,586, 3,716 (5,000), $8.50, Fantasma Prods., Leon County Civic Center, Tallahassee, Fla., Oct. 11. BOBBY HUTCHERSON, STAN GETZ, DEXTER GORDON, STEVE ALLEN, RICHIE COLE, McCOY TYNER, FLORA PURIM -$31,490, 2,110, $15, the Winery, Saratoga, Calif., "Paul Masson Harvest Jazz Fest," two sellouts, Oct. 3 -4. TUBES-$25,687, 2,371 (4,177), $11, $10, & $9, Brass Ring Prods., Hill Auditorium, Ann Arbor, Mich., Oct. 6. KIM CARNES, GARY U.S. BONDS- $25,523, 2,758 (3,000), $9.50, $9, & $8.50, Double Tee Promotions /Albatross Prods., Civic Auditorium, Portland, Ore., Oct. 9. FRANK ZAPPA- $22,712, 2,248 (7,500), $11 & $9.50, Bill Graham Presents, Reno (Nev.) Centennial, Oct. 6. Copyrighted and compiled by Amusement Business. a Billboard Publications. Inc. publication. Boxscores are compiled every Tuesday. If you wish to file your concert report, please call Patricia Bates in Nashville at 615/748 -8120 or Tina Veiders in New York City at 212/764 -7314.

r

General News

Survey For Week Ending 10/24/81 Sim

Post Turns TV Themes Into Hits

Commercial Product Stems From Diverse Background By ROSE CLAYTON

MEMPHIS -Some people say that Mike Post has the sound he does in television because he is a record producer. "Well. that's true," he responds, "but also have the sound in records that I do because I've been 1

in tv."

Post currently has two tv themes on Billboard's Hot 100, from "Hill Street Blues" and "Greatest American Hero," latter (performed by Joey Scarbury) descending from its number two peak. Both are on Elektra, as is Scarbury's followup. "When She Dances," also produced by Post and currently scaling the charts. The award -winning composer, vacationing here recently from Los Angeles, explains how working for both tv and records has helped produce what he refers to as "somewhat commercial" repertoire. "In writing for television, you must reflect the picture," says Post. "You must follow it. not lead it. And. you must do it much faster. They don't want it good, they want it by nine o'clock. The challenge is: Can I be good and fast and efficient? "It's not as exciting. It's like live music. It goes by you -like, 'Gee. is that out of tune? I don't know. Next. Next'." According to Post. in tv writing. one also begins with a blank piece of paper. "Although you are following the picture, you can do it in a thousand different ways." he comments. One of the major advantages Post sees in tv writing is that "you have an orchestra once a week as a toy. With three shows ( "Greatest American Hero," "White Shadow" and "Magnum P.1. ") you have three orchestras a week -three toys. "You can try all kinds of things and you can afford to be not quite as precise because records are played over and over and over. With tv you have more flexibility. You can take some chances and learn some things. "There's something about an orchestra -the power in 50 or 60 guys all at once playing rock'n'roll licks when they're put in the orchestra correctly -licks like (Steve) Cropper and Duck Dunn or Larry Carlton or Lee Sklar would play. When you hear those kinds of flavors in an orchestra. to me it's extremely impressive." At 37. Post may be the youngest composer in tv. Because of his age, his musical influences have been different from those of the traditionalists. As a result, Post introduced rock'n'roll elements. such as volume pedal guitar, into small screen scoring. giving his music his own personal signature. Post made his debut in tv as a conductor for the "Andy Williams Show." It was this position which led to his relationship with Pete Carpenter and his entry into tv scoring. "He knew technically how to put music to film, says Post, "but he didn't know much about rock'n'roll. I didn't know a whole lot about some of the things he knew about: so, we got together. we wrote, and we have a string of successes I feel very proud

-

about."

Post says that when Stephen Can -

nell. the show's producer. approached him with the idea of the format. he said immediately: "Let's get one guy. I've got the perfect

singer." Joey Scarbury. the voice of the greatest American hero, has been working with Post for II years. Although they have released 10 singles together. the theme song is their first chart record. It has also been certified gold. as has the Post -produced "9 to 5 And Odd Jobs" album on Dolly Parton.

Doll \'s brother. Ranch. is another of Post's acts. Post will soon be producing projects on Tom Wopat of the Dukes of Hazzard: Halez, a "very theatrical rock'n'roll band:" and country singer Jacky Ward. In addition. Post is designing Ward's new road show. He also designs and produces stage shows for Las Vegas acts like Dolly and Ronnie Milsap. Production of live shows are particularly satisfying. Post says, because of the "instant feedback" they

provide.

-

c Copyright 981, Billboard Publications, Inc. No .art of this ublication ma be reroduced. stored in'a re rieval system. or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording. or otherwise. without the prior written permission of the publisher.

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Kraftwerk. Warner Bros HS 3549

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NEVER TOO MUCH Luther Vandross, Epic

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Cotillion

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Peces Of A Dream,

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For You

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THREE FOR LOVE (RCA)

IN THE NIGHT Cheryl Lynn. Columbia FC 37034

SLINGSHOT

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KNIGHTS OF THE SOUND TABLE Cameo. Chocolate City

Michael Henderson, Buddah BDS

CCLP 2019 (Polygram)

6002 (Arista)

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Evelyn King, RCA

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I'M IN LOVE

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Rockie Robbins. ABM SP 4869

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STEPHANIE Mills. 20th Century

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EBONEE WEBB

SOLID GROUND Liberty

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65

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Ronnie Laws,

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Ebonee Webb, Capitol ST -12148

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(Warner Bros.)

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NEW AFFAIR

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ALL THE GREATEST HITS

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SUPERIOR MOVEMENT Superior Movement is a five -piece group Irom Chicago's West Side, whose members met and formed the group at Farragut High School. The lineup comprises Billy Avery. Calvin Ford. Tyrone Powell, Stanley Ratliff and David Williams. Powell doubles as the act's choreographer. "For You," penned by the late Van McCoy. is the quintet's first recording, and also the first chart entry for Chvcago International Music (CIM), which is marketed, manufactured and distributed through the Epic /Portrait /Associated Labels arm of CBS. CIM was formed earlier this year by Maurice White. who has been active in independent promotion. management and publishing in the Windy City (Billboard. Aug. ). He's the son of Granville White. associate national director for special markets at CBS Records. Superior Movement originally sent White a tape of their work. but he displayed little interest until viewing their stageshow at Chicago's Copper Box club. Impressed by that -White says the group reminds him of the early Temp tations-he signed them to CIM. producing their debut disk himself. The aggregation is currently working on an album for November release. and will tour nationally early in 1982. They have already appeared in clubs and hotels in and around Chicago. and in Washington. D.C. and New York. Superior Movement is managed by Christian Smith, P.O. Box 14524, Chi-

49

Shalamar, Solar B21.3577

IN THE POCKET Commodores, Motown ME 955M)

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WINNERS The Brothers Johnson.

Gordy G8.1004M1 (Motown)

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16049 (Atlantic)

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PIECES OF A DREAM Elektra 6E350

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Teena Marie,

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WITH YOU Stacy Lattisaw,

IT MUST BE MAGIC

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STANDING TALL Crusaders. MCA MCA 5254

20th Century T-628 (RCA)

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THE SPIRITS IN IT P.I

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CARL CARLTON Carl Carlton,

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Patti Labelle.

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Teddy Pendergrass.

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THE MAN WITH THE HORN

LOVE ALL THE HURT AWAY ketha Franklin, Arista Al 955?

7

HANCOCK MAGIC -Herbie Hancock, left, gets sincere congratulations from KACE -FM program director Cal Shields, right, and Jim Blakely, station sales manager, during a listening party celebrating Hancock's new Columbia LP,

MAGIC WINDOWS

Gordy G8.1002M1 (Motown)

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CAN'T WE FALL IN LOVE AGAIN

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Gil Scott Heron,

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Salsoul SA-8542 (RCA)

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REFLECTIONS

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CAMERON'S IN LOVE Rafael Cameron,

Phyllis Hyman, Arista AL 9544

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Larry Graham,

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Deniece Williams,

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"Greatest American Hero." The theme from "Greatest American Hero" is different from the other series they have produced because it requires a new song (a new lyric and vocal) in the middle of each show

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Superstars are awarded to those prodRecording Industry Assn. Of ucts showing greatest upward movement on the current week's chart Prime Movers). Recording Industry Assn. Of America seal for sales America seal for saksof 500,000 units. (Seal indicated by dot) indicated by triangle.) of 1,000,000 units. (Seal sales strength.

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Gospel

Jazz

Pop Move Positive Says Engineer Burch By ROSE.

NASHVILLE -For years. engineer Jimmy Burch has been working on gospel recording projects and watching the steady growth of the music's popularity. From his viewpoint, that growth has been due to an improvement in the quality of the material recorded and its production. This, he says, has enabled it to gain greater exposure. "There has been an extensive move to pop -oriented material more message songs -that can crossover to the client who doesn't necesI

I

-

sarily believe in the religious concepts, but can get something positive out of the music," says Burch, " You Light Up My Life' is a perfect ex-

ample." Burch's track record as an independent engineer includes an album on Debby Boone, as well as projects on Amy Grant, Little Anthony and B.J. Thomas. He mixed the live "B.J. Thomas In Concert" album. From an engineering standpoint there is no difference in working with gospel -music and secular-music tracks, says Burch.

"The only difference (in the style) the message of the song. The musicians you hire depend on the sound you are trying to achieve. It all depends on the right song for the right artist and the right musicians for the track you want." Although Burch has worked with various producers, he says he has never felt that his abilities were being suppressed, as many other engineers claim. "I look at engineering and producing as two different things," says Burch. "I draw the line unless think the situation presents itself where I should cross the line. "Ninety -nine percent of the time, it's a compatible situation." Burch says he has not had any difficulties in marketing his services as an engineer in the gospel field. "I have been a musician since I was years old. and I've had bands of my own," he says. "I played with a lot of entertainers and these contacts have been helpful. Most of the time people come to me," he continues, "because I have been fortunate to have been affiliated with good studios that lent themselves to bringing in talented clientele." is

I

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Burch. a native of Georgia. worked at International Recording Studio in Augusta. where he engineered several hits on soul singer ,lames Brown. and where a large number of black gospel products were recorded. Later, he worked at Huddleston Recording Studio in Dallas. Two years ago, he moved here and became associated with Gold Mine Recording Studio. "At one time we were doing just about everything for Word Records." Burch comments. "And, since Chris Christian, head of a &r for MCA /Songbird owned the studio. we were doing a lot of things for them." Burch is now serving as chief engineer at Center Row Audio /Video Recording Studio while continuing to maintain his status as an independent. He says he feels the position will be good for his career because the studio itself will play a large role in the quality he achieves in his work. Since gospel records have a more limited budget than secular records, Burch says there is less monies for errors (re- mixing, re- mastering, and

CLAYTON re- pressing). Therefore, an engineer working with gospel recordings is under pressure to be efficient. "For years you dream about being able to mix a song in a recording studio and going into a mastering room and being able to master totally flat," says Burch. "The construction of Center Row is such that this can be done because it is fully trapped for low -end response and geometrically designed for sound dispersion. That's why I undertook the project and why I plan to stay here. You spend so many hours mixing something. you hate to lose it in mastering." Burch helped co- ordinate the construction of Center Row with singer/ songwriter Mark James. its owner. Tom Hidley designed the studio. Although Center Row's first project after opening five months ago was on Brown Bannister for the Benson Co., Burch says the studio will not be used exclusively for recording gospel acts.

James,

a

pop writer whose

"Hooked On A Feeling" formed a musical direction for B.J. Thomas before he began recording gospel songs. will be producing projects of his own that Burch will engineer. Burch, however, has been negotiating with some gospel labels and secular labels with gospel divisions and says he hopes to be able to spend at (cast equal time on gospel projects. One other advantage of working with gospel acts, according to Burch, is "a more peaceful attitude. They are working for another reason hesides playing the notes and the melody, and you can feel that in the at-

mosphere."

New

Companies_ Send -Us Music, offering production and publishing, formed by Greg Guidry, co- author of the Climax Blues Band's "Gotta Have More Love" with Randy Guidry: and Robbie Dupry's "Are You Ready For Love." Address: 1921 Broadway, P.O. Box 24450, Nashville, Tenn. 37202 (615) 329 -4966. * * * Hat Records Hard formed with Bobby Lee Cude, president, and Riley Pickens, vice president. First releases in October and November by the Blue Bandana Country Band and the Cityfolks Country Band, respectively. Address: 519 N. Halifax Ave.. Daytona Beach, Fla. 32018.

Triune Agreement NASHVILLE- Triune Music Inc. has pacted an exclusive print and distribution agreement with Mead owgreen Music Inc.. the new gospel arm of Tree International.

For The Record NASHVILLE -Andrae Crouch and the Walter Hawkins Family are hooked by Regency Artists, not by Subrena Artists as stated in the Oct. 3 issue of Billboard.

Big Bands Push

Philly Stations PHILADELPHIA--Live jazz with big bands is being utilized to promote local radio stations. Most significant was the appearance of "The WPEN 950 Big Band" at the Penn's Landing celebration last Sunday (Oct. 4) as part of an "Apple Celebrity Sunday" promotion staged by the AM station to benefit St. Christopher's Hospital for Children. The 12 -piece band led by Jerry Karol was formed by the station as part of its current nostalgic music format of the 1930s- 1950s. WPEN, among the city's top IO with the programming format, plans to have the band play regularly at events sponsored by the station. The band plays arrangements of standards, swing era classics and dixieland evergreens. In keeping with the big band days. the orchestra wears tuxedos and sits behind music stands with the WPEN logo. The "950" is the station's spot on the AM dial. It's live jazz played by the Steve Gordano Quartet at II p.m. on WUHY -FM Saturday nights started Oct. 3 in a series to be broadcast from the Painted Bride Art Center. Station wants to hark back to the big band era when radio stations aired remote late evening broadcasts from hotels and dance halls. The jazz quartet will play a 9 p.m. concert which will not be broadcast. Led by guitarist Giordano. with pianist/ synthesizer player Dave Posmontier. drummer Tom Cohen and bassist Tom LaRue. the group plays mostly original tunes written in a progressive jazz style. The live music show is part of the Saturday night jazz block WUHY has featured for several years. From 8-11 p.m. the station has local deejay Ben Perkins hosting "Remember This One ?" ajazz record show. MAURIE ORODENKER

Saxist Cole, Muse Sever 6 -Year Tie LOS ANGELES Richie Cole and Alto Madness have parted ways with Muse Records after Cole's exclusive, six -year deal with the label. The alto stylist's most recent disk for the label is "Side By Side," a duo outing with Phil Woods. Cole has also augmented his own dates with featured work on the last two Manhattan Transfer LPs. Inquiries are being directed to Jim Cassell at the Berkeley Agency. 2490 Channing Way, Suite 406, Berkeley, Calif. 94704.

N.J. WVNJ-FM Picks Up Slack NEW YORK -Manhattan's lack

gain in station billings. The Newark -based station has taken advantage of the loss of a regular jazz broadcast vehicle to revamp its own beautiful music format to devote its nightly programming to jazz, aiming at those listeners left without a reliable radio source in the wake of WRVR -FM's format crossover into country about 18 months ago. "Being totally candid, it was a lucky break," admits Herb Saltzman, the broadcast veteran who committed WVNJ to the move as its general manager and vice president. "When 'RVR switched to country quite suddenly. Les Davis, whom I've known for years, was available as a disk jockey." Davis' tenure at WRVR and the

Survey For Week Ending

Billboard

JL

KANSAS CITY, Mo. -The 1982 Women's Jazz Festival here will feature 16 events and a "combo contest." the winner of which will be assured of a paid performing spot at the event's top new talent concert. That concert is one of four that will take place during the five -day event March 24 -28. Deadline for entering is Dec. 15. Entry forms for combos, and for those aspiring to win a $1.000 scholarship, are available at Box 22321 here. zip code 641 13. Nancy Wilson. Blossom Dearie. Joanne Grauer and Barbara Carroll are booked to perform at the festival.

www.americanradiohistory.com

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`Combo Contest' At Femme Fest

sudden gap in the New York market prompted Saltzman to risk the split format. since underlined by the station's own image marketing. He notes that WVNJ had once used its call letters' last entry to seek a "Joy" tag line consistent with its beautiful music on both AM and FM. Now its FM promotions have turned that J into "Jazz" for the evening hours. While WVNJ -FM is far from posting major ratings in the already crowded New York radio market. Saltzman claims billings during its 60 weekly hours of jazz have "added an additional 10`n -and that's just for putting it on at night over our FM. Moreover, we haven't been on that long yet." With Davis the chief lure, the station has built a studio site at Michael's Pub in Manhattan to accommodate live feeds, while its recorded programming ranges from more commercial, fusion- tinged titles to straightahead classics. SAM SUTHERLAND

of a full -time commercial jazz radio format may have the city's stalwarts singing the blues, but across the river New Jersey station WVNJ -FM is making the Big Apple's loss its own

37427

43

18

SOCIAL STUDIES Carla Bley. ECM/W11 (Warner Bros.) B

Copyright 1981, Billboard Publications, Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical. photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher. 'Ç'

* Stars are awarded

Superstars are awarded to those prodto those products showing greatest sales strength. Recording Industry Assn. Of ucts showing greatest upward movement on the current week's chart (Prime Movers). Recording Industry Assn. Of America seal for sales America seal for sales of 500,000 units. (Seal indicated by dot.) of 1,000,000 units. (Seal indicated by triangle.)

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LATIN AMERICA'S #1 RECORDING ARTIST MOVES INTO A WHOLE NEW WORLD.

CBS Records International, the company that brought Roberto Carlos to the top in Latin America, now takes Roberto's special magic to the rest of the world with his first English language album. CBS Records International: developing more artists in more countries because in the world of music, our business is the world!

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CD

-J

Los Vicenti celebrate award

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Leon Giecco, among a list of big selling artists in Argen-

tina.

Argentina's Les Luthiers.

Radio-TV Boom Answer To Inflation uring the first months of 1981 the Argentine peso was overvalued, leading to the anomalous situation where it was cheaper to import electronic equipment -audio and video -than to manufacture it locally. By the same token, it was also relatively cheap to bring to Buenos Aires the big name pop groups. But then came the 30% devaluation, which unfortunately did nothing to alleviate the inflatior which still holds Argentina in its grip. At present the local market place is flooded with imported goods; as one corrmentator suggests: "lt might be a good idea for the government to buy them all up and re- export them (possibly dumping them elsewhere)." For example, where formerly a cassette purchased in Miami cost 50% less than if bought in Buenos Aires, the price is now only marginally less, while the cost cf getting there has risen beyond the ordinary citizen's pocketbook. There is no doubt that the country is going through an extremely painful recession with the unemployment figure for greater Buenos Aires now officially recognized as standing at 200,000. A contracting market and lower purchasing power will naturally affect all aspects of musical activity, as the big names in the record and cassette business have found to their dismay. All the major companies report diminishing sales, particularly of records, in the last three months. On the other hand, a recent poll published in the Buenos Aires Stock Exchange magazine shows that 89% of the country's industry consider that the general situation will improve or at least not get worse. Thus, the government's declared intention to give top priority to stimulating economic recovery has been well received. It now remains to be seen how effective the measures -which have recently been made public -to bring about this miracle will prove to be. But as it has always -

By LIDA VON SCHEY

been believed in these latitudes that export revenue will begin to pick up towards the end of the year, peaking in March when the harvests are shipped abroad. There are signs of returning confidence in other fields: a great step forward has been the government's decision to renationalize the radio and television stations while, at the same time, returning others to private ownership. These were stations and channels either created or expropriated by Peron and which have been run by the state since that time. In accordance with the rulings established by the Broadcasting and Television law, which was promulgated early this year, the Argentine Government -through the relevant Committee COMFER -is calling for tenders for new radio and television concessions every 45 days until the target has been reached. The aim is to bring to every corner of this vast underpopulated country entertainment, information and even edu-

cation. Statistics gathered by IPSA, one of the several audience research agencies which prepare rating charts for television, radio and advertising agencies, show there are 7,000,000 tv sets in Argentina. How many of these are color sets is hard to determine because so many were brought into the country from Brazil or from Miami during the days of the great free importation splurge. In the Federal Capital saturation appears to be imminent: a housing census of 2,775,080 homes in Buenos Aires and greater Buenos Aires shows 97.2% of the homes have a television set. While some say that there are too many niteries in Buenos Aires that are too expensive for the average tourist, still, posh ness notwithstanding, there is enough choice in this great cosmopolitan city to fit the pocketbooks of every economic

strata of society. One can choose between the most unpretentious little dive to the most elaborate poshery one can even imagine. At the top of the list is Michelangelo. To book a table there is like getting a fashionable doctor to make a house call. Often there is a month -long waiting list. Of course, knowing how to get to the maitre d' with the proper amount of gratuity, as is the case almost everywhere else in the world, can save an awful lot of time and hassle. Cano 14, exclusively tango, is another top boite, as is El Palo Borracho, a folklore club which presents very well mounted shows. Other famous Buenos Aires night spots include Karim and King, both of which feature floor shows and dancing. Casual work for the local musician abounds as Buenos Aires is known for its clubs. There are football clubs, yacht clubs, rowing clubs, golf clubs, trade union associations, bank employee organizations and even the municipal employees have their clubs. Each of these groups holds frequent dances during the year, all of which culminates in Carnival Week, when there are dances every night. Huge crowds attend the dances held at the football clubs where the country's favorite rock and pop groups pound out their frenzied rhythms marathon style. At the other end of the spectrum are the musical associations, the choral societies, the chamber and symphony orchestras. The principal associations, of enormous influence and power, are: the Mozarteum, the Wagneriana, and "Los Amigos de la Musica." These associations have the means and the power to bring leading foreign orchestras to perform in Argentina and to contract world famous singers, pianists and performers in all categories of musical expression as well as promoting local talent through scholarships and training programs. Mrs. Jeannet Arata de Erize, who runs the Mozarteum, says, "music is my temple." Another characteristic of the music scene in Argentina is the large number of choral societies. ARS Musicalis, trained by the great musician Padre Jesus Segade, is among the best. ARS Musicalis has toured the United States and Latin America. (Continued on page LA -26) -

-

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Lida Von Schay is a roving correspondent for World Broadcast News and a freelance writer based in Buenos Aires.

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Peru, Chile Pace Andean Nations' Growth Peru Chile Ecuador

Bolivia

he Peruvian record industry has grown ó D m

and stabilized during the 24 -month period since the summer of 1979. Cash sales have soared 300%, bringing the market from a low $6 million in 1978 to $18 million last year. But these figures are misleading without taking into consideration the staggering 80% inflation rate that has plagued the country since an elected, democratic government came into power over a year ago. While cash sales have boomed, unit sales went up during 1980 and have risen only slightly during the first eight months of 1981. Still, a feeling of optimism pervades. Jaime Delgado, executive vice president and general man ager of Industrial Sono Radio S.A. puts it best. "Even though the country is goirig through economic difficulties, the change of government has given people confidence ... a psychological attitude change.... Now, a lot of restrictions have been taken out of the laws, and the red tape has been reduced .. we are using a world -wide market and are not restricted to local artists." One of the more important eases in restrictions is the avail-

ability of foreign currencies for international transactions. Singles unit sales went up to 17 million in 1980, well over the 7.5 million 1978 figure while LPs were up to 3 million from their '78 figure of 1.9 million. Cassette sales have almost doubled over the last two years from an unimpressive 12% of market sales to 22% of 1980 sales. Still, the strongest sellers are the singles with three industry heavyweights, Fabricantes Technicos Asociados S.A. (FTA), Industrias Electricas & Musicales Peruanas S.A. (IEMPSA) and El Virrey Industrias Musicales S.A. reporting $3.4 to 4 million, $2.5 million and $2.1 million in 1980 sales respectively. LP sales showed in second place with IEMPSA reporting 717,000 units sold, while Virrey FTA say that each sold 500,000 units of tapes and LPs combined. 1981 unit sales industry -wide, do not look terribly strong so far this year although information is contradictory. Hector Rocca, owner of Peru's leading record store chain, says that for him, record sales have gone up 105% in the first eight months of 1981 over the same time period in 1980, although unit sales have risen only 25%. With current retail prices at $6 for Cassettes, $5.50 for LPs and $1 for singles, Rocca says that, "records are still an inexpensive gift." Prices include a 22% sales tax on all records. Rocca also attributes the increase in sales to industry-wide promotion efforts. At Sono Radio, Delgado claims that his unit sales have increased 4% to 5% so far this year. "It is a dramatic increase!" He exclaims, "It began last year and now it's stabilizing." Executives at FTA, Virrey and IEMPSA, the three other industry leaders are not quite as enthusiastic. Osvaldo Vasquez, FTA's record division manager, says that 1981 unit sales are "about the same" as unit sales during the same six -month period of 1980 but thinks that the second half of '81 will show an increase. "1981 is okay," he explains, but we're going into the second half of the year which is always better than the first half." Wieland Kafka, Virrey's a &r international manager looks at it this way. "Inflation means less units sold, but we're hoping that things will look up. We haven't lost any money, but it isn't growing like it should." IEMPSA seems to be the hardest hit. Augusto Sarria Jr., production division manager, says that sales have "dropped greatly" over the last year due to the economic situation. Sarria blames sales drops on three prices adjustments that have been made by the industry's record association since January '81. The association, which regulates pricing, approved only two increases during all of 1980. Another important reason for slow sales in the first half of '81 is a series of road collapses, due to heavy seasonal rains, that virtually cut off all record distribution outside of Lima for almost the entire two months of January and February. The landslides hurt everyone. "Our sales dropped markedly during the January through.March cutoff," says Sarria, "and we are only now recovering." Until recently, Latin music -comprised of tropical, "criolla," "chicha" and folk- ranked number one on the public taste charts but recently deregulated airwaves and a flush of imports as the result of let ups in tight import regulations, have brought international tunes into the forefront. Some industry executives claim that international music sales, particularly Spanish, British and "U.S. numbers, are up to as high as 70% of all record sales.

Industria Fonografica Peruana S.A. general manager and industry maverick, Alberto Maravi does not buy those figures and says that tropical music still sells best here. "People here buy tropical music ten to one. Take English language music," he disputes, "you can have a hit, but if it's in Spanish, it will sell twice as much." Rocca says that foreign language music sales account for 40% of all his 1980 sales and estimates that tropical music sells at 20%. Outside of Lima though, he guesses that indigenous music makes up anywhere between 30 and 40% of his

The Panamericana -Virrey deal is clearcut. Panamericana promotes the talent, largely on tv but with radio play as well, and Virrey presses and distributes the record, on the Pantel label. Both sides claim that their split is about 50 -50. "The purpose of this division is to take advantage of tv for a parallel record business," explains Delgado. Pantel has recently bought the rights to the ATC record catalog from which the biggest success at this early stage has been Men -

sales.

El

Still, foreign music is making the move from Lima into the Peruvian provinces. If international music is picking .up and helping internal sales, local talent is becoming a natural Peruvian export. An increase in local recording and production looks like it is due to be the next step in the Peruvian record business. Sono Radio, which has 12 semi -automatic presses, is bringing in four Hamilton double presses and plans to expand its recording studio to 24 channels. IEMPSA has a new 24- channel console and El Virrey plans to buy a 24- channel MCI console before the year is out. At Sono Radio, Delgado says that export is "the thing" on the Peruvian music horizon. "Export hasn't changed but it is changing." Sono Radio is presently working with the Her manos Silva, a tropical -disco group from Mexico who they plan to release in Bolivia. IEMPSA has a special department that handles indigenous music. Although traditionally, folk musicians have just turned up in Lima, IEMPSA is changing that with a new policy of looking for potential talent. Still the cost of producing a local LP, relative to its sales potential, does not justify any dramatic increases in local recording at least not yet. A studio musician gets about $18 per title and hourly studio costs range from $50 to $75, which, although very low for international standards, is quite high in Peruvian currency. All in all, it is easier to press a record here than to record it here. As Kafka says, "The break even point for a local production is much higher." Meanwhile, Vasquez at FTA, the only leading company without its own recording studios, says that although they have no plans to build a studio, they are watching the video disk situation with an eye towards the eventual need to change over from a strictly sound system. Something that has helped push records sales within Peru since '79 and promises to send them skyrocketing in '82, is a sharp increase in the use of television promotion. Although a poor country, most urban dwelling Peruvians own a tv even though many are illiterate. Delgado speaks for all the manufacturers when he says that Sono Radio is "supplying more and more video tapes for tv, both spots and shows." Video clips form U.S. specials, featuring big name stars like Olivia Newton -John or Andy Gibb, are used as air fillers for the three, somewhat loosely programmed, Peruvian networks. In one instance, video shorts are used as the basis of a well known tv show. Gerardo Manuel Rojas, a popular radio personality who has spent years in the record business, is the producer of channel 7's Monday through Friday, half -hour success, "Record Club," the only locally produced music show in the country. The show is built around five or six videotapes of top recording artists performing their latest singles. Rojas says that he selects tapes from what he likes and what is available. Still there is no doubt that the show reflects what are, and will be the most popular songs. Geared towards teenager, "Record Club," says Hector Rocca, "does help sales." The biggest innovation in tv promotion in Peru, and something that should boost record sales significantly, is tv's entrance into record production and promotion. Under the Pantel label, Panamericana TV has been the first company to work out a production /promotion deal, an idea taken from Argentina's television network, ATC. Working with El Virrey, the four month old Pantel division has already launched three albums: "Menudo," a Puerto Rican disco group geared towards young teens, " Estela Raval Presents a Tribute to the Cinco Latinos," a ballad LP with Argentinian Raval, and "Risas y Salsas," a salsa and comedy record named after a popular tv show. Respectively, the LPs ranked one, two and three in Rocca's mid -January sales ratings. Pantel only produces LPs which are sold 12% over normal LP prices at $6.00 per album. Division manager Alejandro Delgado (who is no relation to Jaime Delgado) says that "Menudo" sold over 19,000 LPs and about a quarter of that in cassettes the first month of release. Two month figures show a combined LP and cassette sale of well over 60,000 units for the three Pantel albums. -

Andean Bloc writers: Peru by Anne De Arrarte and Lawrence Wippman; Arrarte is arts critic for the Lima Times, Wippman a Lima Times staffer who also traveled to Bolivia for that story. Arrarte combined with Patricia Moore, another Lima Times writer, for the Ecuador story. Chile by Marcelo Sandoval, Billboard En Espanol's correspondent.

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udo.

Although Kafka says that this is a "marginal business" for Virrey, special tv spot prices as part of the deal makes it more appealing now that tv time is running at about $1,300 per minute. As Kafka sees it," "When we're making something, it's worth it." Meanwhile, the other two networks, along with the leading record companies, are getting into the act. The government owned channel 7 has just begun to promote Los Taivas, a Chilean folk group, working with El Virrey. Jaime Delgado says that because of common stockholders between Sono Radio and channel 4, America Television, that he plans to, "use the tv medium more aggresively in record promotion." IEMPSA has also affiliated itself with America TV. The tv- record company arrangement benefits more than just the companies involved, says Kafka, it is actually opening up a whole new group of buyers. "Kids see a group like Men udo, they buy their first record and then they begin to buy." Alejandro Delgado continues, "Some of the manufacturers see us as competition, but we're not competing with them. We think we will broaden the record market." They also, he says, have no intention of building their own record factory. Raquel de Alcantarqa, general manager at Panamericana TV believes that the Menudo craze will help their ratings. According to mid -summer books, both the AM and FM divisions of the station were in the number one position so she is not really hurting for numbers. Radio airplay, not only of affiliated tv station interests, but also of more international fare, has both helped record sales and helped to increase the popularity of international, versus local, music. As of May this year, the government handed over all tv and radio stations that had been confiscated by the military in 1968, in a first step towards modernizing the Peruvian corn munications industry. One of the most notable outcomes of the return to private ownership, has been the resurgence of English -language songs on the air. FM Radio is a fast growing item in Peru. With 312 AM stations, and only eight FMs, FM is an open market for the entrepreneur. At present, three new FM stations all in the Lima area are in the planning stages with one, Telestereo 88, scheduled to open in December. In an effort to promote modernization of communications, the government, which returned stations to their original owners after 12 years of military confiscation, is offering financial incentives to both radio and tv including tax cuts on construction and imported equipment as well as foreign curency -

loans. Rojas believes that FM is still dangerous territory because it is small market, but there is no toubt that it is growing in pop-

ularity among both listeners and businessmen. Probably the most important reasons for the lag in live show attendance are lack of locations and high ticket prices. Live performances are usually built around dinner -shows held in one of the four major Lima hotels, the Sheraton, Crillon, Bolivar or Country Club. There is only one public arena which is used almost exclusively for sporting events. Tickets run ffom $30 to $40 meaning that the shows attract a more wealthy audience, and one that rarely buys records. Says Kafka, "Record buyers are not from class A. They are from classes B, C, D, E, and F. Wealthy people tape, trade or buy in the States." Although no top name English- speaking performers have played in Lima for the past few years, in general, live shows are much less successful than local criolla productions or penas which are far cheaper than the dinner -shows and feature local music. Paantel has pushed its artists through a combination of live performances and tv promotions. Menudo did three live shows in a local auditorium, one of which was filmed and aired the same evening. A second show, including new material, was filmed while the group was in Lima and is in the can and ready for airing when 'Menudo fever needs a little rekindling. Meanwhile, problems at City Hall have virtually stopped all live shows for the time being. Talent promoters and show producers are up in arms over a new entertainment tax that hands over 30% of net profits to Lima City Hall. The new law, which came out in August, levies a 30% tax on net profits made from all shows in which less than 80% of the performers are Peruvian. As Crillon show organizer Elena de Vidal says, "It's great for tourists and lousy for Peruvians." Promoters had been predicting a sharp increase in the number of high -priced imported acts coming into the country but the hotels that were interested in offering international (Continued on page LA -24) shows are curbing their plans.

Spailz$t On

&ntQnti Country (Current Population;' Projection by 20002)

Country (Current Population;' Projection by 20002) ANDEAN BLOC Peru (13,567,939-1972; 29,468,000) Bolivia (4,687,716-1976; 9,299,000) Ecuador (6,500,845 -1974; 14,596,000) Chile (8,836,223 -1970; 14,934,000) ARGENTINA (23,364,431- 1970;32,861,000) BRAZIL (94,508,554 -1970; 212,507,000) CARIBBEAN (16,877,481- 1970 -1971; 31,910,000)' CENTRAL AMERICA Costa Rica (1,871,780 -1973; 3,377,000) El Salvador (3,549,260 -1971; 8,708,000) Guatemala (5,211,929 -1973; 12,739,000) Honduras (2,653,857 -1974; 6,978,000) Nicaragua (1,894,690 -1971; 5,154,000) Panama (1,428,082-1970; 2,823,000)

Julio Iglesias,

a

major star in nearly every Latin country.

4

6 9 10 12

COLOMBIA (21,070,115-1973; 42,441,000) MEXICO (48,225,238 -1970; 132,244,000) PARAGUAY /URUGUAY Paraguay (2,354,071 -1972; 5,274,000) Uruguay (2,763,964 -1975; 3,448,000) PORTUGAL /SPAIN Portugal (9,940,000) Spain (37,575,000)

U.S.(14,605,883) VENEZUELA (10,721 522 -1971; 25,705,000)

14 18

23 27

36 46

'Statistical Abstract of Latin America, published by UCLA, editor, James W. Wilkie, "National Population Census Series"

'Statistical Abstract, "Population Projections" 'Cuba, Dominican Republic and Haiti only (Statistical Abstract)

Lively television shows centering on music characterize the present day excitement for Latin labels.

Roberto Carlos, relaxing and composing music, is star in many Latin nations but especially in Brazil.

a

major

Latin American Ideals Make Resurgence iscotecas and revolutions, public health and literacy, consumption and plastic these seemingly diverse elements tell us much about the Latin America of today and tomorrow. Whereas daily news reports tend to focus on highly visible political coups, it is the invisible social and cultural revolution exemplified by these other elements that merit interpretation in this spotlight on Latin America. To focus on economic problems and political instability leading to military seizure of power in the region generally suggests that it is "one minute to midnight" and that "there is a man at the door with a gun" ready to overthrow "corrupt oligarchs" who are supported by the "imperialist United States." Such conclusions give a very pessimistic view of Latin America's future, which is seen to pose poor rural peoples against unredeemable governments in the name of "land reform or death!" To examine the rapid social and cultural change that has taken place in Latin America in the last few decades, however, is to take a more optimistic view. Optimism does not mean that Latin America has "solved" its social and economic problems; rather, it means that the region is improving its situation and not worsening its standards of living as has been generally thought. This factor in turn may exacerbate political problems that will further pre -empt the news. It is within this context that music plays a key role in Latin American life. Rapid growth of the popular music industry has been made possible as much by the expansion of consumerism as by the extension of communications, especially the transitor radio that has opened up the backlands and forever shattered the quiet of hitherto isolated areas: Popular music as much as news has carried to rural peoples ideas of "modernity" and "progress" within their own country as well as of the world as a whole. This transistorized revolution in hinterland attitudes helped to make the Beatles the world -wide phenomenon that they became in the 1960s. Indeed, the decade of Beatlemania meant that after the mid -1970s lower -class Latin Americans would join the middle class to reject traditional Latin American music as well as popular and folk music in each country. Such trends and countertrends have social meaning, reflect economic standings of countries, and have portent for politics.

-

By JAMES W. WILKIE

Bleakness of the political situation in Latin America is perhaps best represented by the case of Bolivia where it is claimed that coups come with such frequency that since gaining independence from Spain in 1825, the country has had over 190 changes in government or slightly less than an average of one per year. This information, repeatedly dissemiconfuses the number nated in the U.S. news, is erroneous of attempted coups with successful ones which number less than half of the 190 changes claimed. If political perceptions of stability are wrong by up to 100 %, no wonder it is difficult for foreign observers to fathom the social and economic situation in Latin America. The economic situation of the region is especially misunderstood for two reasons. Even serious analysts have seen GNP as a measure that gives a sure indication of social conditions in poor countries. And analysts have failed to point out that the idea of "poor" (as opposed to "rich ") nations of the world lumps together countries that represent very different cultural patterns and economic achievements. On an economic scale from rich to poor, Latin America is well -to -do compared to poor Asia and poorer Africa. Misunderstanding of economic standings between nations and regions has led to the now popular misconception which seesa "widening gap" between rich and poor countries. Problems of understanding have been compounded by failure of analysts to distinguish between absolute and relative measurements. When we compare data for the United States and the twenty traditional republics of Latin America (including the lands from Mexico in the north to Tierra del Fuego at the bottom tip of South America and including the Caribbean countries of Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Haiti), the result is a surprise. Although the economic gap in per capita GNP more than doubled between the 1940s and 1970s, the relative economic gap between Latin America and the United States remained the same because Latin America's lower

-it

James W. Wilkie, Editor of the "Statistical Abstract of Latin America" and professor of history at UCLA, is the author of more than 75 publications. His most recent work analyzes " Evita As Theater," a study that contrasts the view of the musical about Eva Peron with her own view of self and the legend which has grown concerning her role in Argentine politics.

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base kept pace with that of the higher U.S. base. And within

the Latin America region absolute wealth per capita more than doubled -this, because of the region's growing "economic pie." The psychological importance of increasing absolute wealth cannot be ignored. Yet, the increasing per capita wealth of most Latin American countries does not mean that the wealth is fairly distributed between individuals or regions within countries. Rather, it may mean that countries are accumulating resources needed to build national systems at least capable of better supporting populations. If there is no widening economic gap in this hemispere, then, does that mean that we can assume there is no widening gap in social conditions? Rather than make such an assumption, which already we have suggested to be erroneous, let us summarize data in the Health, Education, and Welfare Index (HEC Index) which includes twelve primary social indicators. Six of these indicators exemplify the dramatic social change that Latin America has undergone: life expectancy, persons per physician, literacy, enrollment of school -age population at the primary and secondary levels, and persons per motor vehicle. Life expectancy has increased from 38 to 65 years of age since 1940. Longer life by an average of 27 years means that the 19- year -old youth no longer feels that he is half way through his span on earth. Because longer life by a 17% increase over 1940 means that early death is no longer the dominant factor for the masses, the immediate import of religion is no longer the same. Indeed, longer life made possible by the spread of modem medicine means that the physician has come to riva! the importance of the priests and witch doctors who formerly supervised the life of the ill who had no hope for survival and could only settle their affairs with God. Increase in life span has contributed to the population growth of traditional Latin America, which has grown from 124 to 347 million persons since 1940. As the number of persons needing service each available physician decreased from 2,800 to 1,900, the number of persons per Catholic priest increased from 7,400 to 9,600. Thus, as the possibility of quality gained in health care it lost in terms of religious care. The Catholic Church, challenged by the weight of sheer population growth, is no longer able to (Continued on page LA -49)

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El Arte de Cantar Después de un rápido ascenso cargado de éxitos viene lo más difícil: mantenerse en la cima. Un constante flujo de adolescentes a los lugares en que actúa Emmanuel, una gran expectatiw por ver la figura juvenil que de alguna manera se distingue de los demás intérpretes de su tiempo el afán de poseer un recuerdo vivo de esa imagen y esa voz que lo ha hecho famoso, un intentc por aprehender algo de la magia que se ha creado a su alrededor, son algunos de los elemento
energía que debió dedicar al toreo, cuando ser matador como su padre era su gran ambición. Desde luego, enfrentarse a un toro nc es lo mismo que hacerlo ante un micrófono, ya sea en un escenaric cargado de luces y equipos de sonido o en un sofisticado estudia de grabación, pero en ambos casos hay un público implícito o explícito que debe ser satisfecho. Por satisfacer ese público fue que toreó sus 40 novilladas en España y otras 20 entre Perú y México, y fue tal vez por eso que los toros se atravesaron en su camino, rompiéndole las rodillas y por eso también, después de tres operaciones y el consejo de sus médicos, Emmanuel es hoy cantante y no torero. Su primer LP, grabado para la RCA como todos los demás, salió al mercado en octubre de 1976, con su música y su letra, con temas remarcables como "Enredadito por tu cintura," y "Diez razones para cantar," que dan cuenta de una de las características más interesantes del ser humano Emmanuel que existe dentro de la figura de cantante: la creatividad. Se trata en este caso de una creatividad compleja, con un valor evolutivo, con un sentido de descubrimiento sobre la razón de ser y existir, sustentada por pensamientos que buscan alejarse de lo banal. Gran parte de la notoriedad de Emmanuel fue conseguida a través y gracias a su participación en festivales, como los de la OTI, 76 en México, con "Enredadito por tu cintura", OTI 78 (tercer lugar) con su tema "El y Yo, ", OTI 79 con "Al final" de Roberto Cantoral, que ocupara durante seis meses los primeros lugares en su país, y que despertara una gran polémica que contribuyó no poco a su actual popularidad. También estuvieron el Festival de Panamá y VII Festival Internacional de Buenos Aires, donde ganó los premios como Mejor Intérprete y Mejor Canción, con el tema "Amor sin final," de Dino Ramos y Omar Sánchez. El propio Emmanuel destaca con orgullo sus propios records de ventas: 1.300.000 copias vendidas de un LP sólo en México, "Intimamente Emmanuel," grabado con Manuel Alejandro. La idea de grabar con el gran compositor español surgió de un almuerzo informal en el cual participó, además del intérprete y el compositor, Guillermo Infante, presidente de la RCA de México. Gastaron un año para terminarlo y de allí salieron los exitos más grandes del intérprete: temas como "Insoportablemente bella," "Todo se derrumbó dentro de mí," y "Quiero dormir cansado." Actualmente, Emmanuel tiene otro LP pendiente con el compositor español. Después piensa dedicarse a sus propias composiciones, una vena que todavía está en su mayor parte por explorar. En este sentido Emmanuel insiste en el compromiso de estas composiciones con la realidad. Parte de este sentido del compromiso viene de sus lecturas, especialmente de poetas como García Lorca y Vallejo, dos de sus fuentes de inspiración. En sus propias palabras, "El verdadero triunfo es el que logra el ser humano al controlar sus deseos." Otro aspecto un tanto desconocido en el artista, es su deseo de verse envuelto en su propia carrera. Le gusta el mundo de la promoción, montar los shows, la coreografía. Su padre, Raúl Acha, "Rovira," quien fuera afamado torero, es su propio manager y para Emmanuel, además de ser padre y manager, también resulta ser su amigo. Uno de los capítulos más importantes en la carrera del artista ha sido la grabación de un LP en Brasil para el público de habla portuguesa. Grabado en dos etapas, que le llevaron menos de un mes. Atreverse a salir en tal mercado es de hecho una proeza y tener éxito sin duda una mucho más grande, especialmente con la diferencia tan marcada de sensibilidades y las distancias en cuanto a niveles creativos se refiere. En este sentido Emmanuel destaca también la colaboración y el interés ofrecidos por su compañía de discos RCA, que se ha mantenido siempre presente y vigilante en su carrera. Para Emmanuel la vida no se detiene. Giras como la realizada recientemente por Latinoamérica, durante la que visitó a Brasil, Argentina, Chile, Venezuela, Perú y Colombia, conciertos, actuaciones en televisión, más LPs, su deseo de estudiar música en Boston, Estados Unidos, y muchas otras cosas más conforman un especie de torbellino en el que todo sigue girando para el artista. Por encima de todo esto está la presión por sostener una posición que ha conseguido a base de esfuerzo, dedicación y talento, por sí mismo, y por México, país del que se siente orgulloso. CARLOS AGUDELO

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*EN PERSONA* * CAMILO SESTO * ROBERTO CARLOS * * LOLA BELTRAN * MIGUEL BOSE * * LUCIA MENDEZ * ASTOR PIAZZOLA* *LEONOR BENEDETTO *TITO PUENTE* *LOS CARRANGUEROS* * y JOSE LUIS RODRIGUEZ"EL PUMA"* RAUI,VELASCOyMARY CRUZ SORIANO *Aniilriunes*

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Julio Iglesias in concert; his success has inspired more promotion attention in Portegueze- language Brazil for Spanish artists.

Rita Lee, one of Brazil's composers as well as a singer.

m

Joanna, another composer and singer from Brazil.

Aggressive Marketing Policies Open New Music Territory t is only now, after a whole year of serious crisis, that the Brazilian record industry is starting to show signs of a reaction. In July, the market displayed a 7% increase in sales in relation to the previous month, which may well imply the end of a period in which most record companies had to discharge employes, thus contradicting the rules suggested by the Brazilian government. In the first quarter of 1981, a decline of nearly 30% in the sale of phonographic products left the entire recording industry seriously alarmed; fact -finding surveys by competent agencies show that from March 1980 to March 1981, 7 million units were sold by comparison with 11 million for 1979. In the case of the store owners and the record wholesalers, the serious problem lies in the sudden increase in the price of product. The galloping inflation (which last year amounted to over 100% and this year should be around 98%) does not permit consumers whose salaries and wages are not indexed in proportion to inflation, to keep up with the price of product. Even stores in localities of high purchasing power that used to sell an average of 7,000 units a month, today do not exceed 5,000. According to Jose Vitor Rosa, general manager of the recently established Ariola concern, The great problem is that nowadays, all over the world, a lot more music is listened to but more records are not consumed. There is substantial supply of music in night clubs, FMs, skating rinks, etc. But what is played at these locations is always generated from the recording facilities; what is required is a sweeping review of the concept of records, meaning that if there is not sufficient remuneration despite the increase in consumption, something must be badly at fault." At EMI. Odeon, whose production capacity of 500,000 LPs per month has been cut by 50 %, there is a different concept of the market. According to a spokesman for the company, "1979 was an artificial year. Before 1979 the companies resorted to certain promotional incentives in order to generate a power purchasing trend over and above the capacity of the market." On that account, Odeon has adopted a new market policy, concentrating on its artists with greater sales potential and releasing less records a month. With a normal production capacity of 600,000- 700,000 records per month, during the crisis Polygram was putting out only 250,000 and was forced to reduce its roster from 90 to 40 artists. But a more aggressive marketing policy, allied to the appointment of Cor van Djike to head up the company, has caused the firm little by little to achieve certain successful undertakings. One of these is the release of the New Disc, developed by a &r manager Roberto Menescal. It is the same size as a normal LP (12 inches in diameter) but with only six bands recorded, which cuts down production costs by 50 %. The New Disc, with two-colored envelope, gets into the store operator's hands at a price a good deal more accessible than the ordi-

By PAULO COELHO

nary LP, and the breakeven point is significantly below normal levels. The major problem in implementing the New Disc lies in the

practice of certain store operators buying the cheap product and then selling it for the same price as an ordinary LP. While Polygram places much of its hopes on the New Disc, WEA has decided to invest in so- called "popular artists" who do not have high prestige with the intellectual classes in the major Brazilian cities but sell plenty of records in the interior of Brazil. They have created a new brand name-Rodeio -and contracted a producer responsible for the meteoric success of Amado Batista (today with over 1,000,000 records sold), and general manager Andre Midani is preparing a specific cast for the sector. Batista, who, like other hinterland singers, has a private plan of his own, gives his formula for success: "I sing songs that tell of everyday situations that all people are acquainted with. do not try to get into the intellectual idiom. My lyrics speak directly to the people." Control of this market had previously been in the hands of Continental, which has Brazilian capital alone. Alberto Byington, founder of Continental, has this to say about the interest of WEA in entering the hinterland market: "At least the phonographic crisis has made the multi -nationals discover our I

roots." The only record company that has sought to avoid any backtracking or shifting in market strategy here is CBS. Its current president, Tomaz Munoz, who has been in Brazil for only a year (he hails from Spain) credits the company's stability to two basic factors: (1) that CBS has Roberto Carlos under contract, the most sought-after singer in Brazil, selling on the average of 2,000,000 records a year throughout Latin America; and (2) the contracting of the Brazilian Musical Movement, a group of artists from the Northeast, which has produced an excellent track record in terms of performance and sales alike. Amelinha, Ze Ramalho Fagner (who has just recorded a disk in Europe) is the new craze of Brazilian youth and always on the Hit Parade. While first place on the Hit Parade nowadays means a good deal less than it did a couple of years ago, CBS has at least retained a slice of the market. This does not mean that its sales are continuing to grow, however. Actually, from November 1979 to March 1980, CBS sold 4,300,000 units, but declined to 3,200,000 between November 1980 and March 1981. Many directors of recording concerns blame the increase in FMs in Brazil for most of the drop in sales. However, this conclusion has been disputed. A fact -finding survey conducted by INFORMASOM, Sistemas de Pesquisa e Controle, to try and establish the characteristics of record buyers, revealed that 88.04% (Sao Paulo) and 88.50% (Rio de Janeiro) of the con-

sumers habitually listen to the radio. And of these buyers who

listen to the radio, the majority (60.18% in Sao Paulo and 54.17% in Rio de Janeiro) listen only to FM broadcasts. Additionally, the Brazilian market is showing signs of changing. The great success of Spanish singer Julio Iglesias has led some of the recording companies to try and offer more product from other Latin American countries. Up to last year, artists such as Juan Manuel Serrat, Mercedes Soza or even Sandro had never managed to achieve any kind of impact on the general consuming public. That taboo started to be broken when Iglesias, after an intensive preparatory publicity campaign by CBS, began achieving excellent results over the radio and in the press. This year, Iglesias managed to mount a successful stand at Hotel Nacional in Rio de Janeiro. Encouraged by Iglesias' success, CBS is launching in Brazil Spanish Miguel Bose, who is getting quite reasonable receptivity with store operators. This induced RCA to immediately release its trump card in the Spanish language- Mexico's Emmanuel -who came to Rio to cut a disk especially prepared for the Brazilian market. Another recording studio, RGE, is preparing to release Venezuelan star Jose Luis Rodrigues, "El Pumo," and thus divide up with RCA and CBS the slice of the market going to semi -known Spanish language artists. With the introduction of New Disc, hinterland music, Brazilian Musical Movement and Spanish language artists, the crisis in the Brazilian market seems to be nearing the end of its more acute phase. A meeting held in July, at Canela, in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, bringing together artists and record company executives, revealed a good deal of optimism on the part of both parties, despite the artists' complaints of lack of promotion. It is estimated that by the end of this year, the majority of the record companies will be able to cover their budgets. It is also hoped that the support given by the new television networks will make a significant contribution to the brazilian record market. The Brazilian recording firms believe that illegal reproduction of tapes and gramophone records will have undergone a drop of 30% in productivity on account of a new law to repress piracy approved by the Brazilian Congress at the beginning of this year. Law 6895, sanctioned by the President of the Republic, Dr. Joa Batista Figueredo, has symptomatically altered the juridicial concept of piracy. Up to march this year, clandestine reproduction of records had been considered as merely a tort in the civil area, subject to an indemnification pre -established in court. The owners of these clandestine plants could not be arrested since Brazilian law does not permit arrest for monetary indebtedness except in cases of alimony. Consequently, they readily returned to their activities right after paying the fine. For a number of years the Brazilian Record Makers Associ(Continued on page LA -28) Paulo Coelho is Billboard En Espanol's correspondent in Rio.

l

Johnny Ventura performing on the "Combo Show." Manuel Montero, who left Cuba in 1973 and travels frequently to Havana, says composers in Cuba are the "privileged class."

r

Sophy, Velvet artist and native Puerto Rican artist, among those acts which sell as well as the popular salsa variety.

I I

1 Ismael

Benny More Jr.

Miranda.

among those salsa artists whose concerts have broken records in Puerto Rico.

/Carlos Orlando Garal.

International Pop Enhances Cross -Culture Surge

(though producers and distributors cannot fully agree on the issue, everything seems to indicate that the favorite kind of music among Puerto Ricans is still the ballad, despite the recent "invasion" in this country (population of 3.5 million) of salsa and rock music. Throughout the 1970s, salsa music managed to sustain itself as the "main dish" in radio programming. Stations like Z -93, Salsoul 98, Salsa 63, Radio Voz, X -100 and Y -96FM decided to have all -salsa programming, this in response to the popular demand. The salsa concerts given by Fania All Stars in stadiums and coliseums have broken attendance records. However, despite high sales by salsa musicians like Willie Colon, Ray Barretto, Ismael Miranda, Ismael Rivera, Tito Puente, Roberto Roena and his Apollo Sound, Sonora Poncena, Pete "Conde" Rodriguez and Luigi Texidor (all of them Puerto Ricans under Fania contract), some baladeers -such as Mexicans Jose Jose (Pronto), Marco Antonio Muniz (Arcano), Spaniards Camilo Sesto (Pronto), Julio Iglesias and Raphael (CBS), Venezuelan Jose Luis Rodriguez (TH), and natives Danny Rivera (TH), Wilkins (Masa) and Sophy (Velvet) -sell as well as the "salseros" almost without promotion. A large percentage of industry people agree that by the end of the 1970s, salsa music was starting to be overshawdowed by rock, especially the "disco" wave, and, more recently, "punk" music. Accordingly, new radio stations like Radio Rock, Alfa Rock 106 (in San Juan), and Radio Heavy (in Mayaguez) were created; but no American rock superstar can yet be credited for having sales of 20,000 units per year. In sharp contrast, salsa vocalists like Marvin Santiago, Oscar D'Leon (both TH) and Panamanian Ruben Blades (Fania) have twice surpassed these figures. In 1980 alone, romantic singers Julio Iglesias and Jose Luis Rodriguez, with their albums "Hey" and "Atrevete," respectively, sold about 50,000 copies each. It's important to remember that on a small island like Puerto Rico, an LP selling more than 10,000 copies is considered a hit. Equally important is the tremendous competition generated by the numerous labels established here. The average price of an LP ranges from $5.95 -$6.95 if made in Latin America, and over $7.95 if manufactured in the States while

By JOSANTONIO MELLADO ROMERO

the average monthly income of the working people (who are the principal record buyers) ranges from $380 -$500 monthly in terms of U.S. dollars. Most labels here are also distributors. Additionally, there are several wholesale and retail dealers, like Distribuidora Nacional de Discos (probably the largest) that distribute most of the American labels -Distribuidora Borinquen, Aponte One Stop, BM Records Distributors, Disconcentro and La Casa de los Tapes. Among the record companies, the most important are: Discos Borinquen, headed by Dario Gonzalez, which includes in its catalog artists Roberto Anglero and his Orchestra Tierra Negra, Rafael Jose, Iris Chacon, Oscar Solo, Monica, etc.

Artomax Records, headed by Tomas Figueroa, with Gilberto Monroig, Roberto Yanes, Orvil Miller, Carlos Camacho, Arleene, Nano Cabrera, Anibal, Jose Nogueras, Pedro Conga, duo Elba and Renny and the salsa Orchestra La Terrifica, among its artists. Tierrazo Records was founded in 1979 by Frank Ferrer. The label has contracts with Lucecita, Glenn Monroig, Lalo Rodriguez, recently signed by CBS, Rafael Cortijo, Raffi Val & his Orchestra, group Batacumbele, among others. Liznel Records, owned by Nelson Velasquez, which edits the recordings of Panamanian baladeer Basilio for the Caribbean, distributes Luis "Perico" Ortiz's Records, and includes in its catalog such popular orchestras as Elias Lopes y Compania and the Conjunto Quisqueya. Recently establishd Global Records, with Anibal Nieves as president, has signed Raphet, Paquitin Soto, Porfirio Morel! & his Orchestra, among others. DC Records, under the leadership of Charlie Munoz, includes in its catalog Orchestra Mulenze, group Concepto Juvenil, and child singers Mimi and Ramoncito. There are other small companies such as Bronco, Orda, Performance, Funny, Fonseca and Lozano. The latter two specialize in recording "oldtimers" and nostalgia music. In addition to the national labels, international companies like CBS, Velvet, Vania, TH, Alhambra, Orfeon, Gema, Micro fon, Caytronics and Sonido Latino, have established branches in Puerto Rico.

www.americanradiohistory.com

In the last year, record producers have discovered tv as a powerful promotion media (traditionally, radio commercials have been used to introduce new product). Today CBS, TH, Liznel, Borinquen and others reserve part of their budgets for tv commercials. This form of advertising has proved to be most effective. Before the revolution of 1959, Cuba, along with Mexico, was the mecca for Latin American artists. It was the most solvent market in the Caribbean, a pioneer in the radio /tv industry, and had the best show places as well as a very healthy record industry. In addition to native companies like Discuba, Kubaney, America, Liberty, Gema, Puchito, Conga, Guajiro, Rumba, Revancha and Solfeo, international labels like RCA Victor, Columbia, Decca and Capitol (American), Peerless and Orfeon (Mexican)s, Odeon (Argentinian), and Hispavox (Spanish), had established licensees in Havana. After the revolution the scenery changed dramatically; The exodus took place. By 1962 the government had gained control of companies that remained in the island, and founded the state -owner EGREM, the only recording enterprise established since then. Record sales were eliminated, and record production is only for radio broadcasting. Singer Benny More Jr., son of the legendary "Barbaro del Ritmo," (deceased in 1963), who left Cuba a year ago and now lives in Puerto Rico, declares: "In my country records are luxury items. Any Cuban would gladly pay a high price for records of Danny Rivera, Julio Iglesias, Lucecita, Jose Luis Rodriguez, Charles Aznavour, Lolita de la Colina or Lissette, who are frequently heard over the radio. It is not uncommon for Cubans to stop tourists in the streets and ask them to buy records in local stores for them, because tourists visiting Cuba may buy records in special stores, to which Cubans do not have access." The Centro Nacional de Contrataciones Artisticas regulates the activities of musicians, singers, dancers, commentators, actors and show business technicians. This entity is respon(Continued on page LA -28) Josantonio Mellado Romero is Billboard en Espanol's correspondent Collaborators: Miguel Amilcar Lopez, Caonabo Diaz Betances and EFE News Agency.

LA PR

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THE FIRST NATIONAL RECORD COMPANY

LA MAS INTERNACIONAL THE MOST INTERNATIONAL RECORD COMPANY

THE LEADER discos de centrocimdrica SONOMUNDI APARTADO 1792 CABLE DIDECA TELEX: 5413 DIDECA -GU 12 CALLE 3 -27 ZONA 1 GUATEMALA, GUATEMALA, C.A.

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APARTADO 6 -4297 EL DORADO TELEX: 2048 SONOMUN CALLE 45 EDIF. CONDOR SER. PISO PANAMA. REP. DE PANAMA

PANAMA

Mellina, one of the most popular artists in Central America.

Raphael,

a

leading artist in Panama.

Karim Baz, winner in Guatemala of the Monja Blanca award, is seen here with Arnoldo Calvo, CBS manager.

Ballader Jose Jose, a frequent Central American visitor.

Troubled Marke! Seeks Stability By DAVID CONSTABLE

By PEPE ESTRADA

the last few years, especially since the Nicaraguan Revolution of July, 1979, Central America has gone from a homogeneous region culturally and economically, boasting a plethora of commercially common markets, to an area divided and replete with conflict. The record industry here deeply reflects this divisiveness. El Salvador's record industry and its entertainment industry in general has been most seriously affected. Since the military coup of 1979, the Salvadorean government, facing the deficit situation of massive unemployment and shortage of currency, has had to impose highly restrictive measures to restrain imports. The situation for DIDECA (Discos de Centro America), a major record label which headquarters in Guatemala, has been little short of devastating until recently. The Salvadorean Government has had to employ the use of the country's radio and television networks to run its propaganda campaigns for weeks at a time. This oppressing obstacle practically negated any chance of promoting records. Moreover, the inculcation of martial law and the suspension of all constitutional guarantees caused the cancellation of all shows and night life in general in the city. In fact, until only a few months ago, martial law was in force, with curfews from 7 p.m. to 5 a.m.; now it's in force from 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. Given the state of political and economic unrest in El Salvador, it is a matter of record that bankruptcy has been declared by more than 200 Salvadorean companies over the last two years. Many other firms have been obliged to lay off employes in large numbers. However, this does not apply to DIDECA. The firm hasn't fired anyone and, in fact, has since reinforced its sales and marketing departments by adding manpower. Even with all its problems, El Salvador keeps going forward as a very good market for records. The other major record manufacturers which operate out of Central America and cover the record demands of seven countries are: FONICA (Fono Industrias de Centro America), which. like DIDECA, headquarters in Guatemala; DICESA (Discos Centro Americanos), a Salvadorean manufacturing company and INDICA (Industria Centro Americana Del Disco), which home n

-

bases in Costa Rica. Taking a look at the record industry picture in Nicaragua, we see that the situation is not much different from El Salvador. Inspite of the historical event which took place in July of (Continued on page LA -46) Pepe Estrada is Billboard En Espanol's correspondent in Guatemala.

iracy? We're flooded with it; especially during the past year." "Panama is a

pirating center."

Those are some of the remarks heard from record manufacturers and 'distributors concerned over record amounts of bootleg recordings sold in disk shops and peddled in bars around Panama City and Colon. To hear them tell it, the situation is out of control. They have suspicions but lack enough proof to make public accusations. For most of the past year and a half a merengue -type tune by a New York -based Haitian group called Tabu Combo was one of the 45s most heard on the air and played in jukeboxes in both Panama City and Colon. Almost no one understood the French patois lyrics, so some Latins in the slum areas gave some vulgar versions of the refrain of the tune called " Mabuya." (It was practically the theme song of the 1980 pre- Lenten Carnival season.) Because of the wide popular appeal of the tune, enterprising Panamanian singer- turnedagent Leroy Gittens contacted the combo, which was willing to come to Panama for a price much more than the market could stand, in Gittens' opinion. However, they finally came down to an acceptable figure and arrived in Panama in May of this year. (They probably won't be coming back because of a bad experience in the city of Colon, where, during the interlude to two performances, their uniforms were stolen out of an unguarded locker room.) "They came here claiming that the person with whom had signed a contract to distribute their records in Panama had no authority to do so," says Alcides Almanza Jr., president of Continental de Discos. They threatened to hire a lawyer, but Almanza says they left and he has heard nothing more about it. However, while here the group did a sign up with Discos de Panama, which has another possible Tabu hit on the market called "Baissez Bas." Despite the tremendous impact ' Mabuya" seemed to have, it was outsold by "El Palo de Mamey" C'The Mamei Tree "), which so far has sold 42,000 45s and is still going strong. "Saturday Night Fever" and Emanuel's "Todo Se Derrumbo" also outsold Mabuya last year. LPs and 45s are not the only victims of piracy. Bootlegging in cassettes is also proliferating. Again, suspicions are rife, but no proof. (Continued on page LA -43) -

I

David Constable is

a

copy editor for

a

local Panama City daily and ABC Radio correspondent.

Durante mas de medio siglo, LOS GRANDES éxitos, de LOS GRANDES en la música latina, han sido y son en todas partes del mundo, éxitos de la PEER SOUTHERN ORGANIZATION, la mayor de las editoras latinas. LA GRANDE EN PRODUCCIONES. Pionera en America

L MUND LOS GRANDES EX/TOS MUSICALES DEL FUTURO...

esté seguro... serán latinos. En la PEER SOUTHERN ORGANIZATION, (despues de 53 años de experiencia), estamos seguros de hacerlos.

Oficinas Latinas en Estados Unidos NEW YORK 1740 Broadway New York, N. Y. 10019 (212) 265 -3910 Telex 424361

HOLLYWOOD 6777 Hollywood Blvd. Los Angeles, CA. 90028 (213) 469-1667 TWX 910 321 4098

MIAMI 150 S. E.

Ave. Suite 1409 Miami, FL. 33131 (305) 358-1488 2

Otras Oficinas Principales en Latino America y España ARGENTINA Tucuman 994 -20 Piso 1049 Buenos Aires

COLOMBIA Calle

Tel: 35 -2187

18 No. 8 -92 30 Bogota, D. E.

Piso

Tel. 419864

BRAZIL Rua Teofilo Otoni, 135/30 Andar Rio de Janeiro - GB Tel. 233 -3046

Avenida Rio Branco, 223 - Of. 01 -205 Sao Paulo Tel. 221 -7325

CHILE Calle Lopez 627 Santiago Tel. 772213

91

MEJICO Hegel No. 207, Despacho 301 Colonia Chapultepec Morales Mejico 5, D. F. Tel. 531 -2371 PUERTO' RICO

ESPANA

Diputacion 337 Barcelona 9 Tel. 225 -6197 Telex 54040

Hortaleza No. 18 -ATICO Madrid 4, Tel. 231 -0661

Edificio Banco de Ponce Ponce de Leon Ave. 1250 - Of. 611 Santurce Tel. 725 -2380 / 723 -3918 PERU Av. Emancipacion 271 Of. 138 Mezzanine, Lima Tel. 28 -1617

REPUBLICA DOMINIANA Calle 18 No. 157 Ensanche La Fe Santo Domingo Tel. 565 -2068

VENEZUELA Ave. Ciudad Universitaria Edif. Macuto Apto. 6, Plaza San Pedro

Los Chaguaramos, Caracas 104 Tel. 662 -3500

Government Lists Records As Family Budget Item By TOM QUINN

welcome but unexpected explosion of popularity this year toward Andean and

Caribbean folk music -the Colombian equivalents of "country music " -is the main factor that's keeping the Colombian record industry from the devastating effects of a fullblown recession. "We don't know exactly how it happened," says FM Discos promotion chief Camilo Mendoza, < "but the fact is there isn't anything on the market that's selling too much except guasca music and vallenatos. And it's nothing new because this music is part of our roots; it's been around fora longtime. Really, think this sudden popularity is due to a movement away from the slick prefabricated songs toward songs about the ordinary man and his life." It's difficult to generalize about a market so multifaceted as Colombia with its three enormous mountain ranges that split the country into practically separate zones, each of which reflects different musical tastes and traditions. Besides these three zones, there is a duo coastal area with its own music and tastes. (Colombia is the only South American country with coasts on both and Atlantic and Pacific oceans.) The fifth zone is the Llanos Orientales, a sea of grassy plains full of cowboys and cattle that reminds one of a tropical Wild West; it has its own music, too. Still, it could be said that Colombians buy music more for dancing than for listening and, as Alberto Acosta of Prodiscos points out, This year, out of every 10 danceable records sold, seven are vallenato or Ancc dean folklore like merengues and guasca." The other three Q danceable records sold probably are salsa, which in itself is an mauthentic expression of the folklore of Colombia's Caribbean Coast and Pacific -Coast -oriented city of Cali. Exactly what is this Colombian -style folk music? For years m Colombian record people have been touting the vallenato. It rn has always been highly popular on the Caribbean coast near the Valley of Upar where it originated. However, it didn't catch 4. on elsewhere in the country, much less outside Colombian borders, until the last year or so. But now we think it's startCC ing to do real well, not only in all Colombian zones but also in and we are projecting results in Central America, 0H Venezuela maybe even Mexico and Ecuador or Peru," says CBS manager ÓJorge Alberto Gutierrez. The regional vallenato rhythms have been compared to the blues of the American South. The music itself, nostalgic, rich in beat and full of the life of these tropical rural people, has a peculiar sound emanating from down -home instruments such as a small accordion, a box -like bong -like drum, a bass guitar and the guacharaca which makes a rasping- scraping sound on a corrugated surface. The singing has a high pitched lament quality. Alfredo Guitierrez, one of the most important interpreters of this genre, often gets so funky he'll end up playing his accordion with his toes as well as his fingers while he whines out lyrics such as his most recent hit, "Dos Esposas," a song about a bigamist who enjoys the best of both worlds because "when one wife happens to be angry, the other is usually happy." Other well -known artists of this genre of music include Los Hermanos Colacho, El Binomio de Oro, Jorge Onate, and the Hermanos Zuleta & Lisandro Meza. But the biggest surprise in Colombia in the last two years has been the success of a group of country boys called Los Carrangueros de Raquira. This group is the principal exponent of the Andean -style merengue or guasca music, which someone described as "a sad thought put to music you can dance to." Pretty much guitar music (with some tiple, a 12string mandolin -like Andean instrument), the guasca of the Carrangueros deals with such themes as country people corning to endure big city life in gargantuan Bogota (5,000,000 population). Guasca, explain the musicians, means "old- fashioned entertainment, authenticity, inspiration from the people on a grassroots level." Whatever it means, guasca music has overwhelmed Colombia in 1981. In a country where a sale of 20,000 records is considered a hit, the Carrangueros have sold around 100,000 records in just the last four months, according to industry spokesmen. A typical lyric (translated from the Spanish) goes: Julia, Julia, Julia 'Sure do love you a lot In fact love you, Julia Even more than my ole truck The Carrangueros de Raquira is now ready to break into the international market and, as part of its campaign, shares the stage at Madison Square Garden this fall with such Spanish superstars as Camilo Sesto and Rocio Jurado and the BraI

-

I

.

Tom Quinn is Time -Life's correspondent and

a

Bogata freelancer.

zilian Roberto Carlos. This is the group's first major exposure outside of Colombia. Salsa fits into this folklore trend with such songs as "Where Are My White Shoes" by the Latin Bros. or others dealing with such themes as the plight of jailbirds by Fruco y Sus Tesos of Discos Fuentes. Salsa is another style selling well in such traditional salsa areas as Barranquil Santa Marta, Cartagena on the balmy Caribbean with its bannana plantations, cotton farms, cattlelands and (now diminishing) marijuana forests. However, in the rest of Colombia, the salsa boom of recent years has lost momentum. So, with the exception of these musical trends, the record industry in Colombia is in stagnation. Several top record executives (who asked not to be identified) went so far as to admit the situation had become a -that chilling word -"recession." "It's a strange phenomenon," observes Jaime Gonzales of Prodiscos. "Some labels are doing pretty good while others are just getting along and unfortunately some just can't make

it." Actually, the phenomenon is not so strange. During times of limited sustenance, the big fish have always fed on the littler ones. While such giants as CBS, RCA -Sonolux and FM Dis cos y Cintas and Incolve claim increases of 15% to 30% in sales so far this year, other smaller record companies have been, in the words of industry spokesmen, "absorbed." This was the case with TH de Colombia and Industrias Nacionales del Sonido, which last year were "absorbed" (meaning "bought out") by Francisco Montoya, who also happens to be the owner of FM Discos y Cintas as well as Prodiscos. On the other hand, Eduardo Calle, the magnate who owns the Bambuco chain of record stores and who is a shareholder in Incolve, just picked up the shaky Fono -Bosa Record Company. The trend in the Colombian record business is clearly toward bigness. Seven major companies (Fuentes; Phillips. Sonolux -RCA, Codiscos, FM Discos, CBS and Incolve) now account for about 90% of total record sales in Colombia, says Alberto Acosta of Prodiscos. In comparison, the big corn panies had just 75% of the market three years ago. -

"This is a reflection of the economic problems everyone in the world has had to face in the last five years," says FM's Jaime Gonzalez. "Things are tough all over." Colombia, for instance, has been suffering an annual inflation of about 30 %. And as the situation gets tighter economically, records become regarded by the consumer more and more as a luxury item. "Our growth has just kept level with demographic growth, that's all," Acosta states. The Colombian population of some 26 million grows by from 3 % -4% per year. Orlando Parra, chief of Asincol (Asociacion de Productores y Fonograficos de Colombia) -the industry's representative association -says total sales in dollars only rose from $24.3 million in 1979 to just $25 million in 1980 -a feeble increase of 3.5% which corresponds with the population rise, just as Acosta had observed. "Another thing that keeps our growth limited," observes CBS's Gutierrez, "is the limited buying power in Colombia. The average Colombian spends about 75 cents per year on records compared to figures like $2 in countries like Venezuela." One of the industry's problems, says CBS marketing expert Fidel Jaramillo, is prices. Long play records have increased in dollar price from only $5.31 in 1979 to just $5.66 in 1981 which, if nothing else, bears out the industry slogan that the record in Colombia is truly "El Regalo Mas Barato" (The Most Economical Gift). "Unfortunately, we're not even keeping up with the inflation,' Jaramillo says. Manufacturers and distributors get together twice a year to voluntarily control the price increases, partially to show enough pricing self -control to keep the Colombian government out of it. (The government does get into controlling prices of food and transportation.) Also, Colombian record people must resist raising prices to international standards of around $8 for a long -play record for fear of losing the Colombian customer with his evermore fragile buying power. (Minimum salary is only $100 per month in this country.) "At the same time, the costs of materials and recording as well as the advances to artists have all been going up far faster than even the inflation," Gutierrez says. "And since the market is increasingly tougher to crack, our promotion costs have gone up, too." For instance, RCA -Sonolux promotion chief Antonio Lozada reports he has doubled his personnel throughout Colombia and is now using, in addition to the traditional radio promos, costlier movie theater spots and television commercials. Since color tv was inaugurated here in December 1979, tv commercial prices have ascended out of sight.

(Continuel on page LA -48)

Claudia de Colombia, one of the major stars in Colombia.

Bogata Nears Medillin As Music Capital By BOB WILLIS

ogata, the capital of Colombia with some 5,000,000 inhabitants, has traditionally maintained a position in the record business second to Medellin's, Colombia's second city with a population less than half that of Bogota's. But now, according to Alberto Acosta, director of sales and credit at Prodiscos Limited, Medellin has lost its frontrunning position. Guillermo Diaz of Ingeson, Bogota's major recording corn pany, disagrees: "Bogota may be ahead of Medellin in terms of record distribution -sales, but in terms of manufacturing we definitely haven't surpassed Medellin." He says that Medellin still has the largest record manufacturing companies and plants: Codiscos, Sonolux, and Discos Victoria, but admits that Bogota will probably surpass Medellin in the manufacturing of records by 1985. Bogota record companies continue to rely on rented studios; big record producers in Medellin own their own. In Bogota the record industry is divided between the studios and the producer /distributors. Prodiscos, top national distributor according to Acosta, distributes records through its chain of stores. For taping and the actual manufacturing of records, Prodiscos relies on FM Discos y Cintas, an independent company that is, nevertheless, owned by Francisco Montoya, the owner of Prodiscos. CBS, an American -controlled producer and distributor, opened a studio in Bogota this year with a 16- channel console and a 1,500 -hour recording capacity. The company plans to inaugurate another studio later this year. But CBS is an exception: Camilo Mendoza, FN Discos y Cintas' promotion manager, when asked about CBS' disproportionate investment, especially in time of near -recession, answers: 'Well, they're a monster; besides, they're not really Colombia. They're the States.' And even CBS has to use independently rented studios, the same studios that smaller Bogota record companies depend on. Ingeson, one of the most important recording companies in Colombia has a number of studios in Bogota: one with a 24track console, two studios with 16 -track consoles, one with eight, and two with four -track consoles. Guillermo Diaz, from Ingeson, says that they use Escuri turntables; Ingeson and CBS are the only companies in Bogota currently using two -inch formats for recording. He praises the "well installed" CBS equipment now in use at the new CBS studio. Musicians say that the smaller studios are using mainly Sony equipment, with one -inch formats. The sales executive agrees that there is a flow of modern equipment -there is no lack of it. But when asked about digital and video equipment, he says it hadn't arrived. "Their (Continued on page LA -46) Bob Willis is

a

freelance writer in Bogata.

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Republic now ranges anywhere from close to $400 million to $600 million annually, according to varying opinions and surveys. The conflicting statistic is because there are no official reports, no one source whereas the precise figures are acceptable to the majority of companies. However, there is enough evidence that the enormous increase is somewhere between the both figures. For the past three to four years the steady climb has been around 30% annually. One of the factors which upholds the incredible rise in a world which is rocking from inflation and devaluation is that an LP entry commonly comes close to or exceeds 500,000 at present. Such artists as Beatriz Adrianax (Peerless), Parchis (via Musart), Enrique Y Ana (via Gamma), Emmanuel (RCA), Youri (Gamma), Julio Iglesias (via CBS), Cepellin (Orfeon), Jose Jose (Ariola), Rigo Tovar (Melody), Juan Gabriel (Ariola), among many, are typical examples. About a year ago, Armando De Llano, general director and vice president of the CBS base in the country, exclaimed: It is not far off when we will see an album entry climbing past the half -million mark. would say it will be within the next couple of years or so." His prediction was right on the money, even sooner than what he personally estimated. Of course, there are periods when a slump in the market is noted; however that lasts just for a month or so -and then the climb resumes. Right now, the pre- Christmas period should see another boom whereby the jump can pick up lost ground -and then some. Other indicators demonstrating where the Mexican music market is today include: a positive figure of more than 100 labels operating in the territory (about 50 of which have their own record manufacturing facilities), a sizable increase of importers (outlets which bring in the prerecorded music from the U.S. and Europe and sell such product at an approximate asking price of $10 to $12, or some 250 to 300 pesos) and more young buyers who can get their hands on around 200 pesos to buy the product (and that number reaches to about 75% of the 70 million population). The Mexican has always been a great lover of music with all kinds of styles available to him wherever he chooses to buy. Not necessarily in order, he can select from norteno, ranch era, ballada, tropical and international. The wide assortment of music keeps him busy, for the most part, listening on radio, watching the variety shows on television, keeping him anxious in the consumption of product. It is a phenomena which shows no signs of leveling off for the immediate future. In fact, some are predicting that long I

-

Billion Market Nears $1

By MARV FISHER

before the end of the decade, Mexico will become a $1 billion market all by itself. Adolfo Tapia, a board member of the growing PROFOMEX organization, recently conducted a survey on behalf of CANIECE, the electrical "camera" (a bloc of similar companies repped in government) and found the results staggering. His figures show the market at closer to $700 million in retail sales. Besides the Federal District, his report covered the most viable areas outside in the provinces. They included Guadalajara, Monterrey, Merida, Acapulco, Chihuahua, Her-

mosillo, Veracruz, among other densely populated regions. The survey also covered major spots along the northern border area. AMPROFON is reportedly compiling statistical numbers in a similar study of the country, but that is not expected to be released for another few months. Although, Guillermo Infante, RCA vice president in charge of the music division and the association's current president, feels it could come sooner. The organization of the major entities releasing product last year began a series of seminars to help beef up sales. They were held in various sales centers and included heads of the most important retailers and wholesalers (there are a few in the nation). It helped to increase promotional thinking, cut down on some shipping charges, speeded up deliveries when the demand called for it and generally updated merchandising tactics. Further healthy signs for the nation in the sale of music are growth of the smaller labels, i.e. Guitarra, Lubata, Tiempo and Ramex, latter, headed by Emilio Garza, seeking further alliances on an international scale. Discos Coro sometime next Mary Fisher is Billboard's correspondent in Mexico.

year will relocate from the heart of the capital to a large complex on the outskirts of the city. More modern equipment is being sought on a weekly basis, including a heavy amount of tape machines, to prepare for an even bigger market than what exists today. As one executive notes, We wouldn't be looking to expand, if we didn't have the confidence in the future." Problems will always exist when change is present, specifically price increasing which took place recently by an average 20% per unit. The danger which exists in this item is to be wary of buyer resistance. But due to rising raw material and labor costs, it was a necessity to hike the numbers somewhat in order to realize profits. It still is a third below the inflation figures which comes in at approximately 30 %. The entire sum substance is that despite the hurdles, the nation -and the industry -are finding ways to make the jump. From a heretofore relatively low productive area to a vital market making its weight felt around the world. More deals are constantly being made for licensee arrangements-and more outside artists are beginning to take note of a market beginning to surge.

Although losing some ground to the growing numbers of members aligned with PROFOMEX, the other record and tape association in Mexico, AMPROFON, the organization of major international and independent companies, is still moving ahead behind the principle it was first founded on in 1962 "for the legal defense and right of authorized prerecorded music." AMPROFON, since its inception some two decades ago, has consistently reached out within its own boundaries to protect the rights of authors, composers, musicians, artists and all those associated with the creation of a pre- recorded disk and tape. And according to some of the principal members of AMPROFON, it will continue to tackle the problems of the day, as well as seeking better means of improving the general quality of the product via open dialog within its ranks. Because it is the host country for the FLAPF Congress XII (Acapulco, Oct. 19 -23), it logically will have the largest delegation in attendance. Meaning, instead of one or two registrants, more like three or four -or perhaps more -from each of the 16 member companies will be there. Through the years, the close to 20- year -old industry alliance of the powerhouse labels has had as high as 21 members and as low as eight, later the actual count when the founding members assembled to air their opinions of the various problems of today. During said era one of the evils was piracy, one of the same obstacles which still confronts AMPROFON (like in most parts of Latin America) today. (Continued on page LA -33)

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W

Small But Musical Nation Upholds Tradition he charm of Paraguay envelops the visitor like a warm bubble bath scented with or-

ange blossom and jasmine, while music seems to thrum on every side. There are people in the world, the Welsh for example, for whom music is as natural as breathing and so it is in Paraguay. Whether it is that the pace of life is slowr and gentler; whether it is that the climate tends to make people sit for hours out of doors listening to music in the velvety hours of darkness or whether it is the mixture of Spanish and Guarani blood, which produced such handsome people and also gave them the genes to play the harp and the guitar with instinctive and outstanding skill. But the fact is that in a population of only 3,000,000 the proportion of really professional performers is astonishing. There are entire streets in Asuncion where numerous out of -door restaurants in close proximity to each other compete to present the best harp and guitar trios so that the lovely music rises into the night mingling with the blue smoke of the barbecues. The distinctive character of Paraguayan music became known internationally some years ago through the tours of Los Paraguayos and the recordings they made abroad of some of their most famous songs: "The Bell Bird" (Pajaro -

Campana) and "Ipacaray." At present the most successful folklore groups record their albums in Buenos Aires where there is a small but steady market for them, for the 50 or so retailers in Paraguay and for distribution to other countries of Latin America. In Buenos Aires EMI handles some of these groups, i.e. Los Cumbrenos. Paraguayan music is also appreciated in Brazil where a certain amount of recording also takes place. In Paraguay itself there are no facilities for cutting records, nor are any of the big international firms represented. In Asuncion the four firms which produce cassettes, Rey, Cero Cora, Elio, and Blue Caps, refute indignantly any charge of piracy. The pirates, they allege, are the street hawkers who buy the cassettes in Brazil or Argentina and then have them clumsily copied by the retailers in Paraguay. According to the editors of Top Hits, the fortnightly musical supplement of A.B.C. Color (one of the leading newspapers of Paraguay), there are record shops that actually advertise "Cassettes copied here." Whatever the truth, pirated cassettes are being marketed illegally across the border in Argentina. In order to keep up to date with latest hits internationally, the radio stations and the retailers follow the ranking charts and then send somebody to Buenos Aires or Brazil to buy a few records. There is no need to pay duty if the number is less than 25, but the system is expensive. Travel expenses for the

courier and profits for all the intermediaries will bring the price of a record up to $17 while a locally manufactured cassette sells for less than 1000 Guaranies ($4). Otherwise bulk purchases, usually about 500 records at a time, are brought into Paraguay legally by trucking companies. The market is small; one album of Capitol, for example, which has sold 100,000 worldwide will sell only 1,000 in Asuncion with luck. As regards local pop and rock groups, they are not up to the quality of the folklore artists. They are described as having no individual personality, being merely imitative. There are more then twelve FM radio stations in Paraguay. These, together with almost 40 AM stations throughout the country, are the channel by which most of the popular numbers are exposed to the public. They achieve this by endless repetition without credits or titles. There are so many fine performers of folklore music that it is difficult to name the best but the following are a few who have become known outside of Paraguay: Luis Bordon- Harpist; Oscar

Fabella- Harpist; Felipe Sosa- Guitarist; Efren Echeverria- Guitarist: Alberto de Luque- Singer. Groups: Los Parana; Los Cumbrenos; Los Signos LIDA VON SCHEY

aliDnn

Spirited artistry characterizes these Paraguayan performers; most recordings however are made in Buenos Aires.

Industry Fights To Stem Business Dehne By CARLOS A. MARTINS

spite of the fact that pop music from Spain in 1980 aided the music business in Uruguay considerably for a relatively short span during that year, it apparently wasn't a strong enough shot of adrenalin to stave off the dramatic decline in the record market at the beginning of 1981. The success of Ariola artists Angela Carrasco and Camilo Sesto, plus that of Abba with its Spanish -sung album which reached the top of the LP charts here, and ELO's 1980 release of "Discovery," were what accounted for the short-lived spurt in sales. The big dip early this year led to the close of APSA's pressing plant and to the phasing out by APSA of seven of its wholly owned subsidiary labels over the last two years- Bronze (U.K.) and Solar (U.S.) in 1981 and Carmusic (Argentina), Caytronics (U.S.), Fonofenix (Argentina), Groove (U.S.) and Kayvette (U.S.) in 1980. In addition, another major label here, Edisa, dropped its 20th Century Records and MCA subsidiary labels. The industry became greatly concerned over this decline and the situation was scarcely alleviated by the growth of n

prerecorded cassette sales in Uruguay. While the cassette market continued its growth during 1979 and 1980, sales this year has been rising at a much slower pace than had been anticipated. Even so, unit sales of cassette tapes has soared to almost that of LPs and the trend seems to be continuing in the current year, which is resulting in the release of cassette versions only for many titles. On the plus side of the ledger (and the primary factor in maintaining at least a semblence of economic health in the record market) is the fact that taxes on imports in Uruguay have been gradually diminishing since 1974 -this in accordance with the liberal government's policy. This has resulted, of course, in an increase of imports of all kinds, including records and prerecorded cassettes, especially from the U.S. and Europe. It has also included the importation of LP and cassette covers from the U.S., Brazil and Argentina by some local producers.

Carlos A. Martins

is a

Uruguayan freelancer.

At the distributing level, conditions remain pretty much status quo. Manufacturers distribute their product directly to the retailer, with a 30% markup. The larger manufacturers own their own retail shops, a condition that has become increasingly prevalent in Uruguay over the past three years. The month of June is set aside for many specially promoted discount sales of up to 50%. Prerecorded cassettes were included in the June sale for the first time in 1981. Most retailers now keep a permanent discount desk operative. In recent months, APSA and EDISA labels, the companies which saw fit to shed several of their subsidiary holdings, have added labels to their corporate families: Backstreet (U.S.), Ensign (U.K.) and 20th Century-Fox Records (U.S.) by APSA; and Daisy Records (licensed foreign) by EDISA. Additionally Renew Variety Records has added ATC (Argentina) and Zafiro Novola (acquired from EDISA) to its family of labels. Another important factor on the upbeat trend is the addition in Uruguay of one major publisher, Tacura Ltd., Nicaragua, which set up shop earlier this year in Montevideo, along with the two old line Montevideo -based publishing firms, Circle Line and Tacuabe.

HIM

ANDEAN BLOC J

ary). Other companies such as Quatro and Philips enjoyed increased profits during the first half of the year. Sonia Y Miriam, two popular Chilean singers, well known throughout Latin America, had a big hit on Sym label, a single titled "Ojala." A cover record by singer Gloria Simonetty hit the top position on numerous bestseller charts in South America. Even though sales in Chile favor foreign material, especially such artists as the Bee Gees, Julio Iglesias, Abba, Queen, Camilo Sesto, etc., the national record companies still produce and promote Chilean acts such as Fernando Ubiergo, Buddy Richard, Cristobal, among others. Radio's popularity has made great inroads in Chile recently. A pool taken by Gallup -Chile determined that Chilean citizens tend to listen to radio. At last count, there were 213 radio stations in Chile, 135 AM and 78 FM. In addition, there are five new FM stations ready to open in Santiago. Some 14,000 individual radio stations comprise the Santiago -based Asociacion Interamericana de Radio Difusion, Air, a network that extends from Canada on the north down to Tierra del Fuego, Chile, south. Anent tv, an interesting development has taken place with the manufacturing of a cassette by the Universidad Catolica, which contains the music and songs from the tv novel "La Madrastra," a musical program aired weekly by TV Nacional De Chile. Cassette sales have been consistently solid. In addition, plans are in the works to sell taped versions of the music from such tv shows as: "Gran Noche, "Vamos A Ver" (starring Raul Mattas, considered the top emcee in Chilean tv) and "Chile Te Invita," a folk musical special which enjoyed great success. At Teleonce TV, "Chilenazo," a show dedicated to Chile's national customs and culture, is starting its second year. Since March, 1980, Santiago has been the site of an invasion by some of the most popular singers in the world. Because of the temperate climate here, to say nothing of the warm reception they consistently receive from the fans, Chile has lured such U.S. acts as: Pat Boone, Al Martino, Grace Jones, Jean Manson, Joan Baez, K.C. & the Sunshine Band and Thelma Houston, among many others; from Europe: Charles Aznavour, Gilbert Becaud, Sylvie Vartan, Julio Iglesias, Miguel Bose and Paloma San Basilio; and from Latin America: Sandro, Roberto Carlos, among others. Without a doubt the most important show of the year came at the end of August with the appearance of Los Jaivas, a group of five Chilean ex- patriots who have taken up residence in Paris since 1976. Los Jaivas toured the principle cities of Chile, and their label, Sym Records, put out a simultaneous release of "Aguila Sideral" and "Ven A Nacer Conmigo Her mano," songs from their musical poem, "Alturas Del Mechu Picchu." Following their tour here, Los Jaivas went to the Incaico Empire to film the musical "Cuzco Machu -Picchu," a production released by TV Peruana and Channel 13 of Chile.

Continued from page LA -4

Pablo D'Onofrio, general manager of the Sheraton expresses his reaction. We don't plan to have any more shows

until this matter is cleared up." Still, the situation should change shortly. Says Maria de Angulo at Juzmar S.A., As of yet, this law isn't very clear. We're hoping that City Hall will reduce or do away with the taxes. Big attraction acts are still performing. Spanish star Manolo Otero was in town in August and put on a series of successful dinner -shows at the Crillon. So at present it seems that the 30% tax has hurt lesser known acts rather than the popular stars.

CHILE Even though the record industry in Chile is a far cry from healthy, it is apparent that record production, while it has slowed considerably, has not come to full -stop, according to a consensus of opinion garnered from some of the country's top record company executives. The only Chilean company that presses its own records is Santiago -based EMI -Odeon. Other Chilean labels -Sello Quatro, Philips, Sym, Alerce and Sol De America -all have to do their pressing at EMI -Odeon. For a good perspective look at Chile's music picture for 1981, one has to go back to February when Festival XXII was held in the city of Vina Del Mar. This is the most important event for popular music in South America and one of the most prestigious. In this contest, the German singer Cherry Laine won first prize with the song "Waiting." Second place went to Chilean singer Fernando Ubriergo with the song "El Pasajero de la Luz," a musical allegory dedicated to the late John Lennon. Both songs were recorded by EMI -Odeon and Sello Quatro, respectively, and sold well in the area early in the year. Another one of the most popular singers at this festival was Chilean singer Maria Ines Naveillan. An Odeon artist, she came to international prominence by winning first prize in a song festival in Peru and another in Colombia earlier this year. Her record "Dejame Sonar" was a best seller in Chile and sold well in many other South American countries as well. In regards to folk music, the Festival of Vina Del Mar presented a great opportunity to a group called Santiago Del Nuevo Extremo with its song "Linda La Minga." The song was later published by Alerce, the company which specializes in folk and popular Chilean music. Pertaining to sales, EMI -Odeon did about $250,000 in gross business during the summer of this year (January and Febru-

A new input in the phonograph industry will be seen this year, according to Jorge Undurraga, president of Camera Records of Chile. Undurraga attributes the upcoming changes and the changes already seen to the emergence in Chile of direct sales of cassettes. He says cassette sales has already outdistanced LPs and singles. Some interesting statistics: cassette sales reached the $4,000,000 mark in 1980 and, by year's end, will rise to

$5,000,000, Undurrago predicts. And while cassette sales are on the rise, singles and LP sales are in decline. For example, 1973 sales of singles was 12,000,000 units; by 1975 sales went down to 10,000,000, by 1977, 9,000,000 and in 1979, down to 4,000,000 units. In 1980 sales declined to a new all -time low of 3,000,000 units, according to Undurraga. ECUADOR

The music industry in Ecuador has been growing steadily over the past two years with gross sales for 1980 estimated at $19.5 million, up from $11 million at the close of '78. The first eight months of '81 have shown a slight decline in sales which industry executives attribute to inflationary trends. Unit sales are down somewhat, but dollar sales are up. Bronislaw Wierdak, general manager of number one Fediscos S.A., the company which controlled 41% of the market last year, comments, "We're growing at a more conservative rate,

but we're still growing." Fediscos, Fabrica Ecuatoriana de Discos S.A., does not export, but instead concentrates on recording local talent for local consumption. Wierdak's recording is made up almost entirely of local artists. His biggest sellers are Marielisa, Darwin, Hugo Enriquez, Maximo Leon and Roberto Calero. "Leon and Calero are bigger here than Julio Iglesias," claims Wierdak. "They're jukebox music." Wierdak also records one or two U.S. groups a year. Attitude, a Miami new wave and slow rock group from Warner Bros., has recorded with Fediscos this year, as well as Los Nefitos, a Los Angeles -based group which, Wierdak says, does very well in the Ecuadorian market. "We record what we have faith in," says Wierdak. "If they sang in Japanese and had punch, we'd record them." Wierdak has just completed construction of a new 24 -track MCI recording studio, just barely squeaking by a 35 % -50% import duty on production equipment that just went into effect Aug. 1. Sophisticated recording techniques should mean more international hits coming out of Ecuador within the next few years. Top-rated Marielisa, Ecuador's number one pop singer, may well be a talent ready for international exposure. Something that will definitely help upgrade production throughout Ecuador and all of South America, are seminars in studio technique, operational and maintenance, like the one (Continued on page LA -38)

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When the importation of product was freed in Argentina, cassette players came flooding into the country together wits all

Continued from page LA -6 As if to prove that music can flourish outside the big cities, the skiing resort of Bariloche has become a center for musical expression. Although the chamber orchestra, founded by such outstanding musicians as Alberto Lisi and Linda Rau -

senstrucah, La Camerata Bariloche now spends most of the year on concert tours. The children's choir and the musical camps for the youth are also the pride of this small town. One of the big musical highlights of 1981 in Argentina came in August, when Frank Sinatra made four appearances at the Sheraton Hotel's Libertador and two at Luna Park, the Madison Square Garden of Buenos Aires. While tango music is popular in Argentine niteries (particularly in Buenos Aires) and is still very much a part of the musical tradition of Argentina, tango music on disk represents less than 5% of the record market here, even less than classical music. The young people of Argentina do not buy tangos; they buy pop, rock, progressive, jazz and folk -in that order. Even so, Phonogram Argentina recently cut a lush album of tangos by Placido Domingo and didn't spare the budget bucks in doing so. As label topper John Lear tells it: " Phonogram went to town on this operation; we chose the best musicians from the best tango orchestras in Buenos Aires to form the group that accompanied Placido Domingo and to add emotion to the event, two of the composers of these classics ('Caminito,' 'Nostalgia,' Volver,' 'Vida Mia,' 'Uno,' among others), both well in their 80s, were present at the recording session. They were Osvaldo Fresedo ('Vida Mia') and Cadicamo ;'Nostalgia'). Phonogram, which owns the world rights on this album, is confident it will sell 1,000,000 units internationally. For the first time in Argentina's musical history, the Record Pressing Companies Association has instituted a series of awards: 30,000 albums sold garners a gold disk; 50,000 singles also merits a gold disk; and 60,000 albums sold translates to a platinum disk. But the record market has been badly hit by the recession. Sales are dropping off month by month. The local stars, however, still manage to chalk up some notable successes; Sergio Denis, a local pop star, has surpassed his target, while Los Visconti, a local folk duo, was the only folklore group to win a platinum disk for 1980. Such perennial attractions as Palito Ortega and Sandro remain popular more for their live performances than their records. One of the principal characteristics of the Argentine record market, according to Lear (former three -time president of the Argentine Record Pressing Companies Association), is the astonishing way that cassettes have taken over from records. '

the audio -electronic de-ices, but cassettes still outsell records three to one. An outcome of this tend has been the almost total disappearance of the single. This makes it difficult fo- record companies to try out new artists and virtually eliminates an important debut vehicle -or She young artist. The musical event o 1931 here was Queen, reputedly the biggest pop happening ever held in Argentina. Queen gave three performances ins Buenos Aires football stzdium which seated 30,000 and sold out. Queen's performances in Ma del Plata, a seaside resort city. were also to full houses. Kiss is also popular here due b heavy TV coverage. Local groups, of which there are scores, tend mostly towards progressive mesic, but these grcups usually proc uce their own recordings. Other names such as Nito Mestre. Charley Garcia and Leon Giecco are all big record sel ers. But the biggest act in the Spanish- speaking world is Julio Iglesias. Eddie Grant has also achieved star status. Currently in Argentina, the independent commercial record pressing companies are indignant about the way ATC (Arentina Televisora Color), -he goverrment -owned tv station, has muscled into the record business. In May of 1980, ATC formed a company which was able to advertise free over the -v channel. Not surprisingly. ATC immediately captured 20% of the market for that yea. The commercial companies suci as Odeon, RCA, CBS, Phonogram and a few others consider this unfair competition. Hcwever, ATC argues that works with the major companies on a percentage basis so they benef t as well. The sheet music business seems, like the brook, to go on forever. Melograph ed is everything recorded h/ CBS. Rely S.A. edits sheet music for RCA. M.A.I. is affiliated with EMI Odeon. Phonogran- uses Intersong. These companies represent 75% of the market. No review of the Argentine musical scene is ccmplete without a reference to its folklore music. Each province has its Dwn distinctive rhythms and lyrics, but per-taps the most outstanding compositions come from the Province of Salta, where the poetic lyrics -effect its origins in the Inca empire of the Bolivian highlands. "La Nochera" is a collectors' piece in this category. Jaime Davalos, with members of his =amity, is one of the foremost exponents of Salteuno music. Los antores del Alba, Los Chalchalerce, and Los Tucu-Tucu, are folklore groups that enjoy international stature. Ariel Ramirez, a gifted composer of a more sophisticated type of folklore music I- as sold more than a million records worldwide-of his "Misa Criolla." Also an outstanding wo-k is his "Mujeres Argentinas," sung by Mercedes Sosa. Manuel -

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Castillo's lyrics set to music by Falu are exainp es of the level of poetic and musical symbiosis achieved by same of these folklore artists. Mercedes Sosa and Horacio Guarany are steacy sellers, despite official disapproval of their political background. Atahualpa Yupanqui is a major source of folk ore composition as well. In tango music there are such names asSusana Rinaldi and Astor Piazzola, considered by many to be -he father of a new expression in tango music, cannot go unnent oned. Aldo Gestoso, president of the Chamber o- P.eord Pressing Companies of Argentina, talks in downbeat terns about the present state of the art in Argentina bit azmits that the record industry, in the shadow of the recession, is no worse off than other sectors. "It is," he says, "as though people were los nc the habit of buying." Statistics compiled by the Chamber show that 1975 was the peak year for the Argentinan record industry, while June 1981 was the absolute nadir. Pressing plants are making special effcrts tr. improve the standards of their products as well as pretesting them as attractively as possible. At the end of 198C he Chamber, together with all the companies that comprise ít. organized a sales campaign to coincide with the holidai Beeson. "It was a help," Gestoso says, "but not much." And yet ... Sr. Garbarino, head of RCA, oelieves his company is moving into a new stage of developmerrt and that if the public is offered a good product, the oLblic will buy. This optimism is echoed by Sr. Cuomo, head of CBS. While admitting that this is a rough time, he foresees a good market for the industry towards the end of the yea-. CBS has some very attractive products, he says. For exarrpie. Maris Marta Serra Lima, who recorded in Mexico with Los Panchos, is a CBS Artina artist and is a best seller in tsis country. CBS is releasing another very good product: Yva _ankh, who is selling well in Italy, has also signed with CBS Another promising sign is that Argentine art s:s like Cacho Castana, a ballad singer, becoming better laloen abroad. To stimulate these trends, the Chamber has aresented a plan to the government whereby all investments made in producing recordings of Argentine musicians-folklore. tango, symphonic, classical, whatever -may be creditec towards the payment of taxes. (This is currently being dcne i- Brazil). There is a great need to stimulate local talent but the cost of recordings is so high that only by means ewf such a tax remission could the companies carry through tie campaign. Where previously there were eight record pressing companies manufacturing their own products -EMI, Odeon, RCA, CBS, Milan, Plastigal, Microfon, Garbarini -several corn panies are selling off their pressing plan:s and in order to prune costs, are merging their manufacturing operations. -

Billboard

Artists Touring Americas Expand Horizons Portugal

By FERNANDO TENENTE

inks at all levels between Portugal and Brazil, and specially in music, have been strongly forged from the early days when the Portuguese people emigrated to Brazil to find a better way of life. Today, the Portuguese community in Brazil and some other Latin American territories, is still big, though involving more the older generations since emigration virtually stopped decades ago. And, today, Portuguese recording acts have to face up to the remarkable popularity build -up of local Brazilian musicians and singers. Despite the problems, though, Portuguese performers see the penetration of Brazil's music scene as a major market breakthrough. Among the big winners from Portugal is fado singer Carlos do Carmo, who has played several sell-out concerts there in Latin America, with attendant radio and television shows. His album "Greatest Hits" was a specatacular seller, with tv back -up. He has played the Paris Olympia this year with great success, too, and the "live" LP from his season at that venue has sold hugely in Portugal and now is set for release in Brazil by PolyGram. Portuguese MOR artist Marco Paulo is another case of Brazilian success coming largely through television. He's a regular visitor to this territory and was voted "most popular foreign act on Brazilian tv" in 1980. Now the latest Portuguese act to hit Latin America is David, a singer -actor building popularity internationally. He is set to star in a new television series in Brazil, and this will probably be shipped back to Portugal. Victor Espadinha, also a mix of singer and actor, has been regularly featured on South American radio and television, especially in Brazil. Yet the most popular Portuguese act of them all in Brazil is Amalia Rodrigues, billed as "queen of fado song," though she's now popular through virtually all the world. Now recovered from illness, she can expect the usual fan hysteria any time she returns to Brazil. There is much new material on record on the way from her. Jose Afonso, Portuguese top act in the social song field, was voted top foreign artist in Brazil as long ago as 1969 by members of the Brazilian press, having played the Canecao, Rio de Janiero, where he received the award. He emphasized his international appeal by picking up a "best foreign folk singer" award in 1974 in West Germany. His latest album in Portugal contains some beautiful songs by Coimbra fado sources. Now, looking ahead, PolyGram Discos is very confident about the future success of the most creative Portuguese singer -songwriter Sergio Godinho, a refugee in Brazil during Caetano's dictatorship. Though the artist lived in Canada and France, his music is highly influenced by Brazilian basic rhythms. Following the April revolution in 1974, Godinho returned to Portugal, having been in the home -country action ever since. His discography is effectively the social song in its very best format, the quotidian. His records have been released in Spain with great success and now Latin American record companies are alert to his sales potential. He's also capable of writing beautiful love songs, his recent album "Canto da Boca" being a strong example. Brazilian acts have always been sympathetically received in Portugal, as have those from other Latin American areas, but only a few successfully hit the record market. Vinicius de Morais did it in the 1960s with his poetry and music, allied to the Bossa Nova style. And he paved the way for Brazilian artist Elis Regina, who now has many followers in Portugal, along with Roberto Carlos. Alongside these two favorites, there are Brazilian acts Chico Buarque and Gal Costa. The former's concert last year in Festa do Avanta pulled around 100,000 fans in what was very much a rare event in Portugal's music scene. The Costa show "Gal Tropical" was a sell-out in Portugal in the Coliseu dos Recreios. The success of Brazilian television series in Portugal is another important showcase for the artists involved, soundtrack participation leading to the right kind of national approval. Yet, in the interest of hard truth, it has to be accepted that the Portuguese people have been much more influenced by Anglo- American rock music over the past two decades than by interchange of musical cultures between Portugal and South America. There's been a recent boom in the rock concert scene through the visits of such U.K. top acts as Police, Lene Lovich, Super tramp, the Clash and many, many more. So the success of foreign groups encouraged Portuguese rock musicians to form their own groups. The movement, supported by local leading record companies, Valentim de Carvalho and PolyGram, started with Oporto's rock musician Rui Veloso and Almada's group UHF having their debut albums move to No. 1 spot in the charts. UHF plays hard rock in a very inventive style. PolyGram's group Taxi won a gold disk for sales of its first album released in Portugal. Soon there were successes for acts like GNR, TNT and Salada de Frutas, and now Taxi and UHF are set for the big Brazilian build -up. Nevertheless, the boom in Portuguese rock music has accelerated talk in Parliament about national quotas on radio or television. If the music is building at international level, with special emphasis on South America, then these quotas must be fulfilled. At present, a minimum 50% of on -air time must go, in the pop field, to Portuguese composers and their songs must feature Portuguese lyrics. Major breeding grounds for the Portuguese music which is becoming so international include the Festival Avante, which is organized by the weekly paper Avante, and features top rock groups and singers of social song, and the Cascais Jazz Festival which is essentially international but where Portuguese musicians get the chance to blow with world names. National and international acts get good exposure on radio and tv in Portugal, but there's no denying the leaning towards U.K. -U.S. styles, including upcoming trends like white reggae and heavy metal rock, rather than linguistic similarities between Portugal and South America. The key reflection of what's happening in Portugal today is the radio show "Rock 'em Stock" on the FM wave, produced by Filipe de Barros in what is a strong British presentation style. Bllload Fernando Tenente is Billboard's correspondent in Portugal.

Spain

By ED OWEN

Imost all Spanish record companies and music publishers have reported an increase in sales to Latin American markets during the last two years. In some cases record companies have made dramatic increases, though in others, particularly in music publishing, there have been problems in collecting royalties. Disk houses doing brisk business include Hispavox, Movieplay, RCA, Columbia, Fonogram and Polydor. And independent publishers such as Quiroga have noticed an appreciable growth. The types of product that sell well appear to be mainly ballad or rhythmic numbers, as well as juvenile material, and the major markets for Spain are Argentina, Colombia, Chile, Mexico and Venezuela. "The Hispavox catalog represents the largest Spanish language catalog in terms of current sales," claims Hispavox international manager Luis Calvo. "Our catalog is continuing to expand very rapidly as much with new signings as with established artists." He says the 'traditional' names at Hispavox include Raphael, Jose Luis Perales, Alberto Cortez, Mari Trini, Paloma San Basilio and Enrique and Ana, as well as new important signing Raffaella Carra. Other new artists taken on by Hispavox during the first half of 1981 are Massiel Paolo Salvatore, Mirla Castellanos, Ramoncin, Rosa Chaves and Bertin Osborne. One of the greatest successes has been Juan Pardo, who came out of virtual retirement to launch a new international career at the end of 1980. Juan Pardo has made two promotional tours to Latin America. In Mexico he was awarded a gold single for sales of "No Me Hables," and sales of his album "Juan Mucho Mas Juan" -platinum in Spain- continue strong. His single was No. 1 in Columbia and was in the Top Ten of the Billboard Latin Market USA chart and also in Peru. "No Me Hables" was also a top twenty hit in five European countries. Hispavox says that it has promoted more tours to Latin America than any other area and that fourteen of their artists have taken part. Countries visited have been the US, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Guatemala, Honduras, Panama, Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Argentina and Chile. In August 1981 Hispavox had no fewer than 10 albums in various Latin American best selling charts. So far this year the company has scored one double platinum, four platinum and ten gold disks for sale of albums and two gold disks for sales of singles in Latin America.

Spearheading the Hispavox sales effort with Juan Pardo have been Enrique and Ana, a youthful singing duo who have done particularly well in Mexico. Television shows completed include "Hoy Mismo," "Siempre En Domingo" and "Noche A Noche." Cities toured include Mexico City, Marica, Puebla, Guadalajara, Veracruz, Monterrey, Salcillo and Chihuahua. The latest album released by Hispavox's Mexican agents Discos Gamma, "Multiplica Con Enrique Y Ana" has already sold 200,000 copies. Another Hispavox artist, Pedro Marin, recently toured extensively in Mexico to launch his new LP "Rebelde." He made several concert appearances, tv shows and radio and press briefings in various cities. Carlos Pinto, sub -director general of Fonogram, reports that sales to Latin America increased during 1980 and also went up again in the first half of this year. " lt is difficult to speak of percentages of total sales," says Pinto, "and the value of our sales to Latin America -for both Fonogram and Polydor- because we do not sell our product direct. Sales are either made through our companies in the larger markets or through a third party in the smaller markets." Regarding recent campaigns in Latin America Pinto singles out the launching of an album by Nino Bravo -a new orchestral recording. "This was very successful in markets like Argentina, Venezuela and Columbia. The campaigns were supported with radio and tv coverage." In Mexico Fonogram has introduced the repertoire of Trigo Limpio who went there last July on a promotional tour. So far sales of one of the group's singles have reached 100,000. In addition to Trigo Limpio there have been other sales successes, including Nino Bravo's "La Voz De Nino Bravo" (Polydor), Miguel Rios with "Santa Lucia:' ( Polydor), Lorenzo Santa marai's "Tu Y Yo" (Fonogram) and Falcons' "Como Tu." Another Fonogram artist Paco de Lucia has recently toured South America and established himself in Mexico, Colombia, Venezuela and Argentina with an album "Solo Quiero Caminar." Fonogram reports the growth of sales as "spectacular," especially in Mexico, and good dividends have been paid for the time and money invested by the company in promotion and

tours. As far as sales of Latin American product in Spain are concerned, Polydor is releasing an LP by the world famous Placido Domingo containing the best of his tangos, hoping it will be as popular in Spain as in Argentina where it has sold over 100,000 copies. Juan Cifuentes, international manager of Movieplay, also says that the tango is very popular in Spain. "For some it is as though the clock stopped in 1935," he jokes. "But there is a new music coming from South America. People here have a lot of sympathy for people such as The Quilapayun, The Chilean exiles, and their protest songs and others are doing well." Cifuentes also cites Movieplay's licensing deal for the official Cuban catalog as an example of deals made for selective recordings. But Movieplay has also made big inroads into the Latin American market with a leading artist and then followed with other product. In Movieplay's case the artist is the group La Pequena Compania, a highly polished vocal quartet. "The 1979-80 success of La Pequena Compania was unbelievable," enthuses Cifuentes. "They had 500,000 sales in Mexico and even in a small market like Guatemala they hit 100,000. The big smash was 'A Final De La Juega.' We had a medley of party tunes and boleros with typical standards and we reached the market at just the right time." Other Movieplay artists followed the trial blazed by Pequena Compania. These included Pablo Abraira, a raucous ballad singer, Jose Maria Puron, Juan Sebastian and Gloria. About to be launched is the popular Spanish Flamenco singer Maria Jimenez, who has just sold 50,000 singles in three months in Ecuador. Puron has toured Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, Venezuela and Central America and his latest single "Entre Dos Amores" is heading for the charts. (Continued on page LA -58) Ed Owen is a freelance

writer based in Madrid.

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Nevertheless, new labels are emerging continually. International companies like TH (Venezuela) and SAR (New York) have opened up branches and other companies like CBS are studying plans of establishing themselves in this Caribbean country. Perhaps what is motivating these foreign companies is the announcement by Dominican President Antonio Guzman Fernandez that there is oil in this country, most probably in large amounts, if the results of different studies are correct. Most of the international labels are represented here by recording houses that have their own stores where they sell both wholesale and retail. Naturally, there are exceptions. The oldest firm in the business, Julio Thonos, C & A, headed by Julio Tonos, began its operations in 1945 as the representative of Odeon from Buenos Aires. Later, in 1952, it acquired the distributorship of EMI -Odeon, Palacio, EMI -Capitol and other subsidiaries of these international corn panies. This firm does not have its own manufacturing facilities and therefore presses abroad. Several years ago, when disco music was at its height, American singers were responsible for almost 48% of the total market sales. For example, Donna Summer's first LP (Casablanca) sold more than 20,000 units. Other American singers with high volume sales were: John Travolta (RSO) with his "Grease" album, Andy Gibbs, The Bee Gees (RSO), Diana Ross (Motown) and Barry White (CBS). American artists had practically taken control of the market. There were three radio stations with all -rock programming, while other stations gave heavy airplay to disco music, jazz and rock. However, as soon as the so- called "disco fever" began to die down, sales of LPs and singles sharply dropped, where today rock & roll influenced music barely accounts for 5% of the market. At present, only a few groups like Abba, Blondie and Village People (RCA) are still given airplay. As far as costs are concerned, a 45 rpm disk sells for the equivalent of $1.50 in US currency to the general public or $1 wholesale. The LP has two prices: $4.30 wholesale and retail $5.50; or $4.65 wholesale and $5.95 retail. Fabiola (16- track) is the largest recording studio and is equipped with Ampex. At present it is renting out to a group of well -known musicians, among whom are Jorge Taveras &

CARIBBEAN Continued from page LA -10 sible for booking them in radio, tv, cabarets, theatres, stadiums, etc., and keep them working the entire year. Top- ranking artists usually are assigned to perform in the more exclusive spots such as: the famous Tropicana Cabaret, the Riviera and Habana Libre Hotels (the old Havana Hilton), the Amadeo Roldan, Nacional and Musical de la Habana theatres. These places also provide the stages for international artists that visit Cuba. In the Western Antilles (including those of Dutch and Portuguese origin like Aruba, Bonaire and Curazao), the main obstacle for the development of the industry is the small popu-

lation of the islands. Within this context, even the record industry in Jamaica is far from having in its catalogs major figures of Antillian and international music. Recently deceased Bob Marley, perhaps the chief exponent of reggae, and Jamaica's most acclaimed musician, produced his first records in the country. He later recorded in England or the United States. The same has happened with disco singer Grace Jones. .11 a In the Virgin Islands, as in Jamaica, the broadcasting of E American music is intense. Rhythms of African origin like calm saco (from Trinidad -Tobago), spouge (Barbados), and reggae are very popular. m Tourists who are attracted by the beautiful beaches, the in< ternational hotels and the free zones in the Antilles, bring their occidental fashions and music closer to residents of the islands. In Trinidad -Tobago one government -owned tv station (black and white) operates two channels. They are two radio stations, one of them state -owned. These two media channels help promote the relatively few native artists extant. The six islands that form the Dutch Antilles are better off than the other islands, thanks to their dynamic tourist promotion, which creates jobs for native artists in hotels and other forums. Economic and social underdevelopment in Haiti, the poorest country in the continent, is reflected in its artistic production; there is virtually no record industry. Haiti lacks good recording studios because there is no flourishing market (either national or international) in this Caribbean island. Perhaps the only artist more or less renowned internationally is Ansi Derosa, who always records abroad because G he, like many other Haitians, believes that career stability and áincentives are only possible in Europe or in other countries of O the continent. Derose, nonetheless, always represents his country in international festivals. The Dominican record industry is more or less typical of the =i m industry in most of the Latin American countries, with one 0 glaring exception, a 50% reduction in normal sales level.

Danny de Leon. The other studio recently set up, the Young & Rubicam Damaris, belongs to a longstanding well -known publicity agency in the local market. It has eight -track equipment and uses TEAC hardware. The cost per hour is $60, while at Fabiola it's $80 per hour. There are smaller studios that use only 4 tracks. Most Dominican bands and artists record in these two studios. On few occasions, certain artists are sent to recording Billboard studios in the United States or Spain. Credits Editor. Earl Paige, Assistant Editor, Ed Ochs; coordinating assistance from Billboard En Espanol staff; art. Bernie Rollins.

BRAZIL Continued from page LA -9 ation -at that time under the presidency of attorney Joao Carlos Muller- carried out a series of blitz operations against pirate plants, without, however, being able to stem the alarming tide of piracy; this amounted to an increase of about 25% a year from 1977 up to the present. With the advent of the new law 6895, however, the juridical approach to piracy underwent a radical change. From now on, clandestine reproduction of tapes and records is considered a crime against physical and intellectual property, rendering those responsible liable to a prison term. Whenever any music is reproduced in jingles, on records or sound -track without written consent of the author or his legal representative, those responsible for the reproduction are subject to a penalty of three months to one year in prison. And whenever such reproduction is effected by an industrial process not authorized and not registered on the General Roster of Taxpayers (the agency cataloging all companies operating in Brazil), the prison term increases to four years. According to a number of directors of recording firms operating in Brazil, Law 6895 is an important step forward towards doing away with "petty adventurers" i.e., those making household reproductions with limited sales to a small number of persons. In those cases where the pirate activity is merely a financial complement, the "petty adventurers" (as they are known in record companies' jargon) will not be prepared to run such heavy risks. However, where large industries are concerned, the new law is merely restrictive in character; because of the immense size of Brazil, clandestine plants are hard to locate and continue to place their products on the market. Together with the application of Law 6895, the ABPO is approving a series of measures that are intended to make pirate activities harder and harder to get away with. Effective immediately, the printing paper used on K -7 tape packages will have a special water -mark and be supplied by Thomas de la Rue, the same company that manufactures the currency circulating in Brazil. And as of last April, it became compulsory to print in bas relief the name of the recording firm on both the K -7 plastic case and the box accompanying it. Yet pirating activities are still a threat, to the point that CBS was forced to release in Brazil the record that Roberto Carlos cut in English for the U.S., thus diminishing the sales impact of the new disk in the Brazilian market. With the new law 6895, however, and a series of blitz operations being mounted by ABPO, together with the Federal police, it is believed that by year's end, pirating activities will have been curtailed by 70%. Billboard

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MEXICO Continued from page LA -18 Basically, the AMPROFON membership consists of all the major internationals and independents (16) within the thriving republic. The latest to officially join this month is WEA, included with the remainder of the transnationals-CBS, RCA, EMI /Capitol, Polygram and Ariola. The lineup of the independents is: Peerless, Musart, Helix, Melody, Cisne, Gamma, Gas, Rex, among a handful of others. Some in the country feel that someday the "ideal" setup for the betterment of the industry would be to have all under the same roof, i.e. the formation of a "camara" (an industry bloc represented officially within the government structure). In other words, to have a louder voice within Congress. But there are too many varying opinions over such a move. Consequently it is unlikely that there will be change within the foreseeable future, although it could mean a closer working relationship. The members of PROFOMEX are increasing in numbers monthly. One of the latest to join them was Discos Coro, a former member of AMPROFON. Therefore, with a size inching towards a total of 40, its voice could be much louder; especially when there is a law that allows any group of similar businesses greater than 35 to establish such a "camara." What is more likely to evolve is an increasing relationship by the AMPROFON members with the PROFOMEX people. It could help in contributing towards the eradication of most piracy and establishing a more solid industry look. Besides the 50 -plus labels now operating in Mexico City alone, there are an estimated like number strewn out in various parts of the country, basically Guadalajara, Monterrey, Merida and Tijuana. The actual number of record manufacturing plants is between 40 and 50; the total of tape duplicating going on around the nation is unknown. Consequently, the enormous amount of production in Mexico right now demonstrates the fact that change is inevitable. And if it shouldn't come to that, the both associations will continue their separate ways, though remain in somewhat united via their memberships in CANECE, the electoral "camara" bloc, whereas most record manufacturers belong but in a sort of secondary capacity. Guillermo Infante, vice president of RCA and current president of AMPROFON, sees a sufficiently satisfying base for the association as it stands right now. He claims their dedication in seeking out means to improve all matters up and down the line will serve as a spillover in generally improving conditions in the industry. Like one of his predecessors, Heinz Klinckwort, president of Peerless, claims, "We always find a way in keeping the ship on a steady path, despite whatever adversities may arise." One of those happened to be in the mid -1970s when the industry almost plummeted because of the acute shortage of vinyl. The situation righted itself though -and it has been better for the Mexican industry ever since (lately the increase in annual retail business has been approximately 25% to 30 %). Other distinguished members of the Mexican record and tape industry who have served as presidents over the years include: Lic. Jose Bustillos (CBS); Eduardo Baptista (Musart); Guillermo Acosta (Gas); Peter Ulrich (Peerless); Luis Baston (formerly with Polygram); Luis Gil (formerly with Rex). Latter is now in another business, while Baston has set up a successful licensing distribution outlet, Lubata. Klinckwort adds that there have always been "ups and downs" and that there no doubt will be more of the same in the future. "But as we get bigger (the industry), there is bound to be a greater difference of opinion -but greater for

all." The executive offices and meeting quarters of AMPROFON have been shifted to a modern installation in the fashionable section of Polanco in Mexico within the past year. It is under the administrative guidance of Lic. Juan Jose Del Rey, who last spring replaced Juan Larequi, now in another field in Acapulco.

Young Acts The numbers of young groups /duos making a powerful penetration into the youth market with surging sales are beginning to tell the story. Most of the numbers are hovering around the one million unit mark. It has always been acknowledged in this territory that the marked increase has been because of the rising number of people under 25 years of age, even a higher percentage under 18. Consequently, an increase in gearing more product towards teenagers and those below the age of 12. Cepellin, a licensed dentist who zoomed in popularity about three years ago by appealing to kids in a clown garb, raised the stock considerably for Discos Orfeon. The ploy was followed almost immediately by a creation of Televisa (Burbujas) which literally broke the bank at the time via manufacturing and distribution of CBS De Mexico. Along came Hispavox's (Spain) duo, Enrique Y Ana, which rang over a million sales here via two Gamma entries. And then it was another phenomenon, Parchis, formed and released by Belter in Spain, distributed with amazing success by Muscart in Mexico, among other outlets throughout the rest of Latin America. The latest to burst the bubble is an outfit of five young boys from Puerto Rico, Menudo. They crashed through the barrier here in Mexico by Cisne, in Venezuela by Sonografica and in Peru by Pantel. Their popularity should soar by year's end. The whole idea is to sustain in capturing the imagination of the extremely young public, with, of course, a lot of imagery by being seen through television. It has worked through promo (Continued on page LA -46)

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2.- TV Festivales de la canción: 1979 - Oswaldo Montenegro /José Alexandre Tercer Lugar 1980 - Oswaldo Montenegro Primer Lugar 1981 - Guilherme Arantes Segundo Lugar

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boast, but one that's fairly substantiated by the recent 1980 census. Spanish origin residents were cited as the fastest growing minority in America, increasing in size a phenomenal 61% from 9.1 million in 1970 to 14.7 million in 1980. Tapping that vast potential is naturally the goal of the Latin music merchandisers. But what's their key to staying afloat in the stormy seas of the U.S. economy? Two things: increasing promotion sophistication as best exemplified by the expanded use of television as a sales medium, and the coming of age of the romantic pop Latin sound, two elements that are cutting across regional tastes and prejudices with chart-topping speed.

The Growth Of International Latin Pop The U.S. is a complex hybrid of Latin cultures. Mexicans dominate the West and Southwest. Cubans and Central and South Americans mainly occupy Florida. And Puerto Ricans, Dominicans and migratory Cubans mingle in the New York area. Each culture has its own musical preferences, and although the musical separatism of decades past is on the wane, it's still true that the Caribbean -bred salsa of the Northeast rarely makes the hit parade of the Mariachi, Tex -Mex and Norteno conscious West. Fragmentation of audience means fragmentation of buying potential, which explains why sales of 100,000 copies of a Latin record is considered the equivalent of a mainstream LP breaking platinum. Most Latin labels, in fact, are content with sales far less than 100,000. But the romantic Latin pop surge has changed those expectations. Led by the fast -selling example of Spain's Julio Iglesias and the legendary Camilo Sesto, contemporary artists such as Emmanuel, Jose Rodriguez, Juan Gabriel, Roberto Carlos, Napoleon, and Raphael are making music that crosses cultural boundaries and appeals to Latins from the proverbial

"sea to shining sea." "It's not hard to deal with the different types of music each area likes," comments Caytronic's Shapiro. "It's so obvious now, it isn't hard and there's always a mixture of types that sell in each market and certain things that automatically sell better. Once you start getting into the International artists like Iglesias and Sesto, you sell everywhere. At one time they didn't. Now they do. Their's seems to be a broader taste happening. A Mexican can now buy a Cuban artist and so on. It isn't quite as distinctive as it used to be. Mexican product can sell in New York if the sound is right. The only holdout is Florida, which still buys very little Mexican, a lot of Tropical music and the Spanish where they talk with a lisp."

By RICARDO FORREST

"International Latin music, the Euro -pop type sound, is the new big competitor in the United States to the other kinds of music that impact the Latin market -regional music and the top 40 American hits," notes Enrique Fernandez, editor of Billboard En Espanol, a sister magazine first published two years ago to serve the worldwide Latin market. "It's beginning to penetrate here in a serious way. The real strength of its success is that it's not regional, not linked to culture." That aspect of the music, says Fernandez, makes it appeal not only to all the different U.S. Latin cultures, but to all different age groups. The usual pattern in America is that young teenagers, the most avid record buying segment, are too anglicized to buy Latin music. American pop hits are what they listen to and purchase. Latin rhythms seem too old fashioned and un -hip. "But even though International Latin pop is in many ways traditional," says Fernandez, "it's not the traditional music of the regional cultures in America. So young people embrace it more readily, seeing in it sophistication and modernism." So what started in Spain and blossomed in Mexico, Venezuela and Argentina has become a full -fledged juggernaut,

not only in the U.S. but throughout the world. "International is international," enthuses Fernandez. " Iglesia, who happens to be just about the best selling artist on the globe, has toured Europe, Japan, Finland, South Africa. It's a sound that's marketable everywhere. "Because of its European flavor and continental flare, compare the phenomenon with designer jeans. International Latin pop is the designer jeans of Hispanic music. And it's marketed in a way that salsa never was. That's the key. Julio Iglesias was big when he was on Alhambra, but he became a superstar when CBS International got hold of him. Talent and personality are essential with any artist, but the heavy push this music has gotten is vital." And one new and major factor in that push -television. I

The Selling Of Latin Music On tv "The major switch in Latin marketing procedures in the last couple years is that tv is becoming tremendously important," notes Shapiro, whose Caytronics' firm has hit the Latin charts with tv greatest hits packages from Jose Jose, Camilo Sesto and Juan Gabriel. "Radio is still important, but it seems like a tv spot tied into various major retail outlets has been an exceptionally successful route for us. It's expensive to buy tv time, but an effective campaign can triple or quadruple your normal sales. We've reached 200,000 and up to 300,000

units. Some cities, such as Houston, a growing Mexican market, are cursed with poor Latin tv coverage. But in urban centers with multiple Latin channels, such as Los Angeles, San Antonio, New York and Miami, the medium is extremely valuable. The best conduit is SIN, Spanish International Network, which reaches over 100 stations nationwide and allows for a tremendous, concentrated exposure. The most popular music show," Siempre En Domingo," is a slickly produced weekly Latin music feast, featuring the newcomers and giants of the Hispanic beat in all parts of the globe. The pioneer in marketing Latin product via tv is Teledicsos, a marketing firm which has set up lucrative tv offers not only for Caytronics, but also for CBS International, Profono, Alhambra and Discos Gas SA, a bevy of the largest companies in Latin music. "Nobody had tried tackling the Latin market through television before us," remarks Dan Kubik, executive vice president for the firm. "We pride ourselves not only on our aggressive tv marketing campaigns but on our follow through in the retail end by using elaborate displays, posters and so on. The

Latin market is growing rapidly and we seemed to have latched onto it." Telediscos started only three years ago with two tv packages. Their second year they boasted four LPs and their third year they had six, all of which are liberally sprinkled near the

top of the Latin charts. An eight week campaign usually costs in the neighborhood of $50,000 and although most of the packages are offered in major outlets such as Woolco and Woolworth, the firm has attempted a couple of mail -order offers, including a highly successful 1980 Disney package of 10 seven -inch records featuring excerpts of Disney films translated into Spanish and retailing at $14.98. "For the most part we prefer selling Latin music through the stores rather than mail- order," explains Shapiro. "It's a more effective way of selling merchandise because you get an immediate coverage of product rather than having to wait for someone to call you about it. The stores don't pay for the tv plug. It's our cost and investment. Retail advertising in the Spanish market is a little different in that way. We co -op to some extent, but if we're pushing something we generally carry the cost. Spanish dealers have never been as aware of advertising. They don't like to spend their money that way." Augustin Gurza, a Latin industry expert who recently opened two retail outlets in the prime Hispanic market of Los Angeles, affirms that despite a high $8.98 list, tv packages are big sellers. "They do very well. People think they're getting a value and they are. The disks are usually of collection of 15 songs, more than on a regular LP, and those 15 are the cream of the artist's hits. The economy is such that people don't want to experiment, but when they see a package full of songs they know and like, they're willing to spend more to have it." Although many of the artists for these tv LPs are of the International Latin pop genre, the medium has even broken the barriers against regional Latin music. By far one of the bestselling records this summer has been Profono Telediscos "Viva El Norte." Comprised of 15 hits in the Norteno vein, a Northern Mexican type of music, this collection hit the top of the charts from coast to coast, an amazing feat for this regional sort of sound. The Latin Beat Of New York Since each section of the U.S. has its own story to tell regarding Hispanic music, it would perhaps be best to now concentrate on the regional Latin happenings and how they relate to the surge of International pop. According to 1980 figures, 2.6 million Spanish people reside in the Northeast section of the U.S. And the prime musical contribution of that mixture of Cubans, Puerto Ricans and Dominicans is salsa, the Latin version of disco. Like disco, salsa was once seen as the "next big thing." It was envisioned that salsa would be the sound that would let Latin music crossover into the mainstream. Those dreams were never realized. Salsa superstars such as Eddie Palmieri, the Fania All Stars and Ray Barretto were snatched up by mainstream labels such as Atlantic and CBS, put out crossover records with English lyrics, and then wandered back to their original Latin labels. The crossover LPs didn't fail by Latin standards, but the expectations that they would be bought by the Anglo market didn't develop, so the salsa "boom" was a bubble that quickly burst. Billboard En Espanol's Fernandez likens salsa's failure to the failure of disco. "Salsa is a peculiar phenomenon. Everyone concedes it's not as strong as it once was, but you could (Continued on page LA -52) Ricardo Forrest is

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ANDEAN BLOC Continued front page LA -24 sponsored by MCI and held at the Fediscos studios during the first week of August. Twenty -five industry personnel from Peru, Bolivia, Chile, Venezuela, Colombia and Brazil attended the four-day conference, which was taught by NYU audio professor John Warren and Greg Lampey, chief engineer at MCI. The idea is to hold these seminars annually with a different South American country hosting every time. Leticia Pino de Ortega, general manager of INFESA, Indus tria Fonografica Ecuatoriana S.A., says that her company is building a new plant outside of Guayaquil which should be ready around the end of October. The company acquired a 16track console system in 1980. Right now, they boast 20 LP presses (with two in reserve) and another 24 -45 rpm presses, 10 of which can be converted to LP size. Ortega says that INFESA does not do much exporting due to the size of their international label obligation. Still, with the new plant, an increase in production, and possible exportation, are in the future. Singles sales have dropped for Ortega during the last three months but they have been replaced by a sudden boom in cassettes and LPs. LPs and cassettes seem to be gaining on the popular 45s with 45 sales down 32.55% and combined LP and cassette sales up 30.13 %. The other three important manufacturers on the Ecuadorian scene, Fadisa (Fabrica de Discos S.A.), Famoso C.A. and Aguilar S.A. continue with steady production of largely international, salsa and Peruvian criolla sellers, respectively. With surveys showing that radio has nearly 90% household penetration (more than television and the press), manufacturers tend to use radio to push their products. Nonetheless, Mary Lou Para de Hay, general manager of two Quito stations, both Radio Musical AM and Teleonda Musical FM, says that radio sales are on the downswing. There is no license requirement to own a radio station in Ecuador and, as Hay says, "There won't be any effective regulating system until someone puts a halt to the granting of new frequencies." With a saturated AM band, high tv time rates that cut into advertising budgets, and no radio advertising time restrictions, radio ad sales are hurting and look like they will continue to do so. AM saturation is one thing that has given a boost to the FM dial. Hay says that FM has picked up noticeably over the last four years and should keep growing as the government continues issuing FM licenses. Of the 402 radio stations in Ecuador, far more have either sports or news formats than music programming. Radio Musical and Teleonda Musical both aim at the 11- 30- year -old market. Format on the AM station centers around top 40 hits,

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BOLIVIA Intense political turbulence and military infighting since the July 17, 1980 military coup has brought the fragile Bolivian economy to its knees. And with the record -buying public's purchasing power drastically reduced, the music industry has been an early casualty. Industry officials report sales off from 10% to more than 50% compared with a year ago, and record presses are working at far below capacity. In addition to economic problems, a strictly enforced curfew since the July 17 coup has reduced the potential for live shows and radio stations find it uneconomical to broadcast past 2 a.m., since the listening audience virtually disappears. In September of 1980, a new military government led by General Celso Torrelio took power, and one of its measures was to move the midnight curfew back to 1 a.m. But Torrelio is seen by political observers as a close ally of former president General Luis Garcia Meza and little change is expected, at least in the near future. Here's the economic setting in which record producers are working: GNP grew, according to official figures, at a rate of 0.8% in 1980, and a zero growth rate was expected for 1981. The cost of various essentials has increased between 25 -50% since July, 1980, because of elimination of most subsidies on food and fuel. This year's annual inflation rate, on an annual basis, is 35 %. Wages are frozen. Interest rates on fixed -term deposits have been raised, taking money out of circulation. And, important for businessmen dealing with foreign corn panies, Bolivia has almost run out of foreign reserves: The Central Bank on July 31, of this year, halted almost all sale of foreign exchange. Payment of foreign obligations is being handled on a priority basis, and one record manufacturer says he has run into delays in making payments outside the country. "I have the money in Bolivian pesos," he says, "but can't get the dollars." Nevertheless, he says, the situation "can't continue," and record companies say they are weathering Bolivia's current crisis. They are upgrading recording facilities, expanding FM radio, and mounting a strong attack on cassette piracy (record piracy is not a problem in Bolivia) in order to recapture a potentially important market. We are selling 35 to 40% of what we sell in good times," according to Miguel Dueri, owner of Discolandia Dueri y Cia., Ltda. Dueri's firm, like other major record companies, han(Continued on page LA -44)

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while FM plays rock album cuts. Radio Musical has been popular, holding between the No. 1 and number five spots since its radio debut 16 years ago. Although there are no regulations controlling advertising air time, Hay has her own. On AM, there is one spot between each tune and on FM one between every three plays. Hay thinks that the recording companies, still quite traditionally oriented, are beginning to realize that Ecuadorian music is a product that will sell abroad, particularly now that Latin music sales in the United States are on the rise. Her summer '81 music festival, an on -air rater which was organized in conjunction with local record companies, seems to indicate that international numbers are on top of the radio charts within Ecuador. Numbers one, two and three on the list were "Time" by Alan Parson, "The One That You Love," an Air Supply hit, and Stars' single of the same name. Big local names, reports Hay, are Marielisa, Claudio Jacombe, Johnny and Susanna, Patricia Gonzales, whom Hay calls the Joan Baez of Ecuador, and finally Mozarella, one of the only Ecuadorian rock bands to command any attention. Hay is not exclusively involved in radio. Aside from serving as vice president of the Ecuadorian Radio Assn., she has also launched a full- service promotional agency called Tecnideas. Built in 1974, Tecnideas has really taken off in the last year with a show Hay promoted called "The History of Jazz." Hay did the promotion and artist Claudio Jacombe handled the musical direction for this audio -visual spectacular that toured Quito, Guayaquil and Cuenca. "The History of Jazz" was not Hay's first venture into live talent presentations. In 1980, she created and produced the Coca -Cola Rock Festival and this year she plans to produce a Halloween rock concert which will feature all Ecuadorian talent. "I'm interested in creating a competitive spirit in young talent to get it up to export quality," she says. The biggest problem facing the Ecuadorian music industry, as in neighboring Peru and Bolivia, is piracy, particularly of cassettes. Cassettes in this country are priced below LPs in a move geared specifically towards reducing piracy, but mixed artist recordings that violate copyright and royalty laws are still popular. Bronislaw Wierdak claims that there is a record pressing factory in Peru near the border of the two countries which pirates Ecuadorian hits. But cassettes are the overwhelming problem. "The Assn. of Ecuadorian Producers and Manufacturers is fighting piracy," says Wierdak. They have managed to confiscate the equipment of some small pirates, "but," he continues, "it's only a drop in the bucket." The Association plans to keep up the battle against piracy but, as Wierdak points out, there is one concentrated area near the river in Guayaquil where pirated tapes are still manufactured and sold on a large

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CEN. AMERICA Continued from page LA -/2 In an effort to encourage the government to introduce legislation in conformity with the Rome and Geneva conventions on record manufacturing, a small group of manufacturers headed by Carolina Arosemena of PADISCO have banded into an officially recognized association called CAPAPROM. According to Carlos Dreyfus of Onda Nueva record manufacturing plant, Panama has ratified the conventions mentioned above but so far all efforts to get the necessary legislation to implement those agreements have been fruitless. The taste in music in Panama runs the gamut. Latin salsa, reggae, calypso, boleros, ballads, and American disco, rock and jazz tunes. Alla go over well in the market. There is little doubt in some minds that most of them that are sold across the counter in record stores and on the streets across the country have been bootlegged in one way or another. On the average a hit single here will sell as many as 30,000, LPs about 25,000 and semi hits, 10,000. Most of the recordings sold here are imported from neighboring Costa Rica, but ballads from Spain and hit songs from Europe also get plenty of mileage over local radio stations, particularly over FM and soft -sell AM stations. Because of the proximity of the Panama Canal, American influence has always been reflected in the musical tastes of Latins in the terminal cities of Panama and Colon. Another factor is the large community of English- speaking or bilingual descendants of West Indian canal builders. American jazz, rock, country, blues and the like vie with Latin tunes for supremacy. Therefore, American artists are just as well known as the Latins. Panamanian singers and musicians often copy the songs and the style of their American and Cuban colleagues at the outset, with Panamanian country music reserved for country towns or stage and cabaret performances. This situation started to change some 20 or 25 years ago, when a "daring" country musician swapped his violin for an accordion and introduced the electronic equipment being used by popular musicians. These days country musicians demand high fees and draw huge crowds to the dance halls that cater to those tastes. Their popularity, however, has not spread to neighboring countries as in the case of Panamanian singers of universally popular melodies who get contracts to perform in the big cities of Latin America. Latin groups, like the Fania All Stars, Oscar de Leon, Sonora Poncena and other "salsa" groups from New York and Puerto Rico are contracted to perform in Panama yearly and are usually promoted by a brewery or other industry producing goods for mass consumption. Tickets run from $2 to $8 or $10, depending on the size of the venue. Also visiting Panama almost on a yearly basis are the balla ders like Juan Bau, Jose Jose, Venezuela's Jose Luis (El Puma) Rodriguez, Mona Bell, Raafael, the Platters, the Supremes and others. Disco and rock music also find favor here and recordings and tapes by these American groups do well on the Panama market. Leading artists include Emanuel, Jose Jose, Juan Bau, Rafael, Ruben Blades (Panamanian), Supremes, Kenny Rogers, Abba, Fania All Stars, Oscar de Leon, Sonora Poncena, Fruko, Tabou Combo, Richie Ray, Willie Colon and others. Imported records in Panama total 385,271. Locally produced 786,940. (No figures for cassette tapes are available.) Type of distribution: Manufacturer-to- retailers, but unestimated quantities of singles and LPs are sold in bars, etc. by street vendors (piracy suspected). There are 44 outlets in all, 21 in Panama City and eight in Colon. Duty on record imports is regarded as comparatively

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Type of promotion: manufacturers and distributors work through disk jockeys and tv ads. There are 83 radio stations overall, 40 in Panama City, 14 in Chiriqui and nine in Colon. Two commercial, one government and one U.S. Armed Forces tv station function in the Canal area. Programming consists of Venezuelan and Mexican soap operas, popular U.S. musical and detective shows dubbed in Mexico and prerecorded videotape musical and other shows from Spain

and Mexico.

Programming is mainly a haphazard affair in Panama. Except for the government -owned Radio Nacional Network and RPC Radio Network; an adjunct of RPC -Television owned by the Eleta family, radio stations in Panama have no real programming, except for regularly scheduled newscasts, hourlong talk shows, sports programs and seasonal sporting events. Two radio networks and at least two more individual stations break into musical programs on Thursdays, Saturdays and Sunday to carry the races from the President Remon Racetrack. Of the 83 radio outlets, six broadcast on FM frequencies. According to Rene Rizcalla, program director of RPC Radio, Stereo FM program is almost evenly divided between American and Latin tunes. The ratio for AM stations is 60% Latin, 40% American, he adds. RPC Broadcasts are simultaneously AM and FM. Musical tastes lean heavily toward disco -rock and country music ballads like the type sung by the bilingual Kenny Rogers. Despite steady promotion other types of American country music don't seem to catch on. In addition to using disk jockeys to promote new records, most distributors resort to radio and tv spots, to the tune of some $200,000 a year. Tv spots to promote new LPs have beBillboard come routine over the last two to three years.

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Continued from page LA -3R dies all phases of the music business: recording, printing, manufacture, retail distribution, and radio station ownership. Dueri has just bought automatic electroplating equipment for stamper production and is equipping a second studio with MCI 24 channel capability to complement current 8- channel recording facilities. The new studio is being built in the same location as the factory, which occupies a former convent in La Paz. The studio should be finished by the end of the year, Dueri says. In addition, Dueri is building a hotel in downtown La Paz which will include a 200 -seat theatre. He says it will be used for recording concerts or video tapes of local artists. The 100 room hotel, which has been in the works for 10 years, should be ready for use in eight months; total cost, furnished, will be about $7 million. Although 1979 was considered a good year, Dueri says, after the downturn that began last year, the company has been producing at 50% of the capacity of its 18 semi -automatic Globe, Finebuilt and Worldex presses. Its cassette duplicator is Ampex, BLM 200, with capacity of 30-35 cassettes per hour. "In good times, we have a cash movement of $40,000 a week, including all retail -audio equipment, records, tapes, etcetera. Now, we scarcely reach $15,000 or $20,000 a week," Dueri says. So why does Dueri, a former symphony orchestra violinist, continue to make major investments? "Believe it or not, it's in your blood," he says. "You can't stay behind. I can't afford to be second.... do it for the fuI

ture." However, Discolandia has laid off about 10 of its 120 workers, may reduce personnel even more, and is "measuring our

spending very carefully." Dueri, who in July began new licensee contracts with WEA, Motown and Delite Records for Kool and the Gang, estimates the total, pre- crisis record market at about $1.4 million. Record prices range as high as $8, but are mostly in the mid price range of $6, with sale prices down to about $4. The curfew has hit record sales by curbing parties and limiting discoteque and club activity, but despite the curfew, which has been set as early as 8 p.m. at times, live acts still have a chance in La Paz -with enough promotion. One recent success story was Manolo Otero, whose appearance at the Sheraton hotel was heavily promoted for about a week, especially on radio. Despite the curfew, the show sold out -800 tickets. Nevertheless, international acts have fallen off to practically nothing in the last year. Dueri says Discolandia's sales include about 35% domestic folklore music, and 65% international. Export of indigenous music, always limited, has fallen off substantially, he says, and the company now prefers to license specific records outside of Bolivia, rather than tie up its entire catalog. Nevertheless, David Villaroel, factory superintendent for Discolandia, believes Bolivian folk groups are gaining greater foreign acceptance, particularly in Europe. An Aymara Indian group, he notes, Los Awatinas, lives in France now, and its newest LP was recorded with Gamm Records in Belgium, and is being released in Bolivia through Discolandia. Other major artists include Yayo Joffre, formerly with Los Jaivas, Zulma Yugar and Ernesto Cavour. Eduardo Ibanez, director- manager of Heriba Ltda., Disco landia's major rival in La Paz, is one of the most enthusiastic of the record executives about Bolivia's export potential. He says that recording quality in the past has been poor, and the music was recorded and promoted better in neighboring countries like Peru and Argentina. But he agrees that Bolivian folk music is popular in Europe, where Savia Andina and other groups tour regularly. Savia Andina has released three LPs abroad through CBS, he says, and has three trips planned to the United States this year, although the U.S. trips are not directly for record promotion. Heriba has recently upgraded its recording studio with a Studer Master 16 channel recorder and MCI console, thus improving recording quality. And Ibanez says the music itself is being polished and refined. Heriba's other well -known folk artists include Kjarkas and Ruphay. But Ibanez agrees with Dueri's appraisal of the industry's situation overall: Heriba has suffered an "alarming" 30% reduction in sales this year as a result of government instability and economic problems. "I think it's one of the worst years in the last decade," says

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Ibanez. The record producers say domestic folklore and Latin romantic music are weathering the crisis better than U.S. disco or even pop. Both Heriba and Discolandia own radio stations and do ratings based on sales and listener phone calls. Heriba's international leaders include Barbra Streisand ( "Woman In Love "), Julio Iglesias, Roberto Carlos and Peter Brown (all CBS). Discolandia's favorites include Kim Carnes ( "Bette Davis Eyes "), Sheena Easton ( "Take My Time "), Carol Douglas ( "My Simple Heart ") and Christopher Cross ( "Sailing "). Spanish language favorites on Radio Panamericana, owned by Dueri, include Manolo Otero, Emmanuel, Los Iracundos and Yolanda del Rio. In domestic music, Dueri is doing some innovative recording with the Nova Chorus; he is currently cutting 16th century colonial music, using a church as a studio. Dueri's Radio Panamericana plays Discolandia's line of records almost exclusively but occasionally relents to listener requests for outside artists like Julio Iglesias. The station programs to reach a "heterogeneous" audience of youth, work (Continued on page LA -49) -

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CEN. AMERICA

Continued from page LA -12 1979, when the Sandinist revolution was executed, record company executives evinced great optimism, as the industry began to emerge from its yoke and recover somewhat early in 1980. The problem in Nicaragua now is not only economic but political as well. A counter -revolution is expected to be staged very soon by enemies of the established system. This has provoked great anxiety among the people, thus opening the door for the opportunistic record pirate. Such a clandestine operation has emerged in this country and has begun to flood the

market with pirated product. Customer purchases have shrunk by 10% over the last year alone and record plants are running scared. Even so, the major manufacturers are trying to give good service to their scanty list of customers. The market is still there, but it can't be effectively exploited. In Costa Rica, a country with a very weak economy for many years, the situation for the record industry is worsening. Since last September, disregarding integration agreements the country has made with the Central American Common Market, the government has unilaterally issued hard restriction rules on imports. Even Guatemala and EI Salvador, both Central American countries and both of which were already being charged with high taxes, were not exempt. Since June of this year, Costa Rican record salesmen have been forced to get half of their accounts receivables from the black market. There the U.S. dollar was quoted at between 14 and 15 colones, when the official exchange rate was at 8.57. This tenuous situation has not only caused an unhealthy uncertainty in the marketplace but has seriously curtailed the competitive power of Guatemalan and Salvadorean enterprises in the face of INDICA's monopoly. INDICA, which is rooted in Costa Rica, was greatly benefit ted by the economic and political turmoil in that country. The cost of LP to the consumer jumped 25% during 1980 and in the last quarter of that year, DIDECA had to sacrifice operational margins, giving additional discounts to local customers, in order to generate sales. Even with these new incentives, few sales were obtained. In order to a more realistic competitive relationship with INDICA, DIDECA is planning to build a factory in Costa Rica and slug it out with them toe -to -toe. Like DIDECA, DICESA (Discos Centro Americanos), is Guatemala -based and it, too, has taken certain measures to more effectively compete with INDICA. DICESA has altered its distribution system top to bottom and has formed a new subsidiary company in Costa Rica which distributes and promotes its product exclusively. This uncertainty caused by the floating currency has affected the credibility of the Costa Rican businessman and consumer alike. Since there is no way of telling what the currency value will be from day to day, to say nothing of the high cost of warehoused product, it is logical that they prefer to buy from the local enterprise, INDICA. Traditionally, Costa Rica has been a good market for the phonograph record. It is the nature of the people to be cheerful and enjoy life through music. And even though the country is still a good distance away from its former peak sales levels of '78 and '79, government authorities have predicted that Costa Rican currency will stabilize at 15 colones per dollar by October of this year and promise to reactivate the record industry at that time, even if minimally. Honduras, traditionally the most serene of the Central American countries with its isolationistic indepedence, has been shaken from its tranquil perch to a certain extent. Early in 1980, it began to reflect some of the internal turmoil its neighbor countries had been experiencing. At one point, due to a political hassle that developed between Honduras and Guatemala, Honduras closed its borders to all Guatemalan product. After several conciliatory parleys, the ban was finally lifted, but there still remains a subsequent penalty for Guatemala; it now pays a 50% ad- valorem tax ($1.50 per kilo), up 20% from the previous tariff rate. For a multitude of reasons, Guatamala is the most complex of the Central American countries with respect to the record industry. Although the country has a population of approximately 7,500,000, 40% of it is comprised of Indians who live outside of the cities in an agricultural environment. Personal income for them is minimal. Therefore, the market for record sales is not big enough to warrant the chronicalling of record sales via charts, awards or any other means. Summing up, the years 1980 and 1981 have undoubtedly proven to be the most difficult years in the history of Central America's record industry. Backing this statement up are the following figures emanating from DIDECA which shows the percentage of sales decrease in 1980, compared with 1979: Costa Rica, 24 %; Nicaragua, 70% (the most significant) and EI Salvador, 35 %. In spite of the fact that the record industry is currently facing consequences brought upon it by political and economic crises that directly affect Central America, optimism prevails among record executives throughout the area. Instead of weakening their positions and chosing to retrench till the storm subsides, to the man, each has intensified his company's aggressiveness and creativity to more effectively pursue their goals. New markets, new production, distribution and promotional methods are constantly being explored, despite the critical situation in which the Central American record industry finds itself. It is a testimony to the fiercely competitive spirit of the free enterprise -oriented Central American that the men at the reigns of its record industry are undaunted in their pursuit Billboard of success in the face of all obstacles.

MEXICO

Continued from page LA -33 tional via exposure, as well as via heavy paid spot commercials. Luis Moyana, general director of Gamma, reports that he has expended a huge amount from his budget in creating a dominating factor for Enrique Y Ana on the tube. The same applied for Burbujas, Cepellin and Parchis, latter prepared to make a return personal appearance visit in these days. Enrique Y Ana, in addition to their exposure via tv (Televisa), also made an extended tour through the nation. Here in the capital, they performed under the big tent. It helped to build their popularity in a big way while adding to their clout of being big, big disk sellers. In fact, their names have grown to the point whereas it has now evolved into a financial commitment on the part of Hispavox general director Luis Gil to sink substantial money into a motion picture in which the pair will star. Menudo wound up a whirlwind schedule here recently, taping two one -hour shows and a short spin into some nearby locales from Mexico City, basically Guadalajara. The young beat goes on. Gamma recently signed an artist not yet in her teens. CBS still has Pedrito Fernandez who has sold to young and "old" alike. Television Television has come upon the scene in a big way in Latin America. For the start of the '80s, there is this added dimension spelling perhaps another record and tape sales boom for the initial half of this decade. In the '70s it was an exclusive operational tool for tv Globo in Brazil, however it has now spread to such countries as Mexico, Venezuela, Argentina and Peru. Televisa's Sunday marathon, "Siempre En Domingo," hosted by Raul Velasco, has always been a vehicle for new artists and releases since the late 1960s, but in the past 12 months its penetration has been stepped up. So has the behind -thescenes maneuvering of the mammoth communications corporation itself. Under the guidance of special projects' vice president Alejandro Quintero, Televisa more than four years ago quietly began its plan of entering the record and tape industry via an unassuming distributing arm, Discos America. That entity practically doesn't exist today -but Melody and Cisne do. And in a big way steered by longtime and successful music industry executive Ignacio "Nacho" Morales who sold 2/3 interest of the former label. He also has obtained- -some interest in Cisne. Between the both, they spell a powerful force on the Mexican scene. How each tv record and tape subsidiary functions is slightly different. Although the concept and ultimate goal for all is the same: a stronger and more obvious use of television in order to sell prerecorded music. Mexico's Melody and Cisne are a couple of homegrown label manufacturers which have come a long, long way up the ladder. They will continue to function as such, developing and featuring such outstanding artists as: Napoleon, Angelica Maria, Diego Verdaguer, Rigo Tovar, among several individuals and groups. Of course, all of the Melody /Cisne performers from both labels will have an inside track for sustained video promotion. The growing membership of PROFOMEX, the "other" association in Mexico, has now reached 43. It proves a more im portant voice in gaining increased dialog with AMPROFON over more global problems of the industry, i.e. combatting piracy

with increased strength and revising some of the authors' rights. We have entered into sporadic conversation with the AMPROFON people," says Bernardo Gonzales, general manager of the alliance of Mexican independents which has had a greater force over the past two years than ever before. Of the total membership in PROFOMEX, just about half of the actual membership are manufacturers of disks and tapes. The balance is made up manufacturers of supplies directly concerned with the record and tape industry. "Naturally, we are concerned with increasing the quality of our industry," Gonzalez, longtime veteran of the business, states, "But, if we don't come to some agreement over a 'camera' (united industry bloc with a legitimate voice in government) over the next two years, there will certainly be more cooperation with the majors and smaller companies." "It's beginning to happen right now with some combined efforts towards the refinement of authors' rights in the land plus the campaign against piracy," he continues. Some of those steps are now being adopted in an organized manner with lawyer reps from both blocs partaking in periodic meetings. AMPROFON's legal counselor, Juan Jose Del Rey, is gathering on a set schedule with Javier Rodriguez and Efram Huerta, latter the actual rep for EMMAC, the association for the some 20 major publishers in the nation. Progress in further cooperation is being reported on several issues, according to Gonzalez. "It just takes a broader outlook on the part of all concerned in order to make bigger strides," concludes Gonzalez. And that will come with more meetings, bigger representation from both associations." Meanwhile, apart from their respective business, both association members areall repped in CANIECE (Camara Nacional De Industria Electronics Y Comunicaciones Electronicas).

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It isGonzalez's contention that while CANIECE is handling a lot of legal breakthroughs for the industry, the ultimate, "ideal" setup would be the combining of the industry into its own camera. Not just a fringe involvement along with another

industry.

Billboord

COLOMBIA

Continued from page LA -14 present use in the world is very reduced," he says. Guillermo Diaz at Ingeson states that he knew of three video recording studios in Bogota: Estudios Gravi, Producciones JES, and Pro ducciones Do Re Mi, But he agrees that as yet in Bogota "there are no digital studios anywhere." Like everything else in Colombia, the cost of renting a studio by the hour has gone up quite a bit in the past two years. Colombia's inflation rate is running at about 30% annually. Two years ago it cost about $35 to rent a studio for an hour; now a well- equipped studio in Bogota costs about $50 per hour. Smaller studios are now charging around $30 per hour. The major recording studio job is that of recording technician. As well as being trained in the technical aspects of their jobs, these young men also have to know quite a lot about music; and all of them have a good ear for it. Distributors, largely dependent on independent studios for their recording work, are also heavily reliant on the radio to promote their artists and albums. Fidel Jaramillo, CBS head of marketing studies, says they have 25 promoters constantly visiting the press and radio stations. Hugo Prieto, at Radio Punto Cinco, says the distributors send around samples of new albums to radio stations: the radio staffs then choose those albums they consider most promising. Indeed, one radio staffer says that one reason why smaller distributing companies have been going out of business in the past couple years is that they don't emphasize promotion of their artists heavily enough. A glance at the figures will reveal the preponderance of radio as a means of promotion. Edwin Tuiran at Radio Super claims there are 1711 radio stations in Colombia -a country of some 26,000,000 inhabitants. Of course, many stations belong to chains. RCA (Radio Cadena Nacional) alone has some 80 stations. Caracol has around 70, and Todelar has some 75 stations. Acosta says, "AM is much more important than FM." Out of 1711 stations, only 20 are FM. Colombia has three tv channels and, in the past two years, has begun to program in color. Acosta notes there is "a tendency to use the tv more to promote artists and their albums. tv has been proven to be more effective than radio," he adds. Dalia Maria de la Cuesta, head of Invamar, which is affiliated with the Gallup Institute International, says that their surveys reveal a 79% rate of public absorption of the radio. That is, out of 100 people interviewed, 79 used the radio. Tv is expensive and its very nature-visual as opposed to audialmakes it unsuitable for promoting music. "It's difficult to promote music on the tv with so little program space," points out Hugo Prieto from Radio Punto Cinco. Radio, therefore, plays the dominant role in promoting new music and new musical talent. The general consensus here seems to be that the tv, and even live performances, play an insignificant (if only in terms of sheer volume) role in the promotion of new talent and new music. AM radio, far -reaching, available to almost everybody, with its wide offering of music, naturally takes the lead in promoting new music. The radio stations overwhelm the tv in program space, and therefore radio is better able to specialize in different kinds of music. Edwin Tuiran estimates that 30% of radio stations specialize in ballads, boleros, Andian music, and foreign music. About 70 %, he adds, specialize in tropical, bailable (literally meaning 'danceable') music. Vallenato stands out as the most popular kind of tropical music. Vallenato, cumbia, and salsa have always been popular on the Pacific and Atlantic coasts; they are generally considered tropical music, though they can also be categorized as folklore music. Folklore music, in its various manifestiations, is riding high at the moment. "People under 30 like folklore," observed Acosta, then adds: "People over 30 like it too, but different rhythms -bambucos, pasillos." In a country whose major musical influences generally blow in from the Caribbean coast, a new folklore phenomenon is making quite a stir in Colombia; from the highlands of Boyaca, the Carrangueros de Require have put mountain music in the spotlight, a position normally reserved for the lowland tropical music. Compared to the wide use made of AM radio for promotional purposes, according to Alberto Suarez of CBS, national and international concert tours "are practically nonexistant," and thus play a small role in the promotion of Colombian artists. Production costs for big -name artists are too high; seats end up costing too much for the general public to pay. Armando Plata, concert promoter, says, "Concert tours are not financially viable here." Perhaps the most serious problem with large -scale concerts is the lack of good sound systems and the crowds, which are too often prone to violence. Most concerts, therefore, are given in theaters and hotels such as the Hotel Hilton and the Hotel Tequendama in Bogota, the Intercontinental in Cali and Medellin, the Hotel del Prado in Barranquilla, and the Hotel Caribe in Cartagena. Fidel Jaramillo says that big acts, especially foreign ones, have had some success on tour here. Vikki Carr, on contract with CBS, Miguel Callardo from Ariola, Paul Mauriat from Phillips, and Richard Clayderman, on contract with Darrow, have staged the most successful concert tours to pass through Colombia in the past year. The Carrangueros de Raquira go to New York's Madison Square Garden this fall to participate in an hispanic music festival there, but it's rare that Colombian artists get overseas. And in general, foreign artists are not excited about touring in Colombia. As Alfonso Escobar from Disco Phillips concedes: "In a relatively unimportant market, hot international artists Billboard are not interested in coming to Colombia." -

Jose Luis Rodriguez, one of the most popular recording artists in Venezuela.

Oscar d'Leon, another popular star in Venezuela.

J

Industry Thrives On Multi National Showcase Status enezuela's record producing industry, in spite of strong competition from the international market, has succeeded in growing, and Venezuelan artists are gradually becoming more known outside the country. Day by day, in places such as Colombia, the Antilles, Puerto Rico, Miami and Los Angeles, which have been difficult markets, are accepting artists such as Oscar de Leon, Billo's, Los Melodicos, Rudy Marquez, Mirla and others. They are constantly being asked for personal appearances. The most important case is that of Jose Luis Rodriguez, actually an idol throughout Latin America, and who, besides, has been able to find success in Spain. The big record companies such as CBS, Polygram, Grupo Ricken (composed of Th, La Discoteca, Corporacion Los Ruices), Velvet, Sono Rodven, Sonografica and others like Beta Records, Corpodisco and Discorona, work hard on producing better material for exportation, and represent Venezuela in Spanish speaking countries. After the approval of a decree which compels all radio stations to play 50% of nationally produced music, there has been more development of this type of material. At the same time, tv attracts new figures who soon become Venezuelan public favorites. New singers venture daily on to the country's radio stations; some of them are soap opera artists (Omar Omana, Miriam Ochoq, Hilda Carrero) and ex- winners of beauty contests, such as Maria Conchita Alonso who, under the name of Ambar, sold over 20,000 units. As for top -selling material, recording houses have found major competition from foreign material. This is due to free importation into the country, notwithstanding actual prices. National LPs cost from US /$8 to US /$10, whereas the imported ones are priced to at least US /$15. In spite of all this both the national record industry and artists are getting to be known. That's what really matters. Venezuela is regarded as one of the most important show rotations in Latin America.

By MANOLO LALQUIAGO & CARMEN ALICIA ALVAREZ

The 11- month -long flow of artists (June is dedicated to the Venezuelan artist, so there are nor foreign presentations that month) has made Venezuela, and specially Caracas, its capital city, an important stop for any artist making rounds through Latin America. This is good not only for Spanish speaking artists, but also for U.S. artists, who are frequently visitors to this important oil- producing country. These last few years Venezuela has had some youth idols. Remembered are the presentations of Gloria Gaynor, the Jacksons, the Hollies, KC and the Sunshine Band, Billy Preston, Barry White, Deodato and Julio Iglesias, among others. Concerts organized especially for the youth began in the seventies, when the New York Ensemble, Santana and Rare Earth caused a big commotion in the country. Actually the capital city has places like the Gran Salon (Caracas Hilton Hotel) where tickets go from US /$50 to US /$70 per person, and shows begin at midnight. Figures such as Lou Rawls, Barry White, Rocio Durcal and Julio Iglesias have sold out. Among the favorite discotheques fzthe young is the City Hall, where tickets go from US /$25 to US /$50. But the biggest space is offered by El Poliedro, also the location of el "Hipodromo La Rinconada." II Poliedro fits in about 13,000 spectators, but even this has proved short at times for the huge public demand. This is what happened with Donna Summer, Peter Frampton, Jose Luis Rodriguez and two child idols: El Chapulin Colorado and el Grupo Menudo from Puerto -

Rico. In El Poliedro there have been shows by Sergio Mendez (who sold out for three nights in a row), Burt Bacharach, Ray Conniff and Maynard Ferguson. Also circuses, folklore ballets, groups of Latin American urban music (salsa) and recently the famous ballet dancer Nureyev. Considering the delay of great film productions, the visit of foreign artists is almost daily! It is appropriate to clarify the classification procedure for Venezuelan radio stations. In a way that differentiates Venezuelan stations from those of other countries, their divi-

www.americanradiohistory.com

sion is made according to a social classification given by publishing agencies. This classification divides social classes in five different types: A, B, C, D and E. A and B groups have an income over US /$10,000. C an income between US /$400 and US /$1000, D an income between US /$100 and US /$450, and E below US /$100.

This classification began to strengthen in the sixties, and gradually radio stations turned to a more specifically oriented schedule. The division in high income (ABC) and low income (CDE) groups allows style differentiation, according to the type of public each station wants to reach. From the schedule point of view there are two types of stations in Venezuela: one of a varied schedule and the other, which has the greatest number of stations, of a musical schedule. Within the ABC schedule we can mention "Exitos 1090" and "Radio Capital," oriented towards a young public (disco rock, ballads); "Estudio 1300" and "Radio Uno" which get to a public with powerful commercial music (instrumentals and ballads); "Radio Caracas Radio" with bulletins on the metropolitan area traffic (this station has a small plane for this service).

Within the varied schedule we find "Radio Rumbos" and "Continente," which, with their series (soap operas) dedicated to housewives, keep on being an important pillar. Unlike the U.S., where there are stations specialized in one type of music (rock, country, gospel), here in Venezuela CDE stations mix the country's folk music with ballads, country music (rancheras), instrumentals and disco music or any song in English that's a hit on stations for the young. These stations for the young maintain a schedule of 50% foreign music (in English) and the other 50% of Venezuelan music (produced in the country and sung in Spanish). Both ABC and CDE styles must submit to 50% of music produced in the country, according to a decree designed to protect the na-

tional artist.

Billboard

Manolo Olalquiaga is Billboard En Espanol's correspondent in Caracas; assistance by Carmen Alvarez.

COLOMBIA Continued from page LA -14 "We've got to work harder and spend more these days," says Incolve promotion director Ruben Dario Pena. Sometimes, though, the promotion of an artist or a group almost begins snowballing on its own. And this of course is one of the most fascinating aspects of the record business. Two such cases have helped keep the Colombian picture this year from becoming too pessimistic. One example was the Richard Clayderman phenomenon that was like a winning lottery ticket that popped out of nowhere for Incolve. First of all, hot 'n' happy Colombia is a country that usually buys about as many classical music records as it does Hot Rocks albums or old Jonathan Winters routines. "Who could have predicted it ?" Incolve's Rugen Dario Pena wonders aloud. "People were saturated with the other sounds and Clayderman represented something different and fresh and not too heavy," says Incolve's part-owner and manager Fanny Frasser. "I've seen it happen before in this business: there comes a moment when the public gets tired of what's going down and just ... changes." Thanks in part to the Clayderman Phenomenon, plus a steady sale of Puerto Rican salsa like Hugo Llera and Borincuba, Frasser reports her company is 15% ahead of last year's sales. The other snowballing promotion was the Carrangueros de

Raquira. The four country-boy, university students entered a country-music contest in the provincial capital of Tunja. When they won it, they began a radio show in a rural station called "Sing to the People" where they specialized in guasca cantina songs. At the same time they were making personal appearances in the festivals of small pueblos and in universities where they were admired for their funky authenticity ( "unos

autenticos cheveres"). At that point, a couple of key television appearances turned their small fiercely -loyal band of followers into a national phenomenon. The programs were Jose Fernandez Gomez's "En Que Pais Vivimos" and Colcultura's " Noches de Colombia." "At first we didn't do any promotion for them. The public started the promotion by simply pressuring the record stores for a record by these country boys," avers FM promo chief Camilo Mendoza. "It was the wierdest thing because only after the demand was already created did they sign with us and make their first LP." All Mendoza and FM had to do was ride the wave of Car ranguero popularity and produce what the public had already showed it wanted. "We lived for a week in the rural community of Raquira (after whom the Carrangueros are named) and tried to get a feel of the place. All our subsequent promotion has been based on the customs of the area," Mendoza says. For example, the label is giving away bright -color handwoven baskets typical of the mountain areas and inside the baskets are chewable toasted lima beans the country people there call "Boyaca gum." The Carrangueros themselves dress in poncho -like wool ruanas, baggy cotton pants and quaint felt hats. Such promotion miracle stories, however, are exceptions in the current tough times. Because of this, the problem of piracy is hurting the industry increasingly. Orlando Parra, manager of the industry association, Asincol, says piracy is grabbing a 30 -35% chunk of the total sales in Colombia. "That's 98% cassettes," Parra says. "And the more we do to combat it, the stronger it gets." Nevertheless, Asincol has taken some important steps in the last two years to attack the pirates who operate principally in Bogota, Medellin, Cali and Barranquilla. The organization for the first time now has four lawyers and a group of investigators working in three areas: west, east and central sections of the country. "In addition we've sponsored seminars in such places as

Cali, Medellin, Pereira and Barranquilla in order to educate

mainly the authorities, especially judges, on the criminality of record and cassette pirating," Parra says. "And now we have a new and tougher law being introduced in the legislature which will give us more tools to use against the pirating mafias." The current Colombian law (Law 86 de 1941 governing "intellectual property ") stipulates fines of 500 pesos ($10) and jail sentences of two to six months for convicted offenders. Even then it's difficult to convict people; Colombian justice is just beginning to regard such pirating as a serious crime. However, the new proposed law would call for fines up to 100,000 pesos ($2,000) and sentences up to two years plus it would give clearer definition of what constitutes piracy of records and cassettes and author's rights in general. In addition, Asincol has been joined in the anti - pirates campaign by SAYCO (the organization that represents the rights and royalties of composers) and the Asociacion de Interpretes (the artists' organization). Despite all the negative indicators and not -so -good news rampant in the Colombian music industry, record company executives don't seem to be so worried. "There may be ups and downs for us here in Colombia," one company director states, "but the great variety of musical tastes here means there'll always be a market for something. In fact, this variety of tastes and traditions in different areas of the country is what characterizes Colombia as a special musical country." It's true. The warm and balmy Caribbean coast tends towards the hot and sensual rhythms of the cumbia, vallenatos and Antillian- tinged beats. This was where disco scored the best in past years. The areas of Antioquia, Caldas, Risaralda and Quindio feel strong about their heritage and the music popular there reflects this. Andean folk, traditional boleros but also Mexican music and even tangos are big in the stores and airwaves of the area. The Argentinian tango idol Carlos Gardel crashed to death in the Medellin, Antioquia air-

port in the 1950s and left a tango cult in Medellin in his homage. Each year a tango festival is celebrated there in Gardel's memory. The wide and fertile Cauca Valley, land of sugar cane and modern industries with Cali as its capital, is an area where the salsa hit its high point. Tropical musical ballads and disco have also hit highs there in recent years. The people there have the reputation of being fun -loving and their musical tastes reflect this

reputation. Bogota, the nation's capital, with more than 20% of the country's total population, is a music marketplace for all tastes: rock, pop, disco, classical, ballads and especially now, folk.

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The area made up of the North and South Santander departments have strong traditional tastes but are influenced by bordering Venezuela. Therefore, anything goes there from traditional boleros and ballads to pop music and tropical dance beats.

The Llanos Orientales, the plains to the east of the country, is not very important to the overall music market, due to low density population, but its influence is felt everywhere. The joropo and other contagious rhythms coming from this area, which also runs into Venezuela, permeate throughout Colombia as well as Venezuela. And Villavicencio, the principal city in the Llanos region, annually celebrates one of the most important music festivals in the country. The point is that Colombia is such musical country with such a spectrum of tastes that some sort of music is bound to sell and be danced to here. Music is so important to the national soul that the government lists records as one of the essential items in the family budget along with potatoes, meat, bus fares and underwear. It's neither exaggeration nor romantic silliness to suggest that as times get harder, people, especially here in the tropics of a Latin culture, will need music more and more. It's part of their roots. Therefore it's not surprising that the country is seeking (and buying) precisely that music which springs from these roots. The music industry here seems to be versatile enough to take advantage of this special Colombian quality and stay alive, if not thrive. OEM a

Resurgence Continued from page LA -3 regularly reach large number of people except indirectly through the televised religious mass, the quality of such a religious relationship competing with soccer matches and telenovelas-in Mexico Sunday television viewers have increasingly become addicted to professional football telecasts from the United States. Even if the Church did not face the handicap of having to work nearly twice as long for each increased individual life span let alone for a rapidly expanding population, it would have to compete with changes in educational patterns, especially involving literacy. Literacy in Latin America has increased from 50 to nearly 80% during the last four decades. This revolution in human capacity has been accompanied by an enrollment gain in primary- school -age population from 45 to over 80 %. At the same time, secondary- school -age population rose from 5 to 28 %. These data affect directly or indirectly the role of the Catholic Church. The Church now faces a situation where it must begin to follow social movements rather than attempt to lead, a factor that explains its internal shifts (however halting) from right to center on the political spectrum -some within the Church even feel that if religion is to compete with Marxism it must appeal to students and workers by adopting Marxist precepts. Yet another HEC indicator -persons per motor vehicle suggests that extent not only of rapidly expanding physical mobility but of upward social mobility as well. In 1940 Latin America had 261 persons per vehicle (autos, trucks, buses). By 1980 this figure had fallen below 30. Per capita figures do not mean that all of the regions' population share equally in ownership of the means of transport; rather, they mean that as there are fewer people per vehicle the chance of ownership increases. More importantly, chance of access to transport increases as the number of vehicles increases in relation to the population -to ride a bus or hitch a ride on a truck has become a common form of transport for the masses.

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That there is no widening social gap between Latin America and the United States can be seen in the total HEC Index summarizing these and other indicators. The total HEC Index also includes infant mortality rate, persons per hospital bed, population per dentist, enrollment in college as a percent of enrollment in primary schools, newspaper circulation per 1,000 persons, and number of telephones per 100 persons. With zero on the HEC Index indicating equality with the United States (and 100 indicating maximum inequality), Latin America has an index rank of 74 in 1940 compared to about 60 in 1980. Clearly Latin America is headed in the direction of narrowing the gap in hemispheric social standards; although it has far to go, its position is not worsening as many observers would have us believe. True, HEC data do not include indicators of income, housing, and non -subsistence nutrition, but these three factors are concerned with secondary rather than primary social change. The twelve HEC Indicators deal with the extent to which infrastructure has been created in human capacity; without a strong primary base in inadequate health, education, and communication it is not possible that much headway can be made in the important secondary sphere especially involving income.

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As Latin America changed socially

during the 1950s and

1960s the first wave of consumerism involved the "plastic revolution." Seemingly all goods demanded by the middle class were to be made of plastic: flowers, furniture covers, shoes, toys, etc. With the advent of the 1970s and 1980s the middle classes increasingly have gone beyond plastic culture even as the masses move to make it their own. Increasing sophistication about consumption sees plastic as "cheap and common," no longer esteemed for itself. Thus, it is seen more often than not (like the Beatles) as something foreign to Latin Americans as they begin to turn to their own past for culture and design, as in the Mexican case where Spanish colonial furniture has regained prestige in stylized form that adjusts to modern needs. Change in soceital taste also has had important repercussion in popular music. Where during the late 1960s and early 1970s it was difficult to find Latin American dance music in first -class nightclubs, it has begun to return widely since the mid- 1970s. This return has been facilitated by some university students who, concerned about Latin America's overly dependent status in relation to the United States and Western Europe for customs and ideas, has begun to conduct research on indigenous music, as in Argentina and Colombia. With glorification of folkloric music and instruments and the recording of some hit records of Indian music (as in Bolivia), Latin American ideals have made a resurgence. In this context it is easier to find dance bands in each country who play cha chas, cuecas, cumbias, sambas, merengues, tangos, mambos, boleros, etc. Too, return to Latin American music in Latin America has been enhanced by the "salsa boom" in the United States. Yet the Latin American cultural current remains mixed. Although disco music has faded in the United States, it continues to play an important role in Latin America, especially among the masses who often dance it in their own national style, as in Mexico where it takes on a distinctive form and "Saturday Night Fever" becomes Mexican rather than foreign. For elites, worship of plastic itself has shifted to worship of plastics in the form of records, the charts for which continue to show foreign songs in English. (Some of the sons of the elite have chosen a different form of plastic to worship plastic bombs to employ terror as they seek political change.) The extent of U.S. musical penetration on and off the

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charts has prompted schemes to counter "negative" foreign influence, as in Nicaragua which since the Revolution of 1979 has required that the broadcasting of each U.S. popular song be matched by the broadcasting of a Latin tune. And broadcast control has risen in other ways. In 1977 the Argentine government banned from the television the Three Stooges who are seen as helping to cause violence wherein over 6,000 persons have "disappeared" in police "detention." The Brazilian military government took steps in the 1960s and 1970s to control broadcast of protest songs, as has EI Salvador this year. Some observers, however, have viewed the role of popular music in Latin America as helping to prevent revolution rather than to weaken the old systems. Many urban Brazilian poor, for example, spend most of the year and much of their excess energy preparing for carnival week when the samba groups take over the cities as their own. Mexican disco contests on television offer another example as poor and middle upwardly

mobile youth compete to gain attention and money. The impact of television on Latin American popular music during the last decade has been phenomenal. Although Mexican music has been important because of Mexico's strong cinema industry and film exports to the region, recently the televising of musical contests with songs broadcast via satellite hookup (linking many Latin American countries and Spain on the same program) has pulled Latin American together in a new way: Romantic and tropical rhythms are now sweeping Latin America, the charts beginning to show concensus favorites from country to country. With television audiences voting by applause meters in each country as their own songs are pitted against those of other countries, the cultural region of Latin America has been strengthened in a way that was unimagined only a few decades ago. Sale of records sparked by international song contests typifies the change in consumption pattern of Latin America. To play a record or a cassette requires equipment that itself gives status to the owner. Boom in musical sales, enhanced by the transistor radio that makes songs known in the first instance, suggests that consumption is becoming more sophisticated. With Latin America's population increasingly becoming an urban one (much more than half of the people now live in cities and towns), the majority population tends to be more interested in consumption than in the politics of making coups and revolutions that can only upset consumption patterns. Thus, national support for land reform has tended to fade in the face of urban demands for low -cost food made possible not by land distribution but by concentration of holdings to be worked in large -scale commercial ventures. Old style revolutions involving land reform as a basic precept have also been called into question throughout Latin America as a result of the failure of the Cuban Revolution to resolve its economic problems -after a brief attempt to distribute land in the early 1960s Cuba set up state farms and is more dependent upon sugar in its relation with the USSR than it ever was in relation with the United States. Even with up to $9,000,000 of subsidy per day the USSR is having a very difficult time keeping Cuba solvent. If many workers and intellectuals may still seek violent revolution to solve national development problems as in El Salvador, the middle classes reject the revolutionary solution. Only when the middle classes have thrown their support to insurgent forces has political revolution been possible, as in Cuba and Nicaragua. In both countries the middle classes were soon disillusioned with the sudden expansion of state power at the expense of private business. For "good reason," then, the middle classes have moved to support governments that deregulate economies "to get government off the back of the people," as in Argentina and Chile where free market economies have been instituted and suggest models for President Reagan's plans in the United States. Latin America's economic problems remain especially serious as its raw -material export prices fall in the OPEC -caused world recession. As industrial demand slackens, so does the need for raw materials. Even the oil exporting Venezuela, Bolivia, Ecuador, and Mexico have been hurt by the recent "oil glut" resulting from the recession as well as oil conservation programs in all countries. Yet with its industrialization advanced, Mexico's long -term advantage as an oil producing country does not lie in export of petroleum but rather in using that "black gold" to manufacture export goods inexpensively. Recall that the rise of the United States to industrial power was financed in no small part by the mid -nineteeth century gold boom in what had been Mexico's California. The competitive edge for pricing of manufactures may in the future belong to Mexico. In the meantime innovative, upwardly mobile Mexicans may not involve themselves in politics but migrate to the United States in the same tradition that troubled peoples have always done, most recently from Haiti, Cuba, and EI Salvador. (Poor Guatemalans migrate to Mexico and Colombians to Venezuela.) Although from the U.S. view political and economic problems appear to dominate Latin American life, a new conservatism in the region seem to prefer military coups to revolution especially at the middle -class level. With much of the lower -class population in each country identifying with the middle class with whom it wants to join, the idea of a "proletarian identity" has been blunted -who wants to live like the poor workers in the USSR and Polish examples where laborers are doomed to remain at the bottom of society? In short, it is generally more enticing to go disco or carnival dancing-to rise up in society and try to increase individual consumption levels -than to follow Che Guevara's path to death in guerrilla battles. Popular music may indeed symbolize the way in which consumption patterns short-circuit revolutionary movements which demand austerity for all in the name of "national good" that is not much fun. E II.

www.americanradiohistory.com

ANDEAN BLOC Continued from page LA -44 ers, office personnel and housewives. Radio Altiplano, in which Heriba recently bought a major interest, plans a similar policy of pushing Heriba records, although not exclusively, and has a similar format iñ mind, with a broad mix of foreign and local music on AM and a stress on rock and popular Latin music on the FM side, which is scheduled to begin separate broadcasting later this year. Bolivia's political turbulence has not affected music broad casting,.except immediately after the Garcia Meza coup when paramilitary forces took over Radio Panamericana and other outlets for about two weeks. La Paz now has about 16 radio stations, with about half a dozen commercially minor stations having been shut down by the armed forces. Panamericana claims the number one position and observers not connected with the company seem to agree, although Radio Nueva America also claims to be number one. Dueri believes FM radio is starting to gain importance, and Panamericana plans to move its transmitter out of La Paz, which is essentially built in a big basin at 12,000 feet, to the high plain surrounding the city. The AM station is 10 KW, as is short wave. Both already have their transmitting plant on the plain outside the city. FM is 3'/z KW, but with extra elements in the antenna. Ibanez, too, is convinced that FM will soon take hold in Bolivia, a country where more than half the population is Indian and campesino, largely marginalized from the mainstream economy, and where the middle class is relatively small. Radio Altiplano now broadcasts the same programming on AM, FM and shortwave, but is expecting stereo FM transmission equipment to arrive in October to permit separate FM stereo broadcast. Altiplano will be the third such FM station in La Paz, after Panamericana and Cristal. Radio Nueva America, which also claims to be leader in La Paz AM, according to a "confidential, unpublished" advertising agency survey, has no close ties to any record manufacturer, according to director Elvira Llosa de Salmon, who is filling in for her husband at the station while he handles his job as La Paz mayor. The station broadcasts at 10 KW in AM and shortwave but has no separate FM programming. The station plays mostly Latin music, and Mrs. Llosa de Salmon says the station buys most of its records since local record companies expect free advertising in exchange for free promotional records. Current listener favorites include Manolo Otero and Abba, she says, and Rod Stewart in the English -

language category. Although each record company has its own estimate of the size of the market and its share, Heriba's Ibanez notes that production has never been measured industry -wide. However, members of the manufacturers' association formed early this year (Ibanez is president) have committed themselves to providing estimates of their production. According to Dueri's estimates, until sales began falling, the Bolivian market for LPs reached 187,500; for extended plays, 625,000; for cassettes, 62,500. The only major record company based outside La Paz, Lauro y Cia., Ltda., believes the potential market is much greater. Lauro owner Laureano Rojas said the company sold 100,000 LPs in 1980 and expects a drop in sales of only about 10 %. Rojas claims the potential record and tape market is as high as $5,000,000 rather than the $1,400,000 million cited by Miguel Dueri. Even so, Rojas says the company is producing at only 20% of the installed capacity of its six semi -automatic presses. Lauro says its new, German -made Asona cassette assembler, purchased this year, gives it a capacity of 2,000 cassettes per day, which the company says is the highest of any of Bolivia's

factories. Lauro too, owns its own radio station, Radio Cosmos, which is preparing to boost to 10 KW transmission from a current 3 KW and also broadcasts in FM stereo. The stations play a mix of youth -oriented pop, Latin -romantic, and Bolivian folklore. FM concentrates on instrumental and easy listening. Rojas ways he is looking into video production to promote local artists on tv, although other record executives say their use of foreign video is still relatively limited since in La Paz, university-owned television broadcasts irregularly and their only outlet for video is the state -owned N. Bolivia's small population, about 5,700,000, combined with a great diversity of taste, requires catalogs to be very broad, according to Rojas. "We release as few as 30 records at a time, and then reissue if necessary," he says. According to Lauro promotion director Raul Guzman, the company's top local artists include Orquesta California, Pukara, Orquesta Flamencos, Los Masis and Enriqueta Ulloa. Lauro organizes an annual three -day folk music festival in Cochabamba -this year's was the 17th- attracting nearly 200 groups from throughout Bolivia as part of its search for new groups to record. Lauro, like its competitors, does its own retailing. Heriba has a half dozen record stores in La Paz and stores in other cities. "There are very few independent stores, because of the small market," says Ibanez. "We've got to go out and commercialize." Discolandia has 12 retail stores, eight of them in La Paz. One of the newer entries on the record scene is Inbofon, The economic squeeze has pulled Bolivian record manufacturers together to face two major threats, cassette piracy and cheaper contraband records, especially from Peru. The Bolivian Association of Video and Phonograph Producers, founded early this year, has had some success, mainly in the cassette piracy.

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Does Mercado believe salsa's dying? "To a certain extent the salsa boom is over as far as trying

UNITED STATES that it was made up as a corn mercial phenomenon but was really a musical current that's very old and that among it's own people will last a long time." That may well be true, but the major salsa labels are finding the '80s a tough period. Coco, a well -known New York salsa firm, was sold and has lost many of its best artists. Fania, a pioneering giant in the salsa sound, also changed ownership, although its artists and executive personnel have remained intact. "I hate to say we're not doing as well as we'd like, but that's a fact," says Jose Florez, a 15 -year Fania veteran who handles publishing and foreign licensing. But want to make the point that it's not just salsa that has been doing bad. The entire industry is shaky. With depression, inflation and so forth people don't have money to spend on records. Our artists who always did well are still doing well but they're not selling what they did two or four years ago, salsa has still not caught on in the West, but it's much stronger in areas like Chicago and Miami, and Europe is becoming the new salsa stronghold." Although record sales may be sluggish, Ralph Mercado of Mercado Productions, the biggest salsa touring firm, is enthusiastic concerning the salsa live talent scene. "We've been doing a lot of gigs in the U.S." says Mercado. "Chicago, Miami, Texas, Houston, Dallas, New Orleans, California. Wherever there's a big Latin population, the big salsa artists are popular. Everybody knows artists like Celia Cruz, Tito Puente and the Fania All Stars. do everything from concerts to dances to festivals. Last night we packed in 5,000 people to see Oscar De Leon in the Hollywood Palladium and the night before that we pulled 3,000 at the Oakland Auditosay that salsa was like disco, in

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rium." Mercado's biggest summer show was a six -day, nine -show salsa week in New York, an annual event which he co -sponsored with Kool cigarettes this year, and which began in a small club and ended with a sold out 18,000 audience concert at Madison Square Garden. Latin music live shows are a high- ticket item, costing generally around $15 to $20 per person. Mercado blames not only the rising costs of rents, production, artist's salaries and ad budgets, but the fact that in the Latin industry the label doesn't offer tour support. "We have to pay everything, which makes it a little tight sometimes and means higher ticket prices." Texas is the newest salsa stomping ground according to Mercado. "There's more Latin types than Mexicans there," he says. "There's Puerto Ricans, Dominicans and Colombians coming in that dig salsa and the demand is really growing."

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to find a crossover to the Anglo market. But believe for Latins it will always be here as an art form, and it's booming in Europe and South America. We find ourselves traveling there more and more each day." Salsa may be king of the road, but the New York radio scene is readily opening up to the rhythms of international Latin pop. Latin music is heard on three AM stations, WADO, WJIT and WBNX. When WBNX plummeted to a distant third with its salsa format, the station took a survey of the New York market and changed this June to an International pop format. "Our survey determined this was the music most people I

Continued from page LA -36

wanted," comments Jimmy Jimenez, program coordinator for WBNX. "In New York there are several ethnic groups. Some do and don't like salsa, but all like romantic International Latin music. Even though we knew this was what people wanted, we were surprised at the reaction we got. Our request lines were flooded with 1,000 calls a week congratulating us for the change and welcoming the music. New York stations weren't playing people like Julio Iglesias very much and since we've started, we've gotten a very positive reaction." Now that WBNX has settled into its format, the station plans a major fall promotion lasting nine weeks with large prizes being given away. "This is a virgin market we're in. Advertisers love it because we appeal to a larger segment of the Latin population. think this romantic rhythm is going to be the musical factor of the '80s. In the '60s and '70s salsa was the king of the New York market. Now romantic is the music of the '80s. Singers like Emmanuel who weren't heard of before are selling millions worldwide. We're happy with the change we've made and we're looking forward to the future." I

Sounds Of Miami Before New York's WBNX started heralding the call to romantic international pop, Latin industry experts were looking at Miami's Super -Q, WQBA -FM, as a very probably future for Latin radio. Super -Q doesn't rank No. 1 among Latin radio listeners. In fact, the dominant Cuban population prefers news over music and thus Super -Q is easily outranked by it's all news counterpart, WQBA -AM and the other all Spanish news outlet, WRAC AM.

But what Super -Q lacks in overall strength it makes up in its leadership in the highly sought-after youth market. There it ranks No. 1 and has no problem selling time spots to youth oriented regional and national advertisers. As noted previously, Latin youths traditionally shun their native music. The need to conform to mainstream musical tastes is too strong. The Latin teenager is usually either totally lost to Latin music industry, or, as is often the case, the Latino may return to the Hispanic music fold when age, marriage and a burgeoning family remind him of his roots.

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Super -Q's secret to attracting the Latin youth market is simple: 50% of the music it plays are American hits. Thus, the young Hispanic is not only fed his daily dose of the American top 40, but is also introduced into the sounds of his culture. Just three years old, Super -Q is a relatively young station. When it first came on the scene, Salsa and Disco were hot among the young, so the station mainly mingled those musical beats with the occasional addition of black music and popular acts such as Blondie. Today, Blondie remains along with such acts as the Commodores, ELO, Journey, Kenny Rogers and Diana Ross, but the big beat of salsa is in a slight retreat. Super-Q has opted for a softer sound from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., meaning that the international tones of artists such as Roberto Carlos, Jose Jose, Napoleon, and the ever -present Julio Iglesias, have even made their inroad into salsa's Miami radio bastion. Still, the youth listen. Super -Q's ad spots are often sold out and the station regularly hosts 15,000 people or more to its series of free shows, which in recent months have seen the likes of Santana, Peaches and Herb, Celia Cruz, Johnny Pacheco, the Fania All Stars, Oscar De Leon and La Tierra. "We're happy," says WQBA's AM and FM operations manager Julio Mendez. "I'm not going to say this is the future of Latin radio because you've got to deal with each market in a different way. But for the young Spanish in Miami this is the appropriate one. We have got problems. think a lot of young kids are afraid to admit they listen to us and that hurts our ratings. We've been doing some separate research and we've found out that when they're asked they'd rather name an American station. You know how young kids are. They want to be cool and they feel that by saying a Spanish radio station they're going to look too Cuban or Spanish. Those are the kinds of feelings we've got to overcome." Miami boasts a veritable plethora of retail stores and two of the biggest Latin labels in America, CBS International and Venezuela's TH Records. It also houses Discos CBS International, a branch of CBS that distributes some of the best selling artists in the U.S. Latin market: Julio Iglesias, Roberto Carlos, Vicente Fernandez, plus an impressive roster of other international and national names. Discos CBS International, founded only a year ago, has direct control of all the CBS Latin product in the U.S. and Puerto Rico-which was previously handled by Caytronics Corp. Ron Chaimowitz, vice president and general manager of the new company, predicts that this year's sales will surpass their previous success, keeping pace with the booming U.S. demand. When asked why the Venezuela firm decided to move into the complex U.S. Latin market, Tony Morena, TH's international promoter, explained: "We saw it as a necessity. This market is very important. Nobody really knows exactly how many Latins are in the United States but we estimate it's upwards of 20 million. And those Latins here are making more (Continued on page LA -55) I

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Continued from page LA -52 than Latins in most other countries. They have the chance to have a car and a stereo and a tape recorder and cassettes. Not everybody in Latin America can have these things. That's why America is such a good market." The Latin Cowboys The Texas music region is known for its "Do It Yourself" emphasis. While labels such as Caytronics and CBS International may dominate the U.S. Latin record sales, most of their artists are not from the United States. "We have very few domestic artists," affirms Caytronics' Shapiro. Most of our product is from the RCA and Ariola foreign catalog. Those are probably as hot as there are in the Spanish business. Recording local talent is like shooting dice, you have to be lucky. If I have a Pedro Vargas album coming from outside to here, know what I'm going to sell. That's one of the beauties of the Spanish business. It's very consistent. Sales are guaranteed each month and those are only enhanced by new releases. The American record industry lives on new releases alone." The Southwest Latin labels take a different approach. The intense concentration of Mexicans in the Texas -New Mexico regions has spawned a separate musical genre, Tex -Mex, and those artists and their labels are predominantly domestic. For the last two years sales have been great," notes Jessie Salcedo, sales and promotion director for Freddie Records, a well-known Texas label whose artists such as Augustin Ramirez, Freddie Martinez, Little Joe, Ramon Ayala and Sonny & the Sunliners regularly hit the Latin charts. "Tex -Mex is very popular and the Texas people are very loyal to it, but we're also selling all over -Hawaii, California, Las Vegas. We get a tremendous amount of orders from Germany, with all the army people. Our product sells in Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, the Midwest and to the migrant farmers in Florida." The Latin Industry changes more slowly than the mainstream record industry and that's why it's common knowledge that 8- tracks are still big in Latin music. But although the more urbanized sections of the East and West coast are now reporting that cassettes are beginning to equal 8 -track sales, Salcedo estimates 8 -track units at about five to one over cassette. In the wake of Freddie Records' prosperity, the company has opened a new tape facility, Sparkling City Tape Duplicators, with a capacity of at least 30,000 tapes a month. The facility is located next to the label's Corpus Christi offices and although the company already has a 24 -track studio where it records most of its music, a new studio with all new MCI equipment is being planned for a location near the new plant, making the operation an efficient, close-knit complex The company is always on the lookout for new talent and sometimes new artists are found in the most surprising places. "One of our newest discoveries is a nice female vocal ist named Zandra," relates Salcedo. "She was our secretary here for the last three years. I was looking for a female background vocalist for this Spanish version of 'Looking For Love' we were doing. Spanish Texans love country music and we like to include Spanish versions of big country hits on some albums." The problems of insufficient Spanish product distribution are long gone, according to Salcedo and other Latin label executives. With such major outfits as Pickwick, Western Merchandisers and Handlemans shipping Hispanic music, and chains like JC Penny, Sears, Woolco and Woolworth selling Latin LPs, product is readily available. However, there are some complaints voiced in the area of live talent. Texas Latin bands tour a lot in all parts of the West, Southwest and even frequently up in the Chicago area, a big Latin stomping ground. The problem says Pete Rodriguez, a big West Texas club owner, is that there are too many groups touring. Rodriguez owns Pete's Fiesta (3,000 capacity) in Lubbock and Pete's Palladium (1,000 capacity) in Plainview, Texas, and asserts that the flood of Texas and Mexican bands are pulling down ticket prices. "There's too much competition," Rodriguez explains. "So many groups come up from Mexico that it hurts the Chicano industry. When disco went down, the Latins started coming back to see live bands, but the name Mexican groups pull away the crowd and make the ticket prices low for everybody." Rodriguez lays part of the blame on Latin radio in Texas, which he says plays more Mexican music in comparison with Texas Latin tunes, thus promoting the Mexican bands more. However, Freddie records' Salcedo sees this as a situation that's changing. "It used to be stations across the border and here were programming more easy listening and International music. But lately we've seen the formats changing to more Tex -Mex, mariachi and norteno music. These changes help us, since they promote our music. From the program directors that I've talked with, they are changing to give the community more what they want." Whichever way Texas Latin radio is drifting, it seems to be drifting successfully. A case in point is San Antonio's KCOR, which first aired on May 1, 1946 and claims to be the first full time Spanish language station. "Economically we're doing very, very well," says Sam Murray, vice president and station manager for KCOR. "Even in these times of economic uncertainty, big national advertisers are realizing that the Latin market hasn't been fully tapped. They want a piece of the action." KCOR's programming is a mix of Mexican and Chicano music. The latest release from South of the border are played as well as Texas favorites such as Joe Bravos and Sonny & the Sunliners, ballads and "Musica de Recuerdos" or in Anglo terminology, golden oldies.

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Continued from page LA -55

The Latin Mix Of Chicago "We have a very mixed group of Hispanics here in Chicago," notes Athena Sofios, general manager for WOJO, the only full time Latin station in the metropolis. "We have 65% Mexican 20% puerto Ricans, 5% Cubans and the rest are Central Americans and South Americans. Our programming reflects that blend. We play everything from salsa to Mexican ranchero music to ballads and International tunes."

Sofios complains that the rapid growth of the Latin community in Chicago has actually hurt their ratings. "We're about 20th in the overall market, which isn't bad, but Arbitron is still using the 1970 figures for the Latin population, about 300,000. We estimate there's about a million and a half Latins in Chicago but it won't be until 1982 that Arbitron starts using the latest census figures. I'd say we're actually in the top ten stations." = co

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Like most Latin radio outlets, WOJO has a lot of public affairs and news programming as well as a lot of musical promotions in the community, such as concerts and fiestas and so on. One unique promotion WOJO does is to sponsor an amateur singing contest in which the winner is sent to California to record a single.

Despite the economic blues sung by various Latin retailers, Sofios is very bullish on the state of the music. "We have record store guys here who are millionaires. Many of the people here work in industry jobs and are unionized. They have higher incomes than Hispanics in most other areas. We have ballrooms such as the Aragon that frequently pack in 7,000 people at $15 a head. Latin people here spend a lot on

entertainment." Gustavo Silva, president of the Chicago's 8 -store Pan Amer-

*

ican Records chain, doesn't quite agree. "Business has been quiet," he says. "It's been down about 12 %, but we hope it will pick up between September and December. We think it's been slow because Chicago is an industrial city and a lot of people, including Mexicans, can't find work."

What is selling are the hit releases from Profono, RCA (Caytronics distributed), CBS and Fania. What's not selling is catalog, the older records, which used to be the mainstay of the Latin industry. The Western Giant With 4.5 million Latinos, the Western United States represents the largest segment of the Hispanic music market. Mostly Mexican with a liberal sprinkling of South and Central Americans, the West is a brisk record market from the Northern California area of San Francisco to the hustling bustling Latin retail and one -stop outlets lining sunny Pico Blvd. in that strange village called L.A. Augustin Gurza, owner of L.A.'s Disco Centro, sees the sales slump as a phase brought on by a vacilating economy. What he complains about, however, is the Latin label policy of upping the pricing on key hot -selling artists. With a major artist like Julio Iglesias, we're forced to sell both his new release and his catalog for $7.49, which is what you'd sell a big rock album for. It's too high for the Latin customer. So what happens? His product freezes and you can hardly distinguish sales surge of a new release from a major

artist." In the consumer search for value for price, Gurza is seeing high sales in the greatest hits compilations, tv packages and albums like that of Emmanuel, in which more than half the songs were radio hits. And in the search for lower prices, Gurza says he is seeing a big run on singles. "On one recent day, we had 25% of our business in 45s. It's a lot of work to keep up the inventory on those, so in order to make it worthwhile for us we upped the price from $1.35 to $1.45 and still they sold."

HILDA MURILLO DARWIN *MARUELISA HUGO HENRIQUEZ

*

LosPrimerosdel Ecuador Con sus mejores interpretaciones

para el selecto público Latinoamericano

Despite the Mexican dominance of the West, musical tastes are varied. An accurate reflection of those tastes can perhaps be measured by two of the biggest Latin radio stations in the West, KALI -AM in Los Angeles and KBRG -FM in San Francisco. KALI, which moved its studios from Hollywood to San Gabriel in August 1980, plays International contemporary Latin pop, from Mexico, South and Central America and Spain. Ironically, its ratings competitor, KWKW, plays a quite different music blend- Mexican ranchera, Tex -Mex and norteno music. San Francisco's KBRG is similar to KALI in that its playlist is highly regimented, but the Northern California outlet goes for a softer sound whereas KALI plays more upbeat rhythms along with rock. Mario Rueda, KBRG's music director, notes that one of his major stumbling blocks is the lack of cooperation between radio and the Latin labels.

The Problem Of Piracy Piracy is an especially harsh disease in the Latin music market. Because many of the hits are released in foreign regions first, it's easy for enterprising counterfeiters to see what releases are going to be hits, pick up a copy, put it on tape and flood the American market with it. To combat the problem, the big West Coast labels such as Orfean, Profono, Caytronics, Arriba, Fama, Mar International, Ramex, and others have banded together to form ALARM (the Assn. of Latin Record Merchandisers). Directed by former RIAA representative Bud Richardson, ALARM has staged several successful attacks on the counterfeiters. In one recent case, two factories in Fresno were raided and more than 750,000 record labels confiscated and three counterfeiters convicted. And in Chicago, $42,000 in cash was seized and seven went to jail. "The main problem is not with the retailers," says Richardson. "Although there are exceptions, most are honest dealers who buy from reputable distributors. The problem is with street vendors, flea markets and the Mom and Pop stores in which somebody comes in with a load of product and quickly disappears." Despite similar cries of piracy on the East coast, there is no Eastern Latin label equivalent to ALARM. "We've only been around a couple of years," said Richardson. "And we've only been really active in the last year. ALARM is in its infant stages. It will definitely spread." America has been justifiably called the melting pot, and in the case of Latins among Latins, the impact of the International pop sound has made American Hispanics of different cultures finally listen to the music of their roots with one ear. But will Latin music ever cross over to the mainstream market in a major way? The failed salsa experiment would make it seem doubtful. And as for the International Latin pop sound -that crossover experiment has yet to begin. "The mass acceptance of Latin product in the United States has some problems, the first of which is the language," notes Billboard En

Espanol's Fernandez. "It's not the kind of music most Americans can sing along with. One way around this that some Latin artists are considering is recording in English. The latest example is Roberto Carlos, a big Brazilian artist, who has a new LP in English. It's comprised of soft, mellow International ballads and how it will do don't know. "There have been groups that have succeeded in English, like Santana and La Tierra and El Chicano, but the number is fairly limited. It's funny, here in New York people know more about Japanese electronic rock or ska or rap music than they do about salsa, which has been here so long it's almost indigenous." Fernandez thinks that the key to unlocking the door to Anglo acceptance of Latin music may be through the country's mainstream sonic artists and trendsetters. "When they pick up on things, they spread. Blondie's Deborah Harry recently released a rap record. think it's awful, but the point is that it will make some people who never listened to black music listen to it and then go out and maybe buy a real rap album. That hasn't happened yet to Latin music, and I'm really at a loss to understand why." Sometimes the simplest solution to the most perplexing problem is Billboard merely a matter of time. I

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SPAIN Continued from page LA -27 Movieplay has recently launched a new venture in Argentina, Mexico and the States by establishing a joint venture company in each country to exploit material from three Spanish companies -Movieplay, Columbia and Zafiro. The new conglomerate is called Discosa in each territory and links with a local licensee. In Argentina it is ATC and Interdisc, in Mexico Discos Helix and in Miami it is Alhambra.

Juan Cifuentes notes, as do most other Spanish operations, the problems connected with the Latin American market and in particular over the collection of royalties, advances and monies owing. "Government regulations in Colombia and Peru, for example, make it difficult for us to receive advances," says Cifuentes, but we can get royalties. This means that sometimes a multinational, by switching funds, can pay advances for another territory. Also we sometimes receive funds with up to 43% tax deducted." RCA's ambassador to Latin America is, according to direc-

tor Manuel Diaz Pallares, Rocio Jurado who obtained the 'Nipper De Oro' gold award for selling more than a million disks in the U.S.A. Latin American market alone. And this summer she was top of the New York charts for two months, RCA reports. Other artists from the Madrid RCA stable attacking the lucrative South American market are Manolo Sanlucar and Los Amaya. Product is mainly either pop or for children. New artists on the roster for Latin America include Jeanette with her album "Corazon De Poeta" by Manuel Alejandro, which will be backed by a promotional tour taking in Mexico, Peru, Chile, Buenos Aires, Brasil, Venezuela and the U.S.A. RCA also has plans to record Mexican artist Emmanuel with another album by Manuel Ale-

What Energy Crisis?

jandro. Gerhard Haltermann, international manager of Discos Columbia SA, says his best selling artists in Latin America are Jose Velez, Betty Missiego and Jeronimo. The most popular material consists of melodic music and ballads, and Haltermann has also noticed an increase in the sales of classical music and zarzuclas- Spanish operettas. "Columbia sales in Latin America during the first half of this year have increased by 32% when corn pared to the same period last year," says Haltermann, "and sales of -

product to Latin America account for 55% of our total export sales." Haltermann stresses the importance of the physical presence of the artist in the market where promotion is taking place, and reports that his company is trying to increase visits to Latin America. Like other Spanish companies he organizes tv appearances, radio interviews and press conferences. Even though a particular record may not become a hit, he says the company notices a surge in sales which gives a much needed boost to any campaign. Talking of the future, Halter mann believes that the formation of Discosa (with Movieplay and Zafiro) will considerably increase the scope of the company, offering a good catalog to Latin America, together with the possibility of joint tour ventures. Independent music publisher Manuel Lopez Quiroga also reports a clear increase in sales to Latin America. Big hits have been "GaviIan 0 Paloma" (1979) by Jose -Jose, -

"Sera" (1980) also by Jose -Jose, and "Con Olor A Hierba" (1980/ 81) by Emmanuel. "We know we have lost large quantities of royalty money," says Quiroga, "mainly because of the

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backwardness of certain South American governments when dealing with "Intellectual Property" laws. Exceptions are Mexico and Argentina where we have few difficulties." However, Quiroga has ambitious plans to promote new material and has recently acquired a catalog of old material which he believes will appeal to Latin Americans. At the Spanish Phonographic Assn., Secretary General Carlos Grande Renales is concerned with piracy in Latin America but says that it is a major problem about which not a great deal can be done by Spain alone. And on a general note one Spanish industry boss stresses the importance of pressing and selling original material in Latin America. "If you've got hit material," he says, "they can produce a cover version with limited means within 24 hours. You can bet your own version is killed if your licensee is not quick enough. Our records are high quality and what they record and press locally is generally lousy -but people don't care." The clear impression is that professionalism from Spain could do much to improve and expand the Latin American market to everyone's advantage. Billboard

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COUNTRY SINGLES Number One Country Singles, 1948 to Present C -1 Top Ten Country Singles, 1948 to Present C-2 Top Country Singles of the Year. 1946 to Present C-3 COUNTRY ALBUMS Number One Country Albums, 1964 to Present D -1 Top Ten Country Albums, 1964 to Present D -2 Top Country Albums of the Year, 1965 to Present D -3 SOUL (RHYTHM & BLUES) SINGLES Number One Soul Singles, 1948 to Present E -1 E -2 Top Ten Soul Singles, 1948 to Present Top Soul Singles of the Year, 1946 to Present E -3 SOUL (RHYTHM & BLUES) ALBUMS F-1 F -2 F-3

Number One Soul Albums, 1965 to Present Top Ten Soul Albums, 1965 to Present Top Soul Albums of the Year, 1966 to Present

$50.00 50.00 50.00

ADULT CONTEMPORARY SINGLES Number One Adult Contemporary Singles, 1961 to Present G-1 Top Ten Adult Contemporary Singles, 1961 to Present G -2 G -3 Adult Contemporary Singles of the Year, 1966 to Present CLASSICAL ALBUMS H -1 Number One Classical Albums, 1969 to Present Top Ten Classical Albums, 1969 to Present H -2 H -3 Top Classical Albums of the Year, 1969 to Present JAZZ ALBUMS I -1 Number One Jazz Albums, 1969 to Present I -2 Top Ten Jazz Albums, 1969 to Present Top Jazz Albums of the Year, 1969 to Present I -3 SPIRITUAL GOSPEL ALBUMS (SOUL GOSPEL) K -1 Number One Gospel Albums, 1974 to Present Top Ten Gospel Albums, 1974 to Present K-2 K -3 Top Gospel Albums of the Year, 1974 to Present GREATEST HITS J Top 1000 Greatest Hits of All Time, 1956 -1977 (1978- Present Top 100 Included) L Yearend Issue "Talent In Action"

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20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 15.00 15.00 15.00

75.00

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Bicentennial Issue -"Music /Records /200"-History Of

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tive single to reach the top 30. In the group's entire pre -"Jive Talkin' " career, by comparison, it accumulated 11 top 30 hits. And with the exception of "He's A Liar" and 1977's live "Edge Of The Universe" (which peaked at 26). every Bee Gees singles since 1975 has sailed into the top 12. * * *

comes Epic's first No.

Write or call Delta for Brochure

\,

Deep Is Your Love," "Stayin' Alive," "Night Fever," "Too Much Heaven," "Tragedy" and "Love You Inside Out" -while the Beatles reached No. with six straight from '64 to '66: "I Feel Fine," "Eight Days A Week," "Ticket To Ride," "Help!," "Yesterday" and "We Can Work It Out." While "He's A Liar" is far from the hit the Bee Gees were hoping for, it is nonetheless their 14th consecu1

1981/ #9.

PARCELS OF DEVELOPMENT PROPERTY IN AND NEAR NASHVILLE

The Bee Gees topped the chart with their last six singles- "How

7

VARIOUS ARTISTS God Rest Ye Merry, Jazzmen LP Columbia FC37551

CAFCT37551

WHITMAN, SLIM I'll Be Home For Christmas LP Cleveland Irrt I. Epic FE37594

87 FEA37594 CA FET37594

MISCELLANEOUS THE ROYAL TRIBUTE LP Columbia C237655 (2)

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52

Country

Accepting Accolades: A train of country music's top celebrities came onstage at the 15th annual CMA awards show to accept various prizes. At left, Oak Ridge Boys Duane Allen, William Golden, Joe Bonsall and Richard Sterban receive the single of the year trophy for their MCA recording of

"Elvira." Another MCA act, Terri Gibbs, center, displays the CMA's new horizon award for "sig nificant creative growth and development." Beaming at his second consecutive male vocalist 01 the year honor is Epic's George Jones, at right. Standing behind Jones are presenters Gail Davies and Rosanne Cash.

To 5' Captures BMI's Burton Honor `9

NASHVILLE-Songwriter/artist

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Dolly Parton and publishers Velvet Apple Music and Fox Fanfare Music took Broadcast Music Inc.'s top honors Tuesday (13) as "9 To 5" was named recipient of the organization's 12th annual Robert J. Burton Award for most performed country song of the year. The Burton Award is BMI's most prestigious honor. founded as a memorial to the licensing firm's late president. Its presentation traditionally caps the annual BMI banquet and country awards gala which recognizes the achievements of its most successful writers and publishers for the year. Unfortunately. Parton was unable to attend the event to pick up her songwriter of the year etched glass plaque due to her on- location filming in Austin. Tex. for "Best Little Whorehouse In Texas." Snuff Garrett scored top country writers honors with a total of six citations, followed by Curly Putman. Eddie Rabbitt and Even Stevens with four each. Winners with a trio of citations apiece were Bobby Braddock. Stephen Dorf. Kye Fleming. Larry Gatlin. David Malloy. Bob McDill. Dennis Morgan, Sonny Throckmorton and Rafe Van Hoy. Milton Brown. Cliff Crofford. Mac Davis. John Durrill. Gary Gentry, Jerry Hayes. Roger Murrah. Willie Nelson, Roy Orbison, Don Pfrimmer. Chick Rains. Johnny Slate and Hank Williams all won two citations of achievement. Once again. Tree International became BMI's top publisher of the year as the huge country song firm packed up 10 citations. Following closely were the Welk Music Group with nine: Unichappel Music. Inc./ Rightsong Music. Inc. with seven: Peso Music with six: and, with four each, Acuff-Rose Publications. Inc./ Fred Rose Music. Inc., Algee Music Corp., Briarpatch Music. Debdave Music, Inc., and Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp. Publishers earning three achievement citations included Bar Cee Music; Duchess Music Corp.: House of Gold Music: and Larry Gatlin Music. Two- citation winners were Blackwood Music, Inc.; Irving Music, Inc.; Combine Music Corp.: Hiriam Music; Magic Castle Music; Partner Music; Songpainter Music: the Times Square Music Publications Co. /Trio Music Co., Inc.; and Willie Nelson Music, Inc. Six of this year's BMI song win-

ners earned citations spotlighting previous accomplishments. Second awards went to "Coward Of The County." written by Roger Bowling. published by Roger Bowling Music (first award 1980); "Faded Love." written by John Wills. published by Rightsong Music, Inc. (1964): "Guitar Man," written by Jerry Reed, published by Vector Music (1968): and "Hearts On Fire." written by Eddie Rabbitt, Even Stevens and Dan Tyler. published by Briarpatch Music and Debdave Music, Inc. (1979). Also in this category were "I'll Be There (If You Ever Want Me)." written by Rusty Gabbard and Ray Price. published by Ernest Tubb Music, Inc. (1954): and "One Day At A Time." written by Kris Kristofferson and Marijohn Wilkin. pub (Continued on page 57)

500 Attend '81 SESAC

Celebration NASHVILLE -More than 5uut guests helped SESAC celebrate its 50th anniversary as this year's 1981 country music awards gala revolved around the theme of "Sesac Goes Gold." Highlighting the festivities held Thursday (15) at the Woodmont Country Club was the presentation of 11 awards honoring excellence in various areas of the country music industry. Outstanding among these awards was the licensing organization's newly created Vista Award. given in recognition of achievements by a new artist displaying the greatest impact on country music within the (Continued on page 58)

CMA AWARDS DISPENSED

ASCAP Awards To Morrison, Goodrum By EDWARD MORRIS NASHVILLE -Randy Goodrum society's most- performed country and Bob Morrison split the country songs of 1980. Among these were 26 songwriter of the year honors at songs which reached No. on the ASCAP's 19th annual country music country charts. This year marks the awards banquet here Wednesday first that ASCAP has used a stand(14). More than 700 music industry ard calendar year of Jan. through figures and guests attending the anDec. 31 as its time frame for measurnual gala at the Maxwell House Hoing these performances and rank. tel saw Goodrum and Morrison each Gloria Messinger, ASCAP's take six individual awards in a first newly appointed managing director, time tie for top songwriter achievemade a special presentation dements. signed to spotlight nine "standards" Saluted as ASCAP's country pubcontained in the most performed lisher of the year was Chappell Mucategory. These included "Always," sic/Intersong Music. The PolyGram "Kaw- Liga." "MacArthur Park," publishing firms scored 10 individ"Misty." "No One Will Ever Know," ual organizational awards. "Orange Blossom Special," "Over ASCAP president Hal David and The Rainbow," "Secret Love" and southern regional executive director "Wichita Lineman." Connie Bradley presented plaques Songwriters scoring multiple honoring the writers and publishers writers awards at this year's ASCAP of 91 of the performing rights banquet were David Bellamy. Charles Black. Rory Bourke, Larry Collins. Rodney Crowell, Bobby Fischer, Jerry Foster, Deborah Hupp. Richard Leigh. Sam Lorber. Brent Maher. Bill Rice. Lionel I

I

=

Mandrel) Is Entertainer Of Year, Again; Dual Honors For Alabama NASHVILLE -Barbara Mandrel! took dual honors as female vocalist and entertainer of the year at the 15th annual Country Music Assn. Awards Show Oct. 12 at the Grand Ole Opry House. Mandrell's feat marks the first time that an artist has captured the coveted entertainer accolade twice. Named entertainer of the year in 1980, Mandrel) also was first awarded the female vocalist honor in 1979. Mandrell's competition for entertainer of the year was Alabama, George Jones, the Oak Ridge Boys and Kenny Rogers. who was making his fifth. ultimately futile bid for this honor. Also taking double honors was Alabama. Nominees in five categories, the band was named both vocal and instrumental group of the year. Although technically no group has ever emerged on top in both categories, in 1978 the Oak Ridge Boys were the vocal group recipients. while their band took top honors as instrumental group. "He Stopped Loving Her Today" continued its awards sweep, taking song of the year for the second consecutive year, making it the first song ever to receive more than two CMA

By ROBYN WELLS awards. Penned by Bobby Braddock and Curly Putman, the tune also garnered the CMA song of the year award in 1980. Although it is unusual for one song to be the recipient twice in the song of the year category. "He Stopped Loving Her Today" 's record is not without precedent. Freddie Hart's "Easy Loving" first turned the trick in 1971 and 1972. It was shut out both times in the single of the year category. bested by Donna Fargo's "The Happiest Girl In The Whole U.S.A." (1972) and Charlie Rich's "Behind Closed Doors" (1973). The CMA criteria which enables a song to win song of the year more than one time is that the award is for songwriters. not for a specific single or album. "He Stopped Loving Her Today" was first released as a single for George Jones during the 1980 eligibility period. The song also appeared as an album cut on Jones' "I Am What I Am," which was issued during the 1981 eligibility period (July 1. 1980 -June 30, 1981). For the second year in a row, George Jones was honored as the top male vocalist. Previous back to back winners in this category are

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Charley Pride (1971 and 1972) and Ronnie Milsap (1976 and 1977). Milsap also was named male vocalist of the year in 1974. Terri Gibbs became the first recipient of the Horizon Award, which is given to any new or established artist who has demonstrated dramatic creative growth and development over the past year. and who has never been a finalist for any CMA award. Gibbs' debut single. "Somebody's Knockin'," first hit the country chart just one week prior to the 1980 CMA awards ceremony. David Frizzell and Shelly West. also nominees in the Horizon category. were awarded vocal duo of the year. Accepting for the duet was West's mother Dottie, who has shared this honor with Kenny Rogers in 1978 and 1979. Single of the year went to the Oak Ridge Boys for their pop /country smash, "Elvira." And album of the year honors went to MCA labelmate Don Williams for "I Believe In You." Grant Turner and the late Vernon Dalhart were inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame during the show. Turner has been a Grand (Continued on page 57)

Richie Jr., Larry Rogers. Fred Rose.

Jeff Silbar, Sonny Throckmorton, Jimmy Webb, Johnny Wilson and Johnny MacRae. Multiple publisher award winners included Almo Music Corp.: April Music; Bellamy Brothers Music; Blue Quill: Canopy Music: Cross Keys: Famous Music Corp.; Bobby Goldsboro Music: Happy Sack Music Ltd. (Visa Music Division): Hon eytree Music; Milene Music; Music City Music Inc.; Sailmaker Music: Senor Music: Southern Nights Music Co.: United Artists Music: Welbeck Music Corp.: and Welk Music

Group. Entertainment for the black -tie event was provided by Bill Walker and his 28 -piece orchestra, who performed a medley of ASCAP's 26 No. tunes from the previous year during the program's intermission. Walker also performed a medley of songs composed by the two writers of the year and the publisher of the I

year. Besides ASCAP president David, executives in for the evening included the firm's board members Leon Brettler, Sal T. Chiantia. Leonard Golove, John Green, Sidney Herman, Irwin Robinson, Wesley Rose and Michael Stewart. Also in town for the event from New York were Paul S. Adler, director of membership; Karen Sherry, director of (Continued on page 58)

A new and better sound in radio ...

The United Stations Country Music Network offering the best in country music .. . America's fastest growing sound. 7 days a week, 24 hours a day, 60 minutes an hour. Live by satellite. A talented partnership committed to excellence and professionalism. ED SALAMON

NICK VERBITSKY

Vice- President/Programming

President

Again voted Major Ma -ket Country Program Director for 1981 by Billboard for his work at WHN. Produced for the Mutual Broadcasting System. "The Johnny Carh Silver Anniversary Special ", (Billboard's 1981 Syndicated Special of the Year) and the record -breaking "Country Music Countdown-1980" co- hosted by Anne Murray.

Recently, senior vice- president of stations and operations for the Mutual Broadcasting System; vice president /general manager of WHN Radio, voted in 1981 by Billboard as Major Market Country Station of the Year.

DICK CLARK

FRANK MURPHY Vice-President/Marketing

Dick Clark is among the most successful of all radio, television and motion pict,,re personalities. He is the innovative man behind many projects throughout the entertainment industry including his most

Recently, vice -president of station relations for the Mutual Broadcasting System, with many years of day -to -day contact with America's finest radio stations.

identified success, 'American Bandstand" ... one of the longest lived continuous programs in broadcast history.

The United Stations. Inc.. 635 Madison Ave.. 3rd Floor. N.Y.. N.Y. 10022 Tel: (212) 751 -2840

www.americanradiohistory.com

54

BiIIboardR

Survey For Week Ending

10!24/81

TMr c

Copyright 1981, Billboard Publications, Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form without the prior written permission of the ppublisher

o by any means. electronic. mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise,

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TITLE -Artist

T1TLE

(Writer). Label d Number (Dist Label) (Publisher. Licensee)

(Write!). Label d Number (Dist Label) (Publisher. Licensee)

Ú

10

NEVER BEEN SO LOVED -Charley Pride

15

(M. Sherrill. B. Sherrill,

Dalton Dalton), Columbia 18/2188

(D (

Hinson,

(1.

5

14

I'LL NEED SOMEONE TO HOLD ME WHEN

I

MOUNTAIN DEW -Willie Ndson

4

WHEN YOU WALK IN THE

CRY -Janie Fricke

(8.1 Lunsford,

10

-

(1. De

Rosanne Cash Columbia 1802463 (Bug, Whiskey Drinkin, Paw. Paw, BMI(

ON- Charly

SLEEPIN WITH THE RADIO

SHARE YOUR LOVE WITH (A. Braggs.

Malone), Liberty

D

40

47

10

W

Skinner,

42

4

11

(K.

Stegal, (Blackwood,

8

8

CHICKEN TRUCK /1 LOVE YOU A THOUSAND WAYS -John Anderson (J. Anderson, E.J. Parker, M. Fields /L. Fnzzell,

13

(T. Hill, W.

Knoblock (C. Berry). Scotti Bros. 02434 (CBS) (ARC. BMI(

4s

61

46

21

(R.

Morgan), MCA 51171 (Pi-Gems, BMI( Contee

Nights, ASCAP)

-

48

11

FEEDIN' THE FIRE -ietta Hobbs), Columbia 18 -02431

(B.

/Darla. ASCAP)

Lehr ( Algee, BMI)

79

13

Babbitt,

L.

Stevens.

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D.

Hurt.

(1.

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2

8

Brasfield,

81

82

(E. T. Conley,

Acklen).

B.

1.

Malloy), Elektra 47174 (Briarpatch. DebDave, BMI)

52

42

RCA

12344 (Blue Moon,

Easy Listening. April.

IT DON'T HURT ME HALF AS BAD -Ray Price

15

(T.

2

2

CAN DO -Anne Murray Jordan). Capitol 5023 (United Artists. Chess, ASCAP)

IF

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JUST ONE

(D. billion,

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Lee

F.

Pennig. 3

Barlow.

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76

14

63

45

12

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18.02505 (Screen Gems EM), BMI)

Bruce.

E.

Bruce.

R.

Peterson). MCA 51139 (Tree, Sugarplum, BMI)

Maltby lr

D.

I

1434 (Chess, ASCAP)

LAUGH- Brenda Lee Shire), MCA 51195 (Golden Touch. Gold Horizon, ASCAP/

I)

87

I'D THROW IT ALL AWAY

2

(D- Holt), Faucet 1592 (D.

80

IMAGINE THAT -Nancy

3

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Sweetwater Holt. Borche Ha, Faucet, SESAC)

R.

Wood

Wilde), Montage 1202 (Wellbeck, ASCAP)

1.

83

SEND ME SOMEBODY TO LOVE

2

81

CATCHING FIRE -Angela

3

84

47216

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1019 (Music West

Buckins.

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85

56

Beland.

G

Dycus. A. Gore). RCA 12319 (Welk.

F

91

(T.

Tucker,

Rainey), MCA 51184 (Glentan.

1.

BMI)

CAROLINA BY THE SEA -Super Grit Cowboy

46

16

77

Gibson.

1.

DON'T WE BELONG IN LOVE -Rita Remington (M. Garvin,

Shapiro), Plantation

T.

202 (Blackwood. 0 Lyric. BMI(

AFTER TEXAS -Roy Head (B. Jones,

M. Johnson).

1.

Churchill 7778 (Tree. BMI /Cross Keys, ASCAP)

LEFTY -David Friuell

8

Blue Lake. Fast Lane.

BMI)

57

DREAMS COME IN HANDY -Cindy Hurt

8

7771 (Ironside, ASCAP)

58

59

FLY- Dottsy Fischer), Tanglewood 1910 (Broken Lance /B

LITTLE BIRD

LET THE

6

(D. Wayne. B.

Fischer, ASCAP)

BY- Sawmill Creek Hart), Cowboy 1045 (Town Sider. BMI)

BARELY GETTIN' (1.

RIGHT IN THE PALM OF YOUR HAND -Mel McDaniel

15

McDill). Capitol 5022 (Hall -Clement (Welk, BMI)

60

HONKY TONK QUEEN -Moe

13

Raven

(R.

Bandy a loe Stampley Hicks). Columbia 18 -02198 (Baray, Mullet. BMI)

Eanvood

Of The Pecos,

93

86

3

94

44

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71

11

YOU (Make Me Wonder Why)

BMI)

A LITTLE BIT CRAZY -Amarillo (W. Newton, D Uboys. D Tyler). NSD 104 (House Of Gold, BMI)

LOVE MY TRUCK -Glen Campbell (I Rainey), Mirage 3845 (Glentan, BMI)

(D Allen, D. Van

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Deborah Allen

Hoy). Capitol 5014 (Duchess. Posey), Tree. BMI)

G.

72

12

Rice

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RECALL A GYPSY WOMAN-B.J. Thomas

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McDill)

B

MCA 51151

(lack. BMI)

Duncan). Charta 166 (NSD) (Hit Kit, Jason Dee. BMI)

YEARS AGO -The Sutler Brothers (D. Reid), Mercury

57059

Newton.

SLIPPIN OUT, SLIPPIN IN -Bill 1433

97

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98

78

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MARRIED WOMEN -sonny Curtis

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DuBois).

99

79

16

TIGHT FITTIN JEANS

BIG LIKE (A.

(American Cowboy. BMI(

MIDNIGHT HAULER /SCRATCH MY BACK -Racy

(D. Burgess) Liberty

Ex*

Band

Mattocks). Hoodswamp 8003 (Hoodswamp. BMI)

(C

(B.

96 (B

BMI /Golden Opportunity.

Gmlbeau). Curb /CBS 50 7243 (Atlantic, BMI)

Moore. M Strong. E Cage, W (Fame. House Of Gold. BMI)

,

804 (Tree, BMI)

RODEO GIRLS -Tanya Tucker

2

McCormick), Capitol 5051 (Muscle Shoals. BMI)

(R

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Melene, ASCAP)

PARDON MY FRENCH -Bobby

7

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Bellamy Brothers Bellamy). Warner /Curb 49815 (Famous. Bellamy Bros ASCAP)

Kaye

Karnes), Yatahey

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JESUS LET ME SLIDE -Dean Dillon

2

BUT ME -The Burrito Brothers

hap, Careers. Down 'N

Cedarwood. BMh

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Calamity lane 1002503 (Combine. BMI)

Krekel). Columbia

Crutchfield). MCA 51159 (Duchess, Red Angus, BMI)

SHE BELONGS TO EVERYONE (1.

Jones

72526

Schweers), Liberty

WHEN (R

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NOW THAT THE FEELING'S GONE-Billy 'Trash" Craddock (M

66

YOU'RE MY FAVORITE STAR (D

Jenkins), Liberty

I'LL STILL BE LOVING YOU -Mundo

Kelly), Paid 144 (Frebar. BMI)

Heeney). Epic

88

BMI)

Lane 1432 (Kevin Lee. Robchns. BMI)

(I. Earwood). Excelsior

Harrington. K. Espy), Scotti Bros (Flowering Stone. ASCAP)

STILL DOIN' TIME -George

Melene, ASCAP)

(

MIND- Cristy

WHO DO YOU KNOW IN CALIFORNIA -Eddy

75

1.

F.

Everly). Mercury 57056 (Acuff Rose

(E. Raven). Elektra

Gray), Epic 14.02468 (Chinn

Carlile). Door Knob 81 -167

Lee

92

12307 (P1 -Gem. BMI)

OUT- George Strait Dycus). MCA 51170 (Pr Gem. Golden Opportunity, BMI/SESAC) M.

CARE AS MUCH -Dickey

WHEN YOU FALL IN LOVE EVERYTHING'S A WALTZ -Ed Bruce

(1.

TIME-

Pennington. BMI)

(1.

IT TURNS ME INSIDE OUT -Lee Greenwood

66

TRY ME -Randy Barlow

(1.

3

14

(P.

THEM GOOD 'OLE' BOYS ARE BAD -John Schneider

(R

*

43

THE CLOSER YOU GET -Don King (1. P.

36

RCA

I

THE BEST BEDROOM IN TOWN -Judy Bailey

-

Morgan).

ON-

Jimmie Cannon Hayes). Warner Brothers 49806 (Partner. Algee.

THE ROSE IS FOR TODAY -Lim Chestnut

1:10

87

Crowell), Warner Bros. 49810 (Coolwell. Granite. ASCAP)

WONDER IF

(C. Craig). Columbia

Tornpall And The Glaser Bros. (D. Gibson). Elektra 47193 (Acuff -Rose, BMI)

35,02489

33

65

The Gatlin Brothers Band Gatlin). Columbia 18.02522 (Larry Gatlin, BMI)

DOWN AND

3

34

W.

D

(T

(B Miltsap), Churchill

WHAT ARE WE DOIN' LONESOME -Larry Gatlin 8

6

(Cross Keys. ASCAP)

CHEATIN IS STILL ON MY (R

Full Moon, Asylum 47215 (April, Widmont. ASCAP)

(K. Fleming.

3

(J

32

(D.

ALL ROADS LEAD TO YOU -Steve Wanner

Dixie,

al

I

63

Emmylou Harris And Don Williams Zandt). Warner Bros 49809 (United Artists, Columbine. ASCAP)

ME- Johnny

J.

(L. Bastian). Warner /Viva 49778 (Peso, Wallet.

1402504 (Shade Tree. BMI)

NEEDED YOU

(I. McBride),

1

3

STARS ON THE WATER-Rodney Crowell

62

Uhr). Epic 14 02499 (Amanda -Lin. ASCAP)

BET YOUR HEART ON

2 3

67

(R. I

(M- Haggard). Epic

* **

Lindsay). Dimension 1021 (Combine. BMI)

EVERYONE GETS CRAZY NOW AND THEN -Roger Miller

MY FAVORITE MEMORY -Merle Haggard

2

*

B.

64

YOU MAY SEE ME WALKIN' -Ricky Scans

2

7

Lay,

D

(K. Welch). Elektra 47192

(R. Leigh, A.

Singleton.

CATCH ME IF YOU CAN -Tom Carlile

2

* * CZ* * 83

Mitchell), Columbia 18-02532 (Baray, BMI)

TELL ME WHY -Earl Thomas Conley

69

King, H. Greenfield), Epic 14 02439 (Screen Gems. BMI)

IT'S ALL

2

81

(D Dillon,

CRYING IN THE RAIN -Tammy Wynette (C

D.

Karnes,

RODEO ROMEO -Moe Bandy (D.

Aldridge), Warner Bros. 49800 (Rich Hall, ASCAP)

W

Suite,

BMI)

DuBois). RCA 12288 (House Of Gold, BMI)

T.

(I. Allen, (T.

WHOLE LOT OF CHEATIN' GOIN'

(S.

Dillon), Mercury 57054 (Coal Miner, King Coal, BMI. ASCAP)

1.

SHE'S STEPPIN OUT -Con Hunter

2

1417 (House of Gold. Cross Keys, BMI /ASCAP)

A

(T.

STEP BY STEP -Eddie Rabbitt (E.

(D Morrison. D. Kirby), Liberty

C3::*

MacRae), Sunbad 7565 (Southern Nights, ASCAP)

1.

ASCAP)

18

JUST ENOUGH LOVE (For One Woman) -Bobby Smith

10

(B. Hill,

LOVE IN THE FIRST DEGREE -Alabama

Fleming, D.W. Morgan), RCA 12302 (Po -Gem. BMI)

(K.

* * * * *

53

Johns

47189 (Lowery. BMI)

a Shelly West

TODAY ALL OVER AGAIN -Reba McEntire

17

68

HEART ON THE MEND -Sylvia

20

41

calt*

SUN -Dolly Parton

17

COMMON MAN -Sammy

6

YOU WERE THERE- Freddie Hart

38

(B. Harden.

THE HOUSE OF THE RISING

16

BMl(

Miller), Warner /Viva 49825 (Tree, BM))

(B. Morrison.

(D. Parton). RCA 12282 (Velvet Apple, BMI

Beck).

73

80 47

Macrae), Elektra 47178 (Southern

1.

50

PARTY TIME -TA. Sheppard

15

ONE NIGHT FEVER -Mel Tillls (B. Morrison,

(N. Bevel), Epic 14.02533 (Tune Bel. BMI)

(B. Channel), Warner/Curb 49761 (Tree, BMI)

MCA 51164 (Tree. BMI)

(R. Lane),

Pierce), MCA51166 (Cedarwood,

HUSBANDS AND WIVES -David Friuell

WISH YOU WERE HERE -Barbara Mandrell W

J.

SLOWLY -Kippi Brannon

54

MEMPHIS -Fred

D

Harris, T. Schuyler), RCA 12270 BMI; Rich Bin. ASCAP)

Warner Bros. 49552 (Al Gallico, Peer. BMI(

Davies 49790 (Vogue, BMI)

MISS EMILY'S PICTURE -John

1

43

GRANDMA'S SONG-Gail

(K. Fleming.

S.

Elektra 47191 (Bocephus, BMI(

(G. Davies), Warner Bros.

10

S.

HURRICANE -Leon Everette

15

Bell, J.L. Wallace), Mercury 57055 (Hall-Clement, BMI)

K

Mercer,

Gibbs Vimnerstedt). MCA 49809 (20th Century Fox, ASCAP)

PATCHES -Jerry Reed (R. Dunbar. N. Johnson), RCA 12318 (Gold Forever, BMI(

5

ME -Kenny Rogen

1430 (Duchess, BMI)

TEACH ME TO CHEAT -The Kendalls (T.

Dimension 1023 (Tree, BMI)

ALL THESE THINGS -Joe Stampley

72

12328 (Tannen, BMI)

RCA

ROOM- Stephanie Winslow Shannon), Warner /Curb 49831 (Unart, BMI)

McClain

ALL MY ROWDY FRIENDS -Hank Williams Jr. (H. Williams Jr. ),

IS Throckmorton).

WANNA BE AROUND -Terri

I (1.

Epic 1402421 (Algee. BMI)

(S. Davis),

Wiseman),

S.

WISH YOU COULD HAVE TURNED MY HEAD -Peggy Forman

I

(S- Lohns), Elektra

(Hall-Clement. Bibo. BMI; Welk, ASCAP)

MY BABY THINKS HE'S A TRAIN

K.

Number (Dist Label) (Publisher. Licensee)

(0. Young), Capitol 5046 (Sterling. Addison, ASCAP)

Watson

A HEARTACHE -Gary Morris Blazy), Warner Bros. 49829 (New Albany, BMI /Hoosier, ASCAP)

4

(B. McDill, W. Holyfield), Columbia 18-02197

(L. Preston).

Dowell,

(J.

d

THE SWEETEST THING -Juke Newton

Gayle

Frazier, 1. Lee), MCA 51183 (Acuff Rase. BMI)

Silverline. ASCAP /PMI)

-Artist

(Writer) Lacer

HEADED FOR

5

August). MCA 51169 (Goldline,

R.

r[

Algee. BMI)

FANCY FREE -oak Ridge Boys

7,3S

2

ZU

18.02523 (O.A.S., ASCAP)

FOURTEEN KARAT MIND -Gene

1.

L.

ME- crystal

(S.M. Thomas), Columbia

4

TAKIN IT EASY -Lacy

TITLE

THE WOMAN IN

3

(N. Wilson, W. Holyfield), RCA 12294 (Al Gallico, Dusty Roads; BMI/Bibo, ASCAP)

2

-Artist

RCA

Bailey

(B

12268

Nash

(M

Wilburn.

RIVER -Tennessee Express

A 1.

Duncan),

RCA

12277 (Prime Time. ASCAP; Master Craft, BMI)

McDilU. Elektra 41176 (HallClement, BMI)

-

Conway Twitty Huffman). MCA 51137 (Prater. ASCAP)

(Barnwood, BMI)

YOU'RE MY BESTEST FRIEND -Mac IM. Davis), Casablanca 2341 (Songpainter,

Davis BMI)

100

88

8

LOVE IS KNOCKIN AT MY DOOR -Susie Allanson (M. Wright),

Liberty /Curb 1425 (Vogue.

*

Superstars are awarded to those products showing greatest upward movement on he current week's chart (Prime Movers). Stars are awarded to those products showing greatest a rplay and sales strength. Recording Industry Assn. Of America seal for sales of 2,000,000 units. indicated by triangle.) America seal for sales of 1,000,000 units. (Seal indica ed by dot.)

G

Paxton. Welk. BMI)

Recording Industry Assn. Of

TOM CARLILE

Our feeling is growing stronger. Watch out for the record of the year!

The newest release from his forth

coming album.

"CATCH ME IF PP YOU CAN # -167

*

'THE TOM CARULE FEEL' # LPS 81 -1006

81

Personal Management:

T.J. PRODUCTIONS

2nd week out (new entry) >e

0

(305) 942 -3112

Billboard Record World Cashbox www.americanradiohistory.com

Door Knob

Records 2125 8th Avenue S. Nashville, TN 37204 (615) 383 -6002

raditi nders on

He's -got the voice of ages. And the heartache going on right now. John Anderson sings it like nobody has for a long tir,1e. His new album gives you more of the stuff that legends are made of.

JOHN ANDERSON I JUST CAME HOME TO COUNT THE MEMORIES Includes the single "I Just Came Home To Count The Memories" ABS 49860 Anderson Produced by Frank Jones and John ORO On Warner Bros. Records & Tapes www.americanradiohistory.com

f

56

Country TOUGH TALK AT CONCLAVE

Talent Seminar's Upbeat Mood Underpinned By Cautious Note NASHVILLE -On the surface, the 10th annual CMA Talent Buyers Seminar (9 -12) was a series of upbeat and self-congratulatory sessions. And there was a lot to celebrate: record seminar registration, announcements of new movie and tv ventures built around country music and more new venues for country acts. But there was also an under-

current of frustration and discontent about how some country artists are conducting and pricing themselves in this still bullish market. Betty Kaye, of Betty Kaye Productions, Sacramento, said that the seminar attracted 502 paid registrants-a 38% increase over last year's event. Tandy Rice, of Top Billing International, Nashville, announced that membership in the CMA, the seminar's sponsor, has just topped 6,000. The boxoffice success of "Coal Miner's Daughter" has led to two spinoff projects, Bernard Schwartz, the movie's producer, told the buyers. One is the conversion of the Loretta Lynn bio into a weekly tv series, and the other is a feature movie about the late Patsy Cline. The figure of Cline was featured

prominently in "Coal Miner's Daughter," a situation which aroused and renewed interest in her life and her records. Theatre, casino and amusement park reps reported upswings in the use of live country music talent. Noting that his venues had cut back on the use of rock acts, Disneyland/ Walt Disney World's Sonny Anderson praised country music for bringing in the "right kind of people" and added that an in -house produced country show turned into the most popular one the parks have ever done. Holmes Hendrickson, executive vice president of entertainment for Harrah's Casinos in Reno and Lake Tahoe. said the use of country acts has jumped from five or six a year a few years back to 16 this year. Normally, the clubs book 40 -45 acts of all sorts each year. Madison Square Garden's vice president of bookings, Robert Franklin, said the Garden's Felt Forum will house a once -a -month series of country concerts, beginning in December. The buyers heard their first voice

By EDWARD MORRIS of caution about live country music from their keynote speaker, Dr. Mortimer R. Feinberg. He warned that the move toward accessible and varied home entertainment will lessen demand for such standbys as movies and concerts. He urged the audience to consider "risk diversification." "Don't lock yourselves in," he said. "Don't see yourself doing the same thing five years from now that you're doing today." He added, "My

-

message is: be secure in yourselves not in country music." Marty Krofft, producer of the "Barbara Mandrell and the Man drell Sisters" tv series, said, "Country music is in a dangerous stage. Tv can make it or break it. Everyday you see more new country music tv programs -and it worries me." Arguing for a more aggressive market push, fair buyer Maynard Potter warned, "Sellers, don't take us country music buyers lightly. As sellers you should be in the selling business." As an example of what he is counseling now, Potter said he still recalls the elaborate and effective sales presentation he received from Ken Kragen when Kragen was managing the then new act of Kenny Rogers and the First Edition. Potter is general manager of the San Luis Obispo (Calif.) Country Midstate Fair. One of the most impassioned criticisms of country music talent came from Larry Bonoff, a concert promoter who books theatres and clubs in Arizona and Rhode Island. Bonoff maintained that within the past 18 months, the price of his country talent has soared 300%, while ticket sales are up on 20% and attendance 23 %.

"Some of these artists are like

teenagers," Bonoff contended. "They're cocky; they're sensitive; they have ego problems." He adds that country acts have dropped entirely from his top five revenue producers in 1981. This year, he continued, 80% of his bookings are country but that next year only 50% will be country. Bonoff charged that artists who play "free shows" at fairs are "hurting the industry." Noting the need for everyone in the music business to cooperate for their common livelihood, entertainer Charlie Daniels lashed out at artists who insist on frivolous and

expensive riders in their contracts,

agents who force opening acts on promoters, halls that charge an exorbitant percentage of merchandise sales and others who rely more on leverage than worth. In another session, Stan Moress, president of Scotti Brothers Management echoed Daniels' sentiments. "I want to make a plea," he told the assembly of buyers, "that all of us in this business work more closely as a team." Besides the analytical parts of the seminar, a great deal of attention was given to what to do and not do to make money from country talent. There were these suggestions and opinions: Tv is not the medium to allow a guest artist to hype his or her newest record if it's only a one -time appearance. "What you're selling," Marty Krofft said, "is not the record, but the artist." Pay tv holds a large commercial promise for country music. Promoters should assess the peculiarities of an area before booking a show. This can be done by an informal poll of deejays, record store

Sometimes there are no other kinds of dates for these acts. Don't be influenced as a promoter by personal likes and dislikes. Don't book an entire season. Leave some openings for emerging acts that might get hot. Big dates do not always require big talent if they are promoted right. Hall managers should maintain a flexible rental and percentage policy, rather than adhering to a standard contract. To promote a facility, sell more than its seating capacity -sell its unique qualities. Co- promote concerts with special business sponsors. Look at the total revenue possibilities generated by a concert-not just what it costs to get in but to get out. Investigate such crowd- building schemes as group and seasonal ticket sales. Survey concert audiences to see what they like and don't like. To anticipate salable acts, stay aware of what the public is talking about and what it's doing to have a good time. Identify experts in the community who can be called on to help promote concerts. Using free fair crowds as a barometer of an artist's popularity and draw is misleading. Because tv has conditioned audiences to expect sophisticated productions, acts cannot expect to thrive on musicianship alone. There is sometimes a conflict between an artist's record enhancement tours and his or her career development moves.

NASHVILLE -Chet Atkins

tries were submitted during the competition.

1

managers and other promoters about local conditions. Beware of acts that offer a "good price" to `fill in a date."

Atkins Pens Theme LYRICAL LEE -Brenda Lee prepares to record the winning songs in the 1981 Kentucky Fried Chicken National Country Music Songwriting contest. The award winning writers and their tunes are Bill Price, left, ( "A Good Love Don't Come That Easy "); and Henry Kinsley, ( "Mind Games "). Nearly 30,000 en-

NASHVILLE -Participants in the CMA's 10th annual Talent Buyers Seminar proved to be talkers as well as doers. Among the quotes heard at the panel sessions were the following: "The biggest problem in this business today is the paucity of good managers."-Ken Kragen, manager of Kenny Rogers, Kim Carnes and comedian Gallagher. "You don't have to be brilliant to be a good manager. " -Dr. Mortimer R. Feinberg, psychologist and keynote speaker. "Run scared. It makes a better damn promoter out of you. " -"Uncle" Len Ellis, president and owner of Porter County Broadcasting Co. "There are a lot of acts out there at $5,000 that are overpriced, and some at $40,000 that are underpriced. " -Maynard Potter, general manager of the San Luis Obispo County Mid -State Fair. "I will not fight to sell out just to break even."-Larry Bonoff, promoter and manager. "Any artist that's too big to be accessible is not going to be a big artist very long." -Bobby Bare. "In California. we've pretty much cut out our rock acts. Country acts not only bring in the right kind of people, they are the right kind of people to work with." -Sonny Anderson, director of talent booking for Disneyland and Disneyworld. "Media should be covering people at the top and people who have a chance of getting to the top."-Jack Hurst, syndicated country columnist and Chicago Tribune writer. "I'm wearing a Hagar suit. I came over here in a Chevrolet pickup. I'll probably have Tyson chicken for lunch. I play an Ovation guitar and use a Shure sound system. If I could make a deal with Jack Daniels, I'd quit." -Tom T. Hall, discussing the mixed blessings of doing product endorsements. "Today we have records going No. the people don't even hear." -Randy Jackson, talent manager.

is

writing, producing and recording the main theme song and background music for the "History Of Country Music," Drake Chenault's 52 -hour radio special.

www.americanradiohistory.com

Prize Panel: Jimmy Bowen, head of Elektra /Asylum's Nashville division, at front center, moderates a panel of artists on the topic "What Is Country Music?" at the 10th annual Talent Buyers Seminar. Panelists are, front row, from left, Brenda Lee, Bowen and Danny Davis; back row, from left, Charlie Daniels, Bobby Bare, Tom T. Hall and Chet Atkins.

Braddock, Whitley Feted At Songwriters Banquet By ROBYN WELLS NASHVILLE -Bobby Braddock Keynote speakers for the banquet were Russ Sanjek, retired BMI vice and the late Ray Whitley were inpresident, who spoke of his "50 -year ducted into the Nashville Songwriters Assn. International's Hall of love affair with country music;" and Fame at the organization's 12th ansinger /songwriter Paul Williams, whose credits include "We've Only nual banquet Oct. 11. Braddock, co- writer of George Just Begun" and "Evergreen." Jones' award -winning "He Stopped Williams stressed the importance Loving Her Today," accepted the of sentiment to the songwriter. honor from Hall of Famer Curly "There seems to be a smaller and Putman, the tune's other co- author. smaller representation of pure unaPee Wee King, also a member of the bashed sentiment. Sentiment ... Hall of Fame, made the presentation cynical. They sound similar but to Whitley's widow Kay. Whitley they're so far apart," he said. "The penned a number of cowboy movie most absolute thing in the world for me is to see to it that my son has fools songs, including "Back In The like you and I to write the things that Saddle Again." Also highlighting the evening was he will see and feel in the back of a 1990 car." the presentation of the association's Among the 600 persons in attendfirst Friendship Award. Darrell ance at the banquet were Hall of Royal, Univ. of Texas football Fame members Pee Wee King, coach, was the recipient for all the Floyd Tillman, Cindy Walker. Vic support he has given country songMcAlpin, Albert Brumley, Zeke Clewriters. ments, Felice and Boudleaux Accepting the award from Eddy Bryant, Jack Clement, Harlan HowRaven, Willie Nelson and Floyd ard, Willie Nelson, Hank Cochran, Tillman, Royal said, "In all my years Marijohn Wilkin, Danny Dill, John in athletics, in talking to the press, all D. Loudermilk, Curly Putman, I've ever done is steal from people Merle Haggard, Joe Allison, Hank like Floyd, Eddy and Willie." Snow and Ben Peters. The recipient of the annual PresiAmong the other luminaries in the dent's Award went to Dorothy Polk audience were Waylon Jennings, Thornton, secretary of the NSAI. Jessi Colter, Chet Atkins and LeonPresenting the award was Randy ard Feist, president of NMPA. Goodrum, current NSAI president.

57

Country TELEVISION REVIEW

To 5' Captures BMI's Burton Honor

`9

Continued from page 52 lished by Buckhorn Music Publishing Co., Inc. (1975). A total of 101 songwriters and 70

publishers of

songs were presented wth BMI's citations of achievement at the annual gala awards festivities. The citations re91

CMA Show: Quality Production, Script Fifteenth annual Country Music

LOVE A RAINY NIGHT -David Malloy, Eddie Rab

I

bitt, Even Stevens, Briarpatch Music, Debdave Music Inc. I THINK

I'LL JUST STAY HERE MID DRINK -Merle

Haggard, Shade Tree Music Inc. WISH

I

I

WAS EIGHTEEN AGAIN

-Sonny Throckmor-

ton, Tree Publishing Co., Inc. IF YOU EVER CHANGE YOUR

MIND

- Parker McGee,

Dawnbreaker Music. I'LL BE THERE (IF YOU EVER WANT ME) (2nd

flect significant popularity in the country music industry as measured by broadcast performances during the period of April 1, 1980 to March

Award) -Rusty Gabbard, Ray Price, Ernest Tubb Music

31, 1981.

non

Heading the New York delegation of BMI executives was Theodora Zavin, executive vice president. Among the 800 invited industry guests and celebrities attending the

Inc.

I'M ALREADY BLUE -Bob McDill, Hall -Clement Publications.

I'M HAPPY JUST (PRS),

TO DANCE WITH YOU -John Len-

MacLen Music

McCartney,

Paul

I'M NOT READY YET -Tom T. Hall, Morris Music Inc., Unichappell Music Inc. IN AMERICA

-Tommy Crain, Charlie Danie,s,

shall, Hat Band Music. ITS HARD TO BE HUMBLE -Mac Davis, Songpainter Music. Gentry, Algee Music Corporation.

John Hartford and Jimmy Webb. A complete list of all BMI award win-

Sure -Fire Music Company Inc.

ANGEL FLYING TOO CLOSE TO TAE GROUND- Willie

Nelson, Willie Nelson Music Inc. ANY WHICH WAY YOU CAN -Milton Brown, Stephen

Dorff, Snuff Garrett, Peso Music, Wallet Music, Warner-

Tamerlane Publishing Corp.

ME

BABY- Bob Stone, Rock Garden

YOU HAPPY

Music. BABY, YOU'RE SOMETHING -Curly Putman,

Rafe

Van Hoy, Tree Publishing Co. Inc.

BARROOM BUDDIES- Milton Brown, Cliff Crofford,

Stephen Dorff, Snuff Garrett, Bar Cee Music, Peso Music, Warner -Tamerlane Publishing Corp. THE BEST OF STRANGERS -Key Fleming, Dennis

Morgan, Hall -Clement Publications. THE BOXER

-Paul

Simon, Paul Simon Music.

BRIDGE THAT JUST WON'T BURN -Roger Murrah,

A

Jimmy McBride, Blackwood Music Inc., Magic Castle I

TONIGHT- Deborah Allen, Rafe Van Music Corporation, Posey Publishing,

SEE YOU

Hoy, Duchess

CHARLOTTE'S WEB -Cliff

Durrill,

Crofford, John

Snuff Garrett, Duchess Music Corporation, Peso Music. CLYDE -J.J. Cale, Johnny Bienstock Music.

COULD

I

HAVE THIS DANCE -Bob House, Onhisown

Music COWARD

(2nd Award) -Roger

MD

DANDY -Bobby

THE

Goldsboro,

House of Gold Music Inc.

Morrison, Johnny Russell,

MEN -Jerry Hayes, Ronnie Scaife, Algee Music Cor-

poration, Partner Music. MIDNIGHT RIDER -Gregg Allman, Elijah Blue Music, Unichappell Music Inc. MISERY AND GIN -John Durrill, Snuff Garrett, Bar Cee Music, Peso Music.

MY HEART-Don Pfrimmer, Hall- Clement Publica-

tions. 9 TO 5 -Dolly Parton, Fox Fanfare Music Inc., Velvet

Apple Music.

1959-Gary Gentry, Taylor and Watts Music Inc. NORTH OF THE BORDER -Steve Davis, Billy Sherrill,

Algee Music Corporation. NOTHING SURE LOOKED GOOD ON YOU -Jim Rushing, Coal Miners Music Inc.

NUMBERS -Shel Siverstein, Evil Bye Music Inc.

-Hugh

Moffatt. Pebe Sebert, Rightsong Music Inc. OLD HABITS -Hank Williams, Jr., Bocephus Music

Inc.

-Willie Nelson, Willie Nelson

Music Inc ONE DAY AT A TIME (2nd Award) -Kris

Kristoffer-

pany INc. ONE IN A MILLION -Chick Rains, Bundin Music Publishing Co.. The Times Square Music Publications Co., Unichapell Music Inc.

Duchess Music Corporation, Peso Music.

Robbins, Hall-Clement Publications. SHRINER'S CONVENTION -Ray Stevens, Ray

Ste-

vens Music. SMOKEY MOUNTAIN RAIN -Kye

Fleming, Dennis

Morgan, Hall- Clement Publications.

CRACKERS -Kye Fleming, Dennis Morgan, Hall -Cle-

ment Publications.

SMOOTH SAIUNG

-Curly Putman,

Sonny Throck-

morton, Tree Publishing Co., Inc.

CRYING -Joe Mellon, Roy Orbison, Acuff -Rose Publi-

cations Inc.

SOUTHERN RAINS-Roger Murrah, Blackwood Music Inc., Magic Castle Music.

CUP OF TEA

- Harlan

White, Fruit Music.

STAND BY ME -Ben

WANNA GO TO HEAVEN-Curly Putman,

Tree Publishing Co.. Inc.

DON'T FORGET YOURSELF

-Don

Reid,

American

King, Jerry Leiber, Mike Stol-

STARTING OVER AGAIN

-Bruce Sudano, Earborne

Music, Rick's Music Inc.

DOWN TO MY LAST BROKEN HEART-Chick Rains,

Chick Rains Music, tensing Music. DRIFTER -Don

E.

ler, A.D.T. Enterprises Inc., Trio Music Co., Inc. Right song Music Inc.

Cowboy Music Co.

Pfrimmer,

TAKE ME TO YOUR LOVIN' PLACE -Larry Gatlin,

Larry Gatlin Music.

Hall- Clement

Publica-

tions.

TAKING SOMEBODY WITH ME WHEN

I

FALL-Larry

Gatlin, Larry Gatlin Music.

DRIVIN' MY LIFE AWAY -David Malloy, Eddie RabEven Stevens,

Briarpatch Music, Debdave Music

Inc.

TENNESSEE RIVER-Rady Owne, Buzzherb Music. TEXAS IN MY REAR VIEW MIRROR -Mac Davis, Song-

NASHVILLE -In the final analysis, the 1981 annual tele-

vised CMA Country Music Awards Show may have said it all.

Unlike too many other awards shows -which seem to spring up these days at the mere mention of a new trophy -the CMA's production was fast -paced and pro-

fessional. More importantly, though, its directors seemed to understand that the show's true meaning revolved around the presentation of awards, not the presence of television cameras. There were no vacuous Texas cheerleaders illustrating the how -nots of doing the Cotton Eyed Joe to lip- synched, prerecorded country tracks. There were no irritating Hollywood celebrities on hand to misread all the names of winners and detract from the night's importance. Even the cue card dialog was, for the most part, intelligent and natural, and the staged production numbers reflective of the sophistication that underlies today's country music. In a second consecutive appearance as teamed anchors for the program, Barbara Mandrell and Mac Davis proved that they may be the singularly perfect country co-hosts. They combined refreshing candor and lively enthusiasm. (Both are also extremely easy on the eyes and ears, have built -in tv viewing appeal, and can be counted on to provide bright oases of humor whenever necessary.) Technically, the show was a certifiable winner. From its opening taped glimpses of all the acts to appear throughout the evening to the Clever introductions leading into the show's closing award for entertainer of the year, everything meshed. Set design, direction and camera work were all geared to impart a feeling of glamorous conviviality to the millions of tv viewers stuck at home. The live satellite interplay with the irrepressible Dolly Parton gave instant comic relief (and almost a third co -host, as she frequently commented on the program's events and winners). The "Elvira" re -write that allowed the Oak Ridge Boys to do a singing introduction for the female vocalist of the year cate-

gory was amusing. Later, another effective production featured a neon -lit bar set and a line -up of backs that slowly turned and revealed, verse by verse, country

singers Razzy Bailey, Johnny Lee, Joe Stampley, Lacy J. Dalton, Bobby Bare, the Bellamy Brothers and Merle Haggard. (Haggard's unexpected appearance elicited a wave of spontaneous applause throughout the Opry House.)

ally from the awards themselves. How was it possible not to flash back to last year when George Jones was once again named top male vocalist, "He Stopped Loving Her Today" scored a dark horse upset to take its second consecutive CMA win (albeit in a different category), and Man drell set a precedent by becoming the first performer ever to win

CMA entertainer of the year twice in a row?

Mandrel) & Davis: Country's perfect co- hosts? As always, whenever she performs live, Emmylou Harris managed in her number to bring a deep-rooted sense of conviction to the staged proceedings. Mac Davis' medley of self-authored songs "that never made it to the charts and I'm gonna show you why" was cleverly carried off. Alabama's spirited mini-medley

displayed the act's impressive instrumental and harmony skills, representative of country's new breed of young performers. And the double piano tribute to Jerry Lee Lewis (coming as it did on the heels of Lewis' recent near-death illness) brought dynamic keyboard companions Mickey Gilley and Ronnie Milsap a deserved ovation at the end of their performance. This was quickly accompanied by a standing ovation as a thin -looking Lewis himself came onstage from the audience. If there was an evasive sense of deja vu about the evening's events, well, that stemmed basic-

Oh, well. There were other messages for viewers to pick up on during the two -hour special. The Oaks' victory with "Elvira" as a single of the year was a tell-

ing comment that having a record score big in pop doesn't have to detract from its country recognition. Alabama, an act carefully groomed by RCA in the past year and a half for emerging star status, underscored country's new acceptance of shared rock/ pop airplay glory as it earned its dual awards. Perhaps, more than anything else, this year's version of the annual Awards Show showed the value of top -notch production and the worth of well -written scripts. Because of these two key elements, the CMA's show stands head and shoulders above other country tv programs (and certain other non -country awards shows as well), proving that when handled right, country makes for highly engrossing tv fare. KIP KIRBY

painter Music.

FADED LOVE (2nd Award) -John Wills, Rightsong

Music Inc. FRIDAY NIGHT BLUES

-Rafe

Van Hoy, Tree Publish-

ing Co., Inc.

THAT LOVIN' YOU FEEUN' AGAIN -Roy Chris Price, Acuff -Rose Publications Inc.

Orbison,

THAT'S ALL THAT MATtERS -Hank Cochran, Tree

Publishing Co., Inc.

GONE TOO FAR -David Malloy, Eddie

Rabbitt, Even

Stevens, Briarpatch Music, Debdave Music Inc. GOOD OLE BOYS UKE ME-Bob McDill, Hall -Cle-

ment Publications.

THEME FROM

DUKES

OF

HAllARD (GOOD OL'

BOYS)-Waylon Jennings, Rich Way Music Inc., Warner -

Tamerlane Publishing Corp. TRUE LOVE WAYS- Norman Petty, Wren Music Co.,

GOODBYE MARIE- Dennis Linde, Combine Music Corp.

Inc. TWO STORY

GUITAR MAN (2nd Award) -Jerry Reed, Vector Mu-

HOUSE -David Lindsey, Glenn Tubb,

Tammy Wynette, ATV Music Corp., First Lady Songs Inc. WE'RE NUMBER ONE -Larry Gatlin,

sic. HARD TIMES -Bobby Braddock, Tree Publishing Co.

Larry Gatlin

Music. WHO'S CHEATIN' WHO -Jerry Hayes, Algee Music

Inc. HE STOPPED

LOVING HER TODAY

-Bobby Brad-

dock, Curly Putman, Tree Publishing Co., Inc. HEART OF MINE -Michael Foster

Silverline Music

Corporation, Partner Music. WHY DON'T YOU SPEND THE NIGHT -Bob

McDill,

Hall-Clement Publications. WHY LADY WHY -Teddy Gentry, Mill House Music.

Inc.

(2nd Award) -Eddie Rabbitt, Even Stevens, Dan Tyler, Briarpatch Music, Debdave HEARTS OF

FIRE

Music Inc.

Music, Inc., Hiriam Music.

ME- Carson Whitsett, Holy Moley Music,

sic Inc. YOU ALMOST SUPPED MY MIND-Tilden Back, Del-

BELIEVE IN YOU -Roger Cook, Sam Hogin, Roger

Cook Music, Cookhouse Music. I FEEL UKE LOVING YOU AGAIN-Bobby

WHY NOT

Whitsett -Churchill Music Corp. YESTERDAY ONCE MORE -Peggy White, Baray 'Mu-

HONKY TONK BLUES-Hank Williams, Fred Rose

I

MAKING PLANS -Voni

SHE JUST STARTED UKING CHEATING SONGS-Kent

COWBOYS AND CLOWNS- Stephen Dorff, Snuff Garrett. Larry Herbstritt, Bar Cee Music, Peso Music, Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp.

DO YOU

Johnny

Slate, House of Gold Music Inc.

PECOS PROMENADE -Snuff Garrett, Sandy Pinkard, OF THE COUNTRY

Bowling, Roger Bowling Music.

COWGIRL

-

UP A STORM -Danny Morrison,

son, Marijohn Wilkin, Buckhorn Music Publishing Com-

Tree Publishing Co. Inc.

bitt,

LJVING

ON THE ROAD AGAIN

Music.

CM

LADY IN THE BLUE MERCEDES-Danny Darst, Gary

OLD FLAMES CAN'T HOLD A CANDLE TO YOU

BLUE SIDE-Allee Willis, Irving Music Inc.

Taz

DiGregorio, Fred Edwards, Charlie Hayward, Jim Mar-

event (held as always in the oversized circus tent behind BMI's music row offices) were the Oak Ridge Boys, Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, Don McLean, Eddie Rabbitt, ners follows:

Inc.,

Unart Music Corporation.

Assn. Awards Show, Oct. 12, CBS TV, produced by Bob Precht.

bert Barker, Don Goodman, Troy Seals, Irving Music Inc.

Braddock,

YOU WIN AGAIN

-Hank Williams,

Fred Rose Music

Sonny Throckmorton, Tree Publishing Co., Inc.

Inc., Hiriam Music.

I KEEP COMING BACK -Jim Hurt, Larry Keith, Johnny Slate, House of Gold Music Inc.

face, Jim Zerface, Combine Music Corp.

YOU'D MAKE AN ANGEL WANNA CHEAT -Bill Zer-

Dual Honors For Alabama, Mandrell At CMA Awards Continued from page 52 Ole Opry announcer since 1945. Dalhart recorded the first million seller country song, "The Prisoner's Song" / "The Wreck Of The Old 97." During his 22-year career, he recorded under more than 100 names. It was the first time in the history of the CMA awards that a tie occurred in this category.

Chet Atkins was named instrumentalist of the year. A four-time winner in this category, Atkins last received this tribute in 1969. During the ceremonies, the CMA deejays of the year were announced. Taking the small market category www.americanradiohistory.com

Band Feted With

3M Scotty Award NEW YORK -The Charlie Dan-

was Jackie West, WGTO-AM, Cypress Gardens, Fla. Tim Wilson, WAXX-FM, Eau Claire, Wis., was

iels Band has been awarded a 3M

medium market winner. And Lynn Waggoner, KEBC-FM, Oklahoma City, took top honors in the large market grouping. The winners received their awards at a CMA deejay luncheon Oct. 16. Preceding the 90- minute telecast, Grover "Shorty" Lavender was named man of the year by the Nashville Assn. of Talent Directors. And in his warm -up remarks prior to the show, Ralph Emery commended CMA executive director Jo Walker Meador for her 20 years of service at the organization.

award for the Epic album "Full Moon." Honored are producer John Boylan, engineer Paul Grupp, the band itself and the two studios used: Los Angeles' Record Plant and Nashville's Woodland Sound. Charlie Daniels' association with producer Boylan began when both worked on Epic's "Million Mile Reflections" in 1979. To qualify for a Scotty, a record must be certified either gold or platinum by the RIAA and have been mastered and mixed on Scotch professional audio tape.

"Scotty" Master Music Maker

58

Country

ASCAP Accolades Went To Morrison, Goodrum Continued from page 52

-Jerry Foster, Bill

OVER

'81 SESAC

Rice, Jack and Bill Music

Celebration

Co.

public relations; and Toni Winter, executive secretary to Hal David. Los Angeles ASCAP executives included Todd Brabec, western regional director of business affairs: and Michael Gorfaine, western regional director for repertory. Artists attending included Razzy Bailey, Guy Clark, Rodney Crowell, Emmylou Harris, Brenda Lee and Paul Williams.

-Harold Arlen,

E.Y.

-Larry Collins.

Leeds

OVER THE RAINBOW

Harburg.

Leo Feist. Inc. PECOS PROMENADE

Music

Corp., Senor Music. PLAY ANOTHER SLOW

SONG- Kieran Kane, Richard

Kane, Cross Keys Publishing Co.. Inc. (YOU SAY YOU'RE) A REAL COWBOY -David Heav-

vier. Achord Music. RHINESTONE COWBOY -Larry

Weiss.

House

of

Weiss Music Co., Twentieth Century Music Corp. SAIL ON- Lionel Richie, Jr., Commodores Entertainment, Publishing Corporation, Jobete Music Co., Inc. SECRET LOVE -Sammy Fain, Paul Francis Webster,

Remick Music Corp. ACAPULCO -Larry Collins, Mary Leath, Cibie Music,

Senor Music. ALWAYS- Irving Berlin, Irving Berlin Music Corp. ARE YOU ON THE ROAD TO LOVIN' ME AGAIN -Deb-

SHE BELIEVES IN ME -Steve Gibb, Angel Wing Mu-

sic.

bie Hupp, Bob Morrison, Southern Nights Music Co.

-Don

BABY, YOU'RE SOMETHING

Cook, Cross Keys

SHE CAN'T SAY THAT ANYMORE -Sonny

BACK TO BACK

THE SHUFFLE SONG -Mack David, Mack David Mu-

-Jerry McBee. Scott -ch

& Brandy

sic Publishing Co.

Music.

SILENT NIGHT (AFTER THE FIGHT) -John Schweers,

BEAUTIFUL YOU

-David Hanner, Blendingwell Mu

Jack and Bill Music Co.

sic, Inc.. Sabal Music, Inc.

SOMEBODY'S KNOCKIN'

-Ron Muir, Ron Muir Music. THE BLUE SIDE -David Easley, Almo Music Corp. BROKEN HEARTED ME -Randy Goodrum, Chappell THE BEDROOM

Inc.

STARTING

Goldsboro Music, Inc. Wheeler,

Edd

Sleepy Hollow Music Co.

-Gary Harju, Billy Music,

Senor Music, WB Music Corp. DANCIN' COWBOYS-David Bellamy, Bellamy Broth-

Keys Publishing Co., Inc.

Music Corp., Appian

Music,

Quixotic Music Corp. DON'T IT MAKE MY BROWN EYES BLUE

- Richard

Leigh, United Artists Music Co.. Inc.

Pfeifer, Bright.

water Music Corp.. Strawberry Patch. Keys Publishing Co., Inc. GIVING UP EASY -Jerry Foster, Bill Rice, April Mu.

sic, Inc.

-Mel McDaniels. Music City

Mu

sic, Inc.

AIN'T LIVING LONG UKE THIS- Rodney Crowell,

Happy Sack Music Limited. JUST FALL IN LOVE AGAIN -Larry Herbstritt, Cot

len. Jack and Bill Music Co. TOO

OLD TO

I'D LOVE TO LAY YOU DOWN- Johnny MacRae, MuGOT A PICTURE OF US ON MY MIND

- Robert

Gundry. Silver Nightingale Music.

ITS TOO LATE (TO LOVE ME NOW) -Rory Bourke, Gene Dobbins, Johnny Wilson, Chappell Music Co.

IT'S TRUE LOVE-Randy Goodrum, Chappell Music Co., Sailmaker Music.

TRUE LIFE COUNTRY MUSIC -Sam Lorber, Jeff Sil-

UNBEUEVERS -Randy

Goodrum,

Sailmaker Music, Welbeck Music Corp. LEAVING LOUISIANA IN THE BROAD DAYLIGHT-W.

Donivan Cowart. Rodney Crowell, Drunk Monkey Music, Happy Sack Music Limited (Visa Music Division). LEAVIN'

-Randy Goodrum, Brent

Maher. Blue Quill Music, Chappell Music Co.. Sailmaker Music, Welbeck Music Corp. LOOKIN' FOR LOVE -Wanda Mallette, Bob Morrison,

Patti Ryan, Southern Nights Music Co. LOVE ME OVER AGAIN -Don Williams, Bibo Music Publishers. LOVE THE WORLD AWAY -Bob Morrison, Johnny A.

Wilson, Southern Nights Music Co. UVE

LONGER -David

Bellamy, Bellamy

Brothers Music, Famous Music Corp. LUCKY

ME- Charlie Black,

Rory Bourke, Chappell

Music Co. LYIN' EYES -Glenn Frey, Don Henley. Cass Country

Music Co., Red Cloud Music Co. MaCARTHUR PARK -Jimmy

L.

Webb. Canopy Music,

Inc.

MAN JUST DON'T KNOW WHAT

A

WOMAN GOES

THROUGH -Bob Brabham, Archie Jordan, Jack and Bill

Music Co.

MIST!- Johnny Burke, Erroll Garner, Octave Music Publishing Corp., Vernon Music Corp. MY HEART-Charles Quillen, Jack and Bill Music Co. MY HEROES HAVE ALWAYS BEEN COWBOYS

-Mary

Rice, Jack and Bill Music Co. NO ONE WILL EVER KNOW -Mel Foree, Fred Rose,

Milene Music. Inc. OH, HOW

I

MPL Communi-

TRYING TO LOVE TWO WOMEN -Sonny Throckmor. (YOU UFT ME) UP TO HEAVEN -Johnny MacRae,

Bob Morrison, Southern Nights Music Co. I

AM -Sonny Throckmorton, Cross Keys

Publishing Co., Inc.

WHY- Richard

Edward Scott,

Shedd

House Music.

WICHITA LINEMAN

-Jimmy

L.

Webb, Canopy Music.

WOMEN GETS LONELY -Larry Rogers, Bill Black MuYESTERDAY ONCE MORE

-Jim Mundy, Honeytree

Music Inc YOU DECORATED MY

LIFE- Debbie Hupp, Bob Mor-

YOU DON'T BRING ME FLOWERS -Alan Bergman,

Marilyn Bergman, Neil Diamond, Stonebridge Music, Threesome Music Co. YOU LIGHT UP MY UFE -Joe Brooks, Big Hill Music

Corp.

MISS YOU TONIGHT -Joe Burke, Benny

Davis, Mark Fisher, Bourne Co., World Music, Inc. ONE OF A KIND -Bobby Fischer, Sonny Throckmorton, Cross Keys Publishing Co., Inc., Honeytree Music

Inc. ORANGE BLOSSOM SPECIAL

-Ervin

Rice, Jack and Bill Music Co. YOU NEEDED ME -Randy Goodrum. Chappell Music

Richie, Jr., Brockman Music.

Brent Maher, Blue Quill Music. Chappell Music Co.,

LOVERS

Music, Inc.

TRUE LOVE WAYS -Buddy Holly,

YOU KNOW JUST WHAT I'D DO -Jerry Foster, Bill

KAW-UGA -Fred Rose. Hank Williams, Milene Music.

Inc., Intersong Music.

IN

Kirby, Cross

rison, Music City Music Inc.

IT'S UKE WE NEVER SAID GOODBYE -Roger Greenaway (PRS), Geoff Stephens (PRS), Dejamus Inc.

LESSON

PLAY COWBOY -Dave

Keys Publishing Co., Inc.

sic, Inc.

sic, Inc.

FOR

-David Wills, Charles Quil-

Inc.

ton Pickin' Songs.

- Lionel

-

Tony Joe White, Tennessee Swamp Fox.

WHY LADY

HALF THE WAY -Ralph Murphy, Murfeezongs.

Inc.

Fischer Music.

THE WAY

LEAVIN'S

Bobby

ton, Cross-Keys Publishing Co., Inc.

THE GAMBLER -Don Schlitz, Writer's Night Music.

LADY

Fischer,

cations, Inc.

FRIDAY NIGHT BLUES-Sonny Throckmarton, Cross

GOODBYE MARIE

YOURS-Bobby

bar, Bobby Goldsboro

FREE TO BE LONELY AGAIN -Diane

S.

Denver, Taffy Nivert, Cherry Lane Music Co.

THEY NEVER LOST YOU

DON'T FALL IN LOVE WITH A DREAM -Kim Carnes,

191E

April Music Inc., Blue Moon Music, Merilark Music.

THAT'S THE WAY A COWBOY ROCKS AND ROLLS

DO YO WANNA GO TO HEAVEN -Bucky Jones, Cross

A

RAG- Vaughn Horton, Cromwell Music,

Inc.

TEMPORARILY

ers Music, Famous Music Corp.

Almo

-David Bellamy, Bellamy Brothers

Music, Famous Music Corp.

TAKE ME HOME COUNTRY ROADS-Bill Danoff, John

COWBOYS AND CLOWNS

Dave Ellingson,

-Donny Summer. Sweet

SURE THING -Earl Thomas Conley, Nelson Larkin,

THE COUNTY -Billy

COWARD OF

A

OVER AGAIN

SUGAR FOOT

COME TO MY LOVE-Sam Lorber, Jeff Silbar, Bobby

Penney, Chiplin Music

Summer Night Music. SUGAR DADDY

BROKEN TRUST- Jimbeau Hinson, Goldline Music,

-Ed

Co.

Music Co., Sailmaker Music.

I

Throckmor-

ton, Cross Keys Publishing Co., Inc.

Publishing Co., Inc.

I

-Charlie Black, Rory

SHADOWS IN THE MOONUGHT

Bourke, Chappell Music Co.

T. Rouse, MCA,

Co., Ironside Music.

YOU

PICK ME UP (AND PUT ME DOWN)

-Randy

Goodrum, Brent Maher, Blue Quill Music, Chappell Music Co., Sailmaker Music, Welbeok Music Corp. YOU'D

MME AN

ANGEL WANNA CHEAT -Bob Morri-

son, Southern Nights Music Co.

YOUR

OLD

COLD SHOULDER- Richard

Leigh,

United Artists Music Co., Inc.

CMA Awards Scribe Hurst NASHVILLE- Chicago Tribune's syndicated columnist Jack Hurst became the first recipient of the Country Music Assn. journalist award during the 10th annual talent buyers seminar here. The award was presented Saturday (10) by CMA president Tandy Rice. Hurst's country music column appears in over 30 U.S. newspapers. A native of Tennessee, Hurst earlier reported for the (Nashville) Tennessean and the Philadelphia Inquirer. The journalist award was introduced by the CMA to honor members of the print and electronic media who have made "important contributions to country music" in their coverage of the industry. Nominees are submitted to the CMA board of directors. This year, Hurst was the board's unanimous choice.

Draws 500 Continued from page 52 previous year. George Strait became the first performer to win this accolade. Sharing the honors with Strait were Frank Dycus, writer of five tunes on Strait's MCA debut album, "Strait Country," along with producer Blake Mevis and publisher Everett Zinn, president of Golden Opportunity Music' Inc. "Some Ladies Don't Love Cowboys," written by Dycus and Raleigh Squires, earned SESAC's most recorded country song of the year honors, with "Somebody's Knockin'," a Jerry Gillespie /Ed Penney composition, took top plaudits as country song of the year. Jerry Gillespie was named SESAC's country music writer of the year, and Ed Penney became the firm's producer of the year. Winning SESAC's best country album honors was Johnny Lee's "Looking For Love" LP, with the Bellamy Brothers scoring top country single of the year kudos for "Do You Love As Good As You Look." Although neither Lee nor the Bell amys were able to be on hand for the evening, both had videotaped their acceptance remarks which were aired for the on -hand audience of industry guests and celebrities. SESAC's best album cut honors went this year to Alabama's "Getting Over You." The organization's most promising country music writer of the year was Steve McCorvey. The 1981 ambassador of country music award was Jo Walker -Meador, who is celebrating her 20th year with the Country Music Assn. And Gerry Wood, Billboard's editor-inchief walked away with SESAC's outstanding journalistic achievement award, an honor which the firm has not bestowed on anyone since 1976. Amidst glimmering gold decor and the strains of Gina Barken and her orchestra, carrying out the elegant dinner -dance theme for SESAC's half- century celebration, chairman A.H. Prager and C. Dianne Petty, vice president and director of country music for SESAC, hosted the 1981 awards gala. Other top organizational executives attending the 17th annual event were vice presidents Jim Black, Vincent Candilora and Charles Scully; Janice Favreau, director of operations; Elaine Guber, director of promotional activities; Rosalie lannacone, a member of SESAC's affiliation department; and Nashville office coordinators Betty Swink and Sherrie Durrett. Artists who attended included award winner George Strait, Faron Young, Charley Pride, Eddy Arnold, Tom T. Hall, Terri Gibbs, Johnny Duncan and Dean Dillon. KIP KIRBY

Murray TV Special NASHVILLE -Plans are in the works for Anne Murray's first American television special, a musical /variety program slated to air on CBS in mid- December. The show will tape Nov. 3 -12 in Nova Scotia, with Kris Kristofferson among the guest artists. In conjunction with the special, Capitol is releasing Murray's LP "Christmas Wishes" in mid -October. www.americanradiohistory.com

COLUMNIST KUDOS: Jack Hurst, syndicated country music columnist, accepts the new CMA journalist award from the association's president, Tandy Rice.

Nashville Scene By KIP KIRBY Maybe it was only the imagination, but somehow, this year's edition of the annual hoopla known as DJ Convention /CMA Week seemed a little more leisurely, a bit less frenetic. Certainly, the dearth of Nashville nightspots crimped the style of record companies considering sponsoring industry showcases for their artists. But even more than that, the pervasive air in town seemed to be that there was more time to participate and enjoy. The week kicked off with the Nashville Songwriters Assn.'s awards banquet. Scene's Spy managed to end up in an elevator on the way to the festivities with no one less than Willie Nelson (sporting a fine- looking new shorter hair length) and Waylon Jennings. And Paul Williams was in from Los Angeles to add an intercontinental touch to the awards. Then, Monday night came the highly- anticipated CMA Awards. Plenty has been written elsewhere about this show (see related stories in this section). Suffice to say here that there was much conversation later in the evening at the Post -Awards Party relating to the second win by He Stopped Loving Her Today." Said one backstage industry commentor, "Maybe the CMA needs to re- evaluate its policies concerning songs' eligibility periods once they've already won an award. There are too many good songwriters and songs around these days to have one song continually eligible in related categories." Even Bobby Braddock and Curly Putnam, writers of He Stopped Loving Her Today," seemed a bit bemused as they took the stage to accept their second CMA award for the tune. And, interestingly enough, under current CMA guidelines, the song could continue to crop up as a contender every time it's re- released by a different artist. Longtime CMA Week "voice of the convention" Ralph Emery had a couple of awkward moments during the various events he hosted. Sunday night, at the Songwriters Banquet, Emery mistakenly said in his intro for guest Paul Williams that the writer had penned "Close To You." Williams affably replied at the microphone 'that he'd wanted to write "Close To You," wished he'd written "Close To You" -but that unfortunately, Bert Bacharach and Hal David had beaten him to it! Then, Monday night, while warming up the audience at the outset of the CMA Awards telecast, Emery erroneously introduced Bruce Lundvall as being with CBS Records (easy mistake to make, given Lundvall's long and illustrious career with that label) instead of Elektra. Oh, well, in the pressure and

excitement of the week, these things happen. At least it didn't happen on camera! Spotted around town during the week were singer /songwriter Don McLean, the aforementioned Paul Williams, members of ABC's "Night line" tv news program interviewing artists, and Johnny Lee gaining admiring glances as he squired about his current date, "Dallas," pretty Charlene Tilton.

Congratulations to the Nashville Assn. of Tal-

ent Directors' new "man of the year," Shorty Lavender-and thanks to Ralph Emery for enlightening us to the fact that Shorty's real name is Grover!

Lot of talk around Nashville right now about the recent Dolly Partan sessions here, and the reportedly great new original songs she's written

for her movie with Burt Reynolds, "Best Little Whorehouse In Texas." Musicians who played on the sessions can't say enough about both the tracks themselves and the material. Bets are on

that this project .will be Dolly's biggest success ever ... Speaking of Dolly, country music ought to consider itself lucky to have such a loyal fan and staunch supporter as this artist. Her impish wit and charm make everything she does sparkle -and she sure did add a lot to the CMA Awards Show just from her satellite appearance. Her comments and asides (to say nothing of her description of the "kissin' scenes with Burt for the movie ") were hilarious and knowing Dolly, it's highly likely she wrote much of her

...

dialog herself! Too bad the country industry didn't nominate Eddie Babbitt and Hank Williams Jr. for honors this year. These two artists are both major stars in their field (Rabbitt has conquered more horizons than only country as well) and certainly are deserving of CMA recognition. With Hank Jr. logging five albums on the country LP chart and Eddie scoring the highest -ever debut entry on this publication's country album chart with "Step By Step," it's difficult to fathom such total industry spurning of their efforts at awards time. Double Header. Roger Miller bows twice on the chart this week. His own single, "Everyone Gets Crazy Now And Then" debuts at starred 76, closely followed at starred 77 with a tune he penned, David Friuell and Shelly West's "Husbands And Wives." Stephanie Winslow bursts on the scene at

starred 62 with a Jackie DeShannon tune, "When You Walk In The Room." The song went to 35 in 1964 for the Searchers, but only managed to reach 99 for DeShannon the same year. By the way, BMI is glowing after the events of the CMA Awards Show. Seems the licensing organization took a clean sweep in the honors, with every song or songwriter winning an award also affiliated with BMI. (In the case of "I Be-

lieve In You," which earned best album of the year for Don Williams -who is himself an ASCAP writer -the title cut was penned by BMI songwriters Roger Cook and Sam Hogin. There was a nice moment at the above -men-

tioned organization's annual country awards banquet when vice president Frances Preston brought both Jerry Lee Lewis and Willie Nelson onstage and said, "Sometimes you don't always realize what you have until you almost lose it," and told both artists to "take care of yourselves for us." Also -for sheer color -it would be hard to match the impact of the Vanderbilt Univ.'s marching band who blew BMI's top song of this year ( "9 To 5 ") at the top of their instrumental lungs as all 800 guests slowly streamed out of the huge BMI tent following the ceremonies! Stay tuned to this column next week for more DI Convention tidbits and highlights.

The Best in Country! 1981 Country Music Association Awards

SINGLE OF THE YEAR The Oak Ridge Boys (BM)

"Elvira"

ENTERTAINER OF THE YEAR

Barbara Mandrel! (BM)

VOCAL GROUP OF THE YEAR Alabama (BM/)

THE HORIZON AWARD

MALE VOCALIST OF THE YEAR

George Jones

Terri Gibbs (BM)

(BM

VOCAL DUO OF THE YEAR

INSTRUMENTAL GF.OUP OF THE YEAR

David frizzell and Shelly West (BM)

Alabama (BM)

INSTRUMENTALIST OF THE YEAR

FEMALE VOCALIST OF THE YEAR Barbara Mandrel! (BM!)

BMI

Chet Atkins (BM)

SONG OF THE YEAR

"He Stopped Loving Her Today" Bcbby Braddock /Curly Putman (BMI)

II The country music the country hears most! www.americanradiohistory.com

60

Country TV SPECIAL PLUGS SET

PASS INTERCEPTED -Former New York Jets t}ta1erback Joe Nama-h shows Epic artist Charly McClain his technique during a recent taping .caf "Nashville Palace," an NBC televis or show.

Survey For Week Ending 10/24/81

Billboard

NASHVILLE -First Generation Records is using a syndicated tv special to promote a new compilation album set. Called "Country Music Celebration." the special features First Generation artists Stonewall Jackson. Jean Shepard, Charlie Louvin, Justin Tubb, Jan Howard, the Vic Willis Trio. Ernest Tubb, Ray Pillow, Billy Walker and the Wilburn Brothers. Making special introductions are Dolly Parton, Loretta Lynn. Minnie Pearl and Roy Acuff. Spots for the five -album set will run in conjunction with the show's airtime. All 10 artists appearing on the special have five cuts apiece on the album package, which sells for $19.95. Vista Marketing, the tv arm of Columbia House, is handling the campaign. Filmed at the Grand Ole Opry House, the show was produced by Jim McKenna and directed by John Thomson for Silver Shadow Productions. Executive producer is Ed LaBuick. Videocassette rights are owned by Silver Shadow and Pete Drake, president of First Generation.

R

Hot Country LPs Copyright 1981, Billboard Publications, Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced. stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in a.y form or by any means, electronic. mechanical. photocopying. recording. or otherwise. without the prior written permission of the publisher. c

r

a 8

MIL Mist,

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t2

1

TITLE

I

Label

Number

(Dist. Label)

A

THERE'S NO GETTING OVER ME

40

Ronnie Milsap, RCA AHLI 4060

2

2

20

4

32

3

8

5

GREATEST HITS

41

34 130

42

37

15

YEARS AGO Mercury SRM 16002

43

46

10

44

30

25

45

52

181

MORE GOOD 'UNS

AHLI 3930

THE PRESSURE

Jerry Glower. MCA 5125

IS ON

LIVE Hoyt Axton, Jeremiah 5002

Elektra /Curb 5E 535

UVE

7

7

Barbara Mandrel!.

7

8

16

8

6

11

9

STARDUST Willie Nelson, Columbia IC 35305

MCA 5243

SHARE YOUR LOVE Kenny Rogers. liberty LOO 1108

46

38

10

47

55

4

48

29

25

49

43

22

THE NIGHT THE LIGHTS WENT OUT IN GEORGIA Soundtrack, Mirage WTG 16051

GOOD TIME LOVIN' MAN Ronnie McDowell, Epic

9

22

FE

37399

LETTIN' YOU IN ON FEELIN'

SURROUND ME WITH Charly McClain, Epic

14

11

FE

37108

11

10

31

12

14

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ONE TO ONE Ed

ESPECIALLY FOR YOU Don Williams. MCA 5210

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50

47

21

51

48

60

DARLIN'

"Never Been So Loved" is Charley Pride's

in 1969. In

fact, Pride has failed to strike the apex

only one year- 1974 -during his 13 -year tenure at the top. He reached the third spot on the

chart twice that year with We Could" and "Mississippi Cotton Picking Delta Town." A

particularly potent time for Pride was be-

tween 1969 and 1971, when he racked up

a

string of six No. 1 singles -"All Have To Offer You (Is Me)," "(I'm So) Afraid Of Losing You Again," "Is Anybody Goin' To San Antone," "Wonder Could Live There Anymore," "I Can't Believe That You've Stopped Loving Me" and "I'd Rather Love You." What broke the chain was "Did You Think To Pray" / "Let Me Live," which peaked at 21 in 1971. Despite its top 30 placement, that single is Pride's second worst showing on the country singles chart. Pride reached his lowest ebb in 1979, when "Dallas Cowboys" bottomed out at

r arrowly misses her first No. 1 It Easy" stops at two this weep. Several other acts looking for their first charttopper have a5o died in the second spot this

Lacy J. Dalton

single as "Taki

4'

includingTonpall and the Glaser Brothers' "Lovin' Her Na! Easier" and Mac Davis' year,

"Hooked On NSusi:." Femmes Fables: 50% of this week's top 10 by female soloists, as Gail Davies joins the ranks of Dalton, Janie Fricke, Rosanne Cash and Chary McClain.

are efforts

I

Bonus Point As a special salute to the recer t CMA festivities, Chart Fax is running down some

tidbits about sane of the tunes which have won

I

89. That "Dallas Cowboys" peak position was something of an anomaly for Pride is underlined by the fact that his chart history includes 42 top -10 songs and an amazing 34 top -three

CMA awards fo

5

"The Devil Went Down To Georgia," (1979).

the year category (award to the number of the tunes have also

15

18

27

songwriter) a been the first chart- topper for the artist. Greene's "There Goes My Everything," was

16

12

12

erything" (196'); Jeannie C. Riley's "HarpeValley P.T.A." (196E); Sammi Smith's "Help Me Make It Through The Night," (1971); Donna Fargo's "The Ha 7piest Girl In The Whole U.S.A.' (1972); Charlie Riei's "Behind Closed Doors,' (1973); Freddy fender's "Before The Next Tear

(175;;

tunes. And all of Pride's singles have been on

Kenny Rogers' "Lucille,' (1977); the Kendalls' "Heaven's Just A Sir

RCA.

Away," (1978); and the Charlie Daniels Band's

LORETTA LEANS -MCA artist Loretta Lynn takes a brea with Owen Bradley, her producer for 20 years, at a recent recording session. Lynn's first television special is scheduled to air on NBC Mov. 16.

Columbia 5236752

52

17

19

15

56

Janie Fricke, Columbia

Sheppard,

c=a0

TAKIN IT EASY

Mac Davis.

Dalton. Columbia

1.

FC

37327

54

50

27

SOME DAYS ARE

53

self-penned "Easy Loving" was song of the year

19

21

16

GREATEST HITS

Moon /Asylum

5E 541

Kenny Rogers, Liberty L00 1072

in both 1971 and 1972. Kenny O'Dell penned

56

54

62

MR. T

I

BELIEVE IN YOU

Don Williams, MCA 5133

Conway Twitty, MCA 5204

20

20

56

I

AM WHAT

AM

I

57

61

27

OUT WHERE THE BRIGHT LIGHTS ARE GLOWING

58

65

13

WITH LOVE

George Jones, Epic JE 36586

21

16

38

for "Back Home Again" in 1975.

ROWDY Hank Williams Jr.,

Ronnie Milsap, RCA AAL

Elektra /Curb 6E 330

22

13

22

cc*

MAKIN' FRIENDS Razzy Bailey, RCA AHLI 4026

23

26

67

HORIZON

60

66

50

61

67

14

Eddie Rabbitt. Elektra 6E 276

24

23

5

Wrangler Search

www.americanradiohistory.com

3986

BET YOUR HEART ON ME Johnny Lee. Full

22

ever, $50.000, a recording contract and a booking contract with the Shorty Lavender agency will be awarded to the national winner. Second prize is $15,000 and the third place winner will receive $10,000. There is no entry fee for the contest, which is open to anyone who has never been affiliated as an artist with a major record label. 255 radio stations nationwide are serving as local contest sponsors. Although some major market stations are requiring submitted tapes as an initial screening process, 95`7 of the stations are going first to live talent shows at local clubs, according to Sam Edwards, vice president of the search. Following the local competitions. state finals will be held in February. March and April of 1982. Nashville is the site for the national finals, which will be staged in April in conjunction with area sponsor WKDAAM. A 90- minute network television special will also feature the finalists. Ray Price and the Cherokee Cowboys are slated to appear in all 50 statewide contests and on the televised finals.

Casablanca NBLP 7257

DRIFTER Sylvia, RCA AHLI

John Denver. RCA AFLI 4055

18

BEAUMONT, Tex. -The Wrangler Country Starsearch, formerly known as the Ray Price Country Starsearch, is being touted as the largest country music talent search

37535

FC

MIDNIGHT CRAZY

DIAMONDS

Bobby Russell's "Honey" (1968) was the first top tune for Bobby Goldsboro. Freddie Hart's

Top Prizes In

SLEEPING WITH YOUR MEMORY

2

LOVE EM ALL

Lacy

year's top single, the Oak Ridge Boys' "Elvira."

Bowling and Hal Bynum penned Rogers' "Lucille" (1977). And John Denver won the award

Soundtrack

Warner/Curb BSK 3528

penned by Dallas Frazier, who also wrote this

Rich's "Behind Closed Doors" (1973) and Roger

I

T.G.

In the song of

siegle and song of the year.

number of thx award- winning tunes wen, the first chart -tappers for the artists who mad' them famous. le the single of the year category (award to the irti :t), first -time around No. tunes include Jack Greene's "There Goes My Ev-

HONEYSUCKLE ROSE

HOLLYWOOD, TENNESSEE Crystal Gayle, Columbia FC 37438

A

drop Falls,"

17

Mercury SRM 14010

Tom Jones.

JUICE Juice Newton. Capitol ST 12136

Chart Fax first top tune this year and his 25th since All I Have To Offer You (Is Me)" graced the summit

31

8 Shelly West,

Warner Bros. BSK 3555

37542

15

Fond

David

36965

GREATEST HITS Willie Nelson, Colbumbia KC2

13

Bruce. MCA 5188

CARRYIN' ON THE FAMILY NAMES

SEVEN YEAR ACHE Rosanne Cash, Columbia

A

Kendalls, Mercury SRM 16005

The

LOVE

10

12110

GREATEST HITS

The Statler Brothers,

Hank Williams Jr..

6

Number

Anne Murray, Capitol S00

Boys, MCA 5209

RCA

i

Waylon Jennings, RCA AALI.3378

FEELS SO RIGHT Alabama,

5

56

FANCY FREE The Oak Ridge

4

45

STEP BY STEP

9

Eddie Rabbitt, Elektra 5E 532

3

Artist, Label (Dist. Label)

FAMILY TRADITION

25

28

72

25

38

49

2

RCA

62

51

24

63

57

4

I'M COUNTRIFIED

Brothers

24

13

39

3

53

25

19

.

Elektra /Curb

65

62

13

66

60

46

36

54

35 102

10

27

17

51

68

74

32

69

63

31

70

58

35

BACK TO THE BARROOMS

SOMEWHERE OVER THE RAINBOW Willie Nelson, Columbia

GREATEST HITS

WHISKEY BENT AND HELL BOUND

FC

36683

HEY JOE, HEY MOE Moe Bandy 8 Joe Sta npley. Columbia

FC

37003

EVANGELINE Emmylou Harris,

YOU DON'T KNOW ME Mickey Gilley. Epic

35

68

525

Elektra /Curb 66237

31

Jones. Epic FE 37346

9 TO 5 AND

Merle Haggard, MCA 5139

Hank Williams Jr_

34

67

PLEASURE

Ronnie Milsap, RCA AALI 3112

33

ENCORE

Dolly Parton. RCA AAL1 3852

Dimension DL 5003

Dave Rowland 8 Sugar.

32

JOHN ANDERSON 2

ODD JOBS

TOWN & COUNTRY

5E

12144

HEART TO HEART

George

RAINBOW STEW

Elektra

WHERE DO YOU GO WHEN YOU DREAM

John Anderson,

278

Ray Price,

32

DO IT

I

ucker. MCA 5228

16003

64

Merle Haggard. MCA 5216

31

-

Warner Bros. BSK 3547

HABITS OLD & NEW Flank Williams Jr.

29

SHOULD

Reba McEntire, Mercury SRM

12116

NOT GUILTY

6E

LOOKIN' FOR LOVE

Anne Murray. Capitol S00

Band. Columbia FC 37464

5

Gene Watson. MCA 5241

AHLI 3644

Larry Gatlm 8 the Gatlin

33

OLD LOVES NEVER DIE

Tanya

MY HOME'S IN ALABAMA

Mel McDaniel, Capitol ST

28

lohn Conlee, MCA

194

Alabama.

26

3932

Johnny Lee. Asylum 6E 309

Hank Williams Jr., Elektra /Curb 6E

1

FE

37416

Warner Bros BSK 350

71

73

35

72

75

22

73

70

11

74

64

67

75

72

48

NOW OR NEVER lohn Schneider. Scoth Bros.

F2

BETWEEN THIS TIME AND THE NEXT Gene Watson, MCA 5170

37400 (CBS)

36

41

4

STRAIT COUNTRY

37

44

51

GREATEST HITS The Oak Ridge

38

42

15

39

40 102

Chipmunks,

RCA

AFLI 4027

THE BEST OF EDDIE RABBITT Elektra 6E 235

* Sta

MINSTREL MAN Willie Nelson. RCA AHLI 4045

Boys. MCA 5150

URBAN CHIPMUNK The

OUTLAWS Waylon Jennings. RCA AALI 1321

George Strait. MCA 5248

THAT'S ALL THAT MATTERS Mickey Gilley. Epic

JE

36492

JE

36851

ENCORE Mickey Gilley. Epic

greatest sales strength. Superstars are awarded to those products showing greatest upward movement on the current week's chart (Prime Movers). Recording Industry Assn. Of America seal for sales of 500,000 units. (Seal indicated by dot.) Recording Industry Assn. Of America seal for sales of 1,000,000 units. (Seal ,idicated by triangle.) s are awarded to those products showing

61

Video Tape-Disk Seminar Attracts 500

Assn.'s Powwow Examines U.S. Technology, Programs CANNES -The rapid growth of video in Europe, with special emphasis on new technical and program achievements in the U.S. which are shortly to reach the old continent was highlighted at the International Tape Disc Assn.'s first European seminar held during VIDCOM here. The two -day seminar attracted nearly 500 participants, 50 of them American, with others coming from such new and potential markets as Nigeria and Israel. As ITA executive vice president Henry Brief stressed in his keynote speech, estimates are that household penetration of home video by the end of next year will be 7% in Europe, compared with 5% in the U.S., and he introduced the theme that recurred through the conference: the video industries in the United States and Europe "must learn from each other if they are to survive." Yet is was also emphasized that while prerecorded video-cassette sales are expanding more rapidly in Europe -an estimated seven million this year compared with the United States (4.5 million units)-this is almost totally due to the multitude of electronic distribution methods in the U..S. which are still a pipedream in Europe.

Specialized panels examined copyrights, videocassettes and videodisks, with analyses of the three leading systems in each format, video creation, major trends in marketing, distribution and sales, competition between small independents and the majors piracy and opportunities for print publishers in video. New York lawyer Michael Sukin highlighted the concern of copyright holders in a market moving ever more strongly to rentals with the basic concept: "Know your rights, but also know with whom you are dealing.

By MICHAEL WAY "There are so many shades between fraud and legality," he commented, and in addition, top people "do make genuine mistakes." Furthermore, the debate was still raging on the level of music fees to be paid and the new question on synchronization rights. For Sukin, the elementary priority for each license acquirer was a check list, and he gave his support to an idea put to the seminar on the establishment of a data base computer for checking copyright. The European viewpoint was put by London Entertainment industry lawyer Michael Flint who focussed on European Common market legislation, on the free movement of goods despite prior territory by territory licensing agreements reached between producers and distributors. However, parallel imports were less of a problem in Europe because of standard differences between the U.S. and Euope, he noted. Opportunities in Europe for prerecorded programming seen from the American side were raised by Bell & Howell Video president Bob Pfannkuch. While these are perhaps greater in Europe than in the U.S. at present because of electronic media distribution systems still largely absent in the former region, this situation will change, he said. Despite government restrictions' on pay and cable tv in many countries, Pfannkuch insisted that "the marketplace will decide in the long term," for electronic distribution is so much cheaper than traditional methods, even though piracy is a major problem. As videogram division vice president at WEA, Lee Mendell, commented: "The rush into the home market in Europe is now under way, attracting all and sundry." Most panelists from the continent in the discussion on distribution agreed

that the situation was "chaotic ", notably in respect of rental licenses. "The big problem was the introduction of a totally new product in such a short time," commented Frank Brandt, vice president of the Dutch De Telegraaf newspaper. The print business, however, was now "regulated," he added. In Britain, CIC managing director Roy Featherstone, remarking on the massive demand for home video prompted by the royal wedding in July -"better than any promotion campaign" -said that at last the industry was emerging from "High Street Chaos," thanks to the active role now played by wholesalers in the U.K. distribution system. They now hold 45% of this distribution, he reported. The dominance of rentals over sales was also revealed by Hans Flury of Videophonen Switzerland where it is a 6 -1 balance and by George Huhne of Select Video Germany, where it is 9 -1. From the American viewpoint, the lack of unification between producers, distributors and dealers has led to considerable hositility "when they should be working together," commented James Jimirro, presi-

dent of Walt Disney Tele-

communications. "There has never before been an industry where all its principal elements are doing different things, and also where there are far too many store outlets for too few customers." Meanwhile, one of the factors helping software sales in France according to Jacques Souplet, president of Warner -Filipacchi Video, is precisely the absence of both privately owned tv station, and cable and pay tv operations; this in a still rather small "video country" where the sales- rental ratio is estimated at about 50-50.

RCA'S POLLACK AT VIDCOM

SelectaVision Debuts In Europe CANNES- Launching RCA's SelectaVision European standard videodisk system at VIDCOM, Roy H. Pollack, RCA executive vice president said: "If any videodisk system can be successful in the United States give the immense variety of programming choices, then the opportunity for success in Europe must be even better." Pollack added that his belief is that the worldwide similarities in consumer electronic products and entertainment programming will help establish one videodisk system as the standard for Europe and elsewhere. "In reviewing the worldwide markets," Pollack said, "you will see the same fundamental trends whether you look at color tv, audio products, VCR, cable or satellite tv. Even in programming, you will see many of the same preferences for movies, music and the other performing

arts" Pollack said that RCA's plan for implantation of the CED system in Europe was to manufacture the disks itself but to leave manufacture of the hardware and marketing to others in each market. Pollack predicted a doubling of CED player volume in the United States by 1982 and the tripling of

disk capacity to nearly 10 million in units. "By the end of 1981, RCA will have produced about three million CED disks and will sell more than 90% of them, and it will have produced and sold more than 200,000 players under its own and other brand names." Herbert S. Schlosser, executive vice president of RCA, revealed that RCA videodisk player owners are buying disks at a much faster rate than had been anticipated. The player owners have averaged 15 albums in four months, nearly twice as many as expected.

The CED player demonstrated at VIDCOM featured such developments as programmable random access, high -speed visual search, repeat picture, and a facility to repeat automatically program segments on the disk. The player also incorporates stereo and bilingual capability. "We continue to believe," Pollack told guests at the demonstration reception, "that our introductory products, particularly with the advent of stereo sound next year, incorporate the features necessary to build a mass market. "It will take many years of blood, sweat, tears and money from many participants, but we are moving for-

VIDEO SHAKE -MGM /CBS recently launched U.K. operations, with Colin Bayliss as managing director (Billboard, Sept. 19). The first set of 17 videocassettes will be released shortly. Pictured above, left to right, are Peter Kuyper, co- chairman, MGM /CBS; Cy Leslie, co- chairman, CBS /MGM; Bayliss; and Maurice Oberstein, chairman, CBS Records U.K.

Swiss Videophon To Bow Warner Rentals By PIERRE ZURICH -Local video software company Videophon is putting the controversial Warner Home Video rental system into operation in around 250 outlets throughout Switzerland and, anticipating industry queries, set up a seminar here to explain the thinking behind its move. Hans Flury, managing director, provided the background. The company has, since mid -1980, operated in the vodeocassette rental marketplace, offering some 500 titles in 40 outlets, charging $10 to $12.50 a

time. He detailed Swiss video statistics. Prerecorded tapes are costly, between $50 to $130, creating a boom in rentals, though relatively few con-

sumers rent regularly. Dealers have to renew titles in stock frequently and 85% of all rentals are for adventure, erotic or horror movies. Some 45% of all customers are in the 20 -30 age group. The rental -sale ratio here now works out at approximately 6 -1 in favor of renting. The slow Swiss video sales business has turned off the radio and television dealers who basically operate the prerecorded videocassette

ward, building momentum and increasing our manufacturing and technical learning every day," Pollack said. He reiterated RCA's belief that the videodisk has "massive worldwide potential as one of the new media, along with, not instead of, VCR, direct broadcast satellite and cable and pay tv."

Dealing with

programming,

Schlosser noted that the RCA catalog currently listed 151 titles. New product will be available early in 1982, bringing the total of RCA and MGM /CBS video titles compatible with any CED player to more than 200.

Schlosser said that RCA's joint venture with Columbia Pictures International will supply home video programs on all cassette and disk formats throughout the world, excluding the United States and Canada. The venture will come into operation in the U.K. first of all, during the first quarter of next year. "We shall have the resources of the great Columbia Pictures library of motion pictures and television programs, amounting to some 2,500 motion pictures and more than 10,000 hours of tv programs," Schlosser said.

www.americanradiohistory.com

HAESLER side of the market. And Flury noted, during the recent Berlin Audio and Video Fair, there's an evergrowing emphasis on rental system. "This clear -cut development encouraged us to enter into distribution deals with the German Select Video company and with Warner Home Video." The German company basically offers "respectable family entertainment movies at average prices" and, in this deal, retailers can either sell or rent. Said Flury: "But we've spent some months preparing to introduce the Warner Home Video rental system here, through at least 250 outlets. There's no national preference for system showing through yet, so Warner product will be offered in VHS, Beta and Video 2000. "There's been a shortage of top movies for the video fan here, but now we can offer the `Superman' and `The Big Race' type of feature. But the Warner rental system is particularly applicable in Switzerland. "The basic geography and topography of the territory favors (Continued on -page 71)

SEE THE REEL

EXCITEMENT IN NEWYORK. and

It's new, it's from Ampex, it's in the Basildon Room at AES.

AMPEX TOOLS FOR TOMORROW

62

Video

Billboard

NOV. 12 -15 AT BEVERLY HILTON HOTEL

tail seminar /workshop- "Successful Video Retailing: Advertising,

Merchandising, Promotion" -will be a key session at Billboard's upcoming Video Entertainment/Mu sic Conference here Nov. 12 -15. The panel, to take place Saturday morning Nov. 14 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel, site of the Conference, will begin as a general seminar to be followed by panelist workshops, according to Jim McCullaugh, Conference chairman /organizer and the magazine's Video /Sound Business Editor. Anne Lieberman, Western regional manager for Magnetic Video, is moderator with panelists to include: Walter Kelleher, executive vice president, American Home Video; Steve Berger, owner, The Screening Room; Larry Foster, purchasing director, Licorice Pizza; Herb Fischer, vice president, Major Video Concepts; Bob Chaney, vice president, Maher Elen: Ayse Kenmore, president Liberty Music; and Ben Tenn, vice president, Walt Disney Home Video. Among topics for discussion are: what manufacturers have done and provided to assist retailers in advertising, merchandising and promotions; what should manufacturers be doing in the near future to assist retailers to more effectively sell /rent their products; what kind of feedback should the retailer be providing for the manu-

determine media placement

-

broadcast vs. print; how can promotions increase traffic and sales; what services should retailers look for from a distributor other than product; how should product be' placed and displayed in a store to maximize visibility and sales potential; what information should the sales personnel know to effectively sell and how should they learn this information; and what should retailers be doing now to prepare for next year? Panelists workshop topics include: managing the large chain operation (Kelleher); in -store design (Berger); training sales personnel (Foster); supporting the retailer as a consultant (Fischer); how to get the most from the ad agency ( Chaney); targeting your market (Kenmore); and effective use utilization of manufacturer provided tools (Tenn). In other Conference updates: Herb Mendelsohn, vice president of marketing for CBS Home Video, joins the "Challenges In A Changing Marketplace" session. Peter Kuyper, co-chairman, MGM/CBS; and David Hilton, director of acquisition for Warner Amex' "The Movie Channel" join the "Day In The Life Of A Movie ... Home Video Meets Its Neighbors" session. Arnold Holland, director of business affairs, RCA Select-

0

6 Lectures Pencilled For Astoria Site

aVision, joins the legal psychodrama panel: "Making Deals: Selling Programs For The New Technologies." Iris Dugow, vice president, special projects, HBO, joins the "Broadcast Entertainment: The New Opportunities" session. Bob Green, producer of the "First National Kid Disk "; joins "The Video New Wave ... Graphics, Computers & Interactivity" session. Also. David Geshwind, Digital Video Systems. A special student reel -highlighting the best video music efforts from the film /video university department level, will be part of the nightly evening showcases. FAS, Hollywood, is the audio /video specialist for the seminars as well as the nightly video showcases. Among confirmed exhibitors thus far: Rock Solid Productions, Visound Video Productions, Video Network, Schulman Video, Visual Music Alliance, Ron Hays Music Image, Electronic Arts Ltd., Inflight Services and Pilot Productions. A full agenda will appear in next week's issue.

Additional Conference details and registration information can be obtained through Kris Sofley, Billboard Conference Bureau, 9107 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills, Calif., 90210, tel. 213 -273 -7040.

Music

Monitor

1

wanda, vice president of advertising, sales and commercial program development for the USA network; John Lack, executive vice president,

Warner Amex Satellite Entertainment Corp.; and producers and attorneys. The Foundation can be reached for further information at (212) 784-

lop

Copyright 1981. Billboard Publications. Inc. No part o1 this publication may be reproduced. stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted. in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical. photocopying. recording, or otherwise. without the prior written permission of the pub fisher c

*

These are best selling videocassettes compiled from retail sales, including releases it both Beta 8 VHS formats.

ó

d TITLE

rz

a

Copyright Owner, Distributor, Catalog Number THE

JAll

SINGER

Paramount Pictures, Paramount Home Video 2305 RAGING BULL

United Artists, Magnetic Video 4523 TESS

Columbia Pictures 10543 DRESSED TO KILL

Warner Bros. Inc. /Warner Home Video 26008 NIGHTHAWKS

Universal City Studios Inc., MCA Dist. Corp. 71000 20

ORDINARY PEOPLE (ITA)

Paramount Pictures, Paramount Home Video 8964 BUSTIN' LOOSE Universal City Studios, MCA Dist. Corp. 77002 8

LOVE AT FIRST BITE

Warner Bros. Inc. /Warner Home Video 26009 9

14

11

10

3

37

11

22

15

BLACK STAWON (ITA)

12

9

20

ELEPHANT MAN (ITA)

13

17

14

14

10

9

15

12

32

9 TO 5 (ITA) 20th Century-Fox Films, Magnetic Video 1099

16

26

34

FAME (ITA) MGM /CBS Home Video M70027

17

19

14

THE GREAT SANTINI

18

16

4

19

27

15

CASABLANCA

United Artists, Magnetic Video 4514 AIRPLANE (ITA)

Paramount Pictures, Paramount Home Video 1305 United Artists, Magnetic Video 4503

Paramount Pictures, Paramount Home Video 1347 AND JUSTICE FOR ALL

Columbia Pictures 10015 ANNIE HALL

United Artists, Magnetic Video 4518

Orion, Warner Home Video OR 22010

)()

By CARY DARLING REAL KOOL: Kool & the Gang is part of a four -song video package for De-

ASTORIA, N.Y.-A lecture series examining the explosive growth of cable television and its opportunities for creative, business and media professionals will be held by the Astoria Motion Picture and Television Foundation Oct. 20 through Dec. at the Astoria Studio Building. The six -session program will explore the emergence of special programming for cable TV and the way these programs are being packaged and sold. The first lecture will provide an in -depth look at the structure of the marketplace -how programming is sold to cable operators and then marketed to the public. Charlotte Schiff Jones, vice president of marketing for CBS Cable, will talk about the network's venture into the creation of an arts channel and plans to market it nationally. The second speaker, Stan Thomas, vice president of national accounts for HBO, will discuss the future of the pay cable market. Other lectures cover such topics as programming opportunities made possible by cable technology and its capacity for 100 or more channels. Featured speakers include Vivian Horner, vice president of program development for Warner Amex Cable Communications; Jeff Le-

4250.

facturer; what are the elements for a successful ad; how does a retailer

10/24/81

Videocossee

Retail Workshop At Conference LOS ANGELES -A special re-

Survey For Week Ending R

Lite Records. From the new album "Something Special," the videos are for the songs "Take My Heart" (the single), "Steppin' Out," "No Show" and "Get Down On lt." Co- produced by Craig Martin and Beth Broday and directed by Denis deVafance for Century Video Productions, the clips will air on "Don Kirshner's Rock Concert" and other tv music programs.

* TAPE IT: Chuck Statler recently completed two new videos for Devo, "Beautiful World" and "Love Without Anger." Both tracks are on the new Warner Bros. album, "The New Traditionalists," and were shot on location in Minneapolis. Speaking of Minneapolis, another Warner Bros. act Prince, which hails from the Midwestern city, has two videos in the can. Made by Cowers, Field & Flattery, at Hollywood National Studios the songs are "Sexuality" and "Controversy." His new album is also called "Controversy." Al Jarrean has two tunes from his top 10 album "Breakin' Away" before the cameras. The songs are "We're In This Love Together" and "Roof Garden." They were shot at the L.A. Ballet Studio with Jack Cole directing and David Fries and Howard Bailin producing. * * * TWO FOR TUTONE: From his new Columbia album, aptly titled "Tommy Tutone 2," Tommy Tutone has two songs which have been taped by Mark Robinson of Modern Productions. Robinson is known for his work with the Pretenders, among others. The videos are for "867 -5309 /Jenny" and "Which Man Are You?" In the latter, comedienne /actress and "Saturday Night Live" veteran Lorraine Newman makes an appearance. Both were shot in 16mm film (then transferred to tape) at various locations around Los Angeles, including the Perkins Palace concert venue in nearby Pasadena. Upcoming videos from Columbia include three for Loverboy. From the Canadian group's second album, the tracks are "Working For The Weekend," "Gangs In The Street," and "Lucky Ones." The principal shooting for this is being done in Albany, NY. Also upcoming are tapes for Neil Schon and Jan Hammer for the tracks "Wasting Time" and "I'm Talking To You." The duo has just released an album called "Untold Passion." * * * COTTON TO IT: Gene Cotton recently turned his new single "Bein' Here With You Tonight" into a video project. Directed by Marc Ball, producer /director at Scene Three film and videoworks in Nashville, the tracks attempts a surrealistic edge. Also helping on the concept was lighting director Wendell Davis. The album containing the single is "Eclipse of The Blue Moon." * * * CUTTING THE LAWNS: Los Angeles' masters of the slightly bizarre, the Suburban Lawns, have taped a promotional video for "Mom And Dad And God," a track from their self -titled I.R.S. album. Band guitarist Frank Ennui is writing and directing. The band's first video, "Janitor," is currently making the rounds at the clubs and on television. www.americanradiohistory.com

FIDDLER ON THE ROOF

United Artists, Magnetic Video 4524 LA CAGE AUX FOLLES

United Artists, Magnetic Video 4506 20

ENDLESS LOVE MCA 77001

NEW ENTRY

21

36

47

STAR TREK

22

11

20

POPEYE (ITA)

23

,MEM

24

15

6

25

24

13

26

39

3

(ITA) Paramount Pictures, Paramount Home Video 8858 Paramount Pictures, Paramount Home Video 1171

EMIT

STIR CRAZY

Columbia Pictures 10248E HOLY MOSES

Columbia Pictures 10587 THE INCREDIBLE SHRINKING WOMAN MCA 66027

THE SOUND OF MUSIC 20th Century Fox -Films, Magnetic Video 1051

27

THE BLUE LAGOON

Columbia Pictures 10025E 28

25

5

29

13

24

CAR WASH

Universal City Studios, MCA Dist. Corp. 66031 SUPERMAN

(ITA)

D.C. Comics, Warner Home Video WB -1013

30

18

36

31

30

5

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34

37

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WINNIE THE POOH Walt Disney Films 25

35

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YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN (ITA) 20th Century -Fox Films, Magnetic Video 1103

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13

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20

26

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THE WIZARD OF OZ MGM, CBS Home Video 600001

United Artists, Magnetic Video 4519 SPIT ON YOUR GRAVE Wizard Video 9209 I

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Universal City Studios Inc., MCA Distributing Corporation 66024 (ITA) 20th Century-Fox Films, Magnetic Video 1090

United Artists, Magnetic Video 4508 Recording Industry Assn. Of America seal for sales of 25,000 units plus SI,000,000 after returns. (Seal indicated by dot.) Industry Assn. 01 America seal for sales of 50,000 units plus 52,000,000 alter returns. International Tape Disc Assn. sea, at least $1,000,000 at list price value.

Recording sdec of

fog

63

Sound Business RETAILER LIBERTY MUSIC

Audiophile Recordings] GORILLA-lames Taylor, Nautilus NR 29, dis ributed by Nautilus Recording Corp. $16 -$17. Taylor still represents the most familiar irchetype for '70s pop's mellow set, and this one partnership with producers Lenny Waron:er and Russ Titelman (the singer /songwriter's ether albums have been produced primarily by 'eter Asher, save one other outside venture) nakes its own subtle revisions to the settings without violating that career -long restraint.That neans "Gorilla" is far from a sonic spectacular lesigned to dramatize technology, but the quiet lividends reaped from the half-speed mastering oute are, if anything, more satisfying. Apart rom Taylor's own bone -dry vocal timbre, some imes infused with an unnatural sibilance by inerior pressings, the set boasts a wide palette of ow -keyed instrumental colorations that are Brought into higher relief: David Sanborn's soul ul alto sax lines ( "How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved 3), You)," the best -known track here, as well as 'You Make It Easy "), David Grisman's delicate nandolin, Victor Feldman's percolating maimbas and Milt Holland's varied percussion all ,enefit, as does a wide array of supporting sing rrs including Carly Simon and Crosby & Nash, vhose own styles shine through even more lu:idly. The album may not rank high as a source if demo fireworks, but discerning audiophiles will be ripe customers. Surfaces are up to Nauilus' high standards with respect to noise level and absence of surface debris. A solid catalog idd. TOWER OF POWER DIRECT

-Welsh Brass Consort, Gyorgy Fischer, Nimbus Records 45006, distributed by Brilly Imports, $14.98. MUSIC FOR BRASS

This Welsh record label does its own record-

ing, mastering and manufacturing and claims to have developed 45 r.p.m. cutting techniques

permitting side lengths comparable to conventional LPs. Here, almost 40 minutes of French music is contained on a 12-inch 45 r.p.m. disk that supplies extremely wide bandwidth and extra spacious dynamics. The group plays tran-

scriptions of Debussy, Gounod and Satie pieces, and the replication of ambiance and the full overtone spectrum is outstanding in the high technology analog taping. Another audiophile inducement is the encoding for four -channel playback using the Ambisonic UHJ system. The group's tone has warm, rounded edges, and the life-like presence of the recording -particularly on systems with a wide frequency characteristic-is stunning. STICKY FINGERS-The Rolling Stones, Mobile

Fidelity Sound Lab MFSL 1-060, distributed by Mobile Fidelity, $16 -$17. With their current tour reaping heavy media coverage, dealers will be tempted to place spe-

cial emphasis on the Stones' first audiophile outing, actually shipped by MFSL during the

summer. But while the Chatsworth, Calif. company has done its usual exemplary job of half speed mastering the original tapes and pressing

the finished product, no technique exists for repairing flaws in the original master itself: as

-Tower Of Power, f17-

one of the band's most technically erratic efforts

118.

ever, ranging from the sublime ( "Wild Horses,"

Sheffield makes a strong initial impression in his direct -disk that features the blazing r &b

with its trellis of delicate acoustic guitars) to the

FOTI

people," Kenmore says. "What's important is distinctive competence. This is what I stand for. I will be the Cartier of this business." Kenmore is a firm believer in the electronics revolution. "There will definitely be a media room in the house in which you give and get information," she says. "It's exciting because there's so much product out there, but it gets funneled into the strangest dealer distribution center I've ever seen in my life. "No one in the city is doing a strong job to the upscale market or to women," she continues. "In other parts of the country it's different because there's more room. But here everything is totally price- orientedno delivery service, follow -up or installation. There's so much people don't know about, and if they just knew the stuff existed they'd want it." An important educational tool, Kenmore believes, is the salesperson. "Our salesmen are polite, totally knowledgeable, and service-

ridiculous ( "Brown Sugar," a virtual primer for Keith Richards' down- and -dirty electric guitar tone) in audio terms. That chainsaw rhythm guitar may indeed be one of the band's most compelling musical signatures, but its inherent sonic raunchiness makes the meticulous remastering seem like a lost cause from the start. High -end collectors will still want this disk for those tracks where gentler dynamics and acoustic instrumentation yield added nuance. Still, dealers should program instore only after screening for high points and lows.

section and tight playing of this popular Ugh decibel group. The sizzling high energy pro luction, however, ultimately falls short as it corn

eeps hitting away at one level without any real lynamic, spatial or timbral contrasts in the pro ;ram. Stereo has been used only minimally, and he group is lumped center channel in a rather me dimensional plane. Another problem is that he group's scoring and material are highly repe-

itious, and wide frequency range exploration, lever really takes place. In short, a much less ife -like recording than one expects from iheffield, although still offering enough basic sizzle and super -clarity to pass many listener's ouster. ULI KRAUS PLAYS FANTASIES -Lili Kraus, pimo, Vanguard VA- 25003, distributed by Van tuard, $14.98 list. Production and pressing are very clean, but he undue low frequency emphasis of the piano round produces a rather dull and unflattering effect. Of course, this doesn't bar interest from (raus' many fans as she serves up her unique nterpretive insights into Fantasias of Mozart, laydn, Bach and Schubert. Those seeking gorteous tone or sheer sonic titillation, however, nust look beyond this four -track analog record ng mastered from a stereo digital mix -down.

NEW YORK -Besides the first simultaneous release of half- speed-

mastered and analog product, Nautilus will have three more new records out this fall. The simultaneous release by Nautilus and A &M is of the Police's "Ghost In The Machine" (Billboard, Sept. 19). The other three Nautilus releases are James Taylor's "Gorilla" (NR29), "Don't Cry Out Loud" (NR33) by Melissa Manchester and "24 Carrots" (NR34) by Al Stewart.

Sefel Records five -LP digital Bartok series

crowning touch to the composer's centeiary celebration. See review, page 67. a

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ARISTA AUDIOPHILE -Jerry Luby, left, vice president, a &r, Nautilus Recordings, and Milt Drosnes, vice president, business affairs, Arista, finalize agreements between the two companies for the release of half -speed mastered product. New shipping from Nautilus is Al Stewart's "24 Carrots," Air Supply's "Lost In Love" and Melissa Manchester's "Don't Cry Out Loud."

Distributor NEW YORK

Klark- Teknik

Electronics has been appointed the exclusive U.S distributor for Brooke -Siren Systems of England. BSS manufactures a range of professional crossovers and accessories. All -sales and service for the company will be handled by Klark -Teknik of Farmingdale, N.Y. BSS accessories include a direct injunction box (AR116) with optional phantom powering (AR 117) and a cable and fuse tester (AR 125). There are also three-, four- or fiveway modular stereo crossover with optional LED metering. All crossovers include a separate limiter section and HF (28kHz) and subsonic (30 Hz) filters.

Wakefield Purchases Digital Processor

OVERLAND PRODUCTS CO. P.O. Box 567 515 North Pierce Street Fremont, Nebr. (USA) 68025 402i721 -7270

cutting master lacquers directly from the Sony digital masters to

Call or Write

oped.

Co. Named

NEW YORK -Wakefield Manufacturing, an audiophile record pressing operation in Phoenix, has purchased a Sony PCM -1610 digital audio processor. Wakefield will be

Special designs on request

and benefit-oriented. No one in this store will tell a customer, `This has Dolby' without explaining what the benefits of Dolby are." Liberty holds sales training sessions every Saturday, and every store policy is being reviewed in regard to its effect on the customer. For example, if making out a separate sales slip for record -keeping purposes means the customer has to wait, the policy will have to be changed. "Our salesmen take the time to teach customers, and if some of them end up going elsewhere to buy because of price, that's all right, because we will be undersold. My customer doesn't buy for price. There's a huge niche in the market, and Lib erty is a natural to fill it because it has the name, customer base and location." An interesting facet of Liberty's record merchandising is Kenmore's concept of putting together pack ages -of show tunes, or an introduction -to- classical grouping, for example. "Our record and tape offerings will be for our customers," she says. "We can't go against Disc O -Mat or Sam Goody on price." Audiophile records do well at Liberty, she says, as do show tunes, the latter because a large portion of the clientele is out -of- towners and "part of the New York experience is to go to a show." However, budget classical recordings, especially the Sine Qua Non line, also do well. "We sell top -of-the -line in most things," Kenmore says. "We'll drop a manufacturer who's everywhere with the exception of Sony, but we still get list on Sony equipment." The second floor is being divided into separate video rooms, with large- screen televisions, VCRs and so on. A full -time design consultant is on staff to advise customers for free how to place equipment in their home. A portfolio of media rooms by top designers is also being devel-

-

MORE FROM NAUTILUS

-

No. 510 Flat -Foam Shield

By LAURA

NEW YORK -Her background in specialty "status" retailing taught Ayse Kenmore that pushing price and rambling on about technical specifications is no way to deal with the upscale customer. Now she is bringing that knowledge to audio/ video /record retailing. Kenmore is the new president of Manhattan's Liberty Music. Many of her ideas for changes in the store, a long -time fixture on Madison Avenue, come from her marketing and public relations work with such businesses as Cartier, Mark Cross, Georg Jensen, Levi Strauss, Jantzen, Mademoiselle and Vogue magazines and Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co. Ayse Kenmore and her husband Bob took over Liberty Music, he as chairman, in August. Since then, changes made have included the store's redesign, more attention to window display and more emphasis on video. But the real change is one of philosophy. "You can't be all things to all

made clear by the end of side one, this may be

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64

Sound Business

New Products

á

Studio Track NEW YORK The Saturday Night Live Band,

new project for Island, Gary Platt engineering,

under the direction of Blues Brothers band member Tom Malone, is doing pre -records for this season's shows at Secret Sound Studio in Manhattan. Also at Secret is a group called

assisted by Steve MacMillan; Lakeside producing self, tracking and overdubbing for Solar,

Warren Dewey at the console, assisted by Terry Christian; Richard Landis producing Juice Newton for Capitol, Joe Chicarelli at the console

Taavi Mote, assisted by Bob Winard and Les

with Bill Jackson assisting; Tommy LiPuma pro-

Cooper engineering;

ducing Larsen -Feiten for Warner Bros., Tom Flye at the board, assisted by Peggy McCreary; and Prince completing a new Warner Bros. LP, pro-

Pieces, featuring Zack Smith,

Patty Smythe, Davy Johnstone, Dee Murray, Frankie LaRocka Paul

and

Shaffer. Engineering

is

by Josiah

Gluck. Corky Stasiak is mixing an EP for Valhalla

Todd Bridges for Solar, Steve Hodges and Les Cooper engineering; Jones Girls on Philadelphia International mixing under supervision by pro-

Records, with Greg Thornwood producing, and

Japanese artist Matsumoto has completed

Crossley producing selves for Motown, recording

a

PMC International album co- produced by Kasagi

and Jeremy Wall of Spyro Gyra. Engineering was by Jack Malken and Gluck. In White Plains, N.Y., at

Minot Studios, final

being completed on an album by Roy Ayers, with Ray Bardani and Ron Carran engineering. Recent work also includes the Columbia is

"Sign Of The Times" album by Bob James, with Joe Jorgenson engineering; mixing on the new Fania All -Stars album, also with Jorgenson as engineer; and David Sanborn's Warner Brothers

"Voyeur," with Michael Colins and Bardani co- producing and Bardani engineering. At the Power Station in New York and House of Music in Plainfield, N.J., Jesse Rae is producing the soundtrack to his video album "Party Crackers." Neil Dorfsman is the Power Station engineer; Charlie Conrad is at House of Music. The Average White Band is laying down tracks at Sigma Sound in New York and doing overdubs at the Schoolhouse in Connecticut, with Dan Hartman producing. The Arista album is being engineered by Michael Hutchinson.

instrumental

and vocal overdubs and mixing with engineer Cal Harris, assisted by Dan Bates; producer 011ie Brown tracking for Motown's Syreeta, Mike Stone engineering with Steve MacMillan; the LA. Boppers overdubbing and mixing with producer Augie Johnson for Doghouse

Productions,

* Mastering of

*

*

Harry Chapin single entitled Life" was recently completed at

"Story Of A Miami's Criteria Recording Studios. Mastering was done by Mike Fuller for the Boardwalk label. Fuller also mastered the new Life single "Don't Go Wanderin'" for WEA International. Finally, the Rossington -Collins Band LP "This.Way In" was mastered at Criteria by Steve Kimball, on the MCA label.

*

and Tom Cummings engineered.

and

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At Kingdom Sound,

Glen Kolotkin producing a new B.T. Express LP for Coast To Coast Records; and Ray Ovetsky of R.L.O. Sound and Stage Concepts managing and

producing new tracks for Preview, Clay Hutchinson engineering with an assist from Paul Mandl.

Don Silver and Ben Wisch producing Orleans at Connecticut Recording Studios for the Empire

Project, Inc.

Action at San Francisco's The Automatt: MiDoobie Brothers doing vocal overdubs for a band project; Kool S the Gang doing vocal overdubs;

Bobby

McFerrin

recording tracks for

Elektra with Linda Goldstein producing, Ken Kessie and Leslie Goldstein producing, Ken Kes-

Droney assisting; and Con Funk Shun finishing up a Mercury LP, Leslie Ann Jones engineering with Susan Kunes assisting.

*

*

tracking, overdubbing and mixing with producer Andrew Gold, Jim Issacson engineering with Stephen McManus; Toto completing overdubs for a

*

Duel Vocational Institution

in Tracy,

medium -security prison, were recorded by Pearl's Place. The studio did remote recording at Duel for an album of eight songs. Dave Humrick engineered, with assistance from Joey Calif.,

a

* In L.A. at

*

* Bor

"Coast To Coast Soul," a syndicated black music radio show for debut shortly on 100 radio sta-

tions, Buzz Richardson engineering. John Wesley Shipp, who plays Kelly on "ThE Guiding Light," at Dick Charles Studios, Manhattan, working on final vocals for his soon -tobe- released LP, Les Paul Jr., engineering, Bill)

Butt producing. Also there, another tv personality, John Gabriel from "Ryan's Hope," putting down tracks for an LP, Les Paul Jr., engineering

with Glenn Productions producing; and Kenny Nix mastering Taana Gardner's new release foi Westend Records. Doug Schwartz engineering Rein at Fein Productions, Santa Cruz, Calif.

Leon Medics producing LeRoux for

The Bee Gees back at Miami's Criteria adding

overdubs for

a new LP, Karlbhy -Gibbs producing with Don Gehman engineering and Al Stegmeyei assisting.

Singer /songwriter James Talley at Nashville's Sound Emporium Recording Studios recording the theme song -"Talk To Me" -for a movie 01 the same name. Producing was Talley and film

director Julius Potocsney, Jim Williamson engineering. Also there, Ray Baker producing Joe Stampley for Epic.

*

band called Prisoner, comprised of inmates

of the

new LP, Tom Knox engineering, David Leonard

assisting;

*

ing Bette LeVette for Motown, Joe Neil engineer ing; and Frank and Bob Williams producing

sie and Leslie Ann Jones engineering, Maureen

singer- songwriter Sandy Haley is doing overdubs

*

*

At Atlanta's Master Sound: the Florida

gospel LPs for Word; Steve Buckingham produc

Syosset, Long Island:

Action at Sunset Sound: Moon Martin is

A

himself with assistance from Pegg) McCreary, Terry Christian and Stephen McManus. At Studio Sound Recorders: Natalie Cok doing pre -production work for a new Capitol LP. George Tobin producing; David Courtney producing Leroy Chicarelli behind the board; Rich. and Kimball producing "The Rockets Live Ir Concert" for Westwood One Syndication, Johnn) Sandlin co- producing; and Richie Griffin co -pro ducing Gamut for Gamut Productions, John Volaitis engineering.

and the Rex Nelson Singers are wrapping ul

*

At Studio A in Dearborn Heights, Mich., rock

Horten.

EXCITEMENT IN NEWYORK.

*

*

partner Randy Scott. Eric Morgeson is at the console. Chris Page and Gary Nestor are at Cloud Born Productions in Grosse Pointe, Mich. putting the finishing touches on an upcoming album produced by Mary Ann Mattiello and engineered by Mike deMartino. Michael Bailey is producing an album by the local group Pendragon; deMartino is engineering and Mark Wisney assisting. At Detroit's Tantus Studio, Gino Washington is working on his new single, "Love Bandit." Engineer is David Schreiner.

ducing

the motion picture "Looker," produced by Barry DeVorzon for Warner Bros. Records, Mike Stone

*

and mixing on four self -produced tracks with

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Mike Evans engineered,

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MIC MIXER -Shure has expanded its line of compact, portable microphone mixers to include this new unit, the M267, with microphone inputs that are switchable to accommodate condenser microphones. Designed primarily for use in studios and remote broadcast setups, the M267 can also be used to provide additional inputs for audio and video tape recorders. Each of four inputs has its own volume control, low -cut filter switch and line /mic switch. A master volume control sets the overall program output level. User net price is $395.

Sylvers producing

ducer McKinley Jackson, Barney Perkins engineering, assisted by Tom Cummings; Nolen &

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WORLD'S FIRST -Shown is a prototype of JVC's new front -loading PCM cassette deck and one -hour recording tape. (Billboard, Oct. 17). The company hopes to have the unit on the market by late 1983.

Leon

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dina engineering; Evan Pace producing Chubby Checker for MCA, Skardina, John Kovarek and Robert Feist engineering; Jimmie Haskell producing Bruce Baum for Horn Records, John Kovarek at the controls; and Richard "Dimples" Fields producing Betty Wright for CBS. New additions to the Music Grinder staff include Robert Feist, former chief engineer at MCA Music, as

first engineer, and George "Corky" Hallal, formerly of Harlequin, as second engineer. At L.A.'s Group IV: engineer David Greene mixing and editing Sheehan TeleScene Productions. "Pippin," recorded live in Hamilton, Canada for pay television, videocassette and videodisk distribution; engineers Paul Aronoff and Greg Orloff mixing sound for "Rock Odyssey," Hanna Barbera's animation only re- creation of rock hits from the '50s, '60s, '70s and '80s, Bob

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65

NewProducEs

Disco business Labels, DJs Reap OPEC Benefits 1

L.I. Pool Forms With 15 Members, Hot Line Service R' BOB RIEDINGER JR.

NEW YORK -It calls itself O.P.E.C., but it has nothing to do with oil politics. Neither is the Organization of Professional Entertainers of Color a group of minority

REALISTIC HEADPHONE -Radio Shack has begun marketing its model PRO 60 top -of- the -line headphone with a $54.95 price tag. The unit features vari able density ear cushions, a frequency response of 15- 35,000Hz, and low distortion. They also weigh a mere eight ounces. They come with a 10 -foot coil.

showbusiness people. The acronym "is strictly an attention- grabbing device" for this new, non -profit record pool on Long Island, says Clyde Davis, a founder and executive board member along with Stewart Best and Michael Greene. Davis believes O.P.E.C. will function as an all- around service, benefiting record companies, the professional and aspiring DJ, and the community at large. Created last September as an alternative for DJs not receiving product from any other organized pool, the Suffolk -based O.P.E.C. handles a roster of 15 members and, "depending on the feedback we get from the record labels," may possibly expand to a corps of 25. The only other existing pool on Long Island, the L.I. Disco DJ Association, has 50 members.

In the metropolitan area. Plans for the pool include an active relationship with the communities where member jocks are working. O.P.E.C. members are expected to participate in two charity functions each year. One DJ is offering his services to a Suffolk Nursing

dio retail stores

are serious about their involvement

with disco, "Those who love their work and envision a future for the industry," says Davis. Current members have a minimum of three years experience, but the pool, Davis claims, will be receptive to dedicated newcomers. The Executive Board also expects that its members will be receptive and helpful to club patrons who express a genuine interest in the industry, especially those who want to learn DJ techniques. Dues required by the pool are the lowest in the country, ($25) Davis claims, because money is used solely for operating expenses and no one draws a salary. Board members realize their income from DJ activity. Davis does mobile disco dates for J.M. Enterprises and is also assistant manager at The Wiz Record Shop in Queens, N.Y. one of six record -au-

Home for a Christmas party. "If you receive from the community. you've got to put back into it," says Davis. "There are a lot of people we can provide a service for. We can help benefit in ways that tap great potential." Davis expects Suffolk area discos to become increasingly strong in the next decade. "Money is tighter, people are less willing to travel to New York City and then pay a big cover charge with expensive drinks. Local clubs can become an enjoyable necessity."

Another Suffolk -based pool, White Card, operated for just over one year several years ago. The pool failed, says one observer, "because it wasn't very high key ... it ran without an adequate amount of direct contact with the industry."

STAR FOG -Starfire Industries of Schenectady, N.Y. has developed a 140 gallon, heat resistant dry ice fog machine for use in special effects for discos and other theatrical environments. The unit features two, 3,000 watt heaters, has a 525 CFM blower, and holds up to 160 pounds of dry ice. Casters for easy mobility of the unit are optional. Suggested price is $829. Thirty and 70 gallon versions are available at $329 and $529 respectively.

Emerald City Bankrupt; Debts Over $1.7 Million CHERRY HILL, N.J. -After a long career as the star -studded Latin Casino and then lavishly refurbished as the flashy Emerald City disco that more recently became a rock music club, this large entertainment complex has come to a complete halt and is now scheduled for liquidation. An auction has been slated for Nov. 20 to help satisfy the debts of 87 creditors for more than $1.7 million. Debts of the Emerald City Corp. include Federal, state and local township taxes, mortgage payments, and bills for service from a variety of food and liquor suppliers and advertising outlets. Seeking relief from creditors. Emerald City filed for Chapter 11 under the bankruptcy code on July 9, requesting a public sale of its assets, but continued to operate until Sept. 26. Dallas Gerson, and his son, Charles, with various members of the Gerson family, own the corporation. While a lobby sign says the club has been closed for repairs and to check newspapers for its reopening, A. Fred Ruttenberg, attorney for the Gersons, said it was unlikely that the club would open again.

Papers filed in bankruptcy court estimate value of the property at nearly $3.2 million -covering 10 acres of prime real estate across from the Garden State Race Track, a liquor license -a plenary retail con-

license -worth about $250,000, machinery and equipment. The scheduled auction would dispose of the building, the club's fixtures and liquor license. Dallas Gerson. who moved the original Latin Casino from nearby Philadelphia to Cherry Hill in 1960, placed Emerald City on the market for$3.5 million in the spring of 1980. but there were no takers. A variety of factors are blamed for the club's demise -inflation and the economy along with the difficulty to attract enough people with its present policy of punk rock and new wave

sumption

bands to pay the overhead of the 1,500- person capacity. As the Latin Casino with a 2,000- person capacite. headliners for the floor shows ran the gamut of the biggest names from Frank Sinatra to Liza Minnelli.

With increasing competition for names with the casino hotels in (Continued on page 66)

O.P.E.C. plans to keep a high profile. Davis, formerly an East Coast Disco Coordinator at Capitol Records, pledges a "close and continuous relationship with record companies, local radio stations and retail outlets in an effort to increase and stimulate productivity and sales." The pool is providing a top 15 "hot line" feedback service, available to the labels, radio stations and retail outlets on a 24 hour basis. The recording, updated weekly, contains the O.P.E.C. top 15 playlist, plus three "pick hits" determined by the pool. In addition, record progress reports culled from in -club play and retail sales are being mailed twice a month. At this time, Davis includes WKTU -FM, WBLS -FM, and KISS 98.7 -FM on his radio mailing list. O.P.E.C. is looking for DJs who

GU Installs Sound

System In Roller Club NEW YORK -GLI has corn pleted installation of a sophisticated sound system at Laces Roller Disco in Woodhaven, N.Y. The assignment follows a similar job completed earlier this year at Laces sister rink in New Hyde Park. N.Y. The system, designed for Laces b\ Steve Emspack in conjunction with Haenel Assoc., incorporates 16 DB -2 speakers, 16 RH -90s, eight GLI SA 2130 dual channel power amplifiers; GLI's model PMX 9000 preamp/ mixer: GLI's model EQ -1500 octave equalizer; RG dynamic processor and two Technic turntables. Greatest challenge in designing and installing the sound system. according to Emspack, came from a metal deck ceiling that produced a high reverberating field. The problem was successfully overcome.

Rock Pool Moves SAN FRANCISCO -The Western Assn. of Rock DJs pool here has moved to 65 Henry St., San Francisco, Calif. 94114 (415) 861 -2706.

www.americanradiohistory.com

TALENTED DUO- Singer Madleen Kane teams with composer/arranger Giorgio Moroder for work on the duo's new album "I Don't Wanna Lose You."

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-

I

,

2

-Dolly Dots Step By Step -Peter Griffin

P S

Malaika-BOney M Them Changes -Pierre Perpall Sam Cooke Medley- Bandana Do You Love Me-Path Austin (Remis) The Force -Nancy Nova Cruisin' the Street-(Inst Pemix)Boystown Gang (U. S. ) Double Dutch (9 Min Remis) -Frankie Smith Trippin on the Moon- Cerrone Dance -Night Force

Import LP's

-

Roberta Kelly (New) Magazine 60 Vol 2 Kano (New) Dance in America (Mix) Stars on 45 Vol 2 LP Best of Rams Horn Alec Costaninos

Capuccino

IMPORT O DISC RECORDS 40 SOUTH MALL, PLAINVIEW, NY 11803 (516) 694 -4545 TELEX 230 199 SWIFT-UR

66

Disco Business

Disco Mix By BARRY LEDERER NEW YORK -Kool & the Gang continue to of-

fer their commercial r &b sound, and it still sounds fresh after earlier successes. Their current 12 -inch 33% r.p.m. "Take My Heart" is included in their latest De -Lite LP, "Something

Special." The title aptly describes all cuts as lead vocalist James "J.T." Taylor has the right amount of pizazz and soul that makes Kool hot. The production by Eumir Deodato and the Gang offers the best in mid -tempo pleasers. The har-

monies present well -honed compositions backed with energetic and spirited arrangements. Highlights other than the current 12-

incher include "Steppin' Out," "Good Time Tonight" and "Get Down On It," all of which of fer potential for future seven- inch /12 -inch releases.

*

*

*

It seems as if remakes of classics from the

rock'n'roll vaults and the best of '60s and '70s music are here to stay. This new direction in musical format will always be well received if the material selected is on target and the production values are quality. "Stars On 45" have proved their worth as well as "Ain't No Mountain High Enough" (Boystown Gang and Inner Life) and "I Heard It Through the Grapevine" by

Arthur Adams sings You Got The Floor" on the Inculcation Band label out of Los Angeles.

this same format by getting snappier as the production propels the dancer into the song. The B side, "Stay With Me Tonight" has less spunk but

sweet vocals in

as the melodic arrangements and easy

is

Billboard

a

string

Week

Chart

'C

This Week

TITLE(S), Artist, Label

Disco

N

SOURCE WE SHIP UPS WITHIN 24 hrs

a

lut

Weeks on

Week

Chart

Copyright 1981, Billboard Publica-

tions, Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical. photocopying, recording, or otherwise. without the prior written permission of the publisher.

TITLE(S), Artist, Label

by New York deejay Tee Scott keeps the melody

intact with an easy going yet funk driven beat. A familiar keyboard melody is repeated throughout that is built upon by string and percussion instrumentation. Houston does not bring this disk to a crescendo as she has done in the past with "Don't Leave Me This Way," but the danceable beat and tight arrangements make for slick boogie tempo that never fades from beginning to end.

*

*

U1

3

9

2

11

4

L'1

5

29

18

GET ON UP AND DO IT AGAIN -Suzy Q. -RFC/

43

33

17

ON THE

8

NEVER TOO MUCH -Luther Vandross -Epic LOVE HAS COME AROUND

9

10

9

7

-Donald Byrd

& 125th

YOU'RE THE ONE /DISCO KICKS -Boystown Gang

-

OUT OF MY HANDS (Love's Taken Over) -OmniFountain Records (12 -inch) FRD 81.1

44

44

6

45

39

20

I'M IN LOVE/IF YOU WANT MY LOVIN' -Evelyn King -RCA (LP) AFL13962

46

36

13

LETS

19

4

7

15

AGAIN- Bohannon Featuring -Phase II (12 -inch) 4W902449 CONTROVERSY- Prince -Warner Bros. (7 inch) WBS LET'S START II DANCE

49808 A LITTLE BIT OF

welcome. The tracks abound from reggae to

47

30

5

WORKING IN THE COAL MINE -Devo -Full Moon/

60

2

JERKIN' BACK'N'FORTH /THROUGH BEING COOL/ GOING UNDER -Devo- Warner Bros. (LP) BSK 3595

49

14

62

2

Asylum (LP /12 -inch) DP- 90004/E -47204

49

JAll-Nick Straker -Prelude

10

14

8543

12

6

6

22

(LP) Import

(LP) SP 70021

12

W 14

18 14

5

7

DANCIN' THE NIGHT AWAY -Voggue- Atlantic (7inch) 3847

START ME

15

10

69

2

52

38

30

-Central Line- Mercury

6520

53

41

8

16

10

GET IT UP/COOL

-Prelude

-The Time -Warner Bros. (LP)

17

26

SUPER FREAK /GIVE IT TO ME BABY /GHETTO LIFE Rick lames -Gordy (LP) 08- 1002M1

W

21

5

19

11

12

20

20

9

TAINTED LOVE -Soft Cell (12 inch) Import

26

5

MAGIC NUMBER -Herbie Hancock -Columbia (LP)

BACKFIRED -Debbi

31

5

5

-

MONY MONY -Billy Idol -Chrysalis (12 -inch) CHS38P WALK RIGHT NOW -The Jacksons Remix) 49 -02403

-Epic (12 -inch

models of its Featherlite Stereophones. According to Robert Kotovsky, vice president of the company, the phones are designed so that they can be worn for extended periods without creating fatigue. The design also allows them to deliver "crisp, clear, full sound." Prices range from $16.95 to $36.95.

55

58

3

HOLD ON I'M COMIN' -Aretha Franklin- Arista (LP) AL9552

65

2

96 TEARS- Thelma Houston -RCA (LP) AFL 13842

tl

* C:=1* 59

59

4

GIVE IT TO

HOT & NEW

Charter, Koria; Claudia Hart; U. Pierre Perpal; Tamara; Pierre Peryal (Remis): Carol Williams: Rhyne; Karen Young; Strikers: Amanda Lear ( "Follow Me "); Dream Ma chine; 2 Twice; Modern Romance; Pilgram Fathers; Heaven 17; Peter Shelley; Bo -Kool 8 Funkmasters; Conquest; Secret Weapon; Syndicate; Linz; Manana; Romance; Dolly Dots; Evelyn Smith; Gary Chriss; Ronny: Stars on 45 Vol. III; Happy Days: Central Line; Nancy Nova (The Force); Pala Austin (Do You Lore Me-Remiz); Double Dutch (Remis); Poyliss Nelson (Don't Stop the Train); Lime (You're My Magician); "Menevgy% Kid (newk Boys town Gang (You're The One); Commodores (Lady); Funkapoliten; Lobo; Patrick Hernandez; Quick; Kraftwerk.; Harry Chalkllis; Tom Tom Club. LP's-Madam Kane; Kano; Heaven 17; Shalemar; Sylvers; Logg; Ashford 8 Simpson; T -Lite; Tan Tom Club; Gary Numan; Gwen McRae;

12"- Bilgeri;

A IR

Patti Austin; Luther Vendrons; Alec Cosldandinos; The Dance.

NEW RECORDS DAILY' Singles 1929 -1980, over 100,000 titles

in

LET'S GROVE -Earth, Wind & Fire -Columbia (7-

inch)

18

-2536

WELCOME ABOARD -Love Unlimited -Unlimited Gold /Epic (LP) FZ 37425

67

2

STREET MUSIC -Bang Gang-Sugarscoop (12 -inch) SS -419A

FUNKY SENSATION /HAVE A GOOD TIME -Gwen McRay -Atlantic (LP) SD 19308 THIS KIND OF LOVIN' -The Whispers

YOU CAN /FIRE IN MY HEART -Madleen Kane

-Solar /RCA

-

13

20

25

25

5

HEARD IT THROUGH THE GRAPEVINE /SO RUFF SO TUFF- Roger -Warner Bros. (LP) BSK 3594

34

5

HEART HEART- Geraldine Hunt PDS 412

32

7

WORDY RAPPINHOOD -Tom Tom Bros. (12inch) DSRE 49817

27

39

YOU'RE MY MAGICIAN /YOUR LOVE- Lime -Prism

28

14

FIRST TRUE LOVE AFFAIR -Jimmy Ross

52

3

47

4

MOVE- Modern Romance -Atlantic (7 -inch) 3860 TAKE MY LOVE -Melba Moore -EMI (7 inch) EMI

35

4

EVERYBODY NEEDS SOMEBODY SOMETIMES -Ann-

NUMBERS/COMPUTER WORLD/COMPUTER LOVE Kraftwerk- Warner (LP) HS 3549 I

-Prism (12 -inch)

Club- Sire /Warner

*

63

65

40

8

HOT SUMMER NIGHT -Vicki Sue Robinson -Prelude (12 -inch) PRLD 617

66

66

2

SOMETHING THAT YOU DO TO ME -T(12 -inch) CP -110

i366(

3

I'LL CAST MY FATE TO THE WIND -Snaps MontigoTune Wizard (12 -inch) TW002 INSIDE YOU -Isley Brothers -T -Neck

(LP)

cemo

FZ

37533

Life- Arista

R.R. EXPRESS -Rose Royce -Whitfield (LP) WHK

3620 68

68

2

TELECOMMUNICATIONS -Flock of Seagulls -Jive/

(LP) PLP-1008

CBS

-RFC/

(12 -inch) Import

BACK TO THE 60's -Tight Fit -Arista (12 -inch)

Quality (12 inch) QRFC 002

CP711SA

CAN YOU

70

71

8

KEEP ON TAKING ME HIGHER/LADY (You Bring Me

71

53

15

SHE'S A BAD MAMA JAMA -Carl Carlton -20th (LP/ 32 -inch) T628/TCD129

72

56

12

DANCE PART I & II -Night Force -lbach

8092

- Phyllis

-

Chalet (LP) CH0702

FA

Up)- Commodores - Motown

1207

(LP) M955

(12 -inch) Import

33

37

13

DON'T STOP THE TRAIN (12 inch) Import

Nelson -Carrere

73

73

11

LET'S DANCE (Make Your Body Move) -West Street Mob -Sugar Hill (12 -inch) SH5559A

34

23

18

BUSTING OUT- Material with Nona Hendryx -ZE/ Island (LP) IL 9667

74

61

11

HERE

35

22

11

CHANT

#1- Spandau

Ballet- Chrysalis (12 -inch)

75

74

10

SNAP SHOT -Slave- Atlantic (LP) SD 5227

76

54

8

77

CDS 2528

48

4

46

4

HOMOSAPIENS -Pete Shelley- Genetic (12 -inch)

42

1

LOVE ACTION /HARD TIMES -Human League -Red

51

17

4

BANG BANG -Iggy

Pop- Arista

(LP) AL9572 45

5

WHO'S BEEN KISSING YOU? -Hot Cuisine -Prelude (12 -inch) PRLD -613 MERCY /HIGH COST OF LOVING -Carol

Jianl- Mantra

PRIME CUTS /THE DOUBLE DANCE ALBUM -All MP 313

Cuts- Various Artists -Importe /12 (LP) 78

72

9

79

64

3

80

50

6

(12 -inch) Import 43

AM- Dynasty -Solar (12 -inch)

(LP) Import

Import

39

I

11504

YOU'RE GONNA WANT ME BACK -Delia Renee

-

Airwave (12 inch) AW 12-94963

LOVE- Barbara Mason -WMOT (12 inch) 4W9 -02237 SPELLBOUND /ARABIAN NIGHTS- Siouxee and the Banshees -PVC (LP) Import LET ME GIVE YOU

WE WANT THE AIRWAVES /KKK TOOK MY BABY

AWAY

-Ramones -Sire (LP) SRK 3571

stock, send 81.25 for catalog. Master Charge 8 Visa. Call us for new imports.

DOWNSTAIRS RECORDS

S

-

ME- Conquest Prelude (12 -inch)

PRLD615

SOMETHING ABOUT YOU -Ebonee Webb -Capitol (LP) ST12148

24

28

EP)

DISCO KICKS -The Original Mass -JDC (12 inch) JDC 12 -10

- Phonogram

(LP /12 -inch) PXL- 3976/YD 12299

FEATHER LITES- Numark Electronics has begun marketing four new

Harry- Chrysalis (12 -inch

4

BL 37387

24

-

57

BSK

3589 17

-Duran Duran

54

(LP) PRL-14100 16

GIRLS ON FILM /PLANET EARTH

CDS 2547

COC 16052

INCH BY INCH -The Strikers

HAPPY DAYS/TEE'S HAPPY -North End featuring Michelle Wallace- Emergency (12 -inch) ENDS

Harvest (LP) ST 12158

UP- Rolling Stones -Rolling Stones/

Atlantic (LP) 15

51

HUPENDI MUZIKI WANGU ?! -K.I.D. -Sam (12 -inch) S. 12340

WALKING INTO SUNSHINE (12 -inch) MDS -4013

WIN- Heaven 17- Virgin

PLAY TO

OUR UPS ARE SEALED- GoGo's- I.R.S.

versions that are offered, the dub side is less vocal. "African Connection," though out for some

KNOCK OUT /PAY GIRL -Innerlife -Salsoul (LP) SA

(12-

inch) PRLD -612 10

DANCIN'-Sparque -Westend (12 inch)

GO

WES 22 -135

Dr. Perri Johnson

L°S

BEAT- B.B.Q. Band -Capitol (LP)

SP 12155

Moby Dick Records (12 inch) BTG 242

acceptance of this 45 r.p.m. should be easy and

time, is by Arte Noir on EMI label. A shorter dub version with less African chanting is more dance -oriented while the longer version might prove more useful to rock clubs.

42

Atlantic (12 -inch) DM 4813

ZULU -The Quick -Pavillion (12 -inch)

Street. N.Y.C. -Elektra (LP) 5E531 8

sticus Avtisticus." The latter by Ian Dury is a Polydor import that has a lyrical content that

punk with riveting guitar sections. Of the two

(12 -inch) Import

/I

WANNA TAKE YOU HOME- Patrick Cowley- Fusion (12 inch) FPSF 003

MENERGY

(LP) FE3745

Two imports that deejays have been picking

be considered offensive to some. How-

STEP BY STEP -Peter Griffin -EMI

55

4Z9 -02433

*

ever, if beauty is in the eye of the beholder, then

DO YOU LOVE ME -Patti Austin -Qwest /Warner

9

Bros. (LP) QWS 3591

up on include "African Connection" and "Spac-

might

1

Margret -First American (12)

o

Atlantic 12- incher offering pleasant r &b format with fluid

is an

10/24/81

R

Weeks Week

32

THED

still fine material for club play.

Survey For Week Ending

Night)"

rhythms and a party sounding atmosphere. Producer Charles Orieux and Ingo Cramer bring a fresh and invigorating sound to this group.

Discolop 8O,

?

Continued /rom page 65 nearby Atlantic City and the booming prices for such names, the Latin closed June 28, 1978. After five months of rebuilding with spotlights, Plexiglas, stainless steel and vinyl upholstery, the Latin reopened November 1978 as Emerald City-the largest and most futuristic discotheque in the East. After a year as a disco, offering only recorded music with its dazzling atmosphere, the Gersons arranged for the Philadelphia -based Electric Factory Concerts, major rock concerts promoters, to bring in punk and new wave bands like the Talking Heads and the New York Dolls. After three months, and failing to bring in the top names, the Gersons hired several members of the Electric Factory staff to do their own bookings. Among the 87 creditors, the largest amount of nearly $1.2 million is owed to Fidelity Bank and Trust Co. of New Jersey for unpaid mortgage payments dating back to last November. Records show that only one performer, Alice Cooper, went unpaid for three nights in late August. But no amount was disclosed. In other papers filed, WIOQ -FM radio in Philadelphia accused Emerald City owners of fraud since an order for services amounting to $1,242 was placed the day before the corporation filed for Chapter 11. According to court records. Charles Gerson, as president of the corporation, received an annual salary of $52,000. Richard Gerson, a Philadelphia attorney and a relative, earned $1.250 per month for rental of additional parking spaces. The corporation's attorney recommended that all proceeds from the auction sale be deposited into an escrow account, pending the validity of the claims of the lien holders. Before putting their property on the auction block, the Gersons asked the court for permission to spend $40,000 on the site, hoping to make some cosmetic improvements and for advertising in hopes of attracting the highest bidder. With no apparent cash to spare, they asked the court for such a loan from the anticipated proceeds of the sale.

"Take It Light (Get That Mojo Working Day

a

sleeper of a record as it does not catch the ear after the first listening. However, the song does grow on you

This 12-incher might prove to be

the ranks of these successes with her release of and the Mysterians' "96 Tears." Running a lengthy 7:45, this production by George Tobin with Mike Piccirillo is from the artist's RCA album, "Never Gonna Be Another One." The remit;

driving tempo with

a

And

Roger. Now Thelma Houston should easily join

Emerald City Goes Bankrupt

background progress to

sassy saxophone highlight. The vocals follow

20 West 43rd St., New York, N.V. 10036 212/354 -4684

Compiled from Top Audience Response Records

in

the

15 U.S. regional lists.

* Stars are awarded to those products showing greatest audience repsonse on 15 U.S. regional disco lists.

"non- commercial 12 -inch

Superstars are awarded to those products showing greatest upward movement on the current week's chart (Prime Movers).

www.americanradiohistory.com

67

Classical

General News

SERIES REVIEW

5 -LP

Edition

CHICAGO-The 1981 Bartok centenary celebration, which has produced many fine new recordings, now is crowned with a Sefel Records edition that ranks in a class by itself. The new five -LP edition of Bartok orchestral music from Sefel is one of the finest classical recording projects of 1981. The Canadian label has mined musical gold in the composer's homeland, and delivered it to the consumer by way of the finest audio technology internationally available. Perhaps no albums before have conveyed the power and beauty of Bartok's music as richly as these new disks, which trace the entire evolution of the composer's career. The series combines the finest Hungarian musicianship, the best U.S. digital recording technology, top British production expertise and U.S. pressing that matches the work done anywhere abroad. The result is close to the company's promotional and advertising claim -"Bartok Perfected." Joseph Sefel, a wealthy Canadian businessman born in Hungary, has realized his aims fully with this series, announced more than one year ago. The records pay highest tribute to Hungary's 20th century musical genius on his birth anniversary, and they are a glittering showcase for the talented young Hungarian conductor now resident in Canada, Arpad Joo (sounds like "You"). The disks also open a broad avenue to the international market for Sefel, which promises to remain active as a classical releaser. Sefel has 'targeted the audiophile record market, and the albums all have the technical brilliance to delight this audience. However, the musical statement is foremost at all times, and the disks should find broad acceptance among classical fans. Joo's survey encompasses nine or-

Nippon /Telarc Cuts Prices TOKYO -Nippon

Phonogram Co., which won the right to import and sell records produced by Telarc of the U.S., placed 21 classical Telarc LPs on sale last month. Kazuko Imahori, manager of the classical group, classical marketing dept., Nippon Phonogram, says the company is aiming at selling a total of 50,000 albums within this year. Nippon Phonogram signed the import-sales contract with Telarc Sept. 1. Previously, an audio equipment maker, Audio -Technica had been importing and selling Telarc records in Japan. Whereas Audio Technica had been selling the records for $20.50, Nippon Phonogram has a list price of $17.10 for 20 of the albums. The only album which is a two -record set, Carl Orffs "Carmina Burana," is listed at $26.65. Imahori said that Nippon Phonogram had lowered the price because the old price was too high. She said that classical music fans who include senior high and university students. are willing to pay higher prices compared to popular music recordings -for the higher quality digital recordings. Imahori said Tchaikovsky's "1812 Overture" apparently was the most popular Telarc LP and that five new Telarc releases will go on sale Oct.

-

25.

Of Bartok Is A-1

By ALAN PENCHANSKY

SHIG FUJITA

chestral scores that trace Bartok's style from its early Straussian and Lisztian influences through its folk influenced and sombre middle period to the composer's final unique synthesis of forms. The collection begins with the early "Kossuth" tone poem, a rarely heard work, and concludes with the famous Concerto For Orchestra. Joo works with Hungary's two leading orchestras, the Budapest Philharmonic and the Budapest Symphony Orchestra, both of which give him radiant playing. The corn prehension of style in these performances, and the flair, intensity and color are remarkable, and provide an antipode to the routinized performances heard on many recordings by more spit- and -polish Western orchestras. The superb digital recording produced by Britain's Brian Culver house permits the full weight and lifelike presence of the orchestra to be experienced, and though the recording site creates a little "hardness" when the orchestras play at top volume, its spacious and warm sound adds to the beauty of the albums. Sefel hired Soundstream to capture the audio, and the music remained in digital language from the time of the sessions until the analog phono disks were cut, assuring that

all the beauty of the orchestral sound comes through. Audio buffs who are sticklers about pressings also come up winners. KM Records of Burbank, Calif., importer of Teldec vinyl, was in charge of plating and pressing. The extra heavy disks are the finest work KM has produced to date, and there are no quieter surfaces coming from anywhere in Europe or

Japan. It should surprise no one at this date that a small company insistent on the highest quality can surpass the work of the world's largest record labels. And Sefel's edition does hold Bartok higher than any major label effort issued this year. Joo also has waxed four albums of standard repertoire with the London Symphony, and Sefel promises these releases in the near future. It will be interesting to hear what results he draws from the British group, in non -specialist repertoire. In the meantime, there are half a dozen major Bartok scores Joo did not tape during Sefel's first trip to Hungary, including the Music for Strings, Percussion and Celeste, the "Wooden Prince" and the Divertimento for Strings. Hearing what Sefel has accomplished to date convinces us that Joo should be sent back to complete the job.

MAJOR $ PUSH IN BRITAIN

EMI, Du Maurier Tie -In For Beethoven Package LONDON -EMI here is launching what it claims to be its most expensive campaign for a classical record package, and says that if it is successful, similar campaigns will follow. It is being run in association with the World Of Music division of cigarette company du Maurier. In all, a total $350,000 is set aside for promoting and advertising an eight record set of Beethoven's symphonies, the first complete digital recording of the works, featuring the Philharmonia Orchestra, conducted by Kurt Sanderling, the East German musician. Reasoning behind the substantial outlay is that the campaign has to reach the broadest possible range of record buyers. The aim is to hit the standard classical audience and also the occasional record -buying group. So advertising is booked in Sunday newspaper color supplements, on commercial radio and a freelance window display team is booked to work with EMI's in -house store specialists. EMI here says the project has grown from du Maurier's associ-

ation with the Philharmonia Orchestra, the cigarette firm sponsoring its concerts to the hefty tune of $600,000. However, the Beethoven symphonic cycle is essentially a commercial project for du Maurier. The company looks for profits from sales as well as the obvious public relations benefits. Says Robin Russell, du Maurier promotion chief: "We have to see whether such expenditure on advertising can be justified and whether we can tap a new market." For EMI's John Patrick, classical division general manager, it is a coup because of the involvement with conductor Sanderling, said to be in the Otto Klemperer style. "He's a strong name, specially with musicians," he says. "We've wanted him for some time now." The box set, in the red /silver coloring of du Maurier cigarette packs, retails at around $60 and is out Nov. 6 to catch the Christmas sales buildup. Beethoven's Symphony No. 5 will also be separately available in a gatefold sleeve and No.'s 8 and 9 in a double sleeve. And in January, 1981, all the symphonies will be individually available.

À

STILL CRAZY -Soupy Sales performs before a live audience during a recording session for his upcoming MCA album "Still Soupy After All Those Years."

Survey For Week Ending 10/24/81

n



MII

R

Latin LPÍ

,

special Survey

Copyright 1981. Billboard Publications, Inc. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic. mechanical. photocopying, recording. or otherwise. without the prior written permission of the publisher. c

N. CALIFORNIA (Pop) This Week 1

i

TITLE- Artist, Label Number (Distributing Label)

JUAN GABRIEL

CHICAGO (Pop) This Week 1

Con tu amor, Pronto 1096

2

RIGO TOVAR

JUAN PARDO

LOLA BELTRAN

5

VICKY

6

EMMANUEL

7

BURBUJAS

15

LOS HUMILDES

4

JUAN GABIREL

5

JULIO IGLESIAS

6

CONJUNTO MICHOACAN

7

NAPOLEON

8

LOS YUMAS

9

JOSE LUIS PERALES

La

inolvidables exitos, Gas 1020

15

JOAN SEBASTIAN

RAPHAEL

Me llamas, CBS 80302

VICENTE FERNANDEZ

11

JOSE LUIS RODRIGUEZ

12

AMANDA MIGUEL

13

JUAN GABRIEL

10

LEONARDO FABIO

11

LOS SAGITARIOS

12

LOS HERMITANOS

CBS 20555

CBS 11306

TH 2151

Chava Romero, Olímpico 5016

Profono 3049

CBS 20342

13

America 1018

LOS HUMILDES LA PEQUENA COMPANIA Tangos

a

LA MIGRA

17

ROBERTO CARLOS

Peerless 1048

LOS PUMAS

16

ABRIL 78

Pedida

Mar Int. 125

Classical Notes The New York Philharmonic names Edward

L

Alley orchestra manager. Alley, formerly director of the Martha Baird Rockefeller Fund, succeeds Henry Fogel who became executive director of

the National Symphony last

July.... American

composer Ivana Themmen is the first woman ever to pen

a

guitar concerto, according to the

Minnesota Orchestra. The new work's premiere,

with soloist Sharon Isbin, is set for Wednesday

taped for NPR broadcast next fall. The season includes Gounod's "Romeo And Juliette," "Ma-

LOS BONDADOSOS Nahual 4910

LUPITAD'ALECIO

18

LOS ACUARIOS

19

LOS SAGITARIOS LA MIGRA

Orfeon 16055

Arriva 6007

NAPOLEON

20

DYANGO la radio, Odeon 14112

20

Renata Scotto, Itzhak Perlman and Eugene Into-

21

LEO DAN

21

JOSE LUIS RODRIGUEZ

min are set to take part in the fifth annual Richard Tucker Memorial gala concert at Carnegie

22

22

LOS BUKIS

23

LOS POLIFACETICOS

dame Butterfly," "Die Walkure" and "Emani."

artistic director and co- founder is conductor Nicola Rescigno.... Marilyn Home,

The company's

Lena verde, Raf19079

Opera's 1981 silver anniversary season is being

service debuted Oct. 16.

Volumen IV, Mar Int. 125

Mujer, TH 2151

DIEGO VERDAGUER Profono 3044

23

VIVA EL NORTE

24

JULIO IGLESIAS

15 exitazos

Award....

www.americanradiohistory.com

Olimpico 5016

CBS 20502

Hall, Sunday (1). Baritone J. Patrick Raferty is

and the London Symphony Orchestra.... Dallas

Philips in November. Colin Davis leads soloists

dada, Olimpico 5015

19

this year's recipient of the Richard Tucker CBS' new cable tv operation will offer the 11 -part Leonard Bernstein Beethoven series, including all nine symphonies, as part of its first two months of programming. The new

(28).... The premiere recording of Sir Michael Tippett's Triple Concerto will be released by

y

Volumen V, Joey 2080

17

CBS 12314

18

LOS POTROS

15

media luz. Alhambra 4826

16

ABRIL 78 Volumen IV. Joey 2079

14

A mis amigos. Fama 608

15

mujer. CBS 50317

Olimpico 5017

80305

10

14

a

Lena verde, Raff 9079

Muzart 1805

Mujer.

exitos mas grandes, America 1018

Piguete de hormiga, Odeon 73111

Burbujas, Profono 1001

CBS

carta numero tres, Fama 608

De nina

Intimamente, Arcano 3535

9

DIEGO VERDAGUER Estoy vivo. Profono 3045

Gas 4236

8

EMMANUEL

3

Juan mucho mas Juan, CBS 80304

4

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Number (Distributing Label)

Intimamente, Arcano 3535

2

Rigo 81. Profono 3046

3

TITLE- Artist, Label

De nina

25

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nortenos, Profono 1501

Oroson 73120

24

mujer, CBS 50317

JULIO IGLESIAS Mi vida en canciones, CBS 50301

CARLOS Y JOSE El

25

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JOSE JOSE 15 exitos mas grandes, America 1015

68

Publishing Score SACEM On Royalties, Disco Fees

fi

SWEET MAN -Priscilla Baskerville of "Sophisticated Ladies" and Al Hibbler gather around Don George playing Fats Waller's piano during a press party for George's book, "Sweet Man -The Real Duke Ellington," held at the Songwriters Hall of Fame in New York.

NUMBER ONE IN ENGLAND

Arista /Interworld Catalog Sizzles With Hot C'rights LOS ANGELES- Arista /Interworld is on a hot streak, with the No. single in Great Britain this week and a half-dozen hits on the U.S. 1

Hot 100. The U.K. topper is a remake of "It's My Party" by Dave Stewart and Barbara Gaskin; the U.S. hits include Hall & Oates "Private Eyes" at number six, Stevie Woods' "Steal The Night" at 51, Savoy Brown's "Run To Me" at 75 and the Alan Parsons Project's "Snake Eyes" at 76. Arista /Interworld also has the Bside of the Air Supply single at 15 and a song on the "More Stars On 45" medley at 55. Billy Meshel, president of the 4'hyear -old company, sums up its winning philosophy in botanical terms. "We're picking 'em out of the fields and not out of highly cultivated little

Songwriters Meet MUSCLE SHOALS, Ala. -The Muscle Shoals Music Assn.'s fifth annual songwriters showcase will be held Thursday (22) at the Corral in Florence, Ala. Appearing on the showcase are Tommy Brasfield and Walt Aldridge, co- writers of Ronnie Mil sap's "(There's) No Getting Over Me;" Donny Lowery, co-writer of

Alabama's "Old Flame;" Terry Skinner, Jerry Wallace and Ken Bell.

gardens, in which there's no profit. "I have a fundamental lack of belief in businessmen, lawyers and accountants who peddle tapes. I don't feel they leave any room for us to make a profit. If a publisher makes a decent profit, I think those types tend to feel they gave too much away. It's a no -win situation which I avoid by going to the street. "We make our deals on a profitable basis. I'm not interested if I can't have a minimum of 25% of the gross worldwide for the life of the copyright. If I have to get involved with new artists for any less than that, and offer them some sort of advance on top of it, it doesn't make any sense. "Music publishers shouldn't bog themselves down making high money deals with these business types. They should go to the street and not end up with 15% administration fees." It's been nearly a year since Arista merged with Interworld, whose catalog is "literally 10 times Arista's size," according to Meshel. The executive says the combined companies have five full -time professional people in addition to Meshel, who spends a portion of his time plugging tunes. In addition to its current singles hits, the firm has covers of tunes on hot LPs by such acts as Pat Benatar, Natalie Cole, Rodney Crowell and Rachel Sweet. PAUL GREIN

SHOWCASE PLOY

Writers Forge Coalition NEW YORK -As a "reaction to the send -me -a- cassette syndrome," a group of writers and performers here has formed Musicmakers Coalition as a live showcase of their talents. Members of the non -profit group will be showcased at Lincoln Center's Bruno Walter Auditorium on two successive Thursdays, Oct. 22 and 29, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. On each night, six different acts will present three original "record- ready" songs to an invited audience of publishers, a &r staffers, independent producers and managers. The showcases are being coordinated by Sheila Davis, executive di-

rector and founder of the Musicmakers Coalition, who notes that the group was formed as "a reaction to the send -me -a- cassette syndrome" and the "depersonalized state of the music industry." Current members, many of whom have had their songs recorded and have performed at New York clubs, include Doug James, Ingrid Russell, the Kushites, Madeline Stone, Michael Pace, Denny Swan, Jodi Ebling, Tina Fabrik, Ricky Williams, Marc Gabriele, Elle Frye, Jim Moses and Bruce Kushnik. For further information, Sheila Davis, a lyricist herself, can be reached at (212) 674-1143.

By HENRY KAHN PARIS-SACEM, the French performing right society, is under simultaneous attack from the French fair trading commission and from some of its own members. On the one hand, the commission is considering allegations from music users that the tariffs applied to discos are inordinately high. On the other hand, authors and composers in Montpelier and Corsica are complaining that SACEM has failed to pay them royalties for their works over the past 10 years. The fair trading commission's inquiry is a response to recent press stories which have drawn attention to the differences between the disco tariffs operating in France and those in the U.S. and U.K. There have been strong criticisms recently that the French rates are "extortionate." It has been pointed out that while monthly license payments for certain classes of discotheque are $80 in the U.K. and $30 in the U.S., the figure in France is

$300.

Ironically, the higher French tariff favors foreign composers rather than French composers because it has been estimated in recent surveys that 72% of music played in French discos is Anglo- American. Easily the more dramatic of SACEM's two principal problems is the militancy of its own members in Corsica and Montpelier. In Ajaccio, Corsica, local songwriters have occupied the SACEM offices, claiming that the society owes them royalties dating back to 1971. They are also demanding the dismissal of Jean Loup Tournier, SACEM directorgeneral. The cause of the dispute is that SACEM says it cannot pay royalties on works until manuscripts are deposited with it. However, the writers involved are largely improvising performers who create original songs but never commit them to

manuscript paper. The disgruntled SACEM members in both Ajaccio and Montpelier are demanding back payment of royalties, due on locally made recordings of their works, but SACEM points out that without supporting documentation and sheet music, its regulations do not permit it to make royalty payments. The matter is now being taken up by the Ministry of Cultural Affairs and Nicolas Alfonsi, who represents Ajaccio in the French Parliament has referred the matter to the minister concerned, Jack Lang. Currently under discussion is the setting up of a commission of inquiry to examine not only the Ajaccio and Montpelier problems but the whole modus operandi of SACEM. Meanwhile, there's a SACEM executive in both trouble spots, seeking out a mutually acceptable solution.

Shermans Compose Richard and LOS ANGELES Robert Sherman, the Oscar -winning composers of "Mary Poppins" and other musicals, are writing additional music for a contemporary version of Prokofieff's classic "Peter And The Wolf." The television special, for Filmation Studios, will incorporate live action plus animation. -

www.americanradiohistory.com

SAVOY ROCK -ASCAP writer Willy DeVille, left,

talks with Ken Sunshine, the organization's communications coordinator, following Mink DeVille's performance at New York's Savoy.

MORE CATALOG DEALS COMING

Hal Leonard Expansion In Pop Print Field Continues By IRV LICHTMAN

NEW YORK -Hal Leonard Publications, for most of its 35 years an educational- market music print factor, will further expand its year -old entry into the pop print field. Last November, the Milwaukee based company took over the manufacture and distribution of the Chappell catalog, a deal that has contributed significantly to what company chief Keith Mardak predicts will be Hal Leonard's best year. Although Mardak notes that the company's initial concept was to stay with Chappell for at least a year before seeking other copyright rights for pop print, several deals, including The Entertainment Company and Mac Davis' Songpainter firm, were struck during this period. Mardak is on the brink of several other unidentified catalog and /or individual song deals, but he does admonish publishers and writers over seeking too big an advance. "The pop field is a game of paying money and getting rights," he says, "but the question of 'how much' is really less than a company's ability to develop a song for the print market." And in print merchandising, Hal Leonard has quickly established some novel ideas, including a gatefold concept for single sheets (with no drop-out page) and a four -song,

$3.95 "mini" folio. The gatefold approach is now utilized on all single sheets, while the "mini" folio has expanded beyond a Police release to such other acts as Tanya Tucker, Tom T. Hall, REO Speedwagon,

among others. Now, the firm has unveiled another idea, one that Mardak says has passed muster via a dealer chain test run. This is an initial six releases of horizontally stitched 4" by 7 " lyric-only books (with some guitar chord frames) selling at $2.95 each. Featured are material cut by the Police, Who, Pink Floyd, Barbra Streisand and Sheena Easton. Mardak says the company has developed a special counter rack for the books, which he expects to sell through print dealers, record shops and supermarkets. Hal Leonard has also gotten a quick taste of big single sheet sales with the Diana Ross -Lionel Richie smash, "Endless Love." He cites "six figure" sales. The sheet carries a list of $2.50, part of the general price rise by most print firms earlier this year. "There were a few moans and groans about the price rise, but there's no resistance to it at this time," Mardak notes. With its Chappell involvement and song deals with others, Hal Leonard is also building -up a mixed folio catalog, now standing at 15.

Intersong Music Shifts Creative Focus To L.A. NEW YORK--Los Angeles is taking on the lion's share of Intersong Music's creative activities, following a four-year phase in which the foreign publishing operation of PolyGram established an independent identity in the U.S. The move, according to Irwin Robinson, president of both Chappell Music and Intersong Music, creates a new post, that of senior vice president of creative, which goes to Ira Jaffe, who joined the company out of Los Angeles earlier this year. Don Oriolo, current vice president and general manager of Intersong, remains in New York, while Pat Rolfe continues to helm Intersong's Nashville activities. John Lombardo remains as West Coast creative director.

"Since so much talent, so many record outlets, and films and tv are there, a logical conclusion was a focusing of Intersong's creative strength in Los Angeles," Robinson comments.

With a number of current successes, including the Diana Ross /Lionel Richie duet, "Endless Love," Intersong has catalog depth, including copyrights by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, Burt Bacharach and Hal David, Ray Charles, Doc Pomus, Mort Schuman, among others. Inter song also publishes the entire Hill & Range catalog and administers such companies as the Casablanca units, Elvis Music and Gladys Music and the copyrights of Hank Williams through Hiriam Music.

The EYES of the world are going to be focused on

'TEXAS The next Major Entertainment Center ?? Billboard's SPOTLIGHT ON TEXAS will capture and publish the highlights of this state's accomplishments, contributions and potential to the world of music- all phases- recording, studios, record companies, talent, management, movie /TV/radio business, Latin music, video, concerts, clubs, and more.

THE ONE -CHANCE -IN -A-YEAR FOR ALL TEXAS FIRMS TO PUT THEIR BEST BOOT FORWARD FOR THE ENTIRE WORLD TO TUNE IN TO INCREASED BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES THAT KNOW NO BOUNDS.

Issue Date: November 21, 1981 Advertising Deadline: October 23, 1981 All in Texas must be represented in this vital SPOTLIGHT Billboard will place you center stage for its world -wide readership ... your ad in this Spotlight will contribute to the growth of Texas AND your own firm...

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For more exciting details,

contact BILL MORAN 18617 Vintage St. Northridge, CA. 91324 (213) 349 -2171

Billboard's 1981

T *E

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DON'T MISS OUT, CALL TODAY IT'S IMPORTANT FOR YOU IN TEXAS TO BE IN THIS ISSUE to "Wild" Bill Moran and ensure your profitable participation.

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GENERAL

SHERMAN WANTS YOU!!

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ROAST in his honor to benefit THE ROSSI FUND Dedicated to the tender, loving care of children with cancer

We hope you'll be able to join Sherman On Tuesday evening, October 20th

At The Beverly Hilton Hotel Beverly Hills, California Cocktails will be served at 7:30 P.M. Dinner will begin at 8:15 P.M. Dress: Must wear shirt and shoes Tax -Deductible Donation: $100 per person $1,000 per corporate table for 10 All donations are used only for the care of children with cancer.

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BETSY WHORF Assistant to Dick Sherman, Motown Records

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AL "DEALS" DiNOBLE N &K Investment Group

ROBERT K. GOLD A&M Records

For more information, please call The Rossi Fund HOT LINE: (213) 272-4440.

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71

International Retail Web FNAC To Brussels

PARIS -FNAC, the biggest record retail discount chain in France, is opening a branch in Brussels, its first venture in a foreign ter-

MANILOW DELUGE

- London

pro-

moter Andrew Miller is surrounded with some of the nearly 500,000 ticket requests for 70,000 possible seats available for Barry Manilow's dates in London, Birmingham, Manchester, Brighton and Edinburgh.

ritory. In Belgium, the store, opening Nov. 6, will be part of a new group SODAL, set up by three national chains acting together. The title, in English, stands for Leisure Articles Diffusion Co. FNAC holds 40% of the share capital. The new Brussels store, covering 3,000 square feet, opens with a stock of 30,000 disks and cassettes and the basic French discounting policy will be followed. The whole FNAC build -up has been impressive, with four large stores in Paris and 12 in the French provinces. It started out exclusively in records but now covers many

other fields, including travel

Agenda Set For CISAC Meeting In Switzerland By LEIF SCHULMAN

STOCKHOLM -Home taping, and an assessment of what is being done worldwide to cope with all the

problems of private domestic recording, is high on the priority list for discussion at the spring, 1982 meeting of the administrative council of the Confederation Internationale des Societes D'Auteurs et Compositeurs (CISAC). The basic agenda for the get -together in Geneva, Switzerland, was agreed here at the annual meeting of the executive bureau of CISAC, which oversees the activities of copyright societies worldwide. There were 12 delegates from 12 countries present and, alongside home taping, it was agreed to discuss the use of computers to help protect copyright works; problems arising from the growth of cable television; and CISAC's own assistance program to help composers and lyricists in the developing countries. Says Hans Nordmark, general manager of Swedish performing right society STIM, the host organization here: "The meeting was essentially to decide what we should all talk about at administrative council level early next year." Among those at the Stockholm meeting were Gloria Messenger, new general manager of ASCAP in the U.S.; Boris Pankin, chairman of Soviet Union society VAAP; and Luigi Conte, of Italian society SIAE, acted as president, assisted by Erich Schulze, of GEMA, West Germany.

Video System Bows In U.K. LONDON -The only fully integrated video system on the market was launched here Oct. I by Scandi-

navian hardware manufacturer Bang & Olufsen.

The company claims its new Beosystem 8800 is the first in which all component units are matched in design and function. The system comprises the 8800V video recorder, based on the Philips V2000 system, 26" color tv, remote control handset and a reversible stand. U.K. retail price is around $2,500.

agencies. FNAC led the big French cam-

paign against the current 331% Value Added Tax levied on records in France, paying the tax itself and so encouraging the public to buy more. Now, if its discount store experiment in Brussels pays off, FNAC looks next to Holland and Switzerland and then to Quebec, in Canada.

Swiss's Videophon Adopts Rental Plan Continuedfrom page 61 rental. In many mountain regions, television reception is far from perfect. And the three language areas,

of German, French and Italian speaking Swiss, can be best serviced by a good video rental distribution system, specially as in many regions there are large minorities of the other language groups. Juerg Rordorf, president of the Swiss division of IFPI, was at the seminar to outline copyright protection for authors and producers of video works in Switzerland, confirming that this territory differs from others in certain respects. He admitted both producers and traders felt a certain insecurity, simply because Switzerland as a country has little experience in the video field. But IFPI is preparing guidelines and Rordorf stressed that here authors of video works enjoy "absolute" performance and distribution rights, with complete control over when and where a video work is performed. Manufacturers and producers are not in the same position, legally. In principle, the rights of recorded works of composers and publishers are protected by SUISA, a collection society in a government -approved monopolistic situation.

Hungary Considers Blank Tape Levy, Reports Bors Continued from page 4 potential beneficiaries of an impost are already reported in heated dispute over an equitable split of expected revenues. He identifies parties to the controversy as the authors' society, the performers' union, and his own Hungariton record company. Some eight million LPs will have been produced and sold in Hungary by year's end, estimates Bors, for a 30% increase over 1980. He attributes much of this increase to price stability of recordings in the face of general inflation affecting other consumer goods. Classical LPs sell routinely for the equivalent of $2 each, while pop albums go for $2.80. The rise in output and consumption of cassettes is even more spectacular for a country with a total population of about eight million. The Hungariton chief expects cassette volume to approach the one million mark in 1981, double the total a year ago. And current plans are geared to a 50% increase in cassette turnover in 1982. Singles do not show the same dynamism, holding fairly steadily to an annual output of some 1.5 million 45

r.p.m. units. Recordings are marketed largely through some 500 book, hi fi and department store outlets, informs Bors, in addition to about only 10 specialized record stores, most of which are Hungariton owned and operated. Overproduction is rarely a problem in his country, he says, since the demand for recordings still outpaces supply. Traditionally, there is rarely more than a two -month supply awaiting distribution in Hungariton warehouses. Production blueprints call for overall increases in recorded product of between 60% and 80% over the next five years, says Bors. Hungariton has already recorded several classical albums digitally

with Sony equipment rented from sources in West Germany. "We have now ordered our own Sony units," says Bors, "and will produce all our important recordings digitally." Digital recordings will sell at about $2.20 per LP, he adds, when they hit the market early next year. Now in the can are a coupling of

Dvorak and Tchaikovsky string serenades, Bartok's "Bluebeard's Castle" and a complete "Emani" by Verdi. Bors notes that the Sefel Bartok recordings, recently introduced in Canada and now moving into the U.S. market, were joint productions with Hungariton. The latter company has rights for distribution in

Eastern European countries, but is still awaiting delivery of metal parts from Sefel. These were Soundstream digital productions. Locomotiv G.T. is one of the Hungarian rock groups to be picked up by a foreign licensee in the West. EMI International is the pactee in this instance. Another Hungariton act, said to be selling well in Japan and the Philippines, with releases slated in other international markets, is the Newton Family. Described as an "Abba -like MOR group," the act has been licensed to RCA for South America and Movieplay for Spain, Bors informs. Other artists will be promoted for international exposure, as well, promises the Hungariton topper. As in the case of Locomotiv and Newton Family, original material is rerecorded in English for alien markets.

Much of Bors' time here was spent with his U.S. distributor, Otto Quittner of Qualiton Imports, who claims a growing demand for Hungariton product. He also visited with label chiefs here and on the West Coast, and surveyed operations of some 30 record and tape retail stores across the country.

www.americanradiohistory.com

The Swiss government arbitration committee has introduced a special tariff "V" for the production of video tapes and royalties for producers and artists are based on retail prices charged. Rordorf admitted the copyright situation in video is complex. In paying a royalty to SUISA, the copyrights of the country of production are, through international agreements, settled for other countries too, with the exception of the U.S. and Canada. North American products are not fully licensed in Switzerland, though authors can ask SUISA to collect the full, or an additional, royalty. Rordorf said: "Video tapes imported from the U.S. or Canada lead to a two-sided legal situation. The importer acquires only the right to trade the pictures but has to pay an additional royalty to SUISA for the soundtrack. "If the imported video tapes are later used for rental, the importer has to pay the double royalty to SUISA as in the case of outright sale, because in the case of sale SUISA applies the basic tariff, which accounts for only half of the rental tariff.

"Therefore a tape, once sold, can't be used later for rental as this might create copyright infringement. But the sale can have serious negative consequences as the authors aren't in a position to protect their legal rights afterwards" Switzerland is now preparing a legal base for the protection of copyrights in the case of videocassette sales to libraries. IFPI here is also undertaking legal measures against illegal copying and trading of video works. And IFPI, said Rordorf firmly, certainly supports the introduction of a basic copyright fee on blank

videotapes or videorecorders, though the legal framework in which this would work has to be firmed up.

Sonet Norway Sets Up Shop OSLO -At a multinational meeting of executives of the Sonet Group of Scandinavia, staged in Bergen, the setting -up of Sonet Norway was formally announced by Arne Ben diksen, long -time Norwegian associate of the Swedish-based conglomerate.

Agreement Closer On Mechanicals Base In U.K. By PETER JONES LONDON-After initial conflict and problems, there is now "a good measure of understanding" between the Mechanical Rights Society here and those record companies (virtually all the majors) who have abolished recommended retail prices, according to trade sources. The original dispute hinged on finding a satisfactory basis for payment of mechanical copyright royalties, though the British Phonographic Industry, in a letter from director general John Deacon to member companies, admits that full agreement has not actually been reached.

Deacon says the MRS has been kept fully informed of the retail price survey completed on behalf of BPI in terms of the methods used and the results.

The survey reveals that the overall mark -up in the third quarter of 1981, July -September, taking account of differing volumes of sales in various categories, is calculated at 31.43%, compared with 31.86% in the second quarter, April-June. But some individual categories show significant variations and there was insufficient data to measure a typical mark-up for cassette singles, last quarter, though the second quarter figure in this market area was 40.2%.

Classical mark -ups were included in the survey for the first time, corning out at 36.92% for albums, compared with 43 %, based on recommended retail price, in the second

quarter. Deacon has written to MRS with the details and says that the BPI copyright administration committee recommends that companies which have stopped publishing recommended retail prices should compile and have available cataloged selling prices, using dealer price plus mark -up. These figures should be included on statutory notices. Also, for categories of records for which recommended retail price has been retained, and that includes classical, then list should be used to calculate copyright royalties and should therefore be included on statutory notices.

Solid State Logic Garners Britain's Exporting Award LONDON -Britain's Solid State Logic, known around the world for its technological work in the recording field, has been given a Queen's Award for Export Achievement. National /Panasonic is the company's latest Japanese client, now added to other industry giants like Yamaha, NC and Warner /Pioneer. Onkio Haus, a leading independent studio in Tokyo, has bought its second SSL system. Recent exports to the U.S. include a third console to Record Plant in Los Angeles and a state -of-the -art

audio /video complex at Bullet Recording Studio in Nashville, Tenn. Two identical SSL systems are in-

stalled in the RCA Studios, Mexico, and Tennessee Studios in Hamburg, West Germany, has a console, including the SSL total recall computer. Denmark Radio's second SSL was built into the network's Copenhagen concert hall and its first master studio system, shipped in March this year, was the world's first computer controlled audio recording truck. The SL4000E series master studio system is particularly successful in the traditional markets, notably Japan, the U.S., Germany and Scandinavia, but now the company is getting many inquiries from places like Korea, India, Hong Kong and New Zealand.

International

Labels Shut Out Of Athens Song Contest

Crown Issues LPs For Tokyo Karaoke Bars TOKYO-"Karaoke" (empty orchestra) clubs where customers sing to a background of recorded music, usually on tape, have sprung up throughout Japan. They provide an emotional outlet for frustrated workers, former singers who want to show how good their voices still are and anyone who wants to let off steam by singing.

There are literally thousands of "karaoke" bars everywhere in Japan, but most of the "karaoke" tapes are for "enka" (Japanese ballads), so that non-"enka" singers don't have a chance. But Crown Records has remedied the situation by putting out 10 LPs and tapes containing background music of hit parade songs, Elvis Presley tunes, country, Liverpool sounds and Japanese rock'n'roll and

JAPAN FEST- Dumbo, a group of primary school children, performs during the 22nd Popular Song Contest in Japan, winning a special judges' prize.

Aladdin Takes Top Honors In Japan's 22nd PopCon

By By SHIG FUJITA Roller)," in the 22nd Popular Song TOKYO -A group from Nagoya, Contest (PopCon) held at Tsumagoi Aladdin, led by Nagoya College of outside Tokyo on Oct. 4. Commerce senior Shigehito TakaAladdin thereby won the right to hara, won the grand prize with its compete in the World Popular Song song, "Kanzen Muketsu No Rock 'n' Contest to be held in the Nippon Roller (The Perfect Rock 'n' Budokan Hall in Tokyo on Oct. 30, 31 and Nov. 1, in which there will be 23 entries from countries outside Japan. Whereas Genichi Kawakami, president of Nippon Gakki Co. and LONDON -Two publications chairman of the Yamaha Music featuring the group Queen, due out Foundation, has served as the chairvirtually at the same time, led to a man of the committee of judges in Music;" writer); "Country High Court case hearing here, with all past PopCons, the chairman for "Liverpool Sounds" (Beatles, Anian injunction granted against one. the 22nd PopCon was Hideto mals, etc.); "Group Sounds" (songs That is "Queen -The First Ten Eguchi, managing director of Yamby Japanese groups); "College Years." An injunction preventing aha Music Foundation. Folk;" "Japanese Rock'n'Roll" (Eifurther distribution was granted There were 25 finalists from rekichi Yazawa, Ryudo Uzaki, etc.); against Music Sales, Record & Tape gional eliminations held throughout and "New Music" (Takuro Yoshida, Sales (trading as Mail Order Music) the nation in which 1,500 singers Kosetsu Minami, Alice, etc.). and Alexander J. Muir, trading as and groups participated. The LPs and tapes are priced at Babylon Books. Outstanding song awards were around $8.60 each. The action, just a couple of weeks given to: "Mai," (Dance) written, prior to for inthe publication of the band's Vol. 2," Parade The "Hit composed and sung by 17- year -old own photo souvenir book "Queen's stance, contains such songs as "Oh, Haruhi Aiso; "Amour," written and Greatest Pix," was based on alleged Carol," "Calendar Girl," "Vacacomposed by Akemi Nawa and sung breach of confidence, breach of Collar," On Your tion," "Lipstick by her group More; "Say! I Love copyright and passing off the publi"You Are My Destiny" and "Pretty You Forever," written and comcation. SHIG FUJITA Little Baby." posed by Akihiko Furukawa and sung by his group Spunky; and "Kanashimi wa Yesterday (Sadness Yesterday)," written, composed and sung by Takashi Koga. The Kawakami Award was given to Chisa Oikawa, who wrote, cornposed and sang, "Sukiyo Anata (I By NICK ROBERTSHAW Like You)." office mands large slice of box Chrysalis Group a -The LONDON A special judges' award was given throughout the world. What we are here has brought forward producto Dumbo, a group of primary setting out to do is make a film tion of its first major feature film, a school children singing and perwhich, though developed and sci-fi horror movie titled "Conforming "Yakyu no Sukina Karintofilmed in the U.K., will appeal to the tagious." Shooting will start Januchan (Baseball-Loving Karinto)," international market. We are makary, 1982 on location at the Isle Of which was written by Kaoru Seki, a ing it with our eyes focused on the Mull, Scotland. fifth grade girl, and composed by export market." Produced by Chrysalis cochairHideya Sakurai, a sixth grade boy. The project is one of two anman Terry Ellis and directed by There were 4,000 people in the aunounced at this year's Cannes Film Harley Cokliss, the film is budgeted dience. Festival, and marks what Ellis calls: at $1.5 million. Terry Ellis com"the beginning of an active program ments: "The horror film still comof film- making in the U.K. by Chrysalis. We are intent on making LP a major commitment to investment TOKYO -To compete with imin the British film industry." ported records, Nippon Phonogram A second feature film, the Joe Orton cinematic biography "Prick Up is selling Barry Manilow's newest Your Ears," will start shooting next The Mechanical LONDON Arista album, "If I Should Love March, with Ellis again as producer. Copyright Protection Society Again," at the special list price of He says: "While we are obviously (MCPS) here was warned U.K. im$8.55 (2,000 yen) for 40 days from keen to establish Chrysalis as a proporters not to handle three albums the Oct. 10 release date. Record duction company, we are also very by Bob Marley and the Wailers on stores are already accepting orders keen to enter into coproductions the Splash label. for the album, and Nippon Phonowith the talented and energetic The LPs are "Soul Revolution," gram is carrying out an extensive young producers who exist in the "Blackout," and "Shakedown," and publicity campaign to let Manilow U.K. On these first projects we are MCPS says they were manufactured fans know about the offer. going out on our own, but for the fuin Canada without the authority of After 40 days, the regular price of ture we would like to encourage the original copyright owners and $10.70 (2,500 yen) will apply. to us with to come young producers licenses have been no society that Alex Abramoff, manager for artist their original ideas." granted.

new wave.

Tsuguo Satoh, Crown producer, says that the label has pressed 5,000 each of the 10 LPs and put out 5,000 each of the tapes. They are available in record stores and proving very popular, according to Satoh, who adds that Japanese businessmen are taking "karaoke" tapes with them when going to the U.S. The 10 LPs and tapes are: "The Hit Parade Vol. 1;" "The Hit Parade Vol. 2;" "Heartbreak Hotel" (Presley songs); "Yuzo Kayama" (popular Japanese song singer /song-

U.K. Ban Of Queen Book

Chrysalis Group Set To Produce 1st Horror Movie

Caution Trade On Marley LPs

By JOHN CARR them against leaving his "protecATHENS -A newly established tion." song contest here has proved to be As director of the Third Program an unexpected mine of new local talof the state -run ERT radio and W ent, but one which the record comnetwork, and as Greece's most prespanies find they can't tap. tigious modern composer, HadjiThe Corfu Song Contest, held for dakis has the clout to keep his artisthopefuls toeing his own line. two evenings in late September and An executive of EMI Greece, after featuring some 30 unknown but trying unsuccessfully to sign ballapromising singer /songwriters, was deer Stavros Papastavrou, who took organized by composer Manos Had third prize in the Corfu event, conjidakis. Its quality drew almost fessed: "The situation is inexplicwas unanimous acclaim here and it able." adjudged superior to the older -esBoth CBS and PolyGram, also on tablished Thessaloniki Song Conthe lookout for fresh local talent, test, also staged each September. have also been thwarted. Says a CBS when But record companies executive: "If Hadjidakis wants to moved in to sign around 15 of the fiset himself up in the recording businalists, each of whom received the ness, then fine, but right now he's equivalent of $800 in prize money, doing his artists a disservice." they found Hadjidakis had closed Hadjidakis now refuses to comthe door on them by holding the perment, apparently determined to proformers to a private contract for an ceed with his recording plans. But independent album. whether the record companies here Says Hadjidakis: "The artists are do or don't manage to get into the free to take up any offers by record act, the fact remains that the Corfu companies, but I know they won't." Song Contest has shown clearly there's plenty of originality bubblAnd the record companies are acing under the 'surface of the Greek cusing Hadjidakis of placing his artmusic scene. ists in a stranglehold and of warning

Blank Tape & Hardware Sales Climb In Romania By OCTAVIAN BUCHAREST -Romanian pop fans are on a near starvation diet when it comes to new records by major international artists. The sadly inadequate supply, imported from India by the state record company, is nowhere near to fulfilling demand and each new batch coming in is sold out in a matter of hours. The result is that the blank tape industry is flourishing in a country where music is an integral part of the way of life. The blank tape or cassette gives the average fan a chance to record privately the kind of music he's most interested in. Demand for this software is huge, and still growing. Tapes highest on the "wanted" list are imported from Agfa in West Germany or from ORWO in East Germany. And the Romanian public just can't get enough blank cassettes to match the appetite for music. Recording of new popular releases is not only handled privately within the household, but also as part of a special service offered by some Romanian stores. While official blank tape sales figures are not available, it is known that they've gone sky -high since the Romanian factory Tehnoton, in Iasi, has started production of cassette player hardware. Otherwise, the

Price Move To Undercut Imports

-

www.americanradiohistory.com

relations in Nippon Phonogram's international pop marketing department, says that past figures indicate that half the Manilow records sold in Japan are imported. Consequently. Nippon Phonogram decided to issue the latest album in Japan as close t6 the U.S. release date as possible, to offer the special low price, and to compete with the imported records with better quality recording, better packaging, liner notes and lyrics. A single from the album, "The Old Songs," will also go on sale on Oct. 10 with the price at $3.00 (700 yen).

URSULESCU most popular imported hardware units are from Unitra (brought in from Poland on a Grundig license), Tesla from Czechoslovakia and Maiak, from the Soviet Union. Both tape recorders and cassette players are in non -stop demand from these territories. Most popular blank tape is Agfa, but ORWO fulfills a less expensive, lower -quality demand. Today there's a cassette player in most Romanian homes and in an ever -increasing number of cars, though again official statistics are

hard to unearth. State record company Electrecord is producing blank cassettes, using BASF tape, and this software division was set up a year ago. In Romania, the price of a prerecorded cassette is now the same as that of the album.

Melodiya Remembers Elton John MOSCOW -Melodiya Records, the Soviet Union record company, finally got around to releasing Elton John's "Single Man" album here, on a license deal from PolyGram. But this first release batch was limited to a mere tens of thousands, unspecified, and sold out inside a couple of days. The move finally completed the process which started here with John's two -city Russian concert trek back in May, 1979. when he played full -house shows in Moscow and Leningrad. That visit triggered massive national and worldwide media interest and negotiations started immediately for licensing the album between PolyGram and Melodiya and its export-import

agency Kniga.

Mezhdunarodnaya

73

Hits OTheWoi'Id.

Billbowd

Copyright 1981, Billboard Publications, Inc No part of this publication may be reproduced. stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted. mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, withou the prior written permission of the publisher 'c

BRITAIN (Courtesy of Music Week) As of

10/17/81

SINGLES

2 3 4 5

ITS MY PARTY, Dave Stewart & Barbara Gaskin, Stiff/Broken

2

BIRDIE SONG, Tweets, PRT UNDER YOUR THUMB, Godley & Creme, Polydor PRINCE CHARMING, Adam & Ants, CBS THUNDER IN THE MOUNTAINS,

1

13

Toyah, Safari 6

21

7

5

8

11

9 10

3

11

16

40

12

7 9

13

OPEN YOUR HEART, Human

League, Virgin HANDS UP (GIVE ME YOUR HEART), Ottawan, Carerre JUST CAN'T GET ENOUGH, Depeche Mode, Mute INVISIBLE SUN, Police, A&M WALKIN' IN THE SUNSHINE, Bad Manners, Magnet IT'S RAINING, Shakin' Stevens,

23

GOOD YEAR FOR THE ROSES, Elvis

19

19

20

12

21

30 14 15

Arista SLOW HAND, Pointer Sisters, Planet YOU'LL NEVER KNOW, Hi Gloss,

6

16

28

17

10

18 NEW

22

23

Epic

24

22

ORIGINAL BIRD DANCE, Electronics,

25

25

MAD EYED SCREAMER, Creatures,

Polydor Polydor 26

18

IN AND OUT OF LOVE, Imagination,

27

17

SO THIS IS ROMANCE, Linx,

R&B

Chrysalis 28

24

29

29

30

37

31 NEW 32

26

33

36

HAND HELD IN BLACK AND WHITE, Dollar, Carerre LOCK UP YOUR DAUGHTERS, Slade, RCA PASSIONATE FRIEND, Teardrop Explodes, Zoo LABELLED WITH LOVE, Squeeze, A &M STARS ON 45 VOL. 3, Star Sound, CBS

34 NEW 35

33

36 NEW 37

20

JUST ANOTHER BROKEN HEART, Sheena Easton, EMI WHEN YOU WERE SWEET SIXTEEN, Fureys, Ritz BACK TO THE SIXTIES PT. 2, Tight Fit, Jive HOLD ME, B.A. Robertson & Maggie Bell, Swan Song WIRED FOR SOUND, Cliff Richard, EMI

38

39

39 NEW 40 35

34

26

35 36

39

EVERYTHING'S GONE GREEN/ PROCESSION, New Order, Factory NIGHTMARE, Gillan, Virgin LOVE ACTION (I BELIEVE IN LOVE), Human League, Virgin

1

2

4

3

2

4

6

5

9

6

3

7

5

8

7

9

8

ALBUMS GHOSTS IN THE MACHINE, Police, A &M SHAKY. Shakin' Stevens, Epic SUPER HITS 1.2, Various, Ronco HOOKED ON CLASSICS, Louis Clark /Royald Philharmonic Orchestra, K-tel MADNESS 7, Madness, Stiff ABACAB, Genesis, Charisma IF SHOULD LOVE AGAIN, Barry Manilow, Arista DEAD RINGER, Meat Loaf, Epic/ Cleveland Intl WIRED FOR SOUND, Cliff Richard, I

31

33

26

1

O

TATTOO YOU, Rolling Stones,

Rolling Stones

CANADA SINGLES This Last Week Week 1

2 3

6

4

9

5

6 7

8

7

11

12

12

19 15

14

18

15 16

8 14

19

Commodores, Motown 20

20

1

20

28

1

1

2

2

BELLA DONNA, Stevie Nicks,

1

5

22 NE N 23 1 8

24 25 26

23 17

22

Int'l

WALK UNDER LADDERS, Joan Armatrading, A &M MAKING MOVIES, Dire Straits, HITS RIGHT UP YOUR STREET, Shadows, Polydor LOVE IS ..., Various, K -tel SECRET COMBINATION, Randy era,ufnrel Warnar Rrnc BEAT THE GARROTT, Jasper Carrott, DJM LOVE SONGS, Cliff Richard, EMI BLACK & WHITE, Pointer Sisters,

Planet

29 NEW

30

24

HOOKED ON CLASSICS, Royal Symphony Orchestra, Teldec MAMA LORRAINE, Andrea Juergens, Ariola HAPPY BIRTHDAY, Stevie Wonder,

3 4

4

5

5

6

Modern 4, Foreigner, Atlantic LONG DISTANCE VOYAGER, Moody Blues, Threshold HEAVY METAL, Soundtrack, Full Moon /Asylum

3

2 8

3

1

4 5

4

6

3

5

7 NEW

8

7

9 10

8 10

QUIETSCHFIDELIO, Electronics, Philips DICH ZU LIEBEWN, Roland Kaiser, Hansa TIME, Electric Light Orchestra, Jet SHAKY, Shakin' Stevens, Epic SYMPHONIC ROCK, London Symphony Orchestra, K-tel TATTOO YOU, Rolling Stones, Rolling Stones ABACAB, Genesis. Charisma KIM WILDE, Kim Wilde, Rak

11

11

IDEAL, Ideal, IC SCHNEIDER WITH A KICK, Helen Schneider, WEA THIS OLE HOUSE, Shakin' Stevens,

12

9

STARS ON 45 VOL. 2, Stars On 45,

13 14

15

20

15

18

Epic

12

13

13

9

Al NO SEDAI NO MAE NI, Shougo Hamada, CBS / Sony TATTOO YOU, Rolling Stones,

Rolling Stones

16 NEW

SUN GLOW, Yasuko Agawa, Victor LOVE POTION NO. 1, Michael Schenker Group, Toshiba -EMI BYE BYE MAKO LIVE, Mako Ishino,

17 18

Victor BALIN, Marty Balin, Toshiba -EMI BLUEJEAN MEMORY, Soundtrack,

14 15

12

15

17 11

RVC

HIDARI UDE NO YUMA, Ryuichi Sakamoto, Alfa A LONG VACATION, Eiichi Ohtaki, CBS /Sony

19 NEW

20

14

9

8 NEW 9 NEW 10 8

16

12

17

NEW

18 NEW 19 NEW

20

13

As of

This Last Week Week 1

1

2

3

NEW

4

3

5

6

4 8

15

10

Seine Freunde, Hansa JAPANESE BOY, Aneka, Hansa RAIN IN MAY, Max Werner, CNR HOLD ON TIGHT, Electric Light Orchestra, Jet FOR YOUR EYES ONLY, Sheena Easton, EMI DICH ZU LIEBEN, Roland Kaiser, Hansa

16

13

17

15

18

16

SEISE! RUTEN, Masashi Sada, Free

20

Flight (JCM /KK Masashi) GUNJOU, Shinji Tanimura, Polystar (Noel /JCM)

7

6

8

7

9

5

10

9

12

10/19/81 13

11

14 NEW

DANCE LITTLE BIRD, Electronics,

Philips

3 4

3 2

7

10

19

20

17

8

GREEN DOOR, Shakin' Stevens, Epic ONLY CRYING, Keith Marshall,

10

9

YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY,

2

1

11

11

MALEDETTA PRIMAVERA, Loretta 3

4

12

Goggi, WEA WEM, Howard Carpendale, EMI GOING BACK TO MY ROOTS, Odyssey, RCA FLIEG NICHT SO HOCH, MEIN KLEINER FREUND, Nicole, Jupiter BETTE DAVIS EYES, Kim Carnes, EMI Girt MIR RITTF FINFN KUSS. Helva Feddersen, Phonogram MAMA LORRAINE, G.G. Anderson. Hansa STARS ON 45 VOL. 3, Stars On 45,

4

Shakin'

Stevens, Epic

14 15

14

15

16 NFW 17

18

16 17

Metronome

JEALOUSY, Yousui Inoue, Four Life

(Nichion/ Hogan)

7

13

1

13 14

18 14

ROCK 'N ROLL ROBOT, Alberto Camerini, CBS TRY IT OUT, Gino Soccio, WEA CANTA APPRESS' A NUJE, Edoardo

15

13

E

Bennato, Ricordi INVECE NO, Edoardo Bennato, Ricordi M'INNAMORO DI TE, Ricchi & Poveri, Baby /CGD-MM

16 NEW

ARTHUR'S THEME, Christopher Cross, Warner Bros., WEA SAILING, Christopher Cross, Warner Bros./WEA STARS ON 45, Various, Delta /WEA DON'T STOP, The Kid, Baby /CGDMM

17 NEW

18

19

19

20

20

17

SWEDEN (Courtesy GLF) As of

2

2

3

3

4

4

5

5

6

7

1

2

2

3

6

YOU WEREN'T IN LOVE WITH ME, Billy Field, WEA YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY, Shakin' Stevens, Epic LOUISE (WE GET IT RIGHT), Jona

4

7

Lewis, Stiff WON'T LET YOU DOWN, PHD, WEA HOLD ON TIGHT, Electric Light

7

3

8

5

1

5

2

5

10

ALBUMS TSUKASA, Tsukasa Itou, Japan SELECTION 1978 -1981, Off Course, Toshiba-EMI

Tsuyoshi Nagabuchi, Toshiba-EMI

6 8

9

11

10

Orchestra, Jet CONQUERED LOVE, Kim Wilde, Rak IF WERE A CARPENTER, Swanee, WEA START ME UP, Rolling Stones,

FOLLOW ME, Iruka, Crown SONGS IN THE ATTIC, Billy Joel, CRC /Cnnv

8

MARIONETTE, Mayumi Itsuwa, CBS /Sony 3606 NICHT, Alice, Polystar STEREO TAIYOU ZOKU, Southern All Stars, Victor

8

9 NEW 10 6

www.americanradiohistory.com

Lionel Richie, Motown TVA AV OSS, X- Models, Parlophone HUBBA HUBBA ZOOT Z OOT,

9 NEW 4 10

Caramba, Trash /Polar

I

YOUR LOVE STILL BRINGS ME TO MY KNEES, Marcia Hines,

13

1

1

2

2

ALBUMS FANTASY, Freestyle, SO S TIME, Electric Light Orchhestra, Jet TATTOO YOU, Rolling St ones,

3

Rolling Stones

Midnight PRINCE CHARMING, Adam & Ants, CBS JESSIE'S GIRL, Rick Springfield, Wizard PRECIOUS TO ME, Phil Seymour,

11 NEW

12

9

13

15

Epic 14

10

15 16

16

20

17

17

STOP DRAGGING MY HEART AROUND, Stevie Nicks, Modern JUST SO LONELY, Get Wet, CBS TOO MANY TIMES, Mental As

Anything, Regular STAND AND DELIVER, Adam & Ants. CBS HOOKED ON CLASSICS, Royal

18 NEW 19

12

20

18

1

Philharmonic Orchestra, RCA WHO CAN IT BE NOW, Men At Work, CBS THE SUN AIN'T GONNA SHINE ANY MORE, Doug Parkinson. CBS

2

2

3

3

4

5

5

ALBUMS TATTOO YOU, Rolling Stones,

1

Rolling Stones SIROCCO, Australian Crawl, EMI BELLA DONNA, Stevie Nicks, Modern /WEA NEW TRADITIONALISTS, Devo, Warner Bros. TIME, Electric Light Orchestra, Jet DEAD RINGER, Meat Loaf, Epic/ Cleveland Int'l CATS AND DOGS, Mental As Anything, Regular THIS OLE HOUSE, Shakin' Stevens.

4

6

6

7

11

8

7

9

12

10

15

11 12

10 14

13 14

9 8

15 16

13 18 16

Epic BAD HABITS, Billy Field, WEA TIME EXPOSURE, Little River Band,

DANGEROUS ACQUAINT ANCES, Isl Marianne Faithfull, Is!,

4 NEW

6

8 4

7

NEW

5

RAGE IN EDEN, Ultravox Chrysalis DEAD RINGER, Meat LLoa Cleveland

Int'l/Epic GOKEN LINDEMAN TJA TAR

VIDARE, Hasse /Tage, Svenska,

Lud

9

5

HARD KARLEK, Mats Ro pander, Polar SAXPARTY 8, Igmar Nor dstroms,

10

6

Fritu na FOER VAENTAN, Eva Da hlgren, CBS

8

7

HOLLAND (Courtesy Stichling Nederlan dse) As of

17

1981 ROCKS ON, Various, EMI LONG DISTANCE VOYAGER, Moody Blues, Decca

HITWAVE, '81, Various, Polystar PRECIOUS TIME, Pat Benatar, Chrysalis ALL THE BEST, Smokie, Rak KOO KOO, Debbie Harry, Chrysalis PIRATES, Rickie Lee Jones, Warner Bros. CHEMISTRY, Mondo Rock, Avenue PRETENDERS 2, Pretenders, WEA STARS ON LONG PLAY, Stars On 45, Mercury

18 17 19 NEW

20

20

10/17/81

SINGLES Last This Week Week WHY TELL ME WHY, Ani to Meyer,

1

1

2

2

3

3

Ariola I'M SO GLAD TO BE A V OMAN, Love Unlimited, Unlim ted Gold 'N BEETJE VERLIEFD, Ar dre Hazes,

4

7

EMI EVERY LITTLE THING SI

5

4

6

5

E DOES IS MAGIC, Police, A &M ENDLESS LOVE. Diana R oss &

Lionel Richie, Motown JUST FOR YOU, Spargo, I- Scream SUPER FREAK, Rick Jam es, Motown THE MARVELLOUS MAR ON ETTES, Doris D & Pins, Utopi. HURT, Timi Yuro, Liberti TAINTED LOVE, Soft Cel Vertigo

7 NEW

8

9

9 NEW 10 NEW

Capitol 1

1

2 3

3 5

4

4

ALBUMS SHADES OF DESIRE, Ani ta Meyer. Ariola GEWOON ANDRE, Andre Hazes, EMI FRIENDS. BZN, Mercury DE REGEN VOORBIJ, Ro b De Nijs,

5 NEW 6 6

ALL ALONE AM I, Timi I 'uro, Liberty DIFFERENT WORLDS, M aywood,

7

2

TATTOO YOU, Rolling St ones.

8 9

9

10

8

EMI

EMI

Rolling Stones ABACAB, Genesis, Vertig o TIME, Electric Light Ord' estra. Jet GO, Spargo. Inelco

7

ITALY (Courtesy Germano Ruscitto) As of 10/13/81

SOUTH AFRIC A (Courtesy Springbok Radi

SINGLES

As of 10/16/81 SINGLES

This Last Week Week ON MY OWN. Nikka Costa, CGD-MM

1

1

2

6

BETTE DAVIS EYES, Kim Carnes, EMI

3

2

4

5

5

4

MALINCONIA, Riccardo Fogli, Paradiso /CGD -MM HULA HOOP, Plastic Bertrand, Durium IN THE AIR TONIGHT, Phil Collins,

6

3

7

7

8

12

Last This Week Week 1

3

2

2

3

6

URGENT, Foreigner, Atl a ntic HAK HOM BLOKKIES. D avid Kramer, CCP QUEEN OF HEARTS, Jui e Newton.

4

1

ONE DAY IN YOUR LIFE Michael

5

4

YOU DRIVE ME CRAZY, Shakin'

6

5

Stevens, Epic STOP DRAGGING MY H :ART

Capitol Jackson, Motown

Atlantic /WEA

LOVE POTION No

6 NEW 7 3

NEW 6 NEW 5

I

Rolling Stones

BYE BYE,

1, Venus, Tokuma YOU COULD HAVE BEEN WITH ME, Sheena Easton, Toshiba -EMI

JAG VILL HA DIG, Freest yle, SOS HANDS UP, Ottawan, Ca rrere FOR YOUR EYES ONLY, Sheena Easton, EMI HOOKED ON CLASSICS, Royal Philharmonic Orchestr a, RCA JAPANESE BOY, Aneka, Hansa RAISING MY FAMILY, St eve Kekana, EMI DOTS, GOING BACK TO MY RO RCA ENDLESS LOVE. Diana R oss &

Lionel Richie, Motown

7 8

10/13/81

SINGLES This Last Week Week 1

ENDLESS LOVE, Diana Ross &

(Watanabe)

8 9

12 13

GINGIRAGIN NI SARIGENAKU, Masahiko Kondo, RVC (Janny's) HIGH SCHOOL LULLABY, Imokin Trio, Four Life (Fuji) KAZE TACHINU, Seiko Matsuda, CBS /Sony (Sun /JCM) KISS WA ME NI SHITE, Venus, Tokuma (Geiei) FURUSATO, Chiharu Matsuyama, News (STV Pack /Panta) MICHINOKU HITORI TABI, Jouji Yamamoto, Canyon (Nichion/

Kitajima)

14

5

Island MUSIC WONDERLAND, Mike Oldfield, Virgin SCHLIESS DIE AUGEN UND TRAEUME, James Last, Polydor DEAD RINGER, Meat Loaf, Epic/

JAPAN

12

Last This Week Week

2

1

NIGHTCLUBBING, Grace Jones,

(Courtesy Music Labo) As of 10/19/81

11

1

RUHE VOR DEM STURM, Georg Danzer, Polydor FOR YOUR EYES ONLY, Soundtrack,

10/12/81

SINGLES This Last Week Week

Cleveland Int'l

(Courtesy Der Musikmarkt) SINGLES

1

Metronome Atlantic NO SLEEP 'TIL HAMMERSMITH, Motorhead, Bronze

EMI

WEST GERMANY As of

9

AUSTRALIA

4, Foreigner,

JA WENN WIR ALLE ENGLEIN WAEREN, Fred Sonnenschein &

Vangelis, PolyGram TIME, Electric Light Orchestra, Jet NINE TONIGHT, Bob Seger. Capitol ESCAPE, Journey, CBS PRECIOUS TIME, Pat Benatar, Chrysalis

12

Victor

(Courtesy Kent Music Report)

MAMOTTE AGETAI, Yumi Matsutoya, Toshiba-EMI (Kirara) SHOUJO NINGYO, Tsukasa Ito, Japan (Yui /JCM) KANASHIMI 2 YOUNG, Toshihiko Tahara, Canyon (Janny's) LONELY HEART, Creation, Toshiba EMI (NTV /Taiyo) SAYONARA MOYOU, Toshihiro Ito, Nippon Phonogram (Yamaha) NAMIDA NO SWEET CHERRY, Chapels, Epic /Sony (PMP) TORI NO UTA, Kaoru Sugita, Radio City (Alai) TSUPPARI HIGH SCHOOL ROCK 'N' ROLL SHIKENHEN, Yokohama Ginbaee MOSHIMO PIANO GA HIKETANARA, Toshiyuki Nishida, CBS /Sony MOONLIGHT KISS, Naoko Kawai, Nippon Columbia (Geiei) STRIPPER, Kenji Sawada, Polydor

FRIENDS OF MR. CAIRO, Jon &

6

form or by any means, electronic,

BILLY'S BARBECUE, Arabesque,

7

Motown

Rolling Stones

Vertigo 21

28

Polydor

STILL, Joy Division, Factory BAT OUT OF HELL, Meat Loaf, Epic /Cleveland

26 20

2

17, Virgin

9

BEACH BOYS MEDLEY, Beach Boys, Capitol ALBUMS TATTOO YOU, Rolling Stones,

6

1

27

11

SINGLES

LADY (YOU BRING ME UP),

13

4

2

23 22

Vangelis. Polydor

6

19

25 26

FRIENDS OF MR. CAIRO. Jon &

18 NEW

5

18

24 NEW

Cummings, CBS

RAGE IN EDEN, Ultravox, Chrysalis VERY BEST OF ANNE MURRAY,

17 NE N

27

23 NEW

Hallervorden, Phonogram RIO, Maywood, Metronome DREIKLANGDIMENSIONEN, Rheingold, Welt Rekord STRADA DEL SOLE, Reinhard Fendrich, Metronome OH NO NO, Bernie Paul, Ariola SARA PERCHE TI AMO, Ricchie & Poveri, Baby CRAZY MUSIC, Ottawan, Carrere

YOU SAVE MY SOUL, Burton

17

DENIM & LEATHER, Saxon, Carerre CELEBRATION, Johnny Mathis, CBS

4

SAUSALITO SUMMER NIGHTS, Diesel, RCA THE NIGHT OWLS, Little River Band, Capitol EVERY LITTLE THING SHE DOES IS MAGIC, Police, A &M TRYIN' TO LIVE MY LIFE WITHOUT YOU, Bob Seger, Capitol MY GIRL (GONE, GONE, GONE), Chilliwack, A &M URGENT, Foreigner, Atlantic THIRSTY EARS, Powder Blues, Capitol

10

2 6

1

STOP DRAGGING MY HEART AROUND, Stevie Nicks, Modern PRIVATE EYES, Hall & Oates, RCA

5

11

17

Lionel Richie, Motown THE VOICE, Moody Blues, Threshold ARTHUR'S THEME, Christopher Cross, Warner Bros. WHO'S CRYING NOW, Journey, CBS HOLD ON TIGHT, Electric Light Orchestra, Jet FOR YOUR EYES ONLY, Sheena Easton, Capitol

3 4

9 10

13

ENDLESS LOVE, Diana Ross &

2

3

16

22

Rolling Stones

1

32

START ME UP, Rolling Stones,

1

13

15

18

2

(Courtesy Canadian Broadcasting Corp.) As of 10/17/81

12

Anne Murray, Capitol ROCK CLASSICS, LSO /ROYAL CHORAL SOCIETY, K-tel PENTHOUSE & PAVEMENT, Heaven

29

ROCK 'N' ROLL GYPSY, Helen Schneider, WEA I'VE SEEN THAT FACE BEFORE, Grace Jones, Island TIERICHER TANGO, Dieter

ALBUMS

11

14

20

1

EMI 10

19

19

21

ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCHESTRA, Jet ANTHEM, Toyahm Safari ASSEMBLAGE, Japan, Hansa KINGS OF THE WILD FRONTIER, Adam & Ants, CBS MICHAEL SCHENKER GROUP, Michael Schenker Group, Chrysalis PRESENT ARMS, UB40, Dep Int'I YOU COULD HAVE BEEN WITH ME, Sheena Easton, EMI THE GARDEN, Jon Foxx, Virgin PRESENT ARMS IN DUB, UB40, Dept Int'l NINE TONIGHT, Bob Seger Silver Bullet Band, Capitol ISMISM, Godley & Creme, Polydor

40 NEW

7

1

CALIFORNIA DREAMIN', Various, K -tel DURAN DURAN, EMI HAPPY BIRTHDAY, Altered Images,

24 37 38 NEW

ENDLESS LOVE, Diana Ross &

Costello, F-Beat PRETEND, Alvin Stardust, Siff HAPPY BIRTHDAY, Altered Images, Epic SOUVENIR, Orchestral Manoeuvers In The Dark, Dindisc 0 SUPERMAN, Laurie Anderson, Warner Bros. QUIET LIFE, Japan, Hansa TAINTED LOVE, Soft Cell, Bizzare LET'S HANG ON, Barry Manilow,

15

31 32 33

20 38 30 34

United Artists SHUT UP, Madness, Stiff Lionel Richie, Motown

14

28 25 29 NEW 30

8

4

29

Epic

This Last Week Week 1

27

in any

GALEOTTO FU IL CANOTTO, Renato Zero, Zerolandiarca FADE TO GREY, Visage, PolyGram CANTO STRANIERO, Marcella Bella, CBS

9

10

10

11

11

8

DONATELLA. Rettore. AristonRicordi CHI FERMERA' LA MUSICA, Pooh, CGD-MM ENOLA GAY, Orchestral Maneouvers In The Dark, Ricordi

7

7

8 9

10

8

10 NEW

AROUND, Stevie Nick s & Tom Petty, Modern AMOUR, B. Longfellow. Trutone HOW 'BOUT US, Champaign, CBS ROCK'N'ROLL DREAMS COME THRU, Jim Steinman, CBS WIRED FOR SOUND, Cliff Richard, BMI

74

West Germany Singer /Songwriters On Target Record Sales Are Rising, Touring Is The Next Step WOLFGANG SPAHR of total national sales at this time. And there's similar satisfaction at RCA over this area of product. Ingrid Sternberg, product manager, looks after the interests of Klaus By

HAMBURG -The German song popularity and proving, after a gap of a couple of years, that it is a useful seller in the music marketplace. That's a summary of attitudes at the major record companies, though most feel that the media, especially radio and television, should give it more coverage. Otherwise, the feeling is that today's crop of German singer /songwriters are touching the right consumer nerve, putting lyrics to the right kind of topics, and generally doing their share of lifting a sagging market. Also emphasized by industry insiders is the need for these artists to get out on tour and present live is on the way back to national

shows for the public.

Deutsche Grammophon has a sizable roster of artists in this field, including Konstantin Wecker, Georg

Danzer, Ludwig Hirsch, F.J. Degenhardt and Robert Long. The latter has sold 100,000 records and tapes in Germany this year and 1981 has also "seen chart breakthroughs for the others. A promising newcomer is Thomas Kagermann. A DG estimate is that the singer/ songwriters contribute around 40%

Hoffman, Ulla Meinecke, Hans Scheibner and Gebrueder Blattschuss. New to the roster is Erich Virch. Says Sternberg: "With this kind of music, it has to be accepted that it takes two or three years to build an artist properly and that each one has, maybe, only one release each year." The German song purveyors at CBS, says Gerd Hofmann, are varied in style. Included are Wolf Bier mann, Fredl Fesl, Eva Maria Hagen,

Iaker and Hamilton, Klaus Peter Schweizer, Ulrik Remy and Bettina Wegner. Hofman, national marketing chief for the major, says Wegner has sold a total 250,000 -plus on two albums, Fes' more than 330,000 with three and Bierman's 10 LPs so far out have topped the 350,000 mark. At Teldec there are Nicos Apostolidis, Herbert Windisch, Ulrich Roski, Shobert and Black and Peter Ludwig, but new artists are to be given full -promotion debuts later this year and early 1982.

So far, these artists have a low

overall share of Teldec total sales but, according to Heidi Muench, marketing executive, there's strong feedback of press interest and the artists are all finding a regular public, something they lacked a few years ago. In terms of artist signings, Ariola in Germany takes the line that "less is sometimes more," so it keeps the singer /songwriter roster down to a few acts, but backs them all with extra press and promotional activity. The company is concentrating on Stefan Waggershausen, Hanna Haller, Michael Heltau, Susan Aviles and Gottfried Schloegl. Sales share of this team is, as yet, low. But Metronome in West Germany was the first company to give the singer /songwriters their own label, Nature, which in 1982 celebrates its fifth anniversary with a special sampler album of some of the earliest successes in this field. Ruediger Litza, head of a &r. and marketing at Metronome, estimates that they have a good 5% of the total corporate sales. Artists contributing greatly are Mario Hene, Peter Horton, Siegfried Schwab, Thommie Bayer and Reinhard Fendrich, the latter hitting No. in Austria with his song "Strada del Sole," performed in Italian. Leading the German -song contribution at WEA here is Heinz Rudolf Kunze, with full promotion on his future career still building. There's a lot of new product in this field coming from Intercord, notably from Reinhard Mey, Stephan Sulke, Hanns Dieter Huesch, Lonzo and Erika Pluhar, and between them they kick in a shade over a third of the total corporate sales. Even so, Peter Springer, marketing chief, says it is hard to find an overall promotional concept because each artist has a completely different style and approach. Abakus has a lengthy list of singer /songwriters who fit well into this fast -building area of today's German music business, and the main name is Siegfried Fietz. Phonogram, too, has a sizable crew: Jorgen von der Lippe, Peter Corneliu, Juergen Schoentges, Michael Z. Schneewitchen, Wolle Kriwanek and Polo Hofer. Barbara Witten, press chief at Phonogram, says she finds the singer /songwriter fraternity among the most interesting artists to work on in a promotional sense and she points to the frequent awards they pick up from the German Phonographic Academy. She reckons they are responsible for some 5% to 10% of today's total Phonogram sales. 1

Hungary Wins Austria Song Festival VIENNA -Participants from 10 countries were in Villach for Austria's biggest annual pop- chanson festival, Carinthia International '81, and Hungary picked up the main prize. Shona Laing, from the U.K., had to cancel out from the event and was replaced by Klari Katona, from

Hungary, a virtual unknown in Western Europe. But her strong per-

Videocassettes Via PolyGram HAMBURG - Alongside its rec-

ord and prerecorded cassette distribution division, PolyGram Record Service here is now handling prerecorded videocassettes, with some 70 productions already in the catalog. All three main systems are avail-

able, the cassettes retailing at roughly $48 here. They're brought in from the duplication centers to the factory in Langenhagen for addition of inlay cards and boxing.

SLEZAK SENDS MUSIC ROUND THE WORLD THAT MEANS A BIG TURNOVER

formance of two songs in Hungarian stood out and she won both the Carinthia Trophy and $2,500 in cash. And she also won a special prize from the Austrian broadcasting corporation ORF. Yvonne Wilkins, the U.S. representative, promoted in Europe by the Italian de Angelis brothers, who make hit records as the Oliver Onions duo, did poorly, finishing in ninth place. Second was Ge Titulaer, from the Netherlands, who won $1,700. The third prize ($900) went to Uschi Breuning, from East Germany. The audience award went to local artist Ines Reiger. The event was organized by Profil Promotions, and guests included Rozay (U.S.), Oliver Onions and Austria's Rainhard Fendrich.

Mackerras And Metheny Win Critics' Awards MUNICH -Sir Charles Mack erras and Pat Metheny are among winners of the 1981 West German Record Critics' awards, announced during the Berlin Audio Fair. Mackerras was cited for his Decca /London series ofJanacek operas with Elisabeth Soderstrom and the Vienna Philharmonic. Metheny's "80/81" and Meredith Monk's "Dolmen Music" gave the ECM label two of the eight awards. Other winners included Deutsche Grammophon for its Concours series of albums with new classical artists; EMI for the seven -LP set "The Hugo Wolf Society 1931 -38 "; the Ernst Klett Verlag for its anthropological recordings; the Vienna Art Orchestra on Eigelstein Records, and Vienna rock band Erste Allgemeine Verunsicherung on Mood Records. The Critics' Awards were started in 1979 by 90 journalists who claim the German Phono Academy's " Schallplattenpreis" awards are influenced by the record industry.

Hardware Assn.: $3 Billion Value HAMBURG -Total value of the West German electronic equipment market last year was $3.7 billion, according to figures released by the manufacturers' association, ZVEI. The total is expected to rise slightly in the current year, with sales up by

around 5 %. Domestic production overall -everything from microphones to satellite receivers -was valued at $3.05 billion. In the sector covering radios, televisions, tape machines and record playing equipment, 1980 production amounted to $2.35 billion. Imports totalled $1.1 billion and exports $1.18 billion. www.americanradiohistory.com

Canada

Berry Says C'Right Act Passé For Today's Needs TORONTO -Canada's Copyright Act, already out of line for developed countries, could be headed for the Dark Ages, according to the new general manager of the Canadian Musical Reproduction Rights Agency (CMRRA). Former executive assistant and solicitor for the agency, Paul Berry made his comments shortly after the week -long. INTERGU meet in this city, which, he says, allowed the international community to take a close look at copyright protection in Canada. "The level of protection offered here is already out of line for developed countries, and current policy shown by the federal government threatens to take us out of the colonial days and put us at the same level as an underdeveloped Third World state." Berry considers the federal government's attitude toward copyright changes to be "culturally and economically oppressive," explaining that the politicians don't want to increase protection or the rate to be paid out because it would increase the flow of funds out of Canada. "They haven't grasped the basic concept of copyright; instead they seem to be using the revisions as a way to increase protectionism here." Among many contentious concepts forwarded by Consumer and Corporate Affairs -the department that has done most of the leg-work in the revisions -is that a significant increase in royalties would, in fact,

lead to a greater cash flow out of the country and that perhaps the solution would be to place a special tax on record companies and that this new revenue be put into a pot to in some way aid Canadian artists. Also a sore point with every level of the industry is the fact that no amount of prodding seems to change the government's attitude that an amendment be made immediately to increase the penalty for copyright violations. At the present time, the maximum penalty for making or selling copyrighted work is $10 per unit, to a maximum of $200. Further offenses can bring jail terms of up to two months. The industry is arguing that the penalties are inconsequential to a big time operator and thus open Canada up as an attractive haven for bootleggers and counterfeiters.

Beyond taking an aggressive stance on the copyright revisions, Berry says the CMRRA has just completed its first cycle of audits at the major record companies in Canada, and that the agency is currently talking with one major producer in order to get an account of manufacturing figures. Berry takes over as general manager from Cyril Devereux who stepped down after five years with the agency. Devereux was instrumental in establishing the CMRRA in 1976 and prior to this was general manager of Chappell Music in Canada for 30 years.

Final Quarter Marked By Unusual Product Promos

TORONTO -The final quarter is anything but blase in Canada this year, in part no doubt propelled by the flow of superstar product that is pulling people of all ages into music stores.

The most extravagant and outrageous promotions going on right now are in western Canada. CHEDAM in Edmonton, for instance, taking advantage of the ratings period, has locked in with a local newspaper and housing developer for a promotion that wins a lucky couple a spanking new house, car, matching his and her fur coats, moving expenses and a trip to Waikiki Beach. If that doesn't sound like music, perhaps the Kelly's record and stereo mart chain promotion which runs a full five weeks through October does. Divisional manager Joe Thomp-

Klaatu To Tour On Heels Of New Capitol LP TORONTO -After interminable ups and downs, the Canadian group that briefly had the dubious distinction of being confused with the Beatles is back with a new album and single. Klaatu released its fifth Capitol album last week in Canada, without any significant fanfare from the record company, but hot on the heels of a single, "The Love Of A Woman," which was added in at least three major markets here first week out, significantly during a

broadcast ratings period. A spokesman for the record company indicates that the three piece studio group will tour this fall, augmenting its lineup with pick-up musicians.

son explains that each week Kelly's takes a selection of rock product, promotes it on radio and in the newspapers, slashes prices and runs full tilt with its campaign. The newspaper ads are full page, color and in one week they might discount 150 albums, for a total promotional discount of 700 titles throughout "Rocktober" month. Prizes are offered as well, an example being a trip to the Grand Canyon. Attic Records has provided a special album for the promotion, the "Rocktober Album" which includes 12 tracks by 12 separate acts on the roster, including Jona Lewie, Desmond Dekker and Any Trouble from the Stiff Canada catalog. CBS Special Products has a major television c