CARLETON UNIVERSITY Institute of European, Russian and

CARLETON UNIVERSITY Institute of European, Russian and

CARLETON UNIVERSITY Institute of European, Russian and Eurasian Studies EURR 4303/5303; HIST 4606 Contemporary Europe: From Postwar to the European Un...

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CARLETON UNIVERSITY Institute of European, Russian and Eurasian Studies EURR 4303/5303; HIST 4606 Contemporary Europe: From Postwar to the European Union Winter 2017 Monday 8:35-11:25 am; Richcraft Hall 3328 (the building formerly known as “The River Building”) Please confirm room in Carleton Central before first class meeting. Dr. James Casteel, Richcraft Hall 3306 Tel.: 613-520-2600, ext. 1934 Email: [email protected] (best way to reach me) Office hours: Fridays, 11:30 am-1:00 pm or by appointment. Dr. Marcel Jesensky, Richcraft Hall 3302 Tel: N/A Email: [email protected] Office Hours Mondays, 2:30 – 4:00 pm or by appointment. COURSE DESCRIPTION: Europe in 1945 was a continent that had been devastated by war, nationalism, forced population transfers, ethnic cleansing, and genocide. Today, an enlarged European Union encompasses the largest free market economy in the world, promotes the values of democracy and human rights globally, and citizens of the E.U. enjoy unprecedented freedom of mobility. How do we explain this transformation and the different social, political, and economic paths taken by of countries of Europe from the postwar period through the Cold War and up to the present? How did Europeans reconstruct their societies after the war? While the nation-state and popular sovereignty was central to this process of reconstruction, in what ways did transnational social, economic, and political ties contribute to a reshaping of the nationstate? Despite the Cold War division of the continent, can we see signs of convergence of European societies during this period? How did new social movements and transborder ties among civil society organizations facilitate the democratization of Europe? To what extent did they contribute to the “return” of eastern European countries to Europe after the collapse of Communism in the eastern bloc? What actors contributed to the processes of European integration that created the European Communities/European Union? How have Europeans commemorated their violent pasts and why do these memories continue to inform European society and politics today? This course will explore these and other questions, through the engagement with historiographical debates in postwar and contemporary European history. Many textbooks on postwar Europe focus solely on the integration of western European countries or treat the histories of the eastern and western halves of the continent in isolation from each other. In this course, we will take a different approach, attempting to showcase the diverse ways in which Europeans on both sides of the Iron Curtain dealt with common social, political, cultural and economic issues faced by modern societies. We will attend to the ways that Europeans’ lives have been transformed by broader global changes such as the emergence of the superpowers of the United States and the Soviet Union, decolonization, the collapse of Communism, and processes of globalization. We will pay particular attention to the ways in which Europeans from all walks of life were actors who possessed a degree of agency in these contested processes.

2 COURSE OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this course are to provide students with an advanced level introduction to major historiographical issues in the history of postwar and contemporary Europe. Students will learn about current debates in the field on a variety of key topics. In both their class discussions and written work, they will gain practice in debating and engaging with scholarly arguments in the academic literature on contemporary European history. They will also develop their historical research and critical thinking skills through their shorter papers, oral presentations, and their major written assignment. REQUIRED COURSE READINGS: Course readings will be made available via the Ares Course Reserves system (link from CU Learn page or directly at http://libares01.carleton.ca/). In some cases or where last minute changes to readings are made, readings may also be made available in electronic format on CU Learn (https://www.carleton.ca/culearn/). If you find that a required reading is not available for a given week, please notify the instructor responsible for that session immediately. Students are expected to come to class having prepared all of the required readings for a particular week. Required readings are indicated with a bullet. SUPPLEMENTAL COURSE READINGS: For each weeks’ topic, students will find an extended list of recommended readings that can be used for students who wish to explore a particular topic in more depth. This list can also serve as a basis for finding sources for the major written assignment. For graduate students doing oral presentations, this is a good place to start to find literature relevant to your topic that can serve as a basis for your presentation. In addition, for students who have little or no background in postwar and contemporary European history, you may find one of the following synthetic works helpful: • Judt, Tony. Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945. London: Penguin, 2006 (long but highly readable narrative history by a major scholar; important for establishing key questions in the field). • Jarausch, Konrad. Out of Ashes: A New History of Europe in the Twentieth Century. Princeton: Princeton UP, 2015. (More recent survey by eminent scholar in field; emphasis on the contradictions of modernity; covers both halves of century but chapters on postwar could be read on their own). • Ther, Philip. Europe Since 1989. Princeton: Princeton UP, 2016 (an original, recent synthetic work with emphasis on social and economic transformations and excellent coverage of central and eastern Europe). • Kenney, Padraic. The Burdens of Freedom: Eastern Europe Since 1989 (concise introduction to eastern European issues). • Rosemary Wakeman, Themes in Modern European History since 1945. London: Routledge 2003 (multi-authored survey). • Buchanan, Tom. Europe’s Troubled Peace, 1945-2000. 2nd. ed. London: Blackwell, 2012. (advanced textbook survey strong on political and international history). • Gilbert, Mark. European Integration: A Concise History. Revised, Updated edition. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2011. • Pittaway, Mark. Eastern Europe 1939-2000. London: Bloomsbury, 2004 (useful survey of postwar eastern Europe with an emphasis on social history).

3 •

Stone, Dan, ed. The Oxford Handbook of Postwar European History. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2012 (Comprehensive handbook with essays and suggestions for further reading on key issues and themes).

When conducting research for their final papers, students may find the following database and journals helpful: Database: Historical Abstracts – Excellent indexing service with some full text links to journal articles; coverage is international and includes original language materials https://library.carleton.ca/find/databases/historical-abstracts. Select Journals: American Historical Review, Cold War History, Contemporary British History, Contemporary European History, Central European History, European Review of History, European History Quarterly, German History, History and Memory, European Review of Economic History, European Legacy, Journal of Contemporary European Studies, Journal of Contemporary History, Journal of European Integration, Journal of European Studies, Journal of Modern History, Journal of Modern European History, Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History, Slavic Review COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING SCHEME: Undergraduates (EURR 4303/HIST 4606) Assignments: Percentage Due Date Attendance and Participation 20% History in Current Events Presentation: 10% 2 Reading Analysis papers, 3-4 pages (15% each) 30% #1 by Jan. 30 (Wk 4) #2 by Mar. 27 (Wk 11) Proposal and Bibliography for Major 5% Feb. 6 (Wk 5) Written assignment (1-2 pages) Major Written Assignment (10 Pages) 35% April 3 (Wk 12) Graduates (EURR 5303) Assignments: Percentage Due Date Attendance and Participation 20% Oral Presentation 10% 3 Reading Analysis papers (4 pages) (10% each) 30% #1 by Jan 30 (Wk 4) #2 by Feb. 27 (Wk 7) #3 by Mar. 27 (Wk 11) Proposal and Bibliography for Major 5% Feb. 6 (Wk 5) Written assignment (1-2 pages) Major Written Assignment (12 pages) 35% April 3 (Wk 12) Note: Page lengths do not include notes and bibliography and assume 250 words/page. Attendance and Participation: This course is a reading intensive course (approximately 100-120 pages per week) held in seminar format. Active participation in classroom discussions is vital to students' success in the course. Students

4 are expected to attend class on a regular basis and to come to class prepared to discuss the assigned readings. Participation grades will be determined based on: (a) attendance and attention level and (b) active participation that (i) displays knowledge of the subject (ii) contributes to the flow of conversation (iii) shows knowledge of the readings (iv) offers critical analysis of the readings and subject. Questions or comments that display a thoughtful knowledge and analysis of the class readings receive the highest participation marks. Oral Presentation (grad only): Graduate students will give presentations of 10-15 minutes each that will offer comparative approaches to the issues of the week, drawing on the supplementary readings. The report may be related to your major assignment. History in Current Events Presentation (undergrad only): Undergraduate students will give a short 5 minute presentation on the role of history in current events. This presentation could take different forms, providing historical context to a current event, exploring the role of memory of past events in contemporary European society and/or politics, etc. Presentations may draw on particular national contexts or frame more universal European issues. Students may find the following sources useful in following current events in Europe: BBC Europe http://www.bbc.com/news/world/europe Deutsche Welle http://www.dw.com France 24 http://www.france24.com/en/ New York Times - Europe http://www.nytimes.com/pages/world/europe/index.html Eurozine aggregates cultural journals from across Europe http://www.eurozine.com Der Spiegel (international edition in English) http://www.spiegel.de/international/ Le Monde , Le Figaro and Le Monde diplomatique http://www.lemonde.fr ; http://www.lefigaro.fr ; http://www.monde-diplomatique.fr The Guardian https://www.theguardian.com/world/eu Reading Analysis Papers: The reading analysis papers will analyze the readings for the week, discussing the authors’ arguments and pinpointing major issues within the selected theme. Students may submit papers before the class meeting in which readings will be discussed, but the papers will be due the week of class discussion. For graduate students, papers should not be done on weeks in which you are doing your oral presentation. Major Written Assignment: The major written assignment may take two forms: 1) Students may write a “traditional” research paper. This can be a paper that focuses in depth on an issue employing close analysis of primary sources and engaging with the secondary literature on the topic. 2) A second variant is to write a historiographic paper based on secondary sources that engages in a critical discussion of the current scholarship on a particular issues. Further details on the major written assignments will be discussed in class. Papers will be evaluated according to the following criteria: evidence of engagement with the literature in the field, quality and thoroughness of research, soundness of thesis, use of evidence to support thesis, coherence of argument, logical structure, writing style, grammar and spelling. We encourage students to consult with us while preparing their essays.

5 Submission of Coursework: All written assignments must be submitted using the electronic drop box in cuLearn. Unless a specific exception has been arranged, assignments sent per email will not be accepted. Comments and grades on assignments will be provided in the cuLearn grade book. Unless a medical (or equivalent) excuse is provided, late assignments will be penalized by two (2) percentage points per day (including weekends); assignments more than a week late will receive a mark of 0%. Our preferred citation format is Turabian/Chicago Manual of Style. Please use footnotes or endnotes rather than parenthetical citation. Assignments sent by fax to the Institute will not be accepted. It is not acceptable to hand in the same assignment (OR PARTS OF THE SAME ASSIGNMENT) for two or more courses. IMPORTANT INFORMATION: General: Laptops, tablets, and phones may only be used for taking/consulting notes, viewing course readings or for oral presentations. Other uses are distracting to everyone around you (and to you). If you don’t think you will be able to resist other uses, give pen and paper a try. You may be surprised! Email Communication: Following university policy, the instructors will communicate by e-mail with students using university “cmail” e-mail addresses. If you have a different account that you check regularly, please set up your Carleton account to forward to that one, so that you do not miss any important course-related announcements. Normally, the instructor expects to reply to e-mail or voicemail queries within 2 days during the working week. The instructor generally does not answer e-mail inquiries or voicemail messages on evenings or weekends. Students who wish to communicate with the instructor are encouraged to meet personally during office hours, at another convenient time by appointment, or at the end of class. Academic Integrity: Academic integrity is a core value of the university and essential for creating a constructive environment for teaching, learning, and research in Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies. Students are responsible for being aware of the University’s Academic Integrity Policy, understanding what constitutes academic dishonesty, and ensuring that all course assignments submitted for evaluation abide by University policy. Any suspected violations of the academic integrity policy will be referred to the Director and then to the appropriate Dean for further investigation. Students who are found to have violated the standards of academic integrity will be subject to sanctions. An overview of the University’s Academic Integrity Policy is available at http://www1.carleton.ca/studentaffairs/academicintegrity/ and the full policy at http://www1.carleton.ca/studentaffairs/ccms/wp-content/ccmsfiles/academic_integrity_policy.pdf Grading: • To obtain credit in a course, students must meet all the course requirements for attendance, term work, and examinations. • Standing in a course is determined by the course instructor subject to the approval of the Faculty Dean. This means that grades submitted by the instructor may be subject to revision. No grades are final until they have been approved by the Dean.

6 COURSE CALENDAR: Please note that the instructor may make changes to the syllabus over the course of the semester. Week 1, Jan 9. Europe as Contemporary History (Casteel/Jesensky) • Konrad H. Jarausch, Out of Ashes: A New History of Europe in the Twentieth Century (Princeton University Press, 2016), 773-788. • Catherine Lee and Robert Bideleux, “East, West, and the Return of ‘Central’: Borders Drawn and Redrawn” in The Oxford Handbook of Postwar European History, ed. Dan Stone (Oxford: Oxford UP, 2012), 79-97. Supplemental: Bialasiewicz, Luiza, “Spectres of Europe: Europe’s Past, Present, and Future”, in Dan Stone, The Oxford Handbook of Postwar European History, pp. 98-119. Boer, Pim den, Peter Bugge, Ole Waever, Kevin Wilson, and W. J. van der Dussen. The History of the Idea of Europe (1995). Buck-Morss, Susan. Dreamworld and Catastrophe: The Passing of Mass Utopia in the East and West (2000). Chakrabarty, Dipesh. Provincializing Europe: Postcolonial Thought and Historical Difference (2000). Goddard, Victoria A., Joseph R. Llobera and Cris Shore, eds. The Anthropology of Europe: Identity and Boundaries in Conflict. Oxford - Washington, DC: Berg, 1994. Hobsbawm, E. J. The Age of Extremes : A History of the World, 1914-1991. New York: Pantheon Books, 1994. Jarausch, Konrad and Thomas Lindenberger (ed). Conflicted Memories: Europeanizing Contemporary Histories (2007). Larres, Klaus (ed.). A Companion to Europe Since 1945 (2009). Lee, Catherine and Robert Bideleux. ‘Europe: What Kind of Idea?’, European Legacy 14:2 (2009): 163176. Lee, Catherine and Robert Bideleux, “East, West, and the Return of ‘Central’: Borders Drawn and Redrawn” in Dan Stone, The Oxford Handbook of Central European History, pp. 79-97. Ludlow, N. Piers, Frédéric Bozo et al. Europe and the End of the Cold War: A reappraisal. London; New York: Routledge, 2008. Mazower, Mark. Dark Continent: Europe’s Twentieth Century. New York: Vintage Books, 1999. Major, Patrick, and Rana Mitter. “East Is East and West Is West? Towards a Comparative Socio-Cultural History of the Cold War.” Cold War History 4, no. 1 (October 1, 2003): 1–22. Week 2, Jan 16 Postwar Reconstructions (Jesensky) • Holly Case, “Reconstruction in East-Central Europe: Clearing the Rubble of Cold War Politics.” Past & Present 210, no. suppl 6 (January 1, 2011): 71–102. • Kunakhovich, Kyrill. “Reconstruction as Revolution Cultural Life in Post–World War II Kraków and Leipzig.” East European Politics & Societies 30, no. 3 (August 1, 2016): 475–95. • Mark Pittaway, “Making Peace in the Shadow of War: The Austrian-Hungarian Borderlands, 1945– 1956,” Contemporary European History 17, no. 3 (2008): 345-64 (ON). • Frank Biess, Homecomings: Returning POWs and the Legacies of Defeat in Postwar Germany (Princeton: Princeton UP, 2006), 97-125.

7 Supplemental: Abrams, Bradley F. The Struggle for the Soul of the Nation: Czech Culture and the Rise of Communism. Landham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2004. Behrends, Jan C. “Nation and Empire: Dilemmas of Legitimacy During Stalinism in Poland (1941-1956),” Nationalities Papers: The Journal of Nationalism and Ethnicity 37, no. 4 (2009): 443-66 (ON). Bessel, Richard and Dirk Schumann, eds., Life after Death: Approaches to a Cultural and Social History of Europe During the 1940s and 1950s. Cambridge Cambridge UP, 2005. Biess, Frank and Robert Moeller, eds. Histories of the Aftermath: The Legacies of the Second World War in Europe. New York: Berghahn, 2010. Bruce, Gary. Resistance with the People: Repression and Resistance in Eastern Germany, 1945-1955 (2003). Deák, Istvan, Jan T. Gross, and Tony Judt, eds. The Politics of Retribution in Europe: World War II and its Aftermath. Princeton: Princeton UP, 2000. Deak, Istvan. Europe on Trial: The Story of Collaboration, Resistance, and Retribution during World War II. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 2015. Diefendorf, Jeffrey. In the Wake of War: The Reconstruction of German Cities after World War II (1993). Dimitrov, Vesselin. Stalin’s Cold War: Soviet Foreign Policy, Democracy, and Communism in Bulgaria, 1941-48 (2008). Eley, Geoff. ‘Europe after 1945’, History Workshop Journal 65 (2008). Eley, Geoff. ‘When Europe was New: Liberation and the Making of the Postwar’ in Monica Riera and Gavin Schaffer (eds.). The Lasting War: Society and Identity in Britain, France, and Germany after 1945 (2008), 17-43. Gaddis, John Lewis. We Now Know: Rethinking Cold War History (1997). Gorlizki, Yoram and Oleg Khlevniuk. Cold Peace: Stalin and the Soviet Ruling Circle, 1945-1953 (2004). Gross, Jan T. “Social Consequences of War: Preliminaries to the Study of Imposition of Communist Regimes in East Central Europe.” East European Politics & Societies 3, no. 2 (March 1, 1989): 198–214. Jones, Polly (ed.), The Dilemmas of De-Stalinization: Negotiating Cultural and Social Change in the Khrushchev Era (2006). Lagrou, Pieter. The Legacy of Nazi Occupation: Patriotic Memory and National Recovery in Western Europe, 1945-1965. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2000. Leffler, Melvyn P and David S. Painter (eds). Origins of the Cold War: An International History (1995). Leffler, Melvyn P. ‘The Cold War: What Do “We Now Know”?’, American Historical Review 104: 2 (1999): 501-524, Major, Patrick. Behind the Berlin Wall: East Germany and the Frontiers of Power (2010). Mastny, Vojtech and Malcolm Byrne. A Cardboard Castle? An Inside History of the Warsaw Pact, 19551991 (2005). Mazower, Mark (ed), After the War was Over: Reconstructing the Family, Nation and State in Greece 1943-1960 (2000). Mazower, Mark. “Reconstruction: The Historiographical Issues.” Past & Present 210, no. suppl 6 (2011): 17–28. Mitter, Rana and Patrick Major (eds), Across the Blocs: Cold War Cultural and Social History (2004). Ouimet, Matthew J. The Rise and Fall of the Brezhnev Doctrine in Soviet Foreign Policy (2003). Overy, Richard, “Interwar, War, Postwar: Was There a Zero Hour in 1945?” in Dan Stone, Oxford Handbook of Postwar European History, pp. 60-78 (2012) Paczkowski, Andrzej. The Spring will be Ours: Poland and the Poles from Occupation to Freedom (2003).

8 Pittaway, Mark. “The Politics of Legitimacy and Hungary’s Postwar Transition.” Contemporary European History 13, no. 4 (2004): 453–75. Risch, William. “A Soviet West: Nationhood, Regionalism, and Empire in the Annexed Western Borderlands.” Nationalities Papers 43, no. 1 (January 2015): 63–81. Tismaneanu, Vladimir. Stalinism for all Seasons: A Political History of Romanian Communism (2003). Trachtenberg, Marc. A Constructed Peace: The Making of the European Settlement, 1945-1963 (1999). Voglis, Polymeris, ‘Political Prisoners in the Greek Civil, 1945-1950: Greece in Comparative Perspective’ Journal of Contemporary History 37:4 (2002): 523-40. Whitcomb, Roger S. The Cold War in retrospect: the formative years (1998). Zubkova, Elena. Russia after the War: Hopes, Illusions, and Disappointments, 1945-1957 (1998). Week 3, Jan 23 Displaced Persons, Population Transfers, and Refugees (Casteel) • Thum, Gregor. “Moving People” in Uprooted: How Breslau Became Wrocław During the Century of Expulsions (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2011), 53-104. • Grossmann, Atina. “Home and Displacement in a City of Bordercrossers: Jews in Berlin 1945-1948.” In Unlikely History: The Changing German-Jewish Symbiosis, 1945-2000, edited by Leslie Morris and Jack Zipes, 63–90. New York: Palgrave-Macmillan, 2002. • Zahra, Tara. “‘A Human Treasure’: Europe’s Displaced Children between Nationalism and Internationalism.” Past and Present 210 (2011): 332–50. doi:10.1093/pastj/gtq053. • Joskowicz, Ari. “Romani Refugees and the Postwar Order.” Journal of Contemporary History 51, no. 4 (October 1, 2016): 760–87. doi:10.1177/0022009415585890. Supplemental: Ahonen, Pertti, Gustavo Corni, Jerzy Kochanowski, Rainer Schulze, Tamás Stark, and Barbara Stelzl-Marx. People on the Move: Forced Population Movements in Europe in the Second World War and its Aftermath (2008). Ballinger, Pamela, “Impossible Returns, Enduring Legacies: Recent Historiography of Displacement and the Reconstruction of Europe after World War II”, Contemporary European History 22 (11): 127138. Ballinger, Pamela. “At the Borders of Force: Violence, Refugees, and the Reconfiguration of the Yugoslav and Italian States.” Past and Present 210 (2011): 158–76. doi:10.1093/pastj/gtq045. Bloxham, Donald and Robert Gerwarth (eds.). Political Violence in Twentieth-Century Europe (2011). Curp, David. A Clean Sweep?: The politics of Ethnic Cleansing in Western Poland, 1945-1960 (2006). Douglas, R. M. Orderly and Humane. The Expulsion of the Germans after the Second World War (New Haven: Yale UP, 2012). Frank, Matthew. Expelling the Germans: British Opinion and Post-1945 Population Transfer in Context (2008). Holian, Anna. Between National Socialism and Soviet Communism (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2011). Naimark, Norman. Fires of Hatred: Ethnic Cleansing in Twentieth-Century Europe (2002) (Chapters 4 and 5). Patt, Avinoam and Michael Berkowitz. “We Are Here”: New Approaches to Jewish Displaced Persons in Postwar Germany. Detroit: Wayne State UP, 2010. Patt, Avinoam J. Finding Home and Homeland: Jewish Youths and Zionism in the Aftermath of the Holocaust. Detroit: Wayne State UP, 2009. Schechtman, Joseph. European Population Transfers 1945-1955 (1962).

9 Ther, Philipp and Ana Slijak (eds.). Redrawing Nations: Ethnic Cleansing in East-Central Europe, 19441948 (2001). Ther, Philipp, “Ethnic Cleansing” in Dan Stone, The Oxford Handbook of Postwar European History, pp. 141-162. Wyman, Mark. DPs: Europe’s Displaced Persons, 1945–51. 1 edition. Cornell University Press, 2014. Week 4, Jan 30 Westernization and Sovietization (Jesensky) • Konrad Jarausch, “Embracing the West” in After Hitler: Recivilizing Germans, 1945-1995 (Oxford: Oxford UP, 2006), 103-129. • Conway, Martin. “Rise and Fall of Western Europe’s Democratic Age, 1945-1973.” Contemporary European History 13, no. 1 (2004): 67–88. • Lebow, Katherine A. “Public Works, Private Lives: Youth Brigades in Nowa Huta in the 1950s.” Contemporary European History 10, no. 2 (2001): 199–219. • Applebaum, Rachel. “The Friendship Project: Socialist Internationalism in the Soviet Union and Czechoslovakia in the 1950s and 1960s.” Slavic Review 74, no. 3 (2015): 484–507. Supplemental (see also relevant literature in Weeks 2 and 5): Apor, Balász, Péter Apor and E. A. Rees (eds), The Sovietization of Eastern Europe: New Perspectives on the Postwar Period (2008). Berghahn, Volker R. America and the Intellectual Cold Wars in Europe. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2002. Castillo, Greg. “Domesticating the Cold War: Household Consumption as Propaganda in Marshall Plan Germany.” Journal of Contemporary History 40, no. 2 (April 1, 2005): 261–88. Connelly, John. Captive university: the Sovietization of East German, Czech, and Polish higher education, 1945-1956 (2000). De Angelis, Emma, and Eirini Karamouzi. “Enlargement and the Historical Origins of the European Community’s Democratic Identity, 1961–1978.” Contemporary European History 25, no. 3 (August 2016): 439–58. De Gaulle, Charles. Memoirs of Hope: Renewal and Endeavor. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1971. De Grazia, Victoria. The Irresistible Empire: America’s Advance through Twentieth-Century Europe (2005). Feinberg, Melissa. “Fantastic Truths, Compelling Lies: Radio Free Europe and the Response to the Slánský Trial in Czechoslovakia.” Contemporary European History 22, no. 1 (2013): 107–25. Frei, Norbert. Adenauer’s Germany and the Nazi Past: The Politics of Amnesty and Integration (2002). Gassert, Philipp. “The Spectre of Americanization: Western Europe in the American Century” in The Oxford Handbook of Postwar European History, ed. Dan Stone. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2012, 182200. Greenberg, Udi. The Weimar Century: German Émigrés and the Ideological Foundations of the Cold War. Princeton: Princeton UP, 2014. Hogan, Michael J. The Marshall Plan: America, Britain, and the Reconstruction of Western Europe, 19471952 (1987). Larres, Klaus, “The United States and European Integration, 1945-1990” in Klaus Larres, A Companion to Europe since 1945, pp. 151-182. Lundestad, Geir. The United States and Western Europe since 1945: from "empire" by invitation to transatlantic drift (2003).

10 Naimark, Norman. ‘Stalin and Europe in the Postwar Period, 1945-1953: Issues and Problems’, Journal of Modern European History 2:1 (2004). Nolan, Mary. “Gender and Utopian Visions in a Post-Utopian Era: Americanism, Human Rights, Market Fundamentalism.” Central European History (Cambridge University Press / UK) 44, no. 1 (03/01/2011 2011): 13–36. Nolan, Mary. The Transatlantic Century: Europe and America, 1890-2010. Cambridge University Press, 2012. Poiger, Uta. Jazz, Rock, and Rebels: Cold War Politics and American Culture in a Divided Germany (2000). Saunders, Frances Stonor. The Cultural Cold War: The CIA and World of Arts and Letters. New York: The New Press, 2000. Steininger, Rolf. Austria, Germany, and the Cold War. From the Anschluss to the State Treaty 1938-1955. New York, Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2007. Stephan, Alexander (ed.). The Americanization of Europe: Culture, Diplomacy, and Anti-Americanism after 1945 (2006). Tobin, Patrick. “No Time for Old Fighters: Postwar West Germany and the Origins of the 1958 Ulm Einsatzkommando Trial.” Central European History 44, no. 4 (2011): 684–710. Week 5, Feb 6 Leisure, Consumption, and Everyday Life (Casteel) • Paulina Bren, “Mirror, Mirror, on the Wall: Is the West the Fairest of Them All?,” Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History 9, no. 4 (2008): 831-854. • Victoria De Grazia, “The Consumer-Citizen: How Europeans Traded Rights for Goods,” Irresistible Empire : America’s Advance through Twentieth-Century Europe, 2005, 336-375. • Biess, Frank. “‘Everybody Has a Chance’: Nuclear Angst, Civil Defence, and the History of Emotions in Postwar West Germany.” German History 27, no. 2 (April 1, 2009): 215–43. • Betts, Paul. “Socialism’s Social Contract: Individual Citizens’ Petitions.” In Within Walls: Private Life in the German Democratic Republic. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2013, 173-192. Supplemental: Anton, Lorena and Timothy Brown (eds), Between the Avant Garde and the Everyday: Subversive Politics in Europe, 1958-2008 (2011). Baranowski, Shelley and Ellen Furlough (eds.). Being Elsewhere: Tourism, Consumer Culture, and Identity in Modern Europe and North America (2001). Berghahn, Volker. “The Debate on ‘Americanization’ among Economic and Cultural Historians.” Cold War History 10, no. 1 (February 2010): 107–30. doi:10.1080/14682740903388566. Betts, Paul. Within Walls: Private Life in the German Democratic Republic (2010). Bignell, Jonathan and Andreas Fickers (eds), A European Television History (2008). Bondebjerg, Ib and Peter Madsen (eds), Media, Democracy and European Culture (2008). Castillo, Greg, ‘Domesticating the Cold War: Household Consumption as Propaganda in Marshall Plan Germany’, Journal of Contemporary History 40:2 (2005): 261-88. Castillo, Greg. Cold War on the Home Front: The Soft Power of Midcentury Design. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2010. Collins, Richard. Media and Identity in Contemporary Europe (2002). Crowley, David and Jane Pavitt (eds), Cold War Modern: Design 1945-1970 (2008). Crowley, David and Susan E. Reid (eds), Pleasures in Socialism: Leisure and Luxury in the Eastern Bloc (2010). Crowley, David and Susan E. Reid (eds), Socialist Spaces: Sites of Everyday Life in the Eastern Bloc (2002).

11 Gatejel, Luminita. “Appealing for a Car: Consumption Policies and Entitlement in the USSR, the GDR, and Romania, 1950s–1980s.” Slavic Review 75, no. 1 (2016): 122–45. Hochscherf, Tobias, Christoph Laucht, and Andrew Plowman. Divided, But Not Disconnected: German Experiences of the Cold War (2010) Iosifides, Petros, Jeanette Steemers and Mark Wheeler, European Television Industries (2005). Jäckel, Anne. European Film Industries (2004). Kostis Kornetis, Eirini Kotsovili, and Nikolaos Papadogiannis, eds. Consumption and gender in Southern Europe since the long 1960s Kuisel, Richard F. Seducing the French: The Dilemma of Americanization. University of California Press, 1993. Mazower, Mark (ed), After the War was Over: Reconstructing the Family, Nation and State in Greece 1943-1960 (2000). McGlynn, Clare. Families of the European Union (2006). Palmowski, Jan. Inventing a Socialist Nation: Heimat and the Politics of Everyday Life in the GDR, 19451990 (2009). Pence, Katherine and Paul Betts (eds), Socialist Modern: East German Everyday Culture and Politics (2008). Penn, Shana and Jill Massino, eds. Gender Politics and Everyday Life in State Socialist Eastern and Central Europe Poiger, Uta. Jazz, Rock, and Rebels: Cold War Politics and American Culture in a Divided Germany (2000). Schissler, Hanna, ed. The Miracle Years. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2001. Stitziel, Judd. Fashioning Socialism: Clothing, Politics, and Consumer Culture in East Germany (Oxford, 2005). Vowinckel, Annette, Marcus M. Payk and Thomas Lindenberger (eds.), Cold War Cultures: Perspectives on Eastern and Western European Societies (2012). Wagnleitner, Reinhold. “The Empire of the Fun, or Talkin’ Soviet Union Blues: The Sound of Freedom and U.S. Cultural Hegemony in Europe.” Diplomatic History 23, no. 3 (July 1, 1999): 499–524. Zhuk, Sergei I. “Religion, ‘Westernization,’ and Youth in the ‘Closed City’ of Soviet Ukraine, 1964–84,” The Russian Review 67 (2008): 661-79. Week 6, Feb 13 Modernism and Urban Planning (Casteel) • Michael Meng, “Erasing the Jewish Past” in Shattered Spaces: Encountering Jewish Ruins in Postwar Germany and Poland (Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 2011), 111-154 • Glassheim, Eagle. “Unsettled Landscapes: Czech and German Conceptions of Social and Ecological Decline in the Postwar Czechoslovak Borderlands.” Journal of Contemporary History 50, no. 2 (April 1, 2015): 318–36. • Mulvey, Michael. “The Problem That Had a Name: French High-Rise Developments and the Fantasy of a Suburban Homemaker Pathology, 1954–73.” Gender & History 28, no. 1 (April 1, 2016): 177–98. doi:10.1111/1468-0424.12182. • Sammartino, Annemarie. “Mass Housing, Late Modernism, and the Forging of Community in New York City and East Berlin, 1965–1989.” The American Historical Review 121, no. 2 (2016): 492–521. Supplemental: Crowley, David. “Paris or Moscow?: Warsaw Architects and the Image of the Modern City in the 1950s.” Kritika: Explorations in Russian & Eurasian History 9, no. 4 (Fall 2008): 769–98.

12 Demshuk, Andrew. “A Mausoleum for Bach? Holy Relics and Urban Planning in Early Communist Leipzig, 1945–1950.” History and Memory 28, no. 2 (2016): 47–88. Jarausch, Konrad. “Planning Social Reform” in Out of Ashes: A New History of Europe in the Twentieth Century (Princton: Princeton UP, 2015), 559-584. Kulic, Vladimir, Timothy, Parker and Monica Penick. Sanctioning Modernism: Architecture and the Making of Postwar Identities. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2014. Ladd, Brian. “Socialist Planning and the Rediscovery of the Old City in the German Democratic Republic,” Journal of Urban History 27, no. 5 (2001): 584–603. Le Normand, Brigitte. Designing Tito’s Capital: Urban Planning, Modernism, and Socialism in Belgrade (Pittsburgh, 2014). 4 Elidor Mëhilli, “The Socialist Design: Urban Dilemmas in Postwar Europe and the Soviet Union,” Kritika 13, no. 3 (2012): 635–665. Molnar, Virag. Building the State: Architecture, Politics and the State in Post-War Central Europe. New York, 2013. Pugh, Emily. Architecture, Politics, and Identity in Divided Berlin. Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh Press, 2014. Rubin, Eli. Synthetic Socialism: Plastics and Dictatorship in the German Democratic Republic. UNC Press Books, 2012. Rubin, Eli. Amnesiopolis: Modernity, Space, and Memory in East Germany. Oxford University Press, 2016. Scott, James C. Seeing Like a State: How Certain Schemes to Improve the Human Condition Have Failed. New Haven, CT, 1998. Urban, Florian. Neo-Historical East Berlin: Architecture and Urban Design in the German Democratic Republic, 1970–1990. Burlington, Vt., 2009. Wakeman, Rosemary. Modernizing the Provincial City: Toulouse 1945-1975. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1997. Wakeman, Rosemary. The Heroic City: Paris 1945-1958. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 2009. Zarecor, Kimberly Elman. Manufacturing a Socialist Modernity: Housing in Czechoslovakia, 1945–1960 Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2011 *** Happy Reading Week – Feb 20-Feb 24 *** Week 7, Feb 27 After Empire? Decolonization, Development, Neocolonialism (Jesensky) • Evans, Martin, “Colonial Fantasies Shattered” in Dan Stone, The Oxford Handbook of Postwar European History, pp. 480-501. • Cooper, Frederick. “Reconstructing Empire in British and French Africa.” Past and Present 210 (2011): 196–210. • Katherine Pence, “Showcasing Cold War Germany in Cairo: 1954 and 1957 Industrial Exhibitions and the Competition for Arab Partners.” Journal of Contemporary History 47, no. 1 (2012): 69-95. • Silverman, Debora L. “Diasporas of Art: History, the Tervuren Royal Museum for Central Africa, and the Politics of Memory in Belgium, 1885–2014.” The Journal of Modern History 87, no. 3 (September 1, 2015): 615–67. Supplemental: Bailkin, Jordanna. The Afterlife of Empire. Berkeley: Global, 2012.

13 Bandeira Jerónimo, Miguel and António Costa Pinto, ed. The Ends of European Colonial Empires : Cases and Comparisons. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. Baranowski, Shelley. “Legacies of Lebensraum: German Identity and Multi-Ethnicity” in Vertreibene and Pied-Noirs in Postwar Germany and France, edited by Manuel Borutta and Jan. C. Jansen. New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2016. Betts, Raymond F. Decolonization. 2nd ed. New York: Routledge, 2004. Chakrabarty, Dipesh. Provincializing Europe : Postcolonial Thought and Historical Difference. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2008. Childers, Kristen Stromberg. Seeking Imperialism’s Embrace : National Identity, Decolonization, and Assimilation in the French Caribbean, n.d. Cooper, Frederick. Citizenship between Empire and Nation : Remaking France and French Africa, 19451960. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2014. Cooper, Frederick. Citizenship between Empire and Nation: Remaking France and French Africa, 1945– 1960. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2014. Cooper, Frederick. Colonialism in Question: Theory, Knowledge, History. Berkeley: University of California, 2005. Devereux, David R., “The End of Empires: Decolonization and Its Repercussions” in Klaus Larres, A Companion to Europe Since 1945, pp. 113-132. Fedorowich, Kent and Andrew S. Thompson. Empire, Migration and Identity in the British World. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013. Firpo, Christina Elizabeth. The Uprooted : Race, Children, and Imperialism in French Indochina, 18901980. Honolulu: University of Hawaiʻi Press, 2016. Frey, Marc and Jost Dülffer (eds.). Elites and Decolonization in the Twentieth Century (2011). Garavini, Giuliano. After Empires: European integration, decolonization, and the challenge from the global South, 1957-1986. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012. Germain, Félix F. Decolonizing the Republic : African and Caribbean Migrants in Postwar Paris, 19461974. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 2016. Goscha, Christopher E. and Christian Ostermann. Connecting Histories: Decolonization and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, 1945-1962. Washington, DC: Woodrow Wilson Center Press, 2009. Hansen, Peo. ‘European Integration, European Identity, and the Colonial Connection’, European Journal of Social Theory 5:4 (2002): 483-498. Harrison, Olivia C. Transcolonial Maghreb : Imagining Palestine in the Era of Decolonization. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2016. Hiddleston, Jane. Decolonising the Intellectual : Politics, Culture, and Humanism at the End of the French Empire, n.d. Hong, Young-sun. Cold War Germany, the Third World, and the Global Humanitarian Regime. Cambridge University Press, 2015. Hubbell, Amy L. Remembering French Algeria : Pieds-Noir, Identity, and Exile. London: University of Nebraska Press, 2015. Husain, Aiyaz. Mapping the End of Empire : American and British Strategic Visions in the Postwar World, n.d. Ikeda, Ryo. The Imperialism of French Decolonisation : French Policy and the Anglo-American Response in Tunisia and Morocco. Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. Kalter, Christoph. The Discovery of the Third World : Decolonization and the Rise of the New Left in France, c.1950-1976, n.d. Kennedy, Dane Keith. Decolonization: A Very Short Introduction. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2016. Klose, Fabian. “‘Source of Embarrassment’: Human Rights, State of Emergency, and the Wars of

14 Decolonization” in Human Rights in the Twentieth Century, ed. Stefan-Ludwig Hoffmann Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2011, 237-257. Loomba, Ania. Colonialism/Postcolonialism. 3 edition. London ; New York, NY: Routledge, 2015. Lorcin, Patricia M. E. and Todd Shepard. French Mediterraneans : Transnational and Imperial Histories. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2016. Lyons, Amelia H. The Civilizing Mission in the Metropole: Algerian Families and the French Welfare State during Decolonization. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2013. Matera, Marc. Black London: The Imperial Metropolis and Decolonization in the Twentieth Century. Oakland, Calif.: University of California Press, 2015. Matsuda, Matt K. Pacific Worlds: A History of Seas, Peoples, and Cultures. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012. McMahon, Robert J. The Cold War in the Third World. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2013. Miles, William F. S. Scars of Partition: Postcolonial Legacies in French and British Borderlands. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2014. Rothberg, Michael. Multidirectional Memory: Remembering the Holocaust in the Age of Decolonization. Stanford University Press, 2009. Rothermund, Dietmar. The Routledge Companion to Decolonization. London-New York: Routledge, 2006. Sanborn, Joshua A. Imperial Apocalypse: The Great War and the Destruction of the Russian Empire. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014. http://myaccess.library.utoronto.ca/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/978019964 2052.001.0001. Shepard, Todd. Inventing Decolonization: The Algerian War and the Remaking of France. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 2006. Shepard, Todd. Voices of Decolonization: A Brief History with Documents. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2015. https://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy1610/2015452149-b.html. Shipway, Martin. Decolonization and its Impact: A Comparative Approach to the End of the Colonial Empire (2008). Streets-Salter, Heather, and Trevor R. Getz. Empires and Colonies in the Modern World: A Global Perspective. 1 edition. New York: Oxford University Press, 2015. Westad, Odd Arne. The Global Cold War: Third World Interventions and the Making of Our Times. 1 edition. Cambridge ; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007. Young, Robert J. C. Postcolonialism: An Historical Introduction. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2001. Week 8, Mar 6 Social Movements and Civil Society (Casteel) • Timothy Brown, “'1968' East and West: Divided Germany as a Case Study in Transnational History,” American Historical Review (2009): 69-96. • Fichter, Madigan. “Yugoslav Protest: Student Rebellion in Belgrade, Zagreb, and Sarajevo in 1968.” Slavic Review 75, no. 1 (2016): 99–121. doi:10.5612/slavicreview.75.1.99. • Belinda Davis, “A Whole World Opening Up: Transcultural Contact, Difference, and the Politicization of ‘New Left’ Activists” in Davis, Belinda, Wilfried Mausbach, Martin Klimke, and Carla MacDougall. Changing The World, Changing Oneself: Political Protest and Collective Identities in West Germany and the U.S. in the 1960s and 1970s. Berghahn Books, 2013, 255274. • Kopeček, Michal. “Human Rights Facing a National Past: Dissident ‘Civic Patriotism’ and the Return of History in East Central Europe, 1968-1989.” Geschichte und Gesellschaft 38, no. 4 (October 2012): 573–602.

15 Supplemental: Anton, Lorena and Timothy Brown (eds), Between the Avant Garde and the Everyday: Subversive Politics in Europe, 1958-2008 (2011). Balibar, Etienne. We, the People of Europe? Reflections on Transnational Citizenship (2004). Banting, K. G. and W. Kymlicka (eds), Multiculturalism and the Welfare State: Recognition and Redistribution in Contemporary Democracies (2006). Barbier, Jean-Claude. The Road to Social Europe: A Contemporary Approach to Political Cultures and Diversity in Europe (2012). Bischof, Günther, Stefan Karner, and Peter Ruggenthaler (eds), The Prague Spring and the Warsaw Pact Invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968 (2010). Blühdorn, Ingolfur, “The Participatory Revolution: New Social Movements and Civil Society”, in Klaus Larres, A Companion to Europe since 1945, pp. 407-431. Bracke, Maud. Which Socialism? Whose Détente? West European Communism and the Czechoslovak Crisis, 1968 (2007). Davis, Belinda, Wilfried Mausbach, Martin Klimke, and Carla MacDougall, eds. Changing the World, Changing Oneself: Political Protest and Collective Identities in West Germany and the U.S. in the 1960s and 1970s. 1 edition. Berghahn Books, 2010. Davis, Belinda. ‘What’s Left? Popular and Democratic Political Participation in Postwar Europe’. American Historical Review 113:2 (2008): 363-90. De Groot, Gerard J. The Sixties Unplugged: A Kaleidoscope History of a Disorderly Decade (2008). den Dulk, Laura, “Changing Norms of Masculinity and Feminity: Development in Gender Relations and Family Structures in Europe” in Klaus Larres, A Companion to Europe since 1945, pp. 450-471. Dufresne, Anne, C. Gegryse, and Philippe Pochet (eds.). The European Sectoral Social Dialogue: Actors, Developments, and Challenges (2006). Falk, Barbara. The Dilemmas of Dissidence in East-Central Europe (2003). Ferguson, Niall, Charles S. Maier, Erez Manela, and Daniel Sargent (eds), The Shock of the Global: The 1970s in Perspective (2010). Gildea, Robert, James Mark, and Niek Pas, “European Radicals and the ‘Third World’: Imagined Solidarities and Radical Networks, 1958-73.” Cultural & Social History 8, no. 4 (2011): 449-71. Herzog, Dagmar, “Desperately Seeking Normality: Sex and Marriage in the Wake of the War”, in Bessel and Schuman, Life After Deat, pp. 161-192. Horn, Gerd-Rainer. The Spirit of 1968: Rebellion in Western Europe and North America, 1956-1976 (2007). Jobs, Richard Ivan. Riding the New Wave: Youth and the Rejuvenation of France after the Second World War (2007). Kenney, Padraic. “Borders Breached: The Transnational in Eastern Europe since Solidarity.” Journal of Modern European History 8, no. 2 (2010): 179-95. Klimke, Martin and Joachim Scharloth (eds.), 1968 in Europe: A History of Protest and Activism, 19561977 (2008). Klimke, Martin, Jacco Pekelder, and Joachim Scharloth (eds), Between Prague Spring and French May: Opposition and Revolt in Europe, 1960-1980 (2011). Schild, Axel and Detlef Siegfried (eds), Between Marx and Coca-Cola: Youth Cultures in Changing European Societies, 1960-1980 (2006). Varon, Jeremy Peter. Bringing the War Home: The Weather Underground, the Red Army Faction, and Revolutionary Violence in the Sixties and Seventies. University of California Press, 2004. Varon, Jeremy. The New Life: Jewish Students of Postwar Germany. Wayne State University Press, 2014.

16 Week 9, March 13 Europeanization (Jesensky) • Konrad Jarausch, “European Integration” in Out of Ashes: A New History of Europe in the Twentieth Century (Princeton: Princeton UP, 2015), 506-532. • Jan Palmowski, “The Europeanization of the Nation-State.” Journal of Contemporary History 46, no. 3 (2011): 631-57. • Patel, Kiran Klaus. “Provincialising European Union: Co-Operation and Integration in Europe in a Historical Perspective.” Contemporary European History 22, no. 4 (2013): 649–73. • Kosicki, Piotr H. “The Soviet Bloc’s Answer to European Integration: Catholic Anti-Germanism and the Polish Project of a ‘Catholic-Socialist’ International.” Contemporary European History, February 2015. Supplemental: Apel, Emmanuel. European Monetary Integration, 1958-2002 (1998). Arts, Wilhelmus A., Jazques A. Hagenaars, and Loek Halman (eds.). The Cultural Diversity of European Unity: Findings, Explanations, and Reflections from the European Values Study (2003). Berend, Ivan T. The History of European Integration: A New Perspective. London: Routledge, 2016. Bideleux, Robert and Richard Taylor (eds.). European Integration and Disintegration, East and West (1996). Bideleux, Robert. ‘Rethinking the Eastward Extension of the EU Civil Order and the Nature of Europe’s New East-West Divide’, Perspectives on European Politics and Society 10:1 (2009): 118-136. Casu, Igor. “Nation Building in the Era of Integration: The Case of Moldova.” In Conflicted Memories: Europeanizing Contemporary Histories, edited by Konrad H. Jarausch and Thomas Lindenberger, 237-253. Cini, Michelle, and Nieves Perez-Solorzano Borragan. European Union Politics. 5 edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. Conway, Martin, and Kiran Klaus Patel. Europeanization in the Twentieth Century: Historical Approaches. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. Crafts, Nicholas and Gianni Tonolio (eds), Economic Growth in Europe since 1945 (1996). Davies, Bill. “Pushing Back: What Happens When Member States Resist the European Court of Justice? A Multi-Modal Approach to the History of European Law.” Contemporary European History, August 2012. De Angelis, Emma, and Eirini Karamouzi. “Enlargement and the Historical Origins of the European Community’s Democratic Identity, 1961–1978.” Contemporary European History 25, no. 3 (August 2016): 439–58. Delanty, Gerard and Chris Rumford. Rethinking Europe: Social Theory and the Implications of Europeanization (2005). Dinan, Desmond. Europe Recast: A History of European Union. 2nd New edition. Palgrave Macmillan, 2014. Dinan, Desmond., ed. Origins and Evolution of the European Union. 2nd. edition. Oxford, United Kingdom ; New York: Oxford University Press, 2014. Eder, Klaus and Willfried Spohn (eds.). Collective Memory and European Identity: The Effects of Integration and Enlargement (2005). Flockton, Christopher, “Economic Integration since Maastricht” in Klaus Larres, A Companion to Europe since 1945, pp. 270-301.

17 Geyer, Michael. “Historical Fictions of Autonomy and the Europeanization of National History.” Central European History 22, no. 3–4 (1989): 316–47. Gillingham, John. European Integration, 1950-2003: Superstate or New Market Economy? (2003). Hansen, Peo. ‘European Integration, European Identity, and the Colonial Connection’, European Journal of Social Theory 5:4 (2002): 483-498. Kaiser, Wolfram, Brigitte Leucht, and Morten Rasmussen, eds. The History of the European Union: Origins of a Trans- and Supranational Polity 1950-72. Routledge, 2008. Kischbaum, Stanislav (ed.). Central European History and the European Union: The Meaning of Europe (2007). Klumbytė, Neringa. “Europe and Its Fragments: Europeanization, Nationalism, and the Geopolitics of Provinciality in Lithuania,” Slavic Review 70, no. 4 (2011): 844-72. Larres, Klaus, “The United States and European Integration, 1945-1990” in Klaus Larres, A Companion to Europe since 1945, pp. 151-182. McGlynn, Clare. Families of the European Union (2006). Mitzner, Veera. “Almost in Europe? How Finland’s Embarrassing Entry into Eureka Captured Policy Change.” Contemporary European History 25, no. 3 (August 2016): 481–504. doi:10.1017/S0960777316000230. Milward, Alan S., George Brennan and Federico Romero. The European rescue of the nation-state, 2nd ed. (2000). Neal, Larry. The Economics of Europe and the European Union (2007). Patel, Kiran Klaus and Johan Schot. “Twisted Paths to European Integration: Comparing Agriculture and Transport Policies in a Transnational Perspective.” Contemporary European History 20, no. 4 (2011): 383-403. Rasmussen, Morten, and Ann-Christina L. Knudsen, eds. The Road to a United Europe: Interpretations of the Process of European Integration. Brussels: Peter Lang, 2009. Sakwa, Richard, and Anne Stevens, eds. Contemporary Europe. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006. Shore, Cris. Building Europe: The Cultural Politics of European Integration. London - New York: Routledge, 2000. Tulli, Umberto. “The Search for a European Identity in the Long 1970s: External Relations and Institutional Evolution in the European Community.” Contemporary European History 25, no. 3 (August 2016): 537–50. doi:10.1017/S0960777316000229. Week 10, March 20 Return to Europe? Post-1989 Transitions (Jesensky) • Kenney, Padraic. “Come With Us! They Aren't Beating Today! The Art of the Blizzard” in A Carnival of Revolution: Central Europe 1989. Princeton: Princeton UP, 2002, 57-90. • Berdahl, Daphne. “The Spirit of Capitalism and the Boundaries of Citizenship in Post-Wall Germany.” Comparative Studies in Society and History, 2005, 1–17. • Philipp Ther, “Getting on the Neoliberal Bandwagon” Europe Since 1989: A History (Princeton: Princeton UP, 2016, 77-111 • Bideleux, Robert. “Rethinking the Eastward Extension of the EU Civil Order and the Nature of Europe’s New East–West Divide.” Perspectives on European Politics and Society 10, no. 1 (April 1, 2009): 118–36. Supplemental:

18 Berend, Ivan T., and Bojan Bugaric. “Unfinished Europe: Transition from Communism to Democracy in Central and Eastern Europe.” Journal of Contemporary History 50, no. 4 (October 1, 2015): 768– 85. doi:10.1177/0022009415596845. Bideleux, Robert. “The ‘Orientalization’ and ‘de-Orientalization’ of East Central Europe and the Balkan Peninsula.” Journal of Contemporary Central and Eastern Europe 23, no. 1 (January 2, 2015): 9– 44. doi:10.1080/0965156X.2015.1068581. Streeck, Wolfgang. Buying Time: The Delayed Crisis of Democratic Capitalism. Brooklyn, NY: Verso Books, 2014. Bideleux, Robert and Ian Jeffries. The Balkans: A Post-Communist History (2007). Clark, Janine Natalya, ‘Collective Guilt, Collective Responsibility and the Serbs’, East European Politics and Societies 22, no. 3 (Summer 2008), 668-692 Davies, R. W. Soviet History in the Gorbachev Revolution (1989). Ekiert, Greggorz and Stephen E. Hanson (eds), Capitalism and Democracy in Central and Eastern Europe: Assessing the Legacy of Communist Rule (2003). Fish, Steven, ‘Post-Communist Subversion: Social Science and Democratization in East Europa and Eurasia’, Slavic Review 58:4 (1999): 794-823. Gill, Graeme and Roger D. Markwick. Russia’s Stillborn Democracy? From Gorbachev to Yeltsin (2000). Hayden, Robert M., ‘Mass Killings and Images of Genocide in Bosnia, 1941-5 and 1992-5’ in Dan Stone (ed.), The Historiography of Genocide (2008), 487-516. Lampe, John. Balkans into Southeastern Europe: A Century of War and Transition (2006). Magas, Branka. The Destruction of Yugoslavia: Tracking the Break-Up, 1980-1990 (1993). Mojzes, Paul. Balkan Genocides: Holocaust and Ethnic Cleansing in the Twentieth Century (2011). Roudometof, Victor. Collective Memory, National Identity, and Ethnic Conflict: Greece, Bulgaria, and the Macedonian Question (2002). Silber, Laura and Allan Little. The Death of Yugoslavia (1995). Tismaneanu, Vladimir. Fantasies of Salvation: Democracy, Nationalism, and Myth in Post-Communist Europe (1998). Udovicki, Jasminka and James Ridgeway (eds). Burn This House: The Making and Unmaking of Yugoslavia (2000). Vujacic, Veljko, ‘From Class to Nation: Left, Right, and the Ideological and Institutional Roots of PostCommunist “National Socialism”’, East European Politics and Society 17:3 (2003). Bozo, Frédéric, Marie-Pierre Rey, and N. Piers Ludlow (eds.), Visions of the End of the Cold War in Europe, 1945-1990 (2012). Bozo, Frédéric, Marie-Pierre Rey, N. Piers Ludlow, and Leopoldo Nutti (eds), Europe and the End of the Cold War: A Reappraisal (2008). Brown, Archie, ‘Perestroika and the End of the Cold War’, Cold War History 7:1 (2007): 1-17. Brubaker, Rogers. Germond, Carine, “The End of the Cold War and the Unification of the European Continent” in Klaus Larres, A Companion to Europe since 1945, pp. 208-227. Kenney, Padraic. 1989: Democratic Revolutions at the Cold War’s End (2010). Kenney, Padraic. The Burden of Freedom: Eastern Europe since 1989 (2006). Maier, Charles S. Dissolution: The Crisis of Communism and the End of East Germany (1997). Rowley, David, ‘Interpretations of the End of the Soviet Union: Three Paradigms’, Kritika 2:2 (2001): 116. Tismaneanu, Vladimir, “The Revolutions of 1989: Causes, Meanings, Consequences”, Contemporary European History 18 (2009): 271-288. Zubok, Vladislav M. ‘Gorbachev and the End of the Cold War: Perspectives on History and Personality’, Cold War History 2:2 (2002): 61-100.

19 Bideleux, Robert. ‘Rethinking the Eastward Extension of the EU Civil Order and the Nature of Europe’s New East-West Divide’, Perspectives on European Politics and Society 10:1 (2009): 118-136. Bideleux, Robert and Richard Taylor (eds.). European Integration and Disintegration, East and West (1996). Brubaker, Rogers. Ethnicity, Migration, and Statehood in Post-Cold War Europe. Ethnicity Without Groups (2005). Brubaker, Rogers. Nationalism Reframed: Nationhood and the National Question in the New Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1996. Germond, Carine, “The End of the Cold War and the Unification of the European Continent” in Klaus Larres, A Companion to Europe since 1945, pp. 208-227. Snyder, Timothy. “Integration and Disintegration: Europe, Ukraine, and the World.” Slavic Review 74, no. 4 (2015): 695–707. Szamuely, George. Bombs for Peace: NATO's Humanitarian War on Yugoslavia (2013). Matlock, Jack F., Jr. Reagan and Gorbachev: how the Cold War ended (2004). Gorbachev, Mikhail. Perestroika: new thinking for our country and the world (1987). Matlock, Jack F., Jr. Autopsy on an empire: the American ambassador's account of the collapse of the Soviet Union (1995). Vachudová, Milada A. Europe Undivided (2005). Ramet, Sabrina Petra. Social Currents in Eastern Europe: The Sources and Consequences of the Great Transformation, 2nd ed. Durham-London: Duke University Press, 1995. Week 11 , March 27 Migration, Citizenship, Identity (Casteel) • Brubaker, Rogers and. “Ethnicity, Migration, and Statehood in Post-Cold War Europe.” In Ethnicity Without Groups, 147–60. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 2005. • Panagiotidis, Jannis. “Germanizing Germans: Co-Ethnic Immigration and Name Change in West Germany, 1953–93.” Journal of Contemporary History 50, no. 4 (October 1, 2015): 854–74. • Celia Donert, “’The Struggle for the Soul of the Gypsy’: Marginality and Mass Mobilization in Stalinist Czechoslovakia,” Social History 33, no. 2 (2008): 123-44. • Silverstein, Paul A. “The Context of Antisemitism and Islamophobia in France.” Patterns of Prejudice 42, no. 1 (2008): 1–26. • Bendixsen, Synnøve K. N. “The Refugee Crisis: Destabilizing and Restabilizing European Borders.” History and Anthropology 27, no. 5 (October 19, 2016): 536–54. Supplemental: Bade, Klaus J. The Encyclopedia of Migration and Minorities in Europe : From the 17th Century to the Present. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011. Bade, Klaus. Migration in European History. Translated by Allison Brown. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2003. Balibar, Etienne. We, the People of Europe? Reflections on Transnational Citizenship (2004). Barbier, Jean-Claude. The Road to Social Europe: A Contemporary Approach to Political Cultures and Diversity in Europe (2012). Bendixsen, Synnøve K. N. “The Refugee Crisis: Destabilizing and Restabilizing European Borders.” History and Anthropology 27, no. 5 (October 19, 2016): 536–54. Berezin, Mabel and Martin Schain (eds.). Europe Without Borders: Remapping Territory, Citizenship, and Identity in a Transnational Age (2003). Castles, Stephen and Mark J. Miller (eds.), The Age of Migration: International Population Movements in

20 the Modern World, 4th Edition (2009). Chin, Rita, Heide Fehrenbach, Geoff Eley, and Atina Grossmann (eds.). After the Nazi Racial State: Difference and Democracy in Germany and Europe (2009). Cohen, Robin. Migration and its Enemies: Global Capital, Migrant Labour and the Nation-State (2006). Fehrenbach, Heide. Race after Hitler: Black Occupation Children in Postwar Germany and America (2005). Gilroy, Paul, ‘Migrancy, Culture, and a New Map of Europe’, in Heike Raphael-Hernandez (ed.), Blackening Europe (2004). Gilroy, Paul. After Empire: Multiculture and Postcolonial Melancholia (2004). Gilroy, Paul. Between Camps: Nations, Cultures and the Allure of Race. 1 edition. London: Routledge, 2004. Goldberg, David Theo, ‘Racial Europeanization’ Ethnic and Racial Studies 29:2 (2006): 331-64. Kastoryano, Riva (ed.). An Identity for Europe: The Relevance of Multiculturalism in the EU Construction (2009). Malskoo, Maria, ‘The Memory Politics of Becoming European: The East European Subalterns and the Collective Memory of Europe’, European Journal of International Relations 15:4 (2009): 653-80. Mandel, Ruth. Cosmopolitan Anxieties: Turkish Challenges to Citizenship and Belonging in Germany (2008). Melegh, Attila. On the East-West Slope: Globalization, Nationalism, Racism and Discourses on Central and Eastern Europe (2006). Meng, Michael, “Democratic (In)Equalities: Immigration in Twentieth-Century Western Europe”, Contemporary European History 22 (1): 139-151. Miller, Jennifer A. “On Track for West Germany: Turkish ‘Guest-worker’ Rail Transportation to West Germany in the Postwar Period.” German History 30, no. 4 (2012): 550-73. Panayi, Panikos, “Postwar Europe: A Continent Built on Migration”, in Klaus Larres, A Companion to Europe since 1945, pp. 432-449. Passerini, Luisa, “Europe and its Others: Is There a European Identity?”, in Dan Stone, The Oxford History of Postwar European History, pp. 120-138. Polian, Pavel. Against their Will: The History and Geography of Forced Migrations in the USSR (2004). Sassatelli, Monica. Becoming Europeans: Cultural Identity and Cultural Policies (2009). Tibi, Bassam, “Between Communitarism and Euro-Islam: Europe, Multicultural Identities and the Challenge of Migration” in John Docker and Gerhard Fischer (eds.), Adventures of Identity: European Multicultural Experiences and Perspectives (2001), pp. 45-60. Wittlinger, Ruth, “The Quest for a European Identity: A Europe without Europeans?” in Klaus Larres, A Companion to Europe since 1945, pp. 367-386. Zielonka, Jan. Europe as Empire: the nature of the enlarged European Union. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2006. Week 12, April 3 Memory Wars (Casteel/Jesensky) • Konrad Jarausch, “Nightmares or Daydreams? A Postscript on the Europeanization of Memories” in A European Memory? Contested Histories and Politics of Remembrance, edited by Małgorzata Pakier and Bo Stråth (New York: Berghahn, 2010), 309-320. • Evans, Martin. “Memories, Monuments, Histories: The Re-Thinking of the Second World War since 1989.” National Identities 8, no. 4 (2006): 317–48. • Hayden, Robert M., ‘Mass Killings and Images of Genocide in Bosnia, 1941-5 and 1992-5’ in Dan Stone (ed.), The Historiography of Genocide (2008), 487-516.

21 •

Hurd, Madeleine, and Steffen Werther. “Retelling the Past, Inspiring the Future: Waffen-SS Commemorations and the Creation of a ‘European’ Far-Right Counter-Narrative.” Patterns of Prejudice 50, no. 4–5 (October 19, 2016): 420–44.

Supplemental: Aguilar, Paloma. Memory and Amnesia: The Role of the Spanish Civil War in the Transition to Democracy (2002). Bloxham, Donald. Genocide on Trial: War Crimes Trials and the Formation of Holocaust History and Memory (2001). Bucur-Deckard, Maria. Heroes and Victims: Remembering War in Twentieth-Century Romania. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2009. Bucur, Maria. "Treznea: Trauma, Nationalism and the Memory of World War II in Romania," Rethinking History 6, no. 1 (2002): 35-55 (ON). Cesarani, David and Eric J. Sundquist (eds.). After the Holocaust: Challenging the Myth of Silence (2011). Eder, Klaus and Willfried Spohn (eds.). Collective Memory and European Identity: The Effects of Integration and Enlargement (2005). Golsan, Richard J. Vichy’s Afterlife: History and Counterhistory in Postwar France (2000). Grant, Bruce, ‘New Moscow Monuments, or, States of Innocence’ American Ethnologist 28:2 (2001): 332-62. Herf, Jeffrey. Divided Memory: The Nazi Past in the Two Germanys (1997). Himka, John-Paul, and Joanna Beata Michlic, eds. Bringing the Dark Past to Light: The Reception of the Holocaust in Postcommunist Europe. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2013. Himka, John-Paul. “Obstacles to the Integration of the Holocaust into Post-Communist East European Historical Narratives.” Canadian Slavonic Papers/Revue Canadienne des Slavistes 50, no., 3-4 (2008): 359-72. Jarausch, Konrad and Thomas Lindenberger (ed). Conflicted Memories: Europeanizing Contemporary Histories (2007). Judt, Tony. “From the House of the Dead. An Essay on Modern European Memory”, in: Tony Judt, Postwar. A History of Europe since 1945, New York 2005, pp. 803-831. Kirschenbaum, L. A. The Legacy of the Siege of Leningrad, 1941-1995: Myth, Memories, and Monuments (2006). Labanyi, Jo (ed), The Politics of Memory in Contemporary Spain, special issue of Journal of Spanish Cultural Studies 9:2 (2008). Labanyi, Jo, ‘Memory and Modernity in Democratic Spain: The Difficulty of Coming to Terms with the Spanish Civil War’, Poetics Today 28:1 (2007): 89-116. Lagrou, Pieter. The Legacy of Nazi Occupation: Patriotic Memory and National Recovery in Western Europe, 1945-1965 (2000). Lebow, Richard Ned, Wulf Kansteiner, and Claudio Fogu (eds.). The Politics of Memory in Postwar Europe (2006). Lebow, Richard Ned, Wulf Kansteiner, and Claudio Fogu, eds., The Politics of Memory in Postwar Europe (Durham, NC: Duke UP, 2006). Levy, Daniel and Natan Sznaider, “Memory Unbound: The Holocaust and the Formation of Cosmopolitan Memory,” European Journal of Social Theory 5, no. 1 (2002): 87-106. Malgorzata Pakier and Bo Strath, A European Memory? Contested Histories and Politics of Remembrance (New York: Berghahn Books, 2010). Malskoo, Maria, ‘The Memory Politics of Becoming European: The East European Subalterns and the Collective Memory of Europe’, European Journal of International Relations 15:4 (2009): 653-80.

22 Mark, James. The Unfinished Revolution: Making Sense of the Communist Past in Central-Eastern Europe. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2010. Mercer, Ben. “Specters of Fascism: The Rhetoric of Historical Analogy in 1968.” The Journal of Modern History 88, no. 1 (March 1, 2016): 96–129. doi:10.1086/684949. Moeller, Robert G. War Stories: The Search for a Useable Past in the Federal Republic of Germany. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2001. Niethammer, Lutz. ‘A European Identity?’, in Bo Strath (ed.), Europe and the Other and Europe as Other (2000). Richards, Michael, ‘Grand Narratives, Collective Memory, and Social History: Public Uses of the Past in Post-War Spain’, in Carlos Jerez Farrán and Samuel Amago (eds), Unearthing Franco’s Legacy: Mass Graves and the Recovery of Historical Memory in Spain (2010). Rothberg, Michael. Multidirectional Memory: Remembering the Holocaust in the Age of Decolonization (2009). Roudometof, Victor. Collective Memory, National Identity, and Ethnic Conflict: Greece, Bulgaria, and the Macedonian Question (2002). Rousseau, Henry. The Vichy Syndrome: History and Memory in France since 1944 (1991). Stańczyk, Ewa. “Transnational, Transborder, Antinational? The Memory of the Jewish Past in Poland.” Nationalities Papers 44, no. 3 (May 3, 2016): 416–29. doi:10.1080/00905992.2015.1126569. Stone, Dan, “Memory Wars in the ‘New Europe’” in Dan Stone, The Oxford Handbook of Postwar European History, pp. 714-731. Stone, Dan. “Memory Wars in the ‚New Europe’” In: The Oxford Handbook of Postwar European History, ed. Dan Stone. Oxford 2012, 715-731. Todorov, Tzvetan. Hope and Memory: Lessons from the Twentieth Century (2003).

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Letter grade A+ A AB+ B B-

12-point scale 12 11 10 9 8 7

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12-point scale 6 5 4 3 2 1

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