CHAPTER 3

CHAPTER 3

 CHAPTER 3  SOILS AND FOUNDATIONS  3.1 INTRODUCTION  The Soils and Foundations chapter of the code is divided into the following three major parts:...

2MB Sizes 0 Downloads 2 Views

Recommend Documents

Chapter Chapter 3 - MacMillan
In this chapter your investigation will require you to: • outline the key features of the Industrial. Revolution in Br

Chapter 3
Ralph Nader challenged this viewpoint in 1965 with the publication of his book Unsafe At Any Speed. He called attention

Chapter 3
We can now see from the figure that the payoff graph of the short index and the long call looks like a fixed obligation

Chapter 3
Early Trade Theory: Mercantilists: Purpose underpin an us versus them view of Trade: ... risk of new product innovations

Chapter 3
Jan 24, 2017 - Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC), Willem-Alexander ... to evaluate the long term consequences of c

chapter 3
of Barton Court, who was referred to by the local labourers as the King of Kintbury. .... According to Mr. William Mount

Chapter 3
2.3.18 Richard Newton, The Four Stages of Matrimony (15 August 1796, .... 3.2.4 Isaac Cruikshank, The new Consular Waltz

Chapter 3
other owners in a condominium association) a part of the Common Area, no owner would have the right to get to their Unit

Chapter 3
joint press statement issued by Douglas Corporation and Trust House Forte ..... Trust Houses Forte Group for the joint d

l Chapter 3
Massachusetts was punished for the Boston Tea Party in the following ways except which one? a. ... Bostonians had to sea

 CHAPTER 3  SOILS AND FOUNDATIONS 

3.1

INTRODUCTION 

The Soils and Foundations chapter of the code is divided into the following three major parts:    Part A:  

General Requirements, Materials and Foundation Types 

Part B:  

Service Load Design Method of Foundations  

Part C:    

Additional Considerations in Planning, Design and Construction of Building Foundations. 

Part A (General Requirements, Materials and Foundation Types) consists of the following sections:   

‐ Scope  ‐ Terminology  ‐ Site Investigations  ‐ Identification, Classification and Description of Soils  ‐ Geotechnical Investigation report  ‐ Materials  ‐ Types of Foundation     Part B (Service Load Design Method of Foundations) has the sections as under:    ‐ Shallow Foundations  ‐ Geotechnical Design of shallow Foundations  ‐ Geotechnical Design of shallow Foundations  ‐ Field Tests for Driven Piles and Drilled Shafts    Part  C  (Additional  Considerations  in  Planning,  Design  and  Construction  of  Building  Foundations)  deals  with  the  following sections:      ‐ Excavation   ‐ Dewatering  ‐ Slope Stability of Adjoining Buildings  Part 6  Structural Design 

   

  6‐151 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

 

‐ Fills  ‐ Retaining Walls for Foundations  ‐ Waterproofing and Damp‐proofing  ‐ Foundation on Slopes  ‐ Foundations on Fill and Problematic Soils  ‐ Foundation Design for Dynamic Forces  ‐ Geo‐hazards for Buildings 

PART A: GENERAL REQUIREMENTS, MATERIALS AND FOUNDATION TYPES (Sections 3.2  to 3.8)  3.2

SCOPE 

The  provisions  of  this  chapter  shall  be  applicable  to  the  design  and  construction  of  foundations  of  buildings  and  structures  for  the  safe  support  of  dead  and  superimposed  loads  without  exceeding  the  allowable  bearing  stresses,  permissible settlements and design capability.   

3.3

TERMINOLOGY 

For the terms used in this chapter, the following definitions shall apply.  ALLOWABLE  LOAD:  The  maximum  load  that  may  be  safely  applied  to  a  foundation  unit,  considering  both  the  strength and settlement of the soil, under expected loading and soil conditions.  DESIGN LOAD: The expected un‐factored load to a foundation unit.  GROSS PRESSURE: The total pressure at the base of a footing due to the weight of the superstructure and  the original overburden pressure.  NET PRESSURE: The gross pressure minus the surcharge pressure i.e. the overburden pressure of the soil at  the foundation level.  SERVICE LOAD: The expected unfactored load to a foundation unit.  BEARING  CAPACITY:  The  general  term  used  to  describe  the  load  carrying  capacity  of  foundation  soil  or  rock  in  terms of average pressure that enables it to bear and transmit loads from a structure.  BEARING  SURFACE:  The  contact  surface  between  a  foundation  unit  and  the  soil  or  rock  upon  which  the  foundation rests.  DESIGN BEARING CAPACITY: The maximum net average pressure applied to a soil or rock by a foundation  unit that the foundation soil or rock will safely carry without the risk of both shear failure and permissible  settlement.  It is  equal  to  the  least  of  the  two  values  of  net  allowable  bearing  capacity  and  safe  bearing  pressure. This may also be called ALLOWABLE BEARING PRESSURE.  GROSS ALLOWABLE BEARING PRESSURE: The maximum gross average pressure of loading that the soil can  safely  carry  with  a  factor  of  safety  considering  risk  of  shear  failure.    This  may  be  calculated  by  dividing  gross ultimate bearing capacity with a factor of safety.  GROSS  ULTIMATE  BEARING CAPACITY:  The  maximum  average  gross  pressure  of  loading  at  the  base  of  a  foundation which initiates shear failure of the supporting soil 

6‐152 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

 

Chapter 3 

ALLOWABLE BEARING CAPACITY: The maximum net average pressure of loading that the soil will safely carry  with a factor of safety considering risk of shear failure and the settlement of foundation. This is the minimum  of safe bearing capacity and safe bearing pressure.  NET ULTIMATE BEARING CAPACITY: The average net increase of pressure at the base of a foundation due to  loading which initiates shear failure of the supporting soil. It is equal to the gross ultimate bearing capacity  minus the overburden pressure.  PRESUMPTIVE  BEARING  CAPACITY:  The  net  approximate  pressure  prescribed  as  appropriate  for  the  particular type of ground to be used in preliminary designs of foundations  SAFE BEARING CAPACITY: The maximum average pressure of loading that the soil will safely carry without the  risk of shear failure. This may be calculated by dividing net ultimate bearing capacity with a factor of safety.  SAFE BEARING PRESSURE: The maximum average pressure of loading that the soil will safely carry without  the risk of permissible settlement.  CAISSON:  A  deep  foundation  unit,  relatively  large  section,  sunk  down  (not  driven)  to  the  ground.  This  is  also  called WELL FOUNDATION.  CLAY MINERAL: A small group of minerals, commonly known as clay minerals, essentially composed of hydrous  aluminium silicates with magnesium or iron replacing wholly or in part some of the aluminium.  CLAY SOIL: A natural aggregate of microscopic and submicroscopic mineral grains that are product  of chemical  decomposition and disintegration of rock constituents. It is plastic in moderate to wide range of water contents.  DOWNDRAG:    The  transfer  of  load  (drag  load)  to  a  deep  foundation,  when  soil  settles  in  relation  to  the  foundation. This is also known as NEGATIVE SKIN FRICTION.  DRILLED  PIER/DRILLED  SHAFT: A deep  foundation generally  of  large diameter  shaft  usually  more than  600 mm  and constructed by drilling and excavating into the soil.   EFFECTIVE STRESS/  EFFECTIVE  PRESSURE:  The  pressure  transmitted through  grain to  grain  at  the  contact  point  through a soil mass is termed as effective stress or effective pressure.   END BEARING: The load being transmitted to the toe of a deep foundation and resisted by the bearing capacity of  the soil beneath the toe.   EXCAVATION: The space created by the removal of soil or rock for the purpose of construction.  FACTOR OF SAFETY: The ratio of the ultimate capacity to the design (working) capacity of the foundation unit.  FILL:  Manmade deposits of natural earth materials (soil, rock) and/or waste materials.  FOOTING: A foundation constructed of masonry, concrete or other material under the base of a wall or one or  more columns for the purpose of spreading the load over a larger area at shallower depth of ground surface.  FOUNDATION:      Lower  part  of  the  structure  which  is  in  direct  contact  with  the  soil  and  transmits  loads  to  the  ground.  DEEP FOUNDATION: A foundation unit that provides support for a structure transferring loads by end bearing  and/or by shaft resistance at considerable depth below the ground. Generally, the depth is at least five times  the least dimension of the foundation.  SHALLOW FOUNDATION: A foundation unit that provides support for a structure transferring loads at a small  depth below the ground. Generally, the depth is less than two times the least dimension of the foundation.  FOUNDATION  ENGINEER:  A  graduate  Engineer  with  at  least  five  years  of  experience  in  civil  engineering  particularly in foundation design or construction. 

  Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐153 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

 

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEER: Engineer with Master’s degree in geotechnical engineering having at least three years  of experience in geotechnical design or construction.  GROUND  WATER  LEVEL/  GROUND  WATER  TABLE:  The  level  of  water  at  which  porewater  pressure  is  equal  to  atmospheric pressure. It is the top surface of a free body of water (peizometric water level) in the ground.  MAT FOUNDATION: See RAFT.  NEGATIVE SKIN FRICTION:  See DOWNDRAG.  OVERCONSOLIDATION RATIO (OCR):  The ratio of the preconsolidation pressure (maximum past pressure) to the  existing effective overburden pressure of the soil.  PILE: A  slender deep  foundation unit  made  of  materials such  as  steel,  concrete,  wood,  or  combination  thereof  that transmits the load to the ground by skin friction, end bearing and lateral soil resistance.   BATTER PILE: The pile which is installed at an angle to the vertical in order to carry lateral loads along with  the vertical loads. This is also known as RAKER PILE.  BORED PILE/CAST IN‐SITU PILE/REPLACEMENT PILE: A pile formed into a preformed hole of ground, usually of  reinforced concrete having a diameter smaller than 600 mm.  DRIVEN  PILE/DISPLACEMENT  PILE:  A  plie  foundation  premanufactured  and  placed  in  ground  by  driving,  jacking, jetting or screwing.   LATERALLY LOADED PILE: A pile that is installed vertically to carry mainly the lateral loads.   PILE CAP: A pile cap is a special footing needed to transmit the column load to a group or cluster of piles.  PILE HEAD/PILE TOP: The upper small length of a pile.  PILE SHOE: A separate reinforcement or steel form attached to the bottom end (pile toe) of a pile to facilitate  driving, to protect the pile toe, and/or to improve the toe resistance of the pile.  PILE TOE/PILE TIP: The bottom end of a pile.   SCREW PILE/ AUGUR PILE: A pre‐manufactured pile consisting of steel helical blades and a shaft placed into  ground by screwing.   PORE WATER PRESSURE:   The pressure induced in the water or vapour and water filling the pores of soil. This is  also known as neutral stress.  RAFT: A relatively large spread foundation supporting an arrangement of columns or walls in a regular or irregular  layout  transmitting  the  loads  to  the  soil  by  means  of  a  continuous  slab  and/or  beams,  with  or  without  depressions or openings. This is also known as MAT FOUNDATION.  RAKER PILE: See BATTER PILE.  ROCK:    A  natural  aggregate  of  one  or  more  minerals  that  are  connected  by  strong  and  permanent  cohesive  forces.  ROTATION:   It is the angle between the horizontal and any two foundations or two points in a single foundation.  RELATIVE ROTATION/ANGULAR DISTORTION: Angle between the horizontal and any two foundations or two  points in a single foundation.  TILT: Rotation of the entire superstructure or at least a well defined part of it.  SETTLEMENT:  The downward vertical movement of foundation under load. When settlement occurs over a large  area, it is sometimes called subsidence. 

6‐154 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

 

Chapter 3 

CONSOLIDATION SETTLEMENT:  A time dependent settlement resulting from gradual reduction of volume of  saturated  soils  because  of  squeezing  out  of  water  from  the  pores  due  to  increase  in  effective  stress  and  hence  pore  water  pressure.  It  is  also  known  as  primary  consolidation  settlement.  It  is  thus  a  time  related  process involving compression, stress transfer and water drainage.  DIFFERENTIAL SETTEMENT:  The difference in the total settlements between two foundations or two points  in the same foundation.  ELASTIC/DISTORTION  SETTLEMENT:  It  is  attributed  due  to  lateral  spreading  or  elastic  deformation  of  dry,  moist or saturated soil without a change in the water content and volume.  IMMEDIATE  SETTLEMENT:    This  vertical  compression  occurs  immediately  after  the  application  of  loading  either  on  account  of  elastic  behaviour  that  produces  distortion  at  constant  volume  and  on  account  of  compression of air void. For sands, even the consolidation component is immediate.  SECONDARY  CONSOLDATION  SETTLEMENT:    This  is  the  settlement  speculated  to  be  due  to  the  plastic  deformation  of  the  soil  as  a  result  of  some  complex  colloidal‐chemical  processes  or  creep  under  imposed  long term loading.  TOTAL SETTLEMENT:  The total downward vertical displacement of a foundation base under load from its as‐ constructed position. It is the summation of immediate settlement, consolidation settlement and secondary  consolidation settlement of the soil.     SHAFT RESISTANCE: The resistance mobilized on the shaft (side) of a deep foundation. Upward resistance is called  positive shaft resistance. Downward force on the shaft is called negative shaft resistance.  SOIL: A loose or soft deposit of particles of mineral and/or organic origin that can be separated by such gentle  mechanical means as agitation in water.   COLLAPSIBLE  SOIL:  Consists  predominant  of  sand  and  silt  size  particles  arranged  in  a  loose  honeycomb  structure.  These  soils  are  dry  and  strong  in  their  natural  state  and  consolidate  or  collapse  quickly  if  they  become wet.  DISPERSIVE SOIL: Soils that are structurally unstable and disperse in water into basic particles i.e. sand, silt  and  clay.  Dispersible  soils  tend  to  be  highly  erodible.  Dispersive  soils  usually  have  a  high  Exchangeable  Sodium Percentage (ESP).  EXPANSIVE SOIL: These are clay soils expand when they become wetted and contract when dried. These are  formed of clay minerals like montmorillonite and illite.  INORGANIC  SOIL:  Soil  of  mineral  origin  having  small  amount  usually  less  than  5  percent  of  organic  matter  content.   ORGANIC  SOIL:  Soil  having  appreciable/significant  amount  of  organic  matter  content  to  influence  the  soil  properties.   PEAT SOIL: An organic soil with high organic content, usually more than 75% by weight, composed primarily  of vegetable tissue in various stages of decomposition usually with an organic odor, a dark brown to black  color,  a  spongy  consistency,  and  a  texture  ranging  from  fibrous  to  amorphous.  Fully  decomposed  organic  soils are known as MUCK.  SOIL PARTICLE SIZE: The sizes of particles that make up soil varying over a wide range. Soil particles are generally  gravel, sand, silt and clay, though the terms boulder and cobble can be used to describe larger sizes of gravel.   BOULDER: Particles of rock that will not pass a 12‐in. (300‐mm) square opening.  Cobbles: Particles of rock that will pass a 12‐in. (300‐mm) square opening and be retained on a 3‐in. (75‐mm)  sieve.    Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐155 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

 

Clay: A natural aggregate of microscopic and submicroscopic mineral grains less than 0.002 mm in size and  plastic in moderate to wide range of water contents.  GRAVEL: Particles of rock that will pass a 3‐in. (75‐mm) sieve and be retained on a No. 4 (4.75‐mm) sieve.  SAND: Aggregates of rounded, sub‐rounded, angular, sub‐angular or flat fragments of more or less unaltered  rock or minerals which is larger than 75 μm and smaller than 4.75 mm in size.  Silt: Soil passing a No. 200 (75‐μm) sieve that is non‐plastic or very slightly plastic and that exhibits little or no  strength when air dry.    

3.4

SITE INVESTIGATIONS 

3.4.1 Sub­Surface Survey  Depending on the type of project thorough investigations has to be carried out for identification, location, alignment  and depth of various utilities, e.g., pipelines, cables, sewerage lines, water mains etc. below the surface of the existing  ground level. Detailed survey may also be conducted to ascertain the topography of the existing ground. 

3.4.2 Sub­Soil Investigations  Subsoil investigation shall be done describing the character, nature, load bearing capacity and settlement capacity of  the soil before constructing a new building and structure or for alteration of the foundation of an existing structure.  The aims of a geotechnical investigation are to establish the soil, rock and groundwater conditions, to determine the  properties  of  the  soil  and  rock,  and  to  gather  additional  relevant  knowledge  about  the  site.  Careful  collection,  recording  and  interpretation  of  geotechnical  information  shall  be  made.  This  information  shall  include  ground  conditions, geology, geomorphology, seismicity and hydrology, as relevant. Indications of the variability of the ground  shall be taken into account.   An  engineering  geological  study  may  be  an  important  consideration  to  establish  the  physiographic  setting  and  stratigraphic sequences of soil strata of the area. Geological and agricultural soil maps of the area may give valuable  information of site conditions.   During  the  various  phases  of  sub‐soil  investigations,  e.g.  drilling  of  boreholes,  field  tests,  sampling,  groundwater  measurements, etc. a competent graduate engineer having experiences in supervising sub‐soil exploration works shall  be employed by the drilling contractor. 

3.4.2.1 Methods of Exploration  Subsoil  exploration  process  may  be  grouped  into  three  types  of  activities  such  as:  reconnaissance,  exploration  and  detailed investigations. The reconnaissance method includes geophysical measurements, sounding or probing, while  exploratory methods involve various drilling techniques. Field investigations should comprise  (i) drilling and/or excavations (test pits including exploratory boreholes) for sampling;  (ii) groundwater measurements;  (iii) field tests.  Examples of the various types of field investigations are:  (i) (ii) (iii)

field testing (e.g. CPT, SPT, dynamic probing, WST,  pressuremeter tests, dilatometer tests, plate load  tests, field vane tests and permeability tests);  soil sampling for description of the soil and laboratory tests;  groundwater measurements to determine the groundwater table or the pore pressure profile and their  fluctuations 

6‐156 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

 

Chapter 3 

(iv)

geophysical  investigations (e.g.  seismic  profiling,  ground  penetrating radar,  resistivity  measurements 

(v)

and down hole logging);  large scale tests, for example to determine the bearing capacity or the behaviour directly on prototype  elements, such as anchors. 

Where  ground contamination or soil gas is expected, information shall be gathered from the relevant sources.  This  information shall be taken into account when planning the  ground investigation. Some of the  common methods  of  exploration,  methods of sampling and ground water measurements in soils are described in Appendix 6.3.A.    

3.4.2.2 Number and Location of Investigation Points  The  locations  of  investigation  points,  eg.,  pits  and  boreholes  shall  be  selected  on  the  basis  of  the  preliminary  investigations  as  a  function  of  the  geological  conditions,  the  dimensions  of  the  structure  and  the  engineering  problems involved. When selecting the locations of investigation points, the following should be observed:  (i)

the  investigation  points  should  be  arranged  in  such  a  pattern  that  the  stratification  can  be  assessed across the site; 

(ii)

the investigation points for a building or structure should be placed at critical points relative to the  shape,  structural  behaviour  and  expected  load  distribution  (e.g.  at  the  corners  of  the  foundation  area); 

(iii)

for linear structures, investigation points should be arranged at adequate offsets to the centre line,  depending on the overall width of the structure, such as an embankment footprint or a cutting; 

(iv)

for structures on or near slopes and steps in the terrain (including excavations), investigation points  should  also  be  arranged  outside  the  project  area,  these  being  located  so  that  the  stability of  the  slope or cut can be assessed. Where anchorages are installed, due consideration should be given to  the likely stresses in their load transfer zone; 

(v)

the investigation points should be arranged so that they do not present a hazard to the structure, the  construction work, or the surroundings (e.g. as a result of the changes they may cause to the ground  and groundwater conditions); 

(vi)

the  area  considered  in  the  design  investigations  should  extend  into  the  neighbouring  area  to  a  distance where no harmful influence on the neighbouring area is expected. 

Where  ground  conditions  are  relatively  uniform  or  the  ground  is  known  to  have  sufficient  strength  and  stiffness  properties, wider spacing or fewer investigation points may be applied. In either case, this choice should be justified  by local experience.  The locations and spacing of sounding, pits and boreholes shall be such that the soil profiles obtained will permit a  reasonably  accurate  estimate  of  the  extent  and  character  of  the  intervening  soil  or  rock  masses  and  will  disclose  important irregularities in subsurface conditions. For building structures, the following guidelines shall be followed:  (i)

For  large  areas  covering  industrial  and  residential  colonies,  the  geological  nature  of  the  terrain  will  help in deciding the number of boreholes or trial pits. The whole area may be divided into grid pattern  with Cone Penetration Tests (see Appendix‐ 6.3.B) performed at every 100 m grid points. The number  of boreholes  or  trial  pits  shall  be  decided  by  examining  the  variation  in penetration  curves.  At  least  67% of the required number of borings or trial pits shall be located within the area under the building. 

(ii)

In compact building sites covering an area of 0.4 hectare (43,000 square feet), one borehole or trial pit  in each corner and one in centre shall be adequate. 

(iii)

For widely spaced buildings covering an area of less than 90 m2  (1000 square feet) and a height less  than four storeys, at least one borehole or trial pit in the centre shall be done. 

  Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐157 

Part 6  Structural Design 

3.4.2.3

 

 

Depth of Exploration 

The  depth  of  investigations  shall  be  extended  to  all  strata  that  will  affect  the  project  or  are  affected  by  the  construction. The depth of exploration shall depend to some extent on the site and type of the proposed structure,  and  on  certain  design  considerations  such  as  safety  against  foundation  failure,  excessive  settlement,  seepage  and  earth  pressure.  Cognizance  shall  be  taken  of  the  character  and  sequence  of  the  subsurface  strata.  The  site  investigation should be carried to such a depth that the entire zone of soil or rock affected by the changes caused by  the building or the construction will be adequately explored. A rule of thumb used for this purpose is to extend the  borings to a depth where the additional load resulting from the proposed building is less than 10% of the average load  of  the  structure,  or  less  than  5%  of  the  effective  stress  in  the  soil  at  that  depth.  Where  the  depth  of  investigation  cannot  be  related  to  background  information,  the  following  guide  lines  are  suggested  to  determine  the  depth  of  exploration:  (a) Where substructure  units  will  be  supported  on spread  footings,  the  minimum  depth  boring  should  extend  below the anticipated bearing level a minimum of two footing widths for isolated, individual footings where  length  ≤  two  times  width,  and  four  footing  widths  for  footings  where  length  >  five  times  width.    For  intermediate  footing  lengths,  the  minimum  depth  of  boring  may  be  estimated  by  linear  interpolation  as  a  function of length between depths of  two times width and five times width below the bearing level. Greater  depth may be required where warranted by local conditions.  (b) For more heavily loaded structures, such as multistoried structures and for framed structures, at least 50% of  the borings should be extended to a depth equal to 1.5 times the width of the building below the lowest part  of the foundation.  (c) Normally the depth of exploration shall be one and a half times the estimated width or the least dimension  of the footing below the foundation level. If the pressure bulbs for a number of loaded areas overlap, the  whole area may be considered as loaded and exploration shall be carried down to one and a half times the  least  dimension.  In  weak  soils,  the  exploration  shall  be  continued  to  a  depth  at  which  the  loads  can  be  carried by the stratum in question without undesirable settlement or shear failure.  (d) Where  substructure  units  will  be  supported  on  deep  foundations,  the  depth  boring  should  extend  a  minimum of 6 m below the anticipated pile of shaft tip elevation.  Where pile or shaft groups will be used,  the  boring  should  extend  at  least  two  times  the  maximum  pile  or  shaft  group  dimension  below  the  anticipated tip elevation, unless the foundation will be end bearing on or in rock.   (e) For piles  bearing on rock, a  minimum of 1.5 m of rock core should  be  obtained at each  boring location to  ensure the boring has not been terminated in a boulder.   (f) For shafts supported on or extending into rock, a minimum of 1.5 m of rock core, or a length of rock core  equal to at least three times the shaft diameter for isolated shafts or two times the maximum shaft group  dimension for a shaft group, whichever is greater, should be obtained to ensure that the boring had not been  terminated  in  a  boulder  and  to  determine  the  physical  properties  of  rock  within  the  zone  of  foundation  influence for design.  (g) The  depth,  to  which  weathering  process  affects  the  deposit,  shall  be  regarded  as  the  minimum  depth  of  exploration for a site. However, in no case shall this depth be less than 2 m, but where industrial processes  affect the soil characteristics, this depth may be more.   (h) It is good practice to have at least one boring carried to bedrock, or to well below the anticipated level of  influence of the building. Bedrock should be proved by coring into it to a minimum depth of 3 m. 

6‐158 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

3.4.2.4

 

Chapter 3 

Sounding and Penetration Tests 

Subsurface  soundings  are  used  for  exploring  soil  strata  of  an  erratic  nature.  They  are  useful  to  determine  the  presence of any soft pockets between drill holes and also to determine the density index of cohesionless soils and the  consistency  of  cohesive  soils  at  desired  depths.  A  field  test  called  Vane  Shear  Test  may  be  used  to  determine  the  shearing strength of the soil located at a depth below the ground.  Penetration tests consist of driving or  pushing a standard sampling tube or a  cone. The devices are also termed  as  penetrometers, since they penetrate the subsoil with a view to measuring the resistance to penetrate the soil strata.  If a sampling tube is used to penetrate the soil, the test is referred to as Standard Penetration Test (or simply SPT). If a  cone  is  used,  the  test  is  called  a  Cone  Penetration  Test.  If  the  penetrometer  is  pushed  steadily  into  the  soil,  the  procedure is known as Static Penetration Test. If driven into the soil, it is known as Dynamic Penetration Test. Details  of sounding and penetrations tests are presented in APPENDIX‐6.3.A. 

3.4.2.5

Geotechnical Investigation Report 

The  results  of  a  geotechnical  investigation shall  be  compiled  in  the  Geotechnical  Investigation  Report which shall  form a part of the Geotechnical Design Report. The Geotechnical Investigation Report shall consist of the following:  (i) (ii)

a presentation of all appropriate geotechnical information on field and laboratory tests including  geological features and relevant data;  a  geotechnical  evaluation  of  the  information,  stating  the  assumptions  made  in  the  interpretation of the test results. 

The Geotechnical Investigation Report shall state known limitations of the results, if appropriate. The Geotechnical  Investigation Report should propose necessary further field and laboratory investigations, with comments justifying  the  need  for  this  further  work.  Such  proposals  should  be  accompanied  by  a  detailed  programme  for  the  further  investigations to be carried out.  The  presentation  of  geotechnical  information  shall  include  a  factual  account  of  all  field  and  laboratory  investigations. The factual account should include the following information:  −

the purpose and scope of the geotechnical investigation including a description of the site and its topography,  of the planned structure and the stage of the planning the account is referring to; 



the names of all consultants and contractors; 



the dates between which field and laboratory investigations were performed; 



the field reconnaissance of the site of the project and the surrounding area noting particularly:  i)   evidence of groundwater;  ii)  behaviour of neighbouring structures;  iii)   exposures in quarries and borrow areas;  iv)  areas of instability;  v)  difficulties during excavation;  vi)   history of the site;  vii)  geology of the site,   viii)survey data with plans showing the structure and the location of all investigation points;  ix)  local experience in the area;  x)  information about the seismicity of the area. 

  Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐159 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

 

The  presentation  of  geotechnical  information  shall  include  documentation  of  the  methods,  procedures  and  results including all relevant reports of:  −

desk studies; 



field investigations, such as sampling, field tests and groundwater measurements; 



laboratory tests. 

The  results  of  the  field  and  laboratory investigations  shall  be  presented  and  reported  according  to  the  requirements defined in the ASTM or equivalent standards applied in the investigations.   

3.5

IDENTIFICATION, CLASSIFICATION AND DESCRIPTION OF SOILS 

3.5.1 Identification of Soil  Samples and trial pits should be inspected visually and compared with field logs of the drillings so that the preliminary  ground profile can be established. For soil samples, the visual inspection should be supported by simple manual tests  to  identify  the  soil  and  to  give  a  first  impression  of  its  consistency  and  mechanical  behaviour.  A  standard  visual‐ manual procedure of describing and identifying soils may be followed.   Soil classification tests should be performed to determine the composition and index properties of each stratum. The samples for  the classification tests should be selected in such a way that the tests are approximately equally distributed over the complete  area and the full depth of the strata relevant for design. 

3.5.2 Soil Classification  3.5.2.1

Particle Size Classification 

Depending on particle sizes, main soil types are gravel, sand, silt and clay. However, the larger gravels can be further  classified as cobble and boulder. The soil particle size shall be classified in accordance with Table 6.3.1.      Table 6.3.1: Particle Size Ranges of Soils  Particle Size  Range, mm 

Soil Type 

3.5.2.2

Retained on Mesh  Size/ Sieve No.   

 

Boulder  Cobble 

   

> 300 

12″ 

 

300 ‐ 75 

3″ 

 

Gravel: 

Coarse 

75 ‐ 19 

3/4″ 

 

 

Medium 

19 – 9.5 

3/8″ 

 

Fine 

9.5 – 4.75 

No. 4 

Sand: 

Coarse 

4.75 – 2.00 

No. 10 

 

 

Medium 

2.00 – 0.425 

No. 40 

 

 

Fine 

0.425 – 0.075 

No. 200 

Silt 

 

0.075 – 0.002 

‐‐‐ 

Clay 

 

< 0.002 

‐‐‐ 

                                           

   

Engineering Classification 

Soils are divided into three major groups, coarse grained, fine grained and highly organic. The classification is based  on classification test results namely grain size analysis and consistency test. The coarse grained soils shall be classified  using Table 6.3.2. Outlines of organic and inorganic soil separations are also provided in Table 6.3.2. The fine grained 

6‐160 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

 

Chapter 3 

soils  shall  be  classified  using  the  plasticity  chart  shown  in  Fig.  6.3.1.  For  details,  reference  can  be  made  to  ASTM  D2487. In addition to these classifications, a soil shall be described by its colour, particle angularity (for coarse grained  soils) and consistency. Further to the above classification soils exhibiting swelling or collapsing characteristic shall be  recorded.   For  undisturbed  soils  information  on  stratification,  degree  of  compactness,  cementation,  moisture  conditions  and  drainage characteristics shall be included. 

3.5.2.2.1 Identification and Classification of Organic Soils  The presence of organic matter can have undesirable effects on the engineering behaviour of soil. For example, the  bearing  capacity  is  reduced,  the  compressibility  is  increased,  swelling  and  shrinkage  potential  is  increased  due  to  organic content. Organic content tests are used to classify the soil. In soil with little or no clay particles and carbonate  content, the organic content is often determined from the loss on ignition at a controlled temperature. Other suitable  tests  can  also  be  used.  For  example,  organic  content  can  be  determined  from  the  mass  loss  on  treatment  with  hydrogen  peroxide  (H2O2),  which  provides  a  more  specific  measure  of  organics.  Organic  deposits  are  due  to  decomposition of organic matters and found usually in topsoil and marshy place. A soil deposit in organic origin is said  to peat if it is at the higher end of the organic content scale (75% or more), organic soil at the low end, and muck in  between.  Peat  soil  is  usually  formed  of  fossilized  plant  minerals  and  characterized  by  fiber  content  and  lower  decomposition.  The  peats  have  certain  characteristics  that  set  them  apart  from  moist  mineral  soils  and  required  special  considerations  for  construction  over  them.  This  special  characteristic  includes,  extremely  high  natural  moisture  content,  high  compressibility  including  significant  secondary  and  even  tertiary  compression  and  very  low  undrained shear strength at natural moisture content.  However,  there  are  many  other  criteria  existed  to  classify  the  organic  deposits  and  it  remains  still  as  controversial  issue with numerous approaches available for varying purpose of classification. Soil from organic deposits and it refers  to  a  distinct  mode  of  behavior  different  than  traditional  soil  mechanics  in  certain  respects.  A  possible  approach  is  being considered by the American society for Testing and Materials for classifying organic soils having varying amount  of organic matter contents. The classification is given in Table 6.3.3.  

3.5.2.2.2 Identification and Classification of Expansive Soils  Expansive  soils  are  those  which  swell  considerably  on  absorption  of  water  and  shrink  on  the  removal  of  water.  In  monsoon seasons, expansive soils imbibe water, become soft and swell. In drier seasons, these soils shrink or reduce  in  volume  due  to  evaporation  of  water  and  become  harder.  As  such,  the  seasonal  moisture  variation  in  such  soil  deposits around and beneath the structure results into subsequent upward and downward movements of structures  leading  to  structural  damage,  in  the  form  of  wide  cracks  in  the  wall  and  distortion  of  floors.  For  identification  and  classification  of  expansive  soils  parameters  like  free  swell,  free  swell  index,  linear  shrinkage,  swelling  potential,  swelling pressure and volume change should be evaluated experimentally or from available geotechnical correlation.  

3.5.2.2.2 Identification and Classification of Collapsible Soils  Soil deposits most likely to collapse are; (i) loose fills, (ii) altered wind‐blown sands, (iii) hill wash of loose consistency,  and (iv) decomposed granite or other acid igneous rocks.  A very simple test for recognizing collapsible soil is the ″sauges test″.   Two undisturbed cylindrical samples (sausages)  of the same diameter and length (volume) are carved from the soil. One sample is then wetted and kneaded to form a  cylinder of the original diameter. A decrease in length as compared to the original, undisturbed cylinder will confirm a  collapsible grain structure. Collapse is probable when the natural void ratio, ei is higher than a critical void ratio, ec  that depends on void ratios eL and ep at liquid limit and plastic limits respectively.     

  Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐161 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

 

Table 6.3.2:   Engineering Classification of Soils (Criteria for Assigning Group Symbols and Group Names using  Laboratory Tests A)  Classification  (For particles smaller  than 75 mm and  based on estimated  weights)                         

     

Gravels  (More than  50%of  coarse  fraction  retained on  No. 4 sieve  (4.75 mm) 

Coarse  grained soils   (More than 50%  of the material  retained on No.  200 sieve (0.075  mm)     

      Sands 

      Clean   gravels 

Group  Symbol    

Group Name B

  GW 

Well graded gravels, sandy  gravels, sand gravel mixture,  D little or no fines.  

 

  GP 

Clayey gravels, silty clayey  D, F, G   gravels. . 

> 12   

    Clean   Sands 

  SW 

Well graded sand, gravelly  H sand, little or no fines.   

 

  SP 

Poorly graded sands, gravelly  H sand, little or no fines.   

  SM 

Silty sand, poorly graded sand  F, G, H   silt mixtures. 

    Inorganic 

wL ≥  50  Organic 

Soils of high organic origin 

       

E

  ML 

Silt of low to medium  compressibility, very fine  sands, rock flour, silt with  K, L, M   sand. 

CL 

Clays of low to medium  plasticity, gravelly clay, sandy  K, L, M clay, silty clay, lean clay.   

IP< 4 or the  limit values  below 'A' line of  plasticity chart  IP >7 and the  limit values  above 'A' line of  Plasticity Chart 

For 4> IP > 7  and limit  values  above  'A' line, dual  symbol  required* 

Cu ≥  6 and  1≤  Cz ≤ 3 C 

E

< 5   

Cu < 6  and/or  1 > Cz > 3 C         

> 12 E 

Clayey sand, sand clay  F, G, H   mixtures. 

IP < 4 or the  limit values  below 'A' line of  Plasticity chart  IP >7 and the  limit values  above 'A' line of  plasticity chart 

For 4 > IP >7  and limit  values  above A‐  line, dual   symbols  required. 

Limit values on or below 'A' line of plasticity  chart & IP <4 

  Limit values above 'A' line of   plasticity chart and/or IP > 4 

K, L, M, N

OL 

Organic clay   and  K, L, M, O  Organic silt  of  low to medium plasticity 

Silts &  Clays  

C

1> Cz> 3   

    GC 

  Organic 

   

  Cu < 4 and/or 

Silty gravels, silty sandy  D, F, G   gravels. 

        Inorganic 

C

Poorly graded gravels, sandy  gravels, Sand gravel mixture,  D little or no fines.   

    GM 

Fine grained   wL < 50  soils   (Over   50% of the   material   smaller than  0.075 mm)     

Cu ≥ 4 and  1 ≤ Cz  ≤ 3   

E

        Gravel  with fines 

(over 50% of  coarse    fraction   Sands with   smaller than   fines  4.75 mm) 

    Silts &  Clays  

   

< 5   

  SC 

         

Laboratory Classification Percent Other Criteria finer  than  0.075mm   

Liquid limit (oven dried) Liquid limit (undried)    < 0.75    Limit values on or below 'A' line of plasticity  chart 

MH 

Silt of high plasticity,  micaceous fine sandy or silty  K, L, M   soil, elastic silt. 

CH 

High plastic clay, fat clay.  M  

OH 

Organic clay of high plasticity.  K, L, M, P  

Liquid limit (oven dried) Liquid limit (undried)    < 0.75 

PT 

Peat and highly organic soils.  K, L, M, Q  

Identified by colour, odour, fibrous texture  and spongy characteristics. 

K, L, 

Limit values above 'A' line of  plasticity chart 

   

6‐162 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

 

Chapter 3 

NOTES:

A  Based on the material passing the 3-in. (75-mm) sieve  B  If field sample contained cobbles or boulders, or both, add “with cobbles or boulders, or both” to group name.  C  Cu = D60/D10, CZ = (D30)2 / (D10 ×D60)  D  If soil contains ≥ 15 % sand, add “with sand” to group name.  E  Gravels with 5 to 12 % fines require dual symbols: GW-GM well-graded gravel with silt GW-GC well-graded gravel with clay GP-GM

poorly graded gravel with silt

GP-GC

poorly graded gravel with clay 

F  If fines classify as CL-ML, use dual symbol GC-GM, or SC-SM.  G If fines are organic, add “with organic fines” to group name. H If soil contains ≥ 15 % gravel, add “with gravel” to group name. I Sands with 5 to 12 % fines require dual symbols: SW-SM well-graded sand with silt SW-SC well-graded sand with clay SP-SM

poorly graded sand with silt

SP-SC

poorly graded sand with clay.

J If Atterberg limits plot in hatched area, soil is a CL-ML, silty clay. K If soil contains 15 to 29 % plus No. 200, add “with sand” or “with gravel,” whichever is predominant. L If soil contains ≥30 % plus No. 200, predominantly sand, add “sand ” to group name. M If soil contains ≥ 30 % plus No. 200, predominantly gravel, add “gravelly” to group name. N PI ≥ 4 and plots on or above “A” line. O PI < 4 or plots below“ A” line. P PI plots on or above “A” line. Q PI plots below “A” line. If desired, the percentages of gravel, sand, and fines may be stated in terms indicating a range of percentages, as follows: Trace −

Particles are present but estimated to be less than 5 %

Few −

5 to 10 %

Little −

15 to 25 %

Some −

30 to 45 %

Mostly −

50 to 100 %

   

 

   

Fig. 6.3.1: Plasticity Chart (based on materials passing 425 µm Sieve) 

  Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐163 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

 

Table 6.3.3: Classification and Description of Organic Soils (after Edil, 1997)  Organic Content   (Test Method : ASTM D2974)  < 5 % 

Description   Little effect on behavior; considered inorganic soil. 

6 ~ 20 % 

Effects properties but behavior is still like mineral soils; organic  silts and clays. 

21 ~ 74 % 

Organic matter governs properties; traditional soil mechanics  may be applicable; silty or clayey organic soils.  Displays behavior distinct from traditional soil mechanics  especially at low stress. 

> 75 % 

The following formula should be used to estimate the critical void ratio.    

 

ec = 0.85 e L + 015 e P    

 

 

 

 

(6.3.1)   

Collapsible soils (with a degree of saturation, Sr ≤ 0.6) should satisfy the following condition:   

 

 

e L − ei ≤ 0.10 1 + ei  

 

 

 

 

  (6.3.2)

 

A consolidation test is to be performed on an undisturbed specimen at natural moisture content and to record the  thickness, ″H″ on consolidation under a pressure ″p″ equal to overburden pressure plus the external pressure likely to  be exerted on the soil. The specimen is then submerged under the same pressure and the final thickness H′ recorded.  Relative subsidence, I subs is found as:   

 

I subs =

H − H′ H   

 

 

 

 

  (6.3.3)

 

Soils having Isubs ≥ 0.02 are considered to be collapsible.  

3.5.2.2.4 Identification and Classification of Dispersive Soils  Dispersive nature of a soil is a measure of erosion. Dispersive soil is due to the dispersed structure of a soil matrix.  An  identification of dispersive soils can be made on the basis of pinhole test.   The pinhole test was developed to directly measure  dispersibility of  compacted fine‐grained soils in which water is  made to  flow  through  a  small hole  in  a  soil  specimen,  where water  flow  through  the  pinhole  simulates  water flow  through a crack or other concentrated leakage channel in the impervious core of a dam or other structure. The test is  run under 50, 180, 380 and 1020 mm heads and the soil is classified as follows in Table 6.3.4.  Table 6.3.4: Classification of Dispersive Soil On the Basis of Pinhole Test (Sherard et. al. 1976)  Test Observation  Fails rapidly under 50 mm head.  Erode slowly under 50 mm or 180 mm head  No colloidal erosion under 380 mm or 1020 mm  head 

Type of Soil

Class of Soil 

Dispersive soils 

D1 and D2 

Intermediate soils 

ND4 and ND3 

Non‐dispersive soils 

ND2 and ND1 

Another method of identification is to first determine the pH of a 1:2.5 soil/water suspension. If the pH is above 7.8,  the soil may contain enough sodium to disperse the mass. Then determine: (i) total excahangable bases, that is, K+,  Ca2+,  Mg2+  and  Na+  (milliequivalent  per  100g  of  air  dried  soil)  and  (ii)  cation  exchange  capacity  (CEC)  of  soil  (milliequivalent per 100g of air dried soil). The Exchangeable Sodium Percentage ESP is calculated from the relation: 

6‐164 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

 

 

ESP =

 

Chapter 3 

Na ×100(%) CEC   

 

 

 

 

  (6.3.4)

 

 

 

 

  (6.3.5)

EmgP is given by:   

EMgP =

 

Mg × 100(%) CEC  

If the ESP is above 8 percent and ESP plus EMgP is above 15, dispersion will take place. The soils with ESP=7 to 10 are  moderately dispersive in combination with reservoir waters of low dissolved salts. Soils with ESP greater than 15 have  serious  piping  potential.  Dispersive  soils  do  not  actually  present  any  problems  with  building  structures.  However,  dispersive  soil  can  lead  to  catastrophic  failures  of  earth  embankment  dams  as  well  as  severe  distress  of  road  embankments. 

3.5.2.2.5 Identification and Classification of Soft Inorganic Soils  No standard definition exists for soft clays in terms of conventional soil parameters, mineralogy or geological origin. It  is,  however,  commonly  understood  that  soft  clays  give  shear  strength,  compressibility  and  severe  time  related  settlement  problems.  In  near  surface  clays,  where  form  a  crust,  partial  saturation  and  overconsolidation  occur  together and the overconsolidation is a result of the drying out of the clay due to changes in the water table.  In  below  surface  clays,  overconsolidation  may  have  taken  place  when  the  clay  was  previously  at,  or  close  to  the  ground  surface  and  above  the  water  table,  but  due  to  subsequent  deposition  the  strata  may  now  be  below  the  surface,  saturated  and  overconsolidated.  Partial  saturation  does  not  in  itself  cause  engineering  problems,  but  may  lead to laboratory testing difficulties. Soft clays have undrained shear strengths between about 10kPa and 40kPa, in  other words, from exuding between the fingers when squeezed to being easily moulded in the fingers.  Soft clays present very special problems of engineering design and construction. Foundation failures in soft clays are  comparatively common. The construction of buildings in soft clays has always been associated with stability problems  and settlement.  Shallow foundations inevitably results in large settlements which must be accommodated for in the  design,  and  which  invariably  necessitate  long‐term  maintenance  of  engineered  facilities.  The  following  relationship  among N‐values obtained from SPT, consistency and undrained shear strength of soft clays may be used as guides.    N‐value (blows/300 mm of penetration)

Consistency

Undrained Shear Strength (kN/m2)

Below 2  2 – 4 

Very soft Soft

Less than 20 20 – 40 

Undrained shear strength is half of unconfined compressive strength as determined from unconfined compression  test or half of the peak deviator stress as obtained from unconsolidated undrained (UU) triaxial compression test.   

3.6

MATERIALS 

All materials for the construction of foundations shall conform to the requirements of Part 5: Building Materials.  

3.6.1 Concrete  All  concrete  materials  and  steel  reinforcement  used  in  foundations  shall  conform  to  the  requirements  specified  in  Chapter  5  unless  otherwise  specified  in  this  section.  For  different  types  of  foundation  the  recommended  concrete  properties  are  shown  in  Table  6.3.5.  However,  special  considerations  should  be  given  for  hostile  environment  (salinity, acidic environment).       Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐165 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

 

    Table 6.3.5: Properties of Concrete for Different Types of Foundations  Minimum cement  content  3 (kg/m ) 

Specified Min.  28days Cylinder  Strength (MPa) 

Slump  (mm) 

Remarks 

Footing/raft 

350 

20 

25 to 125 

Drilled shaft/ Cast‐in‐situ pile  (tremie concrete) 

400 

18 

125 to 200 

  Retarder and  plasticizer  recommended. 

Driven pile 

350 

25 

25 to 125 

Foundation Type 

 

3.6.2 Steel  3.7.2.1 General  Corrosion  in  soil,  water  or  moist  out‐door  environment  is  caused  by  electro‐chemical  processes.  The  process  takes  place in corrosion cells on the steel surface, which consists of an anodic surface (where the corrosion takes place), a  cathodic  surface  (where  oxygen  is  reduced)  and  the  electrolyte,  which  reacts  with  these  surfaces.  In  the  case  of  general  corrosion,  the  surface  erosion  is  relatively  even  across  the  entire  surface.  Local  corrosion  however  is  concentrated to a limited surface area. Pronounced cavity erosion is rather unusual on unprotected carbon steel in  soil or water.  In  many  circumstances,  steel  corrosion  rates  are  low  and  steel  piles  may  be  used  for  permanent  works  in  an  unprotected  condition.  The  degree  of  corrosion  and  whether  protection  is  required  depend  upon  the  working  environment which can be variable, even within a single installation. Underground corrosion of steel piles driven into  undisturbed  soils  is  negligible  irrespective  of  the  soi1  type  and  characteristics.  The  insignificant  corrosion  attack  is  attributed to the low oxygen levels present in undisturbed soil.  For the purpose of calculations, a maximum corrosion  rate of 0.015 mm per side per year may be used.  In recent‐fill soils or industrial waste soils, where corrosion rates  may be higher, protection systems should be considered. 

3.7.2.2 Atmospheric Corrosion  Atmospheric corrosion of steel in the UK averages approximately 0 035 mm/side per year and this value may be used  for most atmospheric environments. 

3.7.2.3 Corrosion in Fresh Waters   

Corrosion losses in fresh water immersion zones are generally lower than for sea water so the effective life of steel  piles  is  normally  proportionately  longer.  However,  fresh  waters  are variable  and  no  general  advice  can  be given  to  quantify the increase in the length of life.   

3.7.2.4 Corrosion in Marine Environments   

Marine  environments  may  include  several  exposure  zones  with  different  aggressivity  and  different  corrosion  performance.  (a)   Below the bed level:  Where piles are below the bed level little corrosion occurs and the corrosion rate given  for underground corrosion is applicable, that is, 0.015 mm/side per year.  (b)   Seawater immersion zone:  Corrosion of steel pi111ng in immersion conditions is normally low, with a mean  corrosion rate of 0 035 mm/side per year.  (c)   Tidal zones:  Marine growths in this zone give significant protection to the piling, by sheltering the steel from  wave action between tides and by limiting the oxygen supply to the steel surface. The corrosion rate of steels 

6‐166 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

 

Chapter 3 

in  the  tidal  zone  is  similar  to  that  of  immersion  zone  corrosion,  i.e.  0  035  mm/side  per  year.  Protection  should be provided where necessary, to the steel surfaces to prevent the removal or damage of the marine  growth.  (d)   Low water zone:  In tidal waters, the low water level and the splash zone are reasons of highest thickness  losses, where a mean corrosion rate of 0 075 mm/side per year occurs. Occasionally higher corrosion rates  are encountered at the lower water level because of specific local conditions.  (e)   Splash  and  atmospheric  zones:  In  the  splash  zone,  which  is  a  more  aggressive  environment  than  the  atmospheric zone, corrosion rates are similar to the low water level, i.e. 0.075 mm/side per year. In this zone  thick stratified rust layers may develop and at thicknesses greater than 10 mm these tend to spall from the  steel especially on curved parts of the piles such as the shoulders and the clutches.  Rust has a much greater  volume than the steel from which it is derived so that the steel corrosion losses are represented by some 10  % to 20 % of the rust thickness.  The  boundary  between  the  splash  and  atmospheric  zones  is  not  well  defined,  however,  corrosion  rates  diminish rapidly with distance  above  peak wave  height and  the mean  atmospheric corrosion  rate of  0.035  mm/side per year can be used for this zone. 

3.7.2.5 Methods of Increasing Effective Life  The effective life of unpainted or otherwise unprotected steel piling depends upon the combined effects of imposed  stresses and corrosion.  Where measures for increasing the effective life of a structure are necessary, the following  should be considered; introduction of a corrosion allowance (i.e. oversized cross‐sections of piles, high yield steel etc),  anti‐corrosion painting, application of a polyethylene (PE) coating (on steel tube piles), zinc coating, electro‐chemical  (cathodic) protection, casting in cement mortar or concrete, and use of atmospheric corrosion resistant steel products  instead of ordinary carbon steel in any foundation work involving steel.  (a)   Use  of  a  heavier  section:  Effective  life  may  be  increased  by  the  use  of  additional  steel  thickness  as  a  corrosion  allowance.  Maximum  corrosion  seldom  occurs  at  the  same  position  as  the  maximum  bending  moment. Accordingly, the use of a corrosion allowance is a cost effective method of increasing effective life.  It is preferable to use atmospheric corrosion resistant high strength low alloy steel.  (b)   Use of a high yield steel: An alternative to using mild steel in a heavier section is to use a higher yield steel  and retain the same section.   (c)   Zinc coatings: Steel piles should normally be coated under shop conditions. Paints should be applied to the  cleaned  surface by  airless  spraying  and  then  cured  rapidly  to  produce  the  required  coating thickness  in  as  few  coats  as  possible.  Hot  zinc‐coating  of  steel  piles  in  soil  can  achieve  normally  long‐lasting  protection,  provided that the zinc layer has sufficient thickness. In some soils, especially those with low pH‐values, the  corrosion of zinc can be high, thereby shortening the protection duration. Low pH‐values occur normally in  the aerated zone above the lowest ground water level. In such a case, it is recommended to apply protection  paint on top of the zinc layer.  (d)   Concrete encasement: Concrete encasement may be used to protect steel piles in marine environment. The  use of concrete may be restricted to the splash zone by extending the concrete cope to below the mean high  water level, both splash and tidal zones may be protected by extending the cope to below the lowest water  level. The concrete itself should be a quantity sufficient to resist seawater attack.  (e)   Cathodic protection: The design and application of cathodic protection systems to marine piles structures is a  complex  operation  requiring  the  experience  of  specialist  firms.  Cathodic  protection  with  electric  current  applied  to  steel  sheet  pile  wall.  Rod‐type  anodes  are  connected  directly  with  steel  sheet  pile  Cathodic  protection  is  considered  to  be  fully  effective  only  up  to  the  half‐tide  mark.  For  zones  above  this  level, 

  Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐167 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

 

including  the  splash  zone,  alternative  methods  of  protection  may  be  required,  in  addition  to  cathodic  protection. Where cathodic protection is used on marine structures, provision should be made for earthing  ships and buried services to the quay.  (f)   Polyetheline  coating:  Steel  tube  piles  can  be  protected  effectively  by  application  of  a  PE‐cover  of  a  few  millimeter  thickness.  This  cover  can  be  applied  in  the  factory  and  is  usually  placed  on  a  coating  of  epoxy.  Steel  tube  piles  in  water,  where  the  mechanical  wear  is  low,  can  in  this  way  be  protected  for  long  time  periods.  When  the  steel  tube  piles  with  the  PE‐cover  are  driven  into  coarse‐grained  soil,  the  effect  of  damaging the protection layer must be taken into consideration.   (g)  Properly  executed  anti‐corrosion  measures,  using  high‐quality  methods  can  protect  steel  piles  in  soil  or  water over periods of 15 to 20 years. PE‐cover in combination with epoxy coating can achieve even longer  protection times. 

3.6.3 Timber  Timber may be used only for foundation of temporary structure and shall conform to the standards specified in Sec  2.9 of Part 5. Where timber is exposed to soil or used as load bearing pile above ground water level, it shall be treated  in accordance with BDS 819:1975.  

3.7

 TYPES OF FOUNDATION  

3.7.1  Shallow Foundation  Shallow  foundations  spread  the  load  to  the  ground  at  shallow  depth.  Generally,  the  capacity  of  this  foundation  is  derived from bearing.  

3.7.1.1     Footing   Footings  are  foundations  that  spread  the  load  to  the  ground  at  shallow  depths.  These  include  individual  column  footings, continuous wall footings, and combined footings. Footings shall be provided under walls, pilasters, columns,  piers, chimneys etc. bearing on soil or rock, except that footings may be omitted under pier or monolithic concrete  walls if safe bearing capacity of the soil or rock is not exceeded.  

3.7.1.2      Raft/ Mat  A foundation consisting of continuous slab that covers the entire area beneath the structure and supports all walls  and columns is considered as a raft or mat foundation. A raft foundation may be one of the following types:  (a)  Flat plate or concrete slab of uniform thickness usually supporting columns spaced uniformly and resting on  soils of low compressibility.   (b)  Flat plates as in (a) but thickened under columns to provide adequate shear and moment resistance.  (c)  Two way slab and beam system supporting largely spaced columns on compressible soil.   (d)   Cellular raft or rigid frames consisting of slabs and basement walls, usually used for heavy structures. 

3.7.2 Deep Foundation  A cylindrical/box foundation having a ratio of depth to base width greater than 5 is considered a Deep Foundation.  Generally, its capacity is derived from friction and end bearing. 

6‐168 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

 

Chapter 3 

3.7.2.1 Driven piles   A  slender  deep  foundation  unit  made  of  materials  such  as  steel,  concrete,  wood,  or  combination  thereof,  which  is  pre‐manufactured and placed by driving, jacking, jetting or screwing and displacing the soil.  (a)    Driven  Precast  Concrete  Piles:  Pile  structure  capable  of  being  driven  into  the  ground  and  able  to  resist  handling stresses shall be used for this category of piles.  (b)  Driven Cast‐in‐situ Concrete Piles : A pile formed by driving a steel casing or concrete shell  in one or more  pieces, which may remain in place after driving or withdrawn, with the inside filled with concrete, falls in this  category of piles. Sometimes an enlarged base may be formed by driving out a concrete plug.   (c)   Driven  Prestressed  Concrete  Pile:  A  pile  constructed  in  prestressed  concrete  in  a  casting  yard  and  subsequently driven in the ground when it has attained sufficient strength.  (d)   Timber  Piles:  structural  timber  (see  Sec  2.9  of  Part  5)  shall  be  used  as  piles  for  temporary  structures  for  directly transmitting the imposed load to soil. When driven timber poles are used to compact and improve  the deposit. 

3.8.2.2  Bored piles/ cast­in­situ piles  A  deep  foundation  of  generally  small  diameter,  usually  less  than  600  mm,  constructed  using  percussion  or  rotary  drilling into the soil. These are constructed by concreting bore holes formed by auguring, rotary drilling or percussion  drilling with or without using bentonite mud circulation. Excavation or drilling shall be carried out in a manner that  will  not  impair  the  carrying  capacity  of  the  foundations  already  in  place  or  will  not  damage  adjacent  foundations.   These foundations may be tested for capacity by load test or for integrity by sonic response or other suitable method.  Under‐reaming drilled piers can be constructed in cohesive soils to increase the end bearing.  

3.8.2.3  Drilled pier/ drilled shafts  The drilled pier is a type of bored pile having a larger diameter (more than 600 mm) constructed by excavating the soil  or sinking the foundation.  

3.8.2.4 

Caisson/ well  

A caisson or well foundation  is a deep foundation of large diameter relative to its length that is generally a hollow  shaft or box which is sunk to position. It differs from other types of deep foundation in the sense that it undergoes  rigid body movement under lateral load, whereas the others are flexible like a beam under such loads. This type of  foundation is usually used for bridges and massive structures. 

 

PART B: SERVICE LOAD DESIGN METHOD OF FOUNDATIONS (SECTIONS 3.9 to 3.12)  3.8

 SHALLOW FOUNDATION  

Shall be applicable to isolated Footings, Combined Footings and Raft/ Mats. 

3.8.1 Distribution of Bearing Pressure  Footing  shall  be  designed  to  keep  the  maximum  imposed  load  within  the  safe  bearing  values  of  soil  and  rock.  To  prevent unequal settlement footing shall be designed to keep the bearing pressure as nearly uniform as practical. 

  Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐169 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

 

For  raft  design,  distribution  of  soil  pressures  should  be  consistent  with  the  properties  of  the  foundation  materials  (subsoil)  and  the  structure  (raft  thickness)  and  with  the  principles  of  geotechnical  engineering.    Mat  or  raft  and  floating foundations shall only be used when the applied load of building or structure is so arranged as to result in  practically uniformly balanced loading, and the soil immediately below the mat is of uniform bearing capacity.   

3.8.2 Footings in Fill Soil  Footings  located  in  fill  are  subject  to  the  same  bearing  capacity,  settlement,  and  dynamic  ground  stability  considerations as footings in natural soil. The behavior of both fill and underlying natural soil should be considered. 

3.8.3 Soil and Rock Property Selection  Soil and rock properties defining the strength and compressibility characteristics of foundation materials are required  for  footing  design.  Foundation  stability  and  settlement  analysis  for  design  shall  be  conducted  using  soil  and  rock  properties based on the results of field and laboratory testing.  

3.8.4 Minimum Depth of Foundation  The minimum depth of foundation shall be 1.5 m for exterior footing of permanent structures in cohesive soils and 2  m in cohesionless soils. For temporary structures the minimum depth of exterior footing shall be 400 mm. In case of  expansive and soils susceptible to weathering effects, the above mentioned minimum depths will be not applicable  and may have to be increased.  

3.8.5 Scour  Footings supported on soil shall be embedded sufficiently below the maximum computed scour depth or protected  with a scour countermeasure.  

3.8.6 Mass Movement of Ground in Unstable Areas  In  certain  areas  mass  movement  of  ground  may  occur  from  causes  independent  of  the  loads  applied  to  the  foundation.  These  include  mining  subsidence,  landslides  on  unstable  slopes  and  creep  on  clay  slopes.  In  areas  of  ground subsidence, foundations and structures should be made sufficiently rigid and strong to withstand the probable  worst loading conditions. The construction of structures on slopes which are suspected of being unstable and subject  to  landslip  shall  be  avoided.  Spread  foundations  on  such  slopes  shall  be  on  a  horizontal  bearing  and  stepped.  For  foundations on clay slopes, the stability of the foundation should be investigated. 

3.8.7 Foundation Excavation   Foundation excavation below ground water table particularly in sand shall be made such that the hydraulic gradient  at the bottom of the excavation is not increased to a magnitude that would case the foundation soils to loosen due to  upward flow of water. Further, footing excavations shall be made such that hydraulic gradients and material removal  do  not  adversely  affect  adjacent  structures.  Seepage  forces  and  gradients  may  be  evaluated  by  standard  flow  net  procedures. Dewatering or cutoff methods to control seepage shall be used when necessary.   In case of soil excavation for raft foundations, the following issues should be additionally taken into consideration:   

(a) Protection for the excavation using shore or sheet piles and/or retaining system with or without bracing,  anchors etc. 

(b) Consideration of the additional bearing capacity of the raft for the depth of the soil excavated.  (c) Consideration of the reduction of bearing capacity for any upward buoyancy pressure of water. 

6‐170 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

3.9

 

Chapter 3 

GEOTECHNICAL DESIGN OF SHALLOW FOUNDATIONS 

3.9.1 General  Shallow  foundations  on  soil  shall  be  designed  to  support  the  design  loads  with  adequate  bearing  and  structural  capacity and with tolerable settlements. In addition, the capacity of footings subjected to seismic and dynamic loads  shall  be  appropriately  evaluated.  The  location  of  the  resultant  pressure  on  the  base  of  the  footings  should  be  maintained preferably within B/6 of the centre of the footing.  

3.9.2 Design Load   Shallow foundation design (considering bearing capacity due to shear strength) shall consider the most unfavourable  effect  of the following combinations of loading:  (a) 

Full Dead Load + Normal Live Load 

(b) 

Full Dead Load + Normal Live Load + Wind Load or Seismic Load  

(c)     

0.9 ×(Full Dead Load) + Buoyancy Pressure 

Shallow  foundation  design  (considering  settlement)  shall  consider  the  most  unfavourable  effect  of  the  following  combinations of loading:  SAND   

(a) 

Full Dead Load + Normal Live Load  

 

(b) 

Full Dead Load + Normal Live Load + Wind Load or Seismic Load  

CLAY  Full Dead Load + 0.5× Normal Live Load  

3.9.3 Bearing capacity  When  physical  characteristics  such  as  cohesion,  angle  of  internal  friction,  density  etc.  are  available,  the  bearing  capacity  shall  be  calculated  from  stability  considerations.  Established  bearing  capacity  equations  shall  be  used  for  calculating  bearing  capacity.  A  factor  of  safety  of  between  2.0  to  3.0  (depending  on  the  extent  of  soil  exploration,  quality control and monitoring of construction) shall be adopted to obtain allowable bearing pressure when dead load  and normal live load is used. Thirty three percent overstressing above allowable pressure shall be allowed in case of  design considering wind or seismic loading. Allowable load shall also limit settlement between supporting elements to  a tolerable limit. 

3.9.4 Presumptive Bearing Capacity for Preliminary Design  For lightly loaded and small sized structures (two storied or less in occupancy category A, B, C & D) and for preliminary  design  of  any  structure,  the  presumptive  bearing  values  (allowable)  as  given  in  Table  6.3.6  may  be  assumed  for  uniform soil in the absence of test results.  Table 6.3.6: Presumptive Values of Bearing Capacity for Lightly Loaded Structures*  Soil Type   

 Soil Description 



Soft Rock or Shale 



Gravel, sandy gravel, silty sandy gravel; very dense and offer high resistance to  penetration during excavation (soil shall include the groups GW, GP, GM, GC) 

  Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

Safe Bearing Capacity, kPa 440 

 

400** 

6‐171 

Part 6  Structural Design 

Soil Type   

 

 Soil Description 

 

Safe Bearing Capacity, kPa



Sand (other than fine sand), gravelly sand, silty sand; dry (soil shall  include the  groups SW, SP, SM, SC) 

200** 



Fine sand; loose & dry  (soil shall include the groups SW, SP) 

100** 



Silt, clayey  silt, clayey sand; dry lumps which can be easily crushed by finger (soil  shall include the groups ML,, SC, & MH) 

150 



Clay, sandy clay; can be indented with strong thumb pressure (soil shall include the  groups CL, & CH) 

150 



Soft clay; can be indented with modest thumb pressure (soil shall include the  groups CL, & CH) 

100 



Very  soft  clay;  can  be  penetrated  several  centimeters  with  thumb  pressure  (soil  shall  include the groups CL & CH) 

50 



Organic clay & Peat (soil shall include the groups OH, OL, Pt) 

10 

Fills 

To be determined after  investigation.  To be determined after  investigation. 

*  Two stories or less  (Occupancy category A, B, C and D as per BNBC)  **  50% of these values shall be used where water table is above the base, or below it  within a distance  equal to the  least dimension of foundation 

3.9.5 Allowable Increase of Bearing Pressure due to  Wind and Earthquake Forces  The allowable bearing pressure of the soil determined in accordance with this section may ay be increased by 33 per  cent when lateral forces due to wind or earthquake act simultaneously with gravity loads. No increase in allowable  bearing pressure shall be permitted for gravity loads acting alone. In a zone where seismic forces exist, possibility of  liquefaction in loose sand, silt and sandy soils shall be investigated. 

3.9.6 Settlement of Foundation  Foundation shall be so  designed that the allowable  bearing capacity  is  not exceeded, and the total  and differential  settlement are within permissible values. Foundations can settle in various ways and each affects the performance of  the structure. The simplest mode consists of the entire structure settling uniformly. This mode does not distort the  structure.  Any  damage  done  is  related  to  the  interface  between  the  structure  and  adjacent  ground  or  adjacent  structures.  Shearing  of  utility  lines  could  be  a  problem.  Another  possibility  is  that  one  side  of  the  structure  settles  much more than the opposite side and the portions in between settle proportionately. This causes the structure to  tilt, but it still does not distort. A nominal tilt will not affect the performance of the structure, although it may create  aesthetic and public confidence problems. However, as a result of difference in foundation settlement the structure  may settle and distort causing cracks in walls and floors, jamming of doors and windows and overloading of structural  members. 

3.9.7 Total Settlement  Total settlement (δ) is the absolute vertical movement of the foundation from its as‐constructed position to its loaded  position. Total settlement of foundation due to net imposed load shall be estimated in accordance with established  engineering principle. An estimate of settlement with respect to the following shall be made where applicable:   

6‐172 

(i)

Elastic compression of the underlying soil below the foundation and of the foundation. 

(ii)

Consolidation settlement. 

(iii)

Secondary consolidation/compression of the underlying soil. 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

 

Chapter 3 

(iv)

Compression  and  volume  change due  to  change  in effective  stress  or  soil  migration  associated with  lowering or movement of ground water. 

(v)

Seasonal swelling and shrinkage of expansive clays.  

(vi)

Ground movement on earth slopes, such as surface erosion, creep or landslide.  

(vii)

Settlement due to adjacent excavation, mining subsidence and underground erosion.  

In normal circumstances of inorganic and organic soil deposits the total settlement is attributed due to the first three  factors as mentioned above. The other factors are regarded as special cases. Because soil settlement can have both  time‐depended  and  noontime‐dependent  components,  it  is  often  categorized  in  terms  short‐term  settlement  (or  immediate  settlement)  which  occurs  as  quickly  as  the  load  is  applied,  and  long‐term  settlement  (or  delayed  settlement),  which occurs  over  some  longer  period.  Many  engineers associate  consolidation  settlement  solely with  the long term settlement of clay. However, this is not strictly true. Consolidation is related to volume change due to  change in effective stress regardless of the type of soil or the time required for the volume change. 

3.9.7.1

Elastic/ Distortion Settlement 

Elastic  Settlement  (δd)  of  foundation  soils  results  from  lateral  movements  of  the  soil  without  volume  change  in  response to changes in effective vertical stress. This is non‐time dependent phenomenon and similar to the Poisson’s  effect where an object is loaded in the vertical direction expands laterally. Elastic or distortion settlements primarily  occur when the load is confined to a small area, such as a structural foundation, or near the edges of large loaded  area such as embankments. 

3.9.7.2

Immediate Settlement/ Short Term Settlement 

This vertical compression occurs immediately after the application of loading either on account of elastic behaviour  that produces distortion at constant volume and on account of compression of air void. This is sometimes designated  as δi. for sandy soils, even the consolidation component is immediate. 

3.9.7.3

Primary Consolidation Settlement 

Primary consolidation settlement or simply the consolidation settlement (δc) of foundation is due to consolidation of  the underlying saturated  or  nearly  saturated  soil  especially  cohesive silt or  clay.   The  full  deal  load  and  50% of  the  total live load should be considered when computing the consolidation settlement of foundations on clay soils.  

3.9.7.4

Secondary Consolidation Settlement 

Secondary consolidation settlement (δs) of the foundation is due to secondary compression or consolidation of the  underlying saturated or nearly saturated cohesive silt or clay. This is primarily due to particle reorientation, creep, and  decomposition of organic materials. Secondary compression is always time‐dependent and can be significant in highly  plastic clays, organic soils, and sanitary landfills, but it is negligible in sands and gravels. 

3.9.7.5

Differential Settlement  and its Effect on the Structure 

Differential  settlement  is  the  difference  in  total  settlement  between  two  foundations  or  two  points  in  the  same  foundation. It occurs as a result of relative movement between two parts of a building. The related terms describing  the  effects  of  differential  settlement  on  the  structural  as  a  whole  or  on  parts  of  it  are  tilt,  rotation  and  angular  distortion/relative rotation which are defined below. 

  Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐173 

Part 6  Structural Design 

3.9.7.6

 

 

Tilt 

It  is  rotation  of  the  entire  superstructure  or  a  well  defined  part  of  it  as  a  result  of  non‐uniform  or  differential  settlement of foundation as a result of which one side of the building settles more than the other thus affecting the  verticality of the building. 

3.9.7.7

Rotation 

It  is  the  angle  between  the  horizontal  line  and  an  imaginary  straight  line  connecting  any  two  foundations  or  two  points in a single foundation. 

3.9.7.8

Angular Distortion/Relative Rotation 

Angular  distortion  or  relative  rotation  is  the  angle  between  imaginary  straight  line  indicating  the  overall  tilt  of  a  structure and the imaginary connecting line indicating the inclination of a specific part of it. It is measured as the ratio  of differential settlement to the distance between the two points.  . 

3.9.8 Causes of Differential Settlement    Due consideration shall be given to estimate the differential settlement that may occur under the building structure  under the following circumstances:   (i) (ii) (iii) (iv)

Nonuniformity in subsoil formation within the area covered by the building due to geologic or  man‐ made causes, or anomalies in type, structure, thickness and density of the formation.  Nonuniform pressure distribution due to nonuniform and incompleteloading.   Ground water condition during and after construction.  Loading influence of adjacent structures. 

(v)

Uneven expansion and contraction due to moisture migration, uneven drying, wetting or softening. 

3.9.9 Tolerable Settlement , Tilt and Rotation  Allowable or limiting settlement of a building structure will depend on the nature of the structure, the foundation and  the  soil.  Different  types  of  structures  have  varying  degrees  of  tolerance  to  settlements  and  distortions.  These  variations  depend  on  the  type  of  construction,  use  of  the  structure,  rigidity  of  the  structure  and  the  presence  of  sensitive  finishes.  As  a  general  rule,  a  total  settlement  of  25  mm  and  a  differential  settlement  of  20  mm  between  columns  in  most  buildings  shall  be  considered  safe  for  buildings  on  isolated  pad  footings  on  sand  for  working load  (unfactored).    A  total  settlement  of  40  mm  and  a  differential  settlement  of  20  mm  between  columns  shall  be  considered  safe  for  buildings  on  isolated  pad  footings  on  clay  soil  for  working  load.    Buildings  on  raft  can  usually  tolerate  greater  total  settlements.  Limiting  tolerance  for  distortion  and  deflections  introduced  in  a  structure  is  necessarily  a  subjective  process,  depending  on  the  status  of  the  building  and  any  specific  requirements  for  serviceability. The limiting values, given in Table 6.3.7 may be followed as guidelines. 

3.9.10 Dynamic Ground Stability or Liquefaction Analysis    Soil liquefaction is a phenomenon in which a saturated soil deposit looses most, if not all, of its strength and stiffness  due to the generation of excess pore water pressure during earthquake‐induced ground shaking. It has been a major  cause  for  damage  of  structures  during  past  earthquakes  (e.g.,  1964  Niigata  Earthquake).  Current  knowledge  of  liquefaction is significantly advanced and several evaluation methods are available. Hazards due to liquefaction are  routinely evaluated and mitigated in seismically active developed parts of the world.    

6‐174 

 

Vol. 2 

Table 6.3.7: Permissible Total Settlement, Differential Settlement and Angular Distortion (tilt) for Shallow Foundations in Soils (Adapted from NBCI, 2005)    Type of Structure 

Isolated Foundations  Sand and Hard Clay 

Raft Foundation  Plastic Clay 

Sand and Hard Clay 

Plastic Clay 

Maximum  Settlement  (mm) 

Differential  Settlement  (mm) 

Angular  Distortion  (mm) 

Maximum  Settlement  (mm) 

Differential  Settlement  (mm) 

Angular  Distortion  (mm) 

Maximum  Settlement  (mm) 

Differential  Settlement  (mm) 

Angular  Distortion  (mm) 

Maximum  Settlement  (mm) 

Differential  Settlement  (mm) 

Angular  Distortion  (mm) 

Steel Structure 

50 

0.0033 L 

1/300 

50 

0.0033 L 

1/300 

75 

0.0033 L 

1/300 

100 

0.0033 L 

1/300 

RCC Structures 

50 

0.0015 L 

1/666 

75 

0.0015 L 

1/666 

75 

0.0021 L 

1/500 

100 

0.002 L 

1/500 

60 

0.002 L 

1/500 

75 

0.002 L 

1/500 

75 

0.0025 L 

1/400 

125 

0.0033 L 

1/300 

    (i)  L/H = 2 * 

60 

0.0002 L 

1/5000 

60 

0.0002 L 

1/5000 

Not likely to be encountered 

    (ii)  L/H = 7 * 

60 

0.0004 L 

1/2500 

60 

0.0004 L 

1/2500 

Not likely to be encountered 

Silos 

50 

0.0015 L 

1/666 

75 

0.0015 L 

1/666 

100 

0.0025 L 

1/400 

125 

0.0025 L 

1/400 

Water Tank 

50 

0.0015 L 

1/666 

75 

0.0015 L 

1/666 

100 

0.0025 L 

1/400 

125 

0.0025 L 

1/400 

Multistoried Building  (a) RCC or steel framed  building with panel  walls  (b) Load bearing walls 

Note:  The values given in the Table may be taken only as a guide and the permissible total settlement, differential settlement and tilt (angular distortion) in each case should   be decided as per  requirements of the designer.  L denotes the length of deflected part of wall/ raft or centre to centre distance between columns.  H denotes the height of wall from foundation footing.  * For intermediate ratios of L/H, the values can be interpolated.   

Part 6  Structural Design 

   

  6‐175 

Liquefaction Analysis  Liquefaction  can  be  analyzed  by  a  simple  comparison  of  the  seismically  induced  shear  stress  with  the  similarly  expressed shear stress required to cause initial liquefaction or whatever level of shear strain amplitude is deemed  intolerable in design. Usually, the occurrence of 5% double amplitude (DA) axial strain is adopted to define the cyclic  strength consistent with 100% pore water pressure build‐up. The corresponding strength (CRR) can be obtained by  several procedures.   Thus, the liquefaction potential of a sand deposit is evaluated in terms of factor of safety FL, defined as in Equation  (6.3.6). The externally applied cyclic stress ratio (CSR) can be evaluated by Equations (6.3.7a, 6.3.7b and 6.3.8).   

FL =

CRR          CSR

(6.3.6) 

If the factor of safety FL is < 1, liquefaction is said to take place. Otherwise, liquefaction does not occur. The factor of  safety obtained in this way is generally used to identify  the depth to which liquefaction is expected to occur in a  future earthquake. This information is necessary if some countermeasure is to be implemented in an in situ deposit  of sands.  The cyclic shear stress induced at any point in level ground during an earthquake due to the upward propagation of  shear waves can be assessed by means of a simple procedure proposed. If a soil column to a depth z is assumed to  move horizontally and if the peak horizontal acceleration on the ground surface is  amax , the maximum shear stress 

τ max  acting at the bottom of the soil column is given by    

τ max = amax rd (γ t )(z / g )   

and,     

rd = 1 − 0.015z  

 

 

 

 

   

(6.3.7a)   

(6.3.7b) 

Where γt is unit weight of the soil, g is the gravitational acceleration and rd is a stress reduction coefficient to allow  for the deformability of the soil column (rd <1). It is recommended to use the empirical formula given in Equation  (6.3.7b) to compute stress reduction coefficient rd, where z is in meters. Division of both sides of Equation (6.3.7a)  by the effective vertical stress  σ v′  gives   

CSR =

τ max a max σ v = rd ' g σ v' σv

 

(6.3.8) 

Where, σv=γtz  is the  total  vertical  stress.  Equation  (6.3.8)  has  been  used  widely to  assess the  magnitude  of  shear  stress induced in a soil element during an earthquake. One of the advantages of Equation (6.3.8) is that all the vast  amount of information on the horizontal accelerations that has ever been recorded on the ground surface can be  used directly to assess the shear stress induced by seismic shaking in the horizontal plane within the ground.     The  second  step  is  to  determine  the  cyclic  resistance  ratio  (CRR)  of  the  in  situ  soil.  The  cyclic  resistance  ratio  represents  the  liquefaction  resistance  of  the  in  situ  soil.  The  most  commonly  used  method  for  determining  the  liquefaction resistance is to use the data obtained from the standard penetration test. A cyclic triaxial test may also  be used to estimate CRR more accurately.     Site Amplification Factor   

Site  response  analysis  of  a  site  may  be  carried  out  to  estimate  the  site  amplification  factor.  For  this  purpose,  dynamic  parameters  such  as  shear  modulus  and  damping  factors  need  to  be  estimated.    The  site  amplification  factor is required to estimate the amax for a given site properly.    

Part 6  Structural Design 

   

  6‐176 

Soils and Foundations   

 

Chapter 3 

3.9.11 Principles of Structural Design of Foundations  3.9.11.1

Loads and Reactions 

3.9.11.1.1 Determination of Loads and Reactions  Footings shall be considered as under the action of downward forces, due to the superimposed loads, resisted by an  upward pressure exerted by the foundation materials and distributed over the area of the footings as determined  by  the  eccentricity  of  the  resultant  of  the  downward  forces.  Where  piles  are  used  under  footings,  the  upward  reaction of the foundation shall be considered as a series of concentrated loads applied at the pile centers, each pile  being assumed to carry the computed portion of the total footing load. 

3.9.11.1.2 Isolated and Multiple Footing Reactions   When a single isolated footing supports a column, pier or wall, the footing shall be assumed to act as a cantilever  element.  When  footings  support  more  than  one  column,  pier,  or  wall,  the  footing  slab  shall  be  designed  for  the  actual conditions of continuity and restraint. 

Raft Foundation Reactions 

3.9.11.1.3

For determining the distribution of contact pressure below a raft it is analysed either as a rigid or flexible foundation  considering the rigidity of the raft, and the rigidity of the superstructure and the supporting soil. Consideration shall  be given to the increased contact pressure developed along the edges of raft on cohesive soils and the decrease in  contact  pressure  along  the  edges  on  granular  soils.  Any  appropriate  analytical  method  reasonably  valid  for  the  condition may be used. Choice of a particular method shall be governed by the validity of the assumptions in the  particular case. Numerical analysis of rafts using appropriate software may be used for determination of reactions,  shears and moments.   Analytical methods (based on beams on elastic foundation) and numerical methods require  values of the modulus  of  subgrade  reaction  of  the  soil.  For  use  in  preliminary  analysis  and  design,  indicative  values  of  the  modulus  of  subgrade reaction for cohesionless soils and cohesive soils i shown in Table 6.3.7 and Table 6.3.8, respectively.    

.

 

 

 

 

 

(6.3.9) 

Table 6.3.7: Modulus of Subgrade Reaction (k) for Cohesionless Soils   Soil Characteristic 

*Modulus of Sub‐grade Reaction (k) Soil  3 Characteristic (kN/m ) 

Relative  Density 

Standard Penetration Test  Value (N) (Blows per 300  mm) 

For Dry or Moist State 

Loose 

<10  

15000 

9000 

Medium 

10 to 30 

15000 to 47000 

9000 to 29000 

Dense 

30 and over 

47000 to 180000 

29000 to 108000 

For Submerged State   

*The above values apply to a square plate 300 mm x 300 mm or beams 300 mm wide.           

  Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐177 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

 

Table 6.3.8 Modulus of Subgrade Reaction (k) for Cohesive Soils   Soil Characteristic  Consistency 

Unconfined Compressive Strength  2 (kN/m ) 

Stiff 

100 to 200 

Modulus of Subgrade Reaction, k  (kN/m3)   27000 

Very Stiff 

200to 400 

27000 to54000 

Hard 

400 and over 

54000 to 108000 

* The values apply to a square plate 300 mm x 300 mm. The above values are based on the assumption  that the average loading intensity does not exceed half the ultimate bearing capacity. 

3.9.11.2

Moment 

3.9.11.2.1

Critical Section 

External moment on any section of a footing shall be determined by passing a vertical plane through the footing and  computing the moment of the forces acting over the entire area of the footing on one side of that vertical plane.  The critical section for bending shall be taken at the face of the column, pier, or wall. In the case of columns that are  not  square  or  rectangular,  the  section  shall  be  taken  at  the  side  of  the  concentric  square  of  equivalent  area.  For  footings under masonry walls, the critical section shall be taken halfway between the middle and edge of the wall.  For footings under metallic column bases, the critical section shall be taken halfway between the column face and  the edge of the metallic base.  

3.9.11.2.2

Distribution of Reinforcement 

Reinforcement of square footings shall be distributed uniformly across the entire width of footing. Reinforcement of  rectangular  footings  shall  be  distributed  uniformly  across  the  entire  width  of  footing  in  the  long  direction.  In  the  short direction, the portion of the total reinforcement given by the following equation shall be distributed uniformly  over a band width (centered on center line of column or pier) equal to the length of the short side of the footing.    

   

   

   

 

    

 

(6.3.10) 

 

Here, β is the ratio of the footing length to width. The remainder of reinforcement required in the short direction  shall be distributed uniformly outside the center band width of footing.  

3.9.11.2.3 Shear  3.9.11.2.4 Critical Section  Computation of shear in footings, and location of critical section shall be in accordance with relevant sections of the  structural design part of the code. Location of critical section shall  be  measured from the face of  column, pier or  wall,  for  footings  supporting  a  column,  pier,  or  wall.  For  footings  supporting  a  column  or  pier  with  metallic  base  plates,  the  critical  section  shall  be  measured  from  the  location  defined  in  the  critical  section  for  moments  for  footings. 

3.9.11.2.5 Critical Section for Footings on Driven Piles/ Bored Piles/ Drilled Piers  Shear on the critical section shall be in accordance with the following. Entire reaction from any driven pile or bored  piles, and drilled pier whose center is located dP/2 (dP =diameter of the pile) or more outside the critical section shall  be  considered  as  producing  shear  on  that  section.  Reaction  from  any  driven  pile  or  drilled  shaft  whose  center  is  located dP/2 or more inside the critical section shall be considered as producing no shear on that section. For the  intermediate  position  of  driven  pile  or  drilled  shaft  centers,  the  portion  of the  driven  pile  or  shaft  reaction to  be 

6‐178 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

 

Chapter 3 

considered  as  producing  shear  on  the  critical  section  shall  be  based  on  linear  interpolation  between  full  value  at  dP/2 outside the section and zero value at dP/2 inside the section.   

3.9.11.3

Reinforcement and Development Length 

3.9.11.3.1

Development Length 

Computation of development length of reinforcement in footings shall be in accordance with the relevant sections  of the structural design part of the code. 

3.9.11.3.2

Critical Section  

Critical sections for development length of reinforcement shall be assumed at the same locations as defined above  as the critical section for moments and at all other vertical planes where changes in section or reinforcement occur. 

3.9.11.4

Transfer of Force at Base of Column 

3.9.11.4.1

Transfer of Force 

All  forces  and  moments  applied  at  base  of  column  or  pier  shall  be  transferred  to  top  of  footing  by  bearing  on  concrete and by reinforcement. 

3.9.11.4.2

Lateral Force 

Lateral forces shall be transferred to supporting footing in accordance with shear transfer provisions of the relevant  sections of the structural design part of the code.  

3.9.11.4.3

Bearing Strength of Concrete 

Bearing  on  concrete  at  contact  surface  between  supporting  and  supported  member  shall  not  exceed  concrete  bearing strength for either surface. 

3.9.11.4.4

Reinforcement 

Reinforcement shall be provided across interface between supporting and supported member either by extending  main  longitudinal  reinforcement  into  footings  or  by  dowels.  Reinforcement  across  interface  shall  be  sufficient  to  satisfy all of the following:   (i)

Reinforcement  shall  be  provided  to  transfer  all  force  that  exceeds  concrete  bearing  strength  in  supporting and supported member.  

(ii)

If  it  is  required  that  loading  conditions  include  uplift,  total  tensile  force  shall  be  resisted  by  reinforcement. 

(iii)

3.9.11.4.5

Area  of  reinforcement  shall  not  be  less  than  0.005  times  gross  area  of  supported  member,  with  a  minimum of 4 bars.  

Dowel Size 

Diameter of dowels, if used, shall not exceed the diameter of longitudinal reinforcements.  

3.9.11.4.6

Development Length and Splicing 

For transfer of force by reinforcement, development length of reinforcement in supporting and supported member,  required splicing shall be in accordance with the relevant sections (Part. 6, Chapter 6) of the structural design part of  the code.  

  Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐179 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

 

3.10 Geotechnical Design of Deep Foundations  3.10.1 Driven Piles  The provisions of this article shall apply to the design of axially and laterally loaded driven piles in soil. Driven pile  foundation  shall  be  designed  and  installed  on  the  basis  of  a  site  investigation  report  that  will  include  subsurface  exploration  at  locations  and  depths  sufficient  to  determine  the  position  and  adequacy  of  the  bearing  soil    unless  adequate data is available upon which the design and installation of the piles can be based. The report shall include:   (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi)

Recommended pile type and capacities  Driving and installation procedure  Field inspection procedure    Pile load test, integrity test requirements  Durability and quality of pile material   Designation of bearing stratum or strata 

A plan showing clearly the designation of all piles by an identifying system shall be filed prior to installation of such  piles. All detailed records for individual piles shall bear an identification corresponding to that shown on the plan. A  copy of such plan shall be available at the site for inspection at all times during the construction.   The design and installation of driven pile foundations shall be under the direct supervision of a competent engineer  who shall certify that the piles as installed satisfy the design criteria 

3.10.1.1

Application 

Pile  driving  may  be  considered  when  footings  cannot  be  founded  on  granular  or  stiff  cohesive  soils  within  a  reasonable  depth.  At  locations  where  soil  conditions  would  normally  permit  the  use  of  spread  footings  but  the  potential  for  scour  exists,  piles  may  be  driven  as  a  protection  against  scour.  Piles  may  also  be  driven  where  an  unacceptable amount of settlement of spread footings may occur 

3.10.1.2

Materials 

Driven  piles  may  be  cast‐in‐place  concrete,  pre‐cast  concrete,  pre‐stressed  concrete,  timber,  structural  steel  sections, steel pipe, or a combination of materials. 

3.10.1.3

Penetration 

Pile penetration shall be determined  based on vertical and lateral load capacities of  both the pile and subsurface  materials.  In  general,  the  design  penetration  for  any  pile  shall  be  not  less  than  3m  into  hard  cohesive  or  dense  granular material, nor less than 6m into soft cohesive or loose granular material. 

3.10.1.4

Estimated Pile Length 

Estimated pile lengths of driven piles shall be shown on the drawing and shall be based upon careful evaluation of  available subsurface information, axial and lateral capacity calculations, and/or past experience. 

3.10.1.5

Driven Pile Types 

Driven piles shall be classified as "friction" or "end bearing" or a combination of both according to the manner in  which  load  transfer  is  developed.  The  ultimate  load  capacity  of  a  pile  consists  of  two  parts.  One  part  is  due  to  friction called skin friction or shaft friction or side shear, and the other is due to end bearing at the base or tip of the  pile. If the skin friction is greater than about 80% of the end bearing load capacity, the pile is deemed a friction pile  and, if the reverse, an end bearing pile. If the end bearing is neglected, the pile is called a “floating pile”.  

6‐180 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

3.10.1.6

 

Chapter 3 

Batter Piles 

When  the  lateral  resistance  of  the  soil  surrounding  the  piles  is  inadequate  to  counteract  the  horizontal  forces  transmitted to the foundation, or when increased rigidity of the entire structure is required, batter piles should be  used  in  the  foundation.  Where  negative  skin  friction  loads  are  expected,  batter  piles  should  be  avoided,  and  an  alternate method of providing lateral restraint should be used.   Free standing batter piles are subject to bending moments due to their own weight, or external forces from other  sources.  Batter  piles  in  loose  fill  or  consolidating  deposits  may  become  laterally  loaded  due  to  settlement  of  the  surrounding soil. In consolidating clay, special precautions, like provision of permanent casing, shall be taken.  

3.10.1.7

Selection of Soil and Rock Properties 

Soil  and  rock  properties  defining  the  strength  and  compressibility  characteristics  of  the  foundation  materials,  are  required for driven pile design.  

3.10.1.8

Design of Pile Capacity 

The  design  pile  capacity  is  the  maximum  load  that  the  driven  pile  shall  support  with  tolerable  movement.  In  determining the design pile capacity the following items shall be considered:  (i) (ii) (iii)

Ultimate geotechnical capacity (axial and lateral).   Structural capacity of pile section (axial and lateral).  The allowable axial load on a pile shall be the least value of the above two capacities. 

In determining the design axial capacity, consideration shall be given to the following:  (i)

The influence of fluctuations in the elevation of ground water table on capacity. 

(ii)

The effects of driving piles on adjacent structure and slopes. 

(iii)

The effects of negative skin friction or down loads from consolidating soil and the effects of lift loads  from expansive or swelling soils. 

(iv)

The influence of construction techniques such as augering or jetting on pile capacity. 

(v)

The difference between the supporting capacity single pile and that of a group of piles. 

(vi)

The capacity of an underlying strata to support load of the pile group;  

(vii)

The possibility of scour and its effect on axial lateral capacity. 

3.10.1.9

Ultimate Geotechnical Capacity of Driven Pile for Axial Load 

The ultimate load capacity, Qult, of a pile consists of two parts. One part is due to friction called skin friction or shaft  friction  or  side  shear,  Qs  and the  other  is  due  to  end bearing  at the  base  or  tip  of the  pile, Qb  The  ultimate  axial  capacity (Qult) of driven piles shall be determined in accordance with the following for compression loading.                                  Qult

= Qs + Qb − W           

 

 

 

 

 

(6.3.11) 

 

 

 

 

 

(6.3.12)  

 

 

 

 

6.3.13

For uplift loading; 

Qult ≤ 0.7Qs + W

         

The allowable or working axial load shall be determined as:    

 

Qallow = Qult / FS

 

 

 

 

Where, W is the weight of the pile and FS is a gross factor of safety usually greater than 2.5. Often, for compression  loading, the weight term is neglected if the weight, W, is considered in estimating imposed loading.     Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐181 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

 

The ultimate bearing capacity (skin friction and/or end bearing) of a single vertical pile may be determined by any of  the following methods.  (i)

By the use of static bearing capacity equations 

(ii)

By the use of SPT and CPT 

(iii)

By field load tests 

(iv)

By dynamic methods 

3.10.1.10

Static Bearing Capacity Equations for Pile Capacity 

The skin friction, Qs and end bearing Qb can be calculated as:                                 QS

= AS f S           

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(6.3.14a) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(6.3.14b)  

and;  

Qb = Ab f b           Where,    

 

As =   skin friction area (perimeter area) of the pile = Perimeter × Length  fs =   skin  frictional  resistance  on  unit  surface  area  of  pile,  that  depends  on  soil  properties  and  loading  conditions (drained or undrained)  Ab=   end bearing area of the pile = Cross‐sectional area of pile tip (bottom)  fb=   end bearing resistance on unit tip area of  pile,  that depends on soil properties to a depth of 2B (B is  the diameter for a circular pile section or length of sides for a square pile section) from the pile tip  and loading conditions (drained or undrained)  For a layered soil system containing n number of layers, end bearing resistance can be calculated considering soil  properties of the layer at which the pile rests, and the skin friction resistance considers all the penetrating layers  calculated as: 





 

 

 

 

(6.3.15) 

Where, ΔZi  represents the thickness of any (ith) layer and (Perimeter)i is the perimeter of the pile in that layer . The  manner in which skin friction is transferred to the adjacent soil depends on the soil type. In fine‐grained soils, the  load transfer is nonlinear and decreases with depth. As a result, elastic compression of the pile is not uniform; more  compression occurs on the top part than on the bottom part of the pile. For coarse‐grained soils, the load transfer is  approximately linear with depth (higher loads at the top and lower loads at the bottom).  In order to mobilize skin friction and end bearing, some movement of the pile is necessary. Field tests have revealed  that  to  mobilize  the  full  skin  friction  a  vertical  displacement  of  5  to  10  mm  is  required.  The  actual  vertical  displacement depends on the strength of the soil and is independent of the pile length and pile diameter. The full  end  bearing  resistance  is  mobilized  in  driven  piles  when  the  vertical  displacement  is  about  10%  of  the  pile  tip  diameter. For bored piles or drilled shafts, a vertical displacement of about 30% of the pile tip diameter is required.  The full end bearing resistance is mobilized when slip or failure zones similar to shallow foundations are formed. The  end bearing resistance can then be calculated by analogy with shallow foundations. The important bearing capacity  factor is Nq.  The full skin friction and full end bearing are not mobilized at the same displacement. The skin friction is mobilized  at about one‐tenth of the displacement required to mobilize the end bearing resistance. This is important in decid‐

6‐182 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

 

Chapter 3 

ing  on  the  factor  of  safety  to  be  applied  to  the  ultimate  load.  Depending  on  the  tolerable  settlement,  different  factors of safety can be applied to skin friction and to end bearing.  Generally, piles driven into loose, coarse‐grained soils tend to density the adjacent soil. When piles are driven into  dense,  coarse‐grained  soils,  the  soil  adjacent  to  the  pile  becomes  loose.  Pile  driving  usually  remolds  fine‐grained  soils near the pile shaft. The implication of pile installation is that the intact shear strength of the soil is changed and  one must account for this change in estimations of the load capacity. 

3.10.1.11 Axial Capacity of Driven Piles in Cohesive Soil using Static Bearing Capacity  Equations   The  ultimate  axial  capacity  of  driven  piles  in  cohesive  may  be  calculated  from  static  formula,  given  by  (6.3.14a),  (6.3.14b) and (6.3.15),  using a total stress method for undrained loading conditions, or an effective stress method  for drained loading conditions. Appropriate values of adhesion factor (α) and coefficient of horizontal soil stress (ks)  for  cohesive  soils  that  are  consistent  with  soil  condition  and  pile  installation  procedure  may  be  used.  There  are  basically two approaches for calculating skin friction:   (i)

The α‐method that is based on total stress analysis and is normally used to estimate the short term load  capacity  of  piles  embedded  in  fine  grained  soils.  In  this  method,  a  coefficient  α  is  used  to  relate  the  undrained shear strength cu or su to the adhesive stress (fs) along the pile shaft. As such,  

Qs = α cu As    

 

 

 

α = 1.0    

 

for clays with cu ≤ 25 kN/m2 

α = 0.5    

 

for clays with cu ≥ 70 kN/m2 

1

 

 

(6.3.16) 

for clays with 25 kN/m2 < cu < 70 kN/m2 

 

The end bearing in such a case is found by analogy with shallow foundations and is expressed as: 

Qb = (cu ) b ( N c ) b Ab    

 

 

 

 

(6.3.17) 

Nc  is a bearing capacity factor, usually 9. cu is the undrained shear strength of soil at the base of the pile.  The suffix b’s are indicatives of base of pile. The general equation for Nc is, however, as follows. 

6 1

            

0.2

9      

 

 

 

(6.3.18) 

The symbol Db represents the diameter at the base of the pile. The skin friction value, fb =(cu)b(Nc)b should  not exceed 4.0 MPa.  (ii)

The β‐method is based on an effective stress analysis and is used to determine both the short term and  long  term  pile  load  capacities.  The  friction  along  the  pile  shaft  is  found  using  Coulomb’s  friction  law,  . The lateral effective stress, σ′x is proportional  where the friction stress is given by  to vertical effective stress, σ′z by a co‐efficient , K. As such,  

f s = Kσ ′z tan ϕ ′ = βσ ′z

 

 

  1

Where, 

  √

 

 

  (6.3.19a)

 

(6.3.19b) 

φ′ is the effective angle of internal friction of soil and OCR is the over-consolidation ratio.  For normally  consolidated  clay,  β  varies  from  0.25  to  0.29.  The  value  of  β  decreases  for  very  long  piles,  as  such  a  correction factor is used. 

    Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

   

   

0.5   

 

(6.3.19c) 

6‐183 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

 

The  end  bearing  capacity  is  calculated  by  analogy  with  the  bearing  capacity  of  shallow  footings  and  is  determined from: 

f b = (σ v′ ) b ( N q ) b  

 

 

 

 

 

(6.3.20)   

 

Where, Nq is a bearing capacity factor that depends on angle of internal friction φ′ of the soil at the base of the pile, as presented in Fig. 6.3.2. Subscript “b” designates the parameters at the base soil.   

Bearing Capacity Factor, Nq

1000

100

10 20

25

30 35 40 45 Angle of Internal Friction, φ (Degree)

50  

Fig. 6.3.2: Bearing Capacity Factor Nq for Deep Foundation (After Berezantzev, 1961) 

3.10.1.12 Axial  Capacity  of  Driven  Piles  in  Cohesive  Soil  and  Non­plastic  Silt  using  SPT Values  Standard Penetration Test N‐value is a measure of consistency of clay soil and indirectly the measure of cohesion.  The  skin  friction  of  pile  can  thus  be  estimated  from  N‐value.  The  following  relation  may  be  used  for  preliminary  design of piles in clay and silt soils. The N value used should be corrected for overburden.  For clay and silt:   

f s = 1.67 N (in kPa)

≤ 70 kPa  

 

 

  (6.3.21)

 

For end bearing, the relationship is as under.  For clay:  

 

f b = 45 N

 

  (6.3.22)

For silt:   

 

⎛L⎞ f b = 40 N ⎜ ⎟ (in kPa) ≤ 300 N and ≤ 10000 kPa     ⎝D⎠

(6.3.23) 

(in kPa)

 

 

 

3.10.1.13 Axial  Capacity  of  Driven  Piles  in  Cohesionless  Soil  using  Static  Bearing  Capacity Equations  Piles in cohesionless soils shall be designed by effective stress methods of analysis for drained loading conditions.   The  ultimate  axial  capacity  of  piles  in  cohesionless  soils  may  also  be  calculated  using  empirical  effective  stress  6‐184 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

 

Chapter 3 

method  or  from  in‐situ  methods  and  analysis  such  as  the  cone  penetration  or  pressure  meter  tests.  Dynamic  formula  may  be  used  for  driven  piles  in  cohesionless  soils  such  as  gravels,  coarse  sand  and  deposits  where  pore  pressure developed due to driving is quickly dissipated.  For piles in cohesionless soil, the ultimate side resistance may be estimated using the following formula:  

f s = βσ ′z

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  (6.3.24)

Where, σ’z is the effective vertical stress at the level under consideration. The values for β are as under.  β = 0.10   

 

for φ = 33o  

β = 0.20   

 

for φ = 35o  

β = 0.35   

 

for φ = 37o  

For uncemented calcareous sand the value of β varies from 0.05 to 0.10.  The following equation, as used for cohesive soil, may be used to compute the ultimate end bearing capacity of piles  in sandy soil in which, the maximum effective stress, σ’v allowed for the computation is 240 kPa   

f b = (σ v′ ) b ( N q ) b  

 

 

Nq = 8 to 12 

 

for loose sand 

Nq = 12 to 40 

 

for medium sand 

Nq = 40   

 

for dense sand 

 

 

 

(6.3.25)   

  Fig. 6.3.2 may also be used to estimate the value of Nq.     

Critical Depth for End Bearing and Skin Friction  The  vertical  effective  stress  (σ′v  or  σ′z)  increases  with  depth.  Hence  the  skin  friction  should  increase  with  depth  indefinitely.  In  reality  skin  friction  does  not  increase  indefinitely.  It  is  believed  that  skin  friction  would  become  a  constant  at  a  certain  depth.  This  depth  is  named  critical  depth.  Pile  end  bearing  in  sandy  soils  is  also  related  to  effective  stress.  Experimental  data  indicates  that  end  bearing  capacity  does  not  also  increase  with  depth  indefinitely. Due to lack of a valid theory, Engineers use the same critical depth concept adopted for skin friction for  end  bearing  capacity  as  well.  Both  the  skin  friction  and  the  end  bearing  capacity  are  assumed  to  increase  till  the  critical depth, dc and then maintain a constant value. Following approximations may be used for the critical depth in  relation to diameter of pile, D.  dc = 10D  

 

for loose sand 

dc = 15D  

 

for medium dense sand 

dc = 20D  

 

for dense sand

3.10.1.14 Axial Capacity of Driven Piles in Cohesionless Soil using SPT Values  Standard Penetration Test N‐value is a measure of consistency of clay soil and indirectly the measure of cohesion.  The skin friction of pile can thus be estimated from N‐value. The following relation may be used for clay soils.  For large displacement piles: 

fb = 2 N

For large displacement piles: 

f b = 1N

(in kPa) (in kPa)

    

 

 

 

  (6.3.26a)

 

 

 

(6.3.26b) 

 For end bearing, the relationship is as under.    Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐185 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

3.10.1.15

 

 

⎛L⎞ f b = 400 N ⎜ ⎟ (in kPa) ≤ 400 N and ≤ 10000 kPa    ⎝D⎠

 

(6.3.27) 

Axial Capacity of Driven Pile using Pile Load Test 

Generally,  the  total  test  load  is  twice  the  design  load.  The  pile  load  test  has  considered  to  have  failed,  if  the  settlement into the soil, that is the gross settlement minus elastic shortening, is greater than 25 mm at full test load  or the settlement into the soil is greater than 13mm, at the end of the test after removal of the load. 

3.10.1.16

Selection of Factor of Safety 

 A factor of safety shall be applied to all estimates of failure load after considering: 

 

i)

The reliability of the value of the ultimate bearing capacity,  

ii)

Control of the pile installation procedure 

ii) 

The type of superstructure and type of loading, and  

iii) 

Allowable total and differential settlement of the structure. 

When ultimate bearing capacity is calculated from either static formula or dynamic formula, the above factors shall  be  considered.  The  minimum  factor  of  safety  on  static  formula  shall  be  3.0.  The  factor  of  safety  shall  actually  depend on the reliability of the formula, depending on a particular site and the reliability of the subsoil parameters  employed  in  the  calculations.  The  assumption  of  a  factor  of  safety  shall  also  consider  the  load  settlement  characteristics of the structure as a whole on a given site. The design pile capacity shall be specified on the plans so  the factor of safety can be adjusted if the specified construction control procedure is altered. When safe load on a  driven pile is assessed by applying a factor of safety to load test data, the minimum safety factor shall be  2.  Settlement is to be limited or differential settlement avoided (i.e., for accurately aligned machinery or a fragile finish  of superstructure)  (i) (ii) (iii)

large impact or vibrating loads are expected  soil strength or modulus may be expected to deteriorate with  time  live load on a structure carried by friction piles is a considerable portion of the total load and  approximate the dead load in duration.  

The allowable axial load on a pile shall be the least value permitted by consideration of the following factors:   (i) (ii) (iii)

The capacity of the pile as a structural member.  The allowable bearing pressure on soil strata underlying the pile tip.  The resistance to penetration of the pile, including resistance to driving, resistance to jacking, the  rate of penetration, or other equivalent criteria.  

(iv)

The capacity as indicated by load test, where load tests are required.     Driven pile in soil shall be designed for a minimum overall factor of safety of 2.0 against bearing capacity failure (end  bearing, side resistance or combined) when the design is based on the results of a load test conducted at the site.  Otherwise,  it  shall  be  designed  for  a  minimum  overall  factor  of  safety  3.0.  The  minimum  recommended  overall  factor of safety is based on an assumed normal level of field quality control during construction. If a normal level of  field quality control cannot be assured, higher minimum factors of safety shall be used. The recommended values of  overall factor of safety on ultimate axial load capacity based on specified construction Control is presented in Table  6.3.8.  Partial factor of safety may be used independently for skin friction and end bearing. The values of partial factor of  safety may be taken as 1.5 and 3.0 respectively for skin friction and end bearing. The design/allowable load may be  taken as the minimum of the values considering overall and partial factor of safety. 

6‐186 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

 

Chapter 3 

Table 6.3.8:  Design Factor of Safety for Deep Foundation for Downward and Upward Load 

Structure 

Design   Life (yrs.) 

Probability of Failure  Good Control

Monument  Permanent  Temporary  

 > 100  25 ‐100  < 25 

10‐5 

Design Factor of Safety     Normal Control Poor Control 

V. Poor Control

2.30 

3.00 

3.50 

4.00 

‐4

2.00 

2.50 

2.80 

3.40 

‐3

1.40 

2.00 

2.30 

2.80 

10   10  

For uplift load, factor of safety is higher. Usually 1.5 to 2.0 times of the values in this chart for downward loading 

3.10.1.17

Group Piles and Group Capacity of Driven Piles 

All piles shall be braced to provide lateral stability in all directions. Three or more piles connected by a rigid cap shall  be  considered  as  being  braced,  provided  that  the  piles  are  located  in  a  radial  direction  from  the  centroid  of  the  group,  not less  than 60  degrees  apart circumferentially.  A  two  pile  group  in a rigid cap  shall  be  considered  to  be  braced along the axis connecting the two piles. Piles supporting walls shall be driven alternately in lines at least 300  mm  apart  and  located  symmetrically  under  the  centre  of  gravity  of  the  wall  load,  unless  effective  measures  are  taken to cater for eccentricity and lateral forces, or the wall piles are adequately braced to provide lateral stability.  Group pile capacity of driven piles should be determined as the product of the group efficiency, number of piles in  the  group  and  the  capacity  of  a  single  pile.  In  general,  a  group  efficiency  value  of  1.0  should  be  used  except  for  friction piles driven in cohesive soils. The minimum center‐to‐center pile spacing of 2.5B is recommended. 

3.10.1.17.1 Pile Caps  Pile caps shall be of reinforced concrete. The soil immediately below the pile cap shall not be considered as carrying  any vertical load. The tops of all piles shall be embedded not less than 75 mm into pile caps and the cap shall extend  at least 100 mm beyond the edge of all piles. The tops of all piles shall be cut back to sound material before capping.  The pile cap shall be rigid enough, so that the imposed load can be distributed on the piles in a group equitably. The  cap  shall  generally  be  cast  over  a  75  mm  thick  levelling  course  of  concrete.  The  clear  cover  for  the  main  reinforcement in the cap slab under such condition shall not be less than 60 mm.  

3.10.1.18

Lateral Loads (Capacity) on Driven Piles 

The design of laterally loaded piles is usually governed by lateral movement criteria. The design of laterally loaded  piles  shall  account  for  the  effects  of  soil‐structure  interaction  between  the  pile  and  ground.  Methods  of  analysis  evaluating the ultimate capacity or deflection of laterally loaded piles may be used for preliminary design only as a  means to evaluate appropriate pile sections. Lateral capacity of vertical single piles shall be the least of the values  calculated on the basis of soil failure, structural capacity of the pile and deflection of the pile head.   Deflection calculations require horizontal subgrade modulus of the surrounding soil. When considering lateral load  on piles, the effect of other coexistent loads, including axial load on the pile, shall be taken into consideration for  checking structural capacity of the shaft.   For estimating the depth of fixity, established method of analysis shall be used. To determine lateral load capacity,  lateral load test to at least twice the proposed design working load shall be made. The resulting allowable load shall  not be more than one‐half of the test load that produces a gross lateral movement of 25 mm at the ground surface.   Lateral  load  tests  shall  be  performed.    All  piles  standing  unbraced  in  air,  water  or  soils  not  capable  of  providing  lateral support shall be designed as columns in accordance with the provisions of this Code.  

  Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐187 

Part 6  Structural Design 

3.10.1.19

 

 

Vertical Ground Movement 

The potential for external loading on a pile by vertical ground movements shall be considered as part of the design.  Vertical  ground  movements  may  result  in  negative  skin  friction  or  downdrag  loads  due  to  settlement  of  compressible  soils  or  may  result  in  uplift  loads  due  to  heave  of  expansive  soils.  For  design  purposes,  the  full  magnitude of maximum vertical ground movement shall be assumed. 

3.10.1.19.1 Negative Skin Friction  (Downward Movement)  Driven piles installed in compressible fill or soft soil subject to compression shall be designed against downward load  due to downdrag known as the negative friction of the compressible soil. The potential for external loading on a pile  by  negative  skin  friction/downdrag  due  to  settlement  of  compressible  soil  shall  be  considered  as  a  part  of  the  design. Evaluation of negative skin friction shall include a load‐transfer method of analysis to determine the neutral  point  (i.e.,  point  of  zero  relative  displacement)  and  load  distribution  along  shaft.  Due  to  the  possible  time  dependence  associated  with  vertical  ground  movement,  the  analysis  shall  consider  the  effect  of  time  on  load  transfer  between  the  ground  and  shaft  and  the  analysis  shall  be  performed  for  the  time  period  relating  to  the  maximum  axial  load  transfer  to  the pile. If necessary,  negative  skin  friction loads  that  cause  excessive settlement  may  be  reduced  by  application  of  bitumen  or  other  viscous  coatings  to  the  pile  surfaces  before  In  estimating  negative skin friction the following factors shall be considered:  (i)

Relative movement between soil and pile shaft. 

(ii)

Relative movement between any underlying compressible soil and pile shaft. 

(iii)

Elastic compression of the pile under the working load. 

(iv)

The rate of consolidation of the compressible layer. 

Negative skin friction is mobilized only when tendency for relative movement between pile shaft and surrounding  soil exists.  

3.10.1.19.2 Expansive Soils (Upward Movement)  Piles driven in swelling soils may be subjected to uplift forces in the zone of seasonal moisture change. Piles shall  extend  a  sufficient  distance  into  moisture‐stable  soils  to  provide  adequate  resistance  to  swelling  uplift  forces.  In  addition, sufficient clearance shall be provided between the ground surface and the underside of pile caps or grade  beams  to  preclude  the  application  of  uplift  loads  at  the  pile  cap.  Uplift  loads  may  be  reduced  by  application  of  bitumen or other viscous coatings to the pile surface in the swelling zone. 

3.10.1.20

Dynamic/Seismic Design of Piles 

In  case  of  submerged  loose  sands,  vibration  caused  by  earthquake  may  cause  liquefaction  or  excessive  total  and  differential settlements. This aspect of the problem shall be investigated and appropriate methods of improvements  should  be  adopted  to  achieve  suitable  values  of  N.  Alternatively,  large  diameter  drilled  pier  foundation  shall  be  provided and taken to depths well into the layers which are not likely to liquefy. 

3.10.1.21

Protection against Corrosion and Abrasion 

Where conditions of exposure warrant, concrete encasement or other corrosion protection shall be used on steel  piles and steel shells. Exposed steel  piles or steel shells shall  not he  used in salt or  brackish  water,  and only with  caution in fresh water. Details are given in Section 3.7.2. 

3.10.1.22

Dynamic Monitoring 

Dynamic  monitoring  may  be  specified  for  piles  installed  in  difficult  subsurface  conditions  such  as  soils  with  obstructions  and  boulders  to  evaluate  compliance  with  structural  pile  capacity.  Dynamic  monitoring  may  also  be 

6‐188 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

 

Chapter 3 

considered for geotechnical capacity verification, where the size of the project or other limitations deters static load  testing. 

3.10.1.23

Maximum Allowable Driving Stresses 

Maximum allowable driving stresses in pile material for top driven piles shall not exceed 0.9Fy (compression), 0.9Fy  ’’

(tension) for steel piles, 0.85f c concrete (compression) and 0.7Fy  (steel reinforcement (tension) for  concrete  piles  and 0.85f’’c‐fpc (compression) for prestressed concrete piles. 

3.10.1.24

Buoyancy 

The  effects  of hydrostatic  pressure  shall  be  considered  in  the  design  of  driven  piles,  where  used  with  foundation  subjected to buoyancy forces. 

3.10.1.25

Protection against Deterioration 

3.10.1.25.1 Steel Piles  A steel pile foundation design shall consider that steel piles may be subject to corrosion, particularly in fill soils low  pH soils (acidic) and marine environments. A field electric resistivity survey or resistivity testing and pH testing of  soil  and  ground  water  samples  should  be  used  to  evaluate  the  corrosion  potential.  Methods  of  protecting  steel  piling  in  corrosive  environments  include  use  of  protective  coatings,  cathodic  protection,  and  increased  pile  steel  area. 

3.10.1.25.2 Concrete Piles  A concrete pile foundation design shall consider that deterioration of concrete piles can occur due to sulfates in soil,  ground water, or sea water; chlorides in soils and chemical wastes; acidic ground water an organic acids. Laboratory  testing  of  soil  and  ground  water  samples  for  sulfates  and  ph  is  usually  sufficient  to  assess  pile  deterioration  potential.  A  full  chemical  analysis  of  soil  and  round  water  samples  is  recommended  when  chemical  wastes  are  suspected.  Methods  of  protecting  concrete  piling  can  include  dense  impermeable  concrete,  sulfate  resisting  portland cement, minimum cover requirements for reinforcing steel, and use of epoxies, resins, or other protective  coatings 

3.10.1.25.3 Timber Piles  A timber pile foundation (used for temporary structures) design shall consider that deterioration of timber piles can  occur due to decay from wetting and drying cycles or from insects or marine borers Methods of protecting timber  piling include pressure treating with creosote or other wood preservers 

3.10.1.26

Pile Spacing, Clearance and Embedment 

3.10.1.26.1 Pile Spacing  End bearing driven piles shall be proportioned such that the minimum center‐to‐center pile spacing shall exceed the  greater of 750 mm or 2.5 pile diameters/widths. The distance from the side of any pile to the nearest edge of the  pile cap shall not be less than 100 mm. The spacing of piles shall be such that the average load on the supporting  strata  will  not  exceed  the  safe  bearing  value  of  those  strata  as  determined  by  test  boring  or  other  established  methods.   Piles deriving their capacity from frictional resistance shall be sufficiently apart to ensure that the zones of soil from  which  the  piles  derive  their  support  do  not  overlap  to  such  an  extent  that  their  bearing  values  are  reduced.  Generally, in such cases, the spacing shall not be less than 3.0 times the diameter of the shaft.  

  Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐189 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

 

3.10.1.26.2 Minimum Projection of Pile into the Pile Cap  The tops of piles shall project not less than 100 mm into concrete after all damaged pile material has been removed.  

3.10.1.27

Structural Capacity of Driven Pile Section 

The  cross‐section  of  driven  piles  shall  be  of  sufficient  size  and  pile  material  shall  have  the  necessary  structural  strength to resist all handling stresses during driving or installation and the necessary strength to transmit the load  imposed on them to the underlying and surrounding soil. Pile diameter/cross‐section of a pile shaft at any level shall  not be less than the designated nominal diameter/cross‐section.The structural design of piles must consider each of  the following loading conditions.  •

Handling loads are those imposed on the pile between the time it is fabricated and the time it is in the  pile driver leads and ready to be driven. They are generated by cranes, forklifts, and other construction  equipment. 



Driving loads are produced by the pile hammer during driving. 



Service loads are the design loads from the completed structures. 

The  maximum  allowable  stress  on  a  pile  shall  not  exceed  0.33 f c′   for  precast  concrete  piles  and  33 f c′ − f pc for  prestressed concrete piles and  0 .25 f y for steel H‐piles. The axial carrying capacity of a pile fully embedded in soil  with undrained shear strength greater than 10 kN/m2 shall not be limited by its strength as long column. For weaker  soils (undrained shear strength less than 10 kN/m2), consideration shall be given to determine whether the shaft  would behave as a long column. If necessary, suitable reductions shall be made in its structural strength considering  buckling. The effective length of a pile not secured against buckling by adequate bracing shall be governed by fixity  conditions imposed on it by the structure it supports and by the nature of the soil in which it is installed.   

3.10.1.28

Driven Cast­in­Place Concrete Piles 

Driven  cast‐in‐place  concrete  piles  shall  be  in  general  cast  in  metal  shells  driven  into  the  soil  that  will  remain  permanently  in  place.  However,  other  types  of  cast‐in‐place  piles,  plain  or  reinforced,  cased  or  uncased,  may  be  used if the soil conditions permit their use and if their design and method of placing are satisfactory. 

3.10.1.28.1 Shape  Cast‐in‐place concrete piles may have a uniform cross‐section or may be tapered over any portion. 

3.10.1.28.2 Minimum Area  The minimum area at the butt of the pile shall be 650 square cms and the minimum diameter at the tip of the pile  shall be 200 mm.  

3.10.1.28.3 General Reinforcement Requirements  Depending on the driving and installation conditions and the loading condition, the amount of reinforcement and its  arrangement  shall  vary.    Cast‐in‐place  piles,  carrying  axial  loads  only,  where  the  possibility  of  lateral  forces  being  applied to the piles is insignificant, need not be reinforced where the soil provides adequate lateral support. Those  portions  of  cast‐in‐place  concrete  piles  that  are  not  supported  laterally  shall  be  designed  as  reinforced  concrete  columns and the reinforcing steel shall extend 3000 mm below the plane where the soil provides adequate lateral  restraint. Where the shell is smooth pipe and more than 3 mm in thickness, it may be considered as load carrying in  the absence of corrosion. Where the shell is corrugated and is at least 2 mm in thickness, it may be considered as  providing confinement in the absence of corrosion. 

6‐190 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

 

Chapter 3 

3.10.1.28.4 Reinforcement into Superstructure  Sufficient  reinforcement  shall  be  provided  at  the  junction  of  the  pile  with  the  superstructure  to  make  a  suitable  connection. The embedment of the reinforcement into the cap shall be as specified for precast piles 

3.10.1.28.5 Shell Requirements  The  shell  shall  be  of  sufficient  thickness  and  strength,  so  that  it  will  hold  its  original  form  and  show  no  harmful  distortion after it and adjacent shells have been driven and the driving core, if any, has been withdrawn. The plans  shall stipulate that alternative designs of the shell must be approved by the Engineer before any driving is done. 

3.10.1.28.6 Splices  Piles  may  be  spliced  provided  the  splice  develops  the  full  strength  of  the  pile.  Splices  should  be  detailed  on  the  contract plans. Any alternative method of splicing providing equal results may be considered for approval. 

3.10.1.28.7 Reinforcement Cover  The reinforcement shall be placed a clear distance of not less than 50 mm from the cased or uncased sides. When  piles  are  in  corrosive  or  marine  environments,  or  when  concrete  is  placed  by  the  water  or  slurry  displacement  methods,  the  clear  distance  shall  not  be  less  than  75  mm  for  uncased  piles  and  piles  with  shells  not  sufficiently  corrosion resistant. Reinforcements shall extend to within 100 mm of the edge of the pile cap Reinforcements shall  extend to within 100 mm of the edge of the pile cap. 

3.10.1.28.8 Installation  Steel  cased  piles  shall  have  the  steel  shell  mandrel  driven  their  full  length  in  contact  with  surrounding  soil,  left  permanently in place and filled with concrete. No pile shall be driven within 4.5 times the average pile diameter of a  pile filled with concrete less than 24 hours old. Concrete shall not be placed in steel shells within the heave range of  driving 

3.10.1.28.9 Concreting  For bored or driven cast‐in‐situ piles, concrete shall be deposited in such a way as to preclude segregation. Concrete  shall be deposited continuously until it is brought to the required level. The top surface shall be maintained as level  as possible and the formation of seams shall be avoided.  For under‐reamed piles, the slump of concrete shall range between 100 mm and 150 mm for concreting in water  free  holes.  For  large  diameter  holes  concrete  may  be  placed  by  tremie  or  by    drop  bottom  bucket;  for  small  diameter boreholes a tremie shall be utilized.  A slump of 125 mm to 150 mm shall be maintained for concreting by tremie. In case of tremie concreting for piles of  smaller diameter and length up to 10 m, the minimum cement content shall be 350 kg/m3  of concrete. For larger  diameter and/or deeper piles, the minimum cement content shall be 400 kg/m3 of concrete.  For concreting under water, the concrete shall contain at least 10 per cent more cement than that required for the  same mix placed in the dry. The amount of coarse aggregate shall be not less than one and a half times, nor more  than two times, that of the fine aggregate. The materials shall be so proportioned as to produce a concrete having a  slump of not less than 100 mm, nor more than 150 mm, except where plasticizing admixtures is used in which case,  the slump may be 175 mm 

3.10.1.28.10 Structural Integrity  Bored  piles  shall  be  installed  in  such  a  manner  and  sequence  as  to  prevent  distortion  or  damage  to  piles  being  installed or already in place, to the extent that such distortion or damage affects the structural integrity of the piles.  

  Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐191 

Part 6  Structural Design 

3.10.1.29

 

 

Prestressed Concrete Piles 

3.10.1.29.1 Size and Shape  Prestressed  concrete  piles  that  are  generally  octagonal,  square  or  circular  shall  be  of  approved  size  and  shape..  Concrete  in  prestressed  piles  shall  have  a  minimum  compressive  strength  (cylinder),  f’c  of  35  MPa  at  28  days.  Prestressed  concrete  piles  may  be  solid  or  hollow.  For  hollow  piles,  precautionary  measures  should  be  taken  to  prevent breakage due to internal water pressure during driving.  

3.10.1.29.2 Main Reinforcement  Main reinforcement shall be spaced and stressed so as to provide a compressive stress on the pile after losses; fpc,  generally not less than 5 MPa to prevent cracking during handling and installation. Piles shall be designed to resist  stresses developed during handling as well as under service load conditions. Bending stresses shall be investigated  for all conditions of handling, taking into account the weight of the pile plus 50‐percent allowance for impact, with  tensile stresses limited to 5√f’c. 

3.10.1.29.3 Vertical and Spiral Reinforcement  The  full length  of  vertical reinforcement shall  be enclosed  within  spiral  reinforcement. For  piles up  to  600  mm  in  diameter, spiral wire shall be No.5 (U.S. Steel Wire Gage). Spiral reinforcement at the ends of these piles shall have a  pitch of 75 mm for approximately 16 turns.   In addition, the top 150 mm of pile shall have five turns of spiral winding at 25 mm pitch. For the remainder of the  pile, the vertical steel shall be enclosed with spiral reinforcement with not more than 150 mm pitch. For piles having  diameters greater than 600 mm. spiral wire shall be No.4 (U.S. Steel Wire Gage). Spiral reinforcement at the end of  these piles shall have a pitch of 50 mm for approximately 16 turns. In addition, the top 150 mm of pile shall have  four turns of spiral winding at 38 mm pitch. For the remainder of the pile, the vertical steel shall be enclosed with  spiral reinforcement with not more than 100 mm pitch. The reinforcement shall be placed at a clear distance from  the face of the prestressed pile of not less than 50 mm. 

3.10.1.29.4 Driving and Handling Stresses  A prestressed pile shall not be driven before the concrete has attained a compressive strength of at least 28 MPa,   but not less than such strength sufficient to withstand handling and driving forces. 

3.10.2

Bored Piles 

In bored cast in place piles, the holes are first bored with a permanent or temporary casing or by using bentonite  slurry to stabilize the sides of the bore. A prefabricated steel cage is then lowered into the hole and concreting is  carried by tremie method. 

3.10.2.1

Ultimate Geotechnical Capacity of Bored Pile for Axial Load 

The basic concept of ultimate bearing capacity and useful equations for axial load capacity are identical to that of  driven pile as described in Section 3.11.1.9.  

3.10.2.2

Axial Capacity of Bored Piles in Cohesive Soil using Static Bearing Capacity  Equations  

The ultimate axial capacity of bored piles in cohesive may be calculated from the same static formula as used for  driven piles, given by Equations (6.3.14a), (6.3.14b) and (6.3.15),  using a total stress method for undrained loading  conditions, or an effective stress method for drained loading conditions. The skin friction (fs) may be taken as 0.67  times the value of driven piles and the end bearing (fb) may be taken as 1/3rd of driven pile.  

6‐192 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

3.10.2.3

 

Chapter 3 

Axial Capacity of Bored Piles in Cohesive Soil and Non­plastic Silt using SPT  Values 

The following relation may be used for preliminary design of piles in clay and silt soils. The N value used should be  corrected for overburden.  For clay and silt:   

f s = 1.11 N (in kPa)

≤ 70 kPa  

 

 

  (6.3.28)

For end bearing, the relationship is as under.  For clay:  

 

f b = 15 N

 

f b = 10 0 N

(in kPa)

 

 

 

 

 

  (6.3.29)

 

 

 

 

 

(6.3.30) 

  For silt:   

3.10.2.4

(in kPa)

Axial  Capacity  of  Bored  Piles  in  Cohesionless  Soil  using  Static  Bearing  Capacity Equations 

The ultimate axial capacity of bored piles in cohesive may be calculated from the same static formula as used for  driven piles described section 3.1.11.13. The skin friction (fs) may be taken as 0.67 times the value of driven piles  and the end bearing (fb) may be taken as 1/3rd of driven pile.      

Critical Depth for End Bearing and Skin Friction  Similar to driven piles, following approximations may be used for the critical depth in relation to diameter of pile, D. 

3.10.2.5

dc = 10D  

 

for loose sand 

dc = 15D  

 

for medium dense sand 

dc = 20D  

 

for dense sand

Axial Capacity of Bored Piles in Cohesionless Soil using SPT Values 

Standard Penetration Test N‐value is a measure of consistency of clay soil and indirectly the measure of cohesion.  The skin friction of pile can thus be estimated from N‐value. The following relation may be used for clay soils. 

f s = 1.33N (in kPa)

≤ 60 kPa  

 

 

(6.3.31) 

 For end bearing, the relationship is as under.   

3.10.2.6

 

⎛L⎞ f b = 133 N ⎜ ⎟ (in kPa) ≤ 133 N and ≤ 10000 kPa     ⎝D⎠

(6.3.32) 

Axial Capacity of Bored Pile using Pile Load Test 

The procedures and principles of pile load test for ultimate capacity are similar to that of driven piles. 

3.10.2.7

Selection of Factor of Safety 

Selection of factor of safety for axial capacity of bored pile is similar to that used for driven piles. 

  Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐193 

Part 6  Structural Design 

3.10.2.8

 

 

Group Capacity of Bored Piles and other  

The  behavior  of  group  bored  piles  is  almost  similar  to  that  of  driven  piles.  For  the  pile  cap,  lateral  load  capacity,  vertical  ground  movement,  negative  skin  friction,  piles  in  expansive  soil,  dynamic  and  seismic  design,  corrosion  protection, dynamic monitoring and  buoyancy, Sections 3.11.1.17 should be consulted as they are similar for both  driven and bored piles. 

3.10.3

Settlement of Driven and Bored Piles 

The settlement of axially loaded piles and pile groups at the allowable loads shall be estimated. Elastic analysis, load  transfer and/or finite element techniques may be used. The settlement of the pile or pile group shall not exceed the  tolerable movement limits as recommended for shallow foundations (Table 6.3.7).  When a pile is loaded two things would happen involving settlement.  



The pile would settle into the soil 



The pile material would compress due to load 

The settlement of a single pile can be broken down into three distinct parts. 



Settlement due to axial deformation, Sax 



Settlement at the pile tip, Spt 



Settlement due to skin friction, Ssf 

Thus ,   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(6.3.33) 

Moreover, piles acting in a group could undergo long term consolidation settlement.   Settlement due to axial deformation of a single pile can be estimated as:         Where,    

Qp =  

 

 

 

 

 

(6.3.34) 

 

 

 

(6.3.35) 

Load transferred to the soil at tip level 

Qs =  

Total skin friction load 

L = 

Length of the pile 

A = 

Cross section area of the pile 

Ep = 

Young’s modulus of pile material 

a = 

0.5 for clay and silt soils 

a = 

0.67 for sandy soil 

Pile tip settlement, Stp can be estimated as:         Where,    

6‐194 

Qp =  

 

 

 

Load transferred to the soil at tip level 

D = 

Diameter of the pile 

qo = 

Ultimate end bearing capacity 

Cp = 

Empirical coefficient as given in Table 6.3.9 

a = 

0.67 for sandy soil 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

 

Chapter 3 

Table 6.3.9: Typical Values of Cp for Settlement Calculation of Single Pile 

Soil Type  

Values of CP 

Dense Sand 

Driven Pile  0.02 

Bored Pile  0.09 

Loose Sand 

0.04 

0.18 

Stiff Clay 

0.02 

0.03 

Soft Clay 

0.03 

0.06 

Dense Silt 

0.03 

0.09 

Loose Silt 

0.05 

0.12 

  Skin friction acting along the shaft would stress the surrounding soil. Skin friction acts upward direction along the  pile. The force due to pile on surrounding soil would be in downward direction. When the pile is loaded, the pile  would slightly move down. The pile would drag the surrounding soil with it. Hence, the pile settlement would occur  due to skin friction as given by:         Where,    

 

  0.93

  0.16

 

Cs= 

Empirical coefficient 

Cp= 

Empirical coefficient as given in Table 6.3.9 

Qs = 

Total skin friction load 

D = 

Diameter of the pile 

qo = 

Ultimate end bearing capacity 

 

 

(6.3.36) 

 

 

Short Term Pile Group Settlement   Short term or elastic pile group settlement can be estimated using the following relation.  .

        Where,    

Sg= 

 

 

 

 

(6.3.37) 

Settlement of the pile group 

St(single)=  Total settlement of a single pile  B = 

Smallest dimension of the pile group 

D = 

Diameter of the pile 

Interestingly,  geometry  of  the  group  does  not  have  much  of  an  influence  on  the  settlement.  As  such,  Group  Settlement Ratio, Rs of a pile group consisting of n number of piles can be approximated as follows.  .

    

 

 

 

 

(6.3.38) 

Settlement of the group can be estimated as the highest value as obtained from Equations (6.3.37) and (6.3.38). 

Long Term Settlement for Pile Group  For pile groups, settlement due to consolidation is more important than for single piles.  Consolidation settlement of  pile group in clay soil  is computed using the following simplified assumptions. 



The pile group is assumed to be a solid foundation with a depth 2/3rd the length of the piles 



Effective stress at mid‐point of the clay layer is used to compute settlement 

If  soil  properties  are  available  consolidation  settlement  may  obtained  from  the  following  equation.  The  depth  of  significant  stress  increase  (10%)  or  the  depth  of  bed  rock  whichever  is  less  should  be  taken  for  computation  of  settlement. Stress distribution may be considered as 2 vertical to 1 horizontal.    Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐195 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

  Where,    

 

,

Cc= 

Compression index of soil 

eo= 

initial void ratio 

     

 

 

(6.3.39) 

H = 

Thickness of the clay layer 

σ′o = 

Initial effective stress at mid point of the clay layer 

σ′p = 

Increase in effective stress at mid point of the clay layer due to pile load. 

  In absence of soil properties the following empirical equations may be used to estimate the long term (consolidation  settlement of clay soils.  For clay:  

 

For sand:  

 

 

Ln 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

(6.3.40) 

 

 

 

 

(6.3.41) 

  Where,    

H = 

Thickness of the clay layer 

σ′o = 

Initial effective stress at mid point of the clay layer 

σ′1 = 

New effective stress at mid point of the clay layer after pile load. 

σ′r = 

Reference stress (100 kPa) 

M = 

Dimensionless modulus number as obtained from Table 6.3.10 

j =  

Stress exponent as obtained from Table 6.3.10. 

Table 6.3.10: Settlement Parameters  Soil 

Density 

Modulus  Number, M 

Stress  Exponent, j 

1000  ‐ 300 

1.0 

Till 

V. Dense to Dense 

Gravel 

‐ 

400  ‐ 40 

0.5 

Sand 

Dense 

400 ‐ 250 

0.5 

Sand 

Medium Dense 

250  ‐ 150 

0.5 

Sand 

Loose 

150  ‐ 100 

0.5 

Silt 

Dense 

200  ‐ 80 

0.5 

Silt 

Medium Dense 

80  ‐ 60 

0.5 

Silt 

Loose 

60  ‐ 40 

0.5 

Silty Clay 

Stiff 

60  ‐ 40 

0.5 

Silty Clay 

Medium Stiff 

20  ‐ 10 

0.5 

Silty Clay 

Soft 

10  ‐ 5 

0.5 

Marine Clay 

Soft 

20  ‐ 5 

0.0 

Organic Clay 

Soft 

20  ‐ 5 

0.0 

Peat 

‐ 

5  ‐ 1 

0.0 

 

3.10.4 Drilled Shafts/ Drilled Piers  3.10.4.1

General 

Large diameter (more than 400 mm) bored piles are sometimes classified as drilled shaft or drilled piers. They are  usually provided with enlarged base called bell. The provisions of this article shall apply to the design of axially and  laterally loaded drilled shafts/ drilled piers in soil or extending through soil to or into rock. 

6‐196 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

3.10.4.2

 

Chapter 3 

Application 

Drilled  shafts  may  be  considered  when  spread  footings  cannot  be  founded  on  suitable  soil  within  a  reasonable  depth and when piles are not economically viable due to high loads or obstructions to driving. Drilled shafts may be  used  in  lieu  of  spread  footings  as  a  protection  against  scour.  Drilled  shafts  may  also  be  considered  to  resist  high  lateral or uplift loads when deformation tolerances are small.  

3.10.4.3

Material 

Shafts shall be cast‐in‐place concrete and may include deformed bar steel reinforcement, structural steel sections,  and/or permanent steel casing as required by design. 

3.10.4.4

Embedment 

Shaft  embedment  shall  be  determined  based  on  vertical  and  lateral  load  capacities  of  both  the  shaft  and  sub‐ surface materials. 

3.10.4.5

Batter Shafts 

The use of battered shafts to increase the lateral capacity of foundations is not recommended due to their difficulty  of construction and high cost. Instead, consideration should first be given to increasing the shaft diameter to obtain  the required lateral capacity. 

3.10.4.6

Selection of Soil Properties 

Soil  and  rock  properties  defining  the  strength  and  compressibility  characteristics  of  the  foundation  materials  are  required for drilled shaft design. 

3.10.4.7

Geotechnical Design 

Drilled shafts shall be designed to support the design loads with adequate bearing and structural capacity, and with  tolerable  settlements.  In  addition,  the  response  of  drilled  shafts  subjected  to  seismic  and  dynamic  loads  shall  be  evaluated.  Shaft design shall be based on working stress principles using maximum un‐factored loads derived from calculations  of dead and live loads from superstructures, substructures, earth (i.e., sloping ground), wind and traffic. Allowable  axial and lateral loads may be determined by separate methods of analysis.  The  design  methods  presented  herein  for  determining  axial  load  capacity  assume  drilled  shafts  of  uniform  cross  section, with vertical alignment, concentric axial loading, and a relatively horizontal ground surface. The effects of  an enlarged base, group action, and sloping ground are treated separately 

3.10.4.7.1

Bearing Capacity Equations for Drilled Shaft 

The ultimate axial capacity (Qult) of drilled shafts shall be determined in accordance with the principles laid for bored  piles.  

Cohesive Soil  Skin friction resistance in cohesive soil may be determined using either the α‐method or the β‐method as described  in the relevant section of driven piles. However, for clay soil, α‐method has wide been used by the engineers. This  method gives:           

 

 

 

 

 

 

(6.3.42) 

  Where,    

fs = 

Skin friction  

su = 

undrained shear strength of soil along the shaft   

  Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐197 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

α = 

 

adhesion factor =0.55 for undrained shear strength ≤ 190 kPa (4000 psf) 

  For  higher  values  of  su  the  value  of  α  may  be  taken  from  Fig.  6.3.3  as  obtained  from  test  data  of  previous  investigators. The skin friction resistance should be ignored in the upper 1.5 m of the shaft and along the bottom  one  diameter  of  straight  shafts  because  of  interaction  with  the  end  bearing.  If  end  bearing  is  ignored  for  some  reasons, the skin friction along the bottom one diameter may be considered. For belled shaft, skin friction along the  surface of the bell and along the shaft for a distance of one shaft diameter above the top of bell should be ignored. 

  Fig. 6.3.3 Adhesion Factor α for Drilled Shaft (after Coduto, 1994)    For end bearing of cohesive soil, the following relations given by Equations (6.3.43) and (6.3.44) are recommended.   

f b = N c su

≤ 4000 kPa  

6 1 Where,    

            

0.2

fb= 

End bearing stress  

 

 

 

 

(6.3.43) 

9      

 

 

 

(6.3.18) 

su = 

undrained shear strength of soil along the shaft 

Nc = 

Bearing capacity factor 

L = 

Length of the pile (Depth to the bottom of the shaft) 

Db = 

Diameter of the shaft base 

If  the  base  diameter  is  more  than  1900  mm,  the  value  of  fb  from  Equation  (6.3.43)  could  produce  settlements  greater than 25 mm, which would be unacceptable for most buildings. To keep settlement within tolerable limits,  the value of fb should be reduced to f’b by multiplying  a factor Fr such that:  

f b′ = Fr f b  

 

 

 

 

 

6‐198 

 

 

 

.  

 

0.0071

 

 

 

 

(6.3.44a) 

 

 

 

(6.3.44b) 

   ≤ 0.0015 

 

 

(6.3.44c) 

          ≤ 1.0 

/

0.0021

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

 

 

Where,    

 

1.59

 

Chapter 3 

              0.5 ≤ ω2 ≤1.5 

 

Br= 

Reference width=1 ft = 0.3 m = 12 inch = 300 mm  

σr = 

Reference stress = 100 kPa = 2000 psf 

 

 

(6.3.44d) 

Cohesionless Soil  Skin  friction  resistance  in  cohesionless  soil  is  usually  determined  using  the  β‐method.  The  relevant  equation  is  reproduced again: 

Where,    

fs = 

f s = βσ ′z  

 

 

 

 

 

 

(6.3.45) 

β = K tanϕ S  

 

 

 

 

 

 

(6.3.46) 

Skin friction  

σ′z = 

Effective vertical stress at mid point of soil layer 

K = 

Coefficient of lateral earth pressure 

φs = 

Soil shaft interface friction angle 

The values of K and  φs can be obtained from the chart of Tables 6.3.11, from the soil friction angle, φ and

preconstruction coefficient of lateral earth pressure Ko. However, Ko is very difficult to determine. An alternative is to compute β directly using the following empirical relation.

1.5 Where,    

0.135

       

 

 

 

Br= 

Reference width=1 ft = 0.3 m = 12 inch = 300 mm  

z = 

Depth from the ground surface to the mid point of the strata 

 

(6.3.47) 

  Table 6.3.11: Typical φS/φ and K/Ko Values for the Design of Drilled Shaft  φS/φ 

Construction Method  

Construction Method 

K/Ko 

Open hole or temporary casing 

1.0 

Dry construction with minimal side wall  disturbance and prompt concreting 



Slurry method – minimal slurry cake 

1.0 

Slurry construction – good workmanship 



Slurry method – heavy slurry cake 

0.8 

Slurry construction – poor workmanship 

2/3 

Permanent casing 

0.7 

Casing under water 

5/6 

The unit end bearing capacity for drilled shaft in cohesionless soils will be less than that for driven piles because of  various reasons like soil disturbance during augering, temporary stress relief while the hole is open, larger diameter  and depth of influence etc.  The reasons are not well defined, as such the following empirical formula developed by  Reese and O’Nell (1989) may be suggested to use to estimate end bearing stress.  0.60 Where,    

       ≤ 4500 kPa 

 

 

 

 

(6.3.48)   

fb= 

Unit bearing resistance 

σ′r= 

Reference stress = 100 kPa = 2000 psf 

N = 

Mean SPT value for the soil between the base of the shaft and a depth equal to two times  the base diameter below the base. No overburden correction is required ( N= N60) 

If  the  base  diameter  is  more  than  1200  mm,  the  value  of  fb  from  Equation  (6.3.48)  could  produce  settlements  greater than 25 mm, which would be unacceptable for most buildings. To keep settlement within tolerable limits,  the value of fb should be reduced to f’b by multiplying  a factor Fr such that:  

  Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐199 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

f b′ = Fr f b    

 

Where,    

3.10.4.7.2

 

4.17

 

        

 

 

 

 

 

 

(6.3.49a) 

≤ 1.0 

 

 

 

 

(6.3.49b) 

Br= 

Reference width=1 ft = 0.3 m = 12 inch = 300 mm  

Db= 

Base diameter of drilled shaft 

Other Methods of Evaluating Axial Load Capacity 

A  number  of  other  methods  are  available  to  estimate  the  ultimate  axial  load  capacity  of  drilled  shafts.  These  methods are based on N‐values obtained from Standard Penetration Test (SPT) and on angle of internal friction of  sand.  These  methods  may  also be  used  to  estimate the  ultimate  load  carrying capacity  of  drilled  shafts. Three  of  these methods are as follows:  (i) (ii) (iii)

Method based on the Standard Penetration Test (Canadian Foundation Engineering Manual, 1985)  Method based on Theory of Plasticity (Canadian Foundation Engineering Manual, 1985)  Tomlinson (1995) Method  

These methods are summarized in Appendix 6.3.C. 

3.10.4.7.3

Factor of Safety 

  Similar to bored and riven piles, drilled shafts shall be designed for a minimum overall factor of safety of 2.0 against  bearing capacity failure (end bearing, side resistance or combined) when the design is based on the results of a load  test conducted at the site. Otherwise, it shall be designed for a minimum overall factor of safety 3.0. The minimum  recommended  overall  factor  of  safety  is  based  on  an  assumed  normal  level  of  field  quality  control  during  construction. If a normal level of field quality control cannot be assured, higher minimum factors of safety shall be  used.  The  recommended  values  of  overall  factor  of  safety  on  ultimate  axial  load  capacity  based  on  specified  construction Control is presented in Table 6.3.8. 

3.10.4.7.4

Deformation and Settlement of Axially Load Drilled Shaft 

Similar  to  driven  and  bored  piles,  settlement  of  axially  loaded  shafts  at  working  or  allowable  loads  shall  be  estimated  using  elastic  or  load  transfer  analysis  methods.  For  most  cases,  elastic  analysis  will  be  applicable  for  design  provided  the stress  levels  in the  shaft are  moderate relative  to Qult.  Analytical  methods  are  similar  to  that  provided in Section 3.11.3 for driven and bored piles. The charts provided in Appendix 6.3.C may also be used to  estimate the settlement of drilled shaft.  

3.10.4.7.5

Layered Soil Profile  

The  short‐term  settlement  of  shafts  in  a  layered  soil  profile  may  be  estimated  by  summing  the  proportional  settlement components from layers of cohesive and cohesionless soil comprising the subsurface profile 

3.10.4.7.6

Tolerable Movement  

Tolerable  axial  displacement  criteria  for  drilled  shaft  foundations  shall  be  developed  by  the  structural  designer  consistent with the function and type of structure, fixity of bearings, anticipated service life, and consequences of  un‐acceptable displacements on the structure performance. Drilled shaft displacement analyses shall be based on  the  results  of  in‐situ  and/or  laboratory  testing  to  characterize  the  load‐deformation  behavior  of  the  foundation  materials.  

6‐200 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

3.10.4.8 3.10.4.8.1

 

Chapter 3 

Group Loading of Drilled Shaft  Cohesive Soil 

Evaluation  of  group  capacity  of  shafts  in  cohesive  soil  shall  consider  the  presence  and  contact  of  a  cap  with  the  ground surface and the spacing between adjacent shafts.   For a shaft group with a cap in firm contact with the ground, Qult may be computed as the lesser of (1) the sum of  the individual capacities of each shaft in the group or (2) the capacity of an equivalent pier defined in the perimeter  area of the group. For the equivalent pier, the shear strength of soil shall not be reduced by any factor (e.g., (α1) to  determine the Qs component of Qult, the total base area of the equivalent pier shall be used to determine the QT  component of Qult and the additional capacity of the cap shall be ignored.   If the cap is not in firm contact with the ground, or if the soil at the surface is loose or soft, the individual capacity of  each shaft should be reduced to ζ times QT  for an isolated shaft, where ζ = 0.67 for a center‐to‐center (CTC) spacing  of 3B (where B is the shaft diameter)  and ζ = 1.0 for a CTC spacing of 6B. For intermediate spacings, the value of ζ  may be determined by linear interpolation. The group capacity may then be computed as the lesser of (1) the sum  of the modified individual capacities of each shaft in the group, or (2) the capacity of an equivalent pier as described  above.  

3.10.4.8.2

Cohesionless Soil 

Evaluation  of  group  capacity  of  shafts  in  cohesion  soil  shall  consider  the  spacing  between  adjacent  shafts.  Regardless of cap contact with the ground, the individual capacity of each shaft should be reduced to times QT for  an isolated shaft, where ζ = 0.67 for a center‐lo‐center (CTC) spacing of 3B and ζ = 1.0 for a CTC spacing of 8B. For  intermediate  spacings,  the  value  of  ζ  may  be  determined  by  linear  interpolation.  The  group  capacity  may    be  computed  as  the  lesser  of  (I)  the  sum  of  the  modified  individual  capacities  of  each  shaft  in  the  group  or  (2)  the  capacity  of  an  equivalent  pier  circumscribing  the  group  including  resistance  over  the  entire  perimeter  and  base  areas. 

3.10.4.8.3

Strong Soil Overlying Weak Soil 

If a group of shafts is embedded in a strong soil deposit which overlies a weaker deposit (cohesionless and cohesive  soil), consideration shall be given to the potential for a punching failure of the lip into the weaker soil strata. For this  case, the unit tip capacity of the equivalent shaft (qE) may be determined using the following:    

 

 

qE =

HBt (qUP − q Lo ) 10

≤ qUp

  

 

 

 

(6.3.50) 

In the above equation qUP is the ultimate unit capacity of an equivalent shaft bearing in the stronger upper layer and  qLO is the ultimate unit capacity of an equivalent shaft bearing in the weaker underlying soil layer. If the underlying  soil unit is a weaker cohesive soil strata, careful consideration shall be given to the potential for large settlements in  the weaker layer. 

3.10.4.9

Lateral Loads on Drilled Shaft 

3.10.4.9.1

 Soil Layering 

The  design  of  laterally  loaded  drilled  shafts  in  layered  soils  shall  be  based  on  evaluation  of  the  soil  parameters  characteristic of the respective layers 

3.10.4.9.2

 Ground Water 

The highest anticipated water level shall be used for design 

  Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐201 

Part 6  Structural Design 

3.10.4.9.3

 

 

 Scour 

The potential for loss of lateral capacity due to scour shall be considered in the design. If heavy scour is expected,  consideration shall be given to designing the portion of the shaft that would be exposed as a column. In all cases,  the shaft length shall be determined such that the design structural load can be safely supported entirely below the  probable scour depth. 

3.10.4.9.4

 Group Action 

There  is  no  reliable  rational  method  for  evaluating  the  group  action  for  closely  spaced,  laterally  loaded  shafts.  Therefore, as a general guide, drilled shaft with diameter B in a group may be considered to act individually when  the  center‐to‐center  (CTC)  spacing  is  greater  than  2.5B  in  the  direction  normal  to  loading,  and  CTC  >  8B  in  the  direction parallel to loading. For shaft layout not conforming to these criteria, the effects of shaft interaction shall  be considered in the design. As a general guide, the effects of group action for in‐line CTC <8B may be considered  using the ratios (CGS, 1985) appearing as below: 

3.10.4.9.5

Centre to Centre Shaft Spacing  for In‐line Loading 

Ratio of Lateral Resistance of  Shaft in Group to Single Shaft 

8B 

1.00 

6B 

0.70 

4B 

0.40 

3B 

0.25 

 Cyclic Loading 

The  effects  of  traffic,  wind,  and  other  non‐seismic  cyclic  loading  on  the  load‐deformation  behavior  of  laterally  loaded drilled shafts shall be considered during design. Analysis of drilled shafts subjected to cyclic loading may he  considered in the COM624 analysis (Reese. 1984). 

3.10.4.9.6

 Combined Axial and Lateral Loading 

The effects of lateral loading in combination with axial loading shall be considered in the design. Analysis of drilled  shafts subjected to combined loading may be considered in the COM624 analysis (Reese. 1984) 

3.10.4.9.7

 Sloping Ground 

For drilled shafts which extend through or below sloping ground. the potential for additional lateral loading shall be  considered in the design. The general method of analysis developed by Borden and Gabr (1987) may be used for the  analysis of shafts in stable slopes. For shafts in marginally stable slopes. Additional consideration should be given for  smaller factors of safety against slope failure or slopes showing ground creep, or when shafts extend through fills  overlying  soft  foundation  soils  and  bear  into  more  competent  underlying  soil  or  rock  formations.  For  unstable  ground. detailed explorations, testing and analysis are required to evaluate potential additional lateral loads due to  slope movements 

3.10.4.9.8

Tolerable Lateral Movements 

Tolerable  lateral  displacement  criteria  for  drilled  shaft  foundations  shall  be  developed  by  the  structural  designer  consistent with the function and type of structure, fixity, anticipated service life, and consequences of unacceptable  displacements on the structure performance. Drilled shaft lateral displacement analysis shall be based on the results  of in‐situ and/or laboratory testing to characterize the load‐deformation behavior of the foundation materials. 

6‐202 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

3.10.4.9.9

 

Chapter 3 

Uplift Loads on Drilled Shaft 

Uplift capacity shall rely only on side resistance in conformance with related articles for driven piles. If the shaft has  an enlarged base, Qs shall be determined in conformance with related articles for driven piles. 

3.10.4.9.10 Consideration of Vertical Ground Movement  The potential for external loading on a shaft by vertical ground movement (i.e., negative skin friction down‐drag due  to settlement of compressible soil or uplift due to heave of expansive soil) shall be considered as a part of design.  For design purposes, it shall be assumed that the full magnitude of maximum potential vertical ground movement  occurs. 

Negative Skin Friction  Evaluation of negative skin friction shall include a load‐transfer method of analysis to determine the neutral point  (i.e., point of zero relative displacement) and load distribution along shaft (e.g., Reese and O'Neill, 1988). Due to the  possible time dependence associated with vertical ground movement, the analysis shall consider the effect of time  on load transfer between the ground and shaft and the analysis shall be performed for the time period relating to  the  maximum  axial  load  transfer  to  the  shaft.  Evaluation  of  negative  skin  friction  shall  include  a  load‐transfer  method of analysis to  determine the neutral point (i.e., point of zero relative displacement) and load distribution  along  shaft  (e.g.,  Reese  and  O'Neill,  1988)  Due  to  the  possible  time  dependence  associated  with  vertical  ground  movement,  the  analysis  shall  consider  the  effect  of  time  on  load  transfer  between  the  ground  and  shaft  and  the  analysis shall be performed for the time period relating to the maximum axial load transfer to the shaft.. 

Expansive Soils  Shafts designed for and constructed in expansive soil shall extend to a sufficient depth into moisture‐stable soils to  provide adequate anchorage to resist uplift movement In addition; sufficient clearance shall be provided between  the ground surface and underside of caps or beams connecting shafts to preclude the application of uplift loads at  the shaft/cap connection from swelling ground conditions. 

3.10.4.9.11 Dynamic/Seismic Design of Drilled Shaft  Refer to Seismic Design section of this code and Lam and Martin (1986a; 1986b) for guidance regarding the design  of drilled shafts subjected to dynamic and seismic loads. 

3.10.4.10

Structural Design,  Shaft Dimensions  and Shaft Spacing 

3.10.4.10.1 Design  Drilled  shafts  shall  be  designed  to  resist  failure  loads  to  insure  that  the  shaft  will  not  collapse  or  suffer  loss  of  serviceability due to excessive stress and/or deformation.  

3.10.4.10.2 Dimensions  All  shafts  should  be  sized  in  150  mm  increments  with  a  minimum  shaft  diameter  of  450  mm.  The  diameter  of  columns supported by shafts shall be less than or equal to the shaft diameter B 

3.10.4.10.3 Center to Center Spacing   The center‐to‐center spacing of drilled shafts of diameter B should be 3B or greater to avoid interference between  adjacent shafts during construction. If closer spacing is required, the sequence of construction shall be specified and  the interaction effects between adjacent shafts shall be evaluated by the designer 

  Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐203 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

 

3.10.4.10.4 Reinforcement  Spacing, Clearance and Embedment  Reinforcement  Where the potential for lateral loading is insignificant, drilled shafts need to be reinforced for axial loads only. Those  portions  of  drilled  shafts  that  are  not  supported  laterally  shall  be  designed  as  reinforced  concrete  columns  in  accordance  with  relevant  sections  in  structural  design  part  of  the  code  and  the  reinforcing  steel  shall  extend  a  minimum of 5 m below the plane where the soil provides adequate lateral restraint. Where permanent steel casing  is used and the shell is smooth pipe and more than 3 mm in thickness, it may be considered as load carrying in the  absence of corrosion.   The design of longitudinal and spiral reinforcement shall be in conformance with the requirements of the relevant  sections  of  the  structural  design  part  of  the  code.  Development  of  length  of  deformed  reinforcement  shall  be  in  conformance with the relevant sections of the structural design part of the code. 

Longitudinal Bar Spacing  The minimum clear distance between longitudinal reinforcement shall not he less than 3 times the bar diameter nor  3  times  the  maximum  aggregate  size.  If  bars  arc  bundled  in  forming  the  reinforcing  cage,  the  minimum  clear  distance between longitudinal reinforcement shall not be less than 3 times the diameter of the bundled bars. Where  heavy reinforcement is required, consideration may be given to an inner and outer reinforcing cage. 

Splices  Splices  shall  develop  the  full  capacity  of  the  bar  in  tension  and  compression.  The  location  of  splices  shall  be  staggered around the perimeter of the reinforcing cage so as not to occur at the same horizontal plane. Splices mal  be  developed  by  lapping,  welding,  and  special  approved  connectors.  Splices  shall  be  in  conformance  with  the  relevant sections of the structural design part of the code. 

Transverse Reinforcement  Transverse reinforcement shall be designed to resist stresses caused by fresh concrete flowing from inside the cage  to the side of the excavated hole. Transverse reinforcement may be constructed of hoops or spiral steel. 

Handling Stresses  Reinforcement cages shall be designed to resist handling and placement stresses. 

Reinforcement Cover  The reinforcement shall be placed a clear distance of not less than 50 mm from the permanently cased or 75 mm  from  the  uncased  sides.  When  shafts  are  constructed  in  corrosive  or  marine  environments,  or  when  concrete  is  placed by the water or slurry displacement methods, the clear distance shall not be less than 100 mm for uncased  shafts and shafts with permanent casings not sufficiently corrosion resistant.   The  reinforcement  cage  shall  be  centered  in  the  hole  using  centering  devices.  All  steel  centering  devices  shall  be  epoxy coated. 

Reinforcement into Superstructure  Sufficient  reinforcement  shall  be  provided  at  tit  junction  of  the  shaft  with  the  superstructure  to  make  a  suitable  connection. The embedment of the reinforcement into the cap shall be in conformance with relevant articles of the  structural design part of the code. 

6‐204 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

 

Chapter 3 

3.10.4.10.5 Enlarged Bases  Enlarged bases shall be designed to insure that plain concrete is not overstressed. The enlarged base shall slope at a  side angle not less than 30 degrees from the vertical and have a bottom diameter not greater than 3 times diameter  of the shaft. The thickness of the bottom edge of enlarged base shall not be less than 150 mm. 

3.10.4.11

Construction and Concreting of Drilled Shafts 

3.10.4.11.1 Method of Construction  Drilled  shafts  may  be  constructed  using  the  dry,  casing,  or  wet  method  of  construction,  or  a  combination  of  methods. In every case, excavation of hole, placement of concrete, and all other aspects of shaft construction shall  be performed in conformance with the provisions of this code.  The load capacity and deformation behavior of drilled shafts can be greatly affected by the quality and methods of  construction.  The  effects  of  construction  methods  are  incorporated  in  design  by  application  of  factor  of  safety  consistent  with  the  expected  construction  methods  and  level  of  field  quality  control  measures  undertaken  as  described in the relevant sections for driven piles.   Where  the  spacing  between  shafts  in  a  group  is  restricted,  consideration  shall  be  given  to  the  sequence  of  construction to minimize the effect of adjacent shaft construction operations on recently constructed shafts.  The following construction procedure shall be followed:  (i)  Place permanent/temporary steel casing in position and embed casing toe into firm strata.  (ii)  Bore and excavate inside the steel casing down to casing toe level, or to a level approved, and continue  excavation to  final pile tip level using drilling mud. The fluid level inside casings shall at all times  be at  least 2 metres higher than outside the casings.  (iii)  Carefully clean up all mud or sedimentation from the bottom of borehole.  (iv)  Place reinforcement cage, inspection pipes etc.  (v)  Concrete continuously under water, or drilling fluid, by use of the tremie method.  (vi)  After hardening, break out the top section of the concrete pile to reach sound concrete.  In drilling of holes for all piles, bentonite and any other material shall be mixed thoroughly with clean water to make  a suspension which shall maintain the stability of the pile excavation for the period necessary to place concrete and  complete  construction.  The  control  tests  shall  cover  the  determination  of'  density,  viscosity,  gel  strength  and  pH  values. Bentonite slurry shall meet the Specifications as shown in Table 6.3.12.  Table 6.3.12   Specifications of Bentonite Slurry  Item to be Measured 

Range of Results at 20° C 

Test Method 

Density during drilling to support  excavation 

greater than 1.05 g/ml 

Mud density Balance 

Density prior to concreting  

less than 1.25 g/ml 

Mud density Balance 

Viscosity 

30 ‐ 90 seconds 

Marsh Cone Method 

pH 

9.5 to 12 

pH indicator paper strips or  electrical pH meter 

Temporary casing of approved quality or an approved alternative method shall be used to maintain the stability of  pile excavations, which might otherwise collapse. Temporary casings shall be free from significant distortion.   Where a borehole is formed using drilling fluid for maintaining the stability of a boring, the level of the water or fluid  in the excavation shall be maintained so that the water or fluid pressure always exceeds the pressure exerted by the    Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐205 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

 

soils and external ground water. The water or fluid level shall be maintained at a level not less than 2 metres above  the level of ground water.  The  reinforcement  shall  be  placed  as  indicated  on  the  Drawings.  Reinforcement  in  the  form  of  a  cage  shall  be  assembled with additional support, such as Spreader forks and lacings, necessary to form a rigid cage. Hoops, links  or helical reinforcement shall fit closely around the main longitudinal bars and be bound to them by approved wire,  the ends of which shall be turned into the interior of the pile or pour. Reinforcement shall be placed and maintained  in position. The cover to all reinforcement for pile cap and bored cast in place pile shall be not less than 75 mm.  Joints in longitudinal steel bars shall be permitted unless otherwise specified. Joints in reinforcement shall be such  that  the  full  strength  of  the  bar  is  effective  across  the  joint  and  shall  be  made  so  that  there  is  no  relative  displacement of the reinforcement during the construction of the pile.  Joints in longitudinal bars in piles with tension (for instance for test loading) shall be carried out by welding or other  approved method.  Concrete to be placed under water or drilling fluid shall be placed by tremie equipment and shall not be discharged  freely  into  the  water  or  drilling  fluid.  The  tremie  equipment  shall  be  designed  to  minimize  the  occurrence  of  entrapped air and other voids, so that it causes minimal surface disturbance, which is particularly important when a  concrete‐water interface exists. It shall be so designed that external projections are minimised,  allowing the tremie  to pass through reinforcing cages without causing damage. The internal face of the pipe of the tremie shall be free  from projections. The tremie pipes shall meet the following requirements:  (i) 

The  tremie  pipes  shall  be  fabricated  of  heavy  gage  steel  pipe  to  withstand  all  anticipated  handling  stress. Aluminium pipe shall not be used for placing concrete.  

(ii) 

Tremie pipes should have a diameter large enough to ensure that aggregates‐caused blockage will not  occur. The diameter of the tremie pipe shall be 200 mm to 300 mm.  

(iii) 

The tremie pipes shall be smooth internally.  

(iv)  

Since  deep  placement  of  concrete  will  be  carried  out,  the  tremie  shall  be  made  in  sections/lengths  with  detachable  joints  that  allow  the  upper  sections/lengths  to  be  removed  as  the  placement  progresses.  

(v)  

Sections  may  be  joined  by  flanged,  bolted  connections  (with  gaskets)  or  may  be  screwed  together.  Whatever  joint  technique  is  selected,  joints  between  tremie  sections  must  be  watertight.  The  joint  system selected shall be tested for watertightness before beginning of concrete placement.  

(vi) 

The joint system to be used shall need approval of the Engineer.  

(vii) 

The tremie pipe should be marked to allow quick determination of the distance from the surface of the  water to the mouth of the tremie. 

(viii)  The  tremie  should  be  provided  with  adequately  sized  funnel  or  hopper  to  facilitate  transfer  of  sufficient concrete from the delivery device to the tremie.   Before  placing  concrete,  it  shall  be  ensured  that  there  is  no  accumulation  of  silt,  other  material,  or  heavily  contaminated bentonite suspension at the base of the boring, which could impair the free flow of concrete from the  pipe of the tremie. Flushing of boreholes before concreting with fresh drilling fluid/mud is preferred.. A sample of  the  bentonite  suspension  shall  be  taken  from  the  base  of  the  boring  using  an  approved  sampling  device.  If  the  specific  gravity  of  the  suspension  exceeds  1.25,  the  placing  of  concrete  shall  not  proceed.  In  this  event  the  Contractor shall modify the mud quality.  During  and  after  concreting,  care  shall  be  taken  to  avoid  damage  to  the  concrete  from  pumping  and  dewatering  operations. 

6‐206 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

 

Chapter 3 

The hopper and pipe of the tremie shall be clean and watertight throughout. The pipe shall extend to the base of  the boring and a sliding plug or barrier shall be placed in the pipe to prevent direct contact between the first charge  of  concrete  in  the  pipe  of  the  tremie  and  the  water  or  drilling  fluid.  The  pipe  shall  at  all  times  penetrate  the  concrete,  which  has  previously  been  placed  and  shall  not  be  withdrawn  from  the  concrete‐urrtil  completion  of  concreting.  The  bottom  of  the  tremie  pipe  shall  be  embedded  in  the  fresh  concrete  at  least  2.0  metres  and  maintained at that depth throughout concreting. At all times a sufficient quantity of concrete shall be maintained  within the pipe to ensure that the pressure from it exceeds that from the water or drilling fluid.   To ensure the quality of concrete being free from mud, clay lumps or any other undesirable materials mixed with  concrete at the top portion of the pile, fresh concrete shall be overflowed sufficiently at the end of the each pour.  The level of concrete poured at the end of concreting operation shall be at least 600 mm higher than the elevation  of the pile at cut‐off. 

3.10.4.11.2 Concreting  In  drilled  shafts/cast‐in‐situ  bored  piles,  concrete  shall  be  placed  only  after  excavation  has  been  completed,  inspected  and  accepted,  and  steel  reinforcement  accurately  placed  and  adequately  supported.  Concrete  shall  be  placed in one continuous operation in such a manner as to ensure the exclusion of any foreign matter and to secure  a full sized shaft. Concrete shall not be  placed through water except where tremie methods are approved. When  depositing concrete from the top of pile, the concrete shall not be chuted directly into the pile but shall be poured  in a rapid and continuous operation through a funnel hopper centred at the top of the pile.   For large diameter holes concrete may be placed by tremie or by drop bottom bucket; for small diameter boreholes  a tremie shall be utilized. In tremie concreting, toe of the tremie shall be set at a maximum of 150 mm above the  bottom  of  the  borehole.  Maximum  permissible  siltation  in  bore  hole  prior  to  start  of  concrete  operation  shall  be  75 mm. A slump of 125 mm to 150 mm shall be maintained for concreting by tremie. In case of tremie concreting for  piles of smaller diameter and length up to 10 m, the minimum cement content shall be 350 kg/m3  of concrete. For  larger  diameter  and/or  deeper  piles,  the  minimum  cement  content  shall  be  400 kg/m3  of  concrete.  See  relevant  sections of the code for further specification  For  uncased  concrete  piles,  if  pile  shafts  are  formed through  unstable  soil and  concrete  is  placed  in  an  open  drill  hole,  a  steel  liner  shall  be  inserted  in  the  hole  prior  to  placing  concrete.  If  the  steel  liner  is  withdrawn  during  concreting, the level of concrete shall be maintained above the bottom of the liner to a sufficient height to offset  any hydrostatic or lateral earth pressure.   If concrete is  placed by pumping through a hollow stem auger, the  auger shall not be  permitted to rotate during  withdrawal and shall be withdrawn in a steady continuous motion. Concrete pumping pressures shall be measured  and shall be maintained high enough at all times to offset hydrostatic and lateral earth pressure. Concrete volumes  shall  be  measured  to  ensure  that  the  volume  of  concrete  placed  in  each  pile  is  equal  to  or  greater  than  the  theoretical volume of the hole created by the auger. If the installation process of any pile is interrupted or a loss of  concreting pressure occurs, the hole shall be redrilled to original depth and reformed.   Augured cast‐in‐situ pile shall not be installed within 6 pile diameters centre to centre of a pile filled with concrete  less than 24 hours old. If concrete level in any completed pile drops, the pile shall be rejected and replaced. Bored  cast‐in‐situ  concrete  piles  shall  not  be  drilled/bored  within  a  clear  distance  of  3  m  from  an  adjacent  pile  with  concrete less than 48 hours old.   For under‐reamed piles, the slump of concrete shall range between 100 mm and 150 mm for concreting in water  free holes. 

3.10.4.11.3 Concreting under Water  For concreting under water, the concrete shall contain at least 10 per cent more cement than that required for the  same mix placed in the dry. The amount of coarse aggregate shall be not less than one and a half times, nor more    Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐207 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

 

than two times, that of the fine aggregate. The materials shall be so proportioned as to produce a concrete having a  slump of not less than 100 mm, nor more than 150 mm, except where plasticizing admixtures is used in which case,  the slump may be 175 mm.  Successful placement of concrete under water requires preventing flow of water across or through the placement  site. Once flow is controlled, the tremie placement consists of the following three basic steps:   i)

The first concrete placed is physically separated from the water by using a “rabbit” or go‐devil in the  pipe, or by having the pipe mouth capped or sealed and the pipe dewatered. 

ii)

Once filled with concrete, the pipe is raised slightly to allow the “rabbit” to escape or to break the end  seal. Concrete will then flow out and develop a mound around the mouth of the pipe. This is termed as  “establishing a seal”. 

iii) Once the seal is established, fresh concrete is injected into the mass of existing concrete.  Two methods are normally used for the placement of concrete using tremie pipe, namely, the capped tremie pipe  approach  and  the  “rabbit”  plug  approach.  In  the  capped  tremie  approach  the  tremie  pipe  should  have  a  seal,  consisting of a bottom plate or approved equal, that seals the bottom of the pipe until the pipe reaches the bottom  of excavation. The tremie pipe should be filled with enough concrete before being raised off the bottom. The tremie  pipe  should  then  be  raised  a  maximum  of  150  mm  (6  inch)  to  initiate  flow.  The  tremie  pipe  should  not  be  lifted  further until a mound is established around the mouth of the tremie pipe. Initial lifting of the tremie should be done  slowly to minimize disturbance of material surrounding the mouth of the tremie.  In the “rabbit” plug approach, open tremie pipe should be set on the bottom, the “rabbit” plug inserted at the top  and then concrete should be added to the tremie slowly to force the “rabbit” downward separating the concrete  from the water. Once the tremie pipe is fully charged and the “rabbit” reaches the mouth of the tremie, the tremie  pipe should be lifted a maximum of 150 mm (6 inch) off the bottom to allow the “rabbit” to escape and to start the  concrete flowing. After this, a tremie pipe should not be lifted again until a sufficient mound is established around  the mouth of the tremie.  Tremies should be embedded in the fresh concrete a minimum of 1.0 to 1.5 m (3 to 5 ft) and maintained at that  depth throughout concreting to prevent entry of water into the pipe. Rapid raising or lowering of the tremie pipe  should not be allowed. All vertical movements of the tremie pipe must be done slowly and carefully to prevent “loss  of seal”. If “loss of seal” occurs in a tremie, placement of concrete through the tremie must be halted immediately.  The tremie pipe must be removed, the end plate must be restarted using the capped tremie approach. In order to  prevent washing of concrete in place, a “rabbit” plug approach must not be used to restart a tremie after “loss of  seal”.  Means  of  raising  or  lowering  tremie  pipes  and  of  removing  pipes  smoothly  without  loss  of  concrete  and  without  disturbing placed concrete or trapping air in the concrete Shall be provided. Pipes shall not be moved horizontally  while they are embedded in placed concrete or while they have concrete within them.  Underwater  concrete  shall  be  placed  continuously  for  the  whole  of  a  pour  to  its  full  depth  approved  by  the  Engineer, without interruption by meal breaks, change of shift, movements of placing positions, and the like. Delays  in  placement  may  allow  the  concrete  to  stiffen  and  resist  flow  once  placement  resumes.  The  rate  of  pour  from  individual tremie shall be arranged so that concrete does not rise locally to a level greater than 500 mm above the  average level of the surrounding concrete.  Tremie blockages which occur during placement should be cleared extremely carefully to prevent loss of seal. If a  blockage occurs, the tremie should be quickly raised 150 to 600 mm (6 inch to 2 ft) and then lowered in an attempt  to dislodge the blockage. The depth of pipe embedment must be closely monitored during all such attempts. If the  blockage cannot be cleared readily, the tremie shall be removed, cleared, resealed, and restarted. 

6‐208 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

 

Chapter 3 

The volume of concrete in place should be monitored throughout the placement. Underruns are indicative of loss of  tremie seal since the washed and segregated aggregates will occupy a greater volume. Overruns are indicative of  loss of concrete from the inside of the steel pile. 

3.11 FIELD TESTS FOR DRIVEN PILES AND DRILLED SHAFTS   

3.11.1 Integrity Test    Low strain integrity testing of piles is a tool for quality control of long structural elements that function in a manner  similar to foundation piles, regardless of their method of installation, provided that they are receptive to low strain  impact testing. The test provides velocity (and optionally force) data, which assists evaluation of pile integrity and  pile physical dimensions (i.e., cross‐sectional area, length), continuity and consistency of pile material. The test does  not  give  any  information  regarding  the  pile  bearing  capacity  or  about  pile  reinforcement.  Integrity  test  principles  have been well documented in literature (ASTM 5882‐96; Klingmuller, 1993). There exist two methods of integrity  testing, namely, Pulse Echo Method (PEM) and Transient Response Method (TRM). In Pulse Echo Method, the pile  head  motion  is  measured  as  a  function  of  time.  The  time  domain  record  is  then  evaluated  for  pile  integrity.  In  Transient  Response  Method,  the  pile  head  motion  and  force  (measured  with  an  instrumented  hammer)  are  measured as a function of time. The data are then evaluated usually in the frequency domain.  In order to check the structural integrity of the piles Integrity tests shall be performed on the piles in accordance  with the procedure outlined in ASTM D5882.  The test is carried out by pressing a transducer onto a pile top while  striking  the  pile  head  with  a  hand  hammer.  The  Sonic  Integrity  Testing  (SIT)‐system  registers  the  impact  of  the  hammer followed by the response of the pile and shows the display. If instructed by the operator, the signal will be  stored  in  the  memory  of  the  SIT‐system  together  with  other  information,  such  as  pile  number,  date,  time,  site,  amplication  factor,  filter  length  etc.    The  reflectograms  are  horizontally  scaled  and  vertically  amplified  to  compensate  external  soil  friction,  which  facilitate  the  interpretation.  Consequently,  the  reflection  of  the  pile  toe  matches the length of the pile which will be confirmed by the SIT‐system. In case of any defects, the exact location  can be determined from the graph on the display.  For  any  project  where  pile  has  been  installed,  integrity  tests  shall  be  performed  on  100%  of  the  piles.  Integrity  testing may not identify all imperfections, but it can be used in identifying major defects within the effective length.  In literature, there are many examples that highlight the success of low strain integrity testing (Klingmuller, 1993).  

3.11.1.1 Some Factors Influencing Implication of Pile Integrity Test  (a) This sonic echo pile integrity testing or dynamic response method is based on measuring (or observing on an  oscilloscope) the time it takes for a reflected compression stress wave to return to the top of the pile. Some waves  will be reflected by a discontinuity in the pile shaft. When the compressive strength is known for the pile material  involved, the depth to the discontinuity and the pile length can be determined. 

(b) On the other hand, area of pile shaft and hence its diameter, is determined from impedance of wave response,  while  impedance  in  any  section  is  a  function  of  elastic  modulus  of  pile  material,  shaft  area  and  wave  velocity  propagating  through  that  section.  If  the  concrete  material  is  uniform  throughout  the  pile  length,  elastic  modulus  and the wave velocity (provided disturbance from other source of vibration nearby is insignificant) are constant for  that pile. In that case, changes in impedance usually indicate changes of pile cross‐sectional area. 

(c) While evaluating pile integrity (i.e., pile length and shaft diameter), the wave velocity is usually assumed to be  constant  throughout  pile  length.  Therefore,  the  reliability  of  integrity  evaluation  entirely  depends  on  the  pile  material and its uniformity throughout shaft length while casting was done. Thus the length and diameter obtained  from pile integrity test is merely an indication of the actual length and diameter of the tested piles.    Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐209 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

 

(d) Besides,  this  test  can  only  assess  shaft  integrity  and  gives  no  information  for  pile  bearing  capacity  determination. However, if a large number of piles are tested, it is generally easy to focus the piles having unusual  responses. Therefore, whenever an integrity testing is contemplated, consideration must be given to the limitations  of  the  various  methods/process  of  pile  installation  (i.e.  pile  driving  or  casting)  and  the  possible  need  for  further  investigation (such as pile load test) to check the results of such testing.   It should be noted here that pile integrity test is an indicative test about the length and quality of concrete in the  pile.  This  test  does  not  give  any  idea  about  its  actual  load  capacity.  It  is  usually  suggestive  to  substantiate  the  findings  of  integrity  test  by  excavation  or  pull  out  of  the  pile  to  facilitate  decisions  about  final  acceptance  or  rejection of any pile. Because of the large cost involved in a pile load test, the necessity of integrity test in facilitating  the selection of piles for load test is a rational approach for quality and safety assurance of piled foundations.  

3.11.2  Axial Load Tests  Where accurate estimate of axial load carrying capacity of a pile is required tests in accordance with "Standard Test  Method  for  Piles  Under  Static  Compressive  Load",  (ASTM  D1143)  or  equivalent  shall  be  performed  on  individual  piles. For a major project, at least 2% of piles (test piles plus service piles) shall be tested in each area of uniform  subsoil conditions. Where necessary, additional piles may be load tested to establish the safe design capacity. The  ultimate load carrying capacity of a single pile may be determined with reasonable accuracy from load testing. The  load test on a pile shall not be carried out earlier than four weeks from the date of casting the pile. A minimum of  one pile at each project shall be load tested for bored cast‐in‐situ piles.   Two principal types of test may be used for compression loading on piles ‐ the constant rate of penetration (CRP)  test  and  the  maintained  load  (ML)  test.  The  CRP  test  was  developed  by  Whitaker  (1953).  The  CRP  method  is  essentially a test to determine the ultimate load on a pile and is therefore applied only to preliminary test piles or  research type investigations where fundamental pile behaviour is being studied.  In this test the compressive force is  progressively  increased  to  cause  the  pile  to  penetrate  the  soil  at  constant  rate  until  failure  occurs.  The  rate  of  penetration  selected  usually  corresponds  to  that  of  shearing  soil  samples  in  unconfined  compression  tests.  However,  rate  does  not  affect  results  significantly.  In  CRP  test  the  recommended  rates  of  penetration  are  0.75  mm/min for friction piles in clay and 1.55 mm/min for piles end bearing in granular soil. The CRP test shall not be  used  for  checking  compliance  with  specification  requirements  for  the  maximum  settlement  at  given  stages  of  loading.   Maintained load (ML) test is so far the most usual one in practice. In the ML test the load is increased in stages to  1.5 times or twice the working load with time settlement curve recorded at each stage of loading and unloading.   The general procedure is to apply static loads in increments of 25% of the anticipated design load. The ML test may  also be taken to failure by progressively increasing the load in stages. In the ML test, the load test arrangements as  specified in "Standard Test Method for Piles under Static Axial Compressive Load", (ASTM D1143), shall be followed.  According to ASTM D1143 each load increment is maintained until the rate of settlement is not greater than 0.25  mm/hr or 2 hours is elapsed, whichever occurs first. After that the next load increment is applied. This procedure is  followed for all increments of load. After the completion of loading if the test pile has not failed the total test load is  removed  any  time  after  twelve  hours  if  the  butt  settlement  over  one  hour  period  is  not  greater  than  0.25  mm  otherwise  the  total  test  load  is  kept  on  the  pile  for  24  hours.  After  the  required  holding  time,  the  test  load  is  removed in decrement of 25% of the total test load with 1 hour between decrement. If failure occurs, jacking the  pile  is  continued  until  the  settlement  equals  15%  of  the  pile  diameter  or  diagonal  dimension.    Details  of  the  test  procedure have been outlined in ASTM D1143.  Selection of an appropriate load test method shall be based on an evaluation of the anticipated types and duration  of loads during service, and shall include consideration of the following: 

(a) The immediate goals of the load test (i.e., to proof load the foundation and verify design capacity)  

6‐210 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

 

Chapter 3 

(b) The loads expected to act on the production foundation (compressive and/or uplift, dead and/or live), and  the soil conditions predominant in the region of concern.  

(c) The local practice or traditional method  As a minimum, the written test procedures should include the following: 

(a) Apparatus for applying loads including reaction system and loading system.   (b) Apparatus for measuring movements.   (c) Apparatus for measuring loads.   (d) Procedures for loading including rates of load application, load cycling and maximum load.   (e) Procedures for measuring movements.   (f) Safety requirements.   (g) Data presentation requirements and methods of data analysis.   (h) Drawings showing the procedures and materials to be used to construct the load test apparatus. 

3.11.2.1

Load Test Evaluation Methods 

A number of arbitrary or empirical methods are used to serve as criteria for determining the allowable and ultimate  load  carrying  capacity  from  pile  load  test.  Some  are  based  on  maximum  permissible  gross  or  net  settlement  as  measured at the pile butt while the others are based on the performance of the pile during the progress of testing  (Chellis,  1961;  Whitaker,  1976;  Poulos  and  Davis,  1980;  Fuller,  1983).  It  is  recommended  to  evaluate  the  load  carrying capacity of piles and drilled shaft using any of the following methods: 

(a)

Davission Offset Limit 

(b)

British Standard Institution Criterion 

(c)

Indian Standard Criteria 

(d)

Butler‐Hoy Criterion 

(e)

Brinch‐Hansen 90% Criterion 

(f)

Other methods approved by engineer 

The recommended criteria to be used for evaluating the ultimate and allowable load carrying capacity of piles and  drilled shaft are summarized below. 

(a) A  very  useful  method  of  computing  the  ultimate  failure  load  has  been  reported  by  Davisson  (1973).  This  method is based on offset method that defines the failure load. The elastic shortening of the pile, considered as  point  bearing,  free  standing  column,  is  computed  and  plotted  on  the  load‐settlement  curve,  with  the  elastic  shortening line passing through the origin.  The slope of the elastic shortening line is 20°. An offset line is drawn  parallel  to  the  elastic  line.  The  offset  is  usually  0.15  inch  plus  a  quake  factor,  which  is  a  function  of  pile  tip  diameter. For normal size piles, this factor is usually taken as 0.1D inch, where D is the diameter of pile in foot.  The intersection of the offset line with the gross load‐settlement curve determines the arbitrary ultimate failure  load.  

(b) Terzaghi (1942) reported that the ultimate load capacity of a pile may be considered as that load which causes a  settlement  equal  to  10%  of  the  pile  diameter.  However,  this  criterion  is  limited  to  a  case  where  no  definite  failure  point  or  trend  is  indicated  by  the  load‐settlement  curves  (Singh,  1990).  This  criterion  has  been  incorporated in BS 8004: 1986 of British Standard Institution (1986) which recommends that the ultimate load  capacity of pile should be that which causes the pile to settle a depth of 10% of pile width or diameter. 

  Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐211 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

 

(c) According to the Code of Practice 2004 of British Standards Institution (1972), the allowable load capacity  of  pile  should  be  50%  of  the  final  load,  which  causes  the  pile  to  settle  a  depth  of  10%  of  pile  width  or  diameter.  

(d) According to IS: 2911 (Part‐VI)‐1979 ultimate load capacity of pile is smaller of the following two:  (i) Load  corresponding  to  a  settlement  equal  to  10%  of  the  pile  diameter  in  the  case  of  normal  uniform diameter pile or 7.5% of base diameter in case of under‐reamed or large diameter cast in‐ situ pile.  (ii) Load corresponding to a settlement of 12 mm.  

(e) According to Indian Standard Code of practice (IS: 2911 – 1979), allowable load capacity of pile is smaller of  the following:  (i) Two thirds of the final load at which the total settlement attains a value of 12 mm.   (ii) Half  of the  final  load  at which total  settlement  equal  to  10% of  the  pile  diameter  in  the  case  of  normal uniform diameter pile or 7.5% of base diameter in case of under‐reamed  pile. 

(f) Butler and Hoy (1976) stated that the intersection of the tangent at the initial straight portion of the load‐ settlement curve and the tangent at a slope point of 1.27 mm/ton determines the arbitrary ultimate failure  load. 

(g) The Brinch and Hansen (1963) proposed a definition for ultimate load capacity as that load for which the  settlement is twice the settlement under 90 percent of the full test load. 

(h) Where  failure  occurs,  the  ultimate  load  may  be  taken  to  calculate  the  allowable  load  using  a  factor  of  safety of 2.0 to 2.5. 

3.11.2.2

Some Factors Influencing Interpretations of Load Test Results 

The following factors should be taken into account while interpreting the test results from pile load tests:  

(a) Potential residual loads (strains) in the pile which could influence the interpreted distribution of load along  the pile shaft. 

(b) Possible  interaction  of  friction  loads  from  test  pile  with  downward  friction  transferred  to  the  soil  from  reaction piles obtaining part or all of their support in soil at levels above the tip level of the test pile.  

(c) Changes in pore water pressure in the soil caused by pile driving, construction fill and other construction  operations which may influence the test results for frictional support in relatively impervious soils such as  clay and silt. 

(d) Differences  between  conditions  at  time  of  testing  and  after  final  construction  such  as  changes  in  grade  groundwater level. 

(e) Potential loss of soil resistance from events such as excavation, or scour, or both of surrounding soil.   (f) Possible difference in the performance of a pile in a group or of a pile group from that of a single isolated  pile. 

(g) Affect  on  long  term  pile  performance  of  factors  such  as  creep,  environmental  effects  on  pile  material,  friction loads from swelling soils and strength losses. 

(h) Type  of  structure  to  be  supported,  including  sensitivity  of structure to  movement  and relations  between  live and dead loads. 

(i) Special  testing  procedures  which  may  be  required  for  the  application  of  certain  acceptance  criteria  or  methods of interpretation. 

6‐212 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

 

Chapter 3 

(j) Requirement  that  all  conditions  for  non  tested  piles  be  basically  identical  to  those  for  test  pile  including  such thing as subsurface conditions, pile type, length, size and stiffness, and pile installation methods and  equipment so that application or extrapolation of the test results to such other piles is valid    

3.11.3

Uplift Capacity of Pile and Drilled Shaft 

Where  required  by  the  design,  the  uplift  capacity  of  pile  and  drilled  shaft  shall  be  determined  by  an  approved  method  or  analysis  based  on  a  minimum  factor  of  safety  of  three  or  by  load  tests  conducted  in  accordance  with  ASTM D3689 (Standard Test Method for Individual Piles Under Static Axial Tensile Load). The maximum allowable  uplift  load  shall  not  exceed  the  ultimate  load  capacity  as  determined  using  the  results  of  load  test  conducted  in  accordance with ASTM D3689, divided by a factor of safety of 2.0.  Where uplift is due to wind or seismic loading,  the  minimum  factor  of  safety  shall  be  2.0  where  capacity  is  determined  by  an  analysis  and  1.5  where  capacity  is  determined by load tests.  For group pile subjected to uplift, the allowable working uplift load for the group shall be calculated by an approved  method of analysis where the piles in the group are placed at centre‐to‐centre spacing of at least 2.5 times the least  horizontal dimension of the largest pile, the allowable working uplift load for the group is permitted to be calculated  as the lesser of the two: 

(a) The proposed individual working load times the number of piles in the group.  (b) Two‐thirds  of  the  effective  weight  of  the  group  and  the  soil  contained  within  a  block  defined  by  the  perimeter of the group and the embedded length of the pile. 

(c) One‐half  the  effective  weight  of  the  pile  group  and  the  soil  contained  within  a  block  defined  by  the  perimeter of the group and the embedded pile length plus one‐half the total soil shear on the peripheral  surface of the group  Uplift or tension test on piles subject to tension/uplift shall be performed by a continuous rate of uplift (CRU) or an  incremental loading (i.e. ML) test. Where uplift loads are intermittent or cyclic in character, as in wave loading on a  marine  structure, it  is  recommended  to adopt repetitive  loading  on  the  test  pile.  The  tests shall  be  performed  in  accordance with "Standard Test Method for Individual Piles Under Static Axial Tensile Load", (ASTM D3689).  

PART  C:  ADDITIONAL  CONSIDERATIONS  IN  PLANNING,  DESIGN  AND  CONSTRUCTION  OF  BUILDING FOUNDATIONS (SECTIONS 3.13 to 3.22)  3.12 EXCAVATION   Excavation for building foundation or for other purpose shall be done in a safe manner so that no danger to life and  property prevails at any stage of the work or after completion. The requirements of this section shall be satisfied for  all such works in addition to those of Sec 3.3 of Part 7.  Permanent  excavations  shall  have  retaining  walls  of  sufficient  strength  made  of  steel,  masonry,  or  reinforced  concrete to retain the embankment, together with any surcharge load.   Excavations for any purpose shall not extend within 300 mm under any footing or foundation, unless such footing or  foundation is first properly underpinned or protected against settlement.  

3.12.1 Notice to Adjoining Property  Prior  to  any  excavation  close  to  an  adjoining  building  in  another  property,  a  written  notice  shall  be  given  to  the  owner  of  the  adjoining  property  at  least  10  days  ahead  of  the  date  of  excavation.  The  person  undertaking  the  excavation shall, where necessary, incorporate adequate provisions and precautionary measures to ensure safety of  the  adjoining  property  and  shall  supply  the  details  of  such  measures  in  the  notice  to  the  owner  of  the  adjoining    Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐213 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

 

property. He shall obtain approval of the Authority regarding the protective provisions, and permission of the owner  of the adjoining property regarding the proposed excavation in writing.   The protective measures shall incorporate the following:  

(a) Where the level of the foundations of the adjoining structure is at or above the level of the bottom of the  proposed excavation, the vertical load of the adjoining structure shall be supported by proper foundations,  underpinning, or other equivalent means.  

(b) Where  the  level  of  the  foundations  of  the  adjoining  structure  is  below  the  level  of  the  bottom  of  the  proposed  excavation,  provision  shall  be  made  to  support  any  increased  vertical  or  lateral  load  on  the  existing adjoining structure caused by the new construction.  If on giving the required notice, incorporating or proposing to incorporate the protective provisions which have duly  been approved by the Authority, the owner of the adjoining property refuses to permit the proposed excavation or  to allow necessary access and other facilities to the person undertaking the excavation for providing the necessary  and approved protection to the adjoining property, the responsibility for any damage to the adjoining property due  to excavation shall be that of the owner of the adjoining property.  

3.12.2 Excavation Work   Every excavation shall be provided with safe means of entry and exit kept available at all times. When an excavation  has been completed, or partly completed and discontinued, abandoned or interrupted, or the required permits have  expired,  the  lot  shall  be  filled  and  graded  to  eliminate  all  steep  slopes,  holes,  obstructions  or  similar  sources  of  hazard. Fill material shall consist of clean,  noncombustible substances. The final surface shall be graded in such a  manner as to drain the lot, eliminate pockets, prevent accumulation of water, and preclude any threat of damage to  the foundations on the premises or on the adjoining property.   

3.12.2.1

Methods of Protection 

3.12.2.1.1

Shoring, Bracing and Sheeting  

With the exception of rock cuts, the sides of all excavations, including related or resulting embankments, 1.5 m or  greater  in  depth  or  height  measured  from  the  level  of  the  adjacent  ground  surface  to  the  deepest  point  of  excavation,  shall  be  protected  and  maintained  by  shoring,  bracing  and  sheeting,  sheet  piling,  or  other  retaining  structures.  Alternatively,  excavated  slopes  may  be  inclined  not  steeper  than  1:1,  or  stepped  so  that  the  average  slope  is  not  steeper  than  forty  five  degrees  with  no  step  more  than  1.5  m  high,  provided  such  slope  does  not  endanger any structure, including subsurface structures. All sides or slopes of excavations or embankments shall be  inspected after rainstorms, or any other hazard increasing event, and safe conditions shall be restored. Sheet piling  and bracing needed in trench excavations shall have adequate strength to resist the possible forces resulting from  earth or surcharge pressure. DESIGN OF PROTECTION SYSTEM SHALL BE CHECKED BY A GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEER. 

3.12.2.1.2

Guard Rail  

A guard rail or a solid enclosure at least 1 m high shall be provided along the open sides of excavations, except that  such  guard  rail  or  solid  enclosure  may  be  omitted  from  a  side  or  sides  when  access  to  the  adjoining  area  is  precluded, or where side slopes are one vertical to three horizontal or flatter.  

3.12.2.2

Placing of Construction Material  

Excavated materials and superimposed loads such as equipment, trucks, etc. shall not be placed closer to the edge  of  the  excavation  than  a  distance  equal  to  one  and  one‐half  times  the  depth  of  such  excavation,  unless  the  excavation is in rock or the sides have been sloped or sheet piled (or sheeted) and shored to withstand the lateral  force  imposed  by  such  superimposed  load.  When  sheet  piling  is  used,  it  shall  extend  at  least  150  mm  above  the 

6‐214 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

 

Chapter 3 

natural level of the ground. In the case of open excavations with side slopes, the edge of excavation shall be taken  as the toe of the slope.  

3.12.2.3

Safety Regulations  

Whenever subsurface operations are conducted that may impose loads or movement on adjoining property, such as  driving of piles, compaction of soils, or soil densification, the effects of such operations on adjoining property and  structures  shall  be  considered.  The  owner  of  the  property  that  may  be  affected  shall  be  given  48  hours  written  notice of the intention to perform such operations. Where construction operations will cause changes in the ground  water  level  under  adjacent  buildings,  the  effects  of  such  changes  on  the  stability  and  settlement  of  the  adjacent  foundation shall be investigated and provision made to prevent damage to such buildings. When a potential hazard  exists, elevations of the adjacent buildings shall be recorded at intervals of twenty four hours or less to ascertain if  movement has occurred. If so, necessary remedial action shall be undertaken immediately.   Whenever an excavation or fill is to be made that will affect safety, stability, or usability of adjoining properties or  buildings, the adjoining properties or buildings shall be protected as required by the provisions of Sec 3.13.   On  excavation,  the  soil  material  directly  underlying  footings,  piers,  and  walls  shall  be  inspected  by  an  engineer/architect prior to construction of the footing. If such inspection indicates that the soil conditions do not  conform  to  those  assumed  for  the  purposes  of  design  and  described  on  the  plans,  or  are  unsatisfactory  due  to  disturbance, then additional excavation, reduction in allowable bearing pressure, or other remedial measures shall  be adopted.  Except in cases where a proposed excavation will extend less than 1.5 m below grade, all underpinning operations  and the construction and excavation of temporary or permanent cofferdams, caissons, braced excavation surfaces,  or other constructions or excavations required for or affecting the support  of adjacent properties or buildings shall  be subject to controlled inspection. The details of underpinning, and construction of cofferdams, caissons, bracing  or other constructions required for the support of adjacent properties or buildings shall be shown on the plans or  prepared in the form of shop or detail drawings and shall be approved by the engineer who prepared the plans. 

3.13 DEWATERING  All excavations shall be drained and the drainage maintained as long as the excavation continues or remains. Where  necessary,  pumping  shall  be  used.  No  condition  shall  be  created  as  a  result  of  construction  operations  that  will  interfere  with  natural  surface  drainage.  Water  courses,  drainage  ditches,  etc.  shall  not  be  obstructed  by  refuse,  waste  building  materials,  earth,  stones,  tree  stumps,  branches,  or  other  debris  that  may  interfere  with  surface  drainage or cause the impoundment of surface water. 

3.14 SLOPE STABILITY OF ADJOINING BUILDINGS  The possibility of overturning and sliding of the building shall be considered. The minimum factor of safety against  overturning of the structure as a whole shall be 1.5. Stability against overturning shall be provided by the dead load  of the building, the allowable uplift capacity of piling, anchors, weight of the soil directly overlying footings provided  that such soil cannot be excavated without recourse to major modification of the building, or by any combination of  these factors.   The minimum  factor of safety against sliding of the structure under  lateral load shall  be 1.5. Resistance to lateral  loads shall be provided by friction between the foundation and the underlying soil, passive earth pressure, batter  piles or by plumb piles, subject to the following:  

(a) The resistance to lateral loads due to passive earth pressure shall not be taken into consideration where  the abutting soil could be removed inadvertently by excavation.    Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐215 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

 

(b) In case of pile supported structures, frictional resistance between the foundation and the underlying soil  shall be discounted.  

(c) The available resistance to friction between the foundation and the underlying soil shall be predicted on an  assumed  friction  factor  of  0.5.    A  greater  value  of  the  coefficient  of  friction  may  be  used  subject  to  verification by analysis and test.   The  faces  of  cut  and  fill  slopes  shall  be  prepared  and  maintained  to  control  erosion.  The  control  may  consist  of  effective  planting.  The  protection  for  slopes  shall  be  installed  as  soon  as  practicable.  Where  cut  slopes  are  not  subject to erosion due to erosion resistant character of the materials, such protection may be omitted.   Where necessary, check dams, cribbing, riprap or other devices or methods shall be employed to control erosion. 

3.15 FILLS  3.15.1 Quality of Fill   The  excavation  outside  the  foundation  shall  be  backfilled  with  soil  that  is  free  of  organic  material,  construction  debris  and  large  rocks.  The  backfill  shall  be  placed  in  lifts  and  compacted  in  a  manner  which  does  not  damage  foundation, the waterproofing or damp‐proofing material.  

3.15.2 Placement of Fill   Fills to be used to support the foundation of any building or structure shall be placed in accordance with established  engineering  principle.  Before  placement  of  the  fill,  the  existing  ground  surface  shall  be  stripped  off  all  organic  growth, timber, rubbish and debris. After stripping, the ground surface shall be compacted. Materials for fill shall  consist  of  sand,  gravel,  crushed  stone,  crushed  earth,  or  a  mixture  of  these.  The  fill  material  shall  contain  no  particles  exceeding  100  mm  in  the  largest  dimension.  A  soil  investigation  report  and  a  report  of  satisfactory  placement of fill, both acceptable to the Building Official shall be submitted.  In an uncontrolled fill, the soil within  the building area shall be explored using test pits. At least one test pit penetrating at least 2 m below the level of the  bottom of the proposed foundation shall  be provided for every 200 m2 of building area. Wherever such test  pits  consistently indicate that the fill is composed of material that is free of voids and free of extensive inclusion of mud,  organic  materials  such  as  paper,  garbage,  cans,  metallic  objects,  or  debris,  the  fill  material  shall  be  acceptable.  Where the fill shows voids or inclusions as described above, either the fill shall be treated as having no presumptive  bearing capacity, or the building shall incorporate adequate strength and stiffness to bridge such voids or inclusions  or shall be articulated to prevent damage due to differential or localized settlement of the fill.  

3.15.3 Specifications   Where foundations are to be placed on controlled fill materials, the fill must be compacted in layers not exceeding  300  mm.  Clear  specifications  shall  be  provided  for  the  range  of  water  content,  the  degree  of  compaction  to  be  achieved  and  the  method  of  compaction  that  shall  be  followed.  Such  specifications  shall  be  based  on  the  shear  strength requirement for the fill soil and allowable settlement estimate. The minimum density of controlled fill shall  be 95% of the optimum density obtained from "Standard Test Method for Moisture‐Density Relation of Soil and Soil‐ Aggregate Mixture using 10‐lb (4.54 kg) Rammer and 18‐in (457 mm) Drop", (ASTM D1557).  The degree of compaction achieved in a fill shall be obtained from in‐situ density measurements. No new layer shall  be placed unless a satisfactory density is attained in each layer. 

3.16 PROTECTIVE Retaining Structures for Foundations/ Shore Piles  A  retaining  wall  is  a  wall  designed  to  resist  lateral  earth  and/or  fluid  pressures,  including  any  surcharge,  in  accordance with accepted engineering practice. Retaining walls for foundations shall be designed to ensure stability  6‐216 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

 

Chapter 3 

against overturning, sliding, excessive foundation pressure and water uplift; and that they be designed for a safety  factor of  1.5  against  lateral sliding and  overturning.  Generally  sheet  pile retaining walls  are  used  for  construction  raft foundations for buildings. Taller sheet piles may need a tie back anchor driven and anchored behind the soil of  the sheet pile retaining wall. 

3.17 WATERPROOFING AND DAMP­PROOFING  Walls  or  portions  thereof  that  retain  earth  and  enclose  interior  spaces,  and  floors  below  grade  shall  be  waterproofed and damp‐proofed, with the exception of those spaces where such omission is not detrimental to the  building  or  occupancy.  The  roof  is  also  required  to  be  waterproofed.    The  owner  shall  perform  a  subsurface  investigation to determine the possibility of the ground water table rising above the proposed elevation of the floor  or floors below grade unless satisfactory data from adjacent areas demonstrate that ground water has not been a  problem.   There may arise two situations: (i) where no hydrostatic pressure occurs and (ii) where hydrostatic pressure occurs.   Where hydrostatic pressure conditions exist, floors and walls below finished ground level shall be waterproofed in  accordance  with  Sec  3.13.1  below.  Where  hydrostatic  pressure  conditions  do  not  exist,  damp‐proofing  and  perimeter  drainage  shall  be  provided  in  accordance  with  Sec  3.13.2  below.  In  addition,  the  damp‐proofing  and  waterproofing shall also meet the requirements of Sec 3.13.3.  All damp‐proofing and waterproofing materials shall  conform to the requirements of Sec 2.16.7 of    Part 5. 

3.17.1.1

Waterproofing where Hydrostatic Pressure Occurs 

Where ground water investigation indicates that a hydrostatic pressure condition exists, or is likely to occur, walls  and floors shall be waterproofed in accordance with this section. 

3.17.1.2

Floor Waterproofing  

 Floors  required  to  be  waterproofed  shall  be  of  concrete  and  shall be  designed  and  constructed  to withstand  the  anticipated hydrostatic pressure.  Waterproofing of the floor shall be accomplished by placing under the slab a membrane of rubberized asphalt, or  butyl  rubber,  or  polymer  modified  asphalt,  or  neoprene,  or  not  less  than  0.15  mm  polyvinyl  chloride  or  polyethylene, or other approved materials, capable of bridging nonstructural cracks. Joints in the membrane shall  be lapped not less than 150 mm and sealed in an approved manner. 

3.17.1.3

Wall Waterproofing  

Walls  required  to  be  waterproofed  shall  be  of  concrete  or  masonry  designed  to  withstand  the  anticipated  hydrostatic pressure and other lateral loads. Prior to the application of waterproofing materials on concrete walls,  all holes and recesses resulting from the removal of form ties shall be sealed with  a bituminous material or other  approved methods or materials. Unit masonry walls shall be pargeted  on the exterior surface below ground level  with not less than 10 mm of Portland cement mortar. The pargeting shall be continued to the foundation. Pargeting  of unit masonry walls is not required where a material is approved for direct application to the masonry.  Waterproofing shall be applied from a point 300 mm above the maximum elevation of the ground water table down  to the top of the spread portion of the foundation. The remainder of the wall up to a level not less than 150 mm  above finished grade shall be damp‐proofed.  Wall waterproofing materials shall consist  of two‐ply hot‐mopped felts, not less than 0.15 mm polyvinyl chloride,  1.0  mm  polymer  modified  asphalt,  0.15  mm  polyethylene  or  other  approved  methods  or  materials  capable  of  bridging  nonstructural  cracks.  Joints  in  the  membrane  shall  be  lapped  not  less  than  150  mm  and  sealed  in  an  approved manner.    Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐217 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

 

Joints in walls and floors, joints between the wall and the floor, and penetrations of the wall and floor shall be made  watertight utilizing established methods and materials. 

3.17.1.4

Damp­proofing with no Hydrostatic Pressure  

Where  hydrostatic  pressure  will not  occur,  floors and  walls  shall  be  damp‐proofed and  a  subsoil  drainage  system  shall be installed as described below: 

3.17.1.5

Floor Damp­proofing  

For floors, damp‐proofing materials shall be installed between the floor and base materials.   The base material shall  not be less than 100 mm in thickness consisting of gravel or crushed stone containing not more than 10 per cent  material that passes a 4.76 mm sieve. Where a site is located in well drained gravel or sand/gravel mixture, a floor  base  is  not  required.  When  the  finished  ground  level  is  below  the  floor  level  for  more  than  25  per  cent  of  the  perimeter  of  the  building,  the  base  material  need  not  be  provided.  Where  a  separate  floor  is  provided  above  a  concrete slab the damp‐proofing may be installed on top of the slab.  Damp‐proofing materials, where installed beneath the slab, shall consist of not less than 0.15 mm polyethylene with  joints lapped not less than 150 mm, or other approved methods or materials. Where permitted to be installed on  top of the slab,  damp‐proofing shall consist of mopped  on bitumen, not less than 0.1 mm polyethylene, or other  approved  methods  or  materials.  Joints  in  membranes  shall  be  lapped  not  less  than  150  mm  and  sealed  in  an  approved manner. 

3.17.1.6

Wall Damp­proofing 

For walls, damp‐proofing materials shall be installed and shall extend from a point 150 mm above grade, down to  the top of the spread portion of the foundation.  Wall  damp‐proofing  material  shall  consist  of  a  bituminous  material,  acrylic  modified  cement  base  coating,  rubberized  asphalt,  polymer‐modified  asphalt,  butyl  rubber,  or  other  approved  materials  capable  of  bridging  nonstructural cracks. 

3.17.1.7

Perimeter Drain  

A drain shall be placed around the perimeter of a foundation that consists of gravel or crushed stone containing not  more than 10 per cent material that passes through a 4.76 mm sieve. The drain shall extend a minimum of 300 mm  beyond the outside edge of the foundation. The thickness shall be such that the bottom of the drain is not higher  than the bottom of the base under the floor, and that the top of the drain is not less than 150 mm above the top of  the foundation. The top of the drain shall be covered with an approved filter membrane material. Where a drain tile  or perforated pipe is used, the invert of the pipe or tile shall not be higher than the floor elevation. The top of joints  or the top of perforations shall be protected with an approved filter membrane material. The pipe or tile shall be  placed on not less than 50 mm of gravel or crushed stone complying with this section, and shall be covered with not  less than 150 mm of the same material.  The  floor  base  and  foundation  perimeter  drain  shall  discharge  by  gravity  or  mechanical  means  into  an  approved  drainage system. Where a site is located in well drained gravel or sand/gravel mixture, a dedicated drainage system  is not required. When the finished ground level is below the floor level for more than 25 per cent of the perimeter  of the building, the foundation drain need be provided only around that portion of the building where the ground  level is above the floor level.  

6‐218 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

 

3.17.2

Other Damp­proofing and Waterproofing Requirements  

3.17.2.1

Placement of Backfill  

Chapter 3 

The  excavation  outside  the  foundation  shall  be  backfilled  with  soil  that  is  free  of  organic    material,  construction  debris and large rocks. The backfill shall be placed in lifts and compacted in a manner which does not damage the  waterproofing or damp‐proofing material or structurally damage the wall. 

3.17.2.2

Site Grading 

The ground immediately adjacent to the foundation shall be sloped away from the  building at a slope not less than  1 unit vertical in 12 units horizontal (1:12) for a minimum distance of 2.5 m measured  perpendicular to the face  of  the wall or an alternative method of diverting water away from the foundation shall be used. Consideration shall be  given  to  possible  additional  settlement  of  the  backfill  when  establishing  the  final  ground  level  adjacent  to  the  foundation. 

3.17.2.3

Erosion Protection 

Where  water  impacts  the  ground  from  the  edge  of  the  roof,  down  spout,  scupper,  valley  or  other  rainwater  collection or diversion device, provisions shall be used to prevent soil erosion and direct the water away from the  foundation. 

3.18 FOUNDATION ON SLOPES  3.18.1 Footings on Slopes  Where footings are to be founded on a slope, the distance of the sloping surface at the base level of the footing  measured from the centre of the footing shall not be less than twice the width of the footing.   When  adjacent  footings  are  to  be  placed  at  different  levels,  the  distance  between  the  edges  of  footings  shall  be  such as to prevent undesirable overlapping of structures in soil and disturbance of the soil under the higher footing  due to excavation of the lower footing.   On  a  sloping  site,  footing  shall  be  on  a  horizontal  bearing  and  stepped.  At  all  changes  of  levels,  footings  shall  be  lapped for a distance of at least equal to the thickness of   foundation or three times the height of step, whichever is  greater. Adequate precautions shall be taken to prevent tendency for the upper layers of soil  to move downhill.  

3.19 FOUNDATIONS ON FILLS AND PROBLEMATIC SOILS   3.19.1 Footings on Filled up Ground   Footings  shall  not  be  constructed  on  loosely  filled  up  ground  with  non  uniform  density  or  consistency,  unless  adequate strengthening of the soil is made by applying ground improvement techniques.  

3.19.2 Ground Improvement  In poor and weak subsoils, the design of shallow foundation for structures and equipment may present problems  with respect to both sizing of foundation as well as control of foundation settlements. A viable alternative in certain  situations  developed  over  recent  years  is  to  improve  the  subsoil  to  an  extent  that  the  subsoil  would  develop  an  adequate  bearing  capacity  and  foundations  constructed  after  subsoil  improvement  would  have  resultant  settlements within acceptable limits. Selection of ground improvement techniques may be done in accordance with  good practice.  

  Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐219 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

 

3.19.3 Soil Reinforcement   Use  of  suitable  geo‐synthetics/geo‐textiles may  be  made  in  an  approved manner  for  ground  improvement  where  applicable based on good practice. 

3.20 FOUNDATION DESIGN FOR DYNAMIC FORCES  3.20.1 Effect of Dynamic Forces  Where machinery operations or other vibrations are transmitted through foundation, consideration shall be given in  the foundation design to prevent detrimental disturbance of the soil.   Impact  forces  shall  be  neglected  in  foundation  design  except  for  foundations  bearing  on  loose  granular  soils,  foundations supporting cranes, heavy machinery and moving equipment, or where the ratio of live load causing the  impact to the dead load exceeds 50%. 

3.20.2 Machine Foundation  Machine  foundations  are  subjected  to  the  dynamic  forces  caused  by  the  machine.  These  dynamic  forces  are  transmitted  to  the  foundation  supporting  the  machine.  Although  the  moving  parts  of  the  machine  are  generally  balanced, there is always some unbalance in practice which causes an eccentricity of rotating parts. This produces  an  oscillating  force.  The  machine  foundation  must  satisfy  the  criteria  for  dynamic  loading  in  addition  to  that  for  static loading.   

3.20.2.1

Types of Machine Foundations  

Basically, there are three types of machine foundation: 

(a) Machines which produce a periodic unbalanced force, such as reciprocating engines and compressors. The  speed of such machines is generally less than 600 rpm. In these machines, the rotary motion of the crank is  converted into the translatory motion. The unbalanced force varies sinusoidal.  

(b) Machines which produce impact loads, such as forge hammers and punch presses. In these machines, the  dynamic  force  attains  a  peak  value  in  a  very  short  time  and  then  dies  out  gradually.  The  response  is  a  pulsating  curve.  It  vanishes  before  the  next  pulse.  The  speed  is  usually  between  60  to  150  blows  per  minute.  

(c) High speed machines, such as turbines, and rotary compressors. The speed of such machines is very high;  sometimes, it is even more than 3000 rpm.   The following four types of machine foundations are commonly used.  

(a) Block Type: This type of machine foundation consists of a pedestal resting on a footing (Fig. 6.3.3a). The  foundation has a large mass and a small natural frequency.  

(b) Box Type: The foundation consists of a hollow concrete block (Fig. 6.3.3b). The mass of the foundation is  less than that in the block type and the natural frequency is increased.  

(c) Wall Type: A wall type of foundation consists of a pair of walls having a top slab. The machine rests on the  top slab (Fig6.3.3c).  

(d) Framed Type: This type of foundation consists of vertical columns having a horizontal frame at their tops.  The machine is supported on the frame (Fig. 6.3.3d).   Machines  which  produce  periodical  and  impulsive  forces  at  low  speeds  are  generally  provided  with  a  block  type  foundation. Framed type foundations are generally used for the machines working at high speeds and for those of 

6‐220 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

Ch hapter 3 

the  rotatin ng  types.  Somee  machines  wh hich  induce  veery  little  dynam mic  forces,  succh  as  lathes,  need  n not  be  prrovided  with a macchine foundatio on. Such mach hines may be directly bolted tto the floor. 

3.20.2.2 2

Design n Considerrations  

For  satisfaactory  perform mance,  machin ne  foundationss  should  satissfy  the  following  requiremeents:  (i)  resonance  is  avoided, (ii) bearing capacity and settlement are saffe, and (iii) theere is an adeq quate vibration n and shock iso olation.  Avoidance of resonance is discussed in this section.  (I) Resonan nce: Based on  their operatin ng frequenciess, the machines are classified d as (i) low spe eed having freequency  less  than  300  3 revolution ns  per  minute  (rpm),(ii)  med dium  speed,  frrequency  300  to  1000  rpm,  and  (iii)  high  speed,  frequency  greater  than  1000  rpm.  To  avoid  resonan nce,  the  naturral  frequency  (or  the  resonaant  frequency))  of  the  machine  fo oundation‐soil  system  must  be  either  veryy  large  or  veryy  small  compaared  to  the  op perating  speed d  of  the  machine.  

(a) Loow  speed  macchines  (f1  <3000  rpm):  Proviide  a  foundation  with  a  natural  frequenccy  at  least  tw wice  the  op perating frequency, i.e., the  frequency ratiio r (=f1/ fn) is  less than 0.5. N Natural frequeency can be inccreased  (i)) by increasingg base area or  reducing totaal static weightt of the foundation, (ii) by in ncreasing mod dulus of  sh hear  rigidity  off  the  soil  by  compaction,  grrouting  or  injection,  (iii)  by  u using  piles  to  provide  the  reequired  fo oundation stiffn ness.  

(b) High speed macchines (f1>1000 rpm): Providde a foundationn with natural frequency nott higher than oone‐half  off the operatingg value, i.e., freequency ratio  r ≥ 2. Natural ffrequency can be decreased d by increasing  weight  off foundation. D During startingg and stoppingg, the machine will operate b briefly at reson nant frequencyy (fr) of  th he foundation.  Probable amp plitude is comp puted at both ffr and f1 and  compared with allowable vaalues to  de etermine if thee foundation arrrangement must be altered.  

(a) 

(b)

(c) 

(d) 

 

Fig. 6.3.3. Tyypes of machin ne foundationss (a) Block Type e (b) Box Type (c) Wall Type ((d) Framed Typ pe. 

 (2)  Types  of  foundation ns.  Considerin ng  their  structtural  forms,  th he  machine  fo oundations,  in n  general,  are  of  the  following  types:  t (i) box ffoundation  consisting of  a  p pedestal  of con ncrete,  (ii)  boxx  foundation  consisting  c of  a  hollow  concrete b block, (iii) wall ffoundation con nsisting of a paair of walls sup pporting the machine. (iv) fraamed foundatio on con‐ sisting of vvertical column ns and a top ho orizontal framee work which fo orms the seat o of essential maachinery. 

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

 

Low speed machines (e.g., forge hammers, presses, low speed reciprocating engines and compressors) are generally  supported on  block foundation having a large contact area with soil. Medium speed machines (e.g., reciprocating  diesel  and  gas  engines)  also  have,  in  general,  block  foundations  resting  on  springs  or  suitable  elastic  pads.  High  speed  and  rotating  type  of  machines  (e.g.,  internal  combustion  engines,  electric  motors,  and  turbo  generator  machines)  are  generally  mounted  on  framed  foundations.  Other  high  speed  machines  are  placed  on  block  foundations. As far as possible, the C.G. of the whole system and the centroid of the base area should be on the same  vertical axis. At the most an eccentricity of 5% could be allowed.   (3)  Permissible  amplitude.  Many  times  the  permissible  amplitude  at  operating  speed  is  specified  by  the  manufactures. If not specified, the following values may be adopted for guidance (i) low speed machines. (f1 < 500  rpm), horizontal and vertical vibrations, A = 0.25 run:. (ii) operating speed f1  = 500 ‐ 1500 rpm, A = 0.4 mm to  0.6 mm for horizontal, and A = 0.7 mm to 0.9 mm for vertical mode of vibration; (iii) operating speed f1 up to 3000  rpm, A = 0.2 mm for horizontal and A = 0.5 mm for vertical vibrations (iv) hammer foundations, A = 10 mm.  

3.20.2.3

Design Methods  

The  various  design  methods  can  be  grouped  as  follows:  (i)  empirical  and  semi‐empirical  methods,  (ii)  methods  considering  soil  as  a  spring  and  (iii)  methods  considering  soil  as  a  semi‐infinite  elastic  mass  (elastic  half‐space‐ approach) and its equivalent lumped parameter method. The lumped parameter method is currently preferred and  will be described here.   A good machine foundation should satisfy the following criteria.  

(a) Like ordinary foundations, it should be safe against shear failure caused by superimposed loads, and also  the settlements should be within the safe limits.  

(b) The soil pressure should normally not exceed 80% of the allowable pressure for static loading.   (c) There  should  be  no  possibility  of  resonance.  The  natural  frequency  of  the  foundation  should  be  either  greater than or smaller than the operating frequency of the machine.  

(d) The amplitudes under service condition should be within the permissible limits for the machine.   (e) The combined centre of gravity of the machine and the foundation should be on the vertical line passing  through the centre of gravity of the base plane.  

(f) Machine  foundation  should  be  taken  to  a  level  lower  than  the  level  of  the  foundation  of  the,  adjacent  buildings and should be properly separated.  

(g) The vibrations induced should neither be annoying to the persons nor detrimental to other structures.   (h) Richart (1967) developed a plot for vertical vibrations, which is generally taken as a guide for various limits  of frequency and amplitude which has been presented in Fig. 6.3.4.  

(i) The depth of the ground‐water table should be at least one‐fourth of the width of the foundation below  the base place.  

3.20.2.4 Vibration Analysis of a Machine Foundation:  Although a machine  foundation has 6  degree  of freedom,  it is  assumed  to have  a  single  degree of freedom  for  a  simplified analysis. Fig 6.3.5 shows a machine foundation supported on a soil mass. In this case, the mass mf lumps  together the mass of the machine and the mass of foundation. The total mass mf acts at the centre of gravity of the  system. The mass is under the supporting action of the soil. The elastic action can be lumped together into a single  elastic spring with a stiffness k. Likewise; all the resistance to motion is lumped into the damping coefficient c. Thus  the  machine  foundation reduces to  a  single mass  having  one  degree  of  freedom. The  analysis  of  damped, forced  vibration is, therefore, applicable to the machine foundation.    6‐222 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

Ch hapter 3 

  Fig. 6.3.4. Limits of frequeency and ampliitudes (Richartt’s chart) 

  5.  Machine fou undation suppo orted on a soil mass   Fig. 6.3.5

3.20.2.4 4.1 Determiination of P  Parameterss  For vibratio on analysis of  a machine fou undation, the  parameters m m, c and k are  required. Thesse parameters  can be  determined as under. 

 

W a  machine  vibrates,  ssome  portion  of  the  suppo orting  soil  masss  also  vibratees.  The  (a) Mass  (m):  When  vibrating soil  is known as th he participatin ng mass or in‐p phase soil masss. Therefore,  the total masss of the  undation  blocck  and  machin ne  (mf)  and  th he  mass  (ms)  of  the  system  is  equal  to  the  maass  of  the  fou participating ssoil. Thus         (6.3.51)  m = m f + ms      

Part 6  Structural Design 

 

 

Unfortunately, there is no rational method to determine the magnitude of ms. It is usually related to the  mass  of  the  soil  in  the  pressure  bulb.  The  value  of  ms  generally  varies  between  zero  and  mf.  In  other  words, the total mass (m) varies between mf and 2 mf in most cases.  (b) Spring  stiffness  (k):  The  spring  stiffness  depends  upon  the  type  of  soil,  embedment  of  the  foundation  block, the contact area and the contact pressure distribution. The following are the common methods.  i)

Laboratory test: A triaxial test with vertical vibrations is conducted to determine Young’s modulus  E.  Alternatively,  the  modulus  of  rigidity  (G)  is  determined  conducting  the  test  under  torsional  vibration,  and  E  is  obtained  indirectly  from  the  relation, E = 2G( 1 + µ ) ,  where  µ  is  Poisson’s  ratio. The stiffness (k) is determined as    

 

k=

AE L  

 

 

 

 

(6.3.52) 

 

        where, A  cross‐sectional area of the specimen, and   L  length of the specimen.  ii)

Barkan’s  method:  The  stiffness  can  also  be  obtained  from  the  value  of  E  using  the  following  relation given by Barken. 

 

 

 

k=

1.13E A   1− µ

 

 

 

(6.3.53) 

 

           Where, A  base area of the machine, i.e. area of contact.  iii) Plate load test: A repeated plate load test is conducted and the stiffness of the soil (kp) is found as  the slope of the load‐deformation curve. The spring constant k of the foundation is  as under.  For cohesive soils:  

⎛ B k = k P ⎜⎜ ⎝ BP

For cohesionless soil: 

⎛ B + 0.3 ⎞ ⎟⎟ k = k P ⎜⎜   ⎝ BP + 0.3 ⎠

⎞ ⎟⎟     ⎠

 

 

 

 

 

 

(6.3.54)   

 

2

(6.3.55) 

                      Where,  B  is  the  width  of  foundation.  Alternatively,  spring  constant  can  be  obtained  from the subgrade modulus (ks), as  

k = K s A      

      

 

 

 

 

 

(6.3.56) 

Where, A = area of foundation.  iv) Resonance test: The resonance frequency (fn) is obtained using a vibrator of mass m set up on  a steel plate supported on the ground. The spring stiffness obtained from the relation                                              II.

fn =

ωn 1 = k m = 4π 2 f n m           2π 2π

 

6.3.57   

Damping constant (c): Damping is due to dissipation of vibration energy, which occurs mainly because of  the following reasons.  i)

Internal friction loss due to hysterisis and viscous effects. 

ii)

Radiational loss due to propagation of waves through soil. 

The  damping  factor  D  for  an  under‐damped  system  can  be  determined  in  the  laboratory.  Vibration  response  is  plotted and the logarithmic decrement δ is found from the plot, as  

6‐224 

 

Vol. 2 

Soils and Foundations   

                                             

 

δ=

2πD 1− D

2

Chapter 3 

⇒ D=

δ 2π

  

 

6.3.58  

The damping factor D may also be obtained from the area of the hysteresis loop of the load displacement curve, as 

D=

∆W    W

 

6.3.59  

   Where, W   total work done; and ΔW   work lost hysteresis. The value of D for most soils generally varies  between 0.01 and 0.1. 

3.21

GEO­HAZARD ANALYSIS FOR BUILDINGS 

Geo‐hazard  analysis  of  buildings  include  design  considerations  for  possible  landslides,  ground  subsidence,  earthquakes  and  other  seismic  events,  erosion  and  scour,  construction  in  toxic  and/or  contaminated  landfills,  groundwater contamination etc. A preliminary review of the selected site should be carried out for existence of any  of the above mentioned geo‐hazard in the area. A detailed analysis may be carried out only if the preliminary review  indicates a significant threat for the building which may exist from any of the above mentioned potential geo‐hazard  at the selected location for the building. See relevant section for details. 

 

  Bangladesh National Building Code 2012 

 

6‐225