Cinderella Unit

Cinderella Unit

Bibbity Bobbity BOOOOOOOOOO! A cross curricular unit including ELA, Social Studies, and Math By Nancy VandenBerge (inspired by the summer 2013 curric...

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A cross curricular unit including ELA, Social Studies, and Math By Nancy VandenBerge (inspired by the summer 2013 curriculum writing team  ) Firstgradewow.blogspot.com Graphics by melonheadz, scrappin doodles, thistle girl, dj inkers

This little unit will take you around the globe and around the curriculum! Some books you may want to look for:

Cinderella as Retold By Kath Jewitt Cinderella By Susan Jeffers Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters By John Steptoe The Persian Cinderella By Shirley Climo Yeh-Shen By ai-Ling-Louie The Korean Cinderella By Shirley Climo Abadeha The Philipine Cinderella By Myrna J. de la Paz Cinder Edna By Ellen Jackson Cindy Ellen By Susan Lowell Prince Cinders By Babette Cole Cinderhazel By Deborah Nourse Lattimore Cinderella Penguin By Janet Perlman Adelita By Tomie dePaola

This unit includes:

A quote about fairy tales Information about folktales, fairytales, and legends Compare fiction/nonfiction Compare fantasy/realistic fiction Fairy Tale Song A poem about Cinderella Tell Me Tower –retelling activity Retelling puppets Reader’s Theater for boys and girls Comparing Cinderella Stories venn and chart Mapping Origins of story Acrostic Poem Written Expression and Hands on Visual Design a new coach ,shoe Inferring Shoe Activity ABC Order activity POOF! Word work (Onset and rime) game Word search 6 math tub activities- place value, expanded notation, greater,/less than, problem solving, strategy

“If you want your children to be intelligent, read them fairy tales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairy tales.” Albert Einstein

Folk tales

To be a true folk tale, a story must have its origins in what we call the oral tradition. This means the story was first passed down orally by storytellers. Along the way it may have had things added or subtracted as each storyteller made it his or her own. It eventually was written down, which is why you're able to read it in a book now, but ti wasn't written down first. For example, Paul Bunyan reads like a folk tale and has many folk tale elements in it, but it is not a true folk tale because ti was a written story to begin with and not something passed down through the generations orally. Folk tales are instructive. They caution readers/listeners about the consequences of certain kinds of behaviors or attitudes. Characters are not complex. Instead they are stereotypes: the thief, the liar, the clever youth, the evil stepmother, etc. Even when written down, they are sometimes told in a way that sounds like the spoken word: directly addressing the reader, use of dialect or slang, etc. The structure may be repetitive. Things that happen in threes are common. Repetition of lines is also common and would have been helpful to whoever was memorizing and telling a story in the oral tradition.

Fairy tales

Surprise! Fairy tales often don't have any fairies in them at all. There isn't much difference between folk tales and fairy tales. But the presence of witches, dragons, trolls, magic spells, or other magical elements help distinguish fairy tales from folk tales. Both folk tales and fairy tales may involve a character learning an important lesson. Both may put the heroes in mortal danger. Like folk tales, fairy tales may serve as cautionary tales to teach their listeners what not to do. Some fairy tales have roots in the oral tradition, but others, called literary fairy tales, were made up and written down, so technically, these are not folk tales. However, they may share many of the same traits as fairy tales from the folk tale tradition. Like folk tales, fairy tales in their original forms often have less than happy endings. Because the stories were invented to be instructive and cautionary, they often feature a main character who suffers for his or her failure to do things the "right" way. Little Red Riding Hood talks to a stranger in the woods and gets eaten by a wolf. In the original story, that's the end of her. No woodcutter comes along to save her. In the original version of Cinderella, the wicked stepsisters cut off their toes to try to fit their feet into the glass slipper, and then on the way back to the castle after Cindy and the prince are reunited, birds come along and peck out the stepsisters' eyes! Ouch! Folk tales and fairy tales are meant to disturb you and teach you to be careful. They may entertain you, but on the other hand, they may scare you. In Irish folklore, fairies are not like Tinkerbell. They have a dark and dangerous side and can make you very sorry if you cross them. The modern, cleaned up versions of fairy tales you may have read as a youngster may be very different from the original versions of these stories.

Legends

Legends are stories told about a person or a place. This person may be a real person or a character based on a real person. Legends may be rooted in oral tradition but changed through the generations by storytellers and writers. For example, the stories of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table are legends. They are based on someone who might have actually lived but who was probably not much like the King Arthur in our stories.

Fairy Tales… Often begin with “Once Upon A Time… “ or “Long Ago…” Often have characters such as kings and queens

Often take place in far away lands

Often contain magic

Often have good and bad characters

Often have talking animals

Often have unusual names

Often uses numbers like 3 or 7

Often have happy endings

Fiction Nonfiction Not Real

Real

Story Talk

Fact Talk

Read to Enjoy

Read to Learn

Read in Order

Read in Any Order

Illustrations

Photos, Charts, Graphs

Beginning, Middle, End

Table of Contents

Characters, Setting

Index, Glossary

Problem, Solution

True info., Directions

FICTION Fantasy Fantasy stories have unrealistic characters and/or a story that could not really happen.

Realistic Fiction Realistic fiction stories have characters who are realistic and a story t hat could really happen.

The following activity is designed to challenge students to determine if something might be found in a fantasy story or a realistic fiction story. Print cards and cut apart. Students organize cards into the two categories and then record findings on the recording sheet.

Fantasy Realistic Fiction

Name __________

Fantasy

Fiction Realistic Fiction

Fairy Tale Song (Tune- Jingle Bells) Author unknown

Once upon a time In a land so far away, A princess kissed a frogWell that just made his day! Far across the town, Red Riding Hood took frightShe found a wolf in Granny’s bed When she told her good night! OH! Fairy tales! Fairy Tales! Read them every day! Oh what fun it is to hear How Goldilocks got away! Fairy Tales! Fairy Tales! Full of joy and laughter! Do you know how this one ends? Why, it’s Happily Ever After!

IN SEARCH OF CINDERELLA by Shel Silverstein From dusk to dawn, From town to town, Without a single clue, I seek the tender, slender foot To fit this crystal shoe. From dusk to dawn, I try it on Each damsel that I meet. And I still love her so, but oh, I've started hating feet.

Retelling An important component in determining comprehension is a student’s ability to retell a story. The following pages will help in exploring the elements of story and act as a reminder while retelling. Students will learn the parts and assemble a “Tell Me Tower” with icons. Print story part cards and cut apart. Go over with kids. Recording page can be used for any story.

Setting

The setting is the time and the place where the story occurs. Characters

The character are the people or animals who act out the story.

Problem

The problem is the struggle the main character is having. Happenings

BEGINNING

MIDDLE

END

The happenings are the events that build from the problem.

Solution

The solution is how the problem was solved

Elements of a Story

Tell Me Tower

Tell Me Tower-Small Student Icons Color, cut out and glue to cardboard tube.

Name ________________

Story Retelling Title_______________________

The next few pages can be used as props/puppets for a retelling of the classic fairy tale, Cinderella. Print, cut, glue to sticks, and put into a center, or divide kids into small groups. Have each group present a retelling. Kids should be sure to include the elements of a story, setting, characters, problem, beginning, middle, end, and resolution. Kids can have their “Tell Me Towers” with them as a reminder. Limited color ink? Simply print using grayscale and have kids color.

Cinderella As Retold By _________

Reader’s Theater The following 5 pages include two different reader’s theater opportunities, one for girls and one for boys along with “Magic Wand” stars. Divide class into small groups and let them decide who will read each part. Have each group practice reading their scripts. Work on reading individual parts with fluency. Students can make a simple “magic wand” out of a straw and a star to use as pointers to smoothly read. After sufficient practice have students present in front of the class.

Cinderella Waiting A Reader’s Theater (For Girls) Author Unknown

Cinderella Waiting

Reader 1Reader 2Reader 3Reader 1-

My foot! It hurts! I lost my crystal shoe! I don’t know where I left it! Reader 2- Whatever shall I do? Reader 3- My Prince will find Reader 1- My fallen shoe, Reader 2- The one I left behind Reader 3- He’s looking hard for me just now, Reader 1- I hope he isn’t far. Reader 2 - I know he’ll find me soon… AllBut how?

In Search of Cinderella A Reader’s Theater (for Boys) Shel Silverstein

In Search of Cinderella

Reader 1- From dusk to dawn Reader 2- From town to town Reader 3- Without a single clue. Reader 1- I seek the tender, slender foot Reader 2- To fit this crystal shoe. Reader 3- From dusk to dawn, Reader 1- I try it on Reader 2- Each damsel that I meet. Reader 3- And I still love her so, but oh, AllI’ve started hating feet!

Magic Wand Pointers. Cut out and attach to straws.

Read several versions of Cinderella from different cultures. Compare and contrast the different stories. There are two different recording sheets to document ideas about stories.

both

Comparing Cinderella

As you introduce the different versions of Cinderella, have students find the origins of each story on the map of the world. Put a star sticker for each area.

Cinderella Around the World Put a star near the place where each story originated!

Brainstorm a list of things you might see in a fairy tale. Have kids create an acrostic using some of those words. Then have them design the shoes in which they went traveling. Patterns follow if needed.

Name ___________ Design a new pair of shoes for Cinderella. Write 3 sentences about them

___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________

Name ___________ Design a new coach for Cinderella. Write 3 sentences about it.

___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________

Name _____________________ Cinderella’s Fairy Godmother turned a pumpkin into a coach for her. What can you really do with a pumpkin?

If The Shoe Fits… Who will wear it? A LESSON ON INFERRING WITH SHOES!

Bring in some different shoes, or use the following pages of shoes, and take them out one at a time. Ask students to tell who the owner of the shoes might be? What would that person do with those shoes on? What are the clues?

Name_____ If the shoe fits… This shoe might be just right for ___________! It would be just right because

__________________ __________________ __________________ __________________

Cinderella Was A Match! Match the Cinderella vocabulary words with the pictures. Then put the words in alphabetical order. Write the words on the recording page.

Cinderella

sister

mother Godmother coach

Prince

shoe

castle

Name ________________ Cinderella is a match! ABC Order Recording Page

Poof The following 8 pages are intended for the practice understanding onsets and rimes. Students will have the opportunity to manipulate onsets to create short vowel words. Students will then read and record words on the recording sheet. Words may be real or nonsense words.

Onsets and rimes

• Similar to teaching beginning readers about rhyme, teaching children about onset and rime helps them recognize common chunks within words. This can help students decode new words when reading and spell words when writing. • The "onset" is the initial phonological unit of any word (e.g. c in cat) and the term "rime" refers to the string of letters that follow, usually a vowel and final consonants (e.g. at in cat). Not all words have onsets. • Research shows that very young children can make links between known words and new words, when the word is split into two parts called onset and the rime. Children make these analogies in both reading and writing. They use their ability to hear onsets and rimes to make letter-sound correspondences. It is easier to distinguish initial onsets rather than individual phonemes. When children understand that different onsets can be spliced onto the same rime, they can make new and different words

POOF Use the letter cards (onsets) to make words. Place one on a star. POOF! Blend the onset and rime (chunk) . Did you make a real or a nonsense word? Write your word on the recording page. Then pick a new onset!

b f j m

c g k n

d h k p

q

r s t v w x y z

ap

ip

an

in

at

it

op

ug

ot

ut

og

un

ed et en

Name _______

POOF! Words Recording Page

Real Words

Nonsense Words

Name ___________ Find all the words in the puzzle.

C I N D E R E L L A P R I N C E C I N C U C O A C H D Y T A

M E S I S T E R S S P R H E L O L I O T K A O C I M B A L L I N E D E R E F L E N M I D N I G H T L CINDERELLA MOTHER SISTER FAIRY PUMPKIN COACH PRINCE BALL SHOE LOST MIDNIGHT CASTLE

Pumpkin Place Value Game: Students use number cards to create the largest number possible. Materials: Deck of digit cards for each set of partners (2-4 each of #0-9) Directions: Place cards facedown . Partner A turns over the first card and decides where to place that card on his/her place value mat. Once the card is placed, it may not be moved. Partner B turns over a card and decides where to place that card on his/her place value mat. Again, the card may not be moved once it is placed. Play continues with each partner turning over a card and deciding where to place it on the place value mat in hopes of building the largest number. When tens and ones places are filled on the place value mats, partners compare numbers to see who created the larger number. That partner wins a point for the round. Partners record both numbers on their recording sheet and circle the larger number. Students clear their mats, shuffle the cards and play additional rounds, as time allows.

For Pumpkin Place Value Game

0 2 4 6 8

1 3 5 7 9

Pumpkin Place Value tens

ones

Pumpkin Place Value

tens

ones

Name __________

Pumpkin Place Value Recording Sheet My Number

My Friend’s Number

My Number

My Friend’s Number

My Number

My Friend’s Number

My Number

My Friend’s Number

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

11

12

13

14

15

16

17 18

9

10

19 20

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40

41

42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

51

52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60

61

62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99

100

Cinderella’s Pumpkin Coach Mystery Picture

Color the boxes on the hundreds board Blue-

All numbers less than 24. 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 39, 40, 41, 50, 60, 69, 70, 79, 80 Green- All numbers greater than 80 71, 72, 73, 78, 61, 62, 51, Gray Numbers 24-27 Numbers 33-38 Numbers 42-49 Numbers 52-59 Numbers 63-68 Numbers 74-77

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

11

12

13

14

15

16

17 18

9

10

19 20

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40

41

42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

51

52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60

61

62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99

100

Name _______________

Cinderella’s Coach Has 4 Wheels! 2 coaches would have ____ wheels.

3 coaches would have ____ wheels.

4 coaches would have ____ wheels.

5 coaches would have ____ wheels.

6 coaches would have ____ wheels.

7 coaches would have ____ wheels.

Continue the pattern on the back!

Slippin’ Slipper Place Value Game Individual play. Choose 2 glass slipper cards. Make the biggest number and write how many in tens and ones on the recording sheet. Write the number in expanded notation, and then in standard notation. Then make the smallest number using the same cards. Repeat with tens and ones, expanded notation and standard notation. Choose a new set of cards.

9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Name _________________ Slippin’ Slipper Recording Page Tens

Ones

Expanded Notation Standard

Cinderella and The Prince Hi-Lo Game

For Cinderella and The Prince Game

Cut apart and tape together to form number line to 20

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

11 12 13 14 15

16 17 18 19 20

Each player gets 3 game pieces of the same color. Take turns putting the pieces on a slipper on the game board. When all 6 pieces are used, take turns moving pieces along the lines until one player gets three in a row across, up and down, or diagonally. That player is the winner! No jumping is aloud! Plan your strategy!! Clear the board and play again!