city of fulton - Oswego County

city of fulton - Oswego County

City of Fulton oswego county, new york Phase I BOA Nomination Study March 2010 Acknowledgments Brownfield Opportunity Area Steering Committee Rona...

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Phase I BOA Nomination Study March 2010

Acknowledgments

Brownfield Opportunity Area Steering Committee Ronald Woodward, Sr., Mayor - City of Fulton Joe Fuimara, Executive Director – Fulton Community Development Agency Ron Edick, Engineer – City of Fulton Daniel A. O'Brien, Commissioner of Public Works – City of Fulton Karen Noyes, Associate Planner - Oswego County Department of Community Development, Tourism & Planning Paul Santore, Legislator, District 16 – Oswego County Legislature Louella LeClair, Legislator, District 25 – Oswego County Legislature Elaine Miller – NYS Department of State, Division of Coastal Resources Carl S. Cuipylo, Engineering Geologist – NYS Department of Environmental Conservation

Planning Consultants

© 2010 Laberge Group, Project #28052

Project Partners Funded by the State of New York by the Brownfield Opportunity Area Program

Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .......................................................................................................................... 1  Project Overview ................................................................................................................................................. 1  What is a BOA? ............................................................................................................................................ 1  The BOA Program........................................................................................................................................ 1  Purpose of the BOA Program ....................................................................................................................... 2  What is a Brownfield? .................................................................................................................................. 2  Fulton BOA Project Overview ..................................................................................................................... 3  Fulton Brownfield Opportunity Area Boundary & Justification ...................................................................3  Brownfield Opportunity Area Boundary ...................................................................................................... 3  Brownfield Opportunity Area Boundary Justification.................................................................................. 4  Community Participation Plan .......................................................................................................................... 4  Local Participation........................................................................................................................................ 4  Stakeholder/Partner Seminars....................................................................................................................... 5  Inventory and Analysis ....................................................................................................................................... 5  Socioeconomic Highlights............................................................................................................................ 5  Neighborhood Assessments.......................................................................................................................... 5  BOA Land Use ............................................................................................................................................. 8  BOA Zoning ................................................................................................................................................. 9  Parks and Open Space .................................................................................................................................. 9  Brownfield, Abandoned, and Vacant Sites ................................................................................................... 9  Land Ownership Pattern ............................................................................................................................. 10  Historic or Archaeologically Significant Areas .......................................................................................... 11  Transportation Systems .............................................................................................................................. 11  Infrastructure .............................................................................................................................................. 11  Natural Resources and Environmental Features ......................................................................................... 11  Summary Analysis, Findings & Recommendations (Preliminary) ............................................................... 12  Vision Statement ........................................................................................................................................ 12  Goals & Objectives .................................................................................................................................... 12  Next Steps in BOA Program ............................................................................................................................ 14  SECTION 1. PROJECT DESCRIPTION & BOUNDARY ....................................................................... 15  Lead Project Sponsors ...................................................................................................................................... 15  Project Overview and Description ................................................................................................................... 15  What is a BOA? .......................................................................................................................................... 15  The BOA Program...................................................................................................................................... 16  Purpose of the BOA Program ..................................................................................................................... 17  What is a Brownfield? ................................................................................................................................ 18  Smart Growth Planning .............................................................................................................................. 19  Fulton BOA Project Overview ................................................................................................................... 19  Relationship of BOA to Existing Plans, Reports & Studies ....................................................................... 21  Community Vision & Goals and Objectives ................................................................................................... 25  Vision Statement ........................................................................................................................................ 25  Goals & Objectives .................................................................................................................................... 25  Fulton Brownfield Opportunity Area Boundary & Justification ................................................................. 27  Brownfield Opportunity Area Boundary .................................................................................................... 27  Table of Contents March 2010

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Brownfield Opportunity Area Boundary Justification................................................................................ 27 

SECTION 2. COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION PLAN & TECHNIQUES TO ENLIST PARTNERS... 31  Community Participation Plan ........................................................................................................................ 31  Local Participation...................................................................................................................................... 32  Techniques to Enlist Partners .......................................................................................................................... 34  Community Partners ........................................................................................................................................ 35  Stakeholder/Partner Seminars ......................................................................................................................... 39  SECTION 3. ANALYSIS OF THE PROPOSED BROWNFIELD OPPORTUNITY AREA ................... 40  Community and Regional Setting .................................................................................................................... 40  Geographic Location .................................................................................................................................. 40  Demographic, Social & Economic Indicators ............................................................................................ 40  Community Features & Conditions ............................................................................................................ 42  Current & Historic Economic Land Use Development Trends .................................................................. 43  Fulton’s Planning Efforts ........................................................................................................................... 44  Inventory and Analysis ..................................................................................................................................... 46  Neighborhood Assessments........................................................................................................................ 46  Existing Fulton Land Use ........................................................................................................................... 49  Fulton Zoning ............................................................................................................................................. 56  Local Laws & Special Designations ........................................................................................................... 60  Parks and Open Space ................................................................................................................................ 61  Brownfield, Abandoned, and Vacant Sites ................................................................................................. 65  Land Ownership Pattern ............................................................................................................................. 68  Historic or Archaeologically Significant Areas .......................................................................................... 70  Transportation Systems .............................................................................................................................. 73  Infrastructure .............................................................................................................................................. 79  Natural Resources and Environmental Features ......................................................................................... 82  Building Inventory ..................................................................................................................................... 88  Strategic Sites ............................................................................................................................................. 88  Socioeconomic Profile................................................................................................................................ 89  Employment Trends ................................................................................................................................... 97  Employment by Industry ............................................................................................................................ 98  Major Employers and Economic Drivers ................................................................................................. 100  Retail Sales and Market Potential ............................................................................................................. 101  Economic and Market Trends Analysis ........................................................................................................ 103  Review of Strategic Brownfield Sites............................................................................................................. 103  Summary Analysis, Findings & Recommendations (Preliminary) ............................................................. 104  Next Steps in BOA Program .......................................................................................................................... 108

LIST OF TABLES Table 1: SWOT Workshop Results ............................................................................................................................. 33  Table 2: Population Projections ................................................................................................................................... 41  Table 3: Local Economic Indicators ............................................................................................................................ 41  Table 4: Countywide Job Growth ................................................................................................................................ 41  Table 5: Existing City of Fulton Land Use .................................................................................................................. 50  Table 6: Existing BOA Land Use ................................................................................................................................ 52  Table 7: Existing City of Fulton Zoning ...................................................................................................................... 59  Table 8: Existing BOA Zoning .................................................................................................................................... 60  Table of Contents March 2010

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Table 9: Fulton Parks & Recreational Facilities .......................................................................................................... 62  Table 10: Publicly Owned Lands ................................................................................................................................ 68  Table 11: City of Fulton Publicly Owned Land........................................................................................................... 68  Table 12: BOA Study Area Land Ownership .............................................................................................................. 68  Table 13: National Register of Historic Places ............................................................................................................ 70  Table 14: Levels of Economic Distress ....................................................................................................................... 90  Table 15: Market Area Population............................................................................................................................... 91  Table 16: Market Area Median Age ............................................................................................................................ 92  Table 17: Market Area Households ............................................................................................................................. 93  Table 18: Market Area Average Household Size ........................................................................................................ 93  Table 19: Employment by Industry ............................................................................................................................. 99  Table 20: Private Industry Segments with Significant Job Growth in Oswego County .............................................. 99  Table 21: Major Employers in Oswego County ........................................................................................................ 100  Table 22: Largest Private Employers in Oswego County, 2006 ................................................................................ 101  Table 23: Retail Sales Profile – City of Fulton .......................................................................................................... 102  Table 24: Sales Leakage Summary for City of Fulton............................................................................................... 103 

LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1: Existing BOA Neighborhood #1 Land Use .................................................................................................. 53  Figure 2: Existing BOA Neighborhood #2 Land Use .................................................................................................. 53  Figure 3: Existing BOA Neighborhood #3 Land Use .................................................................................................. 54  Figure 4: Existing BOA Neighborhood #4 Land Use .................................................................................................. 55  Figure 5: Existing BOA Neighborhood #5 Land Use .................................................................................................. 55  Figure 6: Population Change (Census Tract) ............................................................................................................... 90  Figure 8: Population Change (Oswego County) .......................................................................................................... 91  Figure 7: Population Change (City of Fulton) ............................................................................................................. 91  Figure 9: Estimated & Projected Age Distribution ...................................................................................................... 92  Figure 10: Median Household Income ........................................................................................................................ 93  Figure 11: Per Capita Income ...................................................................................................................................... 94  Figure 12: Educational Attainment, Persons 25+, 2008 .............................................................................................. 94  Figure 13: Resident Civilian Labor Force in the Syracuse MSA, 1990-2007 ............................................................. 95  Figure 14: Resident Civilian Labor Force in Oswego County, 1990-2007 ................................................................. 96  Figure 15: Annual Average Unemployment Rates ...................................................................................................... 96  Figure 16: Place of Employment 2000 ........................................................................................................................ 97  Figure 17: Place of Residence 2000 ............................................................................................................................ 97  Figure 18: Average Annual Employment, Oswego County ........................................................................................ 98  Figure 19: Average Annual Employment Syracuse MSA ........................................................................................... 98 

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LIST OF MAPS Map 1: Community Context ........................................................................................................................................ 24  Map 2: Study Area Boundary ...................................................................................................................................... 29  Map 3: BOA Boundary................................................................................................................................................ 30  Map 4: Existing Land Use ........................................................................................................................................... 51  Map 5: Zoning Map ..................................................................................................................................................... 58  Map 6: Parks and Open Space ..................................................................................................................................... 64  Map 7: Underutilized Sites .......................................................................................................................................... 67  Map 8: Land Ownership .............................................................................................................................................. 69  Map 9: Archaeologically Sensitive Areas ................................................................................................................... 72  Map 10: Transportation Systems ................................................................................................................................. 76  Map 11: Infrastructure and Utilities............................................................................................................................. 81  Map 12A: Natural Resources – Wetlands and Agricultural Districts .......................................................................... 85  Map 12B: Natural Resources – Special Flood Hazard Areas ...................................................................................... 86  Map 12C: Natural Resources – Soils ........................................................................................................................... 87 

LIST OF APPENDICES Appendix A: Community Participation Plan Appendix B: Public Workshops & Outreach Materials Appendix C: Community Partners Appendix D: Stakeholder Seminars Appendix E: Interview Summaries Appendix F: BOA Descriptive Site Profiles

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Executive Summary Project Overview The City of Fulton is located on the Oswego River, twenty-five miles north of the City of Syracuse and twelve miles south of Lake Ontario. The City’s 2000 census population was 11,855 people. The City of Fulton is home to a variety of manufacturing facilities, many related to the food and packaging industry, with nearly 2,000 manufacturing jobs. Today, Fulton faces many of the same problems as larger urban centers in Upstate New York, such as, aging public infrastructure and housing, as well as increased poverty rates. Fulton also is dealing with a population that is aging in place without young persons and families deciding to resettle in the City after receiving education and job training. Many urban areas in the northeast have started to recover from these similar problems through focused policies to revitalize their downtowns, parks, and cultural venues.

What is a BOA? The BOA Program provides municipalities with financial assistance to complete area-wide planning approaches to brownfield redevelopment and site assessments to determine if a brownfield site is contaminated. Completion of the BOA program will lead to the Study Area receiving a New York State designation as a Brownfield Opportunity Area (BOA). Designation of a specified area as a BOA allows sites included within the boundaries to be eligible for state and federal funding opportunities related to brownfield remediation, making them more attractive for future development.

The BOA Program The BOA Program consists of three steps, the PreNomination Study, Nomination Study, and the Implementation Strategy. The Pre-Nomination Study provides a preliminary description and analysis of the proposed BOA. The Nomination Study provides an in-depth and thorough description and analysis, including an economic and market trends analysis, of existing conditions, opportunities, and re-use potential for properties located in the proposed BOA Executive Summary March 2010

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with an emphasis on the identification and reuse potential of strategic brownfield sites that are catalysts for revitalization. The Implementation Strategy provides funding to undertake and complete techniques and actions to implement the area-wide plan and describes how the requirements of the SEQRA have been met, as well as, site assessments for strategic brownfield sites identified in the Nomination Study. The City of Fulton is currently in the process of completing Step 2 of the BOA Program, the Nomination Study.

Purpose of the BOA Program The goal of the BOA Program is to create the necessary public and private partnerships to help communities. The following are the goals of the BOA Program, and should be consistent with visions and plans previously developed for the City of Fulton and County of Oswego: •

Assess the full range of community problems posed by multiple brownfield sites;



Build a shared vision and consensus on the future uses of strategic brownfield sites;



Coordinate and collaborate with local, state, and federal agencies, community groups and private-sector partners;



Develop public-private sector partnerships necessary to leverage investment in development projects that can revitalize diverse local communities and neighborhoods.

What is a Brownfield? NYS Brownfield Definition:

Federal Brownfield Definition

A brownfield site is defined in New York State Environmental Conservation law as “...any real property, the redevelopment or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or potential presence of a contaminant.”

The federal government defines brownfields as “Abandoned, idle, or underused industrial and commercial facilities where expansion or redevelopment is complicated by real or perceived environmental contamination.”

It is important to understand the difference between a greenfield versus a brownfield when discussing brownfield redevelopment. The definition of a greenfield is land that is undeveloped, usually in a rural or suburban location, with no historic use other than agricultural. The majority of new development in Oswego County over the last few decades has occurred on greenfields.

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Smart growth planning provides an option to combat the loss of open space and overconsumption of natural resources.

Fulton BOA Project Overview The City of Fulton and Oswego County have joined together to complete a BOA Nomination Study, which will analyze a 531 acre area located on the eastern side of the City, which includes twenty-one (21) potential brownfield sites. The Fulton BOA Nomination Study is comprised of two phases, Phase I and Phase II. Oswego County received an initial grant to complete the Phase I Nomination Study. Additional funds were applied for and awarded to the County for the Phase II Nomination Study. As a result of the two grant awards, the project was staged into two phases. Phase I Nomination Study provided the inventory and analysis and preliminary visioning that is necessary to develop realistic goals and recommendations for Fulton to redevelop its brownfield sites. The findings from this preliminary Phase I Nomination Study will be incorporated into the Phase II Nomination Study, as well as, detailed economic and market trends to understand the fiscal implications associated with potential strategic site redevelopment scenarios. The result will be the selection of strategic brownfield sites to be studied during Step 3 of the BOA Program, the Implementation Strategy.

Fulton Brownfield Opportunity Area Boundary & Justification Brownfield Opportunity Area Boundary The Fulton BOA Study Area focuses on Fulton’s older, developed, industrial and waterfront areas and proximate Route 481 corridor. The Fulton BOA Study Area is defined by Oswego River on the west, municipal boundaries to the south and southeast, Seventh Street and Route 176 to the east, and bending back west towards the River running parallel to Van Buren Street to the north. The BOA Study Area boundary incorporates existing developed properties as well as vacant and/or underutilized properties that once housed a variety of uses, including commercial and industrial facilities.

Executive Summary March 2010

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Brownfield Opportunity Area Boundary Justification The entire BOA Study Area as initially presented in the BOA grant application followed recognizable natural and manmade boundaries, as well as defined neighborhoods. The City of Fulton and Oswego County originally identified over thirty (30) properties to be examined during the BOA Nomination Study process. After initial analysis, it was determined that the BOA Study Area be further refined to only twenty-one (21) potential brownfield sites on the eastern half of the City.

Community Participation Plan The BOA Program is a community-driven initiative that necessitates an inclusive public outreach process in order to be successful. As such, local community participation was sought in the development of an area-wide plan for the proposed BOA. A Community Participation Plan was developed which identified the public outreach methods exercised as part of the Nomination Study. Included in the Community Participation Plan was an outline of the steps necessary to identify and maintain a community partner’s database, conduct interviews, facilitate public workshops and to create a strategic marketing effort to educate the public and partners of the BOA process and findings.

Local Participation Two public workshops were conducted for the Phase I Nomination Study. These workshops were designed to ensure that the final outcome of the planning process reflects the community’s vision for the BOA Study Area and its surroundings. Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats Workshop: Two community-wide workshops for the BOA Nomination Study were held in Fulton on September 25, 2008 and on October 23, 2008. The second workshop was video recorded and subsequently televised on the local access network. During the workshop, the BOA Program and process was introduced to the public and the participants were asked to identify the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) experienced or perceived within the Study Area. The participants revealed what they considered to be the most apparent positive and negative features of the Study Area and laid the foundation for the development of the future goals and recommendations. Those features that were considered Fulton’s greatest strengths included the Oswego River, Lake Neatahwanta, short driving distance from Lake Ontario, and natural landscapes and viewsheds. Participants then decided upon the community’s opportunities, which included recreational activities along river, indoor recreation facility, marketing lake and river for tourism, waterfront development, adaptive re-use, and workforce development.

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Stakeholder/Partner Seminars Stakeholder or Partner seminars were used to gather the views and opinions of the project partners, and assist in identifying key development issues. The Stakeholder Seminars were held on October 16, 2008 and December 2, 2008. The Stakeholder Seminars served to educate the stakeholders regarding the purpose and intent of the BOA program, the benefits afforded by the BOA designation, and the roles and responsibilities of the stakeholders in the success and implementation of the BOA.

Inventory and Analysis Socioeconomic Highlights While the City has lost population, Census Tract 211.02, the southern portion of the BOA Study Area has stabilized, and is maintaining its overall population. The population in Fulton is aging, which provides an opportunity for young families to find employment opportunities in the job sectors that the 55-64 age cohort once held. The aging population also provides an opportunity for the City of Fulton to capitalize as a walkable community friendly towards seniors and retirees. With a high unemployment rate, a proven workforce, and a low cost of living, the City of Fulton provides an excellent opportunity for available employees that may help attract new employment opportunities. These potential employers should be focused towards properties located in the BOA Study Area.

Neighborhood Assessments The City of Fulton is comprised of several diverse neighborhoods. The BOA Study Area includes five (5) neighborhoods which followed the U.S. Census Block Group boundaries. A neighborhood assessment was completed for each; neighborhood numbers were assigned randomly and not by any ranking system. BOA Neighborhood #1 The BOA Neighborhood #1, located in the southern portion of the BOA Study Area, is the largest neighborhood comprising almost 230 acres of the Study Area. It is characterized by diverse types of land uses and several Executive Summary March 2010

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different abutting development patterns. This neighborhood is defined by its most significant landmark, the Nestle Building. The Nestle Building is designated in the M-1 Zoning District and is directly adjacent to the residential neighborhood. The area includes Route 481, a wide, heavily traveled transportation corridor that is the gateway to the City from the south. The City constructed a well designed gateway sign welcoming motorists to the City of Fulton. The corridor contains several suburban style chain commercial developments in the southern portion of the neighborhood with parking lots in the front of the buildings. This area of the neighborhood is zoned C-2, and is designed for the motorist not pedestrians or bicyclists. The area closer to Broadway has denser development and provides a slightly more pedestrian friendly environment. Single-family residential dwellings comprise almost 25% of the overall neighborhood between Route 481, Broadway and South Seventh Street and is zoned R-1A. These houses vary in condition, but are mostly well maintained historic houses. This neighborhood is walkable with sidewalks and pedestrian right-of-ways, all of which lead to downtown and other neighborhoods in the Study Area. Another portion of this neighborhood is located along First Street and includes parcels that border the Oswego Canal. This area is also zoned R-1A and also consist primarily of residential dwellings. The housing stock is a mix of older and newer/renovated homes and includes the Oswego Falls Playground. Further north on First Street the large industrial parcels abut the residential lots, which presents a land use conflict. BOA Neighborhood #2 The BOA Neighborhood #2 is located in the central eastern portion of the BOA Study Area and is the smallest neighborhood totaling only 28 acres. The area is a traditional neighborhood, zoned mostly R-1A, with small blocks containing single and multi-family residential houses. The street signs have historic character, with black plates and white lettering, allowing visitors to distinguish the neighborhood as a unique part of the City. Most streets in the neighborhood are served by sidewalks, allowing residents to walk to destinations safely. The architecture is primarily from the turn of the century; however, some structures appear to be more recently constructed. Most structures in the neighborhood are well maintained.

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Many of the traditional corner store commercial buildings have remained and are still in business, including a mini-mart and a recycling center (zoned C-1). Oneida Street is the busiest street in the neighborhood, and lacks traffic calming devices to slow auto traffic for pedestrians using the sidewalks. BOA Neighborhood #3 The BOA Neighborhood #3, located in the central western portion of the BOA Study Area, is generally considered “downtown” Fulton. The neighborhood consists of several single-family residential areas zoned R-2 and R-3 located on the eastern edge of downtown. This area provides an excellent opportunity for residents to be able to frequent downtown businesses as pedestrians can walk along old growth tree lined streets surrounded by historic housing. In addition, the neighborhood features the East Side Park which is well maintained and is adjacent to the Fulton City School District Office. Both of these community assets are located in the center of the neighborhood, providing public spaces for residents. The area closest to the Oswego Canal, First Street and its adjoining streets are densely developed and resemble traditional downtown development patterns. This area is zoned C-2 and is the only part of the City that is zoned C-2A. The streetscape on First Street (brick pavers, kiosks, historic lighting, and signage) aesthetically enhances the downtown area and provides a friendly area for shoppers and residents to frequent. Many cultural amenities are also located along First Street and the Oswego Canal, such as the library, City Hall, boating amenities, Veterans Park, and the recently constructed gazebo overlooking the Oswego Canal. Comparatively, Second Street and Oneida Street both have a more auto-oriented pattern of development. The recent adaptive re-use of 129 Cayuga Street has created a mixed-use condo development along the Second Street corridor, which could be a cornerstone for future developments of similar style. BOA Neighborhood #4 The BOA Neighborhood #4, located in the northwestern portion of the BOA Study Area, is the second largest neighborhood (94 acres) within the BOA boundaries. This area has a diverse land use mix, with the highest amount of commercial buildings of any neighborhood, most of which are located along Route 481 which bisects the neighborhood. The businesses located along this corridor are primarily manufacturing and industrial related. This is Executive Summary March 2010

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due to the zoning of the corridor as mostly M-1, with some C-2. Traffic along the corridor is busy and automobiles travel at high speeds in this section of the City. The Route 481 corridor lacks traffic calming devices and sidewalks. The adjoining streets to Route 481, such as Harrison and Shaw Street are both industrial and are appropriately zoned M-1. These sites contain identified contaminated parcels. Recognizing the threats that these parcels provide to residents, the City and County have initiated the environmental remediation of many of these sites. In addition, the area along the Oswego Canal is currently being redeveloped into a hiking and biking trail, attempting to connect the residential land uses to the east of Route 481 to the waterfront. When the trail is completed along the Canal it should be connected to Van Buren Park, which is the largest park in the City at 18 acres and provides the neighborhood with the highest amount of parkland totaling almost 12% of the areas land use. The park is surrounded by single and multi-family residential on Fremont, Van Buren and Sixth Street. These streets and adjacent streets lack sidewalks and pedestrian crosswalks to slow traffic and provide a separation between automobiles, pedestrians, and bicyclists. Such improvements would enhance the park and improve safety for park users. BOA Neighborhood #5 The BOA Neighborhood #5 is located in the northeastern portion of the BOA Study Area. It is characterized by a significant amount of vacant land (51%). Most of the vacant land is zoned R-1A and presents an opportunity for infill residential development in the neighborhood. The neighborhood contains many newer housing units, which blend well with the character of the existing houses and overall neighborhood. This neighborhood is bordered by Van Buren Park, providing direct access to recreation for residents. This neighborhood could benefit from improved sidewalks, pedestrian crosswalks, and better signage for park users.

BOA Land Use Single-Family Residential is the predominant land use within the BOA Study Area, covering 150 acres (28%) of all land. Since the Study Area encompasses the eastern side of downtown, it is not surprising that the second largest land use in the Study Area is Commercial properties, with a total coverage of 92 acres, or 17% of total land use. Vacant land again is the third largest land use, totaling 16% of the BOA Study Area. It should also be noted that there is a significant percentage of industrial properties (11%) in general within the Study Area. Conflicting land uses in the Study Area present a challenge to the City in its revitalization efforts.

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BOA Zoning The most frequent Zoning District found in the BOA Study Area is R-1A (36.4%), which shows that there is a high concentration of dense housing located in the Study Area. The BOA Study Area is the only part of the City that has the C-2 and C-2A Zoning Districts, which allows for mixed-use development. These districts are located downtown along the BOA Study Area’s riverfront, allowing for the potential of mixed-use waterfront development. Mixed-use development would be the preferred type along the waterfront and in areas that are suitable for commercial development, such as the downtown area. Overall the potential for zoning amendments should be based upon the community’s vision, economic issues, and environmental issues.

Parks and Open Space Every neighborhood in the BOA Study Area has at least one park within its boundaries. Van Buren Park, which is located in BOA Study Area Neighborhood #4 and bordering Neighborhood #5, provides an excellent opportunity for the City to improve the local quality of life through revitalization of the park system. The design of the Canal Towpath Trail includes developing several nodes of activity along the canal to be used for recreational activities which would assist the Study Area’s redevelopment.

Brownfield, Abandoned, and Vacant Sites During the Phase I Nomination Study, the City of Fulton identified and assessed twenty-one (21) potential sites within the BOA Study Area boundaries. For each parcel, a site profile was prepared, and a full description of each parcel is provided in Appendix F: BOA Descriptive Profiles. The following summarizes the sites identified by the City of Fulton, categorized by BOA Neighborhood location, street address, approximate acreage and parcel identification number. BOA Neighborhood #1 The BOA Neighborhood #1 contains six (6) BOA-targeted sites: •

460 Park Street - 1.41 acres - parcel # 253.25-02-03



555 S Fourth Street - 2.33 acres - parcel # 253.26-02-01



520 S Second Street - 2.33 acres - parcel # 253.25-07-03.01



610 S Fourth Street - 0.85 acres - parcel # 253.34-02-18



2 Harris Street - 0.27 acres - parcel # 253.34-01-10



902 First Street - 0.62 acres - parcel # 253.42-02-14

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BOA Neighborhood #2 The BOA Neighborhood #2 contains one (1) BOA-targeted site: •

103 Ontario Street - 1.26 acres - parcel # 236.47-01-11

BOA Neighborhood #3 The BOA Neighborhood #3 contains three (3) BOA-targeted sites: •

25 S Second Street - 0.05 acres - parcel # 236.56-04-01



203 E Broadway - 0.27 acres - parcel # 236.72-03-06



215 S Second Street - 0.16 acres - parcel # 236.72-02-31

BOA Neighborhood #4 The BOA Neighborhood #4 contains eleven (11) BOA-targeted sites: •

361 N First Street - 3.07 acres - parcel # 236.31-01-03



N First Street - 0.84 acres - parcel # 236.31-01-05



Route 481 & Shaw Street - 0.27 acres - parcel # 236.31-01-04



208 N Second Street - 0.19 acres - parcel # 236.39-01-03



Shaw Street - 0.85 acres - parcel # 236.39-01-02



258 N Fourth Street - 1.28 acres - parcel # 236.40-01-02



Harrison Street - 0.36 acres - parcel # 236.40-01-07.01



308 Harrison Street - 2.16 acres - parcel # 236.40-04-03



507 Erie Street - 0.60 acres - parcel # 236.48-04-12



62 N Fifth Street - 0.05 acres - parcel # 236.48-03-12.2



616-624 Oneida Street - 0.67 acres - parcel # 236.57-0106

BOA Neighborhood #5 The BOA Neighborhood #5 does not contain any BOA-targeted sites.

Land Ownership Pattern The majority of the Study Area is privately owned (70.1%) in addition to a relatively high amount of publicly owned properties (25.5%). The City of Fulton currently owns approximately 72 acres of public property within the Study Area, followed by the Oswego County IDA (34 acres). Only four (4) BOA Sites within the BOA Study Area are publicly owned properties. Executive Summary March 2010

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Historic or Archaeologically Significant Areas There are several historic districts throughout Oswego County; however, none are located within the City of Fulton boundaries. The City should consider establishing an official historic district, potentially downtown, close to the Oswego Canal in BOA Study Area Neighborhood #3. There is an abundance of clustered historic properties and sites located in this area, including the Fulton Public Library, John Wells Pratt House, U.S. Post Office, and several other historic properties.

Transportation Systems The City of Fulton is serviced by a variety of transportation systems, including state highways, county and local roads, as well as public transportation, rail and air. The City is in proximity to the major Interstates 81 and 90, Oswego Canal, two working freight rail lines and several State Routes. Certain points within the Study Area, including BOA Study Area Neighborhoods #1, 3, and 4, need improved traffic calming measures implemented along State Route 481, which divides surrounding neighborhoods and the waterfront. The potential for future streetscape enhancements should be tied into public transportation options.

Infrastructure In general, the BOA Study Area is well served by public infrastructure. Future redevelopment of the strategic sites in the Study Area may necessitate minor upgrades to supply mains depending on the proposed redevelopment scenario. However, each site should be adequately served with minimal constraints to development. The City and the BOA Study Area have a plentiful supply of fresh water for residents and businesses.

Natural Resources and Environmental Features As the use of the Oswego Canal was transformed into a recreational amenity the development of this infrastructure was determined by the environmental features that affect urban construction, such as water access and quality, wetlands, floodplains, and soil type. None of these environmental features have caused any problems with existing development and should not interfere with redevelopment of the BOA Study Area.

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Summary Analysis, Findings & Recommendations (Preliminary) Vision Statement

Vision of the City of Fulton

“We are a destination community on the Oswego Canal with a unique history and a strong future; we supports innovation, education, commerce, and quality living; we are a place where you belong.” The City of Fulton strives to be a united community, balancing future development through progressive and cooperative local and regional planning. The City of Fulton celebrates its historic settlement pattern and embraces its distinct history along the Oswego Canal; a place where a diverse cross-section of residents and businesses choose to locate and thrive. Collectively the City recognizes that the community can be a destination in the region and must continue to encourage investment to remain a desirable location. The City’s waterfront, downtown, neighborhood communities, and industrial presence are essential to the City’s quality of life. Through thoughtful planning and design, the City will protect these assets while allowing for smart and sustainable growth, encouraging more efficient use of land, and supporting the revitalization of underutilized properties. Most importantly, the City recognizes the inherent value of community and strives to preserve the safety, welfare, and general values viewed as crucial by those that choose to live, work, and play in the City.

Goals & Objectives Through the BOA planning process, the City will continue to identify funding resources and work with public and private partners to implement short and long-term projects that support the vision and meet the revitalization goals and objectives for the Study Area. The following general objectives were developed and are supported as a result of this planning process: •

Facilitate the clean-up and remediation of the environmentally contaminated sites within the City through the completion of Environmental Site Assessments of strategic sites, allowing the City to foster redevelopment projects, create new jobs, and improve the quality of life.



Expand the current business base and attract new businesses through the re-use of vacant or underutilized sites and buildings.



Create housing and community redevelopment, trails, parks and riverfront linkages, streetscapes and infrastructure improvements to revitalize the economy, serve as a catalyst for local businesses, improve public security, and overall quality of life.

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Encourage appropriate modern sustainable development practices that support and employ the local community based upon principles of sound and humane architecture for existing residents, new homeowners, and businesses.



Enhance programs to more equitably meet family and individual social, economic, education and recreation needs through the expansion of public and not-for-profit services and facilities.

These objectives were expanded into specific goals to assist with future decision-making for the BOA Study Area. The goals were developed based upon input from the Steering Committee, stakeholders, and the general public. Below is a series of preliminary goals to implement Fulton’s Vision Statement: •

Goal 1:

Clean-up and redevelop Fulton’s Brownfield, Vacant, and Underutilized Sites.



Goal 2:

Create new and expanded employment opportunities in the City.



Goal 3:

Encourage sustainable and complimentary economic development.



Goal 4:

Encourage the home ownership opportunities for existing and new residents of the City of Fulton.



Goal 5:

Provide better and equal community access, participation and recreation opportunities for youth and elderly.



Goal 6:

Preserve, expand, and maintain community green space, river access, and neighborhood bicycle and pedestrian connections.



Goal 7:

Encourage community pride and history.

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Next Steps in BOA Program The following steps are tailored towards the Fulton BOA Nomination Study and how to proceed from Phase I to Phase II of the Study. The findings from this preliminary Phase I Nomination Study will be incorporated into Fulton’s Phase II Nomination Study, as well as, detailed economic and market trends to understand the fiscal implications associated with potential strategic site redevelopment scenarios. Below is a list of “Next Steps” associated with the Phase II Nomination Study. •

Parking Assessment of BOA Study Area



Housing Needs Assessment of BOA Study Area



Completion of Community Participation and Techniques to Enlist Partners



Completion of Community Vision and Goals and Objectives



Completion of Economic and Market Trends Analysis



Summary Analysis, Findings, and Recommendations



Review of Strategic Brownfield Sites



Completion of Draft Nomination Study



Completion and Distribution of Draft Nomination Study



Final Nomination and Advancing to BOA Program Step 3 “Implementation”



Completion of Project Reporting



SEQRA Processes and Forms

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Plan Participation & Boundary Community Description Project Appendix Section I: A:

Section 1. Project Description & Boundary Lead Project Sponsors In 2006, Oswego County and the City of Fulton applied for funding from the New York State Brownfield Opportunity Area (BOA) Program to further study the revitalization of the City’s existing brownfields. Together, the City and the County had previously completed several environmental investigations through the Federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Brownfield Assessment Grant. The City of Fulton and Oswego County were successfully awarded grant monies to prepare the BOA Nomination Study to establish a revitalization plan for the City’s brownfields. Together, Oswego County and the City of Fulton serve as the Lead Project Sponsors.

Project Overview and Description What is a BOA? The BOA Program provides municipalities with financial assistance to complete area-wide planning approaches to brownfield redevelopment and site assessments to determine if a brownfield site is contaminated. Completion of the BOA program will lead to the Study Area receiving a New York State designation as a Brownfield Opportunity Area (BOA). The BOA Program was established by the Superfund/Brownfield Law in October 2003.1 The Superfund/Brownfield legislation amended the General Municipal Law (Article 18-C), which authorizes municipalities to pursue redevelopment and revitalization of economically distressed areas, by adding Section 970-r, to create the BOA Program. Designation of a specified area as a BOA allows sites included within the boundaries to be eligible for funding opportunities related to brownfield remediation, making them more attractive for future development. Designated BOA’s shall receive priority and preference from New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s (NYSDEC's) Environmental Restoration and Environmental Protection Fund Programs. Designated BOA’s may also receive priority and preference when considered for other state and federal programs. In addition the site specific information gathered during the BOA process can be used by property owners, both public and private, to complete future Environmental Site Assessments (ESA’s). ESA’s are completed as part of a two phase process required by EPA Programs prior to the brownfield remediation and cleanup process. Phase I ESA’s analyze the history and past uses of the sites. Phase II ESA’s, which are only required if the Phase I ESA provided evidence of contamination, involves physical testing to determine the presence of hazards. 1

All information obtained from: www.nyswaterfronts.com

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Phase I ESA

Phase II ESA

Phase I ESA’s provide analysis of site specific land, property and buildings. Analysis includes potential soil contamination, water quality, chemical spills and hazards, asbestos and hazardous storage containers. The completion of a Phase I ESA will determine whether a site is actually contaminated or a “brownfield.” Standards for performing a Phase I ESA are administered by the U.S. EPA. Actual sampling of soil, air, groundwater and/or building materials is typically not conducted during a Phase I ESA. If a site is considered contaminated, a Phase II ESA must be conducted prior to brownfield remediation.

Phase II ESA’s provide a more detailed analysis of site specific land, property and buildings. This investigation is normally undertaken when a Phase I ESA determines that a site is contaminated. Phase II ESA’s include detailed physical investigation and collection of original samples of soil, groundwater and/or building materials. The samples are then analyzed for quantitative values of various contaminants. The most frequent substances tested are petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy metals, pesticides, solvents, asbestos and mold. In severe cases, brownfield sites may be added to the National Priorities List where they will be subject to the U.S. EPA Superfund program.

The BOA Program The BOA Program provides Fulton with an opportunity to leverage existing assets through the remediation of contaminated sites, re-use existing properties and encourage infill development, enhance and leverage the natural environment for recreational purposes, rebrand the BOA Study Area, develop a list of public infrastructure projects that can enhance the Study Area, develop standards for design and landscaping that will create the type of environment desired by the community, increase and foster public/private partnerships, work in a regional context to implement smart growth techniques, and integrate local brownfield planning with related local and regional long-term planning initiatives. The BOA Program consists of three steps, the Pre-Nomination Study, Nomination Study, and the Implementation Strategy. The three steps are described in detail below: •

Step 1: Pre-Nomination Study: The Pre-Nomination Study is intended for communities that are uncertain about existing environmental conditions and have minimal or no information about brownfields that are impacting their community. The Pre-Nomination Study provides a preliminary description and analysis of the proposed BOA.

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Step 2: Nomination Study: The Nomination Study thoroughly describes existing conditions, issues and opportunities. The Nomination Study provides an in-depth and thorough description and analysis, including an economic and market trends analysis, of existing conditions, opportunities, and re-use potential for properties located in the proposed BOA with an emphasis on the identification and re-use potential of strategic brownfield sites that are catalysts for revitalization. The Nomination Study will result in a comprehensive assessment of the BOA Study Area and its associated brownfield sites. Based on the analysis and findings, recommendations are developed for future uses and actions to redevelop strategic sites and revitalize the Study Area and its neighborhoods. Step 3: Implementation Strategy and/or Site Assessments: The Implementation Strategy provides funding to undertake and complete techniques and actions to implement the area-wide plan and describes how the requirements of the SEQRA have been met. Site assessments are completed for strategic brownfield sites that are identified in the Nomination Study, concurrent with progress on the Implementation Strategy. Key findings from the site assessment reports are factored into the Implementation Strategy. Remedial investigations are used to design a conceptual level remediation strategy for priority brownfield sites. The result of Step 3 will lead to the establishment of the following: an effective area-wide site specific redevelopment strategy, priorities for investment and redevelopment, improved information to foster site clean-ups, shovel ready sites, and marketing to attract investors.

The City of Fulton has inventoried and compiled a significant amount of environmental information for many of the potential brownfield sites prior to submitting the BOA application. The extensive research, previous brownfield investigation, completed Phase I ESA’s, and remediation work completed through the EPA’s Brownfield Assessment Grant was considered comparable to the results of a Pre-Nomination Study. The City of Fulton is currently in the process of completing Step 2 of the BOA Program, the Nomination Study.

Purpose of the BOA Program The goal of the BOA Program is to create the necessary public and private partnerships to help communities. The following are the goals of the BOA Program, and should be consistent with visions and plans previously developed for the City of Fulton and County of Oswego: •

Assess the full range of community problems posed by multiple brownfield sites;



Build a shared vision and consensus on the future uses of strategic brownfield sites;

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Coordinate and collaborate with local, state, and federal agencies, community groups and private-sector partners;



Develop public-private sector partnerships necessary to leverage investment in development projects that can revitalize diverse local communities and neighborhoods.

What is a Brownfield? NYS Brownfield Definition:

Federal Brownfield Definition

A brownfield site is defined in New York State Environmental Conservation law as “...any real property, the redevelopment or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or potential presence of a contaminant.”

The federal government defines brownfields as “Abandoned, idle, or underused industrial and commercial facilities where expansion or redevelopment is complicated by real or perceived environmental contamination.”

It is important to understand the difference between a greenfield versus a brownfield when discussing brownfield redevelopment. The definition of a greenfield is land that is undeveloped, usually in a rural or suburban location, with no historic use other than agricultural. The majority of new development in Oswego County over the last few decades has occurred on greenfields. This is because these properties typically provide no significant obstacles for development, such as re-use of existing buildings or constrained parking areas. The downside of this type of development is that it quickly consumes natural resources and remaining open spaces. The result of greenfield development is a lack of incentive to develop in existing commercial and cultural centers, such as downtown Fulton. One recent local example is the development of a new Wal-Mart outside the City’s boundaries, which affects the existing small businesses in the downtown and neighborhoods. It is difficult for small business to compete against national corporate chains that have the ability to sell items for lower costs due to economies of scale. As a result, older properties throughout cities, such as Fulton are often left vacant or underutilized with a perception that such properties are undesirable for redevelopment. The BOA Program identifies opportunities for these properties to become active again, and provide spaces for new businesses and residents. Too often communities understand that brownfield redevelopment is important in the revitalization process, however do not have the tools or knowledge to move these projects Section I. Project Description & Boundary March 2010

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forward. The BOA Program will enable the City of Fulton to establish a clear vision for the Study Area and form the necessary private and public partnerships to make redevelopment realistic. Through the BOA program the City and County will be able to identify redevelopment opportunities through understanding the area’s existing conditions, constraints, and economic and market realities.

Smart Growth Planning Smart growth planning provides an option to combat the loss of open space and overconsumption of natural resources. The movement towards enhanced smart growth planning and sustainable development is assisted by the national advocacy organization, Smart Growth America. Smart Growth America is a nationwide coalition promoting a better way to grow: one that protects farmland and open space, revitalizes neighborhoods, keeps housing affordable, and provides more transportation choices.2 Smart Growth America defines smart growth according to its outcomes, which help to achieve these six goals: •

Neighborhood Livability



Better Access, Less Traffic



Thriving Cities, Suburbs and Towns



Shared Benefits



Lower Costs, Lower Taxes



Keeping Open Space Open

Fulton BOA Project Overview The City of Fulton and Oswego County have joined together to complete a BOA Nomination Study, which will analyze an area located on the eastern side of the City, bordering the Oswego Canal. The BOA Study Area encompasses a total of 531 acres, which includes twenty-one (21) potential brownfield sites. The presence of contaminated, underutilized and vacant sites in this area detracts from the overall quality of life and contributes to small areas of urban blight. However, these sites also represent opportunities for economic development in the City of Fulton through redevelopment . The Fulton BOA Nomination Study is comprised of two phases, Phase I and Phase II. Oswego County received an initial grant to complete the Phase I Nomination Study. Additional funds were applied for and

2

All information obtained from: www.smartgrowthamerica.org

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awarded to the County for the Phase II Nomination Study. As a result of the two grant awards, the project was staged into two phases. Phase I Nomination Study provided the inventory and analysis and preliminary visioning that is necessary to develop realistic goals and recommendations for Fulton to redevelop its brownfield sites. The findings from this preliminary Phase I Nomination Study will be incorporated into Fulton’s Phase II Nomination Study, as well as, detailed economic and market trends to understand the fiscal implications associated with potential strategic site redevelopment scenarios. The Phase I Nomination Study included the following: identification of a BOA Study Area boundary, selection of specific sites to be studied, development of a community participation plan and workshops, engaging and educating stakeholders, inventory, analysis, and socioeconomic profile of the BOA Study Area. Initial investigation during the Phase I Nomination Study has revealed several potential opportunities for returning these vacant, underutilized, or contaminated sites into productive, successful properties for the City.

Through the analysis and public input that was completed during the Phase I Nomination Study, the community and the BOA Steering Committee were able to develop several general goals for Phase I of the BOA Nomination Study. The goals include the following: •

Goal 1:

Clean-up and redevelop Fulton’s Brownfield, Vacant, and Underutilized Sites.



Goal 2:

Create new and expanded employment opportunities in the City.



Goal 3:

Encourage sustainable and complimentary economic development.



Goal 4:

Encourage the home ownership opportunities for existing and new residents of the City of Fulton.



Goal 5:

Provide better and equal community access, participation and recreation opportunities for youth and elderly.



Goal 6:

Preserve, expand, and maintain community green space, river access, and neighborhood bicycle and pedestrian connections.



Goal 7:

Encourage community pride and history.

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The Phase II Nomination Study will expand upon these initial goals to provide Fulton with a detailed assessment of the BOA Study Area, a community vision for brownfield redevelopment, and summary analysis, findings and recommendations for all the brownfield sites in the BOA Study Area. Completion of the Phase II Nomination Study will include an Economic and Market Trends Analysis to be used for identification of business attraction and retention possibilities within the BOA Study Area. The result will be the selection of strategic brownfield sites to be studied during Step 3 of the BOA Program, the Implementation Strategy.

Relationship of BOA to Existing Plans, Reports & Studies The following is a summary of existing plans and studies completed for the City of Fulton and/or Oswego County. Each of these plans contains research, analysis, and recommendations that are directly related to the successful integration of the Brownfield Opportunity Area (BOA) Nomination Study with current City of Fulton goals and strategies. Oswego County Comprehensive Plan The Oswego County Comprehensive Plan was completed in 1997, and has served as a guide to County decision-makers as they work to accommodate the physical growth and development of Oswego County. The Plan covered several sections including natural resources, historic resources, transportation, infrastructure, housing, community facilities, parks and open space, economic development, and community design. An overview of the County’s resources are identified and described. The Plan articulates an overall vision for the County and the means to achieve the objectives set forth. The goals contained in the Plan were developed from a series of public workshops held to gauge public input. Some of the goals included preserving community character through proper community design and land use, open space development, and infrastructure investment. The Plan detailed measures of implementation of these goals, including the creation of public/private partnerships to help develop opportunities for jobs, facilities and businesses. The BOA Nomination Study should recognize the program and policy recommendations developed in the Plan. Specific topics discussed related towards brownfield redevelopment included encouraging the preservation, maintenance, rehab, and adaptive reuse of older and historic structures; develop sites for new commercial and industrial businesses; and promote sustainable land use development.

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City of Fulton LWRP The City of Fulton completed an LWRP in 1998, which established a set of policies for how the Oswego River/Canal waterfront should be developed in the future. The plan concentrated on several community goals, including development and land uses that are beneficial uses of the coastal location; maintaining and enhancing natural areas, recreation areas, and open space areas; minimizing potentially adverse land uses, environmental and economic impacts that would result from proposed development; and protecting stable residential areas. The boundary of the LWRP includes several of the proposed brownfield sites for the BOA Nomination Study, thus it should be sensitive towards the policies established through the plan. Some of these policies include but are not limited to fostering smart patterns of growth that preserve community character and open space; providing public access to the waterfront; and minimizing environmental degradation in the waterfront area from solid waste and hazardous substances. City of Fulton Comprehensive Plan In 2003, the City of Fulton prepared a new Comprehensive Plan that was intended to build upon one of the City’s biggest assets, its neighborhoods. The Plan’s vision was to restore Fulton as a complete community in the regional economy through establishing several goals and recommendations for policy changes and important revitalization projects. The policies identified include advancing neighborhood stability, promoting economic vitality, and improving the overall quality of life for residents. There were several recommendations and strategies from the Plan that are closely aligned with the mission and vision of the BOA Nomination Study. These strategies include cleaning up environmental resources to support environmentally based economic development; developing a strategy for dealing with abandoned, dilapidated sites and vacant lots; and a continued focus on waterfront development opportunities. North First Street Riverwalk In 2004, the Fulton Community Development Agency commissioned a Preliminary Design and Development Report for the North First Street Riverwalk. The report detailed the existing conditions of the Oswego River/Canal waterfront, which at the time was underutilized. The proposal was to turn the waterfront into a recreational walking and biking

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trail, as well as developing several “nodes,” or areas designed for activity and enjoying the water. The design called for making North First Street a one-way street, and shutting down the western lane to traffic, making it exclusively pedestrian and bicycle use only. There would be a Northern Terminus and a Southern Terminus to serve as welcoming centers to visitors and recreational users. The vision of the report is currently being enhanced and carried through by the City of Fulton. Any properties in the BOA Nomination Study located along or near the proposed Riverwalk should incorporate the design elements and potential future improvements to infrastructure and road design to North First Street and the waterfront. For those sites located along the waterfront, integration of design recommendations should be encouraged in an effort to enhance existing and future access points and public spaces, and allow development of a unified recreational greenspace and trails. State of Oswego County Environment The Oswego County Environmental Management Council (EMC) was established in 1971, and has acted as a review and advisory board to local and state government regarding matters related to the protection, conservation, preservation and proper management of natural resources in Oswego County. The EMC provides an annual report detailing the current state of the environment, with 2007 being the latest report available. The report covers specific topics, such as species, wetlands, and water quality, as well as specific sites and geographic locations, such as the Oswego River corridor, and Lake Neatahwanta. This Report identified a total of nine sites in Fulton that are currently labeled as environmentally hazardous or brownfield assessment sites. The properties identified in Fulton that have already undergone EPA Phase I Environmental Site Assessment (ESA) include: •

Two Fulton Mall sites



SOFCO site



62 N Fifth Street



Building 80 (A.L. Lee Memorial Hospital)



Four sites on Oneida Street

In 2006, the County recommended some of these sites to move forward with Phase II ESA’s in an attempt to expedite the remediation of the properties. Each of these sites will be further examined in the BOA Nomination Study.

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Fulton BOA Nomination Study

Community Vision & Goals and Objectives Vision Statement The BOA Nomination Study contains a consistent collection of priorities and values expressed by the community. These priorities and values should be used to promote and enhance future development opportunity/reinvestment in the BOA Study Area. Together these priorities and values reflect an overall community vision intended to serve as the foundation for all goals and objectives contained in this Plan. Using these priorities and values, the following Vision Statement was developed:

Vision of the City of Fulton

“We are a destination community on the Oswego Canal with a unique history and a strong future; we supports innovation, education, commerce, and quality living; we are a place where you belong.” The City of Fulton strives to be a united community, balancing future development through progressive and cooperative local and regional planning. The City of Fulton celebrates its historic settlement pattern and embraces its distinct history along the Oswego Canal; a place where a diverse cross-section of residents and businesses choose to locate and thrive. Collectively the City recognizes that the community can be a destination in the region and must continue to encourage investment to remain a desirable location. The City’s waterfront, downtown, neighborhood communities, and industrial presence are essential to the City’s quality of life. Through thoughtful planning and design, the City will protect these assets while allowing for smart and sustainable growth, encouraging more efficient use of land, and supporting the revitalization of underutilized properties. Most importantly, the City recognizes the inherent value of community and strives to preserve the safety, welfare, and general values viewed as crucial by those that choose to live, work, and play in the City.

Goals & Objectives Through the BOA planning process, the City will examine current land uses, infrastructure conditions and needs, and the potential reuse of underutilized properties to create a starting point for both public and private redevelopment efforts. Those efforts will include tasks that the City can accomplish in the relative short-term, including: support for current property renovation projects; financial assistance to pay for environmental site assessments of potential brownfield properties; creation of plans for new public infrastructure; analyses of market and retail trends to encourage business expansion and recruitment; tougher enforcement of building codes and Section I. Project Description & Boundary March 2010

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Fulton BOA Nomination Study

property maintenance standards; and establishment of architectural design guidelines and zoning regulations that will influence and enhance future redevelopment activities. The City will continue to identify funding resources and work with public and private partners to implement short and long-term projects that support the vision and meet the revitalization goals and objectives for the Study Area. The following general objectives were developed and are supported as a result of this planning process: •

Facilitate the clean-up and remediation of the environmentally contaminated sites within the City through the completion of Environmental Site Assessments of strategic sites, allowing the City to foster redevelopment projects, create new jobs, and improve the quality of life.



Expand the current business base and attract new businesses through the re-use of vacant or underutilized sites and buildings.



Create housing and community redevelopment, trails, parks and riverfront linkages, streetscapes and infrastructure improvements to revitalize the economy, serve as a catalyst for local businesses, improve public security, and overall quality of life.



Encourage appropriate modern sustainable development practices that support and employ the local community based upon principles of sound and humane architecture for existing residents, new homeowners, and businesses.



Enhance programs to more equitably meet family and individual social, economic, education and recreation needs through the expansion of public and notfor-profit services and facilities.

These objectives were expanded into specific goals to assist with future decision-making for the BOA Study Area. The goals were developed based upon input from the Steering Committee, stakeholders, and the general public. Below is a series of preliminary goals to implement Fulton’s Vision Statement: •

Goal 1:

Clean-up and redevelop Fulton’s Brownfield, Vacant, and Underutilized Sites.



Goal 2:

Create new and expanded employment opportunities in the City.



Goal 3:

Encourage sustainable and complimentary economic development.



Goal 4:

Encourage the home ownership opportunities for existing and new residents of the City of Fulton.

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Goal 5:

Provide better and equal community access, participation and recreation opportunities for youth and elderly.



Goal 6:

Preserve, expand, and maintain community green space, river access, and neighborhood bicycle and pedestrian connections.



Goal 7:

Encourage community pride and history.

Fulton Brownfield Opportunity Area Boundary & Justification Brownfield Opportunity Area Boundary The Fulton BOA Study Area focuses on Fulton’s older, developed, industrial and waterfront areas and proximate Route 481 corridor. The Fulton BOA Study Area is defined by Oswego River on the west, municipal boundaries to the south and southeast, Seventh Street and Route 176 to the east, and bending back west towards the River running parallel to Van Buren Street to the north. See Map 2: Study Area Boundary and Map 3: BOA Boundary. The BOA Study Area boundary incorporates existing developed properties as well as vacant and/or underutilized properties that once housed a variety of uses, including commercial and industrial facilities.

Brownfield Opportunity Area Boundary Justification The entire BOA Study Area as initially presented in the BOA grant application followed recognizable natural and manmade boundaries, as well as defined neighborhoods. The City of Fulton and Oswego County originally identified over thirty (30) properties to be examined during the BOA Nomination Study process. These properties were located on both sides of the Oswego River and all were considered abandoned, vacant, or underutilized. After initial analysis, it was determined that the BOA Study Area be further refined to only include those properties located on the eastern side of the Oswego Canal. With the Oswego Canal serving as a natural boundary and the majority of potential sites being located in the eastern half of the City, this boundary allows the City to focus its redevelopment efforts. As a result, the BOA Study Area includes twentyone (21) potential brownfield sites. These sites will be examined thoroughly during the Phase II Nomination Study. The Fulton BOA represents a unique opportunity for the City to capitalize on the numerous regional strengths, mitigate its market challenges, capture current and projected regional growth industries, and leverage the BOA’s assets, both economic and environmental. Together these will transform the Fulton BOA from an underutilized area to an engine of growth and stability. Section I. Project Description & Boundary March 2010

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Often the focus of development policies in industrial communities that have been losing population and are experiencing difficulties creating job growth, such as Fulton, is to identify one key economic solution to solve the region’s problems. However, the reliance on only one or a few companies, strategies, or initiatives to spur urban revitalization only makes a community more economically vulnerable to changes in the regional and national business climate. It also leaves communities at the mercy of independent decisions of only a few businesses. Opportunities for long-term growth of multiple sectors are provided by the diversification of the labor force, the focus on several industries that have long-term growth potential, in the city, state, and country, and the incorporation of the inherent environmental, cultural, and historic value of an area or city into its revitalization efforts. Ultimately this creates a residential and commercial community that is truly diverse and sustainable, with an emphasis on the environmental, economic, and social attributes of the community. A sustainable, long-term economic resurgence within the BOA Study Area is difficult within a context of local and regional economic stagnation. Thus, it is critical to first evaluate the local and regional economy to identify opportunities for growth within the BOA Study Area. In keeping with these ideals, during the Phase I Nomination Study, the overall demographic and market trends were compared with the City’s strengths, weaknesses, physical land base and emerging or sustainable industries. Many of the individual brownfield sites in the BOA Study Area are characterized by vacancy, underutilization, environmental contamination or a perceived threat of contamination. Properties that have plagued the community for years should be closely examined to identify multiple strategies to promote a balanced and sustainable economic resurgence in Fulton.

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This document was prepared with funds provided under the Brownfields Opportunity Area Program. Produced for Planning Purposes Only. Data provided by: Oswego County, Department of Planning & Development. Accuracy or completeness is not guaranteed. Last Modified 2-24-10 Project # 28052

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Map 3: BOA Boundary

LEGEND City of Fulton Adjacent Towns BOA Boundary Parcel Body of Water Limited Access Highway State, County & Local Roads

Neighborhood #1 Neighborhood #2 Neighborhood #3

Brownfields Opportunity Area

CITY OF FULTON OSWEGO COUNTY, NEW YORK

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0.125

0.25

Neighborhood #4 Neighborhood #5

This document was prepared with funds provided under the Brownfields Opportunity Area Program. Produced for Planning Purposes Only. Data provided by: Oswego County, Department of Planning & Development. Accuracy or completeness is not guaranteed. Last Modified 2-24-10 Project # 28052

0.5 Miles

Section II: CPP & Techniques to Enlist Partners

Section 2. Community Participation Plan & Techniques to Enlist Partners Community Participation Plan A successful planning effort requires an inclusive public outreach process. The need for this is two fold: (1) it engages the community in the planning process; and (2) it ensures that the City’s officials and the consultant team will have a clear understanding of those issues that are of concern to City’s residents and stakeholders. The BOA Program is a community-driven initiative that necessitates an inclusive public outreach process in order to be successful. As such, local community participation was sought in the development of an area-wide plan for the proposed BOA. A Community Participation Plan was developed which identified the public outreach methods exercised as part of the Nomination Study. Included in the Community Participation Plan was an outline of the steps necessary to identify and maintain a community partner’s database, conduct interviews, facilitate public workshops and to create a strategic marketing effort to educate the public and partners of the BOA process and findings. See Appendix A: Community Participation Plan. The Community Participation Plan meets the following objectives: •

The public should recognize the importance of the Nomination Study as a Revitalization Plan to guide future planning and zoning decisions in the City of Fulton.



The outreach effort is intended to engage a full range of stakeholders in the community including residents, business owners and elected representatives.



The public should have easy access to project technical information, maps, and analyses.



All involved agencies, including the City, should serve as a conduit throughout the process of the analysis, evaluation, and Nomination process (including SEQRA).



The Fulton BOA Steering Committee should strive to solicit input from the broadest possible range of perspectives and interests in the community.



Input should be solicited through a variety of technical and non-technical means and should be carefully considered and responded to in a timely manner.



The community participation process should be approached in a way that enfranchises local residents and strengthens the sense of community.



Participation should further the vision of the community; enhance civic pride, and encourage future participation in the long-range decision making process for the Study Area.

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A successful Community Participation Plan will continue even after the BOA study is complete, as contacts and partnerships formed during the process will continue to carry out the goals and recommendations of the Study. The full methodology and process is outlined in Appendix A: Community Participation Plan. The following elements are included in the Community Participation Plan for the City of Fulton BOA Nomination Study: •

Creation of the Fulton BOA Steering Committee;



Stakeholder Interviews & Focus Groups;



Stakeholder Seminars;



Resident & Business Surveys;



Interviews with Major Employers;



Public Workshops;



Public Hearings; and



Marketing & Promotion.

Several techniques were utilized to ensure active community engagement. Such techniques included the establishment of a Fulton BOA Steering Committee to oversee and make decisions for the project; public meetings to educate and engage in the BOA process, as well as obtain community feedback, development of a community vision, and the solicitation of public comments on draft documents.

Local Participation Three public workshops were conducted in Fulton for the BOA Study Area. These workshops were designed to ensure that the final outcome of the planning process reflects the community’s vision for the BOA Study Area and its surroundings. Each focus group workshop consisted of a presentation by the planning consultants to educate the public about the planning process, followed by a roundtable discussion with the public. Marketing materials were distributed to solicit participation at the workshops, including a newsletter to aid in educating the public about the BOA program and process. A copy of the newsletter and the marketing materials are included in Appendix B: Public Workshops & Outreach Materials. Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats Workshop: Two community-wide workshops for the BOA Nomination Study were held in Fulton on September 25, 2008 and on October 23, 2008. The second workshop was video recorded and subsequently televised on the local access network. During the workshop, the BOA Program and process was introduced to the public and the participants were asked to identify the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) experienced or perceived within the Study Area. Strengths are internal characteristics that the community can build on to achieve the desired vision. Weaknesses are Section II. Community Participation Plan & Techniques to Enlist Partners March 2010

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internal issues that may make it difficult to achieve the vision, but are factors that the community can influence. Opportunities are factors that the community can possibly take advantage of to achieve the vision. Threats are conditions the community should guard against. The participants revealed what they considered to be the most apparent positive and negative features of the Study Area and laid the foundation for the development of the future goals and recommendations. The table below organizes the factors identified by the participants, related to Fulton’s ability to achieve the community vision, into each of the four categories: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats. In addition, participants were asked to individually identify the most important concept in each of the four categories. These concepts are identified with a “*” in Table 1: SWOT Workshop Results. The full summary of public opinions and ideas generated from the workshops are contained in Appendix B: Public Workshops & Outreach Materials. Table 1: SWOT Workshop Results Strengths Oswego River,(its riverfront & access points)* Lake Neatahwanta * Gateway to Lake Ontario* Natural landscape and viewsheds* Historic homes and structures History of canal and locks Proximity to transportation hubs Small-town atmosphere and safety Variety of parks, recreation areas, and recreational resources Industry and manufacturing Existing infrastructure Zoning Strong healthcare and education system

Weaknesses Population’s dependence on public services* High tax rate* Antiquated infrastructure* Low median income* Potential loss of hospital* Lack of aesthetic appeal in new development*  Large percentage of rental housing Vacant structures Lack of employment opportunities Lack of streetscape and landscape design guidelines Lack of destinations and attractions Lack of retail and sit-down restaurants Lack of youth activities High utilities costs High senior population Disrepair of housing Abundance of big box retail and car lots Community apathy Industrial sites along Oswego River Flood plains

Section II. Community Participation Plan & Techniques to Enlist Partners March 2010

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Opportunities Recreational activities along river* Indoor Recreation Facility* Marketing lake and river for tourism* Waterfront development* Adaptive reuse* Workforce development* Train service to Syracuse and Oswego Hydro power to promote job creation Improve hotel/motel accommodations Upscale dining BOCES Terminal for port and chocolate expansion History of Chocolate tourist attraction  

Threats Community Apathy* Poor quality of life* Decreasing employment opportunities, especially living wage jobs* Potential loss of hospital* Decreasing property values* Appearance of entry-corridors* Lack of pedestrian and bicycle safety* Limited physical activity in winter* Rising taxes and utility costs Loss of population to other areas   Lack of family events, cultural offerings, community gatherings Climate By-pass route around City Potential loss of City status Lake pollution Brownfield sites Loss of tax revenue with arrival of Wal-Mart Power plant affecting housing Loss of representation in legislature

Community Walk & Talk Charrette: Summary to be prepared as part of the Fulton Phase II BOA Nomination Study.

Techniques to Enlist Partners In order to successfully implement and advance the BOA Nomination Study, the City of Fulton needs to identify and activate project partners. These partners may be local or regional, but will be instrumental in the successful revitalization of the City. Some of these organizations may already meet for inter-agency coordination of resources and strategies. The purpose of the BOA Nomination Study will be to identify and create dynamic relationships that are long lasting and accomplish brownfield redevelopment in the City of Fulton. Utilization of New York State and Federal brownfield redevelopment tools and the tasks associated with the development of the Nomination Study will require that the project partners develop an intimate knowledge of the Study Area, an ability to identify and locate necessary information and a keen awareness of the regulatory and legislative environment. Key project partners were identified by the Fulton BOA Steering Committee. These agencies and organizations include the following:

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City of Fulton



Fulton/Local property owners



Fulton City School District



Fulton Community Development Agency (CDA)



Real Estate Agencies



Greater Oswego-Fulton Chamber of Commerce



Operation Oswego County



Oswego County



Oswego County Community Brownfield Advisory Group (CBAG)



Oswego County Opportunities (OCO)



Cayuga Community College (CCC)



Metropolitan Development Association (MDA)



National Grid



New York State Canal Corporation (NYSCC)



New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC)



New York State Department of State Division of Coastal Resources (NYSDOS)



New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT)



New York State Division of Housing and Community Renewal (DHCR)



New York State Empire State Development Corporation (ESDC)



Federal Housing Administration (FHA)



U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT)



U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA)

Community Partners Key community partners, both local and regional, will continue to be identified by the Fulton BOA Steering Committee to solicit their participation in revitalizing the City. A variety of community partners have been involved and/or identified. The following is a list of these community partners; contact information is included in Appendix C: Community Partners. •

City of Fulton: In partnership with the Oswego County, the City of Fulton has led the BOA Study Area effort. The Mayor, as a member of the Fulton BOA Steering Committee, has provided insight into the historic use of key brownfield sites throughout the City, as well as the City’s ongoing efforts to remediate several of these properties. Other Department officials and Board members were active in the public workshops and will be advocates of the implementation process.

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Fulton/Local property owners: Property owners whose properties are within the BOA Study Area will be instrumental to the success of the revitalization efforts. Property owners were invited to participate in workshops, surveys, and outreach to understand their concerns and needs. Educating property owners of the program and process will be the key to advancing the goals and recommendations of the Study.



Fulton City School District: A partnership with the Fulton City School District would be a unique opportunity to benefit the City as a whole. Identifying methods to involve the City’s youth in the revitalization of their community would help create a stronger quality of life for all residents in the City.



Fulton Community Development Agency (CDA): The Futon CDA actively works with property owners to assist with: Homeownership; Community Development Block Grants (CDBG); Economic Development; Fair Housing; Housing Rehabilitation; Lead Paint Program; and Rental Assistance. The Fulton CDA operates several Federal and State grants for the City, specifically HUD programs. Recently the agency became a HUD-Approved Housing Counseling Agency. The Fulton CDA also successfully received approval to serve as the administrator of new funds for the CDBG Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The Fulton CDA will be important throughout the BOA process in allocating necessary subsidies for rehabilitation projects and assisting property owners with financial incentives to engage in the brownfield remediation process.



Real Estate Agencies: The City of Fulton and Oswego County have numerous real estate agencies. These agencies speak to property owners, developers, and business leaders on a daily basis. As a community partner in the planning process, realtors can advance the City’s vision for reinvestment and revitalization.



Greater Oswego-Fulton Chamber of Commerce: Engaging area business owners will be key when focusing on expanding existing and developing new commercial and business opportunities associated with the economic development facets of the BOA Program. Not only will the Greater Oswego-Fulton Chamber of Commerce be useful in marketing the key brownfield sites, but also may serve as an outlet for identifying end users for the targeted BOA properties.



Operation Oswego County: The County’s Industrial Development Agency is a nonprofit corporation that administers Oswego County’s economic development programs and offers financing and other forms of assistance to promote, develop, encourage, and assist in the acquiring, constructing, reconstructing, improving, maintaining, equipping, and furnishing of industrial, manufacturing, warehousing, commercial, research, and recreational facilities. Although private companies benefiting from Industrial Development Agency participation are technically exempt from local government property taxes, a Payments in Lieu of Taxes Agreement (PILOT) is entered into between Operation Oswego County and any applicant. These PILOT Agreements are used as an incentive for business to locate in Oswego County

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and could be beneficial to the long-term revitalization of Fulton. This organization’s mission is to create and retain jobs, strengthen the economic base, and to plan future development. •

Oswego County Community Brownfield Advisory Group: The CBAG oversees multiple brownfield initiatives throughout the County. In addition, the CBAG will provide insight and assistance with securing strategic partnerships to advance the BOA process.



Oswego County Opportunities (OCO): The BOA Program should incorporate existing public transportation networks into the planning process. OCO currently serves the City of Fulton with a bus system that reaches all areas of Oswego County, including the rural and suburban Towns and Villages. OCO is a non-profit organization dedicated towards the delivery of several human services, including safe, affordable public transit to all County residents. Specific programs have been designed and implemented that address the needs of both economically and physically disadvantaged persons in Oswego County, such as, NonEmergency Medical Transport, Call-N-Ride, Oswego County Public Transit (OPT), and Retired Individuals Driving the Elderly Services (RIDE). The BOA process should examine OCO’s programs and services, and prioritize those sites that are best served by public transit.



Oswego County: The County is a project partner with the City of Fulton. The County provides support and resources to assist the City with the redevelopment and revitalization of the BOA properties.



Cayuga Community College (CCC): Partnerships with local universities and colleges are important in the continued revitalization of urban areas. CCC is part of the State University of New York (SUNY), the nation’s largest comprehensive network of public higher education. The college expanded their existing campus in Auburn with a satellite campus in downtown Fulton in 2001. The Fulton campus now serves over 1,000 students each academic year. CCC continues to broaden the scope of programs offered at the Fulton campus, providing opportunities for local residents to obtain training and certification in new cutting edge technologies and job sectors. With increased focus and attention on the new green economy on a national level, the college is developing new programs to allow for local training in related fields that will result in immediate job creation and growth. The BOA Program should continue to support the CCC downtown Fulton campus and provide opportunities to expand the current programs offered.



Metropolitan Development Association (MDA): The MDA serves the region through implementation of key development projects. The MDA represents the area’s business leadership, and has been instrumental in economic development projects and providing immediate access to the people who can make things happen. The MDA has participated in the local workshops and the stakeholder seminars. The MDA has the resources to connect the City with developers experienced in redeveloping brownfields.



National Grid: National Grid offers a host of programs, services, and resources for economic development and brownfield revitalization. National Grid was an active participant at the stakeholder seminars and is a project partner that could significantly assist property owners in the Study Area.

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New York State Canal Corporation (NYSCC): Many of the BOA-targeted properties are located on the Oswego River Canal. In order to effectively include these properties in subsequent steps of the BOA Program, the NYSCC would need to be engaged and active in Futon BOA Steering Committee decisions.



New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC): State government partner sponsoring the BOA Program. A representative from the NYSDEC provides guidance, information, and access to resources throughout BOA Study Area effort.



New York State Department of State Division of Coastal Resources (NYSDOS): State government partner sponsoring the BOA Program. A representative from the NYSDOS provides guidance, information, and access to resources throughout BOA Study Area effort.



New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT): BOA redevelopment projects which would occur in transportation-related areas, such as along State Route would be greatly assisted with the involvement of the NYSDOT for funding, technical assistance, and coordination.



New York State Division of Housing and Community Renewal: The Division of Housing and Community Renewal is responsible for the supervision, maintenance and development of affordable low- and moderate-income housing in New York State. The Division performs a number of activities in fulfillment of this mission, including: Community Development, Housing Operations, Rent, and Policy Research and Development.



New York State Empire State Development Corporation (ESDC): The City of Fulton is served by the Central New York Region of ESDC. Through a partnership with ESDC, the City could incorporate existing programs and incentives into the planning process, as well as build public-private partnerships that can assist in economic development activities. ESDC actively promotes the Riverview Business Park in the Town of Volney as the nation’s largest renewable and alternative energy business parks. The BOA process should incorporate the opportunity for related alternative energy job creation in the City of Fulton to build on its proximity to this unique resource.



Federal Housing Administration (FHA): The Federal Housing Administration, generally known as "FHA,” provides mortgage insurance on loans made by FHA-approved lenders throughout the United States and its territories. FHA insures mortgages on single family and multifamily homes including manufactured homes and hospitals. It is the largest insurer of mortgages in the world, insuring over 34 million properties since its inception in 1934.



U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT): Serve the United States by ensuring a fast, safe, efficient, accessible and convenient transportation system that meets our vital national interests and enhances the quality of life of the American people, today and into the future.



U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA): The long-term remediation activities have the potential to impact many of the planning and potential environmental investigation/remediation projects that are part of the BOA Study Area. The BOA Program could benefit substantially from coordination and technical support provided by the US EPA.

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The U.S. EPA does possess a substantial amount of data from areas adjacent to many sites in the BOA Study Area.

Stakeholder/Partner Seminars Stakeholder or Partner seminars were used to gather the views and opinions of the project partners, and assist in identifying key development issues. In addition, these Stakeholder Seminars serve to educate the stakeholders regarding the purpose and intent of the BOA program, the benefits afforded by the BOA designation, and the roles and responsibilities of the stakeholders in the success and implementation of the BOA. The sessions and topics corresponded chronologically with the components of the Study. From project initiation through implementation, there will need to be many public/private partnerships fostered to facilitate funding, permitting, and remediation. All community stakeholders should be knowledgeable of the entire process and have the ability to coordinate resources when and where appropriate based upon project needs and timeline. These seminars are intended to inform and update all potential partners to advance the City of Fulton’s BOA program. Stakeholder Seminar #1: The first Stakeholder Seminar was held on October 16, 2008. This seminar was used to establish a connection with the City’s potential partners and to introduce these partners to the BOA planning process and Study Area. A presentation on the BOA program and process was provided, as well as information regarding what is a “brownfield.” In general, the purpose of the seminar was to begin building an understanding of the State’s BOA program and the elements specific to Fulton’s BOA; to raise awareness among key segments of the community about it (the stakeholders); and to obtain thoughts and feedback from the stakeholders in guiding the Fulton BOA process. A copy of the presentation is included in Appendix D: Stakeholder Seminars. Stakeholder Seminar #2: The second Stakeholder Seminar was held December 2, 2008. Personal invitations went to all stakeholders that attended the first seminar, as well as additional new potential partners identified. The second seminar was intended to further educate the City’s project partners about the BOA program. The purpose of the second seminar was to identify and discuss elements unique to brownfield redevelopment; examine the tools available to assist in studying and remediating properties; and to consider the importance of such tools in community planning. A copy of the presentation is included in Appendix D: Stakeholder Seminars. Stakeholder Seminar #3: Summary to be prepared as part of the Fulton Phase II BOA Nomination Study. Section II. Community Participation Plan & Techniques to Enlist Partners March 2010

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Section III: Analysis of the Proposed BOA

Section 3. Analysis of the Proposed Brownfield Opportunity Area Community and Regional Setting Geographic Location The City of Fulton is located on the Oswego River, twenty-five miles north of the City of Syracuse and twelve miles south of Lake Ontario. The City of Fulton was originally settled as a result of its advantageous location to the Oswego River. The river runs through the middle of the City and was later used as a Canal to connect the City to Lake Ontario. Similar to many communities in the Northeast region, the City of Fulton grew historically as a result of its easy access to waterways and trade routes, and later as a manufacturing center. Currently the Oswego Canal is one of only four operational canals in New York State. The Oswego Canal is part of the New York State Barge Canal, and is used extensively for both commercial and recreational purposes. Despite the diminished importance of the Erie Canal system as a major transporter of goods and people, there is a growing effort to revitalize many of New York’s historic canals and locks for tourism. Many communities in New York State have used existing canal infrastructure to their advantage, creating vibrant tourist destinations that are used as tools to help revitalize the local economies, downtowns, and waterfronts. The current land uses for the City of Fulton reflect its early settlement pattern along the bisecting river. Traditionally, the Canal was used as a working waterfront and uses dependent upon the water located in close proximity. Many of these past uses included industrial, transportation, public services, and commercial uses and this development pattern is notable on eastern edge of Fulton’s riverfront. As the City of Fulton continues to enhance its downtown and riverfront on the eastside of the Canal and develop strategies for revitalizing the BOA Study Area, rehabilitation of these properties will be critical.

Demographic, Social & Economic Indicators By examining the population, past, present and future, recommendations can be made concerning the socioeconomic make-up of the community. In addition to the City data provided in this section, comparisons to Oswego County and the State of New York have been made where appropriate. These comparisons provide a level of context required to assimilate an understanding of past and future estimated growth patterns for the City of Fulton in comparison to the region. Section III. Analysis of the Proposed Brownfield Opportunity Area March 2010

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Table 2 shows the projected population for the City of Fulton from 2000 to 2013. The City’s 2000 census population was 11,855 people. Between 1990 and 2000 the City lost 8.3% of its population, and is expected to continue losing residents through 2013. This trend is typical for Upstate New York Cities, who are losing population while surrounding suburbs and rural areas are gaining residents and constructing new houses and infrastructure to handle the population increase. Table 2: Population Projections Population Projections Market Area City of Fulton

1990 12,929

2000 11,855

2008 (est.) 11,673

2013 (proj.) 11,608

% Change 1990-2000 -8.3%

2000-08 -1.5%

2008-13 -0.6%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

The reason for the population loss in the City of Fulton can be attributed to the loss of traditional manufacturing related employment opportunities. As shown in Table 3, residents faced an unemployment rate of 9.2% in 2000, which was considerably higher than the national average (it should be noted that these numbers are from 2000 and do not reflect 2010 economic conditions). Table 3: Local Economic Indicators Median Household Market Area Income City of Fulton

$ 29,018

Per Capita Income

Poverty Rate

Unemployment Rate

$ 16,133

19.3%

9.2%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Table 4 details the job growth that occurred in Oswego County between the years of 2002 to 2006. The County experienced an overall net loss of 1,720 jobs, an overall decline of 4.8%. However, several private industries did experience job growth, including health care and social assistance (461 jobs), wholesale trade (89 jobs), and finance and insurance (68 jobs). Table 4: Countywide Job Growth Private Industry Segments With Significant Job Growth* in Oswego County, 2002-2006 Employment Description

HEALTH CARE & SOCIAL ASSISTANCE: Social Assistance HEALTH CARE & SOCIAL ASSISTANCE: Hospitals RETAIL TRADE: Building Material & Garden Supply Stores HEALTH CARE & SOCIAL ASSISTANCE: Nursing & Residential Care Facilities HEALTH CARE & SOCIAL ASSISTANCE: Ambulatory Health Care Services MANUFACTURING: Printing and Related Support Activities WHOLESALE TRADE: Merchant Wholesale, Nondurable Goods FINANCE & INSURANCE: Financial Investment & Related Activity

2002

856 1,015 254 923 1,095 --98 12

2006

Net Change

992 1,139 357 1,026 1,191 82 178 72

136 124 103 103 96 82 80 60

*Defined as net employment growth of 50 or more Source: NYS Department of Labor and E.M. Pemrick and Company

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Community Features & Conditions The City of Fulton has similar opportunities and challenges that many communities in Upstate New York currently face. These include a housing stock that is both aging and historic, an increased need for public services while keeping taxes low, maintaining connections to the regional transportation networks, and the maintenance and expansion of recreational facilities. Housing U.S. Census figures show that the City had a 10.5% vacancy rate for housing in 2000, compared to 5.9% in 1990. The rental vacancy rate in 2000 was 12.2%, compared to a homeowner vacancy rate of 2.8%. While there has been a low demand for owner-occupied and rental housing in Fulton, Oswego County has continued to receive new applications for residential building permits. The City has only had a few singlefamily houses built in the last 20 years, whereas the County has issued thousands of permits for new singlefamily homes during the same time period. Public Services The City of Fulton is serviced by both paid fire and police protection staffs. According to the City of Fulton Comprehensive Plan, there are two fire stations located in the City. Fire station No. 1 is located in the City’s Municipal Building, which is located within the BOA Study Area, and is able to provide sufficient response time to the entire eastern side of the City. The same can be said about the Police Department, which is also located at the City’s Municipal Building, and provides sufficient response time, as well as, neighborhood safety patrol. Parks and Recreation With Lake Neatahwanta and the Oswego River, the City of Fulton provides abundant waterfront access to all residents. The City currently has thirteen (13) parks or open spaces located throughout its boundaries. Every neighborhood within the BOA Study Area is located within a 10minute walking distance (1,500 feet) to a public park or school owned recreational area. Van Buren Park is the largest neighborhood park, providing close proximity to the riverfront and an excellent opportunity to improve the resident’s quality of life. Residents of all ages gather year round at two local indoor recreational venues, the Fulton Community Center Ice Arena and War Memorial. Both venues provide opportunities for increased availability of local sporting events, community gatherings, and social events.

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Infrastructure and Schools The City of Fulton contains complete public water, sewer and a conventional urban stormwater management infrastructure system that serves the BOA Study Area. The City provides water service to approximately 12,900 users daily, which extends beyond City limits. The public sewer system was updated in the 1980’s when the City bonded for $8 million to update 60 miles of infrastructure. The conventional urban stormwater management infrastructure system catches water at curbside and delivers it via underground piping to nearby water bodies. In addition, the BOA Study Area contains the Fulton City School District Office within its boundaries.

Current & Historic Economic Land Use Development Trends The City of Fulton is home to a variety of manufacturing facilities, many related to the food and packaging industry, with nearly 2,000 manufacturing jobs. Fulton is within 300 miles of 50% of the U.S. population, making it an ideal location for regional distribution. Oswego Opportunities and A.L. Lee Memorial Hospital provide an additional 800 jobs in the City of Fulton. In the last two decades of the 20 th century, the City of Fulton has continued to lose population at an accelerated rate. One factor for this trend is the appeal of suburban and country living in the small towns surrounding the City of Fulton or farther out in Oswego County. During the 1980s, Fulton’s population was stabilized by a jump in the number of construction jobs associated with the development of new power plants in the Town of Scriba. The construction of these major power plants sustained the local economies and attracted a skilled workforce to the area. However, the rapid in-migration of the construction workforce accelerated conversion of many of Fulton’s larger single-family homes into rental units, causing a host of maintenance problems in neighborhoods, ranging from parking to loss of residential character. Upon completion of the projects in the mid 1980s, the population resumed its downward trend. Both Fulton and Oswego experienced a large out-migration of constructionrelated workers and their families. The City has utilized its community partners in the past to provide incentive packages, Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) financing, benefits through the Empire Zone, and other local, state, and county funding.

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Today, the City of Fulton faces many of the same problems as larger urban centers such as Syracuse and Binghamton. Public infrastructure is aging along with the City’s housing stock with limited funds for improvements. The poverty rate has increased and remains at a higher level than Oswego County overall, and the City’s median household income of its urban residents has not kept pace with the broader County. In 1990, nearly 17% of Fulton’s residents were over 65 years of age, compared to only 11% in Oswego County. Fulton’s population is aging in place without young families choosing to settle in Fulton. Fulton is not alone in its economic circumstance; old industrial cities throughout upstate New York, New England, and the Mid-West are similarly struggling with transition. Many urban areas in the northeast have started to recover; the goal of urban revitalization is not unreachable. Demographic and cultural trends indicate that vibrant urban places will remain a lifestyle alternative for an increasing number of Americans. The City of Fulton and the Fulton Community Development Agency (CDA) have made sustained efforts to stabilize Fulton’s neighborhoods, urban core, and economic base. Major accomplishments of City departments and partner organizations include application of federal community development block grants to renew public infrastructure and rehabilitate housing; development of a canal front park; conversion of an historic mill site into senior housing; and the development of the Bullhead Point Pavilion and Boat Launch on Lake Neatahwanta.

Fulton’s Planning Efforts The City of Fulton has completed numerous planning efforts over the past several years. Each of these plans contains research, analysis, and recommendations that are directly related to the successful integration of goals and strategies of the BOA Nomination Study. These plans and studies include: •

Oswego County Comprehensive Plan, 1997: The goals contained in the Plan recognized preserving the County’s community character through proper community design and land use, open space development, and infrastructure investment. Specific topics discussed related towards brownfield redevelopment included: encouraging the preservation, maintenance, rehabilitation, and adaptive reuse of older and historic structures; develop sites for new commercial and industrial businesses; and promote sustainable land use development.



City of Fulton Local Waterfront Revitalization Plan (LWRP), 1998: The City of Fulton completed an LWRP in 1998, which established a set of policies for future development of the Oswego River/Canal waterfront. The LWRP boundary includes several of the proposed brownfield sites. Policies identified in the LWRP directly relate to the objectives of Fulton’s BOA Nomination Study and

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include, but are not limited to: fostering smart patterns of growth that preserve community character and open space; providing public access to the waterfront; and minimizing environmental degradation in the waterfront area from solid waste and hazardous substances. •

City of Fulton Comprehensive Plan, 2003: Fulton prepared a new Comprehensive Plan in 2003 to build upon the City’s biggest assets, its neighborhoods. The Plan’s vision was to restore Fulton as a complete community in the regional economy. The policies identified include: advancing neighborhood stability; promoting economic vitality; and improving the overall quality of life for residents. There were several recommendations and strategies from the Plan that are closely aligned with the mission and vision of the BOA Nomination Study. These strategies include cleaning up environmental resources to support environmentally based economic development; developing a strategy for dealing with abandoned, dilapidated sites and vacant lots; and a continued focus on waterfront development opportunities.



North First Street Riverwalk, 2004: The Fulton Community Development Agency commissioned a Preliminary Design and Development Report for the North First Street Riverwalk. The report detailed the existing conditions of the Oswego River/Canal waterfront and proposed to turn the waterfront into an active and passive recreational amenity for the City. This area is also part of the Fulton BOA Nomination Study and the design recommendations should be integrated into the BOA Nomination findings.



State of the Oswego County Environment, 2007: The Oswego County Environmental Management Council (EMC) was established in 1971, and serves as an advisory board to local and state government regarding matters related to the protection, conservation, preservation, and proper management of natural resources in Oswego County. The 2007 annual report prepared by EMC reviewed species, wetlands, and water quality, as well as specific sites and geographic locations, in the Oswego River corridor and Lake Neatahwanta. It identified several sites in Fulton as environmentally hazardous or brownfield assessment sites, some of which have already undergone EPA Phase I Environmental Site Assessments (ESA) include: The County recommended some of these sites to move forward with Phase II ESA’s in an attempt to expedite the remediation of the properties and will be further examined in the BOA Nomination Study.

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Inventory and Analysis Neighborhood Assessments The City of Fulton is comprised of several diverse neighborhoods. While most neighborhoods are difficult to define geographically, residents and business owners in urban areas, like Fulton, often connect to each other as a result of socio, economic, land use or natural features that define a particular area or neighborhood. For purposes of consistency, the geographic locations of the neighborhoods included in the BOA Nomination Study are defined based upon the City of Fulton Comprehensive Plan, which followed the U.S. Census Block Group boundaries. The BOA Study Area includes five (5) neighborhoods. A neighborhood assessment was completed for each; neighborhood numbers were assigned randomly and not by any ranking system. See Map 3: BOA Boundary for the location of each neighborhood within the Study Area. BOA Neighborhood #1 The BOA Neighborhood #1, located in the southern portion of the BOA Study Area, is the largest neighborhood comprising almost 230 acres of the Study Area. It is characterized by diverse types of land uses and several different abutting development patterns. This neighborhood is defined by its most significant landmark, the Nestle Building. The Nestle Building is designated in the M-1 Zoning District and is directly adjacent to the residential neighborhood. The area includes Route 481, a wide, heavily traveled transportation corridor that is the gateway to the City from the south. The City constructed a well designed gateway sign welcoming motorists to the City of Fulton. The corridor contains several suburban style chain commercial developments in the southern portion of the neighborhood with parking lots in the front of the buildings. This area of the neighborhood is zoned C-2, and is designed for the motorist not pedestrians or bicyclists. The area closer to Broadway has denser development and provides a slightly more pedestrian friendly environment. Single-family residential dwellings comprise almost 25% of the overall neighborhood between Route 481, Broadway and South Seventh Street and is zoned R-1A. These houses vary in condition, but are mostly well maintained historic houses. This neighborhood is walkable with sidewalks and pedestrian rightof-ways, all of which lead to downtown and other neighborhoods in the Study Area. Another portion of this neighborhood is located along First Street and includes parcels that border the Oswego Canal. This area is also zoned R-1A and also consist primarily of Section III. Analysis of the Proposed Brownfield Opportunity Area March 2010

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residential dwellings. The housing stock is a mix of older and newer/renovated homes and includes the Oswego Falls Playground. Further north on First Street the large industrial parcels abut the residential lots, which presents a land use conflict. BOA Neighborhood #2 The BOA Neighborhood #2 is located in the central eastern portion of the BOA Study Area and is the smallest neighborhood totaling only 28 acres. The area is a traditional neighborhood, zoned mostly R1A, with small blocks containing single and multifamily residential houses. The street signs have historic character, with black plates and white lettering, allowing visitors to distinguish the neighborhood as a unique part of the City. Most streets in the neighborhood are served by sidewalks, allowing residents to walk to destinations safely. The architecture is primarily from the turn of the century; however, some structures appear to be more recently constructed. Most structures in the neighborhood are well maintained. Many of the traditional corner store commercial buildings have remained and are still in business, including a minimart and a recycling center (zoned C-1). Oneida Street is the busiest street in the neighborhood, and lacks traffic calming devices to slow auto traffic for pedestrians using the sidewalks. BOA Neighborhood #3 The BOA Neighborhood #3, located in the central western portion of the BOA Study Area, is generally considered “downtown” Fulton. The neighborhood consists of several single-family residential areas zoned R-2 and R-3 located on the eastern edge of downtown. This area provides an excellent opportunity for residents to be able to frequent downtown businesses as pedestrians can walk along old growth tree lined streets surrounded by historic housing. In addition, the neighborhood features the East Side Park which is well maintained and is adjacent to the Fulton City School District Offices. Both of these community assets are located in the center of the neighborhood, providing public spaces for residents. The area closest to the Oswego Canal, First Street and its adjoining streets are densely developed and resemble traditional downtown development patterns. This area is zoned C-2 and is the only part of the City that is zoned C-2A. The streetscape on First Street (brick pavers, kiosks, historic lighting, and signage) aesthetically enhances the downtown area and provides a friendly area for Section III. Analysis of the Proposed Brownfield Opportunity Area March 2010

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shoppers and residents to frequent. Many cultural amenities are also located along First Street and the Oswego Canal, such as the library, City Hall, boating amenities, Veterans Park, and the recently constructed gazebo overlooking the Oswego Canal. Whereas, Second Street and Oneida Street both have a more auto-oriented pattern of development. The recent adaptive re-use of 129 Cayuga Street has created a mixed-use condo development along the Second Street corridor, which could be a cornerstone for future developments of similar style. BOA Neighborhood #4 The BOA Neighborhood #4, located in the northwestern portion of the BOA Study Area, is the second largest neighborhood (94 acres) within the BOA boundaries. This area has a diverse land use mix, with the highest amount of commercial buildings of any neighborhood, most of which are located along Route 481 which bisects the neighborhood. The businesses located along this corridor are primarily manufacturing and industrial related. This is due to the zoning of the corridor as mostly M-1, with some C-2. Traffic along the corridor is busy and automobiles travel at high speeds in this section of the City. The Route 481 corridor lacks traffic calming devices and sidewalks. The adjoining streets to Route 481, such as Harrison and Shaw Street are both industrial and are appropriately zoned M-1. These sites contain identified contaminated parcels. Recognizing the threats that these parcels provide to residents, the City and County have initiated the environmental remediation of many of these sites. In addition, the area along the Oswego Canal is currently being redeveloped into a hiking and biking trail, attempting to connect the residential land uses to the east of Route 481 to the waterfront. When the trail is completed along the Canal it should be connected to Van Buren Park, which is the largest park in the City at 18 acres and provides the neighborhood with the highest amount of parkland totaling almost 12% of the areas land use. The park is surrounded by single and multi-family residential on Fremont, Van Buren and Sixth Street. These streets and

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adjacent streets lack sidewalks and pedestrian crosswalks to slow traffic and provide a separation between automobiles, pedestrians, and bicyclists. Such improvements would enhance the park and improve safety for park users. BOA Neighborhood #5 The BOA Neighborhood #5 is located in the northeastern portion of the BOA Study Area. It is characterized by a significant amount of vacant land (51%). Most of the vacant land is zoned R-1A and presents an opportunity for infill residential development in the neighborhood. The neighborhood contains many newer housing units, which blend well with the character of the existing houses and overall neighborhood. This neighborhood is bordered by Van Buren Park, providing direct access to recreation for residents. This neighborhood could benefit from improved sidewalks, pedestrian crosswalks, and better signage for park users.

Existing Fulton Land Use A land use analysis was developed to compare the City of Fulton, the BOA Study Area, and the five neighborhoods that define the BOA Study Area. Using Geographic Information System (GIS) data provided by the Oswego County Department of Planning and Development, the analysis assigned a land use category based upon the New York State Real Property Type Classification Codes. The local tax assessor uses these codes to complete real property tax assessment for the City. The following ten (10) categories classify the land uses in the City of Fulton and are illustrated on Map 4: Existing Land Use Map: •

Single-Family Residential: Property used for one-family, year round and seasonal residences, including apartments.



Multi-Family Residential: Property used for two or more residences.



Mixed-Use: Downtown buildings with ground level commercial uses and upper floor residential/ office uses.



Vacant Land: Property that is not in use, in temporary use, or is lacking any permanent improvements.



Commercial: Property used for hotels, restaurants, automobile services, storage, retail, banks, offices, funeral homes, etc.



Recreation & Entertainment: Property used for parks, theaters, racetracks, bowling centers, health spas, beaches, campgrounds, etc.

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Community Services: Property used for schools, libraries, places of worship, cultural facilities, welfare services, hospitals, clinics, government, police, armed forces, correctional facilities, shelters, cemeteries, etc.



Industrial: Property used for the production and fabrication of durable and non-durable goods, mining, quarrying, etc.



Public Services: Property used for electric or gas power generation or transmission, public drinking water and water treatment facilities, communications, train, plane and bus terminals, canals, waste disposals, etc.



Wild, Forested, Conservation Lands & Public Parks: Includes State, Federal and privately owned forestlands, reforested lands, and preserves; City, County and State public parkland; and private hunting and fishing clubs.

Table 5: Existing City of Fulton Land Use summarizes the existing land uses present on the City’s 4,306 parcels. With large portions of the City, including the southwestern, northwestern, and northeastern sections comprised of Single-Family Residential, it is not surprising that these parcels total 768 acres (34%) of current land use. The second largest land use is Wild, Forested, Conservation Lands, and Public Parks, which totals 310 acres, or 14% of the City’s land area. Vacant land comprises the third largest land use, covering almost 13% of the City’s total acreage. Table 5: Existing City of Fulton Land Use Land Use Category Single-Family Residential Multi-Family Residential Mixed Use Vacant Commercial Recreation & Entertainment Community Services Industrial Public Services Wild, Forested, Conservation Lands & Public Parks Totals

Land Area (Acres) 768.1 122.9 7.6 286.1 209.1 21.9 253.9 105.3 141.1 310.2 2,226.7

% of Total Acres 34.5% 5.5% 0.3% 12.8% 9.4% 1.0% 11.4% 4.7% 6.3% 13.9% 100.0%

# of Parcels 2,788 601 48 419 232 111 54 20 24 9 4,306

% of Total Parcels 34.5% 5.5% 0.3% 12.9% 9.4% 1.0% 11.4% 4.7% 6.3% 13.9% 100.0%

Source: Laberge Group, 2008

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St

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yS

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e Av

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is S t

W 6th St

Hubbard

Atlantic Ave

St

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W 3rd St N

th

St

W 5th St N

12

h

W 5th St

S

3

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W 6th St N

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S

W 8th St N

Dr

St

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Buffalo

ad Ac

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Br is

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St

Gansvoort St

Jerome S

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Wall St

Wor th

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Map 4: Existing Land Use

LEGEND City of Fulton

Neighborhood #1

Adjacent Towns

Neighborhood #2

Parcel

Neighborhood #3

Body of Water

Neighborhood #4

Limited Access Highway

Neighborhood #5

State, County & Local Roads

On ei

St

o Ontari

N 3rd

Walradt St

3

St in

Harrison St

Fulton Ave

Gille spie

ig ich M

Seward St

Batavia Ave

W 7th St N ry

Manhattan Ave

Fremont St

St

Melrose Ave

ne

N 7th St

St

Shaw

n Ta

176

en

Poll

White Ave

n Va

r Wate City

Ctr ution

yD r

Dr

d rR

Clark St

Clark St

48

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Bun n

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Floo d

Ln

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n Gorma

Brownfields Opportunity Area

CITY OF FULTON OSWEGO COUNTY, NEW YORK

0

0.125

0.25

This document was prepared with funds provided under the Brownfields Opportunity Area Program. Produced for Planning Purposes Only. Data provided by: Oswego County, Department of Planning & Development. Accuracy or completeness is not guaranteed. Last Modified 3-3-10 Project # 28052

0.5 Miles

Fulton BOA Nomination Study

BOA Land Use As illustrated in Table 6: Existing BOA Land Use, Single-Family Residential is the predominant land use within the BOA Study Area, covering 150 acres (28%) of all land. Since the Study Area encompasses the eastern side of downtown, it is not surprising that the second largest land use in the Study Area is Commercial properties, with a total coverage of 92 acres, or 17% of total land use. Vacant land again is the third largest land use, totaling 16% of the BOA Study Area. It should also be noted that there is a significant percentage of industrial properties (11%) in general within the Study Area. Conflicting land uses in the Study Area present a challenge to the City in its revitalization efforts. Table 6: Existing BOA Land Use Land Use Category Single-Family Residential Multi-Family Residential Mixed Use Vacant Commercial Recreation & Entertainment Community Services Industrial Public Services Wild, Forested, Conservation Lands & Public Parks Totals

Land Area (Acres) 150.7 41.8 3.1 85.1 92.4 2.9 30.6 60.7 33.7 30.8 531.8

% of Total Acres 28.3% 7.9% 0.6% 16.0% 17.4% 0.5% 5.7% 11.4% 6.3% 5.8% 100.0%

# of Parcels 856 270 21 159 208 3 28 9 8 3 1,565

% of Total Parcels 54.7% 17.3% 1.3% 10.2% 13.3% 0.2% 1.8% 0.6% 0.5% 0.2% 100.0%

Source: Laberge Group, 2008

BOA Neighborhood #1 Land Use Figure 1 illustrates BOA Neighborhood #1, which is almost 230 acres and is the largest of all five neighborhoods. Single-Family Residential is the largest land use in this neighborhood with approximately 24% of all uses. Industrial land uses total over 21% of all land in the neighborhood, with a strong mix of Commercial (17%) and Vacant land uses (16%).

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Figure 1: Existing BOA Neighborhood #1 Land Use

Source: Laberge Group, 2010

BOA Neighborhood #2 Land Use As shown in Figure 2, BOA Neighborhood #2 is characterized by a high percentage of SingleFamily Residential (63%). The second largest land use in the neighborhood is Multi-Family Residential (23%), followed by Commercial (7%). Figure 2: Existing BOA Neighborhood #2 Land Use

Source: Laberge Group, 2010

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BOA Neighborhood #3 Land Use Figure 3 illustrates the land use mix in BOA Neighborhood #3, which is approximately 94 acres. Single-Family Residential is the largest land use with approximately 28% of all uses. Commercial and Industrial land uses total approximately 16% of all land in the neighborhood, followed by Community Services (14%). Figure 3: Existing BOA Neighborhood #3 Land Use

Source: Laberge Group, 2010

BOA Neighborhood #4 Land Use Figure 4 provides an illustration for the land use mix in BOA Neighborhood #4, which is approximately 155 acres. Single-Family Residential is the largest land use with approximately 21% of all uses. Commercial land uses total over 18% of all land in the neighborhood, with a high percentage of Vacant (12%) and Community Services (10%).

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Figure 4: Existing BOA Neighborhood #4 Land Use

Source: Laberge Group, 2010

BOA Neighborhood #5 Land Use As shown in Figure 5, BOA Neighborhood #5 contains over 50% Vacant land use within its boundaries. The neighborhood is approximately 88 acres, with Single-Family Residential the second largest land use with approximately 29% of all uses. Public Services land uses total over 11% of all land in the neighborhood, followed by Multi-Family Residential (7%). Figure 5: Existing BOA Neighborhood #5 Land Use

Source: Laberge Group, 2010

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Fulton Zoning The City’s Zoning Ordinance regulates the types of uses allowed in the City, the minimum lot sizes required, and the intensity of each use and parcel. The purpose of the Zoning Ordinance is to promote orderly development, protect the character of the City, and maintain the overall stability of the City’s residential, business, and manufacturing areas. The City is divided into fifteen (15) zoning districts: eight (8) residential districts, five (5) commercial or business districts, two (2) manufacturing or industrial districts. The following describes each Zoning district in abbreviated form, for a more detailed definition please reference the City of Fulton Zoning Ordinance. Residential •

R-1 Residential District: Established to provide and maintain land area for neighborhoods of single-family dwellings on large size lots.



R-1A Intermediate Density Residential District: Established to provide and maintain land area for neighborhoods of single-family dwellings on smaller lots than R-1 district.



R-2 Residential District: Established to provide and maintain land area for neighborhoods of single- and two-family residential dwelling units on medium-sized lots.



R-2A Residential Cluster Overlay District: Established to provide and maintain land area for various types of clustered single-family residential units, both attached and detached, in existing R-2 and R-3 Residential Districts, having less square feet of land than would be normally required of such use, with the right to subdivide such lots or sites to accommodate such dwelling units.



R-3 Residential District: Established to provide and maintain land area for neighborhoods of single-family, two-family and multiple-family dwellings on medium size lots.



R-4 Residential Planned Unit Development (PUD) District: Established to provide and maintain land area for large-scale residential multiple dwelling developments of a type and/or density that would not be permitted in other residential districts.



R-AP Residential Accessory Parking District: Established to provide accessory parking for residential uses.



MHP Mobile Home Park District: Established to provide and maintain land area for residential mobile homes in a mobile home park.

Commercial •

C-1 Neighborhood Commercial District: Established to provide for limited commercial use abutting any residential district. The following uses shall be permitted in the C-1 District with site plan approval from the Planning Commission: neighborhood grocery store, small retail store, banking, church, social club/lodge, restaurant and drinking establishment, bakery, personal services, laundry/dry-cleaning, professional offices, copy center, licensed day-care center, and municipal public or private utility structure.

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C-2 Commercial District: Established to provide for a wide variety of business uses. The following uses shall be permitted in the C-2 District with site plan approval from the Planning Commission: retail store, police/fire/ambulance station, restaurant and drinking establishment, movie theater, convenience store/mini mart, repair garage, service station, public parking garage, professional offices, banking, personal services, laundry/dry-cleaning, wholesale supplier, printing/photo copy shop, hotel/motel, appliance sales or service, bowling alley/pool hall, indoor golf range/tennis courts, commercial or vocational school, public offices, business services/trade union, auto/boat/mobile home sales lot, farm implementation sales, car work, greenhouse supply, veterinarian hospital, licensed day-care center, and municipal public or private utility structure.



C-2A Central Business District: Established to provide for a limited variety of small businesses and mixed residential use in close proximity to one another. The following uses shall be permitted in the C-2A District with site plan approval from the Planning Commission: retail store, banking, insurance/real estate office, travel bureau, movie theater, personal services, restaurant and drinking establishment, book store, photographic studio, delivery/mailing/telephone answering service, dry-cleaning, liquor store, hobby shop, business services/trade union, residential dwellings in existing buildings located above the First floor, residential dwellings in multi-story buildings at least 30 feet in height, residential townhouse on property abutting Oswego River, day-care center, and municipal or private utility structure.



C-3 Commercial Planned Unit Development (PUD) District: Established to provide and maintain land area for large-scale commercial developments of a type and/or density that would not be permitted on other commercial land. Any permitted use in C-1 or C-2 District shall be permitted in the C-3 District. Any prohibited use in the C-1 and C-2 District shall be prohibited in the C-3 District.



C-AP Commercial Accessory Parking District: Established to provide accessory parking for commercial uses.

Manufacturing and Industrial Districts •

M-1 Manufacturing/Industrial District: Nine (9) permitted uses including processing, packaging, assembly, etc.



M-AP Manufacturing Accessory Parking District: Established to provide accessory parking for manufacturing and industrial uses.

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481

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Kimball Ave

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a

St

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N 6th St

st St N1

Hubbard

Atlantic Ave

St

Tower

Dr

W el l sS

t

E 11th St

S 8th St

t th S

E Broadway

t

Dr

Foxwood

th St th St

St

St

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St

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McCollum Dr

N Pollard Dr

Riverview

Patrick Cir

Baldwin Ave

WE

Morin Dr

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Rd

Whitcomb Rd

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Dr

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M-2

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Wor th

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176

Map 5: Zoning

LEGEND City of Fulton

Neighborhood #1

Adjacent Towns

Neighborhood #2

Parcel

Neighborhood #3

Body of Water

Neighborhood #4

Limited Access Highway

Neighborhood #5

State, County & Local Roads

On ei

St

o Ontari

N 3rd

Walradt St

3

St in

Harrison St

Fulton Ave

Gille spie

ig ich M

Seward St

Batavia Ave

W 7th St N ry

Manhattan Ave

Fremont St

St

Melrose Ave

ne

N 7th St

St

Shaw

n Ta

176

en

Poll

White Ave

n Va

r Wate City

Ctr ution

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Dr

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Clark St

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Floo d

Ln

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Brownfields Opportunity Area

CITY OF FULTON OSWEGO COUNTY, NEW YORK

0

0.125

0.25

This document was prepared with funds provided under the Brownfields Opportunity Area Program. Produced for Planning Purposes Only. Data provided by: Oswego County, Department of Planning & Development. Accuracy or completeness is not guaranteed. Last Modified 3-3-10 Project # 28052

0.5 Miles

Fulton BOA Nomination Study

Table 4: Existing City of Fulton Zoning summarizes the current zoning for the City’s 2,018 acres. There is a difference between the acreage of zoned parcels and land use parcels; this difference is due to certain parcels not receiving any zoning, but still warranting a land use designation. The table below shows that R-1 is the most frequent Zoning District, covering 23.6% of municipal land. R1-A, which allows single-family dwellings on smaller lots than R-1, is the second most frequent Zoning Regulation at 21.8% of total acres. Table 7: Existing City of Fulton Zoning Zoning District RP: Residential R-1: Residential R-2: Residential R-3: Residential R-1A: Intermediate Density Residential C-1: Neighborhood Commercial C-2: Commercial C-2A: Central Business M-1: Manufacturing/Industrial M-1(P): Manufacturing Accessory Parking M-2: Manufacturing/Industrial R-4: Residential PUD Parks Schools Totals

Land Area (Acres) 21.3 477.0 153.6 60.7 439.4 20.6 215.6 6.8 171.1 2.8 24.9 0.8 353.1 70.5 2,018.3

% of Total Acres 1.1% 23.6% 7.6% 3.0% 21.8% 1.0% 10.7% 0.3% 8.5% 0.1% 1.2% 0.0% 17.5% 3.5% 100.0%

# of Parcels 2 1,151 528 131 1,884 30 358 30 136 1 5 1 15 11 4,283

% of Total Parcels 0.0% 26.9% 12.3% 3.1% 44.0% 0.7% 8.4% 0.7% 3.2% 0.0% 0.1% 0.0% 0.4% 0.3% 100.0%

Source: Laberge Group, 2008

BOA Zoning As Table 8: Existing BOA Zoning shows, the zoning for the BOA Study Area is comprised of more diverse zoning districts than the City as a whole. The most frequent Zoning District found is R-1A (36.4%), which shows that there is a high concentration of dense housing located in the Study Area. C-2, Commercial District is the second highest allowed use, covering 20.2% of total land, followed by M-1, Manufacturing/Industrial District with 19.1%. The diverse range of uses in the BOA Study Area allows for the opportunity of several types of development of any potential brownfield sites. The BOA Study Area is the only part of the City that has the C-2 and C-2A Zoning Districts, which allows for mixed-use development. These districts are located downtown along the BOA Study Area’s riverfront, allowing for the potential of mixed-use waterfront development. When deciding which sites are most valuable to the BOA Nomination Study, it will be important to analyze the existing land use and zoning for each site. This will allow the City and County to better decide which types of zoning districts best fit specific areas and sites for redevelopment. Section III. Analysis of the Proposed Brownfield Opportunity Area March 2010

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Mixed-use development would be the preferred type along the waterfront and in areas that are suitable for commercial development, such as the downtown area. Overall the potential for zoning amendments should be based upon the community’s vision, economic issues, and environmental issues. Table 8: Existing BOA Zoning

Zoning District

Land Area (Acres)

% of Total Acres

# of Parcels

% of Total Parcels

RP: Residential R-1: Residential R-2: Residential R-3: Residential R-1A: Intermediate Density Residential C-1: Neighborhood Commercial C-2: Commercial C-2A: Central Business M-1: Manufacturing/Industrial M-1(P): Manufacturing Accessory Parking M-2: Manufacturing/Industrial R-4: Residential PUD Parks Schools Totals

0.0 0.0 36.1 15.0 186.2 1.0 105.3 6.8 97.5 2.8 24.9 0.0 31.7 4.2 511.6

0.0% 0.0% 7.1% 2.9% 36.4% 0.2% 20.6% 1.3% 19.1% 0.5% 4.9% 0.0% 6.2% 0.8% 100.0%

0 0 219 67 973 2 206 30 103 1 4 0 4 2 1,611

0.0% 0.0% 13.6% 4.2% 60.4% 0.1% 12.8% 1.9% 6.4% 0.1% 0.2% 0.0% 0.2% 0.1% 100.0%

Source: Laberge Group, 2008

Local Laws & Special Designations Economic Development Programs The City of Fulton has a number of financial assistance programs available to new and expanding businesses. Many of these programs are administered through the not-for-profit organization, Operation Oswego County (OOC) and help to guide development and land use within the County of Oswego as well as the City of Fulton. This organization’s mission is to create and retain jobs, strengthen the economic base, and to plan future development. Empire Zone The Empire Zone (EZ) offered through New York State in the City of Fulton is administered by the Fulton Community Development Agency, with support from OOC. EZ’s are designated areas throughout New York State that offer special incentives to encourage economic and community development, business investment, and

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job creation. Businesses located within an EZ are eligible to receive significant tax credits and benefits. A portion of the City of Fulton is designated an EZ. Areas included in the EZ primarily include most of the east side of the riverfront, as well as the west side of the riverfront, and a major portion of the western edge of the City. In relation to the BOA Study Area, nearly all parcels would qualify for EZ benefits. Power For Progress Program Oswego County’s Public Utility Service offers low-cost electrical energy to new and expanding businesses in Oswego County. Applicants are asked to provide detailed information about the project, their job creation plans and their power usage requirements. To be eligible, businesses must meet certain minimum usage requirements and commit to create permanent new jobs. County of Oswego IDA The Oswego County Industrial Development Agency (IDA) provides financial assistance to qualified business applicants. The IDA provides tax-exempt or taxable bonds; direct financial lending assistance; or assistance with sale/leaseback transactions for purposes of accessing real property tax, sales and use tax, and/or mortgage recording tax exemptions. The IDA administers four (4) business loan programs: HUD Micro RLF, HUD RLF, General RLF, and PILOT RLF. Small Business Administration (SBA) 504 Loan Program The program offers accessible, fixed rate, long term financing for land, buildings, and equipment. Businesses eligible for Small Business Administration (SBA) 504 loans are independently owned, for-profit businesses that are ready to expand and create jobs. Businesses must have a net worth less than $6 million and annual after-tax profit of less than $2 million. An SBA Certified Development Company (CDC), such as OOC, finances 40 percent of the project with an SBA 504 loan, and the small business provides ten percent equity.

Parks and Open Space As more communities are concerned with their quality of life appeal to current and potential residents, the availability and access to parks and open space becomes crucial. Parks provide public places for leisure, recreation, and social gathering. Open space, which includes parks, is considered any land which is not developed. Many communities have increased their effort to preserve open space as a way to add to the

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Fulton BOA Nomination Study

quality of life for their residents. Open space is valuable to municipalities as it provides the opportunity for trails, public access to waterfronts, and space for both passive and active recreational activities. Table 9 lists the existing parks and recreational facilities in Fulton. Table 9: Fulton Parks & Recreational Facilities Park

Park or Facility

Acres

Foster Park

Neighborhood

9.5

Recreation Park

Neighborhood/Community

Patrick Park

Neighborhood

1.2

Oswego Falls Playground

Neighborhood

4.8

John Lincoln Park

Neighborhood

1.8

Rowlee Beach East Side Park Quirk Park Veterans Park

Neighborhood Neighborhood Open Space

7.6 4.1 1.7 0.6

Van Buren Park Guyer Park

Neighborhood/Community Neighborhood

18 1.1

North Bay Recreation Area Bullhead Point

Community/Regional Special Use Community

75 5

21.5

Activities softball, children's play area, picnic area field sports, children’s play area, beach area, outdoor pool children's play area, open field area baseball, basketball, children's play area children's play area, open field area outdoor swimming pool, pond, picnic area, children's play area children's play area, open space open space open space soccer, tennis, volleyball, children's play area, picnic area children's play area, open space softball, boat launch, beach, open space fishing, event pavilion

Source: City of Fulton Comprehensive Plan

With Lake Neatahwanta and the Oswego River, the City of Fulton provides abundant waterfront access to all residents. The City currently has thirteen (13) parks or open spaces located throughout its boundaries. Every neighborhood in the BOA Study Area has at least one park within its boundaries. The only portion of the City that is not located within a 10-minute walking distance (1,500 feet) to a public park or school owned recreational area is the northwest quadrant of the City. Van Buren Park, which is located in BOA Study Area #4 and bordering BOA Study Area Neighborhood #5, provides an excellent opportunity for the City to improve the local quality of life through revitalization of the park system. Future improvements to Van Buren Park were identified in previous plans, which include a skateboard park, bicycle paths, and trail links to the Oswego River and future trail expansions. Section III. Analysis of the Proposed Brownfield Opportunity Area March 2010

62

Fulton BOA Nomination Study

Lake Neatahwanta which is located outside the BOA Study Area in the southwestern part of the City is an asset that should be enhanced and improved through recreational trail networks connecting the waterfront to Bullhead Point, North Bay Recreation Area, War Memorial, Recreation Park, and the G. Ray Bodley High School. This plan is detailed in the Lake Neatahwanta Opportunities Plan, which was developed as an economic development tool to aid in the improvement of the overall quality of life in Fulton. The City is also studying strategies through the North First Street Riverwalk Plan to further develop the eastern riverfront Canal Towpath Trail. These improvements will provide better pedestrian and bicycle access to the Oswego River. The design includes developing several nodes of activity along the canal in BOA Study Area # 3 and #4 to be used for recreational activities. The City has already successfully completed infrastructure improvements to the riverfront, including Veteran’s Park and Indian Point. Residents of all ages gather year round at two local indoor recreational venues, the Fulton Community Center Ice Arena and War Memorial. Both venues provide opportunities for increased availability of local sporting events, community gatherings, and social events. Fulton should continue to encourage the maintenance and improvement of these facilities, as well as study the feasibility for future expansion. Several community based groups could utilize an improved venue, such as the Elks, Rotary, Lion’s, and Moose Club, as well as youth and adult sporting leagues. The Fulton YMCA, which is located along Lake Neatahwanta, is the only existing indoor multi-use recreational facility in the City. It was noted during the BOA public workshops that residents desire a more modernized multi-use indoor recreational facility that contains a variety of uses and spaces for groups, organizations, music and cultural events, and sporting events. Indoor facilities are attractive to existing and future residents, as such facilities allow for year-round recreation. As the baby-boomer generation continues to age, communities are evolving to provide the services desired by this demographic. Indoor recreation venues are extremely popular with baby-boomers because they offer the safety of enclosed walking tracks, swimming pools, modern meeting spaces, and group activities.

Section III. Analysis of the Proposed Brownfield Opportunity Area March 2010

63

481

d

r Bu

a Av e Flor id

N 8th St

a

St

Mar yla

nd D r

N 7th St

N 6th St

t st S N1

St

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St

t

Tower

Dr

W ell

sS

E 11th St

S 8th St

t

t

Eastside Park

Dr

Foxwood

S6 th St St

th

St

St

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St

on Ly

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t

Oswego Falls Playground

St

ple

Ave

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57

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Whitcomb Rd

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S Pollard Dr

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McCollum Dr

N Pollard Dr

Riverview

Patrick Cir

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Dr

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Oswego River

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Olde Maple Ave

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S 12

St

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is S t

W 6th St

Hubbard

Atlantic Ave

St

ry Eme

W 3rd St N

th

St

W 5th St N

12

h

W 5th St

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3

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S 3rd

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an

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St Utica

Veteran's Park

Schuyler St

Bro

N 4th St

St

Gansvoort St

wA

c a St

ne Marine/CanalSePark

Wor th

evie Lak

t Erie S

Wall St

W 8th St N

On ei

St

o Ontari

N 3rd

Walradt St

3

St in

Harrison St

Fulton Ave

Gille spie

ig ich M

Seward St

Batavia Ave

W 7th St N ry

Manhattan Ave

Fremont St

St

Melrose Ave

ne

176

St

Shaw

n Ta

Van Buren Park

Kimball Ave

en

P

White Ave

n Va

r Wate City

tr on C olluti

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Dr

rR

Clark St

Clark St

48

Ln

Bun n

James St

Floo d

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wa t

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176

Map 6: Parks & Open Space

LEGEND BOA Boundary

Neighborhood #1

City of Fulton

Neighborhood #2

Adjacent Towns

Neighborhood #3

Parcel

Neighborhood #4

Body of Water

Neighborhood #5

Limited Access Highway

Public Parks & Conservation Lands

State, County & Local Roads

Brownfields Opportunity Area

CITY OF FULTON OSWEGO COUNTY, NEW YORK

0

0.125

0.25

This document was prepared with funds provided under the Brownfields Opportunity Area Program. Produced for Planning Purposes Only. Data provided by: Oswego County, Department of Planning & Development. Accuracy or completeness is not guaranteed. Last Modified 2-24-10 Project # 28052

0.5 Miles

Fulton BOA Nomination Study

Brownfield, Abandoned, and Vacant Sites A significant component of the BOA Nomination Study is the identification and analysis of sites that have been characterized as brownfields, abandoned, vacant, or underutilized by the community. During the Phase I Nomination Study, the City of Fulton identified and assessed twenty-one (21) potential sites within the BOA Study Area boundaries. For each parcel, a site profile was prepared using a variety of sources, including NYSDEC records of spills and remediation programs, EPA Phase I Environmental Site Assessments, Oswego County tax records, EDR Data Map Area Study, Sanborn Maps (1924-1960), and stakeholder and committee interviews. A full description of each parcel is provided in Appendix F: BOA Descriptive Profiles. The descriptive profiles include such information as location, existing buildings or structures, past and existing ownership information, past and existing land use, existing zoning, available environmental site history and condition, access to utilities and transportation systems, proximity to natural and cultural resources, and an initial identification of potential redevelopment opportunities. These sites are shown on Map 7: Underutilized Sites, visualizing where in the BOA Study Area each site is located, and where there are intense clusters of sites versus isolated individually located sites. The following summarizes the sites identified by the City of Fulton, categorized by BOA Neighborhood location, street address, approximate acreage and parcel identification number. BOA Neighborhood #1 The BOA Neighborhood #1 contains six (6) BOA-targeted sites: •

460 Park Street - 1.41 acres - parcel # 253.25-02-03



555 S Fourth Street - 2.33 acres - parcel # 253.26-02-01



520 S Second Street - 2.33 acres - parcel # 253.25-07-03.01



610 S Fourth Street - 0.85 acres - parcel # 253.34-02-18



2 Harris Street - 0.27 acres - parcel # 253.34-01-10



902 First Street - 0.62 acres - parcel # 253.42-02-14

Section III. Analysis of the Proposed Brownfield Opportunity Area March 2010

65

Fulton BOA Nomination Study

BOA Neighborhood #2 The BOA Neighborhood #2 contains one (1) BOA-targeted site: •

103 Ontario Street - 1.26 acres - parcel # 236.47-01-11

BOA Neighborhood #3 The BOA Neighborhood #3 contains three (3) BOA-targeted sites: •

25 S Second Street - 0.05 acres - parcel # 236.56-04-01



203 E Broadway - 0.27 acres - parcel # 236.72-03-06



215 S Second Street - 0.16 acres - parcel # 236.72-02-31

BOA Neighborhood #4 The BOA Neighborhood #4 contains eleven (11) BOA-targeted sites: •

361 N First Street - 3.07 acres - parcel # 236.31-01-03



N First Street - 0.84 acres - parcel # 236.31-01-05



Route 481 & Shaw Street - 0.27 acres - parcel # 236.31-01-04



208 N Second Street - 0.19 acres - parcel # 236.39-01-03



Shaw Street - 0.85 acres - parcel # 236.39-01-02



258 N Fourth Street - 1.28 acres - parcel # 236.40-01-02



Harrison Street - 0.36 acres - parcel # 236.40-01-07.01



308 Harrison Street - 2.16 acres - parcel # 236.40-04-03



507 Erie Street - 0.60 acres - parcel # 236.48-04-12



62 N Fifth Street - 0.05 acres - parcel # 236.48-03-12.2



616-624 Oneida Street - 0.67 acres - parcel # 236.57-01-06

BOA Neighborhood #5 The BOA Neighborhood #5 does not contain any BOA-targeted sites.

Section III. Analysis of the Proposed Brownfield Opportunity Area March 2010

66

Site #1 B

481

Dr Floo d nd D r th

N 8th St

Mar yla

N 6th St

t st S N1

St

St

a

Hubbard

Atlantic Ave

12

lH l

ry Eme

h St

Tower

Dr

W ell

sS

t

t Emery S

E 11th St

S 8th St

t

Site #14

t

Dr

Site #15

Foxwood

S6 th St th St

th St

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nS

t

y Fa

St

t

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Site #18

Pl

Av e

t tS Bu r

Pr im

Harris St

em

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an

St

W4

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57

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Dr

481

r gD

t S

e Rd

Whitcomb Rd

s re Fo

E

dge

Ed

ge

te wa r rD

S Pollard Dr

Dr

McCollum Dr

N Pollard Dr

Riverview

Patrick Cir

Baldwin Ave

WE

Morin Dr

Dr

ve tA

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Dr

r ll D

dg Ri

Dr

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Ave

481

57

in sh

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In g

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Site #21

St

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Site #20

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St

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Oswego River

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Site #17

Site #19 se

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Address 361 N First Street t N SFirst Street nut est Ch Rt 481 & Shawt Street tS l nu Wa 208 N Second Street Shaw Street 258 N Fourth Street St dar Harrison Street Ce 308 Harrison Street 103 Ontario Street 507 Erie Street 62 N Fifth Street 616-624 Oneida Street 25 S Second Street 203 East Broadway 215 S First Street 460 Park Street 555 S Fourth Street 520 S Second Street 610 S Fourth Street 2 Harris Street 176 902 S First Street

klin

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St

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Site #16

St

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St

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W3

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Wildwood Ave

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S4

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St

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Acres 3.07 0.84 0.27 0.19 0.85 1.28 0.36 2.16 1.26 0.60 0.05 0.67 0.05 0.27 0.16 1.41 23.30 2.33 0.85 0.27 0.62

st

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W7

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W 6th St

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3

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W 6th St N

N 8th

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LEGEND

wa t

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Dr

Map 7: Underutilized Sites Location

BOA Boundary City of Fulton

Neighborhood #1

Adjacent Towns

Neighborhood #2

BOA Sites

Neighborhood #3

Parcel

Neighborhood #4

Body of Water

Neighborhood #5

Limited Access Highway

Al y

3

Site #13

ad Ac

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ter St

Buffalo

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Site # Parcel # 1 236.31-01-03 2 236.31-01-05 3 236.31-01-04 4 236.39-01-03 5 236.39-01-02 6 236.40-01-02 7 236.40-01-07.01 8 236.40-04-03 9 Lake Neatahwanta 236.47-01-11 10 236.48-04-12 11 236.48-03-12.2 12 236.57-01-06 13 236.56-04-01 14 236.72-03-26 15 236.72-02-31 16 253.25-02-03 17 253.26-02-01 18 253.25-07-03.01 19 253.34-02-18 20 253.34-01-10 21 253.42-02-14

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Site #10

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St

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N 4th St

W 8th St N

N 7th St

St

Site #8

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Wall St

Wor th

State, County & Local Roads

St in

On ei

Gille spie

ig ich M

Site #7

St

o Ontari

N 3rd

Walradt St

3

Site #6

Harrison St

Fulton Ave

W 7th St N ry

Site #5

Manhattan Ave

Seward St

Batavia Ave

176

Site #4

Fremont St

St

Melrose Ave

ne

Site #3

en

Kimball Ave

a Av e

r Bu

Shaw

n Ta

White Ave

n Va

P

Site #2

Flor id

d

r Wate City

o olluti

n C tr

yD r

St

rR

Clark St

Clark St

48

Ln

unn

James St

Ut ic

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Ln

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Brownfields Opportunity Area

CITY OF FULTON OSWEGO COUNTY, NEW YORK

0

0.125

0.25

This document was prepared with funds provided under the Brownfields Opportunity Area Program. Produced for Planning Purposes Only. Data provided by: Oswego County, Department of Planning & Development. Accuracy or completeness is not guaranteed. Last Modified 2-24-10 Project # 28052

0.5 Miles

Fulton BOA Nomination Study

Land Ownership Pattern As illustrated by Table 10: Publicly Owned Land, over 31% of all land in the City of Fulton is owned by a local, county, state, or federal public agency. In general, the City of Fulton owns the greatest percentage (57.7%) of the publicly owned properties within the City’s boundaries. The Oswego County IDA owns the second largest amount of public land (21.2%), followed by the Fulton City School District (14.6%). Table 10: Publicly Owned Lands Geographic Area City of Fulton BOA Study Area

Land (Acres) 705.1 136

% of Total Acres 31.7% 25.5%

# of Parcels 166 82

% of Total Acres 57.7% 0.5% 14.6% 21.2% 2.1% 3.9% 100.0%

# of Parcels 83 7 13 20 8 35 166

Source: Laberge Group, 2008

Table 11: City of Fulton Publicly Owned Land Public Agency City of Fulton City of Fulton CDA Fulton City School District Oswego County IDA NYS Other Total

Land (Acres) 406.9 3.2 103.1 149.2 15.1 27.6 705.0

Source: Laberge Group, 2008

The majority of the Study Area is privately owned (70.1%) in addition to a relatively high amount of publicly owned properties (25.5%). When analyzing the land ownership in the BOA Study Area, a third category was analyzed, quasi-public. This includes those parcels which are owned and operated by utility and infrastructure related organizations. Two organizations, National Grid and CSX Transportation, Inc. own approximately 22 acres within the BOA Study Area. Please refer to Table 12: BOA Study Area Land Ownership for a complete breakdown of public, quasi-public, and private land ownership within the BOA Study Area. The City of Fulton currently owns approximately 72 acres of public property within the Study Area, followed by the Oswego County IDA (34 acres). Only four (4) BOA Sites within the BOA Study Area are publicly owned properties. Table 12: BOA Study Area Land Ownership Land Owner Public Quasi-Public Private Total

Land (Acres) 136 22.8 373.0 531.8

% of Total Acres 25.5% 4.3% 70.1% 74.4%

# of Parcels 82 8 1,475 1,565

Source: Laberge Group, 2008

Section III. Analysis of the Proposed Brownfield Opportunity Area March 2010

68

481

d

r Bu

Kimball Ave

nd D r

a Av e Flor id

N 8th St

St

a

St

th

Mar yla

N 6th St

t st S N1

St

Ut ic

Hubbard

Atlantic Ave

12

ry Eme

h St

t sS

Tower E 11th St

t

Dr

Foxwood

S6

St

th St St

th St

St

nS

t

n

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Old e

Harris St

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481

57

481

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Whitcomb Rd

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S Pollard Dr

Dr

McCollum Dr

N Pollard Dr

Riverview

Patrick Cir

Baldwin Ave

WE

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Rowlee Ave

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Fra n

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E Broadway

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W 5th St N

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N 5th

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St

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S 3rd

Schuyler St

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St

St

Gansvoort St

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N 4th St

Wor th

t Erie S

Wall St

W 8th St N

On ei

St

o Ontari

N 3rd

Walradt St

3

St in

Harrison St

Fulton Ave

Gille spie

ig ich M

Seward St

Batavia Ave

W 7th St N ry

Manhattan Ave

Fremont St

St

Melrose Ave

ne

N 7th St

St

Shaw

n Ta

176

en

P

White Ave

n Va

r Wate City

tr on C olluti

yD r

Dr

rR

Clark St

Clark St

48

Ln

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Floo d

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176

LEGEND BOA Boundary City of Fulton Adjacent Towns BOA Sites Parcel Body of Water Limited Access Highway State, County & Local Roads Railroad

Neighborhood #1 Neighborhood #2 Neighborhood #3 Neighborhood #4 Neighborhood #5 Public Owned Land Right-of-Way Private Owned Land Quasi-Public Land

Map 8: Land Ownership Brownfields Opportunity Area

CITY OF FULTON OSWEGO COUNTY, NEW YORK

0

0.125

0.25

This document was prepared with funds provided under the Brownfields Opportunity Area Program. Produced for Planning Purposes Only. Data provided by: Oswego County, Department of Planning & Development. Accuracy or completeness is not guaranteed. Last Modified 3-3-10 Project # 28052

0.5 Miles

Fulton BOA Nomination Study

Historic or Archaeologically Significant Areas Historic Properties & Areas Similar to most canal towns and cities, the County of Oswego and the City of Fulton both contain numerous historic sites and buildings. Early settlement of the City was clustered along the Oswego River and Canal, including mills that were later built and became the focus of daily life. Due to early settlement patterns along the riverfront, many historic residential and commercial properties were built in the center of the City to support the growing population. Fulton currently has six (6) historic properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places, all of which are located within the Study Area 4 . Table 13: National Register of Historic Places includes a list of National Register sites located in the City of Fulton. Table 13: National Register of Historic Places District, Building, or Property

Architectural Style

Historic Period

CHANCELLOR (tugboat) Fulton Public Library

Other Beaux Arts

Mount Adnah Cemetery

Other

1925-1949 1900-1924 1850-1874, 1875-1899, 1900-1924 1900-1924, 1925-1949, 1950-1974 1850-1874, 1875-1899 1900-1924, 1925-1949

Oak Street School John Wells Pratt House

Tudor Revival Italianate

US Post Office Greek Revival Source: National Register of Historic Places

Within BOA Study Area

Ownership

Yes Yes

Private Public

No

Private

No

Public

No

Public

Yes

Public

The City of Fulton has been successful at finding modern uses for many of these historic properties. Some commercial buildings have been turned into residential dwellings and some have successfully retained their initial and intended uses. This is true for the Mount Adnah Cemetery, which has remained untouched by time, and has been maintained and restored well throughout its storied history. Mount Adnah Cemetery dates back to 1850, and is an excellent example of the rural cemetery movement that occurred in the U.S. during the mid 19th century. This movement was an important period in landscape design and architecture, and was very popular in northeastern cities during the pre-civil war era. The City also contains several examples of historic architecture, dating as far back as the mid 19th century, including but not limited to, Italianate, Greek Revival, and Tudor Revival periods of architectural history. The Fulton Public Library is an excellent example of the Beaux Arts

4

Information obtained by the National Register of Historic Places website (http://www.nps.gov/nr/).

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architectural style, dating back to the early 1900’s. The Library is a tremendous asset to the City and serves as a unique landmark for residents and tourists. Archaeologically Significant Areas According to the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (OPRHP), almost the entire City of Fulton, with the exception of a very small portion located on the eastern edge of the municipal boundaries, is labeled an archaeologically sensitive area. New York State designated archaeologically sensitive areas are characterized to a strong history of early settlement activity.7 Many areas in New York State contain not only original European settler artifacts, but also Native American artifacts from thousands of years before any Europeans explored America. These artifacts are important in continued research of New York’s history and heritage, and allow further insight into the lifestyles and settlements of pre-European Native Americans. The designation as an archaeologically sensitive area is also used as a tool for historic preservation. By creating an overlay district, buildings that are not yet on the National or State Register of Historic Places can receive protection against demolition from the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) that otherwise might not be available from the State agency. Despite the growing number of registered historic properties and the designation as an archaeologically sensitive area, the City does not have any designated historic districts. There are several historic districts throughout Oswego County; however, none are located within the City of Fulton boundaries. The City should consider establishing an official historic district, potentially downtown, close to the Oswego Canal in BOA Study Area Neighborhood #3. There is an abundance of clustered historic properties and sites located in this area, including the Fulton Public Library, John Wells Pratt House, U.S. Post Office, and several other historic properties. This could serve as a tourist attraction for visitors and residents, sparking further interest and pedestrian activity in the downtown area.

7

All information obtained from the NYSHPO website (http://www.oprhp.state.ny.us/nr/).

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481

d

r Bu

Kimball Ave

nd D r

a Av e Flor id

N 8th St

St

a

St

th

Mar yla

N 6th St

t st S N1

St

Ut ic

Hubbard

Atlantic Ave

12

ry Eme

h St

t sS

Tower E 11th St

t

Dr

Foxwood

S6

St

th St St

th St

St

nS

t

n

St

ple

Ave

t

Ma

Bu r

tS

se

Pr im

Ne stl e

Av e

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Old e

Harris St

un

St

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481

57

481

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57 e Rd

Whitcomb Rd

s re Fo

E

dge

Ed

ge

te wa r rD

S Pollard Dr

Dr

McCollum Dr

N Pollard Dr

Riverview

Patrick Cir

Baldwin Ave

WE

Morin Dr

ve tA

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r ll D

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Dr

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y we De

y wle Fra

Dr

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Dr

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St

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lor

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Rowlee Ave

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t

Lake Neatahwanta

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Oswego River

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Dr

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S 8th St

dS

Olde Maple Ave

l an

y wa

h Hig

t

t yS

E Broadway

th S

em

Gilbert St

S 12

St

lo So

ad Ac

e Av

ter St

Buffalo

S3

gg

St

W 5th St N

S

3

lH l

t 11

W 5th St

to

e Av

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W 3rd St N

W 6th St

Dr

St

W 6th St N

Br is

3

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l W

iew

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St

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Mall

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St

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rt Ha

a Senec

S 3rd

Schuyler St

wA

St

St

Gansvoort St

evie Lak

N 4th St

Wor th

t Erie S

Wall St

W 8th St N

On ei

St

o Ontari

N 3rd

Walradt St

3

St in

Harrison St

Fulton Ave

Gille spie

ig ich M

Seward St

Batavia Ave

W 7th St N ry

Manhattan Ave

Fremont St

St

Melrose Ave

ne

N 7th St

St

Shaw

n Ta

176

en

P

White Ave

n Va

r Wate City

tr on C olluti

yD r

Dr

rR

Clark St

Clark St

48

Ln

Bun n

James St

Floo d

ve Ri

n Ln Gorma

wa t

er

Dr

176

LEGEND BOA Boundary

Neighborhood #1 Neighborhood #2

City of Fulton

Neighborhood #3

Adjacent Towns

Neighborhood #4

Parcel

Neighborhood #5

Body of Water

Historic Sites

Limited Access Highway State, County & Local Roads

Archaeologically Sensitive Areas

Map 9: Historic or Archaeologically Significant Areas Brownfields Opportunity Area

CITY OF FULTON OSWEGO COUNTY, NEW YORK

0

0.125

0.25

This document was prepared with funds provided under the Brownfields Opportunity Area Program. Produced for Planning Purposes Only. Data provided by: Oswego County, Department of Planning & Development. Accuracy or completeness is not guaranteed. Last Modified 2-24-10 Project # 28052

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Fulton BOA Nomination Study

Transportation Systems The City of Fulton is serviced by a variety of transportation systems, including state highways, county and local roads, as well as public transportation, rail and air. The City is in proximity to the major Interstates 81 and 90, Oswego Canal, two working freight rail lines and several State Routes. (See Map 10: Transportation Systems). Certain points within the Study Area, including BOA Study Area Neighborhoods #1, 3, and 4, need improved traffic calming measures implemented along State Route 481, which divides surrounding neighborhoods and the waterfront. If the City is to be successful at drawing neighborhood residents towards the Oswego Canal, it should develop better pedestrian crosswalks, sidewalks, pedestrian signage, and bicycling infrastructure (lanes, racks, etc.), all of which will attract residents and tourists to travel amongst the City while still being connected to the waterfront. The potential for future streetscape enhancements should be tied into public transportation options.

Highway/Roads The City of Fulton’s network of local roads provides vehicular access to all areas of the City. The most common street pattern throughout the City is a grid pattern, on both the west and east side of the City. Areas of the City in the southwestern portion of the City have more suburban, curved roads, as well as the edges of the northwest and eastern part of the City. There are four New York State highways that serve the City of Fulton, State Routes 3, 48, 176, and 481. State Route 3 serves the City as an east-west arterial highway. As it enters the City boundaries on the east, it turns into East Broadway, and then the Broadway Bridge as it moves over the Oswego River. As this route continues west, it is locally referred to as West Broadway Section III. Analysis of the Proposed Brownfield Opportunity Area March 2010

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Fulton BOA Nomination Study

and then continues as State Route 3 towards Cayuga County. State Route 3 runs northeast out of the City of Fulton and eventually is referred to as the Seaway Trail, as it runs parallel to Lake Ontario. State Route 48 is parallel to the Oswego River on the west side of the City. It provides direct north south access to the City of Fulton and connects with Interstate 690 to the south, connecting Fulton to Syracuse. State Route 48 is referred to as West First Street as it merges with State Route 176 and becomes a local road while running through the City boundaries. State Route 176 continues to run southwest out of City boundaries, eventually providing access to Interstate 90 to the south. State Route 481 runs north to south along the eastern side of the City, providing direct access to both the City of Oswego to the north and the City of Syracuse to the south. State Route 481 is a heavily traveled road, and provides access for the City of Fulton not only to the City of Syracuse, but the rest of New York State, as it connects with Interstate 81 and Interstate 90 to the south. State Route 481 turns into Second Street as it enters the City’s boundaries. Second Street connects Oneida Street in the downtown portion of the City, forming a major intersection. Oneida Street, which branches off State Route 3 on the eastern side of the City, runs east-west and is one of only two bridges that cross the Oswego River within City’s boundaries. Rail The City of Fulton has two regional freight railroad connections that are currently used to provide freight services for major manufacturers and wholesalers in the region. Both rail lines run north to south, eventually connecting the City of Fulton with both the City of Syracuse to the south and the City of Oswego to the north. The two rail lines provide service on the west side and the east side of the City, with the line on the west side running parallel to the Oswego River, between Lake Neatahwanta and the western edge of the City. The east side line runs close to the eastern edge of the City boundary and then moves closer to the Oswego River as it approaches State Route 3, running parallel to State Route 481 and the Oswego River as it heads north to the City of Oswego. The City of Fulton does not currently provide any rail service for the movement of people. However, it would be advantageous to begin talks with Amtrak, the current provider of passenger rail service in New York State, to consider linking the City to the current network of passenger rail lines that are provided in the region and the state as a whole. With the rising price of gas caused by peak oil production, and as state and federal highways continue to become more crowded with the travel of goods and people, the location of two working rail lines that both run through the City boundaries will be of growing importance to the City, County, and region. The BOA process should incorporate any future plans for transit oriented development in the City of Fulton.

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River and Canal Fulton grew historically because of its location near the Oswego River. Following construction of the Oswego Canal in 1826, the primary use for the Canal was transporting goods, as well as people, connecting the City to the rest of the State of New York through the Erie Canal.8 Currently the Oswego Canal is one of only four operational canals in New York State. The Oswego Canal is part of the New York State Barge Canal, and is used extensively for both commercial and recreational purposes. Despite the diminished importance of the Erie Canal system as a major transporter of goods and people, there is a growing effort to revitalize many of New York’s historic canals and locks for tourism. Many communities in New York State have used existing canal infrastructure to their advantage, creating vibrant tourist destinations that are used as tools to help revitalize the local economies, downtowns, and waterfronts. The City of Fulton has completed several projects in the last few years to reclaim its waterfront, such as the Canal Landing Marina, which has opened the canal to both residents and tourists. The Marina is located between Locks 2 and 3 on the Oswego River Canal. The facility has 20 wet slips that provide accommodations for boats up to 42 feet in length, overnight electric and water hookups, a dumping station, and bathroom facilities. In addition, the City offers seasonal docks for residents that would like to boat on the canal all summer. These enhancements to the original canal infrastructure have allowed Fulton to capitalize on the tourism industry, bringing new restaurants and businesses to the downtown area. In 2000, the City received funding from New York State to develop the Canal Towpath Trail, a half-mile paved trail along the eastside of the Oswego Canal between the Broadway and Oneida Street bridges. The result was better pedestrian and bicycle access, as well as physical enhancements that included new plantings, trees, lighting fixtures, benches, and historic interpretive signs. The City is currently expanding the trail alongside the Canal through the vision established by the North First Street Riverwalk Plan. The Plan includes reclaiming First Street from Indian Point Boat Launch to Harrison Street, and converting sections of the road into a non-vehicular path for bicyclists and pedestrians. Due to residential and commercial properties located along First Street, portions of the street will need to remain accessible to vehicular traffic, although, it will be limited to single lane, one-way traffic flow. The implementation of this plan will continue the momentum of future waterfront redevelopment in the BOA Study Area. 8

City of Fulton: Local Waterfront Revitalization Program

Section III. Analysis of the Proposed Brownfield Opportunity Area March 2010

75

481

d

r Bu

Kimball Ave

nd D r

a Av e Flor id

N 8th St

St

a

St

th

Mar yla

N 6th St

t st S N1

St

Ut ic

Hubbard

Atlantic Ave

12

ry Eme

h St

t sS

Tower E 11th St

t

Dr

Foxwood

S6

St

th St St

th St

St

nS

t

n

St

ple

Ave

t

Ma

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Av e

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Harris St

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St

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481

57

481

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57 e Rd

Whitcomb Rd

s re Fo

E

dge

Ed

ge

te wa r rD

S Pollard Dr

Dr

McCollum Dr

N Pollard Dr

Riverview

Patrick Cir

Baldwin Ave

WE

Morin Dr

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Dr

r ll D

dg Ri

Dr

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nS t

y we De

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Dr

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Dr

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le A ve

Ha rro

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St

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kh Wic

th S

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lor

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Ta y

Rowlee Ave

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Ma p

St

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t

Lake Neatahwanta

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Oswego River

t St l nu Wa

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St

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S1

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Dr

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S 8th St

dS

Olde Maple Ave

l an

y wa

h Hig

t

t yS

E Broadway

th S

em

Gilbert St

S 12

St

lo So

ad Ac

e Av

ter St

Buffalo

S3

gg

St

W 5th St N

S

3

lH l

t 11

W 5th St

to

e Av

S

W 3rd St N

W 6th St

Dr

St

W 6th St N

Br is

3

N 8th

l W

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St

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S 6th

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St

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St

St

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S 3rd

Schuyler St

wA

St

St

Gansvoort St

evie Lak

N 4th St

Wor th

t Erie S

Wall St

W 8th St N

On ei

St

o Ontari

N 3rd

Walradt St

3

St in

Harrison St

Fulton Ave

Gille spie

ig ich M

Seward St

Batavia Ave

W 7th St N ry

Manhattan Ave

Fremont St

St

Melrose Ave

ne

N 7th St

St

Shaw

n Ta

176

en

P

White Ave

n Va

r Wate City

tr on C olluti

yD r

Dr

rR

Clark St

Clark St

48

Ln

Bun n

James St

Floo d

ve Ri

n Ln Gorma

wa t

er

Dr

176

Map 10: Transporation Systems

LEGEND BOA Boundary

Neighborhood #1

City of Fulton

Neighborhood #2

Adjacent Towns

Neighborhood #3

Parcel

Neighborhood #4

Body of Water

Neighborhood #5

Limited Access Highway State, County & Local Roads Railroads

Brownfields Opportunity Area

CITY OF FULTON OSWEGO COUNTY, NEW YORK

0

0.125

0.25

This document was prepared with funds provided under the Brownfields Opportunity Area Program. Produced for Planning Purposes Only. Data provided by: Oswego County, Department of Planning & Development. Accuracy or completeness is not guaranteed. Last Modified 2-24-10 Project # 28052

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Fulton BOA Nomination Study

Cycling/ Pedestrian With a traditional street grid pattern, and a relatively small boundary (4.8 sq miles), the City of Fulton could easily be considered a walkable community. The City currently provides sidewalk access to portions of local roads, and continues to improve pedestrian accessibility to all parts of the City. Downtown along the eastside of the waterfront in the BOA Study Area, the City has installed kiosks, directing pedestrian traffic to businesses and institutions throughout downtown. This shows recognition of the growing importance of creating a walkable, pedestrian friendly downtown area for residents and tourists. The City of Fulton currently is lacking any bicycle infrastructure, such as bicycle lanes, signage, and bicycle racks. This is an issue that the City should address as it continues improving access to the waterfront and the City as a whole. The North First Street Riverwalk Plan details strategies to revitalize the eastern side of the Oswego Riverfront through creation of a biking/walking trail running parallel to the water. In addition, the 2003 City of Fulton Comprehensive Plan identified a system of potential bike lanes and pedestrian trails throughout Fulton that would connect the Canal to Lake Neatahwanta and the surrounding neighborhoods. The City should continue building this type of infrastructure, and identifying funding opportunities to expand pedestrian and bicycle friendly trails/paths into adjoining residential neighborhoods to create a complete non-motorized transportation network for residents and tourists. Airports The City of Fulton is located near two (2) airports, the Hancock International Airport and the Oswego County Airport.9 The Hancock International Airport is owned and operated by the City of Syracuse. It is located less than 30 miles from the City of Fulton, accessible from Interstate 81, and is a major regional airport. Air travel is provided by seven major airlines, and several smaller commuter and charter planes. The City of Syracuse is currently engaging in several plans to increase passengers and daily flights to and from the airport, in an effort to better serve areas such as the City of Fulton.

9

All airport information was obtained from Oswego County Airport and Hancock International Airport websites

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The Oswego County Airport is located in the Town of Volney, less than a few miles northeast from downtown Fulton. The Oswego County Airport serves smaller charter and locally bound planes throughout central New York, linking Oswego County with larger regional airports, such as Hancock International Airport. The airport handles approximately 25,000 aircraft take offs and landings per year, with two (2) runways, 31 hangar stalls, and a new Instrument Landing System (ILS). Over the last 20 years, the Airport has been expanded by Oswego County. Realizing the value of this asset, the County has made every effort in recent years to modernize the facilities and ensure proper maintenance of the runways. The airport has partnered with the Cayuga Community College (CCC) and BOCES to provide a Joint Aeronautical College Degree Program. This is part of an ongoing effort to market the airport as a training facility that offers a complete flight school for less experienced pilots. In addition to the airport itself, there are approximately 170 acres of land available on-site for industrial development. This site has excellent potential for manufacturing or service companies, which may find close proximity to air transport service advantageous. The City of Fulton would benefit from the location of new businesses to the airport because of its close proximity, and has a vested interest in the further development of the facilities and services. Public Transportation The City of Fulton receives bus transportation service from Centro, which is a regional central New York company that provides transportation services to local and regional destinations, including the City of Syracuse, Oswego County, and the City of Utica.10 In 2006, The American Public Transportation System voted Centro “America’s Best Midsized Transit System.” Centro’s Fulton service operates on weekdays and Saturdays. It runs on a single route in both directions, and provides service to both sides of the City, crossing the Oswego River at the Broadway Bridge. Centro also provides an Oswego-Fulton-Phoenix-Syracuse bus service available seven days a week, connecting Fulton to the City of Oswego, including SUNY Oswego, and the City of Syracuse, including Syracuse University. The City of Fulton is also served by Oswego County Opportunities (OCO), which provides safe, affordable public transportation to all County residents, especially assisting target of economically and physically disadvantaged persons.11 OCO offers numerous transportation programs that allow residents the option to choose public transit as a viable means of transportation. Some of the programs that OCO offers include, Non-Emergency Medical Transport, Call-N-Ride, and Retired Individuals Driving the Elderly Services (RIDE). Currently

10 11

All information on Centro was obtained from Centro, Inc.’s website All information obtained from OCO website

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OCO operates approximately 40 buses, with several major routes within the City of Fulton and Oswego County. Through partnerships with New York State, forged by the Oswego County Transportation Coalition, OCO recently expanded their services to cover an even larger geographic area, and provide increasingly convenient bus routes and schedules to its patrons. With the formation of Oswego County Public Transit (OPT), a division of OCO, residents are now able to access a comprehensive bus service that travels throughout urban, suburban, and rural areas in Oswego County. OPT currently offers twelve (12) bus routes that allow easy transfers to existing OCO and Centro transit lines, with the option of personal pick-up within one mile of a standard bus stop. The City of Fulton has recently begun studying the possibility of constructing a state of the art transportation facility in the downtown area. The facility would serve as the transportation hub for Oswego County, linking all organizations and agencies that provide public transit in one central location. The result would be a one-call, one-stop destination for multi-modal transportation, including waiting areas, bus terminals, and both indoor and outdoor directories for residents and tourists. This facility would be an excellent opportunity to develop a transit oriented development style neighborhood. This type of development has become increasingly popular among urban residents, and has shown to cause increased property values to adjacent buildings and houses. Many cities are using public transportation infrastructure as a tool for economic development, and Fulton should continue studying available transportation funding mechanisms to subsidize the overall cost of the projects infrastructure.

Infrastructure Approximately 40% of the City’s water and sewer mains date as far back as 1885, when it was operated by the Fulton Water Works. This aging infrastructure is the root of many modern day problems due to the smaller pipes used during this earlier time period. Currently, there are no items on the capital budget itemized for water and sewer system upgrades. The City is heavily reliant on State and Federal grants for infrastructure updates. Despite problems with delivery, the City and the BOA Study Area have a plentiful supply of fresh water for residents and businesses. In general, the BOA Study Area is well served by public infrastructure. Future redevelopment of the strategic sites in the Study Area may necessitate minor upgrades to supply mains depending on the proposed redevelopment scenario. However, each site should be adequately served with minimal constraints to development. Section III. Analysis of the Proposed Brownfield Opportunity Area March 2010

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Fulton BOA Nomination Study

Public Water Supply Fulton has an extensive water system with mostly 8-inch diameter pipes providing service to approximately 12,900 users in the water service area, which extends beyond City limits. The modern standard for pipe size is a minimum of an 8-inch diameter, which allows for a more manageable flow of water through the system. The City has successfully upgraded its water supply system whenever possible, replacing the original four-inch diameter pipes. The City of Fulton has an abundance of available groundwater. The main sources for water in the City are the Great Bear Springs, which produce approximately 1.6 million gallons per day. Also water resources are provided by Lake Ontario, and three wells near the banks of the Oswego River. The wells near the Oswego River were contaminated by an accidental spill caused by the Miller Brewing Company, thus forcing the City to clean the water prior to delivery. The water delivered from Lake Ontario is made available from the Onondaga County Water Authority, which has the ability to supply much more water to Fulton if needed in the future. Public Sewer Disposal In the 1980’s the City upgraded its sanitary sewer system with 60 miles of piping, numerous manholes, and pumping stations that transmit wastewater to the Wastewater Treatment Plant.12 This project was paid for entirely by an $8 million bond taken out by the City, resulting in higher than desired sewer rates for residents and businesses. Today, the entire City is serviced by public sewer. The City should continue to investigate the potential for upgrading hook-ups and improving the efficiency of service to new infill developments. Stormwater Management The City of Fulton currently has a conventional urban stormwater management system, which catches stormwater on curbside drainage basins. These basins are connected to underground pipes that carry the stormwater into surrounding streams, river, and lake discharge points. The City will need to comply with modern Phase II stormwater regulations, which require municipalities to “clean” stormwater prior to release in natural water systems. The City should investigate the possibility for implementation of any new green building practices into the upgraded system, which incorporate natural stormwater management processes. These practices include swales and retention ponds, using site stormwater as irrigation, and providing municipally reclaimed stormwater for irrigation through the construction of additional infrastructure.

12

City of Fulton Comprehensive Plan, 2003

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481

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Kimball Ave

nd D r

a Av e Flor id

N 8th St

a

St

Mar yla

N 6th St

t st S N1

St

Ut ic

St

t sS

Tower

Dr

Foxwood

S6 th St St

St

St

sS

St

on Ly

t

Pl

Cu rt

sha

Ba k

em

an

St

ak tw Li

r Pe

t

Ave

tS Bu r

481

57

nS t

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e Rd

Whitcomb Rd

s re Fo

E

dge

Ed

ge

te wa r rD

S Pollard Dr

Dr

Ell e

McCollum Dr

N Pollard Dr

Riverview

Patrick Cir

Baldwin Ave

WE

Morin Dr

ve tA

Dr

r ll D

dg Ri

Dr

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In g

o ers

Dr

481

57

r gD

t S

Dr

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W4

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Fra n

se

Pr im

Ne stl e

Av e

Av e

Old e

St

t nS

St

un

ee Gr

n

Ha rro

St

ne De

am

t

kh Wic

th S

t St

lor

ro

Ta y

Av e

Ave

W6

Electric and Gas Supply

le A ve

h Jo

Rowlee Ave

Telephone Supply

Ma p

St

St

s

t

Government Parking Lot Water Supply

y Fa

t

Oswego River

t St

Government Building Private Parking Lot

nS

n

S on Ly

t

l nu Wa

Infrastructure Lake Neatahwanta

io Un

io Un

St

t S

k Par

ve ll A

Rd

dwe

ore

a Bro

es h Lak

nu est Ch

rS

t

Cricket Ln

th

St

nd

rd S

t

kS Oa

sS

Wildwood Ave

rts

t

n isio Div

on Ly St

eA ve

a Ev

tS

S5

at Pr

St

rid g

Ave

th

th

t eS

W2

W3

t S

th S

e Pin

Oa k

S7

S4

St

St

St

t S th S

W7

t

rd

st

ve

th S W6

hS

t Sta

eA

W5 ee

t sS

rk Pa

S3

S1

t

id ers Riv

hS

da Ce

Railroad Service

E 11th St

t

St

c Bee

Dr

W ell

S 8th St

dS

Olde Maple Ave

l an

y wa

h Hig

t

t yS

E Broadway

th S

em

Gilbert St

S 12

St

lo So

ad Ac

e Av

ter St

Buffalo

is S t

W 6th St

Hubbard

Atlantic Ave

St

ry Eme

W 3rd St N

th

St

W 5th St N

12

h

W 5th St

S

3

lH l

t 11

W 6th St N

to

e Av

S

W 8th St N

Dr

St

s Roche

St

iew

Mall

S 6th

l

gg

rh Voo

y wa

wa t

er

Dr

176

Map 11: Infrastructure & Utilities

LEGEND BOA Boundary

Neighborhood #1

City of Fulton

Neighborhood #2

Adjacent Towns

Neighborhood #3

Parcel

Neighborhood #4

Body of Water

Neighborhood #5

Limited Access Highway

Br is

3

N 8th

St

e Av ll P W

ge

Al y

S 5th

alv Can

t

s ti n Au

c Leit

ad

Vill a

Ra y

an

Rd

t Emery S

St Utica

St

lo Kel

Bro

da

g

St

er S

St uga Cay St l a Can

St

ve

N 5th

ing

ps

St

St

Irv rri Mo

lli Phi

a Senec

S 3rd

t Fos

t Jerome S

wA

St

Schuyler St

evie Lak

N 4th St

St

Gansvoort St

rt Ha

t Erie S

Wall St

Wor th

State, County & Local Roads

On ei

St

o Ontari

N 3rd

Walradt St

3

St in

Harrison St

Fulton Ave

Gille spie

ig ich M

Seward St

Batavia Ave

W 7th St N ry

Manhattan Ave

Fremont St

St

Melrose Ave

ne

N 7th St

St

Shaw

n Ta

176

en

P

White Ave

n Va

r Wate City

tr on C olluti

yD r

Dr

rR

Clark St

Clark St

48

Ln

Bun n

James St

Floo d

ve Ri

n Ln Gorma

Brownfields Opportunity Area

CITY OF FULTON OSWEGO COUNTY, NEW YORK

0

0.125

0.25

This document was prepared with funds provided under the Brownfields Opportunity Area Program. Produced for Planning Purposes Only. Data provided by: Oswego County, Department of Planning & Development. Accuracy or completeness is not guaranteed. Last Modified 2-24-10 Project # 28052

0.5 Miles

Fulton BOA Nomination Study

Natural Resources and Environmental Features The City of Fulton was originally settled around the Oswego River which was later improved to serve as the Oswego Canal. As the use of the Canal was transformed less as a means of commercial transportation and more into a recreational amenity, the City began to capitalize on its assets by developing boating infrastructure and waterfront parks. The development of this infrastructure was determined by the environmental features that affect urban construction, such as water access and quality, wetlands, floodplains, and soil type. Water Resources There are plenty of surface water resources for Fulton residents located within the City. Lake Neatahwanta, which is approximately 1.2 sq. miles, is located along the southwestern border of the City. In addition, approximately 3.4 miles of the Oswego River bisects the center of the City and provides opportunities for recreation and commerce. Under New York State’s Environmental Conservation Law (ECL), Title 5 of Article 15, certain waters in the State are protected on the basis of their classification.13 All water bodies in the state (lakes, rivers, streams, and ponds) are assigned a water quality classification based on existing, or expected best usage. There are eight (8) surface water classifications, with Class A being the highest standard, and suitable for drinking water. Streams and small water bodies located in the course of a surface water body that are designated as Class C or higher, are collectively referred to as “protected streams.” The City of Fulton has several water bodies, including streams, rivers and tributaries that are classified as Class C; these waters are suitable for fish propagation and survival and may warrant primary and secondary contact recreation. Both the Oswego River and Lake Neatahwanta are classified as Class B or optimal as primary and secondary recreation and fishing. These classifications further exemplify the City’s clean water and allow both residents and tourists enjoyment of the River. Several of the BOA Study Area neighborhoods are directly adjacent to the Oswego Canal, including Neighborhoods #1, 3, and 4. These neighborhoods provide opportunities for future access to water-based recreational activity, such as the Canal Towpath Trail that the City recently designed.

13

U.S. EPA: www.epa.gov/waterscience/standards/wqslibrary/ny/ny_2_water_quality_reg.pdf

Section III. Analysis of the Proposed Brownfield Opportunity Area March 2010

82

Fulton BOA Nomination Study

Wetlands Both the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have designated wetlands in the City. However, such State and Federal wetlands are limited within the City of Fulton municipal boundaries, as most are located around Lake Neatahwanta and to the west of the City. The small wetlands that are located within the City are focused on the west side, with small areas along the eastern riverfront, located within the BOA Study Area. See Map 11A: Natural Resources – Wetlands & Agricultural Districts. Floodplains The City of Fulton contains four different floodplains as classified by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Zones A, AE, AO, and X500. All of these floodplains, less X500 are classified as 100-year floodplains, with X500 being a 500-year floodplain. Zone AO is a 100year shallow flooding area with depths of one to three feet. Zone X500 is the base area, or sealevel area of a floodplain, and is prone to 500-year flooding with depths of less than one foot, or with drainage areas less than one square mile. The BOA Study Area Neighborhoods #4 and 5 contain zones AE, AO, and X500, with a four-block area defined by Seward Street, N 15 th Street, Ontario Street, and N Third Street covered by zone AO. See Map 12B: Natural Resources – Special Flood Hazard Areas. Soils The City of Fulton contains a variety of soil types with varying properties and characteristics. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, soil constrains are typically reflected by depth to bedrock and depth to the water table. Depth to bedrock is the distance from the surface of the soil to the upper surface of the rock layer. Depth of the seasonal high water table is the distance from the surface of the soil to the highest level that ground water or perched water reaches in the soil in most years. Studying soil types allows municipalities to understand how the land is best used, and how the land will drain when disturbed by impervious surfaces. Below is a summary of the six most frequent soils types found in the City of Fulton. •

Arkport Series: Amboy Very Fine Sandy Loam (AvB) consists of very deep, well-drained soils, with 2 to 6 percent slopes, and is an easily cultivated soil type.



Canandaigua Series: Canandaigua Silt Loam (Cd) consists of very deep and very poorly drained soils, and is common near lowland lake plains and in depression areas on glaciated uplands.

Section III. Analysis of the Proposed Brownfield Opportunity Area March 2010

83

Fulton BOA Nomination Study



Hinckley Series: Hinckley Gravelly Loamy Sand (HkC) consists of very deep, excessively drained soils formed in water-sorted materials, with 8 to 15 percent slopes.



Braceville Series: Ira Gravelly Fine Loamy Sand (IrB) consists of a nearly level to moderately steep soil that is very deep, and well drained, with 0 to 25 percent slopes.



Raynham Series: Raynham Silt Loam (RaB) consists of very deep, poorly drained soils, has 0 to 6 percent slopes, and is common in depressions and drainage ways.



Middlbury Series: Middlebury Loam (Mf) is typically found in flood plains and consists of very deep soils with 0 to 3 percent slopes.

The most common soil classification within the City of Fulton is Urban Land (UB). This soil type covers the entire western riverfront and expands further west. Urban Land is a common soil classification for more developed, urbane areas, whose soils have been disturbed by the construction of roads, parking lots, housing, factories, railroad yards, churches, and commercial properties. The most common soil type found in the Study Area consists of the Arkport Series (AvC3), which is well drained and good for development. This soil type is great for development, and should not present significant obstacles during construction within the BOA Study Area, particularly BOA Study Area neighborhoods #1, 3, and 4. Map 12C: Natural Resources - Soils shows all of the different soil types located in the City of Fulton and the BOA Study Area. Fish and Wildlife Habitats Under the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Department of Interior, Fish and Wildlife Services determines if a species is to be labeled endangered, and if so, which environments are essential towards preserving the species. The Bald Eagle, Bog Turtle, Indiana Bat, and Piping Plover are all U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service federally listed endangered and threatened species located in Oswego County 6 . Also, Oswego County is listed as a “critical habitat” for the Piping Plover. Being labeled as a “critical habitat” protects certain terrains and locations from specific types of development potential because they are part of a small group of areas that are still habitable for certain endangered species. As these species become more threatened, it is more important to protect these unique habitats. All future development within the BOA Study Area should be sensitive to these habitats and provide detailed studies of any potential harm or damage caused by proposed construction.

6

http://www.fws.gov/northeast/nyfo/es/ColistCurrent

Section III. Analysis of the Proposed Brownfield Opportunity Area March 2010

84

481

d

r Bu

Kimball Ave

nd D r

a Av e Flor id

N 8th St

St

a

St

th

Mar yla

N 6th St

t st S N1

St

Ut ic

Hubbard

Atlantic Ave

12

ry Eme

h St

t sS

Tower E 11th St

t

Dr

Foxwood

S6

St

th St St

th St

St

nS

t

St

ple

Ave

t

Av e

Ma

tS Bu r

Pr im

Ne stl e

Av e

Harris St

un

St

t nS

n

Pl

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sha

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is S t

St

ne De

am

t

t St

kh Wic

th S

Ba k

em

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St

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481

57

481

r gD

t S

57 e Rd

Whitcomb Rd

s re Fo

E

dge

Ed

ge

te wa r rD

S Pollard Dr

Dr

McCollum Dr

N Pollard Dr

Riverview

Patrick Cir

Baldwin Ave

WE

Morin Dr

ve tA

Dr

r ll D

dg Ri

Dr

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y wle Fra

Dr

In g

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Dr

St

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se

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Ta y

Rowlee Ave

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Ma p

St

h Jo

Av e

s

t

Lake Neatahwanta

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t

Oswego River

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Ave

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t

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St

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S

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St

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t S

t

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t

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St

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W3

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t

St

st

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ve

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hS

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rd

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t

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Dr

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l an

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h Hig

t

t yS

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th S

em

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S 12

St

lo So

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e Av

ter St

Buffalo

S3

gg

St

W 5th St N

S

3

lH l

t 11

W 5th St

to

e Av

S

W 3rd St N

W 6th St

Dr

St

W 6th St N

Br is

3

N 8th

l W

iew

s Roche

St

alv Can

t

Mall

S 6th

e Av ll P

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St

St uga Cay St l a Can

s ti n Au

c Leit

ad

ge

Al y

an

Rd

t Emery S

St Utica

St

lo Kel

Bro

Vill a

Ra y

S 5th

er S

St

ve

da

g

St

ing

ps

N 5th

Irv rri Mo

lli Phi

St

St

t Fos

t Jerome S

rt Ha

a Senec

S 3rd

Schuyler St

wA

St

St

Gansvoort St

evie Lak

N 4th St

Wor th

t Erie S

Wall St

W 8th St N

On ei

St

o Ontari

N 3rd

Walradt St

3

St in

Harrison St

Fulton Ave

Gille spie

ig ich M

Seward St

Batavia Ave

W 7th St N ry

Manhattan Ave

Fremont St

St

Melrose Ave

ne

N 7th St

St

Shaw

n Ta

176

en

P

White Ave

n Va

r Wate City

tr on C olluti

yD r

Dr

rR

Clark St

Clark St

48

Ln

Bun n

James St

Floo d

ve Ri

n Ln Gorma

wa t

er

Dr

176

LEGEND BOA Boundary City of Fulton Adjacent Towns Parcel Body of Water Limited Access Highway State, County & Local Roads

Neighborhood #1 Neighborhood #2 Neighborhood #3 Neighborhood #4 Neighborhood #5 FLOOD ZONES

A - 1% annual chance of flooding AE - 1% annual chance of flooding AO - 1% annual chance of flooding X500 - 0.2% annual chance of flooding

Map 12A: Natural Resources Special Flood Hazard Areas Brownfields Opportunity Area

CITY OF FULTON OSWEGO COUNTY, NEW YORK

0

0.125

0.25

This document was prepared with funds provided under the Brownfields Opportunity Area Program. Produced for Planning Purposes Only. Data provided by: Oswego County, Department of Planning & Development. Accuracy or completeness is not guaranteed. Last Modified 2-24-10 Project # 28052

0.5 Miles

481

d

r Bu

Kimball Ave

nd D r

a Av e Flor id

N 8th St

St

a

St

th

Mar yla

N 6th St

t st S N1

St

Ut ic

Hubbard

Atlantic Ave

12

ry Eme

h St

t sS

Tower E 11th St

t

Dr

Foxwood

S6

St

th St St

th St

St

nS

t

n

St

ple

Ave

t

Ma

Bu r

tS

se

Pr im

Ne stl e

Av e

Av e

Old e

Harris St

un

St

t nS

Pl

Cu rt

sha

Ba k

em

e Pierc

an

St

ak tw Li

W4 r Pe

481

57

481

r gD

t S

57 e Rd

Whitcomb Rd

s re Fo

E

dge

Ed

ge

te wa r rD

S Pollard Dr

Dr

McCollum Dr

N Pollard Dr

Riverview

Patrick Cir

Baldwin Ave

WE

Morin Dr

ve tA

Dr

r ll D

dg Ri

Dr

Ell e

nS t

y we De

y wle Fra

Dr

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St

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Ha rro

ee Gr

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St

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am

t

kh Wic

th S

t St

lor

ro

Ta y

Rowlee Ave

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St

h Jo

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s

t

Lake Neatahwanta

Fra n

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t

Oswego River

t St l nu Wa

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St

Ave

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t

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St

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n

S

k Par

ve ll A

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Wildwood Ave

rts

th

St

io Un

St

t S

t

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on Ly St

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a Ev

t

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St

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S4

St at Pr

nd

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t S

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t eS

W2

W3

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t

St

st

t S

t sS

ve

th S W6

hS

t Sta

eA

W5 ee

rd

S1

t

id ers Riv

hS

rh Voo

c Bee

Dr

W ell

S 8th St

dS

Olde Maple Ave

l an

y wa

h Hig

t

t yS

E Broadway

th S

em

Gilbert St

S 12

St

lo So

ad Ac

e Av

ter St

Buffalo

S3

gg

St

W 5th St N

S

3

lH l

t 11

W 5th St

to

e Av

S

W 3rd St N

W 6th St

Dr

St

W 6th St N

Br is

3

N 8th

l W

iew

s Roche

St

alv Can

t

Mall

S 6th

e Av ll P

y wa

St

St uga Cay St l a Can

s ti n Au

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ad

ge

Al y

an

Rd

t Emery S

St Utica

St

lo Kel

Bro

Vill a

Ra y

S 5th

er S

St

ve

da

g

St

ing

ps

N 5th

Irv rri Mo

lli Phi

St

St

t Fos

t Jerome S

rt Ha

a Senec

S 3rd

Schuyler St

wA

St

St

Gansvoort St

evie Lak

N 4th St

Wor th

t Erie S

Wall St

W 8th St N

On ei

St

o Ontari

N 3rd

Walradt St

3

St in

Harrison St

Fulton Ave

Gille spie

ig ich M

Seward St

Batavia Ave

W 7th St N ry

Manhattan Ave

Fremont St

St

Melrose Ave

ne

N 7th St

St

Shaw

n Ta

176

en

P

White Ave

n Va

r Wate City

tr on C olluti

yD r

Dr

rR

Clark St

Clark St

48

Ln

Bun n

James St

Floo d

ve Ri

n Ln Gorma

wa t

er

Dr

176

LEGEND

Neighborhood #1

BOA Boundary

Neighborhood #2

City of Fulton

Neighborhood #3

Adjacent Towns

Neighborhood #4

Parcel

Neighborhood #5

Body of Water

NWI Wetland

Limited Access Highway

NYSDEC Wetland

State, County & Local Roads

Agricultural District

Map 12B: Natural Resources Wetlands & Agricultural Districts Brownfields Opportunity Area

CITY OF FULTON OSWEGO COUNTY, NEW YORK

0

0.125

0.25

This document was prepared with funds provided under the Brownfields Opportunity Area Program. Produced for Planning Purposes Only. Data provided by: Oswego County, Department of Planning & Development. Accuracy or completeness is not guaranteed. Last Modified 2-24-10 Project # 28052

0.5 Miles

481

r Bu

Kimball Ave

r nd D

e

St

St

a

St

Ma r yla

N 6th St

st St N1

a Av Flor id

N 8th St

th

Ut ic

ry Eme

W 3rd St N

12

h St

l an

t

Tower

E 11th St

t

Dr

Foxwood

S6

St

th St St

th St

St

sS

St

on Ly

t nS

y Fa

Ma p

St

le A ve

n St h Jo

Pl

Cu rt

sha

Ba k

t

em

an

St

ak tw Li

W4 r Pe

t Bu r

481

gD

t

r

57 e Rd

Whitcomb Rd

s re Fo E

dge

Ed

ge

te wa r rD

S Pollard Dr

Dr

nS Ell e

McCollum Dr

N Pollard Dr

Riverview

Patrick Cir

Baldwin Ave

WE

Morin Dr

ve tA

r ll D

dg Ri

Dr

Dr

In g

o ers

Dr

481

57

y we De

ley

Dr

w Fra

ers

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Ave

St

in sh

t S th S w Po

klin

pl e

Harris St

e Pierc

Rowlee Ave

Fra n

Ma

tS

se

Pr im

Ne stl e

Av e

Av e

Old e

St

t

St

un

nS

n

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ee Gr

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St

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am

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t

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l nu Wa

rS

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nu est Ch

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t

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th

St

nd

rd S k Par

ll A

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ore

a Bro

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t

n isio Div

on Ly St

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tS

S5

at Pr

St

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Ave

th

S4

St

t eS

W2

W3

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St

st

t S th S

t th S

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hS

t Sta

ve eA

W5 ee

rd

S1

t

id ers Riv

hS

rh Voo

c Bee

Dr

W el l sS

S 8th St

dS

y wa

h Hig

Olde Maple Ave

t

E Broadway

t th S

yS

Gilbert St

S 12

St

lo So

em

S3

gg

St

W 5th St

S

3

lH l

t 11

W 5th St N

Hubbard

Atlantic Ave

W 6th St

to

e Av

S

W 6th St N

Dr

St

W 8th St N

Br is

3

N 8th

St

ter St

Buffalo

ad Ac

e Av

w

at

er

Dr

176

Map 12C: Natural Resources Soils

LEGEND BOA Boundary

Neighborhood #1

City of Fulton

Neighborhood #2

Adjacent Towns

Neighborhood #3

Parcel

Neighborhood #4

Body of Water

Neighborhood #5

Limited Access Highway

iew

s Roche

St

alv Can

t

Mall

S 6th

St uga Cay St l a Can

s ti n Au

W6

W

y wa

St

l ll P

Soils AvB AvC3 AwC3 CHD HW IrA Lake Neatahwanta IrB IsC Mf ScB SgC WIA WIB w

ad

ge

Al y

S 5th

er S

c Leit

Br o

Vill a

Ra y

an

Rd

t Emery S

St Utica

St

lo Kel

Ave

da

g

St

e Av ps

N 5th

ing

rri Mo

lli Phi

St

St

Irv

rt Ha

a Senec

S 3rd

t Fos

t

ew

St

Schuyler St

ev i Lak

N 4th

St

St

Gansvoort St

Jerome S

t Erie S

Wall St

Wor th

State, County & Local Roads

On ei

St

o Ontari

N 3rd

Walradt St

3

St in

Harrison St

Fulton Ave

Gille spie

ig ich M

Seward St

Batavia Ave

W 7th St N ry

Manhattan Ave

Fremont St

St

Melrose Ave

ne

N 7th St

St

Shaw

n Ta

176

en

Poll

White Ave

n Va

r Wate City

Ctr ution

yD r

Dr

d rR

Clark St

Clark St

48

Ln

Bun n

James St

Floo d

Ln

ve Ri

n Gorma

Brownfields Opportunity Area

CITY OF FULTON OSWEGO COUNTY, NEW YORK

0

0.125

0.25

This document was prepared with funds provided under the Brownfields Opportunity Area Program. Produced for Planning Purposes Only. Data provided by: Oswego County, Department of Planning & Development. Accuracy or completeness is not guaranteed. Last Modified 3-3-10 Project # 28052

0.5 Miles

Fulton BOA Nomination Study

Building Inventory Analysis of Key Buildings Summary to be prepared as part of the Fulton Phase II BOA Nomination Study.

Strategic Sites Selection Process of Strategic Sites Summary to be prepared as part of the Fulton Phase II BOA Nomination Study. Identification Factors of Strategic Sites Summary to be prepared as part of the Fulton Phase II BOA Nomination Study.

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Economic & Market Trends Analysis Socioeconomic Profile The demographic and socioeconomic profile presents a range of quantitative data on the City of Fulton, the proposed Fulton BOA Study Area, and Oswego County. This data provides a brief analysis of trends that impact the area under study and will allow the City to better understand the socioeconomic issues that it is currently combating. The Phase II Nomination Study will expand upon this initial data analysis to provide a complete Economic and Market Trends Analysis used to identify business attraction and retention possibilities within the BOA Study Area. The data used in this report was compiled from multiple sources, including the U.S. Census Bureau and the NYS Department of Labor. In addition, demographic, socioeconomic and retail sales data was purchased from ESRI, a leading national provider of market information. ESRI prepares demographic updates and projections based on federal data sources, and offers retail market data derived from public and proprietary sources at varying levels of geography.

Socioeconomic Highlights: •

While the City has lost population, Census Tract 211.02, the southern portion of the BOA Study Area has stabilized, and is maintaining its overall population.



The population in Fulton is aging, which provides an opportunity for young families to find employment opportunities in the job sectors that the 55-64 age cohort once held.



The aging population also provides an opportunity for the City of Fulton to capitalize as a walkable community friendly towards seniors and retirees.



With a high unemployment rate, a proven workforce, and a low cost of living, the City of Fulton provides an excellent opportunity for available employees that may help attract new employment opportunities. These potential employers should be focused towards properties located in the BOA Study Area.

Proposed Fulton Brownfield Opportunity Area (BOA) The boundaries of the proposed Fulton BOA roughly correspond with Census Tracts (CT) 211.01 and 211.02 on the east side of the Oswego River. CT 211.01 covers all of the area north of the bridge crossing, while CT 211.02 extends southward from the bridge to the City line. This area is characterized by significant levels of socioeconomic distress relative to the City of Fulton overall and Oswego County. As shown in Table 14: Levels of Economic Distress, rates of poverty and unemployment in CT 211.01 and 211.02 were higher than those in the City, County, Section III. Analysis of the Proposed Brownfield Opportunity Area March 2010

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or region in 2000. CT 211.01 had a median household income that was 38% less than the median for Oswego County, while the median household income in CT 211.02 was 48% less. Special tabulations from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) indicate that 54.6% of Fulton residents in 2000 were in low and moderate income households, with incomes at or below 80% of the area median. Within Census Tracts 211.01 and 211.02, the percentages were 62.1% and 62.8%, respectively. The rate for Oswego County overall was 47.2%. Additional data on Census Tracts 211.01 and 211.02 is provided in subsequent sections of this report. Table 14: Levels of Economic Distress Median Household Market Area Income Census Tract 211.01 Census Tract 211.02 City of Fulton Oswego County Syracuse MSA

$ 26,989 $ 24,855 $ 29,018 $ 36,598 $ 40,051

Per Capita Income

Poverty Rate

Unemployment Rate

$ 13,130 $ 17,688 $ 16,133 $ 16,853 $ 20,254

24.4% 27.8% 19.3% 14.0% 12.1%

13.4% 10.8% 9.2% 9.3% 6.2%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Population Trends

4,000 Population

Since 1990, the two Census Tracts that roughly correspond to the proposed Fulton BOA have experienced a decline in population. In fact, CT 211.01 and CT 211.02 accounted for 63% of the overall population decline in the City of Fulton between 1990 and 2000.

5,000 4,324

3,000 2,000

2,573

3,950

3,784

3,728

2,277

2,272

2,269

1,000 1990

2000

2008 (est.) 2013 (proj.) Year

Census Tract 211.01

Census Tract 211.02 Current estimates of population from ESRI suggest that the number of residents in CT Figure 6: Population Change (Census Tract) 211.02, the southern portion of the proposed BOA, has stabilized. This is not the case with the CT 211.01, however, which continues to lose population.

In contrast to the City of Fulton, Oswego County has experienced a moderate increase in population since 1990. By 2012, Oswego County is projected to reach 125,000 residents. Based on the approximately 2,485 seasonal homes on the assessment rolls and an average household size of 2.54 persons, Oswego County’s population is supplemented by an estimated 6,300 part-time residents during the summer months. This does not include overnight visitors staying in one of the nearly 1,200 lodging rooms or at local campgrounds in the County. These seasonal residents impact the housing market and represent a potential target market for retail and recreational uses.

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Table 15: Market Area Population summarizes the population trends in the two BOA census tracts, the City of Fulton, Oswego County, and the Syracuse Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) from 1990 projected to 2013. 126,000

14,000

125,660

124,000

13,000

124,881 Population

Population

125,000

123,000 122,000 121,000

122,377 121,771

12,929 12,000 11,855

11,673

11,000

11,608

120,000 10,000

119,000 1990

2000

1990

2008 (est.) 2013 (proj.)

2000

2008 (est.) 2013 (proj.) Year

Year

City of Fulton

Oswego County

Figure 7: Population Change (City of Fulton)

Figure 8: Population Change (Oswego County)

Table 15: Market Area Population Market Area Population Market Area Census Tract 211.01 Census Tract 211.02 City of Fulton Oswego County Syracuse MSA

1990 4,324 2,573 12,929 121,771 659,864

2000 3,950 2,277 11,855 122,377 650,154

2008 (est.) 3,784 2,272 11,673 124,881 653,519

2013 (proj.) 3,728 2,269 11,608 125,660 654,551

% Change 1990-2000 -8.6% -11.5% -8.3% 0.5% -1.5%

2000-08 -4.2% -0.2% -1.5% 2.0% 0.5%

2008-13 -1.5% -0.1% -0.6% 0.6% 0.2%

Source: ESRI, U.S. Census Bureau, and E.M. Pemrick and Company. Population by Age

Based on estimates of population from ESRI, persons under age 20 currently make up the largest segment of the total population in both the City of Fulton (27.8%) and Oswego County (25.4%). This age cohort is projected to shrink slightly over the next five years, however. In contrast, the number of residents ages 55-64 and age 65 and over is projected to increase. This may have implications for the local workforce as individuals begin to retire. It will also contribute to the increased demand for health care services and access to various housing choices that allow older adults to maintain their independence.

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Estimated and Projected Age Distribution 100% 15.2%

15.8%

80%

10.0%

11.9%

70%

13.7%

90%

12.1%

13.1%

11.5%

13.3%

65 and over 55 - 64

15.4%

13.2%

15.5%

60%

45 - 54 35 - 44

12.8%

11.6%

13.5%

11.8%

40%

13.1%

13.4%

12.0%

12.4%

30%

7.4%

7.5%

8.7%

8.5%

27.8%

26.6%

26.8%

25.4%

50%

25 - 34 20 - 24 < Age 20

20% 10% 0% 2008 (est)

2013 (proj) 2008 (est)

City of Fulton

2013 (proj)

Oswego County

Figure 9: Estimated & Projected Age Distribution

Table 16: Market Area Median Age % Change 2000-08 2008-13

Market Area

2000

2008

2013

Census Tract 211.01

32.2

32.3

32.9

0.3%

1.9%

Census Tract 211.02

35.6

37.4

38.4

5.1%

2.7%

City of Fulton

35.5

36.5

37.3

2.8%

2.2%

Oswego County

35.0

37.0

38.1

5.7%

3.0%

Syracuse MSA

36.0

38.1

39.0

5.8%

2.4%

Source: ESRI, U.S. Census Bureau, and E.M. Pemrick and Company.

Households Change in the number of households can impact the overall demand for housing in a community. Table 17: Market Area Households compares the number of households in the two BOA census tracts, the City of Fulton, Oswego County, and the Syracuse Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) from 1990 projected to 2013. As the table shows, virtually no change in the total number of households is projected for the City of Fulton over the next several years. Recent data on the distribution of households by type is not available. According to the 2000 Census, however, the City of Fulton had a total of 4,923 households, 60.4% of which were family households, including married-couple families and single parents with children; 39.6% were nonfamily households, comprised mostly of individuals living alone. Nearly 29% of the households in Section III. Analysis of the Proposed Brownfield Opportunity Area March 2010

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Fulton, compared with 22% of those in Oswego County and 24% in the Syracuse MSA, included an individual over age 65. As shown in Table 18: Market Area Average Household Size, the average number of persons per household in the City of Fulton was 2.38 in 2000 and an estimated 2.34 persons in 2008. These figures reflect a continuing trend toward smaller families and the increasing prevalence of single-person households – including households occupied by persons over age 65 – both locally and nationally over the past several decades. Table 17: Market Area Households Market Area Households % Change Market Area

Census Tract 211.01 Census Tract 211.02 City of Fulton Oswego County Syracuse MSA

1990

1,731 1,055 5,235 42,347 243,972

2000

1,578 959 4,923 45,522 252,043

2008 (est.)

2013 (proj.)

1,529 964 4,923 47,274 259,276

1,516 970 4,934 48,028 261,692

1990-2000

2000-08

2008-13

-8.8% -9.1% -6.0% 7.5% 3.3%

-3.1% 0.5% 0.0% 3.8% 2.9%

-0.9% 0.6% 0.2% 1.6% 0.9%

Source: ESRI, U.S. Census Bureau, and E.M. Pemrick and Company.

Table 18: Market Area Average Household Size Market Area Average Household Size % Change Market Area

1990

Census Tract 211.01 Census Tract 211.02 City of Fulton Oswego County Syracuse MSA

2.48 2.33 2.44 2.76 2.60

2000

2.48 2.27 2.38 2.60 2.49

2008 (est.)

2013 (proj.)

2.45 2.23 2.34 2.54 2.43

2.43 2.22 2.32 2.52 2.41

1990-2000

0.0% -2.6% -2.5% -5.8% -4.2%

2000-08

2008-13

-1.2% -1.8% -1.7% -2.3% -2.4%

-0.8% -0.4% -0.9% -0.8% -0.8%

Source: ESRI, U.S. Census Bureau, and E.M. Pemrick and Company.

Income Levels Median Household Income $70,000

Personal income is one of the most important indicators of the economy. Understanding the income characteristics of the community is also important in determining a community's wealth as well as the ability of residents to maintain their housing, contribute to the local tax base, and participate in the economy.

$60,000 $50,000 $40,000 $30,000 $20,000 $10,000 $-

As shown in the top chart at right, income levels in the City of Fulton are low relative to the County and the region. In 2008, for example,

1990

2000

2008 (est.)

2013 (proj.)

Year

Census Tract 211.01

Census Tract 211.02

Oswego County

Syracuse MSA

City of Fulton

Figure 10: Median Household Income Section III. Analysis of the Proposed Brownfield Opportunity Area March 2010

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the estimated median household income in the City of Fulton was $37,783, versus $45,652 in Oswego County and $51,085 in the Syracuse MSA. The projected household income for 2013 shows a continuation of trends from 1990 and 2000, with the median household income in Fulton, $43,933, remaining well below that of Oswego County ($52,906) or the Syracuse MSA ($59,681).

Per Capita Income $35,000 $30,000 $25,000 $20,000 $15,000 $10,000 $5,000 $1990

2000

2008 (est.)

2013 (proj.)

Year

Census Tract 211.01

Census Tract 211.02

City of Fulton

Oswego County Syracuse MSA The per capita income is the mean (average) Figure 11: Per Capita Income income computed for every man, woman, and child. The per capita income in Fulton in 2000 ($16,133) is nearly identical to that of Oswego County ($16,853), but still about 80% of the regional per capita figure.

Educational Attainment The chart below presents the highest level of educational attainment among persons age 25 and older in the two BOA census tracts, the City of Fulton, Oswego County, and the Syracuse MSA. As the chart indicates, significant proportions of individuals living within the proposed BOA lack a high school diploma, and are not prepared for the “knowledge economy” jobs of the future. Most adults in the City of Fulton overall have at least a high school diploma, with 12% achieving a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Educational Attainment, Persons Age 25+, 2008 Syracuse MSA

26%

Oswego County

15%

City of Fulton

12%

Census Tract 211.02

13%

Census Tract 211.01

7%

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

Less than High School Diploma

High School Diploma

Some College / Associate's Degree

Bachelor's Degree or Higher

100%

Figure 12: Educational Attainment, Persons 25+, 2008

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Resident Labor Force The Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS) program of the NYS Department of Labor provides the most up-to-date estimates of persons employed and unemployed by place of residence. The civilian labor force is comprised of individuals aged 16 and older, excluding those in the military, who are employed or actively looking for work. Since 1990, the size of the civilian labor force in Oswego County has ranged from a low of 57,200 in 1998 to a high of 60,300 in 2005-06. Today the County makes up 18.2% of the civilian labor force in the Syracuse MSA, up from 17.1% in 1990. Unemployment Trends Unemployment rates in Oswego County have been consistently higher than state and regional averages. As shown below, Oswego County faced double-digit rates of unemployment in the early 1990s; however, rates have generally been more moderate since then. Figures from the NYS Department of Labor indicate an unemployment rate of 6.6% in Oswego County, compared to 5.7% for the Syracuse MSA and 5.6% for New York in August 2008, the most recent month for which data are Resident Civilian Labor Force in the Syracuse MSA, 1990-2007 available 340.0 . Thousands

335.0

338 336

336 334

330.0

331

331 329 329

325.0

330 331

329 330 325 325

326 326

329

328

320.0 315.0

1990

1992

1994

1996

1998

2000

2002

2004

2006

Figure 13: Resident Civilian Labor Force in the Syracuse MSA, 1990-2007

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Thousands

Resident Civilian Labor Force in Oswego County, 1990-2007 61.0 60.5 60.0 60.3 60.3 59.5 59.9 60.0 59.9 59.0 59.3 58.5 58.8 58.8 58.0 58.3 58.1 57.5 58.0 57.9 57.7 57.0 57.5 57.5 57.3 57.3 57.2 56.5 56.0 55.5

1990

1992

1994

1996

1998

2000

2002

2004

2006

Figure 14: Resident Civilian Labor Force in Oswego County, 1990-2007 Annual Average Unemployment Rates 12.0

10.3 10.4 9.3

10.0 8.0

8.7 8.5 7.4

7.0 7.0

6.8

5.8

6.0

6.5

6.3 4.8

6.9

6.3

5.9

5.4

5.5

4.0 2.0 0.0 1990

1992

1994

1996

New York State

1998

2000

Syracuse MSA

2002

2004

2006

Oswego County

Figure 15: Annual Average Unemployment Rates Commutation Patterns Journey-to-work data from the U.S. Census Bureau show that of Fulton residents who were employed in 2000, 42.4% also worked in Fulton, while 23.5% worked elsewhere in Oswego County, including the City of Oswego. More than a quarter of Fulton residents worked in Onondaga County, in which the City of Syracuse is located. Looking at individuals who were working in the City of Fulton in 2000, the majority resided within Oswego County, including 27.1% in Fulton and 6.0% in Oswego. Relatively few of those employed in Fulton commuted into the City from Syracuse or elsewhere in Onondaga County.

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Where Fulton Residents Worked in 2000

City of Osw ego, 8.0%

Other Osw ego County location, 15.5%

City of Syracuse, 8.3%

Other Onondaga County location, 18.5% All other locations, 7.2%

City of Fulton, 42.4%

Where Fulton Workers Lived in 2000 Other Osw ego County location, 45.2%

Other Onondaga County location, 6.6%

City of Osw ego, 6.0% City of Syracuse, 1.9%

Figure 16: Place of Employment 2000

All other locations, 13.3% City of Fulton, 27.1%

Figure 17: Place of Residence 2000

Employment Trends The Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) Program includes all employment covered under unemployment insurance laws in New York. Only the self-employed, student workers, unpaid family workers, and some agricultural workers are excluded. Unlike the decennial Census and other sources of employment data, QCEW measures jobs by place of work, rather than place of residence. As shown in the top chart at right, average annual employment in Oswego County since 2000 peaked with 35,477 in 2002 and declined to 33,757 in 2006. The number of jobs has generally been stable with no major increases or decreases over the last several years. Private sector as a proportion of all employment in Oswego County also held steady at approximately 73%, compared to 82% in the Syracuse MSA overall.

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Average Annual Employment, Syracuse MSA

Average Annual Employment, Oswego County

370,000

37,000

350,000

35,000 33,000

34,402 34,630

35,477 35,162 34,314 34,253

330,000 308,614 305,962

33,757

31,000

310,000

29,000

290,000

27,000

25,038

25,697 25,665 25,607

24,925 24,792 24,488

25,000

270,000 256,244 253,501

301,069 300,175 301,390 303,715 303,164

247,388 246,868 248,345 250,368 249,749

250,000 230,000

23,000 2000

2001

2002

2003

Private Sector

2004

2005

2006

2000

Total Employment

Figure 18: Average Annual Employment, Oswego County

2001

2002

2003

Private Sector

2004

2005

2006

Total Employment

Figure 19: Average Annual Employment Syracuse MSA

Employment by Industry Table 19: Employment by Industry presents the total employment by major industry division in Oswego County in 2006, the most recent annual average data currently available. As the table indicates, of the 33,757 jobs in the County, 9,269 (27.5%) were in government, with about 1,500 positions at the State University of New York at Oswego; 4,380 jobs (13.0%) were in retail trade, and 4,348 (12.9%) were in health care and social assistance. Manufacturing, including the production of primary and fabricated metals, paper and printing, represented 10.5% of total employment. The County also averaged 3,161 jobs in accommodation and food services. Most other industries had a relatively modest presence with respect to employment, although power production, with more than 2,000 jobs, is considered one of the dominant sectors of the Oswego County economy.

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Table 19: Employment by Industry Employment by Industry, Oswego County, 2006 Description Total, Government Retail Trade Health Care and Social Assistance Manufacturing Accommodation and Food Services Utilities Construction Other Services Administrative and Waste Services Finance and Insurance Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services Transportation and Warehousing Wholesale Trade Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting Real Estate and Rental and Leasing Information Management of Companies and Enterprises Educational Services Mining Total, All Industries

Number 9,269 4,380 4,348 3,544 3,161 2,029 1,298 1,210 878 740 595 483 482 285 270 255 255 72 61 NA 33,757

Percent 27.5% 13.0% 12.9% 10.5% 9.4% 6.0% 3.8% 3.6% 2.6% 2.2% 1.8% 1.4% 1.4% 0.8% 0.8% 0.8% 0.8% 0.2% 0.2% NA 100%

Source: NYS Department of Labor and E.M. Pemrick and Company.

Employment Growth Trends Between 2002 and 2006, Oswego County experienced a net loss of 1,720 jobs, a decline of 4.8%. Several industry sectors gained employment during this period, however, including health care and social assistance (461 jobs), wholesale trade (89), and finance and insurance (68). Private industry segments with significant employment growth are shown in Table 20: Private Industry Segments with Significant Job Growth in Oswego County. Table 20: Private Industry Segments with Significant Job Growth in Oswego County Private Industry Segments With Significant Job Growth* in Oswego County, 2002-2006 Employment Description

HEALTH CARE & SOCIAL ASSISTANCE: Social Assistance HEALTH CARE & SOCIAL ASSISTANCE: Hospitals RETAIL TRADE: Building Material & Garden Supply Stores HEALTH CARE & SOCIAL ASSISTANCE: Nursing & Residential Care Facilities HEALTH CARE & SOCIAL ASSISTANCE: Ambulatory Health Care Services MANUFACTURING: Printing and Related Support Activities WHOLESALE TRADE: Merchant Wholesale, Nondurable Goods FINANCE & INSURANCE: Financial Investment & Related Activity

2002

856 1,015 254 923 1,095 --98 12

2006

Net Change

992 1,139 357 1,026 1,191 82 178 72

136 124 103 103 96 82 80 60

* Defined as net employment growth of 50 or more. Source: NYS Department of Labor and E.M. Pemrick and Company.

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Major Employers and Economic Drivers Major employers in Oswego County other than local government are presented in Table 8. The list includes several companies located in the City of Fulton: Huhtamaki Consumer Packaging, which produces paper packaging for the food industry; Oswego Industries, a private, not-for-profit rehabilitation program for adults with disabilities; Black Clawson, a machinery and equipment manufacturer; and Birds Eye frozen vegetable processor Agrilink Foods. Table 21: Major Employers in Oswego County Major Employers in Oswego County Company

State University of New York National Grid Alcan Rolled Products New York Power Authority Huhtamaki Packaging Oswego Hospital Verizon Communications Inc Oswego Industries Inc EMC Corporation Black Clawson Converting Machinery Agrilink Foods Vegetable Co Armstrong Industrial Specialties Metal Transportation Systems Fulton Boiler Works Inc Owens-Brockway Corp Sonoco Products Company Loretto Heights Oswego Wire Incorporated NRG Energy Hammermill Paper Co

Empt.

1,500 1,300 810 700 600 550 500 365 311 300 250 225 225 205 200 165 160 110 108 100

Industry

Services Utilities Manufacturing Utilities Manufacturing Services Communications Services Manufacturing Manufacturing Manufacturing Manufacturing Distribution Manufacturing Manufacturing Manufacturing Services Manufacturing Utilities Manufacturing

Source: National Grid, www.shovelready.com, 10/8/2008.

Other companies with employment of fifty or more in the City of Fulton include InterFace Solutions, a manufacturer of sealing systems and engineered composite materials; A.L. Lee Memorial Hospital, a private hospital; the Kenwell Corporation, which manufactures precision machined parts for the pump, HVAC, and aerospace industries; and Spear USA, a producer and supplier of pressure-sensitive labeling systems. Fulton also has a number of small companies engaged in precision machining, welding, and sheet metal work. Table 22: Largest Private Employers in Oswego County presents the largest private industries in the County based on employment. Restaurants and bars represent the County’s top employer, followed by utilities and food and beverage stores, which includes grocery stores. Many of the largest employers are in the health care sector, a growing segment of the economy for both Oswego County and the Syracuse region.

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Table 22: Largest Private Employers in Oswego County, 2006 Largest Private Employers in Oswego County, 2006 NAICS Code

722 221 445 621 622 331 623 624 238 322 561 452 441 813 551

Description

Food Services and Drinking Places Utilities Food and Beverage Stores Ambulatory Health Care Services Hospitals Primary Metal Manufacturing Nursing and Residential Care Facilities Social Assistance Specialty Trade Contractors Paper Manufacturing Administrative and Support Services General Merchandise Stores Motor Vehicle and Parts Dealers Membership Organizations & Associations Professional and Technical Services

Empt.

2,953 2,029 1,227 1,191 1,139 1,039 1,026 992 876 857 823 765 639 604 595

Source: NYS Department of Labor and E.M. Pemrick and Company.

Retail Sales and Market Potential Table 23 presents estimates of retail sales within the City of Fulton. According to ESRI, 129 retail establishments in Fulton generate an estimated $136.4 million in annual sales. More than $56 million, or 41%, is generated in the automotive category, which includes car dealerships, gas stations, and auto supply stores; grocery stores account for $29 million, or 21% of total sales. The high level of grocery store sales is typical of most communities, since groceries are a basic commodity purchased regardless of income. Aside from general merchandise, however, Fulton has a relatively low level of sales in specialty retail stores (see “shoppers’ goods retail”) that could attract consumers from a wider geographic market. In fact, this category represents 16.4% of retail sales (supply) but fully 27.8% of the retail potential (demand) in Fulton. The term sales leakage is used to refer to the demand for goods and services that is not being met locally – in other words, consumers are going outside the area for purchases in a given retail sector. Typically, rural and suburban communities with predominantly residential land uses experience high levels of sales leakage because retail establishments are limited in number; conversely, a sales surplus often exists in large cities and metropolitan areas because of their retail diversity and ability to draw shoppers from other areas.

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Table 23: Retail Sales Profile – City of Fulton Store Type

Store Count

Food Services & Drinking Places Full-Service Restaurants Limited-Service Eating Places Special Food Services Drinking Places Convenience Retail Building Materials & Supplies Dealers Lawn and Garden Equipment Stores Grocery Stores Specialty Food Stores Health & Personal Care Stores Gasoline Stations Automotive Dealers Auto Parts, Accessories, and Tire Stores Shopping Goods Retail General Merchandise Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores Electronics & Appliance Stores Beer, Wine, & Liquor Stores Clothing & Shoe Stores Jewelry, Luggage, and Leather Goods Stores Used Merchandise Stores Sporting Goods/Hobby/Musical Instruments Stores Book, Periodical, and Music Stores Office Supplies, Stationery, and Gift Stores Florists Other Miscellaneous Store Retailers Total Retail Sales (Supply)

Estimated Total Sales

Sales Distribution (%)

38 20 14 0 4 56 7 2 11 2 9 7 14 4 34 5 5 4 1 1 2 3 4 2 3 4 0

$ 19,852,885 $ 4,763,239 $ 14,278,858 $$ 810,788 $ 93,905,983 $ 1,644,113 $ 574,932 $ 29,066,628 $ 229,903 $ 7,778,404 $ 19,780,764 $ 32,598,301 $ 2,232,938 $ 22,689,891 $ 17,812,958 $ 1,119,862 $ 563,670 $ 531,401 $ 326,708 $ 185,463 $ 87,050 $ 318,801 $ 963,765 $ 330,922 $ 449,291 $-

14.5% 3.5% 10.5% 0.0% 0.6% 68.8% 1.2% 0.4% 21.3% 0.2% 5.7% 14.5% 23.9% 1.6% 16.6% 13.1% 0.8% 0.4% 0.4% 0.2% 0.1% 0.1% 0.2% 0.7% 0.2% 0.3% 0.0%

128

$136,448,759

100.0%

Source: ESRI, infoUSA, and E.M. Pemrick and Company

As shown in Table 24, the sales leakage in the City of Fulton is estimated at a total of $12.5 million. The sales leakage is highest for full-service restaurants ($2.8 million), clothing and shoe stores ($2.8 million), electronics stores ($1.5 million), and furniture and home furnishings stores ($1.4 million). Although this brief analysis does not take into account specific aspects of the retail market in Fulton or the competition that exists in neighboring communities, recapturing a portion of the sales leakage may represent a potential opportunity for additional establishments as well as associated tax revenues in Fulton.

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Table 24: Sales Leakage Summary for City of Fulton Store Type

Value

Full-Service Restaurants Clothing & Shoe Stores Electronics & Appliance Stores Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores Building Materials & Supplies Dealers Specialty Food Stores Other Miscellaneous Store Retailers Sporting Goods/Hobby/Musical Instruments Stores Special Food Services Jewelry, Luggage, and Leather Goods Stores Drinking Places Office Supplies, Stationery, and Gift Stores

$ 2,773,521 $ 2,757,260 $ 1,488,530 $ 1,440,043 $ 1,105,879 $ 724,242 $ 658,735 $ 529,591 $ 381,420 $ 285,591 $ 130,618 $ 124,614

Beer, Wine, & Liquor Stores Total Sales Leakage

$ 112,364 $ 12,512,408

Source: ESRI, infoUSA, and E.M. Pemrick and Company

Economic and Market Trends Analysis Summary to be prepared as part of the Fulton Phase II BOA Nomination Study.

Review of Strategic Brownfield Sites Summary to be prepared as part of the Fulton Phase II BOA Nomination Study.

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Summary Analysis, Findings & Recommendations (Preliminary) Without goals, and plans to reach them, you are like a ship that has set sail with no destination. - Fitzhugh Dodson

The extensive research, analysis, and community engagement conducted as part of Phase I of the Fulton BOA Nomination Study will allow this document to serve as an initial foundation from which more detailed analysis for Phase II will take place. Successful redevelopment of the BOA Study Area will depend upon the location of future uses, as well as how and when such uses are phased into future development. Redevelopment strategies should leverage near-term opportunities, but also generate sustainable, long-term economic activity. Broadly stated, the Final BOA Nomination Study should position the City to fully capitalize upon the core strengths of the BOA Study Area and its five neighborhoods. In order to position the BOA Study Area as an engine of growth for the City and the region, the City must target appropriate growth industries and draw them to the Study Area with existing and creative new incentives. Several preliminary goals and strategies were identified to assist with future decision-making for the BOA Study Area. A goal is a general statement of a future condition that is considered desirable for Fulton; it is an end towards which strategies are aimed. A strategy is a specific proposal that relates directly to accomplishing the goal. The goals and strategies were developed based upon input from the Steering Committee, stakeholders, and the general public. Below is a series of preliminary goals and strategies to achieve a diverse balance in Fulton. Goal 1:

Clean-up and redevelop Fulton’s Brownfield, Vacant, and Underutilized Sites: Strategy 1.1: Study the known contaminated sites to determine the best mitigation of contamination to meet the City’s redevelopment goals. Strategy 1.2: Promote community development/redevelopment that will encourage clean up of the City’s brownfields. Strategy 1.3: Implement “Environmental Justice” programs to inform and educate local residents to recognize and report the inequitable burden of contaminated site and the lack of access to a safe environment in the City of Fulton. Strategy 1.4: Continue to investigate the potential for upgrading hookups and improving the efficiency of service to new infill developments. Strategy 1.5: Continue to investigate the possibility for new green

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building practices into the upgraded stormwater management system. Goal 2:

Create new and expanded employment opportunities in the City. Strategy 2.1: Study the market and economic feasibility of the City’s underutilized sites. Strategy 2.2: Develop programs that will encourage new commercial ventures and diversify employment opportunities in the City. Strategy 2.3: Ensure that services to support employment, such as training, childcare, and healthcare are available for residents locally. Strategy 2.4: Continue to explore the feasibility of constructing a state of the art transportation facility in Futon’s downtown area. The facility would serve as the transportation hub for Oswego County. The result would be a one-call, one-stop destination for multi-modal transportation, including waiting areas, bus terminals, and both indoor and outdoor directories for residents and tourists. Many cities are using public transportation infrastructure as a tool for economic development, and Fulton should continue studying available transportation funding mechanisms to subsidize the overall cost of the projects infrastructure. Strategy 2.5: Explore, with New York State and Amtrak, passenger rail service to increase accessibility and mobility for Fulton’s workforce.

Goal 3:

Encourage sustainable and complimentary economic development. Strategy 3.1:

Encourage and recruit business enterprises that compliment the needs of local businesses and residents.

Strategy 3.2: Assist existing home-based businesses to expand and develop in the City. Strategy 3.3: Identify strategies to sustain businesses in the Study Area through both local and regional markets. Strategy 3.4: Develop a marketing and outreach strategy for the Fulton BOA to present community opportunities to potential investors. Strategy 3.5: Promote community development/redevelopment of the City’s brownfields to retain existing residents and attract new residents to the City.

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Goal 4:

Encourage the home ownership opportunities for existing and new residents of the City of Fulton. Strategy 4.1: Encourage owner occupied residential development projects and discourage conversion of one and two family residences into apartment buildings. Strategy 4.2: Prevent “slum lords” through a combination of community reporting, City code enforcement and stiff penalties. Strategy 4.3: Maintain an adequate supply of affordable housing and encourage residential redevelopment that is sensitive to the needs of the community. Strategy 4.4: Create a sense of place for the City’s neighborhoods in the Fulton BOA Study Area.

Goal 5:

Provide better and equal community access, participation and recreation opportunities for youth and elderly. Strategy 5.1: Create better access to places for youth and elderly to interact and recreate safely. Strategy 5.2: Consider the needs of youth and elderly in the development of new recreation facilities in the City. Strategy 5.3: Create new participation programs and events oriented towards youth and elderly. Strategy 5.4: Expand training and educational opportunities oriented towards youth to create a more skilled local workforce.

Goal 6:

Preserve, expand, and maintain community green space, river access, and neighborhood bicycle and pedestrian connections. Strategy 6.1: Complete the development of the Riverwalk Trail in the City of Fulton.

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Strategy 6.2: Expand usable green space through the creation of greenway connections to the Riverwalk Trail, Lake Neatahwanta, other local parks, pocket parks, etc. Strategy 6.3: Encourage maintenance and security of existing trails to provide a safe place for the City’s residents. Strategy 6.4: Develop venues capable of hosting events such as concerts, competitions, recreational events, and tours that celebrate the Riverfront, local heritage, and local culture. Strategy 6.5: Expand the City of Fulton’s bicycle infrastructure, such as bicycle lanes, signage, and bicycle racks. Such infrastructure is important as the City continues to improve access to the waterfront and the City as a whole. Continue to identify funding opportunities to expand pedestrian and bicycle friendly trails/paths into adjoining residential neighborhoods to create a complete non-motorized transportation network for residents and tourists. Goal 7:

Encourage community pride and history. Strategy 7.1: Develop a Community Beautification network partnering local community groups and the City for projects that improve the appearance of the Study Area and address detrimental properties (such as painting/decorating of the plywood enclosures). Strategy 7.2: Study ways to develop stronger links between the community and education/cultural organizations. Strategy 7.3: Coordinate efforts of community groups with the efforts made by the City officials. Strategy 7.4: Consider establishing an official historic district on the west side of downtown, close to the riverfront. There are an abundance of clustered historic properties and sites located in this area that could be enhanced through a local historical district.

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Next Steps in BOA Program The following steps are tailored towards the Fulton BOA Nomination Study and how to proceed from Phase I to Phase II of the Study. The findings from this preliminary Phase I Nomination Study will be incorporated into Fulton’s Phase II Nomination Study, as well as, detailed economic and market trends to understand the fiscal implications associated with potential strategic site redevelopment scenarios. Below is a list of “Next Steps” associated with the Phase II Nomination Study. •

Parking Assessment of BOA Study Area



Housing Needs Assessment of BOA Study Area



Completion of Community Participation and Techniques to Enlist Partners



Completion of Community Vision and Goals and Objectives



Completion of Economic and Market Trends Analysis



Summary Analysis, Findings, and Recommendations



Review of Strategic Brownfield Sites



Completion of Draft Nomination Study



Completion and Distribution of Draft Nomination Study



Final Nomination and Advancing to BOA Program Step 3 “Implementation”



Completion of Project Reporting



SEQRA Processes and Forms

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