Communities in Motion 2040 Vision - Community Planning

Communities in Motion 2040 Vision - Community Planning

Communities in Motion 2040 Vision Vision Areas Below are possible interpretations of how the land use types included in Communities in Motion 2040 co...

8MB Sizes 0 Downloads 4 Views

Communities in Motion 2040 Vision

Vision Areas Below are possible interpretations of how the land use types included in Communities in Motion 2040 could look.

The Communities in Motion 2040 Vision illustrates a preferred growth scenario for the Treasure Valley, specifically Ada and Canyon Counties. Defined by local stakeholders, including the public, the Vision will help guide development of the Communities in Motion 2040 regional long-range transportation plan. Vision Statement

Land Use Density and Diversity

The Communities in Motion 2040 Vision provides new housing and jobs along transit corridors and in major activity centers with a strong focus on maintaining the region’s recreation and open space areas. New growth would be comprised of a variety of housing types, served by infrastructure, nearby services, and outside of prime farmland or environmental constraints. This scenario supports local comprehensive plan goals and densities, and includes entitled developments as of July 2012. This scenario would support high-capacity transit for State Street (Highway 44) and a route parallel to Interstate 84, as well as multimodal infrastructure and services throughout the region. Key goals include walkability, preserving farmland, minimizing congestion, increasing transportation options, improving jobs-housing balance, better access to parks, and maintaining environmental resources.

Downtown

Employment Center

Mixed Use

This area supports the highest densities and land-use mix, including housing, office, and retail jobs. Downtowns typically are centers for culture and activity. Complete streets for all users would be a priority.

A center for mostly employment-related business. Freight and mobility would typically be prioritized in these areas.

Horizontal mix of land uses, including housing and employment, spread out in relatively low density. Complete streets for all users would be a priority.

Features: Light industrial/manufacturing aligned along freight routes; energyefficient buildings; perimeter office buildings serve as noise buffers to nearby neighborhoods; transit connections; eateries within walking distance; pocket parks.

Features: Mix of residential and employment areas reduce peak traffic and parking demands; work, services, and retail walkable within minutes; variety in housing stock with critical mass to promote transit services; multiple transportation options; bikeand pedestrian-friendly design; road design and traffic signals managed to reduce congestion; frontage or service road when appropriate.

Features: Mixed-use buildings, typically with ground-floor retail; restaurants and eateries with patio seating; pocket parks and plazas; variety in building height and massing; multiple transportation options; right-sized parking areas; mix of highdensity housing, including affordable, workforce, market rate, and luxury; and redevelopment potential. Housing: 20-40%

Jobs: 60-80%

Housing: 0-20%

Jobs: 80-100%

Other: 5-15%

Housing: 20-50%

Jobs: 50-70%

Other: 10-20%

Other: 5-15%

Vision Map

Transit Oriented Development

Small Town

Vertical mix of land uses, including housing and employment spread out in relatively higher densities, enabling transit services.

Smaller and rural towns with opportunities for sustainable growth while maintaining a small-town feel. Primarily residential but with local servcies and mostly reliant on the urban area for employment and regional amenities.

Features: Variety of building heights; moderate to high densities; mixed-use buildings with ground-floor retail; adaptive resuse/redevelopment potential; pocket parks and plazas; right-sized parking areas; appropriately sized roads; bike lanes; transit stops; sidewalks. Housing: 20-80%

Jobs: 20-80%

Features: Main street businesses serve local needs; opportunties for agri-tourism; park and ride lots; larger back yards with gardens provide local produce; “third places” for community gateherings; proximity to highway.

Other: 10-25%

Housing: 75-95%

Future Neighborhood

Neighborhoods with existing development, with different opportunities for reuse and infill than in future developments. Primarily housing but with a few services, including parks, schools, and small-scale shopping to support the neighborhood.

Neighborhoods projected to be built, with different opportunities for planned development than in existing developments. Primarily housing but with a few services, including parks, schools, and small-scale shopping to support the neighborhood.

Housing: 75-95%

Jobs: 5-15%

Features: Range of housing types; services within walking distance; pedestrian pathways; parks and recreation; neighborhood gardens; road network with narrow streets, boulevards, and alleys; close to existing infrastructure and preserved farmland.

Other: 10-25%

Housing: 75-95%

The Community Planning Association of Southwest Idaho (COMPASS) is an association of local governments working together to plan for the future of the region. COMPASS members consider factors that affect quality of life for area residents when making decisions about transportation and setting priorities for spending federal transportation dollars over the next 25 years.

Other: 10-25%

Existing Neighborhood

Features: Mix of housing styles, ages, and costs; infill potential; retail and services within walking distance; community gardens; transit options; sidewalks and bike lanes.

Please note: The Vision Map reflects the preferred growth scenario approved by the COMPASS Board. It is not a plan and has no regulatory authority.

Jobs: 5-15%

Jobs: 5-15%

Other: 10-25%

Unique Areas Areas for special consideration, including regional higher education centers and regional medical centers, that have regional impact but that don’t fit other center typologies. These areas will differ in types of use, densities, and layout. They include airports (A), hospitals (H), prisons (P), and universities (U). In the Treasure Valley, you’ll see:

• • • •

Boise State University College of Idaho Northwest Nazarene University Collge of Western Idaho

• St. Alphonsus Medical Center (Boise, Eagle, and Nampa) • St. Luke’s Medical Center (Boise and Meridian) • Boise International Airport, Nampa Airport, Caldwell Airport

Communities in Motion is the regional long-range transportation plan for Ada and Canyon Counties. It offers a vision that addresses: • How land use affects transportation • How investments in transportation influence growth • What the transportation system is supposed to achieve • How transportation projects are selected • How transportation projects serve regional needs It is based on: Connections: Providing options for safe access and expanded mobility choices in a cost-effective manner in the region.

Vision Benefits

Vision Demographics

Economic Development: A 61% increase in composite population near downtowns and other activity centers. Growth in these areas is typically more sustainable than other locations due to the proximity of features.

2010 City Area of Impact

Population

2040

Households

Jobs

Population

Buildout

Households

Jobs

Population

Households

Jobs

Boise

237,241

96,654

141,628

317,192

140,848

234,520

439,462

174,365

696,293

Housing: Growth in areas with transportation and other infrastructure improve overall affordability by locating housing near transit routes, employment centers, and basic services.

Eagle

23,122

8,197

5,507

52,246

18,823

15,498

106,603

37,876

47,085

11,101

4,949

7,049

18,311

8,911

13,794

41,516

18,747

57,839

13,319

4,283

1,806

25,991

10,270

4,950

344,705

124,426

119,170

Land Use: Better jobs-housing balance reduces traffic, improves air quality, and increases discretionary time.

Meridian

83,786

28,296

30,772

154,780

57,501

65,642

355,201

125,516

199,477

Star

6,472

2,177

564

35,644

12,035

3,114

79,234

28,615

10,079

Ada County (outside areas of impact)

17,426

3,925

7,648

70,153

23,656

13,161

82,941

26,669

21,385

392,365

148,445

190,324

674,317

272,044

350,679

1,449,662

536,214

1,151,328

50,672

16,540

13,144

109,111

40,098

37,550

271,204

105,252

185,349

2,748

959

440

5,947

2,145

977

137,984

44,981

31,246

845

279

205

2,358

801

539

3,009

968

2,956

Middleton

10,348

3,514

1,282

18,475

6,626

1,937

157,666

52,766

25,625

Nampa

96,173

32,829

29,278

160,886

59,886

61,973

412,953

152,131

233,839

Notus

984

332

134

2,452

822

462

12,855

4,340

3,883

Parma

2,568

905

687

6,861

2,456

1,118

50,471

16,971

35,918

Wilder

1,951

612

283

6,760

2,317

729

11,479

3,720

16,160

22,634

7,634

4,729

34,833

12,224

5,693

216,485

71,724

50,777

Canyon County Total

188,923

63,604

50,182

347,683

127,375

110,978

1,274,106

452,853

585,753

Total Region

581,288

212,049

240,506

1,022,000

399,419

461,657

2,723,768

989,067

1,737,081

Transportation: Strong transportation infrastructure and services promote economic development and quality of life. Open Space: Access to parks and open space enables citizens to enjoy the natural beauty of the region.

Coordination: Achieving better inter-jurisdictional coordination of transportation and land use planning.

Health: More transportation options and development near services enables physical activity and improves air quality.

Environment: Minimizing transportation impacts to people, cultural resources, and the environment. Information: Coordinating data gathering and dispensing better information.

Farmland: Almost 80% of farmland can be preserved by developing infill sites and other non-farm areas. This will increase agricultural economic value in the area and preserve food security.

The complete Communities in Motion 2040 plan is available online at www. compassidaho.org.

Community Infrastructure: Development in or nearby areas served by infrastructure reduces infrastructure costs and can save municipalities millions of maintenance and operations costs.

Garden City Kuna

Ada County Total Caldwell Greenleaf Melba

Canyon County (outside areas of impact)

Note: Totals may not sum due to overlapping areas of impact.

Population Density Maps 2010

2040

Buildout

2040

Buildout

Employment Density Maps 2010

The 2010 maps above were the baseline conditions used in developing the Communities in Motion 2040 Vision. These maps are based on the 2010 census counts and 2010 Idaho Department of Labor employment data.

The above maps show the generalized densities when the Communities in Motion 2040 Vision is implemented.

Buildout is the quantification of local land use (comprehensive) plans. It enables COMPASS to consider long-range corridor preservation and is not constrained by the 2040 population forecast adopted by the COMPASS Board. It is not an official forecast for air quality conformity.