Community Recreation Plan for the City of Gladwin 2010 prepared by

Community Recreation Plan for the City of Gladwin 2010 prepared by

Community Recreation Plan for the City of Gladwin 2010 prepared by Clare West Branch This page left intentionally blank. TABLE OF CONTENTS Visio...

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Community Recreation Plan for the City of Gladwin 2010

prepared by Clare

West Branch

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Vision And Purpose .................................................................................................. ii City Of Gladwin Officials........................................................................................ iii The Goals ...................................................................................................................1 The Process ................................................................................................................2 City Administrative Structure ....................................................................................3 City Organizational Chart ..........................................................................................4 City Expenditures And Budget For Recreation And Culture ....................................5 Geography ............................................................................................................... 10 Zoning Districts....................................................................................................... 15 Demographics ......................................................................................................... 17 Socioeconomic Characteristics ............................................................................... 21 Recreational Inventory............................................................................................ 23 Inventory of Events................................................................................................. 38 Recreation Facilities Policy Barrier Free Compliance ........................................... 39 Analysis of Needs, Goals, and Opportunities ......................................................... 41 Proposed Improvements.......................................................................................... 42 Funding and Strategic Plan ..................................................................................... 52 Recreation Facilities Policies.................................................................................. 55 List of Community Organizations .......................................................................... 56 A Recommended Classification System for Local and Regional Recreational Open Spaces...................................................................................................................... 57 List of DNR Grants ................................................................................................. 63 List of Maps

List of Tables

Regional Location Map............................ 7 Gladwin County Map............................... 8 Ortho Photo.............................................. 9 Topography Map.................................... 12 Existing Land Use Map ......................... 13 Proposed Land Use Map........................ 14 Zoning Map............................................ 16 Recreation Facilities Map ...................... 24 Map of Gladwin Sports Complex .......... 29 County Recreation Facilities Map ......... 30 Map of North City Park ......................... 36 Map of South City Park ......................... 37 Map of Proposed Peripheral Pathway.... 44

City of Gladwin

Population Change ................................. 18 Age Distribution..................................... 18 Native vs. Foreign Born......................... 18 Male / Female Ratio............................... 19 Persons Per Household .......................... 19 Occupancy Characteristics..................... 19 Population Projections ........................... 20 Race Characteristics............................... 20 City of Gladwin Recreation Facilities Inventory ................................................ 25 Gladwin County Recreation Facilities Inventory ................................................ 31 Capital Improvement Schedule.............. 47

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Vision and Purpose

The people of Gladwin, Michigan see themselves at the center of one of the most beautiful and hospitable communities in all of Michigan. The Gladwin area abounds in natural resources that furnish abundant opportunities for outdoor recreation and flourishes in human resources that have created some of the best opportunities for recreation and sports in Mid-Michigan. This plan seeks to continue to expand these opportunities hoping to provide the best facilities, activities, and programs for all its citizens and visitors.

Children Playing in the Cedar River at North Park.

City of Gladwin

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CITY OF GLADWIN OFFICIALS Parks Commission Darlene Jungman, Chairman Don Kehoe, Vice Chair John Caffrey Tom Hindman Vee Novak Debbie Platt Craig Smith Dan Svetcos Barb Weaver Parks Manager Tim Ferrell City Administrator Bob Moffit Mayor Thomas L. Winarski City Council Polly Alward John Caffrey Dave Crawford Tom Hindman Darlene Jungman Thomas Mienk Vee Novak Michael Smith Planning Commission George Alward John Clayton Carol Darlington Joan David John Foor Tom Hindman Jill Witkowski Dave Beyer Lori Stout Planning Consultants Don Hamilton, A.I.C.P. Scott Bell, GIS Specialist Plan Adoption Record Parks Commission _________________ City Council Adoption _________________ MDNR Approval _________________ City of Gladwin

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THE GOALS

To involve as many of the citizens, groups and organizations of the City of Gladwin as possible in its Recreation Program. To provide access for all its citizens, people from the region, and tourists to each of its major parks and recreation facilities. To furnish sufficient recreation facilities to serve the increasing population in the City and region and the growing number of tourists visiting the City for recreational purposes. To coordinate and cooperate with the County, the Gladwin Community School District, and regional recreation providers to furnish ample facilities for our citizens and visitors. To expand year-round recreational opportunities.

City of Gladwin

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Community Recreation Plan

Process Gladwin’s last Recreation Plan was prepared and approved in 2010 with the help of Lapham Associates to aid the Parks Commission to create a new recreation plan for the city. A series of meetings were held to review the status of projects proposed in 2010. A public meeting was publicized and held to gather at-large citizen input for community needs. Contacts were made with the school district, county officials involved with the sports complex and other recreational facilities, members of the local tennis club and the Historical Society. All were invited to attend the planning meetings as well as official public hearings before the Parks Commission and the City Council. Notices and articles regarding the recreation plan were published in the local newspaper, The Gladwin County Record and Clarion, and in The Midland Daily News. Existing facilities and programs were assessed against the proposed new ones and against objective standards and the relevant data collected during the process. Goals were then put forth and the overall plan was devised with schedules for action and budgeting of major capital expenditures. The completed draft was approved by the Parks Commission and presented to the citizens of the community at a public hearing. The Parks Commission approved the plan and recommended approval by the City Council. The City Council approved the plan on ______________, 2010.

City of Gladwin

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Gladwin Sports Complex in order to provide the best facilities and opportunities for recreation for all of its citizens and for visitors to the area. The City of Gladwin and the Commission promote the city’s recreational opportunities as part of its effort to attract tourists, a primary economic sector of the region.

City Administrative Structure The City of Gladwin has a manager council form of government with a city administrator to oversee daily operations. The Parks Commission is therefore under the authority of the council and mayor with the guidance of the city administrator. The Parks Commission was formed in 1983 when the city acquired the Gladwin State Park (now the Gladwin South City Park) from the State of Michigan. The Commission represents the interests from throughout the area: Gladwin County, Gladwin Community Schools, tourist related businesses, senior citizens, and others. The Commission recommends the appointment of the Parks Manager to oversee programs and activities as well as the development and maintenance of city park facilities. Maintenance and many of the capital improvement projects are performed by the City Public Works Department with recommendations from the Parks Commission and Parks Manager.

Over the last decade, the City of Gladwin has endeavored to make its parks and recreation programs open and accessible to all its citizens. The city maintains a policy of not only constructing all its new buildings and other facilities to handicapped accessibility standards, but all repairs and maintenance are also done to these specifications. All programs run by the city and those carried out jointly with the county, school district or other agencies are all designed to include the handicapped and structured so all may afford them. Particular recreation programs are carried out by the Council on Aging and others to serve various client groups. Good examples of these efforts are the archery program for mentally handicapped children run by the Gladwin Bow Hunters Association and the hard surfaced trail that currently goes through North Park all the way to South Park.

The Parks Commission actively pursues recreational possibilities and projects throughout the city and in cooperation with the county, the school district and with other groups such as the Gladwin Hockey Association, Gladwin Skate Park and

City of Gladwin City hall building. City of Gladwin

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City of Gladwin Organizational Chart Gladwin City Residents

Compensation Commission

City Manager and City Council

Board of Review

City Auditor

Zoning Board of Appeals

City Attorney

City Administrator

Downtown Development Authority

Arts Council

Housing Comm./ Development Corp.

Parks Commission

Planning Commission

Senior Service Director

Zoning Admin./Code Enforcement

City Engineer/Director of Public Works

Utility Billing Clerk

Clerk

Treasurer

Fire Chief

DPW Crew Leader

Sidewalks

Equipment

City of Gladwin

Water

Sewer

Streets

Solid Waste

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Assessor

Housing Director

Economic Dev. Corporation

Building Authority

Transportation Director

Police Chief

Parks & Rec. Director

Police Department

Parks & Rec. Department

Cemetery

Community Recreation Plan

Recreation and Culture Expenditures 1995-2004; adopted 2005; 2006 budget

City Expenditures and Budget for Recreation and Culture

Year 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

The City of Gladwin spends between 5 to 10% of its annual budget for parks and recreation, averaging approximately 7%, as shown in the table at the right. The magnitude of these expenditures over the past ten years has varied greatly depending on repairs and maintenance and capital improvement projects undertaken in those years. As indicated in the “Recreation Inventory” section of this plan, the city maintains its equipment, grounds, building and furnishings regularly and proficiently. It appears also from expenditures, well above budgeted figures, that the city council acts, as opportunities occur to provide the best facilities and programs within its means. The City of Gladwin’s part in making Gladwin Community Arena become a reality (see “Recreational Inventory”) exemplifies the leadership of the Parks Commission and the City Council and the prominent role recreation plays in the lives of the citizens of Gladwin and the entire Gladwin area. These citizens’efforts extend even to the extraordinary skills and efforts of temporary tenants at the county jail who have provided invaluable services in building and maintaining many of the city facilities.

City of Gladwin

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Expenditures $90,427 $130,543 $108,235 $122,054 $94,441 $143,593 $319,349 $99,442 $97,700 $82,926 $215,496 $118,334

Community Recreation Plan

COMMUNITY DESCRIPTION

City of Gladwin

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City of Gladwin Location

City of Gladwin

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Gladwin County Map

City of Gladwin

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Digital-Ortho Aerial Photo of City of Gladwin and surrounding areas.

City of Gladwin

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Typical of mid-Michigan, Gladwin County has fairly cold winters and cool summers. In January the average high temperature is 28° and the low 10°. The average high temperature in July is 82° and the low 56°. The highest recorded temperature is 105° and the lowest recorded temperature is –39°. The area receives an average annual precipitation of 31 inches and average annual snowfall of 52 inches. The growing season lasts about 126 days with the final freeze being around May 18 and the first freeze being around September 22. Gladwin has four distinct seasons with a plentitude of recreational opportunities in each.

Geography The City of Gladwin is the county seat of Gladwin County. Situated on the Cedar River, this city became known as “Cedar” back in 1875. Later renamed after the county, it was incorporated as a city in 1883. Gladwin County (latitude 43.980N, longitude 84.486W) is located in the centralnortheastern section of Michigan’s lower peninsula. The county was named in honor of British Major Henry Gladwin of Fort Detroit who defended the Fort against the assaults of Chief Pontiac in 1763 when Pontiac resisted the settlement of Michigan and Ohio by Europeans. The lumbering era of the late 1800’s was a boom to the county bringing a great increase of population and wealth. Farming became a way of life when the lumbering era ended and cleared lands were homesteaded by farmers. In the 1930’s an oil boom again led to an increase in the county’s population and helped finance the new county courthouse.

Agriculture accounts for nearly 37% of the county’s area. Approximately 51% of the county is forested (186,000 acres) and the Tittabawassee State Forest makes up a large portion of this area. The Tittabawassee State Forest with 80,000 acres of state land in Gladwin County covers almost a fourth of the county on the east, offering plenty of opportunity for hiking, bird watching, hunting, and snowmobiling. There are nearly 50 miles of backwater ponds, 450 miles of waterways, and 7300 acres of lakes and ponds in the county. The Tittabawassee River runs the length of the county and provides two major impoundment lakes, Secord and Smallwood. The Cedar River runs through the City of Gladwin and flows into the Tobacco River in the southeast of the county where the river then enters the Tittabawassee River. The Tobacco, Molasses, Sugar and Cedar rivers provide sport fishing. There are six lakes within a few miles of downtown Gladwin.

The City of Gladwin is located at the junctions of state highways M-18 and M-61. Much of the area surrounding the City of Gladwin is level to undulating with some rolling areas southeast of town. Within the city there are steep banks along the Cedar River except in areas of the North and South City Parks and the City Hall where the flood plain widens. Adjacent to the Cedar River are most of the wooded lands in the city. These woodlands are predominately broadleaf deciduous forests and provide excellent habitat for songbirds and other wildlife. The other major forested area in Gladwin is the city-owned property, mostly wetlands in the northeast corner of the city and near the industrial park. There are also numerous small wetlands, which ring much of the city and provide habitat for trees, shrubs, and other native natural vegetation and animals. City of Gladwin

Development within the city ranges from single-family residences to industrial sites with single-family residences being by far the predominant land use (17% of the total 10

Community Recreation Plan

Industrial development has taken place mainly in the Gladwin Industrial Park where about 35 acres are dedicated for this use.

land area). Most existing single-family homes are north of the center of town (M-61) but new subdivisions are being created in all directions. There are few duplexes and multi-family structures, comprising only roughly 1% of the total city land area. There is also a small mobile home park on the north side of town that has 74 spaces.

The parks and other public and semi-public uses (churches, schools, etc.) cover an almost equal amount of land as singlefamily homes. These large users of land actually contribute to open space and provide both passive and active recreational opportunities

The City of Gladwin has an active and growing commercial and office sector mainly along state highways M-61 and M-18 North. The enterprises in these areas provide services and goods to the local and regional community. Many of the businesses cater to sportsmen and women from the area and beyond as Gladwin’s recreational opportunities are only a short drive (within a two and a half hours) from most metropolitan areas of the State. Many business owners are active in developing and promoting sports and recreational activities in the city and the county (e.g., Gladwin Hockey Association, Little League Association, Gladwin Bow Hunters Association).

By far, though, the largest amount of land within city boundaries is undeveloped. Excluding road rights-of-way and some cultivated agricultural fields, these woods, wetlands, marshes are prize wildlife areas that maintain the city’s connections with the surrounding countryside and furnish an environment of natural beauty and resources for residents and visitors to the city. The City of Gladwin is striving to address environmental issues within its boundaries. The city recently created a new by-pass to re-direct sewer overflows to their lagoon system and eliminate the overflows to the Cedar River. There are no other known environmental issues on city lands and parks.

Services in the City of Gladwin include City Police, County Sheriff’s Department and State Police, Gladwin Rural-Urban Fire Protection District Department and volunteer township fire departments, Department of Public Works, City Housing Commission; transportation through the Gladwin County Transit Corporation, the Gladwin County Library and the airport. The Gladwin Zettel Memorial Airport is equipped with a 4,700 foot paved runway, instrument approach, low frequency beacon and is capable of handling small jets. MidMichigan Medical Center Gladwin is a 42 bed primary care hospital providing general medical and surgical care for impatient and 24 hour emergency room services. City of Gladwin

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U.S.G.S. Quadrangle Map

City of Gladwin

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City of Gladwin Existing Land Use Map from 1996 Master Plan.

City of Gladwin

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City of Gladwin Proposed Land Use Map from 1996 Master Plan.

City of Gladwin

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C-2 Service Commercial District Designed to provide sites for more diversified business types which would often be incompatible with the pedestrian movement in the Central Business District and which are oriented to serving the needs of “passer-by”traffic and locations for planned shopping centers. Many of the business types permitted also generate greater volumes of traffic and activities, which must be specially considered to minimize adverse effects of adjacent properties.

Zoning Districts The City of Gladwin is divided into seven Zoning Districts as follows. R-1A One-Family Residential District Principal use is for single-family dwellings (12,000 sq. ft. minimum lots). R-1B One-Family Residential District Principal use is for single-family dwellings (7,500 sq. ft. minimum lots). R-O Residential Office District Transition of use in existing housing areas by permitting new construction or conversion of existing structures between adjacent residential and commercial, office, thoroughfares or other uses which would affect residential character. This district also recognizes the existence of older residential areas of the city where larger houses have been or can be converted from single-family and two-family residences to low-intensity commercial and office uses in order to extend the economic life of these structures and allow the owners to justify the expenditures for repairs and modernization.

MT Manufacturing Technology District Designed to accommodate primarily wholesale activities, warehouses, and industrial operations whose external, physical effects are restricted to the area of the district and in no manner affect in a detrimental way any of the surrounding districts. Residential districts comprise more than half of the city. Commercially zoned areas are adjacent to the M-61 and M-18 corridors. Industrial areas lie generally north and south of M-61 behind the commercially zoned areas.

R-M Multi-Family Residential District Designed to provide sites for multi-family dwellings structures, and related uses, which will generally serve as a transitional land use between non-residential districts and lower density One-Family Districts. The multifamily District is further provided to serve the limited needs for the apartment type of unit in an otherwise medium density, onefamily community. C-1 Central Business District Designed to cater to the needs of the local and regional consumer population. It is generally characterized by an integrated cluster of establishments serviced by common parking areas, and generating large volumes of both vehicles and pedestrian traffic. City of Gladwin

Pathway by the Riverwalk Place

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City of Gladwin Zoning Map

City of Gladwin Zoning Map

City of Gladwin

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Demographics According to the 2000 U.S. Census, the population of the City of Gladwin was 3001 persons, almost 12% increase from the 1990 census. Gladwin County, much like the City of Gladwin, has increased in population since the last census, approximately 19% percent, and is also expected to grow substantially in this decade.

The River at City Park Pedestrian Bridge at North park.

While the growth rate has risen, the household size has decreased slightly. Married couple family households (45% ±) and persons living alone (34% ±) have remained relatively at the same level during the ten year period from 1990 - 2000.

The median age of the city population is 37.9 versus the county median age of 42.3. The majority of people in the area are between 25-64 years of age; with the fastest growing group being those between 45 - 65 years of age. Those under the age of 24 are shown to have the slowest growth rate.

Per square mile the population of the City is 1,047 persons.

Ranger Station at City Park

City of Gladwin

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Community Recreation Plan

Population Change City of Gladwin and Gladwin County 1990 - 2000 Governmental Unit City of Gladwin Gladwin County

1990 2,682 21,896

2000 3,001 26,023

Change 319 4,127

Percent 11.9% 18.8%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 1990 U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000

Age Distribution City of Gladwin and Gladwin County 1990 and 2000 City of Gladwin Age 0 - 24 years 25 - 44 years 45 - 65 years 65 and over

1990 937 676 417 616

2000 987 778 578 658

Change 14 102 161 42

Percent 1.4% 15.0% 38.6% 6.8%

1990 7,508 5,599 4,976 3,813

2000 7,737 6,287 7,231 4,768

Change 229 688 2,255 955

Percent 3.0% 12.2% 45.3% 25.0%

Gladwin County Age 0 - 24 years 25 - 44 years 45 - 65 years 65 and over

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 1990 U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000

Native vs. Foreign Born Citizens City of Gladwin and Gladwin County 1990 - 2000 City of Gladwin Nativity Native Born Foreign Born

1990 2,655 27

2000 2,937 55

Change 282 28

Percent 10.6% 103.7%

1990 21,632 264

2000 25,693 330

Change 4,061 66

Percent 18.8% 25.0%

Gladwin County Age Native Born Foreign Born

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 1990 U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000

City of Gladwin

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Community Recreation Plan

Male / Female Ratio City of Gladwin and Gladwin County 1990 - 2000 City of Gladwin Sex Male Female

1980 1,153 1,326

Change

1990 1,220 1,462

(1980-1990)

1990 10,777 11,119

(1980-1990)

67 136

Change

Percent 5.8% 10.3%

2000 1,354 1,647

(1990-2000)

Percent 8.6% 9.5%

2000 12,916 13,107

(1990-2000)

134 185

Percent 11.0% 12.7%

Gladwin County Sex Male Female

1980 9,852 10,064

Change 925 1,055

Change 2,139 1,988

Percent 19.8% 17.8%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 1980 U.S. Census Bureau, Census 1990 U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000

Persons Per Household City of Gladwin and Gladwin County 1990 - 2000 Governmental Unit City of Gladwin Gladwin County

1990 2.37 2.59

Change (Persons) -.09 -.16

2000 2.28 2.43

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 1990 U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000

Occupancy Characteristics City of Gladwin and Gladwin County 1990 - 2000 City of Gladwin Category Occupied Vacant Seasonal

1990 1,071 114 10

2000 1,234 95 18

Change 163 -19 8

Percent 15.2% (17.0%) 0.8%

1990 8,357 6,528 5,492

2000 10,561 6,267 5,588

Change 2,204 -261 96

Percent 26.4% (4.0%) 1.7%

Gladwin County Age Occupied Vacant Seasonal

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 1990 U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000

City of Gladwin

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Community Recreation Plan

Population Projections City of Gladwin and Gladwin County 1990 - 2030 Governmental Unit City of Gladwin Gladwin County

1990 2,682 21,896

2000 3,001 26,023

2010 3,245 29,967

2020 3,634 34,660

2030 4,070 39,097

Growth Rate 1.12 1.19

Source: ecmpdr.org/pdf/projections2030.pdf

Race Characteristics City of Gladwin 1990 - 2000 Category White Black or African American American Indian or Alaskan Native Asian Other

1990 2,645 4

2000 2,884 7

Change 239 3

Percent 8.3% 42.9%

10

16

6

37.5%

22 1

32 62

10 61

31.3% 98.4%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 1990 U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000

City of Gladwin

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total housing is seasonal usage. Over ninety (90%) percent of housing units are occupied and almost forty (40%) percent of those are rented. During the last ten years, rent costs have been stable between $300 - $750 per month. Home values, however, have doubled over the decade. The majority of housing units (67.2%) are one-unit detached structures. About half of the homes within the city were built before 1970.

Socioeconomic Characteristics About half of the City of Gladwin’s population is employed. The main economic sectors of the county are Services (24.4%), Retail/Wholesale (24.1%), Government 14.2%, and Manufacturing (11.6%). Most are employed in either management and professional related occupations (32%) or sales and office occupations (27%). About 11% of workers are self-employed. Eighty (80%) percent of workers drive alone when traveling to and from their workplace and the mean commute time is 17 minutes. Median household income, as reported in 1999, was $25,598 (per capita dollars $16,370). The 2000 Census indicated 9.3 percent of families were below the poverty level. Gladwin is close to the cities of Midland, Bay City, Saginaw and Mt. Pleasant and its economics are affected by these areas. According to the State of Michigan Office of Labor Market Information, the unemployment rate for the city in 2000 was 6.5 percent. The rate had been decreasing from 1990 data when the rate was 9.7%. But unemployment appears to be on the rise again with the 2004 figures showing 9.9% for the year.

Of the population 25 years old and over, eighty (80%) have attained a high school diploma or the equivalent and sixteen (16%) percent have obtained a bachelor’s degree or higher. There are several choices in the surrounding area for continuing education. Two-year colleges include: Mid Michigan Community College with its newly built Michigan Technical Education Center (one of only 18 in the state) located in Harrison; Kirtland Community College in Roscommon; Delta College located at University Center/Auburn; and Davenport University and Northwood University, private schools, in Midland. Four-year degrees are offered through Saginaw Valley State University located at University Center/Auburn, Ferris State University in Big Rapids, and Central Michigan University, offering doctorate degrees in addition to master’s and bachelor’s degrees, in Mt. Pleasant.

The Michigan State Highway M-61 runs east-west through the center of the city, connecting to I-75 to the east and US-127 to the west. State Highway M-18 runs north and south through Gladwin from US-10 on the south to I-75 near Higgins Lake. The city is positioned almost at the center of the state, within a two- and- a- half- hour drive from most metropolitan areas of the state; 73 miles from Saginaw, 43 miles from Midland, 105 miles from Flint, 120 miles from Lansing, and 170 miles from Detroit, Traverse City 100, and Grand Rapids 140.

Despite its continuing growth and development, the city retains a friendly, small town character.

Vacant housing in the city is less than ten (10%) percent and one (1%) percent of the City of Gladwin

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City of Gladwin Skate Park

RECREATION INVENTORY

City of Gladwin

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game between Gladwin and Beaverton, free donkey rides for kids under 12 years old among its many activities. New programs scheduled during 2009-2010 included tennis, youth basketball, new programs yearly and men’s hockey teams

Recreation Inventory The Gladwin City Park (North City Park and South City Park) is located along the Cedar River with a riverside path between the North and South Parks under the main street Cedar Avenue Bridge. Recreational facilities in the South Park area include camping and picnic grounds supplemented by tennis and basketball courts, a playground with swings, monkey bars, slides, a giant sandbox and riding toys, pavilions, and a sandy beach for swimmers. The wooded campground has camping with electric at all sites and water at most. Each site has a fire ring, and a sanitation station services the park. Modern toilets and hot showers are also available. The North Park area, opened in 1994, provides horseshoes, soccer, volleyball, basketball and a series of hiking trails. A skateboard park opened in 2008. Canoeing and tubing trips on the Cedar River can be arranged through nearby canoe liveries with trips from 8 miles to 26 miles. The park is also within easy walking distance of downtown Gladwin, where a variety of shopping and fine restaurants can be found.

The newly built Gladwin Sports Complex provides a convenient and safe environment for numerous recreational activities. Baseball and softball diamonds, soccer fields and football fields are available for the community and a concession stand and toilet facilities are also available. The Sacred Heart Church Activity Center offers indoor basketball, two racquetball courts, volleyball, a children’s playground, kitchen and food serving facilities and a large play field and is available to rent for gatherings. Our Savior Lutheran Church has a large gymnasium, kitchen/ food service and a large meeting room for city and county functions. They also offer an annual sauerkraut and sausage dinner on November 14th.

Near the entrance of the South Park is the Community Center with its adjacent outdoor amphitheater having a capacity of 500 persons. These facilities are used for scheduled events including the annual Gladwin Friends of the Theatre winter dinner theater, summer musical theatre, and the Council for the Arts summer arts festival, the Annual Christmas Walk with Luminaries, Taste of Gladwin, as well as various civic, fraternal and school activities.

Gladwin County Recreation Area, located along North Shaw Road, is a 160-acre parcel located approximately five miles northwest of the City of Gladwin. It features approximately 2.3 miles of pathways for hiking, rollerblading, cross country sking, snowshoeing and bicycling, picnic areas, and an observation deck. Calhoun Park Campground just west of the City of Beaverton offers fifty-four campsites, modern toilets and hot showers, picnic area, a volleyball court, playground, hiking trails, canoeing and tubing.

The Gladwin Community Arena is another popular spot in the City of Gladwin. It features hockey, open skating, a weight and fitness center, Red Wing Alumni Game, Gladwin Business and Professional Association Expo, yearly donkey basketball City of Gladwin

A complete inventory of local & regional recreational facilities follows. 23

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City of Gladwin Recreational Facilities Map.

City of Gladwin

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The following inventory tables display the existing recreational facilities in the city and the county. The tables include a description of each facility and a notation of the ownership. All of the facilities within the city are in good to excellent condition and all are handicapped accessible.

City of Gladwin Recreation Facilities Inventory Map ID# 1

2

3

Facility Name

Description 61 campsites with water, electricity, fire rings, showers and bathrooms, sanitation station, picnic area, beach, children’s Gladwin South play field, foot trails, City Park tennis and horseshoe courts, canoe launch, canoeing and tubing areas, and two pavilions. Open May 1 - Nov. 30. All areas handicapped accessible. Accessibility ranking of 3. Horseshoe pits, shuffleboard, basketball courts, skateboarding, softball diamond, sandbox, tot lot, canoe Gladwin North and tubing launch sites City Park soccer field, & a community building available for rent with kitchen and bathroom facilities, newly remodeled to provide handicapped accessibility. Accessibility ranking of 2 43,000 sq. ft. arena built in 1999, located behind commercial area on M61, east of City center. Gladwin 17,000 sq. ft. NHL ice Community rink. Hockey and figure Arena skating lessons and programs. Multipurpose 6,000 sq. ft. gymnasium. 5,000 sq. ft. exercise area and cardiovascular center, basket ball court, and indoor batting cage. Accessibility ranking of 2

City of Gladwin

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Owner

City of Gladwin

City of Gladwin

Gladwin Community

Community Recreation Plan

4

Gladwin County Fairgrounds

5

Gladwin County Sports Complex

6 Gladwin Community Amphitheater and Community Center Building 7

City of Gladwin Tennis Courts

City of Gladwin

Occupies 15 acres in the SE corner of the City of Gladwin. Includes racetrack, grandstand, three merchant buildings at the north end of the property and animal barns to the south. Also includes a pavilion and picnic area in a small grove of trees. Use has increased with the complex now used as a site of many events throughout the seasons. Buildings are also used for storage on a fee-basis in the winter. Accessibility ranking of 2. The Gladwin Little League is now part of the Gladwin County Sports Complex. This is a 55-acre project that was recently completed and opened May 2004. There are 14 ball fields –8 baseball, 2 girls softball and 4 adult softball. Also included in the complex are 9 soccer fields and 2 ½ Pee Wee football fields (5th to 8th graders). There is a 24’x80’concession stand/storage building that includes storage for each of the above programs. Accessibility ranking of 3. 500 seat capacity outdoor theater. Annual Council of the Arts musical and arts festival, 2nd weekend in July. Winter dinner theater. Many other programs. Available for civic, fraternal, school activities and church services by local churches. Accessibility ranking of 3. Four hard surfaced enclosed Tennis Courts Accessibility ranking of 3.

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Gladwin County Fair Association

Gladwin County and Little League

City of Gladwin

City of Gladwin

Community Recreation Plan

8a 8b 8c 8d

Gladwin Community Schools High School, Intermediate School, Elementary School, Junior High School

9

City Hall

10 Historic Settlement

11

Well-developed public school complex, which includes an Elementary School, Intermediate, and High School on a large site. Outdoor recreation facilities include fields for baseball/softball, track, football, and soccer along with stadium seating, playgrounds and play structures at the Elementary and Intermediate Schools. Indoor facilities include gyms and multi-purpose cafeteria. All facilities are handicapped accessible. The Junior High has six outdoor basketball backboards on hard surface play area, open play field and gymnasium. Accessibility ranking of 3. North of Cedar Avenue along the Cedar River. Hiking/cross-country ski trail forms link with North and South Parks. Hard surfaced for handicapped accessibility. Accessibility ranking of 3. Six building “Historical Settlement”at Cedar and State Streets. Craft demonstrations given for public. Accessibility ranking of 2.

18-hole golf course located immediately west of the City Gladwin of Gladwin. Available for public use and is handicapped Golf Course accessible. Accessibility ranking of 2.

City of Gladwin

27

Gladwin School District

City of Gladwin

Gladwin County Historical Society Privately Owned

Community Recreation Plan

12

Church facility offering indoor basketball, two (2) racquetball courts, volleyball, children’s playground, kitchen and food serving facilities, and a large play field. Accessibility ranking of 3

Our Savior Lutheran Church

Semi-public

13 Free Methodist Church 14 15

Bowling Alley Bowling Alley

16 Gladwin Senior Centers 17 Our Savior Lutheran Church

Semi-public Gymnasium and baseball field. Accessibility ranking of 3. Meadow Lanes located on Fifth Street in the City of Gladwin. Accessibility ranking of 2. Beaverton Bowl and Lounge Bowling Alley. Accessibility ranking of 2. Antler Arms, located at 215 S. Antler and Maple Manor at 130 W. Maple provide on site meal service as well as “Meals on Wheels”for homebound seniors. Activities offered at both facilities include Bingo, craft classes, square dancing and sing-alongs. Accessibility ranking of 3. Our Savior Lutheran Church located at 361 Clendening Road, offers their Gymnasium for nonprofit organization use. Accessibility ranking of 3.

Privately Owned Privately Owned City of Gladwin

Semi-public

*Accessibility Assessment All items listed in the recreational facilities inventory for the City of Gladwin have been graded for accessibility based on the following ranking: 1 = none of the facilities/park areas meet accessibility guidelines. 2 = some of the facilities/park areas meet accessibility guidelines. 3 = most of the facilities/park areas meet accessibility guidelines. 4 = the entire park meets accessibility guidelines. 5 = the entire park was developed/renovated using principles of universal design. City of Gladwin

28

Community Recreation Plan

Map of Gladwin County Sports Complex.

City of Gladwin

29

Community Recreation Plan

Gladwin County Recreational Facilities Map

City of Gladwin

30

Community Recreation Plan

EXISTING RECREATIONAL FACILITIES INVENTORY Map ID#

Name & General Location

1

House Lake Campground Sherman Township

2

Trout Lake Campground Sherman Township

3

State Roadside Park Clement Township

4

Tittabawassee State Forest; Parts of several townships: Billings, Bentley, Bourrett, Clement, Grim, Hay and Secord

City of Gladwin

Description

Owner

State owned and operated campground. Located 2.5 miles NE of Meredith on an inland lake in the NW corner of the county within the AuSable State Forest. Swimming, beach, fishing, no facilities for boating/canoeing, although boating is allowed. Open all year. Cost $6 ($3 for seniors). No reservations. Campground offers 41 sites, swimming with sandy beach and bottom and warm-water fishing. House Lake offers a 2.7-mile pathway. State owned and operated campground located 3 miles NE of Meredith via Meredith Grade on an inland lake in the NW corner of the county within the Ogemaw State Forest. The campground offers 35 sites for boating. Swimmers will find a rocky bottom and no beach. Good cold-water fishing (trout), a pathway and a Code 2 gravel boat ramp. Facility is located at the intersection of M-30 and the west branch of the Tittabawassee River. Has picnic tables, scenic outlooks, a parking lot and is used by tourists. Picnickers and fisherman who utilize the river. The Tittabawassee State Forest covers nearly half of Gladwin County; primarily the eastern half. There is another small portion of the state forest located in the NW portion of the county. This state forest is managed fairly intensively for wildlife, forest products, and dispersed recreational activities, such as ORV trail riding and camping. Open all year.

State of Michigan

31

State of Michigan

State of Michigan

State of Michigan

Community Recreation Plan

5

Public Fishing Sites/ Boat Launch Butman, Sage, Tobacco, Secord and Clement Townships

6

J&J’s Marina & Landing

7

Gladwin School Nature Area Buckeye Township Gladwin County Recreation Area: Sage Township

8

9

Andy Kulich Park Hay Township

10

Gilman Springs Baptist Camp Secord Township

City of Gladwin

Four (4) sites in Gladwin County operated by Michigan Department of Natural Resources. They area located at: Pratt Lake, Wiggins Lake, Lake Four and Wixom Lake, Secord, North Tittabawassee River Marina, soccer, baseball fields. Open all year. 200-acre parcel located approximately five (5) miles SE of the City of Gladwin. Maintained by Gladwin School. Area consists of 160 acres of gently rolling land, ¼ mile wide by 1 mile in length with the Cedar River crossing the western end. Has a 40’x80’log-type lodge with a 24’x24’wing for kitchen and bath facilities. Archery range, handicapped accessible, paved hiking trail and other walking trails. Picnic area. No camping. Pavilion, primitive toilets, playground equipment, cement basketball court, baseball/softball diamond. Open all hours, year-round. Operated and maintained by Tittabawassee Lions Club. Non-denominational private youth camp, open to church groups with restrictions (non-church groups can rent but have to adhere to park restrictions). Two (2) rivers, 312 acres, dining for 150, dorms for 100, winterized. Weekend retreat for all age groups. Open year-round. Family camping for one (1) week. Youth camping from mid-June to mid-August. Programs include: archery, rifle, canoeing, arts and crafts, miniature golf, horseshoes, volleyball, water slides, tether ball, and sledding.

32

State of Michigan

Privately Owned Gladwin School District Gladwin County, Gladwin County Parks and Recreation Commission State of Michigan

Privately Owned Baptist Church Camp

Community Recreation Plan

Privately owned 174-acre summer youth camp and year-round retreat center. Overnight accommodations for 145 in dorms and cabins, 16 campsites and dining facilities for 120. Camping area with trailer hookups. Canoeing, horseback riding, hayrides, swimming, archery range. Religious affiliation. Privately owned. Picnic facilities, swimming, boating. 100 sites, modern facilities, pavilion. Horseshoe pitching, volley ball, hayrides, game room. On-site store. Private but open to public.

Privately Owned.

11

Good News Camp (Gladwin) Butman Township

12

Lost Haven Campgrounds Beaverton Township

13

Lakeside Golf Course Privately (Hockaday Road) Owned Butman Township Tobacco Road Trailer Camp Electricity, bath and shower, sanitation Privately station, central water, playground, fishing, Owned beach. Open May 1 –November 15. Curry’s Landing Primitive camping, boat rentals, trailer Privately Tobacco Township park, electrical hookup. Live bait and Owned tackle, dockage, storage. Open April 15 – October 15. Gladwin Golf Course 18-hole golf course located immediately Privately Grout Township west of the City of Gladwin. Although Owned privately owned, it is available for public use. Beaverton Rural Schools High school and elementary site City of City of Beaverton encompasses approximately 20 acres and Beaverton is located within the city limits of Beaverton. Fulfills a recreational need for elementary children who use the playground equipment and young adults using the tennis courts and baseball fields. School buildings are also available for appropriate types of public meetings. Leo Ross Park Small park located in a residential area City of City of Beaverton east of M-18 and south of the Tobacco Beaverton River. Only an acre or so but has some playground equipment and a picnic pavilion. Beaverton Churches (5) No grounds devoted to recreational Owned by City of Beaverton activity, however, some social functions individual are offered. congregations

14 15

16

17

18

19

City of Gladwin

33

Privately Owned

Community Recreation Plan

20

Ross Lake Park City of Beaverton

21

Beaverton School Nature Areas #1 and #2 Beaverton/Tobacco Townships

22

Calhoun Campground Beaverton Township

23

Lake Lancer Access Butman Township

24

Gladwin Area Walleye Association Rearing Pond Butman Township

25

Sugar Springs Butman Township

City of Gladwin

Approximately 6-acre park located on the north shore of Ross Lake within the City of Beaverton. Contains a boat launch, swimming area, and picnic facilities. A major park for city residents and also serves many residents of the southern portion of the county. Needs drainage work to stop erosion of beach and boat launch area, better restroom facilities and improvement of the beach area. Westerly portion of the park is undeveloped. Facility is presently used to capacity and should be expanded. Nature areas controlled by the Beaverton School District. Some pine trees have been planted and conservation clubs use the site for hiking, snowmobiling, and animal study. Used by school science classes. Located on Ross Lake outside the city limits south of town on Roehrs Road. Electricity, showers, and bath, water close by, sanitation station, boat and fishing dock, playground, softball diamonds, pavilion. Open May 1 –November 30. Boat launch/public access to Lake Lancer (830 acres). Operated/maintained by Butman Township. Five (5) acre fish rearing pond to support state game fish planting efforts for walleye and other species. Sponsored by Gladwin Area Walleye Association (GAWA). Privately owned waterfront development featuring 18-hole championship golf course, Olympic sized pool (used by residents from surrounding townships), modern campground, and horseback riding stables/trails.

34

Beaverton School District

City of Beaverton

State of Michigan GAWA

Privately Owned

Community Recreation Plan

26

Midland to Mackinaw Trail Midland, MI

27

Sage Township Park Sage Township

28

Allbright Shores Ice Carnival Facilities Billings Township Ralph Bears Memorial Park Clement Township Lost Arrow Resort on the Water Gladwin County

29 30

City of Gladwin

A 210 mile long hiking trail running from Northern Midland County to downtown Mackinaw City, mostly primitive in the southern half while the northern half is more modern. The trail goes through remote and wild areas of Northeast Lower Michigan allowing users to view deer, bear and small game while crossing nearly a hundred streams and rivers. There are several “horse trail”camps with water and over 90% of the trail is on public land where camping is free with a DNR permit. Small (5-acre) local park with water access, soccer, etc. Minimal facilities. New township hall is available for rental. Adjoins the park. Winter and warm weather facilities, motorcycle and snowmobile racetracks, camping area, restrooms, large building. Softball, soccer fields, and sand volley ball court. A four-season family resort offering log cabins, suites, and motel guest rooms; banquet facilities; dining rooms, trophy deer hunting, and upland game bird hunting on the Midwest’s largest highfenced range; river cruises; boat docks, indoor pool, exercise room, gift shop, water’s edge boardwalk, sporting clays and hayrides.

35

State of Michigan

Sage Township Ice Carnival Association Clement Township Privately Owned

Community Recreation Plan

Map of North City Park. City of Gladwin

36

Community Recreation Plan

Map of South City Park.

City of Gladwin

37

Community Recreation Plan

INVENTORY OF MAJOR EVENTS There are a variety of events in Gladwin County with shared participation by government and the private sector. The following list indicates the events and the month in which the event is held. JANUARY Bells on Bobtails

FEBRUARY

GBPA Annual Breakfast Meeting- 1st Wed.

MARCH GAFT Dinner Theater Farmer Appreciation Day Easter Egg Hunt-Gladwin City Park

APRIL Customer Appreciation Day, Comm.Arena Lincoln Day Dinner, Riverwalk Easter Egg Hunt-Gladwin City Park MMC Gladwin Health Fair

JULY

JulyFest –1st 10 days Fireworks –Ross Lake –weekend of 4th of July Annual Craft Show –Sugar Springs -2nd Rotary Golf Day –2nd Thursday Summer Theater –2nd weekend (Th.-Sat.) Art Fair –2nd weekend (Sat.-Sun.) Classic Car/Motorcycle Show –2nd Saturday Gladwin Airport Fly-in Show –2nd Saturday Sidewalk Sales –Gladwin –2nd weekend (Fri.-Sat.) Gladwin County Fair –3rd week Tuesdays in the Park Softball Tournament, Sports Complex

AUGUST Tuesdays in the Park Relay for Life-2nd weekend Carriage Festival 2nd weekend

MAY Donkey Basketball –first Saturday of the month Chamber Annual Golf Outing Family Free Fishing Day –3rd Saturday Softball Tournaments - Memorial Day Weekend (Sat.Mon.) Country Music Festival –Memorial Day Weekend Little League Parade –Memorial Day Weekend Memorial Day Parade –Memorial Day Championship Rodeo –Memorial Day Sat.-Sun. Community Wide Garage Sale City Wide Cleanup Day 3rd Saturday

SEPTEMBER MMCC Fall Festival-Harrison Campus GAWA Annual Dinner- K of C Hal1 Eagles #3292 Pig Roast –Labor Day Weekend Open House-Gladwin Arena

OCTOBER Founder’s Day-Historical Museum GAFT Fall Drama Fall Art Exhibit-Community Center Pumpkin Painting-Community Center Batty About Crafts-Gladwin High-3rd weekend

JUNE

Sacred Heart Rummage Sale-3rd weekend 5K Run-Walk, Community Arena Log Cabin Day, Gladwin Historical Museum

NOVEMBER

St. Anne Bazaar –1st Saturday Episcopal Church Bazaar –1st Saturday Hunter’s Dinner –Grass Lake Holiday Open House – Opening Day Lutheran Church Sausage & Kraut Dinner –14th Sacred Heart Christmas Bazaar –weekend before Thanksgiving Decorating Ross Park –last Sunday

DECEMBER

Festival of Lights Parade –1st Saturday

City of Gladwin

38

Community Recreation Plan

Recreation Facilities Policy Barrier Free Compliance As indicated in the Recreation Inventory section, the amount and variety of recreation programs available in the City of Gladwin and the surrounding area is tremendous. With the installation of the projects proposed in this plan, programs could be established to complement existing ones and make more programs more available to everyone. Continuation of the “necklace”pathway from the South City Park connecting with the Gladwin County Sport Complex and Community Arena then to North City Park (City Hall Parking Lot) and back to South City Park is most notable and will make getting to the various fields and activity areas much easier than at present. The north-south path follows a beautiful course along the Cedar River and connects the two largest city park nature areas. The continued development of the peripheral path would enable groups not only to visit the associated natural areas, expanding these wild areas for various educational and recreational programs involving native habitat, but would also to bring visitors through the city and enabling businesses to be patronized. Seniors and handicappers could take advantage of this hard-surfaced trail for exercise, fresh air, and diversion. In the winter, these pathways would afford cross-country skiing (and possible snowshoeing) and exploring of the snow-covered natural areas. The Parks Commission coordinates with Commission on Aging to provide programs with in the parks for the elders, especially in the summer. This new expanded path system would encourage extending the programs into other seasons. The improvements at the North Park Pavilion also allow for accessible activities, such as open houses, graduation parties, family reunions, etcetera. The City of Gladwin’s policy of rectifying any barriers to accessibility, and not to create any to start with, has proved successful. As indicated in previous sections, no barriers to accessibility were found except in older sites where this plan addresses their reconstruction and/or renovation. Many of the recreation programs offered by the city are either free of charge or at very minimal rates. Most programs with charges have a family fee cap allowing and encouraging participation by larger, poor families in these programs. The city regularly publishes a newsletter announcing recreational events and programs. The local paper also provides notices for programs. The city’s website, as it expands, will include up-to-date information on the parks and recreation programs and activities.

City of Gladwin

39

Community Recreation Plan

NEEDS, GOALS, AND OPPORTUNITIES

Riverwalk Trail

City of Gladwin

40

Community Recreation Plan

Analysis of Needs, Goals, and Opportunities

The commission also reviewed the analysis done by Gladwin County in its most recent Recreation Plan. The highest priority needs put forward by the commission draw upon those projects and actions of the 2000 Recreation Plan not completed, with the addition of construction of tennis courts in conjunction with the Gladwin Community School District, and a different proposed focus for the State of Michigan land south of South Park. The Historical Park as part of the Pathway and City Hall area has also been dropped. Of highest need, the commission determined, are previously planned improvements to the South Park and the completion of the peripheral path proposed to circle the city and to connect almost all the various city recreational facilities.

The Parks Commission has reviewed the community data and the recreation accomplishments of the city over the past five years. The goals it has set for its future recreational programs and facilities in Gladwin are based on these analyses and an assessment of the community’s needs and opportunities available. The goals of this recreation plan once again are: · To involve as many of the citizens, groups and organizations of the City of Gladwin as possible in its Recreation Programs. · To provide access for all its citizens, people from the region, and tourists to each of its major parks and recreation facilities · To furnish sufficient recreation facilities to serve the increasing population in the City and region and the growing number of tourists visiting the City for recreational purposes. · To coordinate and cooperate with the County, the Gladwin Community School District, and regional recreation providers to furnish ample facilities for our citizens and visitors. · To expand year-round recreational opportunities.

2000-2010 Recreational Improvements The reconstruction of the M-61 Bridge over the Cedar River allowed for the implementation of a pedestrian walkway beneath M-61 to connect the north and south parks. This pathway meanders along the banks of the Cedar River and provides a beautiful and safe passage for pedestrians and bicyclists. The new pathway has been incorporated into the walkway of the Riverwalk Place development. The Little League Association and other sports groups with Gladwin County and the city joined forces in the creation of the Gladwin Sports Complex. The complex is 55-acres with 14 ball fields (8 baseball, 2 girls softball, and 4 adult softball) 9 soccer fields, and 2 ½ peewee football fields. Also, a 24’x80’concession stand and storage building is situated on the complex. This complex serves the city and county and has filled need for these types of active sports.

The Commission reviewed its current inventory of programs and facilities against the National Recreation and Parks Association standards, “Recreation, Park and Open Space Standards and Guidelines” (1983) and found the community to meet or exceed most of these measures. The notable exceptions are a swimming pool and the number of tennis courts serving the city and county residents and tourists to the area. City of Gladwin

41

Community Recreation Plan

The City of Gladwin in 1999 enabled the construction of the Gladwin Community Arena, which is home to a full-size ice hockey rink, a fully furnished fitness center, basketball courts, an exercise activity area.

2010-2015 Proposed Improvements In analyzing the city geographically, the Commission saw an opportunity for improvement with incorporating new neighborhood parks with the peripheral pathway around the City of Gladwin. There are a few private playgrounds around the city but small public playgrounds are needed. The Commission worked with the local churches to incorporate their facilities into the peripheral walkway and allow public use of their recreational facilities wherever possible. Currently looking at plans for a Farmer’s Market.

As part of the arrangement for the Gladwin Community Arena development, the Gladwin Area Hockey Association donated its outdoor hockey rink and building to the City of Gladwin. The city has since refurbished and updated these facilities to meet barrier free design codes and integrated them into the North Park. Gladwin City Council voted to authorize its members to begin work on the “Gladwin Skate Park”at its regular meeting March 21, 2005. The Skate Park is located near the soccer field at the Gladwin North Park. The project is based on a similar skate park in Mt. Pleasant. The ramps and walls are made of metal and sit on a 100 x 100 cement slab. The area is be fenced and locked after hours of operation, which is from dawn to dusk. There is currently lighted parking in place, and the site will also be patrolled by the Gladwin City Police Department. The city assumed liability for the park and construction cost more than $80,000. In order to raise the money for the construction, the kids and their parents helped with fund raising bake sales, car washes, and anything else they could do to help with the funding.

Camper walking his dog in South Park. Community recreation facilities may exceed the national standards but improvements and additions to the North and South parks are being made annually. Because of Gladwin’s popularity as a summer vacation area the usage of its campgrounds and other facilities has increased greatly. South Park needs to add water service to eleven camping sites and at the pavilions. Electric service should be buried and upgraded for the lower campground sites (lots 1-45). With the Gladwin Community Arena, the city has become a regional center for hockey and other winter sporting activities. The

Pavilion in South Park City of Gladwin

42

Community Recreation Plan

proposed pathway system should connect to the Arena and could provide cross-country skiing around the city during the winter months. The Gladwin Community Schools Athletic Director is enthusiastic about completing the peripheral pathway. Already cross-country and other distance runners use the pathway. Access would also increase for elders (and handicappers) who use the existing pathway extensively. Exercise fitness stations along with natural study areas along the pathway are being considered.

more parking and landscaping. The possibility of a climbing wall has also been discussed.

Planned construction projects for the Gladwin Community Arena include completing the indoor walking track plus

The Beach at City Park

City of Gladwin

43

Community Recreation Plan

City of Gladwin

44

Community Recreation Plan

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City of Gladwin

45

Community Recreation Plan

ACTION AND CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PLAN

City of Gladwin

46

Community Recreation Plan

CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT SCHEDULE Year 2010-2011

City of Gladwin

Improvement

Cost $85,000

South Park Pave upper campsites roadway. Replace existing tennis courts. Construct handicapped accessible viewing and fishing deck at beach. Install sidewalk to day- use bathrooms (+75’) Upgrade electric service and provide water to all campsites (11) Install day use bathroom facility. Construct 2 accessible camping lots. Install Mobi-Mat.

Funding Sources DNR, Foundations General Fund

$14,000 $3,800 $2,500 $93,400 $90,500 $3,800 $8,000

Construct two wilderness cabins in upper camp ground

$1,000

General Fund

Prepare plans, cost estimates and phasing for peripheral pathway

$20,000

General Fund

Gladwin Arena Complete indoor walking track pave, add parking and install landscaping Continue to improve City Recreation Web Site Construct sand volleyball court in City Park Total for Year

$165,000

Donations, operating funds, foundation grants

$2,000

General Fund

$1,000

General Fund

$493,000

47

Community Recreation Plan

CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT SCHEDULE 2011-2012

Improvement Prepare plans for development of State of Michigan land south of South Park Install paved driveway at North Park canoe launch +- 200 ft.

City of Gladwin

Cost $20,000

Funding Sources General Fund/ Grants/ Donations

$4,500

DNR/ Donations/ General Fund

Peripheral Path-Phase I South Park to Sports Complex

$75,000

Total for Year

$99,500

48

DNR/ Foundations/ General Fund

Community Recreation Plan

CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT SCHEDULE 2012-2013

Improvement Pave access road and parking lots at Sports Complex Continue Recreation Web Site Improvements Peripheral Path-Phase II Sports Complex to Community Arena Community Arena Construction of meeting, card and conference rooms. Construction of trail and primitive campsites south of South Park, Phase I Total for Year

City of Gladwin

Cost $80,000

Funding Sources DNR/ Foundation Grants/ Donations

$1,500

General Fund

$100,000

General fund, DNR Foundation Grants

$50,000 $25,000

Foundations/ Donations/ Operating Funds DNR/ Foundations/General funds

$256,500

49

Community Recreation Plan

CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT SCHEDULE 2013-2014

Improvement

Cost $75,000

Peripheral Path Phase III Arena to Fifth Street Nature study area along peripheral pathway at Industrial Park Construction of trails and primitive campsites on land south of South Park Phase II Total for Year

City of Gladwin

$20,000

$75,000

Funding Sources DNR/ Foundations/ General Fund

DNR/ General Funds Donations DNR Grants/ General fund/ Donations

$170,000

50

Community Recreation Plan

CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT SCHEDULE 2014-2115

Improvement

Cost $75,000

2014-Peripheral PathPhase IV Fifth Street to North Park Community Arena Investigate addition for walking track and climbing wall Total for Year

City of Gladwin

$1,000

Funding Sources DNR/ Foundations/ General Funding

Donations/ Operating funds

$76,000

51

Community Recreation Plan

Funding and Strategic Plan The primary funder of recreation facilities for small municipalities is generally the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. The main programs managed by the Department of Natural Resources are the Michigan Natural Resources Trust Fund Program, and Federal Land and Water Conservation Fund. The Trust fund monies are made available from the sale of oil, gas, and mineral leases and royalties on State Lands. The Michigan Natural Resources Trust Fund’s goals are resource protection, water access, community recreation, urban recreation, and economic development. The Land and Water Conservancy funds are provided by the National Park Service for public outdoor recreation projects. These programs provide sizable grants on a competitive basis statewide. There are also numerous private foundations in the greater area. The Dow Foundation, Gerstacker Foundation, the Midland Area Community Foundation, Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow Foundation, Deshano Community Foundation and the Seebeck Family Fund are examples. There are also grants available from Inland Fisheries Grants and Natural Heritage Small Grants that could be sources of funding for specific projects of the Parks and Recreation Commission. The other source of support, which has been amply evidenced by the Gladwin Community Arena, and Sports Complex, is private funds –individual, and corporate. There are also grant monies available through the State of Michigan Department of Transportation for specific recreation programs. MDOT administers federal funds under the Michigan Transportation Enhancement Program. The categories of funded projects are: · · · ·

Non-motorized facilities: This includes pedestrians and bicycle facilities, preservation of abandoned railway corridors (including their conversion to pedestrian and bicycle trails) and safety and educational activities; Transportation aesthetic: This includes acquisition of scenic easements and scenic sites, scenic highway programs, landscaping and beautification, and control and removal of outdoor advertising; Water quality and wildlife mortality: This includes efforts to reduce water pollution due to highway runoff and efforts to reduce animal mortality and maintain wildlife habitat connectivity across transportation facilities; Historic preservation: This includes acquisition of historic sites, historic highway programs, historic preservation, rehabilitation of historic structures, archeological planning and research, and establishment of transportation museums.

Once the Recreation Plan is approved by the Gladwin City Council the Parks Commission will prepare a strategic plan, including grant applications to be prepared, in order to achieve the capital improvements as set forth in the plan.

City of Gladwin

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City of Gladwin

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Community Recreation Plan

APPENDIX

City of Gladwin

54

Community Recreation Plan

Recreation Facilities Policies Violations of any rule may result in revocation of camping permit or eviction from the park or both. Violation may also result in a criminal complaint being initiated. Campground reservations are taken by telephone or mail for the current and following year only. There is no fee for advanced reservations. Although not guaranteed, an effort will be made to have the site reserved. A person shall not engage in any violent, abusive, loud, boisterous, wanton, profane, obscene, or otherwise disorderly conduct; disturb or annoy others. A person shall not use a loudspeaker or sound-amplifying equipment of any kind without permission from the Park Manager or Assistant Manager. A person shall not dump, place, throw, or leave litter on the grounds or waters, except in containers provided. It is unlawful to place or dispose of garbage or refuse in park receptacles or dispose of garbage or refuse in park receptacles or dumpsters if the material originates from outside. Dogs or other animals must be under immediate control on a leash not exceeding six feet in length. Dogs or animals may not be in the bathing beach area. It is unlawful to possess glass containers in the bathing beach area. It is unlawful to ride or allow horses or other riding animals within the park or campground without prior approval of the Park Manager. A person shall not destroy, damage or remove city property, trees, shrubs, wildflowers, grasses or vegetation. It is unlawful to possess a firearm or bow and arrow. This does not apply to registered campers who are legally transporting hunting weapons. It is unlawful to discharge any device that propels a projectile by gas, air, spring, or rubber. It is unlawful to drive at a speed in excess of ten miles per hour, to drive in an unsafe manner or to disobey traffic or parking signs. It is unlawful to enter or remain in the park or campground between the hours of one-half-hour after sunset and 8 a.m. unless the person is a registered camper. It is unlawful to store or leave a boat, trailer, camper or other property in the park or campground without permission from park staff. It is unlawful to build fires except in designated fire pits and stove provided or grills approved by park staff. It is unlawful to enter the campground with a vehicle unless you are a registered camper. Legitimate visitors to a specific campsite must advise park staff of their intent when entering the park. Each campsite may be used by only one family or not more than four unrelated persons. Campers not part of a single family must at least 18 years old to register or occupy a campsite unless part of a chaperoned group, (i.e. scouts, cyclists, etc.). only two motor vehicles may be placed on one campsite. For complete list see City of Gladwin Ordinances, Title IX, Chapter 95: Parks And Recreation.

City of Gladwin

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Community Recreation Plan

List of Community Organizations Alcoholics Anonymous American Cancer Society American Legion Post #171 Beaverton Business Association Beaverton Community Center Beaverton Cooperative Nursery Beaverton Youth Recreation Program Billings Township Business Association Blue Star Mothers of America, Inc.-Gladwin County Chapter #174 Butman Township Neighborhood Watch Clare/Gladwin Literacy Council Clement Fire Association Clement Ladies Fire Auxiliary Council on Aging Disabled American Veterans Ducks Unlimited Eagles, Fraternal Order #3292 Eagles, Fraternal Order #3655 Eagles, Fraternal Order #4121 Eagles, Ladies Auxiliary Eastern Star, Order #84 Gladwin Area Hockey Association Gladwin Area Hospice Gladwin Area Ministerial Association Gladwin Athletic Association Gladwin/Beaverton Bowling Association Gladwin Business and Professional Association Gladwin Council of Arts Gladwin County Democratic Party Gladwin County Fair Association Gladwin County Farm Bureau Gladwin Artists Guild Master Gardener

City of Gladwin

Gladwin County Historical Society Gladwin County React Team Gladwin County Republican Party Gladwin County Women’s Club Gladwin Little League Gladwin Slow Pitch League Gladwin Walleye Association Gladwin Women’s Bowling Association Golden Agers Goodfellows Grass Lake Community Civic Association, Inc. Grass Lake Ladies Group Human Aid, Inc. Kiwanis Club of Gladwin Knights of Columbus Lions Club/Beaverton Mason, F&AC #397 Mid Michigan Big Brothers/Big sisters of Clare-Gladwin Area Mid Michigan Visiting Nurses Association Oddfellows, Independent Order of Rebekahs Ross Lake Rods & Relics Car Club Rotary Club Salvation Army Tobacco River Muzzleloaders Club Twin Council for Older Americans Veterans of Foreign Wars Gladwin County Post #7303 Veterans of Foreign Wars Gladwin County Post #11256 Wixom Lake Association Pheasants Forever Whitetail Association

56

Community Recreation Plan

A Recommended Classification System For Local and Regional Recreation Open Space This classification system is intended to serve as a guide to planning— not as an absolute blueprint. Sometimes more than on component may occur within the same site (but not on the same parcel of land), particularly with respect to special uses within a regional park. Planners of park and recreation systems should be careful to provide adequate land for each functional component when this occurs. The National Recreation and Park Association suggests that a park system, at a minimum, be composed of a “core” system of parklands, with a total of 6.25 to 10.5 acres of developed open space per 1,000 population. The size and amount of “adjunct”parklands will vary from community to community, but must be taken into account when considering a total, well-rounded system of parks and recreation areas. COMPONENT

USE

SERVICE

DESIRABLE

ACRES/1,000

AREA

SIZE

POPULATION

A. LOCAL/CLOSE –TO-HOME SPACE: Less than ¼ mile Specialized facilities that Mini-Park

Neighborhood Park/ Playground

Community Park

1 acre or less

0.25 to 0.5 A

¼- to ½-mile radius to serve a population up to 5,000 (a neighborhood).

15+ acres

1.0 to 2.0 A

Several neighborhoods. 1 to 2 mile radius.

25+ acres

5.0 to 8.0 A

serve a concentrated or limited population or specific group such as tots or senior citizens. Area for intense recreational activities, such as a field games, court games, crafts, playground apparatus area, skating, picnicking, wading pools, etc.

radius.

Area of diverse environmental quality. May include areas suited for intense recreational facilities, such as athletic complexes, or large swimming pools, May be an area of natural quality for outdoor recreation, such as walking, viewing, sitting, or picnicking. May be any combination of the above, depending upon site suitability and community need.

DESIRABLE SITE CHARACTERISTICS Within neighborhoods and in close proximity to apartment complexes, townhouse development or housing for the elderly. Suited for intense development. Easily accessible to neighborhood population, geographically centered with safe walking and bike access. May be developed as a school park facility. May include natural features, such as water bodies, and areas suited for intense development. Easily accessible to neighborhood served.

TOTAL CLOSE-TO-HOME SPACE = 6.25-10.5 A/1,000

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Community Recreation Plan

COMPONENT

USE

B. REGIONAL SPACE: Areas of natural or Regional/ ornamental quality for Metropolitan outdoor recreation, such as Park

Regional Park Reserve

picnicking, boating, fishing, swimming, camping, and trail uses; may include play areas. Area of natural quality for nature-oriented outdoor recreation, such as viewing and studying nature, wildlife habitat, conservation, swimming, picnicking, hiking, fishing, boating, camping, and trail uses. May include active play areas. Generally, 80% of the land is reserved for conservation and natural resource management, with less than 20% used for recreation development.

SERVICE

DESIRABLE

ACRES/1,000

AREA

SIZE

POPULATION

DESIRABLE SITE CHARACTERISTICS

Several communities. 1 hour driving time.

200+ acres

5.0 to 10.0 A

Contiguous to or encompassing natural resources.

Several Communities. 1 hour driving time.

1,000+ acres; sufficient area to encompass the resource to be preserved and managed.

Variable

Diverse or unique natural resources, such as lakes, streams, marshes, flora, fauna, or topography.

TOTAL REGIONAL SPACE = 15-20 A/1,000 C. SPACE THAT MAY BE LOCAL OR REGIONAL AND IS UNIQUE TO EACH COMMUNITY: No applicable Sufficient Variable Built or natural corridors, Area developed for one or Linear Park

Special Use

more varying modes of recreational travel, such as hiking, biking, snowmobiling, horseback riding, cross-country skiing, canoeing and pleasure driving. May include active play areas. (NOTE: any included for any of above components may occur in the “linear park”). Areas for specialized or single purpose recreational activities, such as golf courses, nature centers, marinas, zoos, conservatories, arboreta, display gardens, arenas, outdoor theaters, gun ranges, or downhill ski areas, or areas that preserve, maintain, and interpret buildings, sites, and objects of archeological significance. Also plazas or squares in or near commercial centers, boulevards, or parkways.

City of Gladwin

standard.

width to protect the resource and provide maximum use.

No applicable standard.

Variable depending on desired size.

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such as utility rights-ofway, bluff lines, vegetation patterns, and roads, that link other components of the recreation system or community facilities, such as school, libraries, commercial areas, and other park areas.

Variable

Within communities.

Community Recreation Plan

COMPONENT

USE

Conservancy

Protection and management of the natural/cultural environment with recreation use as a secondary objective.

City of Gladwin

SERVICE

DESIRABLE

AREA No applicable standard.

SIZE Sufficient to protect the resource.

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ACRES/1,000 POPULATION Variable

DESIRABLE SITE CHARACTERISTICS Variable, depending on the resource being protected.

Community Recreation Plan

Suggested Facility Development Standards Source: Roger A. Lancaster, Ed. 1983. Recreation, Park and Open Space Standards and Guidelines. Alexandria, VA: National Recreation and Park Association, pp. 60-61.

Activity/ Facility

Badminton

Basketball 1. Youth 2. High School 3. Collegiate

Recommended Space Requirements

No. of Units Per Population 1 per 5,000

Service Radius

Location Notes

¼ - ½ mile

Long axis northsouth.

1 per 5,000

¼ - ½ mile

Usually in school, recreation center or church facility. Safe walking or bike access. Same as badminton. Outdoor courts in neighborhood and community parks, plus active recreation areas in other park settings.

Long axis northsouth. Front wall at north end.

1 per 20,000

15-30 minutes travel time

½ - 1 hour travel time

Recommended Size and Dimensions

Recommended Orientation

1620 sq. ft.

Singles –17’x44’ Doubles –20’x44’ With 5’unobstructed area on all sides

Long axis northsouth.

2400-3036 sq. ft. 5040-7280 sq. ft.

46’-50’x84’ 50’x84’

5600-7980 sq. ft.

50’x94’ with 5’unobstructed space on all sides. 20’x40’–Minimum of 10’to rear of 3-wall court. Minimum 20’ overhead clearance.

Handball (3-4 wall)

800 sq. ft. for 4wall. 1000 sq. ft. for 3wall

Ice Hockey

22,000 sq. ft. including support area.

Rink 85’x200’ (minimum 85’x185’. Additional 5,000 sq. ft. support area).

Long axis northsouth if outdoor.

Tennis

Minimum of 7,200 sq. ft. single court. (2 acres for complex.) Minimum of 4, 000 sq. ft.

36’x78’. 12’clearance on both sides; 21’ clearance on both ends.

Long axis northsouth.

Indoor –1 per 100,000. Outdoor – depends on climate. 1 court per 2, 000

30’x60’. Minimum 6’ clearance on all sides.

Long axis northsouth.

1 court per 5,000

¼ - ½ mile

·Baselines - 90’ Pitching distance - 60½’ Foul lines - min. 320’ Center field - 400’+

¼ - ½ mile

2. Little League

1.2 A minimum

Field Hockey

Minimum 1.5 A

·Baseline –60’ Pitching distance –46’ Foul lines –200’ Center field –200’-250’ 180’x300’with a minimum of 10’ clearance on all sides.

Locate home plate so pitcher throwing across sun and batter not facing it. Line from home plate through pitcher’s mound run eastnortheast. Fall season-long axis northwest to southeast. For longer periods, north to south.

1 per 5, 000

3.0-3.85 A minimum

1 per 20,000

15-30 minutes travel time

Volleyball

Baseball 1. Official

City of Gladwin

60

¼ - ½ mile

4-wall usually indoor as part of multipurpose facility. 3wall usually outdoor in park or school setting. Climate important considerations affecting number of units. Best as part of multi-purpose facility. Best in batteries of 24. Located in neighborhood/commu nity park or adjacent to school site. Same as other court activities (e.g. badminton, basketball, etc.) Part of neighborhood complex. Lighted fields part of community complex.

Usually part of baseball, football, or soccer complex in community park or adjacent to high school.

Community Recreation Plan

Activity/ Facility

Recommended Space Requirements

Football

Minimum 1.5 A

Soccer

1.7 to 2.1 A

Golf-Driving Range

13.5 A for minimum of 25 tees

¼-Mile Running Track

4.3 A

Softball

1.5 to 2.0 A

Multiple Recreation Court (basketball, volleyball, tennis) Trails

9,840 sq. ft.

Archery Range

Minimum 0.65 A

Combination Skeet and Trap Field (8 station)

Minimum 30 A

N/A

City of Gladwin

Recommended Size and Dimensions 160’x360’with a minimum of 6’clearance on all sides. 195’to 225’x330’to 360’with a 10’ minimum clearance on all sides.

Recommended Orientation Same as field hockey. Same a field hockey.

900’x690’wide. Add 12’ Long axis width for each additional southwest/northtee. east with golfer driving toward northeast. Long axis in Overall width –276’ sector from north Length –600.02’ to south to Track width for 8 to 4 northwest/ lanes is 32’. southeast with finish line at northerly end. Baselines –60’ Same as baseball. Pitching distance –46’ min., 40’–women Fast pitch field radius from plate –225’ Slow pitch –275’ (men), 250’(women) 120’x80’ Long axis of courts with primary use is north-south. Well defined head, maximum 10’width, maximum average grade 5% not to exceed 15%. Capacity rural trails - 40 hikers/day/mile. Urban trails –90 hikers/day/mile. 300’length x minimum 10’wide between targets. Roped clear space on sides of range minimum of 30’clear space behind targets, minimum of 90’x45’ with bunker. All walks and structures occur within an area approximately 130’wide by 115’deep. Minimum cleared area is contained within two superimposed segments with 100-yard radii (4 acres). Shot-fall

No. of Units Per Population 1 per 20,000 1 per 10,000

Service Radius 15-30 minutes travel time 1-2 miles

Location Notes Same as field hockey Number of units depends on popularity. Youth soccer on smaller fields adjacent to schools or neighborhood parks. Part of golf course complex as a separate unit. May be privately operated.

1 per 50,000

30 minutes travel time

1 per 20,000

15-30 minutes travel time

Usually part of high school or in community park complex in combination with football, soccer, etc.

1 per 50,000 (if also used for youth baseball)

¼ - ½ mile

Slight difference in dimensions for 16” slow pitch. May be used for youth baseball.

1 per 10,000

1-2 miles

N/A

1 system per region

N/A

Archer facing north + or –45 degrees.

1 per 50,000

30 minutes travel time

Part of a regional/metro park complex.

Centerline of length runs northeast/southwest with shooter racing northeast.

1 per 50,000

30 minutes travel time

Part of regional/metro park complex.

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Community Recreation Plan

Activity/ Facility

Recommended Space Requirements

Recommended Size and Dimensions

Recommended Orientation

No. of Units Per Population

Service Radius

Location Notes

½ to 1 hour travel time

9-hole course can accommodate 350 people/day. 18-hole course can accommodate 500-550 people a day. Course may be located in community or district park, but should not be over 20 miles from population center. Pools for general community use should be planned for teaching, competitive, and recreational purposes with enough depth (3.4m) to accommodate 1m and 3m diving boards. Located in community park or school site. Should have sand bottom with slope a maximum of 5% (flat preferable). Boating areas completely segregated from swimming areas.

danger zone is contained within two superimposed segments with 300-yard radii (36 acres). Golf 1. Par 3 (18hole) 2. 9-hole standard 3. 18-hole standard

· 50-60 A · Minimum 50 A · Minimum 110 A

· Average length-vary 600-2700 yards · Average length-2250 yards · Average length-6500 yards

Majority of holes on north-south axis.

·-· 1/25,000 · 1/50,000

Swimming Pools

Varies on size of pool and amenities. Usually ½ to 2 A site.

Teaching –minimum of 25 yards x 45’even depth of 3 to 4 feet. Competitive –minimum of 25m x 16m. Minimum of 27 square feet of water surface per swimmer. Ratios of 2:1, deck vs. water.

None-although care must be taken in siting of lifeguard stations in relation to afternoon sun.

1 per 20,000 (Pools should accommoda te 3 to 5% of total population at a time.)

15 to 30 minutes travel time

Beach Areas

N/A

Beach area should have 50 sq. ft. of land and 50 sq. ft. of water per user. Turnover rate is 3. There should be a 3-4 A supporting land per A of beach.

N/A

N/A

N/A

City of Gladwin

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Community Recreation Plan

DNR Grants List

Gladwin South City Park Condition of Shelter is good

Gladwin South City Park

Condition of all elements is good

Condition of trail is good

City of Gladwin

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Community Recreation Plan

Gladwin South City Park

Gladwin South City Park

City of Gladwin

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Community Recreation Plan