Cultural Report (11-11-15).pdf - City of Vacaville

Cultural Report (11-11-15).pdf - City of Vacaville

LSA ASSOCIATES, INC. 157 PARK PLACE PT. RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 94801 510.236.6810 TEL 510.236.3480 FAX BERKELEY CARLSBAD FRESNO IRVINE PALM SPRINGS ...

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LSA ASSOCIATES, INC. 157 PARK PLACE PT. RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 94801

510.236.6810 TEL 510.236.3480 FAX

BERKELEY CARLSBAD

FRESNO IRVINE PALM SPRINGS

RIVERSIDE ROCKLIN SAN LUIS OBISPO

November 11, 2015

Melissa Nance Director of Real Estate and Development Camping World and Good Sam 250 Parkway Drive, Suite 270 Lincolnshire, IL 60069 Subject:

Cultural Resources Study for the Proposed Camping World Expansion Project, Vacaville, Solano County, California (LSA Project #CPG1501)

Dear Ms. Nance: LSA Associates, Inc. (LSA) completed a cultural resources study for the Camping World Expansion Project (project) located in Vacaville, Solano County, California (Figures1 and 2). The proposed project would develop the parcel (APN# 0133-100-040) adjacent to the current Camping World facility at 5051 Quinn Road, Vacaville, for recreational vehicle (RV) RV inventory, display, and parking. The project would include: (1) lights to provide visibility for sales and security; (2) two driveways to connect the new display and inventory parcel with the existing inventory parcel; (3) removal of an existing driveway, to be replaced with a public sidewalk; (4) widening of the remaining existing driveway to allow for delivery of RV vehicles; (5) installation or replacement of approximately 121,520 square feet of impervious surface; (6) excavation and compaction of 3 to 4 feet of fill; and (6) installation of ornamental metal perimeter fencing. The cultural resources study was conducted as part of the project’s review under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), and the CEQA Initial Study Checklist for Cultural Resources is attached to this report (Attachment B). The purpose of this study is to identify cultural resources that (1) may meet the CEQA definition of a historical resource (California Public Resources Code [PRC] §21084.1) or unique archaeological resource (PRC §21083.2) and that may be impacted by the proposed project; and (2) recommend procedures for the mitigation of impacts to such resources. The study consisted of background research and a field survey. LSA Archaeologist/Cultural Resources Manager Lora Holland, M.A., Registered Professional Archaeologist #989173, conducted the study. The study identified one previously recorded and evaluated historic-period cultural resource in the project area. This resource, consisting of a an L-shaped single-family residence, a one-story rectangular corrugated metal building, and a wood shed, was relocated to its present location and does not appear eligible for inclusion in the California Register of Historical Resources, nor does it otherwise qualify as a historical resource under the other provisions of the CEQA Guidelines §15064.5(a). Further study for cultural resources is not recommended at this time. Please see the Recommendations section for procedures regarding the accidental discovery of cultural resources or human remains during project activities.

PLANNING

|

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

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DESIGN

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Calistoga

128 V U

Santa Rosa

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121 U V

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C O S TA

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§ ¦ Oakland ¨ § ¦ § ¨ ¦ ¨ San Francisco Alameda § ¦ ¨ 80

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680

San Francisco Berkeley F R A N C I S C O

Pittsburg

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Richmond

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Lodi

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I:\CPG1501\GIS\Maps\Cultural\Figure 1_Project Location.mxd (10/7/2015)

FIGURE 1

Camping World Expansion Project Vacaville, Solano County, California

Project Location

Project Area

FIGURE 2

0

1000

2000

FEET

SOURCE: USGS 7.5-minute Topo Quads - Allendale, Calif. (1973) and Elmira, Calif. (1980). I:\CPG1501\GIS\Maps\Cultural\Figure 2_Project Area.mxd (10/7/2015)

Camping World Expansion Project Vacaville, Solano County, California

Project Area

LSA ASSOCIATES, INC.

PROJECT AREA The project area is approximately 80 feet above sea level within the southwest ¼ of Section 1 of Township 6 North, Range 1 West of the Mount Diablo Base Line and Meridian, as depicted on the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Allendale, Calif. 7.5-minute topographic quadrangle. The project area is located at 5051 Quinn Road and is bordered by residential development to the north, vacant lots to the west, commercial development to the east, and a frontage road that parallels Interstate 80 to the south. The closest natural surface water source is Canyon Creek, approximately one mile north of the project area. According to the geotechnical study conducted for the project, the soils within the project area consist of three to five feet of uncompact fill material with varying amounts of assorted debris and rubble situated on native Clear Lake clay and San Ysidro sandy loam (KC Engineering 2015; Natural Resource Conservation Service 2015). Geologically, the project area consists of Holocene alluvium deposits (Wagner et. al 1981).

BACKGROUND RESEARCH Background research was done to identify cultural resources and studies within and adjacent to the project area. The background research consisted of records searches at the Northwest Information Center (NWIC) and the Native American Heritage Commission (NAHC), and an archival map and literature review.

Records Searches LSA archaeologist Lora Holland conducted a records search (#14-161) at the NWIC of the project area and a 0.5-mile radius on April 22, 2015. The NWIC, located in Rohnert Park, California, is an affiliate of the State of California Office of Historic Preservation and the official state repository of cultural resource records and reports for Solano County. As part of the records search, LSA also reviewed the following State of California inventories for cultural resources in and adjacent to the project area: 

California Inventory of Historic Resources (California Department of Parks and Recreation 1976);



Five Views: An Ethnic Site Survey for California (California Office of Historic Preservation 1988);



California Historical Landmarks (California Office of Historic Preservation 1996);



California Points of Historical Interest (California Office of Historic Preservation 1992); and



Directory of Properties in the Historic Property Data File (California Office of Historic Preservation, 2012). The directory includes the listings of the National Register of Historic Places, National Historic Landmarks, the California Register of Historical Resources, California Historical Landmarks, and California Points of Historical Interest.

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LSA ASSOCIATES, INC.

LSA requested a search of the NAHC Sacred Lands File (SLF) on May 28, 2015, to determine if any Native American cultural resources are present within or near the vicinity of the proposed project area. NWIC Results. The results of the records searches indicate that one historic-period cultural resource, Frank’s Auto Repair, has been recorded within the project area. Two resources are recorded within the 0.5-mile search radius. Franks Auto Repair is located in the eastern portion of the project area and consists of an L- shaped single-family residence, a one-story rectangular corrugated metal building, and a wood shed. According to the Historic Architectural Survey Report, all of the buildings were constructed between 1945 and 1949 (Corbett and Kostura 1996a). Sometime between 1953 and 1968, the house and corrugated metal building were moved west from the property line to their present location due to a road widening project. During the 1970s, the house and metal building underwent a series of alterations consisting of new siding, porch replacement, a room addition, and new metal awnings. The fenestration and doors have been altered on the corrugated metal building. The property was evaluated in 1996 for its eligibility for listing in the National Register of Historic Places and in 2000 for the California Register of Historical Resources. The residence did not appear to be eligible for listing in either register at the time of the evaluations (Corbett and Kostura 1996a; Fernandez 2000). The previously recorded resources within 0.5 miles of the project area consist of CA-SOL-363H/P48-000409, a historic-period trash scatter approximately 1,400 feet southwest of the project area, and CA-SOL-383H/ P-48-000178, a historic-period road located approximately 300 feet west of the project area. The NWIC records search identified four previous studies of the entire project area. Three of these studies were completed for the Leisure town Road /I-80 interchange improvement project and consist of a Historic Architectural Survey Report (Corbett and Kostura 1996a), an Archaeological Survey Report (Guedon 1996), and a Historic Property Survey Report (Corbett and Kostura 1996b). The fourth study was a Cultural Resources Inventory Report for the Orange Drive/Quinn Road Realignment Improvement Project (Fernandez 2000). These studies identified one cultural resource, Frank’s Auto Repair, in the project area. A National Register of Historic Places evaluation was conducted as part of the Historic Architectural Survey Report for Frank’s Auto Repair. That evaluation determined that Frank’s Auto Repair was not eligible for listing in either the National Register of Historic Places or California Register of Historical Resources under any criteria. NAHC Results. In a letter dated June 11, 2015, Debbie Pilas-Treadway, NAHC Environmental Specialist, informed LSA that a review of the SLF did not indicate any “Native American cultural resources in the immediate project area.” However, the NAHC letter noted that the SLF is not exhaustive and provided a listing of Native American contacts that might have knowledge about the project area (Attachment A.)

Map and Literature Review Archival maps were reviewed for the presence of historic-period buildings and/or structures within the project area and the general vicinity to assist in determining the potential for historic-period archaeological deposits. The results of this review are presented below in Table A.

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LSA ASSOCIATES, INC.

Table A: Archival Map Review Map Name and Date

Review

1978 USGS Allendale, Calif. Quadrangle

This map depicts three buildings in the southeastern portion of the project area.

1973 USGS Allendale, Calif. Quadrangle

This map depicts three buildings in the southeastern portion of the project area.

1968 USGS Allendale, Calif. Quadrangle

This map depicts three buildings in the southeastern portion of the project area.

1953 USGS Allendale, Calif. Quadrangle

This map depicts three buildings in the southeastern portion of the project area.

1917 USGS Wolfskill, Calif. Quadrangle

This map depicts no buildings or structures in the project area.

1908 USGS Vacaville, Calif. Quadrangle This map depicts no buildings or structures in the project area.

Archival maps indicate that the project area was mostly undeveloped until the latter half of the 20th century. Three buildings were constructed between 1945 and 1949. These buildings are depicted on USGS Allendale, Calif. topographic quadrangles from 1953 to 1978. According to the Historic Architectural Survey Report, the buildings consisted of an L- shaped single-family residence, a onestory rectangular corrugated metal building, and a wood shed. The house and metal building were moved further west on the parcel due to a road widening project and the wood shed was demolished and the area paved over sometime after 1996. The sensitivity of the project area for historic-period archaeological deposits is diminished by previous demolition and construction impacts (i.e. shed removal and road widening); therefore, it is unlikely that any intact historic-period archaeological deposits are present within the project area.

FIELD SURVEY LSA Archaeologist/Cultural Resources Manager Lora Holland, M.A., RPA, conducted a pedestrian survey of the project area on April 23, 2015. The project area was surveyed with north-to-south transects spaced 10 meters apart. The native ground surface in the northeastern portion of the project area was obscured by pavement and buildings associated with the former Franks Auto Repair business. The southeastern portion of the project area consisted of the single-family residence house, landscaping, and metal fencing. Surface visibility in the western project area was good and only slightly obscured by non-native grasses. The survey was documented with field notes and photographs.

Field Survey Results The survey did not identify previously unrecorded cultural resources within the project area. The exposed soils consist of heavily disturbed imported fill material from demolition and construction of the Leisure Town Road/ I-80 interchange improvement projects. During the field survey, the owner of the property, Mr. Steve Nelson, stated his father used debris from the Interstate I-80 and Leisure Town Road Interchange Project demolition to add approximately three to five feet of fill to the northern portion of the property in the 1990s (Steve Nelson, personal communication, 2015).

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LSA ASSOCIATES, INC.

STUDY RESULTS No significant cultural resources or historic properties were identified in the project area. The native soil, Holocene-era Clear lake clay, is considered archaeologically sensitive, project excavation will not exceed the depth of imported fill; therefore the probability for encountering intact, significant subsurface archaeological resources is considered low. The study identified one previously recorded and evaluated historic-period cultural resource in the project area. This resource, consisting of a an L- shaped single-family residence a one-story rectangular corrugated metal building, and a wood shed, was relocated to its present location and does not appear eligible for inclusion in the California Register of Historical Resources, nor does it qualify as a historical resource under the other provisions of the CEQA Guidelines §15064.5(a). Further study for cultural resources is not recommended at this time.

RECOMMENDATIONS The likelihood of project impacts to cultural resources is low. This conclusion is based on (1) the negative results of this study and previous studies; (2) previous ground disturbance of the project area from construction of buildings associated with the former auto repair business and road demolition and construction; and (3) project ground disturbance occurring in existing fill material. Further study for cultural resources is not recommended at this time. However, should project-related excavation occur below fill material in native soil, there is a remote chance that archaeological deposits could be encountered. In that event, the recommendations for accidental discovery, described below, should be followed.

Accidental Discovery If deposits of prehistoric or historical archaeological materials are encountered during project activities, all work within 25 feet of the discovery should be redirected and a qualified archaeologist contacted to assess the situation, consult with the City of Vacaville, and make recommendations for the treatment of the discovery. Project personnel should not collect or move any archaeological materials. It is recommended that impacts to such deposits be avoided by project activities. If such deposits cannot be avoided, the deposits should be evaluated to determine if they meet the CEQA definition of historical or unique archaeological resources. If the deposits do not so qualify, avoidance is not necessary. If the deposits do so qualify, impacts to the deposits must be avoided or such impacts must be mitigated. Upon completion of the assessment, the archeologist should prepare a report documenting the methods and results, and provide recommendations for the treatment of the archaeological materials discovered. The report should be submitted to the City and the NWIC. Prehistoric materials can include flaked-stone tools (e.g., projectile points, knives, choppers) or obsidian, chert, basalt, or quartzite toolmaking debris; bone tools; culturally darkened soil (i.e., midden soil often containing heat-affected rock, ash and charcoal, shellfish remains, faunal bones, and cultural materials); and stone milling equipment (e.g., mortars, pestles, handstones). Prehistoric sites often contain human remains. Historical materials can include wood, stone, concrete, or adobe footings, walls, and other structural remains; debris-filled wells or privies; and deposits of wood, glass, ceramics, metal, and other refuse.

7

LSA ASSOCIATES, INC.

Human Remains. If human remains are encountered, work within 25 feet of the discovery should be redirected and the Solano County Coroner and City notified immediately. At the same time, an archaeologist should be contacted to assess the situation and consult with agencies as appropriate. Project personnel should not collect or move any human remains and associated materials. If the human remains are of Native American origin, the Coroner must notify the NAHC within 24 hours of this identification. The NAHC will identify a Most Likely Descendant (MLD) to inspect the site and provide recommendations for the proper treatment of the remains and associated grave goods. Upon completion of the assessment, the archaeologist should prepare a report documenting the methods and results, and provide recommendations for the treatment of the human remains and any associated cultural materials, as appropriate and in coordination with the recommendations of the MLD. The report should be submitted to the City and the NWIC. Please contact me at [email protected] if you have any questions. Sincerely, LSA ASSOCIATES, INC.

Lora Holland M.A., RPA #989173 Cultural Resources Manager

Attachments:

A: NAHC Sacred Lands Database Search B: CEQA Initial Study Checklist

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LSA ASSOCIATES, INC.

REFERENCES CONSULTED

California Department of Parks and Recreation 1976 California Inventory of Historic Resources. California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento. California Office of Historic Preservation 1988 Five Views: An Ethnic Sites Survey for California. California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento. 1992 Points of Historical Interest. California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento. 1995 Instructions for Recording Historical Resources. Office of Historic Preservation, Sacramento. 1996 California Historical Landmarks. California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento. 2012 Directory of Properties in the Historic Property Data File, April 5 2012. California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento. Corbett, Michael, and William Kostura 1996a Historic Architectural Survey Report, Interstate I-80 and Leisure Town Road Project, City of City of Vacaville, Solano County, California Department of Transportation District 10, SOL-80, KP 47.48/49.08. Corbett and Minor, Berkeley, California. 1996b Historic Property Survey Report, 10-SOL-I-80 KP47.48-49.08 EA 325400, Improvements to I-80. Corbett and Minor, Berkeley, California. Fernandez, Trish 2000 Cultural Resources Inventory Report for the Orange Drive Extension/ Quinn Road Realignment Improvement Project, City of Vacaville. Jones and Stokes, Sacramento, California. Guedon, Stuart A. 1996 Archaeological Survey Report, 10-SOL-I-80, Kp 47.48/49.08, EA 325400, Improvements to Leisure Town Road. Basin Research Associates, Inc. San Leandro, California. Hoover, Mildred Brooke, Hero Eugene Rensch, Ethel Rensch, and William N. Abeloe 1989 Historic Spots in California. Fourth edition, revised by Douglas E. Kyle. Stanford University Press, Stanford, California.

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LSA ASSOCIATES, INC.

Johnson, Patti J. 1978 Patwin. In California, edited by Robert F. Heizer, pp. 350–60. Handbook of North American Indians, Volume 8, William C. Sturtevant, general editor. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Kroeber, Alfred L. 1925 Handbook of the Indians of California. Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 78. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Reprinted 1976 by Dover Publications, New York. Natural Resource Conservation Service 2015 Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) Database. United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC. http://www.ncgc.nrcs.usda.gov/products/datasets/statsgo, accessed October 2015. Wagner D.L, C.W. Jennings, T.L. Bedrossian, and E.J. Bortugno 1981 Geologic Map of the Sacramento Quadrangle. California Division of Mines and Geology, Sacramento. Wood, Alley & Co 1879 This history of Solano County. Wood, Alley & Co., East Oakland, California. Reprinted by James Stevenson Publisher, Fairfield, California. United States Geological Survey 1978 Allendale, Calif., 7.5-minute topographic quadrangle. United States Geological Survey, Washington, D.C. 1953 Allendale, Calif., 7.5-minute topographic quadrangle. U. S. Geological Survey, Washington, D.C. 1908 Vacaville, Calif. 15-minute topographic quadrangle. U. S. Geological Survey, Washington, D.C.

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LSA ASSOCIATES, INC.

APPENDIX A NAHC SACRED LANDS DATABASE SEARCH

LSA ASSOCIATES, INC.

APPENDIX B CEQA INITIAL STUDY CHECKLIST

LSA ASSOCIATES, INC.

Potentially Significant Impact

Potentially Significant Unless Mitigation Incorporated

Less Than Significant Impact

No Impact

V. CULTURAL RESOURCES Would the project: a) Cause a substantial adverse change in the significance of a historical resource as defined in §15064.5? b) Cause a substantial adverse change in the significance of an archaeological resource pursuant to §15064.5? c)

Directly or indirectly destroy a unique paleontological resource or site or unique geologic feature?

d) Disturb any human remains, including those interred outside of formal cemeteries?

A cultural resources study was conducted for the proposed project area. The study consisted of background research and a field survey. The purpose of this study is to identify historical resources, unique archaeological resources, paleontological resources (fossils), and human remains that may be impacted by the proposed project and to recommend procedures for the mitigation of impacts to these resources, as appropriate. The methods and results of the cultural resources study are summarized below, and the CEQA Initial Study Checklist questions for cultural resources are addressed. Background Research Background research was done to identify cultural resources and studies within and adjacent to the project area. The background research consisted of records searches at the Northwest Information Center (NWIC) and the Native American Heritage Commission (NAHC), and an archival map and literature review. The NWIC, an affiliate of the State of California Office of Historic Preservation (OHP), is the official State repository of cultural resources records and reports for Solano County. The NAHC maintains the Sacred Lands File, which depicts reported locations of resources with cultural or religious significance to local Native American tribes. The results of the records searches indicate that one historic-period cultural resource, Frank’s Auto Repair, has been recorded within the project area. Franks Auto Repair is located in the eastern portion of the project area and consists of an L- shaped single-family residence a one-story rectangular corrugated metal building, and a wood shed. According to the Historic Architectural Survey Report, all of the buildings were constructed between 1945 and 1949 (Corbett and Kostura 1996a). Sometime between 1953 and 1968, the house and corrugated metal building were moved west from the property line to their present location due to a road widening project. During the 1970s, the house and metal building underwent a series of alterations consisting of new siding, porch replacement, a room addition, and new metal awnings. The fenestration and doors have been altered on the corrugated metal building. The property was evaluated in 1996 for its eligibility for listing in the National Register of Historic Places and in 2000 for the California Register of Historical Resources. The

LSA ASSOCIATES, INC.

residence did not appear to be eligible for listing in either register at the time of the evaluations (Corbett and Kostura 1996a; Fernandez 2000). In a letter dated June 11, 2015, Debbie Pilas-Treadway, NAHC Environmental Specialist, informed LSA that a review of the SLF did not indicate any “Native American cultural resources in the immediate project area.”

Field Survey A qualified archaeologist with LSA Associates, Inc., conducted a pedestrian survey of the project area on April 23, 2015. The project area was surveyed with north-to-south transects spaced 10 meters apart. The native ground surface in the northeastern portion of the project area was obscured by pavement and buildings associated with the former Frank’s Auto Repair business. The southeastern portion of the project area consisted of the house, landscaping, and metal fencing. Surface visibility in the western project area was good and only slightly obscured by non-native grasses. The survey was documented with field notes and photographs. The survey did not identify previously unrecorded cultural resources within the project area. The exposed soils consist of heavily disturbed imported fill material from demolition and construction of the Leisure Town Road/ I-80 interchange improvement projects. During the field survey, the owner of the property, Mr. Steve Nelson, stated his father used debris from the Interstate I-80 and Leisure Town Road Interchange Project demolition to add approximately three to five feet of fill to the northern portion of the property in the 1990s (Steve Nelson, personal communication, 2015). a)

Cause a substantial adverse change in the significance of a historical resource as defined in

'15064.5? (Potentially Significant Unless Mitigation Incorporated) Neither the records searches at the NWIC and NAHC nor the field survey identified historical resources in or immediately adjacent to the project site. For a cultural resource to be considered a historical resource (i.e., eligible for listing in the California Register of Historical Resources), it generally must be 50 years or older. Although Frank’s Auto Repair was constructed between 1945 through 1949, a previous evaluation of that cultural resource determined it was not eligible for listing in either the National Register of Historic Places or California Register of Historical Resources. Frank’s Auto Repair does not appear to have important historical associations that would qualify it as historical resources under CEQA. Therefore, no mitigation measures for built-environment historical resources are necessary. b)

Cause a substantial adverse change in the significance of an archaeological resource pursuant to §15064.5? (Potentially Significant Unless Mitigation Incorporated)

There is the potential, although low, that archaeological deposits that qualify as archaeological resources under CEQA could be encountered during project construction. Such deposits, should they qualify as archaeological resources, could be disturbed by project construction, which could result in a significant impact under CEQA Guidelines §15064.5.

LSA ASSOCIATES, INC.

Implementation of Mitigation Measure CULT-1, described below, would reduce impacts to previously undiscovered resources to a less-than-significant level. Mitigation Measure CULT-1 would mitigate this potential impact to a less-than-significant level by incorporating impact avoidance in the project work program. In the event that avoidance is not possible, the project will treat the potential loss of a sensitive resource by recovering, through documentation or excavation, the scientifically consequential data contained in the deposit that would otherwise be lost due to construction-related disturbance. In this way, the damage to the resource would be offset by the realization of its data potential. Mitigation Measure CULT-1: If deposits of prehistoric or historical archaeological materials are encountered during project activities, all work within 25 feet of the discovery shall be redirected and a qualified archaeologist contacted to assess the situation, consult with the City of Vacaville, and make recommendations for the treatment of the discovery. Project personnel shall not collect or move any archaeological materials. It is recommended that impacts to such deposits be avoided by project activities. If such deposits cannot be avoided, the deposits shall be evaluated to determine if they meet the CEQA definition of historical or unique archaeological resources. If the deposits do not so qualify, avoidance is not necessary. If the deposits do so qualify, impacts to the deposits must be avoided or such impacts must be mitigated. Upon completion of the assessment, the archeologist shall prepare a report documenting the methods and results, and provide recommendations for the treatment of the archaeological materials discovered. The report shall be submitted to the City and the NWIC. Prehistoric materials can include flaked-stone tools (e.g., projectile points, knives, choppers) or obsidian, chert, basalt, or quartzite toolmaking debris; bone tools; culturally darkened soil (i.e., midden soil often containing heat-affected rock, ash and charcoal, shellfish remains, faunal bones, and cultural materials); and stone milling equipment (e.g., mortars, pestles, handstones). Prehistoric sites often contain human remains. Historical materials can include wood, stone, concrete, or adobe footings, walls, and other structural remains; debris-filled wells or privies; and deposits of wood, glass, ceramics, metal, and other refuse.

c)

Directly or indirectly destroy a unique paleontological resource or site or unique geologic feature? (Potentially Significant Unless Mitigation Incorporated)

No paleontological resources have been identified in the project area. According to the geotechnical study conducted for the project, the soils within the project area consist of three to five feet of uncompacted fill material with varying amounts of assorted debris and rubble situated on Clear Lake clay and San Ysidro sandy loam (KC Engineering 2015; Natural Resource Conservation Service 2015). Geologically, the project area consists of Holocene alluvium deposits, which are too recent to contain significant paleontological resources (Wagner et. al 1981). Since ground disturbance associated with the proposed project would not exceed the depth of imported fill there is, therefore, a low potential for encountering fossils within surface soils. The project would have no impact on significant paleontological resources.

LSA ASSOCIATES, INC.

d)

Disturb any human remains, including those interred outside of formal cemeteries? (Potentially Significant Unless Mitigation Incorporated)

No human remains were identified in the project area. Although unlikely, should unidentified human remains be encountered during ground disturbance, their disturbance could result in a significant impact under CEQA. Implementation of the following mitigation measure would reduce impacts to a less-than-significant level. Mitigation Measure CULT-2: If human remains are encountered, work within 25 feet of the discovery shall be redirected and the County Coroner notified immediately. At the same time, an archaeologist shall be contacted to assess the situation and consult with agencies as appropriate. The project proponent shall also be notified. Project personnel shall not collect or move any human remains and associated materials. If the human remains are of Native American origin, the Coroner shall notify the Native American Heritage Commission within 24 hours of this identification. The Native American Heritage Commission will identify a Most Likely Descendant (MLD) to inspect the site and provide recommendations for the proper treatment of the remains and associated grave goods. Upon completion of the assessment, the archaeologist shall prepare a report documenting the methods and results, and provide recommendations for the treatment of the human remains and any associated cultural materials, as appropriate and in coordination with the recommendations of the MLD. The report shall be submitted to the City and the NWIC. Mitigation Measure CULT-2 would mitigate this potential impact to a less-than-significant level by incorporating impact avoidance in the project work program. In the event that avoidance is not possible, the project will treat the potential disturbance of human remains in accordance with the regulatory requirements of the procedures described above, which parallel the core requirements of California Health and Safety §7050.5. This treatment would address the disposition of the remains in a way that respectfully incorporates the wishes of the descendant community representatives.

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REFERENCES CITED

Corbett, Michael, and William Kostura 1996a Historic Architectural Survey Report, Interstate I-80 and Leisure Town Road Project, City of City of Vacaville, Solano County, California Department of Transportation District 10, SOL-80, KP 47.48/49.08. Corbett and Minor, Berkeley, California. 1996b Historic Property Survey Report, 10-SOL-I-80 KP47.48-49.08 EA 325400, Improvements to I-80. Corbett and Minor, Berkeley, California. Fernandez, Trish 2000 Cultural Resources Inventory Report for the Orange Drive Extension/ Quinn Road Realignment Improvement Project, City of Vacaville. Jones and Stokes, Sacramento, California. Guedon, Stuart A. 1996 Archaeological Survey Report, 10-SOL-I-80, Kp 47.48/49.08, EA 325400, Improvements to Leisure Town Road. Basin Research Associates, Inc. San Leandro, California. Natural Resource Conservation Service 2015 Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) Database. United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC. http://www.ncgc.nrcs.usda.gov/products/datasets/statsgo, accessed October 2015. Wagner D.L, C.W. Jennings, T.L. Bedrossian, and E.J. Bortugno 1981 Geologic Map of the Sacramento Quadrangle. California Division of Mines and Geology, Sacramento.