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Star-Orion South Diamond Project Environmental Impact Statement SECTION 7.0 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM SX03733 – Section 7.0 December 2014 S...

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Star-Orion South Diamond Project Environmental Impact Statement

SECTION 7.0 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

SX03733 – Section 7.0

December 2014

Star-Orion South Diamond Project Environmental Impact Statement

TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 7.0

SAFETY, HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM ................................. 1 7.1 Introduction ................................................................................................................... 1 7.2 Environmental Risk Management ................................................................................ 2 7.2.1 Risk Assessment ...................................................................................... 2 7.2.1.1 Methodology .......................................................................... 2 7.2.1.2 Framework ............................................................................. 3 7.2.2 Assessment of Hazards ............................................................................ 4 7.2.3 Critical Events ........................................................................................... 5 7.2.3.1 Wildfire................................................................................... 6 7.2.3.2 Hazardous Goods Spill .......................................................... 7 7.2.3.3 Slope Failure- Southern Wall of Star Pit ............................... 7 7.2.3.4 Slope failure – Other walls of Star Pit and Orion South Pit ... 7 7.2.3.5 Slope failure – Overburden and Rock Storage Pile .............. 8 7.2.3.6 Slope failure – Coarse PK Pile .............................................. 8 7.2.3.7 Berm Failure – PKCF ............................................................ 9 7.2.3.8 Collapse of Underground Works during Mining .................... 9 7.2.3.9 Explosives Magazine Fire ..................................................... 9 7.3 Sustainability Management Plan ................................................................................ 10 7.3.1 Introduction ............................................................................................. 10 7.3.2 Scope ...................................................................................................... 10 7.3.2.1 Values .................................................................................. 10 7.3.3 Vision Statement ..................................................................................... 11 7.3.3.1 Goals ................................................................................... 11 7.3.4 Sustainability Policy ................................................................................ 14 7.3.5 Sustainability Objectives ......................................................................... 15 7.3.6 Implementation ....................................................................................... 15 7.4 Monitoring and Follow-up Plan ................................................................................... 16 7.4.1 Introduction ............................................................................................. 16 7.4.2 Biophysical Monitoring ............................................................................ 17 7.4.2.1 Air Quality Monitoring .......................................................... 17 7.4.2.2 Noise Monitoring.................................................................. 18 7.4.2.3 Soil Quality Monitoring ........................................................ 19 7.4.2.4 Vegetation, Wildlife Habitat and Wildlife ............................. 19 7.4.2.5 Hydrogeology and Hydrology .............................................. 23 7.4.2.6 Surface Water Quality ......................................................... 24 7.4.2.7 Field and Laboratory Procedures for Water Quality ............ 28 7.4.2.8 Fisheries and Aquatic Resources........................................ 29

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Page

7.5

7.6

7.4.2.9 Waste Water ........................................................................ 32 7.4.2.10 Sediment Sampling ............................................................. 33 7.4.2.11 Groundwater Related Mitigation and Monitoring ................. 33 7.4.2.12 Aquatic Effects Monitoring Plan .......................................... 36 7.4.2.13 Vegetation Monitoring ......................................................... 37 7.4.2.14 Geochemical Drainage ........................................................ 38 7.4.2.15 Geotechnical Stability .......................................................... 38 7.4.3 Socio-Economic Monitoring .................................................................... 38 7.4.3.1 First Nations, Métis and the General Public ........................ 39 7.4.3.2 Worker Health Monitoring .................................................... 40 7.4.4 Auditing and Continual Improvement ...................................................... 40 7.4.5 Record Keeping and Reporting............................................................... 41 Closure and Reclamation Plan ................................................................................... 41 7.5.1 Reclamation Objectives .......................................................................... 41 7.5.2 Merchantable timber ............................................................................... 43 7.5.3 General Soil Salvage .............................................................................. 43 7.5.4 Non-merchantable vegetation, woody debris and perimeter berms ....... 44 7.5.5 Revegetation ........................................................................................... 44 7.5.5.1 On-Going Revegetation Trials ............................................. 46 7.5.6 Development and Reclamation of Site Facilities .................................... 47 7.5.6.1 Plant Site ............................................................................. 47 7.5.6.2 Processed Kimberlite Containment Facility (PKCF)............ 48 7.5.6.3 Overburden and Rock Storage Pile..................................... 50 7.5.6.4 Pit Areas .............................................................................. 52 References ................................................................................................................. 60

LIST OF TABLES Table 7.2-1: Table 7.2-2: Table 7.2-3: Table 7.2-4: Table 7.2-5: Table 7.2-6: Table 7.4-1: Table 7.4-2: Table 7.4-3:

Definition of Potential of Occurrence ............................................................................ 3 Definition of Impact on Facility Category ...................................................................... 3 Naturally Occurring Hazard Assessment ..................................................................... 4 On Site Anthropogenic Hazard Assessment ................................................................ 5 Off Site Anthropogenic Hazard Assessment ................................................................ 5 Critical Events ............................................................................................................... 6 Rationale for Surface Water Quality Site Section ...................................................... 26 Surface Water Quality Parameters for Monthly Monitoring ........................................ 28 Rationale for Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Site Section ..................................... 31

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Table 7.4-4: Table 7.5-1: Table 7.5-2: Table 7.5-3: Table 7.5-4: Table 7.5-5: Table 7.5-6: Table 7.5-7:

Waste Water Monitor Well Parameters ...................................................................... 32 Reclamation Suitability Ratings of Soils within the Project Footprint ......................... 43 Conceptual Replanting Densities (Adapted from Alberta Environment 2010) ........... 45 Closure Characteristics of the PKCF .......................................................................... 49 Closure Characteristics of the Overburden and Rock Storage Pile ........................... 52 Predicted Star Pit Lake Discharge Water Quality at Closure ..................................... 54 Closure Characteristics of the Coarse Processed Kimberlite Pile ............................. 57 Closure Cost Estimates .............................................................................................. 59

LIST OF FIGURES Figure 7.2-1: Figure 7.4-1: Figure 7.4-2: Figure 7.4-3: Figure 7.5-1: Figure 7.5-2: Figure 7.5-3: Figure 7.5-4: Figure 7.5-5: Figure 7.5-6: Figure 7.5-7:

Level of Risk Typical Dynamic Monitoring Equipment Typical Static Monitoring Equipment Water Monitoring Sites Closure Soil Nutrient and Moisture Regimes Closure Ecosite Phases PKCF Pile Cross Section OB Pile Cross Section Start Pit Closure cross Section Orion Pit Closure Cross Section CPK Pile Cross Section

LIST OF APPENDICES

Appendix 7-A: Appendix 7-B: Appendix 7-C: Appendix 7-D: Appendix 7-E:

Emergency Response Plan Hazardous Materials Management Plan Weed Management Plan Fire Control Plan University of Albert Reclamation Research

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Star-Orion South Diamond Project Environmental Impact Statement

7.0

SAFETY, HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

This Section describes the Safety, Health and Environmental Management System (‘SHEMS’) proposed for the Star-Orion South Diamond Project (the ‘Project’). The SHEMS is based on prevention, mitigation and management of impacts identified by the effects assessments for the environmental and social disciplines for the Project. The SHEMS is the fundamental way Shore’s Safety, Health and Environmental Policy will be implemented throughout the Project. Shore has developed its initial SHEMS, Environmental Protection Plans and environmental protocols to support its exploration activities. These existing programs are the basis of Shore’s SHEMS for the Project. 7.1

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of the SHEMS is to organize and guide all activities during all phases of the Project to ensure orderly, safe, compliant, and environmentally and socially responsible operations at the Project. The SHEMS aims to manage significant aspects to control or reduce the effect of the Project on the environment (biophysical and human). Shore’s SHEMS is structured as follows: Health, Safety and Environmental Policies; planning; implementation and operation; checking and corrective action; and management review and that feeds back to the policies to recommend and implement changes to the SHEMS. The aim of this structure is to promote continual improvement through a planning-executionchecking-improvement cycle. Key aspects of checking and corrective action include: monitoring and measurement; incident and non-conformance reporting, corrective and preventive action; safety, health and environmental records; and SHEMS audits. Shore will carry out periodic, documented reviews of the SHEMS to ensure the continuing relevance and effectiveness of the SHEMS and to address opportunities for improvement.

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Star-Orion South Diamond Project Environmental Impact Statement

Reviews will take into account changing circumstances and will include consideration of: results of internal and external audits; compliance records; safety records; environmental incident and response records; concerns of stakeholders, including complaints; Shore’s commitments to continual improvement and pollution prevention; and environmental performance including progress towards achievement of objectives and targets. 7.2

ENVIRONMENTAL RISK MANAGEMENT

This Section describes the physical aspects of the Project setting that could be affected by Project development. The management of environmental risk for the Project was assessed from two perspectives: evaluation of failure modes of major components of the Project using risk assessment methods; and consideration of potential accidents and malfunctions primarily related to spills or failure of mitigation measures. 7.2.1

Risk Assessment

The risk assessment process is described below in terms of methodology and framework. 7.2.1.1

Methodology

Risk is defined as the product of: the likelihood of an event; and the adverse effects (consequences) produced by the event, should it occur. Risk assessment is the process to identify potential events that could result in effects and assign likelihoods and levels of consequences. Risk management involves reviewing the results of the risk assessment, developing approaches to reduce the risk (likelihood or consequence or both) and establishing monitoring and contingency plans, particularly for the higher risk events.

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Shore conducted a risk evaluation to evaluate the likelihood of occurrence and the likely environmental consequences (in a qualitative fashion) for the Project, related to identified accidental, failure or malfunction events. The defensive measures and contingencies included were considered when evaluating the likelihoods and the consequences. The risk assessment was used in project design to identify potential environmental events requiring project modifications or further study. 7.2.1.2

Framework

The environmental risks of each of the Project components were assessed and rated for both likelihood and potential consequence. Likelihood and consequences were assessed on a four point scale ranging from negligible to high as shown in Tables 7.2-1 and 7.2-2. Table 7.2-1:

Definition of Potential of Occurrence Annual Potential (chance of occurrence per year)

Category N – Negligible L – Low M – Moderate H – High

Table 7.2-2:

< 10

-6

Life of Project Potential

Description

< 1%

Doubt it could happen

-6

-4

5 to 25%

Unlikely to happen

-4

-2

50%

It could happen

-2

-1

75 to 100%

Has or probably will happen

10 to 10 10 to 10 10 to 10

Definition of Impact on Facility Category

Category

Description

N – Negligible

-

No measurable effect to the receiving environment Non-reportable incident Minor spill retained on site <$10,000

L – Low

-

Reportable incident Minor effect on habitat Significant spill on site, no discharge violation <$100,000

M – Moderate

-

Reportable incident that may have some significant longer term implications Off-site spill or release Effect can be remediated but at a cost

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H – High

-

Permit violation Significant reversible impact on habitat <$1,000,000

-

Significant incident (real or perceived) with effect that may not be completely remediated at any cost Critical, large, irreversible effect on habitat Reportable and long-term environmental impact that is not readily remediated >$1,000,000

-

An event is considered critical if it has a large, irreversible effect upon habitat and exposes Shore to liabilities in excess of $1,000,000. Critical events are catastrophic and considered separately to ensure they are appropriately taken into account. The combination of likelihood and consequences results in a four by four matrix (see Figure 7.2-1) where nine levels of risk (I to IX) can be defined by diagonal lines through the matrix. These diagonal lines represent approximately equal levels of risk and allow higher risk events to be readily identified. 7.2.2

Assessment of Hazards

The draft Emergency Response Plan (ERP) (Appendix 7-A) contains an initial assessment of hazards as described in the following tables, and an emergency response procedure to respond to these events. These assessments will be updated prior to construction. The relatively high ranking (medium potential and high impact) of forest fire (both natural and man-made) necessitates the development of a specific wildfire management plan, which will be based on the Fire Control Plan provided in Appendix 7-D. Note that these potential rankings are based on large or out of control wild fires in the immediate area of the Project. Small, controllable wild fires within the FalC (but outside of the LSA) would have a high potential of occurrence, but would have low impacts on the facility. Table 7.2-3:

Naturally Occurring Hazard Assessment

Hazard

Potential of Occurrence

Impact on Facility

Lightning

Medium

Medium

Ice Storm

Low

High

Tornado

Low

High

Earthquake

Negligible

High

Forest Fire

Medium

High

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Star-Orion South Diamond Project Environmental Impact Statement

Table 7.2-4:

On Site Anthropogenic Hazard Assessment

Hazard

Potential of Occurrence

Impact on Facility

Chemical Vapour Release

Low

Low

Chemical Liquid Release Hydrocarbons

Medium

Medium

Structural Collapse

Negligible

High

Fire

Low

Medium to High

Radiation Release (Sorting equipment)

Negligible

Low

Explosion

Low

Medium to High

Transportation Accident On Site

Negligible

Medium

Bomb Threat

Low

Low

Workplace Violence

Low

Low

Pit Flooding

Low

High

Table 7.2-5:

Off Site Anthropogenic Hazard Assessment

Hazard

Potential of Occurrence

Impact on Facility

Access Impairment

Medium

Low

Forest Fire

Medium

High

Transportation Accident Off Site

Medium

Low

7.2.3

Critical Events

Critical events are typically those with extremely low probability of occurrence, but which consequences may be very large on the Project or on the environment. The following critical events are considered for each identified phase of the Project (Table 7.2-6), and discussed below.

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Table 7.2-6:

Critical Events Event

Construction

Operations

Closure

Large Wild Fire

X

X

X

Hazardous Goods Spill

X

X

X

Slope Failure – South Wall, Star Pit

X

X

Slope Failure – Other Walls, Star Pit

X

X

Slope Failure – Orion South Pit

X

X

X

X

Slope Failure – Coarse PK Pile

X

X

Berm Failure – PKCF

X

X

Collapse of Underground Works during Mining

X

Explosives Magazine Fire

X

Slope Failure – Overburden Pile

7.2.3.1

X

Wildfire

Large wildfires are in the area of the Project are considered to have a medium likelihood, and are listed here because of the potential long term interruption of operations and potential effect on health and safety, especially concerning site access. Wildfires are addressed specifically in a separate wildfire management plan, which will be incorporated into the draft ERP (Appendix 7-A) based on the Fire Control Plan presented in Appendix 7D. As a clarification on the risk assessment of wildfire, the risk of wildfire could be considered high based on the average age of the forest and other factors outlined in the draft FalC Land Use Plan. However, when considered in the context of the duration of the project, likelihood of a fire occurring that could impact operations is considered medium, as Project duration (25 years) is finite, and with consideration that most of the area in the immediate area of the Project are young, regenerating stands which are less likely to experience high intensity wildfires that would directly threaten site facilities. Regardless of the rating, wildfire is an important hazard and Shore is committed to appropriate wildfire training and response as outlined in Section 7.0 and Appendix 7-D. Shore will have on site emergency response capabilities (fire truck, trained staff and other equipment) in order to respond to, and take initial action on small fires.

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7.2.3.2

Hazardous Goods Spill

Hazardous goods spills that are not immediately containable and enter fish-bearing water bodies as a result of accidental release or pose irreversible hazards to the terrestrial environment (e.g., vehicular accident involving a truck full of diesel fuel) have the potential to cause a high environmental impact. These possibilities are specifically addressed in the ERP and in the Hazardous Substances Wastes and Dangerous Goods (HSWDG) Management Plans (Appendix 7-B). 7.2.3.3

Slope Failure- Southern Wall of Star Pit

Slope failure of the southern wall of the Star pit, adjacent to the Saskatchewan River, is the most catastrophic event considered in the EIS. The potential for slope failure between the pit and the river could potentially result in the river being diverted into the pit. This would create unacceptable environmental changes, including changes to the path of the river, creating an unauthorized harmful alteration, disruption and destruction of fish habitat, and preclude mine operations. Slope design has been conducted to be conservative at a geotechnically stable angle. Overall slopes in the overburden are planned at 16.5 degrees (P&E 2010). This provides a factor of safety of 1.10 or higher on the pit slopes during operations. Additionally, the Saskatchewan River is separated by approximately 300 m of soils (surficial, sands and silts and clay till) at its closest approach and is highly unlikely to experience a failure that would connect the pit to the Saskatchewan River. Continuous monitoring and state of the art mine survey equipment will monitor pit slopes to detect any slight movements of the pit walls. As slope failures often begin with small movements, early identification of movement will allow Shore to re-direct resources to stabilize the slope. Additionally, backfilling of the Star pit with Orion South overburden is planned to begin at the south part of the Star pit, as soon as possible (likely in Year 13). This will reduce the slope, further increasing long term stability, and load the toe of the slope, thus further reducing the possibility of failure. 7.2.3.4

Slope failure – Other walls of Star Pit and Orion South Pit

Slope failure in the other areas of the Star pit and in the Orion South pit would lead to an unplanned expansion of the pit footprint, leading to potential loss of dewatering centers and mine infrastructure. This critical event would cause a moderate, permanent change to the project footprint; however, reclamation would be able to return affected areas to a forest ecosystem.

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Slope design has been conducted to be conservative at a geotechnically stable angle. Overall slopes in the overburden are planned at 16.5 degrees for the Star pit (P&E 2010). The OS pit utilizes an inter-ramp angle of 16° above the 340 m elevation for overburden and an inter-ramp design slope of 30° below the 340 m elevation for design of the Orion South pit (Figures 2.6-6 and 2.6-7). The 16° inter-ramp angle would consist of a bench height of 15 m with a 22° batter angle, resulting in an average berm width of 15 m. In the till units an inter-ramp angle of 18° would consist of a bench height of 15 m with a 34° batter angle, resulting in a berm width of approximately 15 m. This provides a factor of safety of 1.10 or higher on the pit slopes during operations. As stated, state of the art mine survey equipment will monitor pit slopes continuously to detect any slight movements of the pit walls. As slope failures are often presaged by small slope movements, monitoring and early identification of movement will allow Shore to redirect resources to stabilize the slope. 7.2.3.5

Slope failure – Overburden and Rock Storage Pile

Slope failure of the overburden and rock storage pile could mobilize material and lead to impacts on Caution Creek or the 101 Ravine, and/or bury additional terrestrial habitat. This catastrophic event would cause a moderate, permanent change of the Project footprint, however reclamation would be able to return affected areas to a forest ecosystem. Inspections and surveys will be conducted as the pile is constructed to monitor for potential mass movements. The pile is designed to be geotechnically stable at a height of 60 m. Backfilling into the Star pit has the potential to reduced this height, thus further improving stability. Side slope angles have been designed to be no steeper that 4:1. 7.2.3.6

Slope failure – Coarse PK Pile

Slope failure of the Coarse PK pile could mobilize material and lead to impacts on the Duke Ravine drainage channel, or bury additional terrestrial habitat. The Coarse PK pile will be formed as material is transported by conveyor to the pile, and will be designed to have slope movement as part of the evolution of this facility. Therefore, only a slope failure on an extreme scale would be considered to be a risk. This scale of event would only cause a low to moderate, permanent change of the Project footprint; however, if necessary, reclamation would be able to return affected areas to a forest ecosystem. Inspections and surveys will be conducted as the pile is constructed to monitor for potential mass movements, on a large scale. Side slope angles have been designed to be approximately 4:1, or lower than the angle of repose of this material.

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7.2.3.7

Berm Failure – PKCF

Slope failure of the PKCF berm could mobilize significant quantities of Fine PK and process water into the environment, towards the Duke Ravine or the English Creek drainage channel, or over terrestrial habitat. The worst case would be if a failure released all contained water and suspened fine PK into a simgle drainage, leading to the release water and sediments into the Saskatchewan River, potentially causing a harmful alteration, disruption and destruction of fish habitat. The sediments could be considered release of a deleterious substance into the river. This catastrophic event would cause a major, but short term effect on the Saskatchewan River due to the non-acutely toxic nature of the Fine PK and process water. PKCF berms are designed to rest at a 4:1 slope angle, and due to the centerline construction of the berms using dewatered tailings, are lower than the angle of repose of the material. This reduces the possibility of failure. In addition, regular inspections and surveys of the PKCF are planned during construction and operations to identify areas of instability before they become a problem. 7.2.3.8

Collapse of Underground Works during Mining

Exploration of the Star and Orion South kimberlites included underground drifting. The open pits are planned to mine through these underground drifts. There is the possibility that heavy equipment could inadvertently drive over these underground workings, and cause a collapse. This would have minimal environmental effect, but could impact operations. The locations of the drifts are surveyed and known, so proper mine planning will identify the areas and depths of the underground workings so that these areas can be excavated safely. 7.2.3.9

Explosives Magazine Fire

In the event of a fire in the explosives magazine, up to 70 tonnes of ammonium nitrate-fuel oil (ANFO) explosives may explode. Mitigation includes proper siting and maintenance of buffer areas, construction of an appropriate fire break around the facility, and the following of safe handling procedures. The environmental effects of this event are considered minimal and short term, however the potential effects on health and safety are considered high. No interaction with other chemicals is expected, as no other chemicals will be stored in the magazine. Details on specific explosives fire management will be included in the detailed ERP.

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7.3

SUSTAINABILITY MANAGEMENT PLAN

7.3.1

Introduction

Shore recognizes the value in incorporating the principles of sustainable development in all aspects of the Project. Shore’s success with the Project depends on the responsible management of economic, environmental and social factors. This plan outlines Shore’s vision, values, goals, and implementation to guide the sustainable development of the Project. 7.3.2

Scope

Shore’s values are guided by a commitment to long-term sustainable development. These values are outlined in the following subsection. 7.3.2.1

Values

Shore’s sustainability management plan is based on the following key values: Safety, People, Environment, Community and Security. Shore also acknowledges that responsible development of the Project requires careful consideration of economic viability.

Safety Shore seeks to maintain a safe and healthy workplace for all employees with the ultimate goal of zero lost time incidents, and to foster company-wide awareness and cooperation in safety to develop an environment in which all employees can work safely and productively.

People Shore values its workforce and strives to develop a respectful and representative workplace which recognizes the diversity of individuals while promoting a team environment.

Environment Shore recognizes and respects the inherent value of the environment and seeks to minimize impact on the environment through strategic planning, implementation of best management practices and innovation, while striving to continually improve the quality of its environmental practices.

Communities Shore values the communities neighbouring its operations and hopes to see the quality of life of their citizens enhanced by emerging employment and business opportunities.

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Star-Orion South Diamond Project Environmental Impact Statement

Security Shore seeks to provide professional and efficient security to ensure appropriate safeguards are in place to protect our employees and assets. 7.3.3

Vision Statement

Shore’s vision statement, set out below, will guide the decisions made and the development of all activities with regard to the Project. At Shore Gold Inc., we seek to provide value to shareholders by identifying, exploring, and ultimately developing quality natural resource properties in an environmentally, socially and economically responsible manner while providing employment and economic opportunities to individuals and communities. 7.3.3.1

Goals

Safety Goals Shore will ensure that it maintains a comprehensive Health and Safety program incorporates the safety measures necessary to provide a safe workplace and will ensure employees are aware of their roles and responsibilities as key partners within all components of the Health and Safety Program. Shore is committed to: identifying, assessing and managing health and safety risks; educating employees in best health and safety practices; educating employees in compliance with applicable health and safety rules and regulations; and investigating incidents promptly and thoroughly to determine the root cause and prevent re-occurrence.

People Goals In order to develop a workforce which represents the diversity of skills required to advance the Project and is representative of the population of the geographic areas in which the Project operates, including communities and cultural groups surrounding the Project, Shore will recruit and develop a dedicated workforce committed to the advancement of the Project. Shore is committed to:

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providing a workplace that rewards and inspires talented and motivated individuals; offering opportunities for growth and success, supporting performance excellence and fostering continuous improvement in all areas of work; creating and maintaining a work environment in which all individuals are treated with respect and dignity; and establishing a work environment which promotes equal opportunity, cooperation and full participation for all its employees.

Environmental Goals Shore considers the environment as an integral part of all stages of project planning and strives to implement and follow environmental best management practices. In order to meet or exceed regulatory and industry standards, promote a shared responsibility for environmental management with all employees and to adapt to changes in regulation and the natural environment, Shore will: collect and analyze meaningful environmental information to better understand the potential effects of its activities on the environment; evaluate alternatives and maintain flexibility in project design to reduce its environmental footprint where practical; educate employees in environmental best management practices and permit conditions relevant to their work; continually monitor, evaluate and modify its environmental practices and procedures where applicable; use innovative solutions to reduce its environment footprint by: reducing, reusing and recycling wastes; maximizing the benefits of any resource utilized; and evaluate procedural alternatives and new technologies.

Community Goals Shore will build long-term relationships with neighbouring communities and will engage these communities through open communication and mutual respect to share information and allow community partners to participate in meaningful ways. Shore will gather community input to shape Project development and will provide opportunities for communities to enhance their ability to participate in economic opportunities provided by the Project.

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For the duration of the Project, Shore will recognize the unique position of First Nations and Métis people in Canada through their treaty and constitutional rights, will provide support to the government in respect of the government’s duty to consult with First Nations and Métis people, and will assess and discuss the potential socio-economic benefits of the Project with First Nations and Métis communities through employment and business participation. Shore will achieve this by: working collaboratively with communities, governments and institutions to create training opportunities for skill development in industry-related occupations; providing employment opportunities with a focus on local participation and build relationships with local suppliers and businesses to obtain quality, competitively priced goods and services in a timely fashion; developing meaningful engagement and communication with First Nations and Métis and other neighbouring communities; creating mutually beneficial relationships with First Nations and Métis communities to promote training and recruitment of young people into trades, technical and skilled occupations; and networking with the government to support and facilitate the government’s duty to consult process, when possible. Shore is committed to implementation of measure to facilitate Aboriginal participation in the Project. Details of these measures may become formalized as part of confidential discussions underway with specific Aboriginal groups toward the development of an Impact Benefit Agreement or Participation Agreement. Regardless of the successful conclusion of Agreements with any or all Aboriginal groups, Shore is committed to the following: supporting Aboriginal education and training, to obtain skills and qualifications necessary for employment related to the Project; supporting community development in the region through donations and sponsorships; Shore’s Representative Workforce Policy will provide employment opportunities for Aboriginal community members. As described in Section 5.4.1.3, 27.2% of the population in the RSA self indentified as Aboriginal. As such, Shore anticipates that about 27 to 30% of the Project Workforce will be Aboriginal; Shore will develop procedures that facilitate and support Aboriginal business participation in the Project;

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Shore will continue community engagement activities throughout the Project in order to share and exchange information to increase the transparency of the Project and to develop community level understanding; and Shore will compensate for direct trapping losses due to the Project.

Security Goals In order to ensure a safe and secure work environment and to limit the possibilities for theft and ensure the protection of its assets by planning and coordinating effective and efficient security initiatives, Shore will: develop and promote a sense of security awareness as a shared responsibility for all its employees; ensure professionalism, cooperation, sensitivity, and mutual respect are maintained throughout security programs and initiatives; and foster stakeholder and partner confidence by ensuring a consistent standard of enhanced security. 7.3.4

Sustainability Policy

Shore’s Sustainability Policy includes commitments to benefit the local economy, environmental protection, capacity building, and partnerships, including: implementing and maintaining ethical business practices and meeting or exceeding applicable sustainability standards and legal requirements; integrating short, medium, and long-term sustainable development considerations and practices into its decision making; engaging with people affected by its activities in an effective and transparent manner and considering their views and concerns; respecting cultures, customs, heritage and values in its dealings with local First Nations, Métis and other communities; contributing to the conservation of biodiversity, and using integrated and consultative approaches to land management; and developing partnerships that foster sustainable development, including enhancing the social and institutional development and economic benefits for the local First Nations, Métis and other communities.

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7.3.5

Sustainability Objectives

Within each value, objectives were determined, and goals established to strive to meet each objective. These objectives and goals are summarized below.

Safety Objective: To ensure a safe and healthy workplace and to share responsibilities related to safety.

People Objective: To value performance and foster a respectful workplace that is representative of a diverse workforce.

Environmental Objective: To undertake comprehensive planning utilizing industry best environmental management practices, innovation and continuous improvement.

Community Objective: To be involved in the local communities, including First Nations and Métis communities, and to provide economic opportunities for those communities.

Security Objective: To provide security for employees and assets and foster stakeholder and partner confidence.

7.3.6

Implementation

Program Development Shore corporate governance practices guide the development of management systems. Some of the performance objectives will be further developed during the transition between development and production of the Project to include mine managers in the process. Shore has a variety of programs that have been previously developed that support its sustainability initiatives.

Sustainability Planning

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Shore has begun to identify and engage stakeholders in discussions about the elements of sustainability. Potential objectives for the Project will be assessed with reference to Shore’s vision and sustainability commitments. This engagement process will result in a set of Project-specific sustainability objectives, implementation plans, metrics and reporting criteria.

Assessment of Progress Shore will test its progress against the sustainability objectives both at the corporate and Project level. Indicators and Monitoring Shore will establish a set of specific indicators to monitor its contributions to, and effects on, sustainability. Results of indicator monitoring will be reported annually in the Project’s Sustainability Report as a part of the annual environmental report beginning at the end of the first full year of operations. Ongoing Engagement and Review As part of the on-going consultation process Shore will continue to host regular (likely quarterly) Diamond Development Advisory Council (DDAC) meetings, with representatives from the local First Nation, Métis and other communities. An engagement and review process will be established that provides for annual reporting as a part of the annual environmental report, including comment monitoring results and an on-going stakeholder forum process for discussing current and future initiatives. 7.4

MONITORING AND FOLLOW-UP PLAN

The monitoring and follow up plan provides the conceptual framework for construction, operation, closure and post closure monitoring for the Project. A more detailed plan will be developed prior to construction once detailed engineering is completed. 7.4.1

Introduction

Monitoring will allow Shore to adjust the Project to inevitable changing conditions. Mitigation and management for the Project before it is constructed depends on assessment of potential impacts and public and government concerns expressed through engagement and the approval process; however, it is almost impossible to fully and accurately predict all environmental effects which might arise from the Project at an early stage, as it is possible that the impact assessment may fail to identify and mitigate all negative impacts which the

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Project could have on the natural and social environment. For these reasons, monitoring and evaluation of the Project's environmental impact following approval and implementation is an important part of the overall project cycle. 7.4.2

Biophysical Monitoring

Monitoring of the biophysical environment will include monitoring of the valued components identified as part of the impact assessment, as listed below, and will be carried out through all phases of mining as appropriate: air quality; noise; terrain and soils disturbance; vegetation, wildlife habitat and wildlife; hydrology; surface water quality; aquatic effects; groundwater quality and quantity; sediment; reclamation and revegetation; geochemical stability (ARD/ML); and geotechnical stability (of berms, dykes and overburden and rock storage and processed kimberlite storage piles). 7.4.2.1

Air Quality Monitoring

The air quality monitoring plan will address the concentration of suspended particulate matter in the air surrounding the major areas of activity (dynamic monitoring; Figure 7.4-1) and the deposition rate of particles (static monitoring; Figure 7.4-2). Dynamic monitoring will be based on high volume (HV) air sampling for PM10 and PM2.5. The monitors will be deployed at the site boundary in the direction of the prevailing wind (i.e., the east side), away from any taller structures or trees. Results will be extracted on a monthly basis for comparison to the relevant ambient air quality standards in order to determine the status of Project compliance and, if necessary, guide in implementation of the most appropriate mitigation method.

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Static monitoring of dust deposition will follow the ASTM D1739-98 Standard Test Method for Collection and Measurement of Dustfall (Settleable Particulate Matter), using a dust canister to measure the amount of dust that settles out of the atmosphere by the effect of gravity deposited on a unit area over a certain length of time. The Saskatchewan provincial standard is 20 g / (m2 month). It is proposed to deploy three static samplers: one, at the east side of the site, near the dynamic sampler; one by the Star pit near the waste conveyor; and one in the area of the processing plant near the overburden and rock storage pile. The samplers will be replaced every month and gravitational analyses performed at an accredited laboratory. The purpose of ambient air quality monitoring is not only to check degree of compliance but also to: commit to reporting emissions in support of Canada’s Voluntary Challenge Registry (see www.ghgregistries.ca/assets/pdf/Challenge_Guide_E.pdf); refine environmental management systems, reporting and stewardship; share data with regulators to provide a better understanding of air quality; and report particulate matter emissions to National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI), if necessary. The particulate matter monitoring program will be implemented for the operations phase only as emissions during the construction phase will continuously change spatially and temporally. After the first year of monitoring during the operation phase, the results will be reviewed and the sampling program will be maintained, expanded, contracted, or discontinued, as appropriate. The monitoring program will adhere to the Air Monitoring Directive for Saskatchewan (SMOE 2007). For particulates the Canada-wide National Air Pollution Surveillance Network monitoring program (NAPS) will be followed. Shore will conduct 24-h continuous sampling every 6th day according to the NAPS monitoring schedule. Static samplers will be deployed for monthly periods. 7.4.2.2

Noise Monitoring

To effectively manage noise and blast emissions throughout the life of the Project a noise monitoring program will be implemented. An ambient 24-hour sound monitoring survey will be conducted annually once full production is reached to verify predictions in Section 6.2.3.3 and measure the actual ambient sound level for the day and night time periods, 1500 m from the noise sources and at any identified critical receptors. The survey will include the sound pressure level of the slow-response, Aweighted, 1/3 octave bands between 31.5 Hz and 16 kHz required for the tonal and

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impulse/impact adjustment. The calculated permissible sound levels described in Section 6.2.3.3 will be reviewed when the Project is in operation. No other noise monitoring program is proposed unless a noise complaint investigation must be undertaken. In such cases Shore will attempt to resolve the issue through direct contact with the complainant to understand the concerns and establish a dialogue to set reasonable expectations, and a time frame for action to resolve the issue. 7.4.2.3

Soil Quality Monitoring

Sampling frequency and parameters analyzed for soil quality will be adapted based on results from air quality and surface water monitoring results, to evaluate the linkages between deposition of dust on soil quality and potential drawdown of groundwater on soil moisture. Soil monitoring will be coordinated with vegetation monitoring to occur at the same sites, and may be integrated with existing Provincial monitoring sites within the FalC. The soil monitoring program will include two rounds of sampling in Year 1 (May and August to determine if any seasonal variations occur) to collect additional baseline information, including moisture content. Thereafter, monitoring will take place as required based on the results of the air quality monitoring and surficial groundwater monitoring. Monitoring would be conducted with test pits located downwind and down gradient from mine facilities; and upwind and upstream from these facilities at designated control points.

The suite of analyses for the monitoring program may include: inorganic: pH (H2O), CEC+Ca+Mg+K+Na; Anion Exchange Capacity; electrical conductivity+S+SO4; Phosphorus; and full metals scan using ICP-MS; organic: toluene extractable organics. 7.4.2.4

Vegetation, Wildlife Habitat and Wildlife

Biodiversity

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Impacts were predicted at a regional level due to increased areas of disturbance and linear disturbances. These are best monitored by maintaining a spatial disturbance data layer and measuring landscape level indicators on a regular basis. An update interval of 10 years is suggested. Other biodiversity effects are addressed within the Vegetation and Wetlands and Wildlife subheadings below.

Vegetation and Wetlands Vegetation monitoring will provide additional information to verify predicted impacts and could be used to help develop mitigation programs and best management practices and policies. The increase in weeds and other non-native plant species was predicted to have significant effects on vegetation in the Local Study Area. Vegetation monitoring will include annual onsite monitoring of weeds and other non-native plant species. Information from this monitoring will be used to help plan control measures as planned in the Project Weed Management Plan (Appendix 7-C). Successful implementation of this plan will reduce these predicted impacts.

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Biodiversity monitoring is suggested for species at risk that occur within the LSA. The suggested monitoring interval is annually for two years to establish initial conditions, followed by once every five years, to examine long term trends. The following taxonomic groups, with consideration of appropriate SARA listed species, would be monitored using standard methods applicable to each discipline: Plants; Songbirds; Amphibians; and Butterflies. Searches will be conducted to identify suitable habitat outside of the Project footprint. These areas could then be used to transplant known rare plants that would be disturbed or removed during Project clearing as mitigation. This is needed to ensure that these species are not permanently lost within the confines of the Project footprint. If species can be relocated into suitable habitat prior to clearing activities, these relocation sites will be monitored as part of the species at risk program. If a rare plant species is delisted, monitoring of this species would cease. Monitoring of vegetation within a variety of sites (i.e., old growth forests, wetlands, riparian communities and uncommon vegetation classes) will be conducted to ensure theses areas are not further affected by encroaching weeds or other edge effects. The monitoring interval will be annually for two years followed by once every five years. The total area of these vegetation features should also be monitored using updated spatial data on 10 year intervals, to ensure the total area is not being reduced by Project disturbances. As part of the vegetation monitoring, berries and other country foods will be collected to supplement understanding of effects on country foods. Wetlands are also predicted to be impacted by the Project due to drawdown associated with mine dewatering. A monitoring program examining the effects on wetland vegetation will be implemented, including monitoring of a reference wetland outside of the area of direct predicted effects. The monitoring interval will be annually for two years followed by once every five years.

Wildlife Effects monitoring for wildlife will be used to confirm the accuracy of the effects predictions in the EIA and to assess the effectiveness of mitigation and enhancement measures. Adaptive management will form the basis for the mitigation and monitoring program. The Project effects will be minimized and managed by following best management practices,

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adjusting mitigation measures, and implementing new mitigation measures where required. As part of the wildlife monitoring, wild game meat will be periodically collected and tested to further understanding on effects to country foods. Wildlife monitoring will include pre-construction monitoring and construction/operations phase monitoring. Pre-construction wildlife surveys will be conducted by trained Shore employees. The pre-construction surveys will be subject to the timing of construction activities relative to construction activity restriction windows, to identify active nests or dens of species of conservation concern. Activity restriction buffers (distance and timing) during construction will be followed as per industry best practice. The majority of clearing is planned to occur during early and mid-winter, outside of the activity restriction windows. However limited clearing of smaller blocks may occur during an activity restriction window. Should such instances arise, appropriate pre-construction surveys (e.g. a migratory bird nest search) will be conducted within 7 days of the clearing activity to confirm whether the clearing can proceed without affecting a species of conservation concern (including relevant SARA listed species. Construction and operation phase monitoring will include: Annual monitoring at least the first two years of construction to establish an appropriate baseline. The monitoring will then be adjusted (e.g 3 year intervals) where appropriate to monitor trends during the operation phase. Monitoring will include: Wildlife winter track and ungulate pellet transect surveys to assess changes in range occupancy by ungulates and other wildlife within the LSA ±10 km buffer. Wetland monitoring of representative sites within the LSA ±5 km buffer to assess changes in wildlife distribution and use in relation to project activities by amphibians (spring call survey), waterfowl/waterbirds (spring nesting survey) and passerine birds during breeding/nesting season Systematic point-count bird surveys of the LSA and a control area to assess changes in community structure in relation to the project footprint and to monitor use by migratory birds and bird species of conservation concern. Nesting raptor survey of LSA ±5 km buffer during construction and operation phases to assess whether local project activities might be having an effect on raptors (particularly for species that reuse platform nests) proximate to the Project area monitoring of wildlife mortalities due to human interactions (e.g., vehicle collisions) along Project roads and facilities;

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monitoring the, sewage lagoon, kimberlite and overburden piles, and other site facilities for wildlife use during the life of the project to identify potential or actual wildlife-project conflicts that can be mitigated or avoided; monitoring reclaimed areas as appropriate, to assess effectiveness of reclamation on wildlife re-colonization and use; and maintaining a daily wildlife management log to determine Project areas where wildlife interactions are most common and helping to develop a hazard awareness program to reduce wildlife/human/operations interactions. 7.4.2.5

Hydrogeology and Hydrology

A program to monitor groundwater levels in dedicated monitoring wells installed by Shore in all appropriate geological layers (i.e., Mannville Formation, Colorado Shale (if present), lower till, upper till, and surficial sands) and in private water supply wells will be developed to confirm the predictions of dewatering effects. This will include wells located close to and distant from the Project and wells completed in different aquifers, including the Mannville Group aquifer and deep sand seam aquifers in the till. Limited domestic wells in surficial sands will also be monitored, as will peizometers installed in the surficial sands within the FalC. A number of monitoring wells outside the drawdown cone of the mine in analogous environmental conditions will also be included to identify seasonal and climate variations. Further details are provided in Section 6.2.6. Other monitoring will include: continuous measurements of the discharge volume from the dewatering systems; periodic sampling of the discharge water; stream flow measurements in area creeks and in a reference watershed; and collection of climate data from established monitoring stations, including precipitation and snow pack data. The monitoring will be used to confirm that the predictions based on the groundwater model are consistent with observed drawdowns, and to incorporate newly drilled private wells drilled in the region into the monitoring program. As part of the follow up program, the ground water model will be periodically updated and calibrated to the new data. The monitoring will continue for at least two decades after pumping ceases, and will continue until a clear recovery trend is established after mine closure. Groundwater modelling predicts changes in area streams, particularly English Creek which is fish bearing. The hydrology monitoring network set up for the baseline studies will be reestablished and will be updated to include water level gauges to be installed and operated throughout the open water season. These sensors will be pulled during the ice-over season

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since levels on ice covered streams are not accurate due to water flowing over the ice and between ice layers. The established stage-discharge relationships will be used to convert water levels to discharges. Data will be used to monitor the effects of the Project on stream water levels and as a check against impact predictions. Water level gauges and flow monitoring are proposed for hydrological monitoring at all locations. Shore will continuously monitor water levels and flow with data loggers set to record measurements at a minimum of every 15 minutes at each location. Shore proposes to download data monthly from all stations. Monitoring will begin at construction and end once closure and appropriate release of the site is completed. 7.4.2.6

Surface Water Quality

Water quality monitoring will commence at construction and continue through the postclosure period, with the goal of identifying changes in water quality before they become impacts, according to the principles and study design suggested in the Metal Mining Effluent Regulations (MMER). The aquatic effects monitoring plan will be designed according to all applicable regulations. Methodology will follow guidance contained in CCME Protocols Manual for Water Quality Sampling in Canada (CCME 2012). Monitoring will be modified as required by changes in the Project and future regulatory requirements (i.e., the development of specific diamond regulations) to reflect: adaptive management and lessons learned; changes in the mine configuration; and regulatory requirements at the time of the update as prescribed.

Construction Period Mine Site During site clearing, temporary sedimentation ponds will be constructed as needed to prevent sediment export to surface water bodies, and will operate to settle suspended solids and release water overland or receiving streams. Target release water quality will be in accordance with the Metal Mine Effluent Regulations or other appropriate limits. During construction, daily field turbidity readings will be taken and monthly samples will be collected for lab TSS analyses. A turbidity action level (where additional mitigation/treatment may be needed) will be negotiated with SMOE prior to issue of the effluent permit. The location and timing of construction of temporary sedimentation ponds will be developed during detailed engineering and prior to commencement of construction.

Access Road Upgrade

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Access road upgrades will follow best practices and, for crossings of fish-bearing waters, DFO Operational Statements pertinent to road construction and maintenance in Saskatchewan. Silt screens will be used to prevent sediment transport downslope into water bodies. Construction that could affect fish bearing water bodies will not be carried out during rain storm events. Any new or upgraded ditches over 5% grade will be armoured to reduce erosion. Standard erosion and suspended sediments monitoring will be provided to ensure adequacy of mitigation measures.

Operations Period During operations surface water quality monitoring will include, at a minimum, monthly sampling of the sites shown on Figure 7.4-3 to evaluate compliance with water quality requirements and to observe changes over time. At a minimum, monthly sampling of PKCF water effluent will commence once the facility is constructed and Fine PK is pumped to it. Frequency of sampling may be adjusted as required to meet the requirements of the Aquatic Effects Monitoring Plan, but monthly will be the minimum frequency. Rationale for the sites selected is provided in Table 7.4-1. Note this table is a reproduction of Table 6.2.7-15.

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Table 7.4-1:

Rationale for Surface Water Quality Site Section

Site

Rationale

Commitment

Link to WQ model

English Creek above the PKCF

Control site upstream of the Project

Revised EIS

Table 6.2.7-6

English Creek at mouth

Control site down gradient of the Project facilities

Revised EIS

Table 6.2.7-6

Wapiti Ravine at mouth

Monitor effects of PKCF on water quality

Revised EIS

Table 6.2.7-7

Duke Ravine at mouth

Monitor effects of Project facilities on water quality before entering the Saskatchewan River

Revised EIS

Table 6.2.7-8

East Ravine upstream of access road

Control site upstream of the Project

Revised EIS

Table 6.2.7-5

East Ravine at mouth

Monitor Project effects on water quality before East Ravine enters the Saskatchewan River

Revised EIS

Table 6.2.7-5

West Ravine at mouth

Monitor Project effects on water quality before West Ravine enters the Saskatchewan River

Revised EIS

Table 6.2.7-5

101 Ravine downslope of overburden & rock storage

Near field site to monitor effects of the storage facility on water quality

Revised EIS

Table 6.2.7-5

101 Ravine at mouth

Monitor effects of the OB & rock storage facility on water quality before it enters the Saskatchewan River

Revised EIS

Table 6.2.7-5

Caution Creek upslope of the overburden & rock storage facility

Control site above the facility

Revised EIS

No effect predicted; not modeled

Caution Creek at mouth

Monitor effects of the OB & rock storage facility on water quality before it enters the Saskatchewan River

Revised EIS

Table 6.2.7-5

Saskatchewan River upstream

Control site for Saskatchewan River water quality

Revised EIS

No effect predicted; not

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Site

Rationale

Commitment

of the Project

Link to WQ model modeled

Saskatchewan River downstream 200 m below English Creek

Monitor Saskatchewan River water quality downstream of the Project below the mixing zone with English Creek.

Revised EIS

Table 6.2.7-4

PKCF

Monitor water quality of the PKCF

Revised EIS

Table 2.1, Appendix 6.2.7E

Discharge to Saskatchewan River

Monitor discharge water quality

Revised EIS

Table 6.2.7-4

PKCF drainage ditch

Monitor water in seepage

New site

Table 2.1, Appendix 6.2.7E

Duke Ravine upstream of facilities

Monitor seepage effects

New site

Table 6.2.7-8

Stream F at mouth

Control Site; coordinated with flow monitoring

New site

No effect predicted; not modeled

Stream F upstream

Control Site

New site

No effect predicted; not modeled

Pehonan Creek at Mouth

Control Site coordinated with flow monitoring

New site

No effect predicted; not modeled

Pehonan Creek 1,500 m upstream

Control Site

New site

No effect predicted; not modeled

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Previously monitored sites (English Creek, Caution Creek, 101 Ravine and East Ravine) will be monitored at the same sites that were used during baseline collection. These sites have established stage-discharge curves, and will be continuously monitored using water level gauges. Similar monitoring will be established on the lower reach of Duke Ravine, Peonan Creek and Stream F. Flow monitoring will also occur on upper reaches of Duke, 101, and East Ravine, and at the crossing of Division Road and English Creek. These upper locations are expected to detect any changes in flow earlier than the locations at the mouth. Once established, sites will be monitored continuously throughout operations.

Closure At closure, periodic sampling of surface water will continue at the above-referenced sites until reclamation is completed and the site has stabilized.

Post-Closure At the end of the closure period, and depending on water quality from previous monitoring, water sampling will be scaled back and sites where water quality has reached background levels will be discontinued in communication with SMOE. 7.4.2.7

Field and Laboratory Procedures for Water Quality

The parameters for analysis will be finalized with SMOE through permit review but are anticipated to be similar to those used during baseline studies, although detection limits used by the analysis laboratory will keep pace with advances in assay technology (i.e., industry standard detection limits will apply). Table 7.4-2 lists the parameters that will be analyzed. These parameters are the same as those monitored during baseline studies. Table 7.4-2:

Surface Water Quality Parameters for Monthly Monitoring

Physical

Anions

Cations

Nutrients

pH

Chloride

Calcium

Ammonia – N

Conductivity

Fluoride

Magnesium

Nitrite – N

Total dissolved solids

Sulphate

Potassium

Nitrate – N

Total suspended solids

Carbonate

Sodium

Total Kjeldahl N

Turbidity

Bicarbonate

Total dissolved P

Total hardness

Organics

Total alkalinity

Total organic carbon

Total P

Total and Dissolved Metals

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Physical

Anions

Cations

Nutrients

Aluminum

Cesium*

Molybdenum

Tin

Antimony

Chromium

Nickel

Titanium

Arsenic

Cobalt

Rubidium*

Tungsten*

Barium

Copper

Selenium

Uranium

Beryllium

Iron

Silver

Vanadium

Bismuth

Lead

Strontium

Zinc

Boron

Manganese

Tellurium*

Zirconium*

Cadmium

Mercury

Thallium

Note: * optional, to be discussed with SMOE.

An accredited laboratory will be contracted to undertake analyses. Standard field and laboratory procedures and QA/QC will be employed including blanks and duplicates in the field and duplicates and spiked standards in the laboratory. Results will be reported to appropriate regulatory agencies monthly and summarized in an Annual Report. Water quality predictions will be updated and presented to regulators every 5 years as part of updates to the overall Closure Plan. 7.4.2.8

Fisheries and Aquatic Resources

For fisheries and aquatic resources monitoring will commence at construction and continue through the post-closure period, and will be coordinated with water quality monitoring into an aquatic effects monitoring plan, in order to achieve the goals set out by the Environmental Effects Monitoring system set out in the MMER. The plan will be modified as required by changes in the Project and regulatory requirements to reflect: adaptive management and lessons learned; changes in the mine configuration; and regulatory requirements at the time the update is prescribed.

Construction Monitoring Construction of Site Facilities Monitoring in local streams, including the 101 Ravine, West Ravine, East Ravine, and Duke Ravine as well as Caution Creek and English Creek, will be conducted simultaneously with fish capture and salvage operations. Fish count and species identification will be recorded to confirm habitat utilization in these areas. Total suspended sediments / turbidity

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monitoring will be in place at all construction sites that can have a potential effect on streams to ensure mitigation measures are effective.

Operations Period Saskatchewan River and Major Tributaries During operations fisheries and aquatic resources monitoring will include sampling every third year of the sites shown on Figure 7.4-3 to evaluate the affect of the Site and to observe changes over time. Fisheries and aquatic resources sampling sites have also been selected in conjunction with the water quality monitoring locations to get a comprehensive assessment at these locations. Rationale for the sites selected is provided in Table 7.4-3. In regard specifically to stream F and Peonan Creek, they will be incorporated into the Aquatic Monitoring Plan according to the principles currently described in the MMER (see 7.4.2.6, 7.4.2.7 and 7.4.2.8) and adjusted based on future requirements. Flow monitoring will occur in the lower reach of these streams but within a defined channel/valley to establish a stage-discharge curve. Once the stage discharge relationship is established, water level gauges will be installed and operated during the open water season to continuously record flows. Water quality monitoring will be conducted at the flow measurement stations and approximately 1500 m upstream as described in 7.4.2.6. Fisheries and aquatic resources will be monitored as described in 7.4.2.8 at the mouth of the Streams and the upstream location to establish baseline conditions, with monitoring of the upstream location throughout operations. Should changes in flow be detected, then operational monitoring of the mouth locations will resume. At this time, no impacts requiring habitat compensation are expected, however the potential for effects on Stream F was identified. Impacts to Stream F are considered only due to uncertainty. The baseline monitoring described above will be used to increase certainty on this stream, and identify any mitigation appropriate. Mitigation may include flow supplementation during low flow (as is considered on Duke Ravine, English Creek and 101 Ravine) or re-evaluation of the FHCP if necessary.

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Table 7.4-3:

Rationale for Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Site Section

Site

Rationale

English Creek above the PKCF

Control site upstream of the Project

English Creek at mouth

Control site down gradient of the PKCF

Caution Creek upslope of the overburden & rock storage facility

Control site above the facility

Caution Creek at mouth

Far Field site to monitor effects of the overburden & rock storage facility on fisheries and aquatic resources before it enters the Saskatchewan River

Saskatchewan River upstream of the Project (upstream of Caution Creek)

Control site for Saskatchewan River fisheries and aquatic resources

Saskatchewan River downstream 200 m below English Creek

Monitor Saskatchewan River fisheries and aquatic resources downstream of the Project below the mixing zone with English Creek.

Discharge to Saskatchewan River

Monitor potential discharge effects on fisheries and aquatic resources

Codette Resevoir

Monitor potential impact of discharge into Saskatchewan River on the Resevoir

At each of these sampling locations, fish populations surveys (electrofishing) and benthic community surveys with sediment texture and chemistry will be conducted every third year. Additional control sites may be added during detailed design.

Closure At closure, periodic sampling of surface water will continue at the above-referenced sites until reclamation is completed and the site has stabilized.

Post-Closure At the end of the closure period, and depending on water quality from previous monitoring, water sampling will be scaled back and sites where water quality has reached background levels will be discontinued in communication with SMOE.

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Flow Supplementation Flow supplementation will be sourced either from the East Ravine runoff pond or from the Saskatchewan River. As precipitation and surfical groundwater supply the East Ravine pond, water quality should be very similar to the water quality in the supplemented streams. Field measurements of ph, EC, temperature, dissolved oxygen and TSS will be taken from the source water, and the supplemented water, daily during the first week of pumping, then weekly thereafter for the duration of the program. East Ravine water and supplemented water is also sampled monthly for water quality as described in Table 7.4-1. Supplementation will be triggered once levels in any monitoring station on these waterways reach 115% of base flow, and will be managed to maintain or exceed 115% of base flow. This will ensure that fish habitat is not affected beyond baseline conditions.

7.4.2.9

Waste Water

Monitoring wells will be installed within 50 m from the outer perimeter of the sewage lagoon at three sites (one upgradient and two downgradient) of the sewage lagoon. Shallow groundwater quality will be monitored on a seasonal basis for the parameters listed in Table 7.4-4. Table 7.4-4:

Waste Water Monitor Well Parameters Parameter

Canadian Drinking Water Guidelines

Biochemical Oxygen Demand

no guidelines

Total coliform

Health Canada: <10% of samples/ mo. w/ detectable TC

Fecal coliform

Health Canada: none detectable

Ammonia – N

no guidelines

Nitrite – N

3.2 mg/L

Nitrate – N

10 mg/L

Odour

Inoffensive

Oil and grease

Inoffensive

Taste

Inoffensive

Total Kjeldel Nitrogen

no guidelines

Total Phosphorus

no guidelines

pH

6.5 – 8.5

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7.4.2.10 Sediment Sampling Prior to construction, during the first year of operation and subsequently every three years, sediment samples will be collected and analyzed for metals from: Saskatchewan River downstream of English Creek; Saskatchewan River upstream of Caution Creek; Codette Reservoir; and Saskatchewan River 100 m downstream of the outfall from the diffuser. 7.4.2.11 Groundwater Related Mitigation and Monitoring The objectives of the groundwater modeling and monitoring commitments are to reduce uncertainty in the groundwater modeling results and to enable adaptive management of potential groundwater related effects, including: to monitor the effects of dewatering on local aquifers; to confirm model predictions; to anticipate impacts to local wells before they occur; to help resolve well interference complaints by providing sufficient information to distinguish between groundwater level fluctuations due normal seasonal or climate; and to optimize operation and dewatering system maintenance. Specific modeling commitments, as well as updates to other models dependant on inputs from the groundwater model (e.g., water quality modeling), include to: 1. Provide a full update of the Model during detailed design, incorporating any new information gathered during this phase and provide updated impact predictions to further quantify the risk that impacts may be different than presented in the REIS; 2. Update the model during construction and update impact predictions incorporating information obtained from installation of the dewatering system and excavation of the Star pit overburden; 3. Re-evaluate and update the model 3 months, 6 months and 12 months after start up of the pit dewatering system incorporating measured data; and

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4. Re-evaluate and submit groundwater modeling results annually thereafter, comparing measured results to model predictions.

Groundwater Monitoring The goal of the groundwater monitoring program is to provide data for verification of the model, and increase confidence in model predictions allowing for proactive mitigation of effects and adaptive management of potential effects. These commitments are as follows: Establish a network of groundwater monitoring wells consisting of standpipe/vibrating wire piezometers. Seven nests of piezometers (with monitoring in each geological unit, i.e., surficial sand, confining clay, upper till, lower till, Colorado group shale and Mannville formation) will be established, with four positioned within the predicted drawdown cone north, east, south and west of the Project, with two nests forming a transect north and east of the project to describe the shape of the drawdown cone, and one nest outside the drawdown cone in analogous environmental conditions to identify seasonal and climate variations; Establish standpipe piezometers in the surficial sand near watercourses as part of the stream flow monitoring program and wetland monitoring; Groundwater level monitoring within the immediate project area (dewatering system pilot holes and seepage monitoring); A regional program of water level monitoring in private wells will be commissioned; The program may utilize existing private wells for monitoring, or may drill new dedicated, strategically located, monitoring wells. Approximately 10% (or about 50) wells will be initially included in the monitoring; collection of climate data from established monitoring stations, including precipitation and snow pack data; and continuation of monitoring for at least two decades after pumping ceases, or until a clear recovery trend is established after mine closure.

Water Quality Water management considers recycling from 0 to 100% of the plant water requirements (approximately 57,000 m3/day), and varying withdrawal from the Saskatchewan River accordingly. The pit dewatering system is predicted to manage up to 120,000 m3/day. As such, the system can accommodate changes in flow of approximately 50% of the pit

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dewatering system predicted flows. This built in contingency can be expected to maintain predicted water quality seasonally and accommodate any changes in pit- flows due to modeling uncertainty.

Drawdown effects- Potable Wells The EIS examined the base case, as well as the sensitivity scenarios (whereby the vertical hydraulic conductivity of the till and shale were varied by a factor of 3) and found, for any of these scenarios, approximately 150 private wells were potentially affected. The monitoring program described above will identify where mitigation is needed; specific mitigation will vary on a case by case basis depending on landowner needs, but could include: providing additional above ground storage for water, lowering the pump setting or by the replacement of existing pumps with more efficient highlift pumps providing alternative water supplies; or drilling new water supply wells.

Drawdown Effects- Fish and Fish Habitat Flow monitoring in local streams, including sites where baseline data exists (the 101 Ravine, East Ravine, well as Caution Creek and English Creek), and new sites (Duke Ravine, Peonan Creek and Stream F and a reference watershed) will begin at construction. In order to account for model variability, flow in the two unnamed ravines east of English Creek, and the tributary to the Whitefox River (to the north of the LSA) will also be monitored at their discharge points. Shallow peizometers will be installed near the monitoring point and above the valley break within the surficial sand to measure water levels in these formations at each stream. Shore Gold has committed to monitor and supplement flows in local creeks and ravines (English Creek, 101 Ravine, and Duke Ravine) to maintain or exceed 115% of base flow in order to avoid impacts to fish and fish habitat. This mitigation will be extended to any other potentially affected watercourses providing fish habitat so that impacts are avoided. Makeup water would continue to be sourced from the East Ravine diversion or the Saskatchewan River intake. This avoidance of additional potential effects will not change the proposed Fish Habitat Compensation Plan. Shore is also committed to flow supplementation south of the Saskatchewan River, however, worst case modeling results indicate that the likelihood of this occurring is low.

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Drawdown Effects- Wetlands Wetlands are also predicted to be impacted by the Project due to drawdown associated with mine dewatering. A wetland monitoring program will be established as part of the vegetation monitoring program, whereby species, abundance, and health will be surveyed at set locations. Mitigation for potential effects on wetlands will result from flow supplementation in local streams, as most wetland ecosites are located within the upper most reaches of the Ravines and along the Ravine bottoms. Discharge locations for flow supplementation on Duke Ravine and 101 Ravine would mitigate wetland effects on the upper reaches, while potential effects on English Creek would be mitigated by discharge at Division Road. 7.4.2.12 Aquatic Effects Monitoring Plan The proposed Star-Orion South Diamond Project Aquatic Effects Monitoring Plan (AEMP) will be developed pre construction based on similar plans developed for diamond mines in the Northwest Territories (Golder 2013) to incorporate all aquatic monitoring programs into a single plan. The AEMP’s goal is to monitor Project discharges to all aspects of the aquatic environment so that potential ecological risks can be identified, so that appropriate actions can be developed to mitigate possible adverse effects. The AEMP will begin the first year of construction to obtain 4 additional years of pre-operation data and continue throughout operations. The AEMP will be reviewed and updated after construction, and every three years thereafter to conform with existing AEMPs and Environmental Effects Monitoring programs required by other mines and jurisdictions. Valued Components related to the aquatic environment that will be incorporated into the AEMP: 1. Water quality, including metals, nutrients and dissolved solids in the effluent, surface water and sediments for the; a. Saskatchewan River; and b. Tributaries to the Saskatchewan River; 2. Water quantity (flow) in Tributaries to the Saskatchewan River; 3. Fish Habitat including availability of forage (e.g., invertebrates and other food sources); 4. Fish abundance and health; and 5. Fish use/consumption. Detailed monitoring of these VCs are described in other sections within Section 7.4.2. Within the AEMP, for each Valued Component, assessment endpoints and measurement endpoints will be based on information in the REIS and current of regulations, with consideration of input from stakeholders, regulators and Aboriginal groups. These

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endpoints will be further reviewed and refined at the conclusion of the construction period. Changes in assessment and measurement endpoints will then be evaluated within a framework with consideration of appropriate benchmarks to determine if changes can be attributed to Project activities (i.e., are there project related effects, and the ecological importance of the changes), and what management actions, if any, are required. Initial AEMP benchmarks will be based on CCME water quality objectives, Saskatchewan Surface water Quality Objectives, and measured baseline data (including the four year construction period). Traditional knowledge will be incorporated throughout the process. Sample locations were selected based on a reference-exposure sampling method. Locations are marked on Figure 7.4-3 with reference locations upstream of the Project on the Saskatchewan River, at Pehonan Creek and Stream F. Additional reference sites are planned up gradient of the Project on English Creek and Caution Creek. Predicted exposure sites include the mouth of the 101, East, Duke and Wapiti Ravines, and the mouth of English and Caution Creek. Two exposure locations are planned in the Saskatchewan River: one immediately downstream of the Project discharge, and one down River, past English Creek. These locations will be confirmed during detailed study design. Sampling frequency is described in Section 7.4 of the REIS. During the four year construction phase, flow monitoring will be continuous, water quality sampling will be monthly, and fish, fish health, aquatic resources and sediment sampling will occur twice. Throughout operations, and at least one cycle post closure, flow monitoring will be continuous, water quality will be sampled monthly, fish population, health and aquatic resources sampling will be conducted every three years, and sediment sampling will be conducted every three years, beginning with year 1 of operation. Frequency of sampling has been updated to correspond to with the three year AEMP cycle. Sampling location and frequency will be examined after construction and every three years during operations. 7.4.2.13 Vegetation Monitoring

Construction and Mine Operations Vegetation monitoring will entail the establishment of representative vegetation sampling locations to assess potential effects of fugitive dust emissions during construction and mine operations. During construction and mine operations, experimental/test plots will be continued to investigate on a small scale those revegetation practices to be used when the reclamation plan is fully implemented. Test plots will help determine the most appropriate plant species and revegetation methods for use on a large scale. Routine monitoring of the test plots will continue and will include vegetation condition, and observations of wildlife grazing pressure. Success criteria (e.g., survivorship, cover, and plant health/vigour) will be developed in order to define success versus failure.

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Post-Closure A post-closure monitoring program for reclaimed areas, as well as for areas of “natural” recolonization, will be developed, based on what is learned from the programs established during the operations phase. Monitoring locations will be established systematically and will encompass the dominant post-closure habitats, including upland forests, shrublands, wetlands, marshes, and pit lakes. Vegetation monitoring protocols will be adapted to the different habitat classes. The goal of this monitoring will be to examine species that colonize the sites, their growth rates and biomass, the amount of downed wood and litter layer development on terrestrial sites, growth of mosses in wetlands and establishment of aquatic vegetation in pit lakes and marshes. The suggested monitoring interval is annually for 4 years followed by once every 5 years to a maximum of 10 years, after which the program would be re-evaluated. 7.4.2.14 Geochemical Drainage Drainage from overburden and processed kimberlite storage facilities will be monitored on a monthly basis, at a minimum (or more frequently as required), during operations and periodically post mining, to confirm that these drainages are not acidic and do not contain elevated levels of metals in the ravines. Seepage from the PKCF will tested during operations and either pumped back to the PKCF or released through natural wetlands. The need for treatment of other site drainage will be assessed from water quality samples collected during the operations and closure phases. Based on studies to date, acid generation is not expected. 7.4.2.15 Geotechnical Stability The physical stability of Project facilities will be monitored annually by an independent geotechnical engineer. This monitoring will be designed to meet the Canadian Dam Safety Guidelines (Canadian Dam Association 2007) where necessary. A report will be forwarded to the SMOE and the Ministry of Energy & Resources, Mines Branch presenting these findings annually. Weekly visual inspections of these facilities will be conducted by appropriate mine personnel and observations logged for inspection by the independent geotechnical engineer, and government regulators upon request. 7.4.3

Socio-Economic Monitoring

The purpose of socio-economic monitoring is to determine the actual effects of the Project on the human environment as construction and operations progress. Results of socioeconomic monitoring will be used to ascertain the extent to which the assessment

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predictions bear out, and whether Project socio-economic programs could be improved. Monitoring is particularly critical for socio-economic issues as they are driven largely by individual choice and interplay with other societal factors and developments that progress and evolve over time. 7.4.3.1

First Nations, Métis and the General Public

Shore intends to develop a socio-economic monitoring program that will operate throughout the life of the mine. The program will meet the following objectives: comply with any permits, authorizations and approvals that are related to socioeconomic effects; assess the effectiveness of approved mitigation and enhancement measures; and verify the accuracy of impact predictions made in the EIS. This monitoring will be an important part of the on-going dialogue between Shore and the nearby affected communities. Depending on the extent to which monitoring findings indicate the Project is compliant with any permits, authorizations and approvals, the extent to which mitigation and enhancement measures are effective, and the extent to which effect predictions are accurate, monitoring can contribute to adaptive management. Shore will use this principle by assuring timely feedback of monitoring results to Project management, triggering appropriate follow-up. Best practices in mining projects suggest that monitoring is best done in co-operation with affected stakeholders. Shore will seek to design and implement its monitoring program, and indicators to be monitored, in collaboration with governments, Aboriginal groups, communities and other stakeholders. Shore commits to sharing the results of its annual monitoring exercises with the SMOE, First Nations and Métis and other communities and the public at large, as requested. The Monitoring Plan will be reviewed as required with the SMOE. While precise monitoring indicators will be developed in consultation with local communities, economic indicators that could be monitored include: Aboriginal and local employment; employment of women; value of contracts for local firms/contractors as well as Saskatchewan firms; number of successful completions of local training programs; and Shore’s corporate investments, donations and other spending in the local area.

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Social indicators that may be monitored could include: concerns about traffic safety and road conditions, concerns about local service provision and quality of life (including health and social conditions such as traffic violations, drug/alcohol and violent crimes), injuries, infectious disease, addiction services caseloads, children-in-care caseloads, and service provider perceptions of social issues. The methods used to gather information will originate with the DDAC and may include the compilation of statistical data, public meetings, individual interviews, or focus groups. Any data limitations and underlying assumptions will be documented. To assist with data collection, Shore will develop consistent and timely data gathering procedures and mechanisms to ensure that the information collected and analyzed (for example, on numbers of employees by home community) is accurate. In addition, Shore will adhere to its Code of Ethics to protect confidential information from misuse or disclosure. Results of the monitoring program will be presented to communities, governments, local First Nations, Métis, and other communities and the general public will be done through public meetings, newsletters, annual reports and other methods as appropriate. 7.4.3.2

Worker Health Monitoring

Shore will work through its Occupational Health and Safety Committee to develop a worker health monitoring program that will have three key components: health surveillance; exposure assessment; and environmental monitoring. Health surveillance programs may include monitoring for respiratory conditions and hearing loss. Exposure assessment may include area and personal monitoring programs. Physical, chemical, biological and ergonomic hazards will be assessed in through the Health and Safety Plan. 7.4.4

Auditing and Continual Improvement

Regular review of the monitoring plan will be undertaken and modifications made as necessary. Formal evaluations of the monitoring plan will be documented, deficiencies noted, and progress in addressing deficiencies tracked in writing. Responsibilities to address deficiencies and accountabilities will be assigned and deadlines for addressing required

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changes will be set. The Occupational Health and Safety Committee will assume overall responsibility for the process. 7.4.5

Record Keeping and Reporting

Monitoring records will be maintained for all significant environmental and health and safety matters, including accidents, spills, fires, occupational illnesses and other emergencies. This information will be reviewed and evaluated to improve the effectiveness of all the programs that involve environmental and health and safety programs. Annual or periodic reports as required will be filed with government agencies as specified in Project permits. 7.5

CLOSURE AND RECLAMATION PLAN

The proposed conceptual closure and reclamation plan provides for soil salvage, closure, conservation and reclamation activities needed to comply with regulatory and permit requirements, including the Reclaimed Industrial Sites Act. A more detailed plan will be developed following construction once more accurate closure timelines have been established. 7.5.1

Reclamation Objectives

The objectives of the conceptual Closure and Reclamation Plan are to: revegetate disturbed areas as soon as they are no longer active; revegetate sites so that the vegetation communities post closure are similar to naturally occurring vegetation communities in the FalC forest post closure; reclaimed soils should be similar or better than baseline soils with respect to soil moisture holding capacity and organic matter content; replace a variety of ecosites (combinations of soil, drainage and aspect) such that a diversity of vegetation communities can be supported; and incorporate traditional knowledge and traditional land use (when available) into closure planning so that traditional uses can continue after closure. The conceptual plan presented is expected to evolve using adaptive management to incorporate the most recent and best information available as mining progresses. Shore anticipates regular updating of this plan throughout operations, to incorporate the results from on-going revegetation trials (both research and operational) and traditional knowledge through regular meetings with regulators and Aboriginal groups.

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Reclamation effectiveness of the facilities, including the PKCF have low levels of uncertainty as no new technology is being proposed, and the boreal forest has adapted to disturbance. Unlike other operations, uncertainty about the effectiveness of reclamation on the PKCF is low due to the nature of the fine PK and water management during operations and closure. Fine PK is defined as material less than 1 mm, and as such, is a relatively coarse grained material. Other operations define ‘fine tailings’ in different ways, with mines in Alberta defining the fine fractions as material less than 44 μm. For the proposed project, even the cycloned fine PK would be coarser (less than 0.25 mm or 250 μm) than most other mines ‘fine tailings’. In addition, the fine PK is created only by crushing and washing of the kimberlite. No heat or chemicals are used in the proposed process that have the potential to change the chemistry of the clay particles in ways that could affect their settling. Consolidation and settling characteristics are described in Section 2. Significant differences were described between the settling characteristics of the ‘ultra fine’ fraction of ore from Star and Orion South due to the different clay mineralogy at the two ore bodies. Fine PK from Star settled rapidly, while Orion South fine PK did not. Within the PKCF, only fine PK from Star will be managed. Once mining begins at Orion South, all fine PK and process water will be managed in the Star Pit. The proposed Project does not contemplate the use of flocculants or coagulants during operation as results of specific studies, operation of the exploration processing facility (which produced PK with particle sizes less than 0.5 mm, i.e., finer than the proposed Project) and associated fines management area, and observations from other diamond operations do not indicate potential issues with closure of the PKCF. Even so, reclamation and water management at closure is designed to facilitate development of a trafficable surface. The PCKF will be decommissioned upon completion of mining at Star, and not used during the mining of Orion South. As such, progressive reclamation will begin about 8 years prior to overall site closure. Once the PKCF berms are constructed to their final height (i.e., in year 17), a 1 metre overburden cap would be placed on it and the site would be revegetated. On the interior of the PKCF, the first reclamation step would be to pump any standing free water from the PKCF to the Star pit, which would minimize the amount of saturated fine material, and facilitate internal drainage of the fines. This pumping would also remove whatever fine material remained in suspension in the free standing water. Reclamation material (1 metre depth) would then be placed on the unsaturated fine material as it dries out and becomes trafficable. Internal drainage and seepage would continue to be managed by the Star Pit until the facility is fully reclaimed.

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7.5.2

Merchantable timber

All merchantable timber within the Project footprint will be harvested according to discussions with the Forest Service branch of the SMOE and an appropriate forest product contractor. Shore will coordinate with the Forestry Branch to ensure that the volumes expected from the Project footprint are appropriately incorporated into the FalC annual allowable cut. 7.5.3

General Soil Salvage

Soil salvage is generally not warranted on the coarse textured Brunisols of the Pine and La Corne soil associations. These soils have coarse texture (sand to loamy sand), very thin LFH (typically less than 4 cm) and Ae horizons less than 10 cm. Due to the very thin A and LFH horizons, salvage of topsoil is not feasible without dilution of organic material with poor material below. In general, these soils are rated as having a poor reclamation suitability (Table 7.5-1). Table 7.5-1:

Reclamation Suitability Ratings of Soils within the Project Footprint Topsoil

Quality Rating

Good Good-Fair Fair

Baseline Area (ha)

Subsoil

Disturbed Area (ha)

781.1

31.1

297.8 0

Disturbed Area Baseline (% of LSA) Area (ha)

Disturbed Area (ha)

Disturbed Area (% of LSA)

0.3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,473.2

98.3

0.8

Poor

7,688.0

3,320.0

27.2

7,688.0

3,320.0

27.2

Poor-Fair

2,170.8

270.0

2.2

2,170.8

270.0

2.2

Organic

621.5

101.2

0.8

227.2

34.0

0.3

Disturbed Land

251.0

158.8

1.3

251.0

158.8

1.3

Water

407.5

1.1

<0.1

407.5

1.1

<0.1

Total

12,217.7 3,882.2

12,217.7 3,882.2

Note: From Table 6.2.1-9, Section 6.2.1 (Terrain, Soils and Geology).

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Short term (i.e., less than 2 years) stockpiling or direct placement of fair or good reclamation suitability material will be considered as practical. In particular, soil from ravine areas (e.g., West Ravine) may be targeted for salvage and direct placement on areas not planned for further development. Any short term stockpiles will be located within the facility footprint. 7.5.4

Non-merchantable vegetation, woody debris and perimeter berms

Stumping and grubbing of non-merchantable material will only occur where needed for geotechnical stability, and generally placed only when suitable for direct placement. Material around the perimeter of the site will be pushed into large windrows to act as natural security berms, and serve as a long term stockpile of organic matter and limited topsoil. This material will otherwise be placed in the overburden pile or buried. Chipping and shredding will be considered for use as erosion control or as a mulch for revegetation. 7.5.5

Revegetation

Revegetation is assumed to mean tree planting, and areas will be planted or seeded with understory species (i.e., shrubs and/or native grasses) if required to meet reclamation goals. All seeds and seedlings will be sourced locally and inspected for weeds prior to use. In areas where rapid revegetation would reduce erosion risk, or on areas that may be redisturbed in the future, annual and perennial grasses may be seeded. Annual barley may be seeded on these areas, and seeding of native grasses will be evaluated during construction to determine if their use is appropriate. Possible revegetation options are listed below: 1. natural revegetation on areas with direct placement of topsoil; 2. planting of tree seedlings in reclaimed disturbed areas; 3. seeding of tree species and other species on bare soil; 4. planting of native shrubs on reclaimed disturbed areas; and 5. temporary seeding of annual grasses for erosion control. Tree planting would supplement any natural regeneration on site using 4-10a or 4-12a containerized seedlings at a rate of approximately 1,200 to 1,600 stems per hectare. In dry areas, an open canopy is targeted (a/b canopy closure) while on moist and wet areas, a closed canopy is targeted (c/d). Planting of understorey species is assumed to be at a density of 200 stems/ha and may occur at the same time as tree planting or may be delayed until the tree species are established. The exact species composition will depend on site

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specific conditions, and is provided on a conceptual basis in the Table 7.5-2. Dry sites are defined as xeric to submesic, moist sites are generally mesic and sub hygric, and wet sites are hygric to subhydric. For the FalC forest, soils generally have low nutrient contents. In general, medium nutrient sites include medium and isolated rich sites, while poor nutrient sites include poor and very poor sites. Table 7.5-2: Moisture Dry

Conceptual Replanting Densities (Adapted from Alberta Environment 2010) Nutrients Poor

Medium

Moist

Poor

Medium

Wet

Poor/ Medium

Tree Species Pinus banksiana (jack pine)

1

Density

Understory Species

Density

1,200

Vaccinium myrtilloides (blueberry)

100

Ledum groenlandicum (Labrador tea)

100

Pinus banksiana (jack pine)

800

Vaccinium myrtilloides (blueberry)

50

Populus tremuloides (aspen)

500

Ledum groenlandicum (Labrador tea)

50

Amelanchier alnifolia (Saskatoon)

50

Rosa acicularis (rose)

50

Pinus banksiana (jack pine)

700

Amelanchier alnifolia (Saskatoon)

100

Populus tremuloides (aspen)

700

Corylus cornuta (beaked hazelnut)

100

Picea glauca (white spruce)

1000

Alnus rugosa . (river alder)

100

Populus balsamifera (balsam poplar)

400

Populus tremuloides (aspen)

200

Picea mariana (black spruce)

600

Picea glauca (white spruce)

600

Ribes spp. (current) 100

Salix spp. (willow)

200

Note: These understorey species are a preliminary list only; species may be added or subtracted based on results of the TK and TLU studies and revegetation studies, or to more accurately reflect vegetation conditions at closure.

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Jack pine seeding or spreading of cones may replace or reduce the need to plant containerized seedlings on areas of disturbed soil for the dry-poor, dry-medium, and moist poor sites. Jack pine is adapted to disturbance and has been demonstrated to germinate well on bare soil based on preliminary observations of the on-site revegetation trials as described below. Table 7.5-2 should be read in coordination with Figure 7.5-1, which shows the predicted areas of different nutrient-moisture conditions in the reclaimed landscape by facility. The generalized planting prescriptions and soil nutrient-moisture conditions were analyzed to estimate the post-closure vegetation communities on the landscape (Figure 7.52). Note that site-specific conditions would lead to the development of a somewhat more complex distribution of vegetation communities. This complexity is discussed in a general manner in the sections below, as more specific analysis would be highly speculative. It is important to note that the entire site is not expected to be cleared, but rather islands of intact forest will be left near the facilities, and within the proposed mineral lease area, where possible. These forested islands will assist with natural recruitment of vegetation, and provide a nearby source of seeds, reflecting the vegetation composition in the baseline forest. 7.5.5.1

On-Going Revegetation Trials

Several revegetation studies have been initiated by Shore to determine appropriate reclamation and revegetation options at closure. These trials include: Greenhouse trial conducted by Dr. Anne Naeth of the University of Alberta. This study looked at plant growth of various species on Fine PK, Coarse PK on their own and amended with sand from the FalC, agricultural topsoil from north of the FalC, compost, composted biosolids from Prince Albert, and chemical fertilizer. The final report is included as Appendix 7-E. Although conclusions varied for each processed kimberlite type, in general, un-amended PK showed reduced germination and growth as compared to the treatments. Response of trembling aspen was poor, enven in the potting soil controls, which suggests that the greenhouse conditions may not have been ideal for this species. Overall, amended PK was able to support growth of several reclamation species. As a result of this work, the depth of sand or overburden placed as a cap on the CPK and the PKCF was increased to a minimum of 100 cm; Site Revegetation Plots. Plots were established in 2008 to look at plant growth on bare sand, sand with topsoil and slash rolled back, Fine PK, Coarse PK, a mix of Fine and course PK with the following treatments: no treatment, spreading of jack pine cones, seeding native grass and planting jack pine seedlings. Initial results show that the roll back areas have the highest vegetation growth, the bare sand has

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the highest jack pine seedling survival, and the kimberlite treatments have the lowest revegetation. In general, this trend has continued, however, with good growth of established vegetation on all treatements (likely due to relatively wet conditions over the last two growing seasons, with increased grass density in all treatments. More results are expected, as this study is on-going; and Pad Reclamation Study. Drill pads from were selected to monitor long term revegetation based on age, reclamation method and size. Several sites were inaccessible due to localized flooding in 2011, but were surveyed in 2013. Additional surveys are planned for summer 2015. 7.5.6

Development and Reclamation of Site Facilities

7.5.6.1

Plant Site

The area of the plant site is 36.9 ha, and occurs in an area regenerating from past fire and harvesting activities. None of this area currently contains merchantable timber. The plant site will be cleared and levelled. About 42,000 m3 of soil rated with a fair or good reclamation suitability will be salvaged and placed in windrows along the south and northwest perimeter of the site for future use. At closure, once all mining and processing has been completed, all infrastructure and equipment will be removed from the site or buried (inert waste only), sold as used equipment or scrap where possible and the land returned to an acceptable end-land use as determined by the EIA. All industrial wastes would be either returned to suppliers or removed from site for disposal by a licensed waste contractor. All concrete foundations would be broken up and buried. The plant site will then be re-contoured to blend into the surrounding topography, and any salvaged organic material rolled back to an average depth of 15 cm. Deep ripping may be required to alleviate the effects of compaction. At closure, the plant site is expected to have a combination of dry-poor, dry-medium and moist-poor areas based on changes in slope position and limited availability of reclamation material, and planting prescriptions will be applied as outlined in Table 7.5-2. Even considering the re-coutouring, the site is expected to be relatively level, and have a somewhat homogenous distribution of vegetation types at closure (Figure 7.5-2). Closure vegetation is expected to resemble BP03 (Jack pine- feathermoss) ecosite over the entire site (36.9 ha), with inclusions of BP04 (Jack pine - trembling aspen – feathermoss) in specific micro site conditions. Due to potential future accessibility, the plant site area could be identified as an area where traditionally used plants are targeted, depending on the results of future discussions. There will be no opportunities for direct placement of

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reclamation material or progressive reclamation on the plant site as it will be active for the duration of the Project. The plant site is expected to be returned to a jack pine dominated area, with similar soil nutrient capacity as existing pre-development. 7.5.6.2

Processed Kimberlite Containment Facility (PKCF)

The area of the PKCF is 513.6 ha, of which approximately 3.3 ha is merchantable timber. Stumping, grubbing and removal of all organic material will be required under the starter berm, and under the outer berm as it is being constructed with the dewatered fine kimberlite. Assuming a 30 cm depth to ensure geotechnical stability, the estimated amount of material from under the starter berm is 0.1 Mm3, and the amount from the ultimate berm footprint is estimated to be an additional 0.45 Mm3. The current plan is to dispose of the first 0.1 Mm3 within the PKCF. Approximately 25% (about 0.11 Mm3) of the remaining material is planned to be pushed to the outer boundary of the PKCF using bulldozers to create a perimeter security berm. The remainder will be used for direct placement or disposed within the overburden pile or PKCF. Internal drainage within the PKCF will follow the existing slope created by the beached Fine PK at a slope of 1%. Internal drainage at closure will toward the low area in the PKCF, with surface runoff directed to the Duke Ravine at closure. Drainage of the outer slopes will be collected initially collected in the perimeter ditch and routed natural wetlands in the Duke and English Creek watersheds. No engineered drainage channels are expected to be required on the outer slopes of the PKCF, with the exception of the main outlet, which will either feed into the existing drainage system or directly to the Duke Ravine. Note that the PKCF is expected to operation only during mining at Star. Although, due to the center line construction method using dewatered Fine PK, progression reclamation is not possible of the PKCF, reclamation of the entire facility can begin in approximately year 17, beginning with the outer berm slopes. Ponded water in the PKCF will pumped to the Star pit prior to closure, and the surface allowed to dry out before placement of reclamation material. During exploration, sub 0.5 mm fine PK was found to be free draining, with no permanent ponded water 1 year after use. Since the fine PK in the PKCF is less than 1 mm material, higher permeabilities are expected, and no issues are expected (i.e., problems with trafficability) with capping once inputs cease. . At closure, the perimeter berms will be rolled back onto the toe slope of the PKCF. Assuming a 15 cm depth, about 73 ha would be covered. The remaining exposed Fine PK will be mixed with a top dressing of at least 100 cm of sand or other overburden material,

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and/or mixed with suitable soil amendment (composted biosolids or other) based on the results of ongoing research. A gently undulating surface topography will be constructed using place cap material and reworked fine PK with slopes ranging from 0 to 2%. Relief within the PKCF would be less than 2 m. Closure characteristics are summarized in Table 7.5-3. In general, the perimeter of the PKCF is expected to be dry-moderate (149 ha), while the interior of the PKCF is expected to range from wet-moderate (15 ha) near the centre, moistpoor (93 ha) around the central area, and dry-poor (257 ha) around the inside of the berm (Figure 7.5-1). Revegetation prescriptions (Table 7.5-2), based on the closure moisture and nutrients, would be applied to the PKCF, resulting in 199 ha of BP02, 149 ha of BP04, 57 ha of BP12, 89 ha of BP14, 16 ha of BP25 and 3 ha of BP28 at closure (Figure 7.5-2). A conceptual vegetation-landscape cross section is presented in Figure 7.5-3. Table 7.5-3:

Closure Characteristics of the PKCF PKCF Pile Side slopes

Main pile

Parent Materials

Fine PK

Fine PK

Subsoil placement

100 cm

100 cm

Topsoil Placement

15 cm roll back

none

Slopes

4:1

0 to 2%

Aspect

Variable

Variable

To permiter ditches

Contingency for overflow to ditches

Incline

Gently undulating

<1 m

0-2 m

Drainage structures Landform type Relief

Shore has committed to pumping off any ponded water in the PKCF prior to reclamation. After pumping this ponded water off, Shore will breach the upper portion of the PKCF dam and create a diversion channel down the slope of the PKCF. This will reduce ponding in the low-lying area from future precipitation events. The controlled dam breach and diversion channel will be on the west side of the PKCF to minimize the channel length from the lowest area in the PKCF to the outside perimeter. The height of dam on the west to southwest side of the PKCF is less than on the south side of the PKCF. The diversion channel will have a

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grade and dimensions suitable for handling peak flows of the PMF runoff event. The channel will be lined with low permeability clay or till and will have a geomorphic design to provide a natural appearance and self-healing resistance to erosion. The capping material that Shore has committed to placing on the PKCF will also be low permeability clay or till to encourage runoff but will also retain sufficient moisture for supporting vegetation on the top of the PKCF. Despite this low permeability and tendency to shed runoff, the top of the PKCF will be quite flat in the low0lying center portion and may be slow to drain. This will tend to promote the growth of wetland and riparian vegetation. The capping soil is expected to be saturated in the spring and early summer and after heavy precipitation events. For this reason, the area is considered to be a wet site. 7.5.6.3

Overburden and Rock Storage Pile

The area of the overburden and rock storage pile is 2,008.3 ha, and contains approximately 1,391 ha of merchantable timber. Once merchantable timber is harvested, the overburden and rock storage pile will be constructed without stumping and grubbing, with the exception of a 20 to 30 m area around the perimeter of the facility to create a temporary material stockpile and security berm. The proposed security berm will be constructed around the final overburden and rock storage pile. Assuming an average depth of 20 cm (to avoid admixing) the total volume of reclamation material, minus the non-merchantable material would be about 100,000 m3. The overburden and rock storage pile will be constructed out of sand, silt, and till from the Star pit and the Orion South pit. This material will be placed as it is excavated, so that the surface of the pile has a mosaic of surface textures and drainage, thus creating a complex pattern of moisture regimes. It is not possible to predict the exact locations where the various material will be deposited; however, based on the proportions of sand, clay and till expected at the Star pit, approximately 15% of the surface area is expected to have a sandy soil texture and the remainder the surface area will have clay soil texture. The overburden and rock storage pile would be progressively reclaimed with reclamation material from the Star and Orion South pits whenever possible. As described below, non merchantable material, organic soil horizons, and some mineral topsoil would be removed by small equipment prior to excavation by the In-pit Crushing and Conveying (IPCC) system and directly placed on the overburden and rock storage pile. The side slopes would be constructed during excavation of the Star pit, and would be available for direct placement of topsoil from Orion South. In addition, the southernmost one third of the area is expected to be complete during excavation of Orion South, and would receive material from Orion South Phase 2. Topsoil placement depth would be 15 cm. The area reclaimed during operations will encompass almost 1,579 ha (Figure 2.6-3).

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Of the total OB material (943 Mm3), approximately 29 Mm3 (or 3.0% of the total volume) will be Colorado Group shale. As described in the geochemistry baseline, this shale is saline and sodic due to its marine origin. As a result, it is unsuitable as a surface material for revegetation, and will be encapsulated within a minimum 2m thick envelope of clay and till on the bottom, sides and top of the shale. This placement method will minimize infiltration and seepage from this unit. Surface drainage will be constructed as shown on Figure 2.6-2 to direct any surface runoff into the 101 Ravine to the south, and into the Caution Creek drainage to the north. Slopes within the drainage areas will be designed to be geotechnically stable, and erosion control blankets will be applied as needed. Target slopes in the drainage channels will be 1 to 2%, and channel length will be extended on the OB pile side slopes by creating meanders. Surface topography will generally be undulating to level with slopes ranging from 0 to 10% in the main pile area, with drainage basins created by stacking at slightly different heights during operation. Moisture regimes are expected to be wet within depressions created within the drainage channels (45 ha), moist within the drainage areas (263 ha), moist on 85% of the remaining area due to the clay-clay loam subsoil, and dry on 15% of the area due to sandy subsoil (total of 1,700 ha). Closure characteristics are summarized in Table 7.5-4. Revegetation prescriptions (Table 7.5-2), based on the closure moisture and nutrients, would be applied to the overburden and rock storage pile. Revegetation would be expected to replace 528 ha of BP032, 297 ha of BP04, 617 ha of BP09, 320 ha of BP12, 133 ha of BP14, 76 ha of BP25 and 36 ha of BP28. A conceptual vegetation-landscape cross section is presented in Figure 7.5-4.

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Star-Orion South Diamond Project Environmental Impact Statement

Table 7.5-4:

Closure Characteristics of the Overburden and Rock Storage Pile Overburden Pile Side slopes

Main pile

15% Sand, 85% Clay loam

15% Sand, 85% clay loam

Subsoil placement

None

None

Topsoil Placement

15 cm

15 cm (southern 1/3 only)

Slopes

4:1

0 to 10%

Aspect

Variable

Variable

Designed channel for outlet to 101 Ravine and Caution Creek

Drainage as shown

Incline

undulating

<2 m

0-10 m

Parent Materials

Drainage structures Landform type Relief

7.5.6.4

Pit Areas

The Star pit has a total area of 588.8 ha and an area of merchantable timber of 45 ha. The Orion South pit has a total area of 427.6 ha, none of which contains merchantable timber. The pit areas will be cleared for mining using smaller equipment as the IPCC system does not handle woody debris well. This separate handling of surface material (organic horizons and non merchantable timber) allows for subsequent direct placement on the overburden and rock storage pile for later stripping of Star. Orion South material will be placed directly on the last phase of the overburden and rock storage pile, and then directly placed on the PKCF. There is the opportunity to place Orion South overburden within the Star pit, reducing pit infilling time, reducing the area of the Overburden and Rock Storage Pile, and potentially reducing the area of the Star pit lake. This option will be further considered during detailed design. Drainage on the Star pit will internal to the Star pit lake, and then to the south where the East Ravine intersects the pit. Slopes within the drainage areas will be designed to be geotechnically stable, and erosion control blankets will be applied as needed. The exposed upper pit slopes will receive direct placement of at least 15 cm depth of reclamation material, and will be considered to have a moderate nutrient regime. The final pit slope upper benches (i.e., surface sand and clay benches) on both pits will be revegetated with annual and native perennial grasses as soon as possible, whether or not

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Star-Orion South Diamond Project Environmental Impact Statement

they will be subsequently flooded at closure or potentially buried by back fill, either using broadcast seeding or a straw erosion control blanket over broadcast seeding. Lower bench areas (i.e., benches within till) will be monitored for dust generation and may be revegetated as above. If necessary the former East Ravine channel will be armoured (if it to be used as drainage channel) or raised to prevent drainage from the Star pit Lake to the Saskatchewan River. The Star pit will be used for the disposal some overburden from Phase 4 or Star and of Fine PK from Orion South. Material will be deposited from the north part of the pit. The deepest part of the Star pit will be backfilled by overburden from pushback development up to 267 masl from year 10 to year 17 of mining. Fine PK material and process water from Orion South will be placed to the partially backfilled part of the Star pit from year 18 to year 24 and the pit bottom elevation will rise up to 307 masl at the end of mining. At closure, the Orion South fine PK would be covered by groundwater naturally filling the Star pit. The elevation of the Star pit lake at closure is expected to be 392 masl (which is the elevation of the discharge point from the lake into the existing East Ravine). Up to 4,100 m3 of water per day is predicted to be discharged through the East Ravine from groundwater. Surface runoff would add to the predicted flows. Modeling results show that 80% of the pit lake water, at a steady state comes from surface runoff (SRK 2011). Closure water quality is discussed in Section 6.2.7 and Appendix 6.2.7-A. In pit water quality is not expected to influence reclamation efforts. The backfilling of the Star Pit was simulated instantaneously in year 18 (instead of continuously rising) to conservatively model groundwater inflows to the pit during operations. Note that water inflows were modeled yearly. This approach was considered to be appropriate and conservative, as the modeling of transient conditions during infilling would be less accurate and introduce considerable uncertainty and in reality, any backfilling would reduce the passive inflows into the pit. Assuming instantaneous backfilling in year 18 leads to an overestimate of passive inflow. After backfilling, water level changes within the backfill material were simulated transiently by the groundwater model. At closure, the Orion South pit lake is expected to be at 411 masl. Upper pit slopes will be reclaimed progressively during pit construction with placement of at least 15 cm of reclamation material. The Orion South pit lake will not discharge. Since the upper pit slopes will have a placement of top soil, and are likely to receive water both from precipitation and groundwater discharge, they are expected to be moist-moderate sites (128 ha for Star and 85 ha at Orion South). The remainder of the area would be considered open water, with wetland vegetation developing around the perimeter of the lake

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where benching creates shallow water (461 ha for Star and 343 ha at Orion South). Revegetation prescriptions (Table 7.5-2), based on the closure moisture and nutrients, would be applied to the upper slopes of the pits, and modified accordingly based on the composition of the seeded grasses. Resulting vegetation communities are expected to be BP 03 (<1ha), BP09 (37 ha), BP15 (91 ha) and BP 28 (62 ha) at the Star Pit and BP15 (85 ha) and BP28 (23 ha) at Orion South, with the remainder open water. Conceptual vegetation-landscape cross sections are presented in Figure 7.5-5 and 7.5-6. Slopes in the exposed area are expected to range from level to 20%. The deepest part of the Star pit will be backfilled by overburden from pushback development up to 267 masl from year 10 to year 17 of mining. Fine PK material and process water will be placed to the partially backfilled part of the Star pit from year 18 to year 24 of mining and pit bottom elevation will rise up to 307 masl at the end of mining. Pumping will continue as described in SRK (2011). Tailings will be placed from 267 masl to 307 masl. The final elevation of tailings in the Star pit is therefore 307 masl. Predicted water quality in the Star and Orion South Pits over time, including post closure, is shown in Appendix 6.2.7-A, in Figures 3-96 to 3-138. Water quality modeling is presented in Section 6.2.7 for the pit lakes, and predicted discharge water quality for the Star pit is reproduced in Table 7.5-5 below. The Orion South pit lake is expected to remain brackish. The option to fill either or both of the pit lakes with water from the Saskatchewan River will be evaluated during detailed design. Further reductions of the hydraulic connection between the lake and the Mannville Aquifer could be achieved by placement of overburden from Orion South in the Star pit, along with fine PK. The decision as to the action to be taken at closure will be determined in conjunction with the local stakeholders and the regulators over the life of the mine. Table 7.5-5:

Predicted Star Pit Lake Discharge Water Quality at Closure

Parameter

Conventional Parameters Total alkalinity Total dissolved solids Total hardness Turbidity Major Ions Calcium Carbonate Chloride Fluoride

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Units

Star Pit Release Concentration

mg/L mg/L mg/L NTU

120 460 93.7 57

mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L

30 3 152 0.23

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Star-Orion South Diamond Project Environmental Impact Statement

Parameter

Units

Star Pit Release Concentration

Hydroxide Magnesium Potassium Sodium Sulfate Nutrients Ammonia as nitrogen Dissolved organic carbon Nitrate Total Phosphorus Metals Aluminum Antimony Arsenic Boron Cadmium Chromium Cobalt Copper Iron Lead Manganese Mercury Molybdenum Nickel Selenium Silver Strontium Thallium Tin Titanium Uranium Vanadium Zinc

mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L

1.8 8.1 5.5 123 65

mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L

0.2 1.6 1.63 0.03

mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L

0.023 0.00009 0.00083 0.29 0.00005 0.0035 0.0005 0.0006 0.19 0.00024 0.045 0.0007 0.007 0.00009 0.000026 0.22 0.00006 0.000033 0.004 0.0002 0.0011 0.012

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Star-Orion South Diamond Project Environmental Impact Statement

Linear corridors Topsoil will be used to create a side berm along all linear corridors (i.e., internal roads, pipeline routes, conveyor right-of-ways [RoWs]). At closure, this material will be rolled back onto the corridor. Culverts and other infrastructure will be removed. On compacted areas, deep ripping may be needed to reduce soil bulk density. At closure, these areas are assumed to be a dry-poor or dry-medium sites, and will be revegetated to conform with undisturbed adjacent vegetation at closure as shown on Figure 7.5-2. The total area of these facilities is approximately 87.8 ha, with 5 ha of merchantable timber.

Coarse PK pile The Coarse PK pile covers 179.9 ha with no merchantable timber. The Coarse PK pile will be constructed over the existing topography. No stumping or grubbing of non-merchantable timber is expected, however standing vegetation may be knocked down to create a working surface for the stacker. The organic materials at the perimeter of the Coarse PK pile will be pushed to create a security berm and act as a reclamation material stockpile. The Coarse PK pile will remain active throughout operations and may be reprocessed, so progressive reclamation is not feasible. In the event it is determined that the Coarse PK will not be reprocessed, it will be capped with at least 1 m of till or clay to minimize infiltration. Sand may be placed on the pile as part of reclamation and to achieve target vegetation communities. In the event that recovery rejects are placed in the coarse PK pile, they will be encapsulated in till or clay similar to shale in the overburden pile. The perimeter berm would be rolled back to cover the lower slopes of the pile, and revegetated to a dry-poor (171 ha) site. The Coarse PK pile will be contoured at closure to direct drainage to the south east toward the Duke Ravine, and to the west toward the East Ravine. Drainage channels will be engineered to be geotechnically stable with target slopes of 1% and erosion control blankets will be applied as needed. Due to the coarse nature of the CKP, limited runoff is expected, and the drainage channels are assumed to be dry for most of the year. However, these channels may be considered as moist-poor (9 ha) sites for revegetation. Closure characteristics are summarized in Table 7.5-6. Revegetation prescriptions (Table 7.5-2), based on the closure moisture and nutrient regime, would be applied to the Coarse PK pile. Revegation is expected to result in 95 ha of BP02, 46 ha of BP04, 29 ha of BP12, and 9 ha of BP25. A conceptual vegetationlandscape cross section is presented in Figure 7.5-7.

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Star-Orion South Diamond Project Environmental Impact Statement

Table 7.5-6:

Closure Characteristics of the Coarse Processed Kimberlite Pile CPK Pile Side slopes

Main pile

Coarse crushed kimberlite

Coarse crushed kimberlite

Subsoil placement

100 cm

100 cm

Topsoil Placement

15 cm roll back

none

Slopes

3:1

0 to 5%

Aspect

Variable

Variable

Outlets to Duke and east Ravine

Outlets to Duke and east Ravine

Incline

undulating

<1 m

0-5 m

Parent Materials

Drainage structures Landform type Relief

Access Corridor and Other Areas The paved access road will remain in place at closure to provide access to the site for post closure monitoring and for access by other land users. The access corridor contains 19 ha of merchantable timber, both in the LSA and RSA. On-going maintenance of the access road once no longer required by Shore will be discussed with the local RM and with the Saskatchewan Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure at that time. Other areas (and merchantable timber amounts) not covered above are listed below: Camp Facility 0.1 ha (0 ha); Explosive Storage <0.1 ha (0 ha); South Settling pond 1.7 ha (0 ha); Polishing pond 1.7 ha (0 ha); Runoff Pond 6 ha (2 ha); Sewage Lagoon 3 ha (0.6 ha); and Wells 0.1 ha (0.0 ha).

Final Closure Costs Closure costs are estimated in Table 7.5-7 below.

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Star-Orion South Diamond Project Environmental Impact Statement

The cost to re-grade and contour piles is estimated at $0.25 per square meter to create large topographic variations and construct the general layout of drainage channels. For costing, it was assumed that 25% of each area would require contouring. The cost to move and spread reclamation material is estimated at $4 per cubic meter, assuming dump truck hauling and spreading with a bull dozer or grader. The cost to create stable drainage channels has been estimated at $5.00 per square meter. This cost includes additional grading, slope stabilization (i.e., erosion control blankets at $1.50 /m2) and revegetation. For costing, it was assumed that 10% of each area would require creation of drainage channels. Tree planting costs were estimated based on information provided by the ForestFirst Center in Prince Albert (Michael Bendzsak Pers. Comm.). Planting density was assumed to be 1,400 tree stems per ha and 200 understory stems per ha, an average seedling cost of $0.34 per seedling (including $0.25 per tree seedling ) and a contingency number of $0.90 for understory species (as determined by an internal Shore estimate), and a planting cost of $0.35 per seedling, totalling approximately $1,100 per ha.

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Table 7.5-7:

Closure Cost Estimates Estimated Area (ha)

Contouring ($)

PKCF

513

320,625

0.3

6,156,000

2,565,000

564,300

9,605,925

CPK

180

112,500

1

7,200,000

900,000

198,000

8,410,500

Ob Pile

2,008

1,255,179

0.15

12,049,717

10,041,431

2,209,115

25,555,442

Star Pit

589

368,013

0.15

3,532,927

2,944,106

647,703

7,492,748

OS pit

428

267,228

-

-

2,137,822

470,321

2,875,370

Plant Site

37

23,091

0.15

221,677

184,731

40,641

470,140

Structures & HSWDG*

-

-

-

-

-

28,000,000

Roads and Access

141

88,125

0.15

846,000

705,000

155,100

1,794,225

Ponds

7

4,607

-

-

36,858

8,109

49,573

Conveyors and access

24

20,504

0.30

393,674

164,031

36,087

614,296

Other cleared Areas

9

5,625

0.15

54,000

45,000

9,900

114,525

Total

3,936

2,465,497

-

30,453,995

19,723,978

4,339,275

84,982,745

Facility

Reclamation Material Depth (m)

Reclamation Material ($)

Drainage ($)

Revegetation ($)

Total ($)

*Note: The Structure and HSWGD costs include all potential remediation and removal of structures with no salvage value. 1- These costs will be considered in addition to mining costs.

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Temporary shut down For the purposes of this discussion, a temporary shut-down is a shut-down where all mining and processing is temporarily halted for a period of greater than 1 month. At the present time, no temporary shut-downs are anticipated. If a temporary shut-down is required, then the site may have to be put under care and control maintenance. Although the actual activities that would occur at this time would be dependent on management decisions at that time, from a conceptual basis it is envisioned that this may entail the following activities: incineration and/or removal of all garbage and hazardous waste; removal of all blasting materials and any excess/broken equipment; moving all in-pit equipment either to a bench at the mid-point of the pit or completely out of the pit; pumping out the sewage lagoon; ensuring that all environmental inspections and security continue during the shutdown; and regrading all steep slopes on the overburden and Coarse PK piles to reduce erosion. 7.6

REFERENCES

Alberta Environment. 2010. Guidelines for Reclamation to Forest Vegetation in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region, 2nd Edition. Prepared by the Terrestrial Subgroup of the Reclamation Working Group of the Cumulative Environmental Management Association, Fort McMurray, AB. December 2009. Canadian Dam Association. Canadian Dam Safety Guidelines. 2007 Golder Associates. 2013. Diavik Diamond Mines Inc. Aquatic Effects Monitoring Program. Study Design Version 3.2. October 2013. Doc No. Rpt-1083 Ver. 0. 10-13280028/22000 Po No. D0156 Line 1. P&E. 2010. Star - Orion South Diamond Project: Updated Prefeasibility Study and NI 43-101 Technical Report. Report prepared by P&E Mining Consultants for Shore Gold Inc. March 24, 2010. SMOE 2007. Air Monitoring Directive for Saskatchewan – Draft. Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment, Environmental Protection Branch

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