Download Teachers Notes - Sunshine Classics

Download Teachers Notes - Sunshine Classics

LEVEL 18 use t Boggywooga SUNSHINE CLASSICS – LEVEL 18 The Secret of Spooky House Boggywooga In the Middle of the Night The Secret of Spooky House L...

2MB Sizes 0 Downloads 13 Views

Recommend Documents

View Teachers Notes - Sunshine Classics
While cleaning up the water, he gets the girl's T-shirt dirty. Finally, they are ready to go to town. The sloppy tiger g

Download teachers notes - Allen & Unwin
... the study of With a Sword in My Hand could include the television series Merlin and the movie Ladyhawke and books su

Download teachers notes - Allen & Unwin
a place where women and girls are thought to be extinct. • Suitable for ... Vulture's Gate is a piece of speculative f

Download Teachers' Notes here - Brink Productions
These include the theatre of Christoph Marthaler, the art of Escher, Jeffrey Smart, Marc Chagall,. Matisse (Les amants)

Teachers' Notes - Marianne Musgrove
Juliet decides Nana needs her very own Worry Tree so she gives her a bonsai tree ... the book. The more I wrote, the mor

Teachers Notes - Hachette Australia
Activity: Research the meaning of Nowruz Day or New Year's Day, and other cultural or religious Afghani customs. Activit

Teachers' Notes - Brink Productions
contemporary audiences. These teachers' notes will provide information on Brink Productions along with background notes

Gravity Teachers' Notes - Scot Gardner
A – Adam thinks he loses his job for suggesting that Tony and Debbie were having an affair. SEX, LUST AND LOVE. 1 –

teachers' notes - The Film Space
classroom activities exploring different aspects of Ava DuVernay's film. ... analysis whilst finding out more about this

Marvell - notes for teachers - Teachit
'A Dialogue between the Soul and Body'. The poem is ... I feel, that cannot feel, the pain; ..... My soul into the bough

LEVEL 18

use t

Boggywooga SUNSHINE CLASSICS – LEVEL 18 The Secret of Spooky House Boggywooga In the Middle of the Night The Secret of Spooky House Lizard’s Grandmother In the Middle of the Night Letters Mr James Lizard’sfor Grandmother A Magician’s Letters for MrHouse James Tracks in the House Sand A Magician’s Seeds Tracks in the Sand The Desert Machine Seeds Bees The Desert Machine

SUNSHINE CLASSICS Teaching Notes Level 18

Bees Boggywooga

Boggywooga The Story When a space traveller arrives on a purple planet, she plays a monster at his own game. The Story s on a purple planet, When she plays a monster at his own on game. a space traveller arrives a purple planet, she plays a monster at his own game. High-frequency Words across, behind, close, coming, great, small, smaller, there, through, why High-frequency Words great, small, smaller,across, there, behind, through,close, why coming, great, small, smaller, there, through, why Reading the Text •Reading Students the predict the setting and character from the information on the cover and title page. Text They look at the title useand their knowledge of beginning letter and sound /b/ and other and character from the information on the theand cover title page. from • Students predict setting and character the information on the cover and title page. letter (y, oo)sound to work theknowledge word. their knowledge of beginning and /b/out and other They patterns lookletter at the title and use their of beginning letter and sound /b/ and other •letter Listen to page(y,2.oo) Ask: is happening out the word. patterns to What work out the word. at the beginning of the story? What do you think will happen when Officer Susan meets the boggywooga. Students what theydo think is happening at the beginning of the story? What do you think • Listen to page 2. Ask: What is happening at the beginning of thesay story? What youmight think happen in the story. an meets the boggywooga. Students say what they think might will happen when Officer Susan meets the boggywooga. Students say what they think might •happen Listen to in the the story story.together and discuss the illustrations. Students confirm their previous predictions. Ask them to say they notice about the boggywooga as the their story previous unfolds. and discuss the illustrations. confirm theirwhat previous • ListenStudents to the story together and discuss the illustrations. Students confirm • On page 15, pause for students to use the beginning of the story to predict what Officer what they notice about the boggywooga as the story unfolds. predictions. Ask them to say what they notice about the boggywooga as the story unfolds. Susan will story reply to predict Commander John. nts to use the beginning the to what Officer • Onofpage 15, pause for students to use the beginning of the story to predict what Officer •Susan Students find there and they’re on page 2. They notice similarities in sounds and differences in der John. will reply to Commander John. spelling. on page 2. They notice similarities in sounds and differences • Students find there and they’re on page 2. in They notice similarities in sounds and differences in •Go to page 6 and focus on the word yell. Have students identify the onset and rime. They spelling. think other6 words thatand rhyme with yell. well) Give them strips of paper. he word yell. Have students identify the rime. They •Go toof page andonset focus on the word yell. (sell, Havetell, students identify thenarrow onset and rime. They They work with a partner to change the beginning letters to list new words. Ask: What’s a me with yell. (sell, tell,think well) of Give them narrow strips of paper. other words that rhyme with yell. (sell, tell, well) Give them narrow strips of paper. great yell? change the beginningThey letterswork to list newa words. What’sthe a beginning letters to list new words. Ask: What’s a with partnerAsk: to change •great Students read for themselves and then with a reading partner. Ask: Why do you think the yell? boggywooga got smaller? When have you been a bit scared of something tried it s and then with a reading partner. Ask: Why do you think the • Students read for themselves and then with a reading partner. Ask: Whybut do have you think theand found that it isn’t so scary any more? What would you have done if a boggywooga had en have you been a bit scared of something but have tried it and boggywooga got smaller? When have you been a bit scared of something but have tried it and out you? y more? What would jumped you have done if asoboggywooga had What would you have done if a boggywooga had found that itatisn’t scary any more? jumped out at you? Returning to the Text •Returning Have students retellText the story in their own words. Ask them what they would say instead of to the this forwhat size.” (page Would you own say, “Get what a loadthey of this!” “How about y in their own words.“Try them they would sayininstead of “Take • Ask Have students retell the7)story their words.this!” Ask them wouldorsay instead of Would you say, “Takethis?” this!” “Get a load of this!” or “How about “Try this for size.” (page 7) Would you say, “Take this!” “Get a load of this!” or “How about •this?” On page 8, focus on z at the beginning of zap and zonk. Students practise formation of the letter and write other (including invented ones) beginning with z. formation of the beginning of zap and• zonk. Students practise formation of the On page 8, focus onwords z at the beginning of zap and zonk. Students practise • Go to page 11 and focus on small. Students listen and suggest other words in the -all word ncluding invented ones) beginning z. words (including invented ones) beginning with z. letter and writewith other family. They find out how many -all words they can make. Have students use tool to small. Students listen •and words thesmall. -all word Go suggest to pageother 11 and focusinon Students listen and suggest other words in the the pen -all word underline all the words in the they wordcan small in them. Whatuse does mean? any -all words they can make.They Have students usethe thestory pen tool to family. find out how many -allwith words make. HaveAsk: students thesmaller pen tool to Sunshine Classics when Level 18 2add -er to a describing word? (becomes a comparative) What happens you story with the word small in them. Ask: What does smaller mean? underline all the words in the story with the word small in them. Ask: What does smaller mean? -er to a describing word? comparative) What(becomes happens awhen you add -er to a describing word? (becomes a comparative) • Go to page 16 and listen to laughed. Ask: What letters do you expect to see in this word? Have students work together to write other words in which gh is pronounced as /f/. (enough, tough, rough, cough)

© Wendy Pye Publishing

© Wendy Pye Publishing Writing • Students think about when the story is taking place. Ask: Is the story happening in the past, present or future? Have them rewrite the story in the present tense. The spaceship lands on the purple planet. “We aren’t getting out,” says Commander John. • Students write words from the story on a graffiti chart. Have them write words they remember, put a line under parts that don’t look right and check in the book for the spelling. They use the words to write their own stories about boggywoogas. • Students draw and write what happened at the beginning, middle and end of the story on

SUNSHINE CLASSICS Teaching Notes Level 18

Sunshine Classics Level 18

2

• Go to page 16 and listen to laughed. Ask: What letters do you expect to see in this word? Have students work together to write other words in which gh is pronounced as /f/. (enough, tough, rough, cough) Writing • Students think about when the story is taking place. Ask: Is the story happening in the past, present or future? Have them rewrite the story in the present tense. The spaceship lands on the purple planet. “We aren’t getting out,” says Commander John. • Students write words from the story on a graffiti chart. Have them write words they remember, put a line under parts that don’t look right and check in the book for the spelling. They use the words to write their own stories about boggywoogas. • Students draw and write what happened at the beginning, middle and end of the story on charts. Develop their ideas to make a wall display. • Work together to transform some sentences, for example, An amazing (wonderful, marvellous, incredible, surprising, strange) thing happened to the boogywooga. Home/School Link Have students access the story at home and re-read it. They can then complete the interactive activities: Words: Match adjectives to their comparative forms Thinking: Answer five comprehension questions 1. How did Officer Susan make the boggywooga smaller? A. She showed him she wasn’t scared of him. √ B. She zapped him with a zapper. C. She yelled at him. 2. What word suits Officer Susan best? A. brave √ B. angry C. funny 3. What word suits Commander John best? A. careful √ B. angry C. funny 4. What word tells about the boggywooga in this story? A. bullying √ B. friendly C. funny 5. What is the author’s message in this book? A. Boggywoogas get small quickly. B. Space travel can be dangerous. C. Boggywoogas are only big if you are scared of them. √ Record: They can read the story by themselves and save it for you to listen to. The Secret of Spooky House The Story A monster child insists on popcorn for dinner. Her parents find that they like it too.

B. angry C. funny 4. What word tells about the boggywooga in this story? A. bullying √ B. friendly C. funny 5. What is the author’s message in this book? A. Boggywoogas get small quickly. B. Space travel can be dangerous. C. Boggywoogas are only big if you are scared of them. √ Record: They can read the story by themselves and save it for you to listen to.

SUNSHINE CLASSICS Teaching Notes Level 18

The Secret of Spooky House The Story A monster child insists on popcorn for dinner. Her parents find that they like it too. Sunshine Classics LevelWords 18 3 High-frequency because, began, can’t, even, every, find, know, never, would, wrong

Reading the Text • Students use their knowledge of high-frequency words and familiar letter and sound patterns in words to work out the title. Ask: What do these words mean? What is the secret of Spooky House? Can you find any clues about the secret in the cover and title page illustrations? © Wendy Pye Publishing • Students read the story with a partner to answer these questions. For help they can tap on the text to hear it read. • Explore the meaning of events, words and phrases in the story. Ask: What gives us the idea that page 2 of the story was taking place in the evening? What does having supper mean? What do you say in your house? What word tells us that the Monster child was out of control? What does “making my blood curdle” mean? What things curdle? • Students listen to come (page 12) and came (page 14). Ask: What are the sounds you hear? What letters would you use to show those sounds? Students listen to some and same and write the words. • Focus on the sounds in want (page 5) and went (page 6). Have students tell the difference. They identify the different medial sounds and name the letters that make them. They suggest other words that have the same /o/ sound as in want (was, wand, what, cough, wash, job, dog), and talk about the different spellings. Returning to the Text • Look through the illustrations together to retell the story. Students respond to questions and talk about events and discoveries they have made. Ask: What was the first thing that happened? What then? (and so on.) What did you think when that happened? What was the secret? Why was it a secret? What did Mr and Mrs Monster do to try to get their child’s mind off popcorn? What would you have done? What did Mr Monster do to keep the secret? Do you think the neighbours ever found out? Why? Why not? • Have students identify the genre. Ask: What sort of story would you say this is? A humorous story? A mystery? What does “Dig your fangs into this!” mean? What would you say? How did you read the words that name sounds? (pages 12, 14) Students read out loud to give examples. • Work together to explore the sounds and letters in know (page 8). Ask: What sounds can you hear? What letters are used to show those sounds? What happens when we take away the letter k? • Students underline words with the pen tool that start with letter blends. Have them think of other words that start the same way. (screamed, blood, fried, drink, strange) Writing • Rewrite the sentence on page 10. The man in the shop didn’t have popcorn, but he did have corn to pop. Students make new sentences using compound words. The man in the shop didn’t have silverfish, but he did have fish that were silver; didn’t have bumblebees, but he did have bees that could bumble; didn’t have butterflies, but he did have flies made of butter. • Students rewrite the story about what other secrets the family in the spooky house might have and illustrate it. • Students write a Monster Meal Calendar for a week to show what the Monster Family might eat each night. (ground grasshopper soup and fried frog flippers with slug sauce)

• Focus on the sounds in want (page 5) and went (page 6). Have students tell the difference. They identify the different medial sounds and name the letters that make them. They suggest other words that have the same /o/ sound as in want (was, wand, what, cough, wash, job, dog), and talk about the different spellings.

SUNSHINE CLASSICS Returning to the Text • Look through the illustrations together to retell the story. Students respond to questions and talk about events and discoveries they have made. Ask: What was the first thing that happened? What then? (and so on.) What did you think when that happened? What was the secret? Why was it a secret? What did Mr and Mrs Monster do to try to get their child’s mind off popcorn? What would you have done? What did Mr Monster do to keep the secret? Do you think the neighbours ever found out? Why? Why not? • Have students identify the genre. Ask: What sort of story would you say this is? A humorous story? A mystery? What does “Dig your fangs into this!” mean? What would you say? How did you read the words that name sounds? (pages 12, 14) Students read out loud to give examples. • Work together to explore the sounds and letters in know (page 8). Ask: What sounds can you hear? What letters are used to show those sounds? What happens when we take away the letter k? • Students underline words with the pen tool that start with letter blends. Have them think of other words that start the same way. (screamed, blood, fried, drink, strange)

Teaching Notes Level 18

Writing • Rewrite the sentence on page 10. The man in the shop didn’t have popcorn, but he did have corn to pop. Students make new sentences using compound words. The man in the shop didn’t have silverfish, but he did have fish that were silver; didn’t have bumblebees, but he did have bees that could bumble; didn’t have butterflies, but he did have flies made of butter. • Students rewrite the story about what other secrets the family in the spooky house might have and illustrate it. • Students write a Monster Meal Calendar for a week to show what the Monster Family might eat each night. (ground grasshopper soup and fried frog flippers with slug sauce) Home/School Link Have students access the story at home and re-read it. They can then complete the interactive activities: Words: Letter blends Thinking: Answer five comprehension questions 1. Select the word that means lots of shouting and yelling. tantrum Sunshine Classics Level 18 4 2. Why did Mr Monster put on dark glasses, a big cloak and a hat? A. He was cold. B. He didn’t want the man in the shop to know who he was. √ C. He needed big pockets for the popcorn. 3.Wendy Why Pye didn’t Mrs Monster want to give popcorn to the Monster child? © Publishing A. Monsters don’t eat popcorn. √ B. Popcorn is noisy. C. She didn’t like popcorn. 4. How did Mr Monster go home? tip-toed 5. What was the secret of Spooky House? A. The monster child had tantrums. B. The monsters ate popcorn every night.√ C. The monsters ate boiled beetles. Record: They can read the story by themselves and save it for you to listen to. In the Middle of the Night The Story One night five farmers think they see a monster in the shed. High-frequency Words against, behind, fifth, first, fourth, middle, once, quickly, second, third Reading the Text • Students look at the illustrations on the cover and title page. They read the title of the story

A. Monsters don’t eat popcorn. √ B. Popcorn is noisy. C. She didn’t like popcorn. 4. How did Mr Monster go home? tip-toed 5. What was the secret of Spooky House? A. The monster child had tantrums. B. The monsters ate popcorn every night.√ C. The monsters ate boiled beetles. Record: They can read the story by themselves and save it for you to listen to.

SUNSHINE CLASSICS Teaching Notes Level 18

In the Middle of the Night The Story One night five farmers think they see a monster in the shed. High-frequency Words against, behind, fifth, first, fourth, middle, once, quickly, second, third Reading the Text • Students look at the illustrations on the cover and title page. They read the title of the story and make guesses about what might happen. • Talk through the illustrations. Ask: How do you think this story will end? Have students listen to the story with a partner and retell it in their own words. • Read the story together. Ask students to identify what happens in each paragraph. Focus on mood. Ask: How does each farmer increase the tension in the story? Which character behaves differently? What does he do? What things in the illustrations give us ideas about the characters’ feelings? What words give us ideas about the characters’ feelings? How would you read those parts? Returning to the Text • Have students use the text and illustrations to construct a sequence chart. They match sentences that describe events to relevant parts of the sequence chart and form a wall display. • Say the word quiet and quickly. Ask: What letters would you use to show the sounds in quiet and quickly? Have students find the words in the context of the story (pages 2 and 10) and check their guess. They write the words and suggest other words that begin with the same letter blend. (queen, quilt, quick) • Students find words in the text that end with -ed. (howled, bashed, tiptoed, jumped, shouted, attacked, landed, dressed, grabbed) Work together to identify the base words. Explore how some words change before adding the -ed ending (grabbed). • Have students work through the text finding sentences with commas. They practise reading the sentences with expression. Ask: How do you think the author wants us to read this sentence? Why? Why has she used a comma? How would you read this sentence? Writing • Students write sentences about events in the story, using punctuation to help the reader know where to pause and how to read them. • Students rewrite the story from the old dog’s point of view. I was thirsty. I had a drink from the watering can. Sunshine Classics Level 18 5 My head got stuck. I howled and bashed. The fifth farmer came to get me. The farmers had their clothes on backwards. Poor old things! They looked scared. We drove away fast. © Wendy Pye Publishing Home/School Link

Have students access the story at home and re-read it. They can then complete the interactive activities: Words: Letter blends Thinking: Answer five comprehension questions 1. Why did the old dog put her head inside the watering can? A. She was trying to hide. B. She was thirsty. √ C. She wanted to water the garden. 2. Why did the farmers put their clothes on backwards? A. They dressed too quickly. √ B. They wanted to trick the dog.

SUNSHINE CLASSICS Teaching Notes Level 18

Sunshine Classics Level 18

5

Poor old things! They looked scared. We drove away fast. Home/School Link Have students access the story at home and re-read it. They can then complete the interactive activities: Words: Letter blends Thinking: Answer five comprehension questions 1. Why did the old dog put her head inside the watering can? A. She was trying to hide. B. She was thirsty. √ C. She wanted to water the garden. 2. Why did the farmers put their clothes on backwards? A. They dressed too quickly. √ B. They wanted to trick the dog. C. They wanted to have some fun. 3. What word tells how the first farmer got the keys? grabbed 4. What sort of person was the fifth farmer? A. He liked wearing his clothes backwards. B. He wasn’t scared of anything. C. He was brave and kind to animals. √ 5. What were the feelings of the farmers in the story? A. They were excited. B. They were surprised and scared. √ C. They were angry. Record: They can read the story by themselves and save it for you to listen to. Lizard’s Grandmother The Story Lizard loved to play tricks on the other animals, but they got tired of her pranks and decided to trick her instead. High-frequency Words again, always, closer, herself, mine, much, never, sometimes, together, yourself Reading the Text • Look at the cover. Ask: What sort of creature is that? Ask if anyone can work out the title of the book. Read the names of the author and illustrator. • Go to pages 2–3. Ask: What can you see in the illustration? Who do you think has played the trick on the giraffe and zebra? How do you know? Have students read or listen to the text and discuss. Talk about any words students may have been stuck on and how they might work out the words. • Go to pages 4–5. Ask: What is happening in this picture? Have students read the text individually and then check for understanding. Ask: How did the animals describe Lizard’s grandmother? What do you think the animal really is? • Talk through the illustrations and have students read the text individually and then ask questions. For help, they can tap on the text to hear it read.

3. What word tells how the first farmer the tells keys?how the first farmer got the keys? 3. Whatgot word 3. What word tells how the first farmer got the keys? grabbed grabbed ot the keys? grabbed 4. What sort of person was the fifth farmer? 4. What sort of person was the fifth farmer? 4. He What sortwearing of person the fifth farmer? A. liked hiswas clothes backwards. A. He liked wearing his clothes backwards. er? A. He liked wearing his clothes backwards. B. He wasn’t scared of anything.B. He wasn’t scared of anything. ds. B. He He was wasn’t scared anything. C. brave andofkind to animals. C. He√was brave and kind to animals. √ C. He was brave and kind animals. √ the story? 5. What were the feelings oftothe farmers 5. Whatin were the feelings of the farmers in the story? 5. What were the feelings of the farmers in the story? A. They were excited. A. They were excited. n the story? A.They Theywere weresurprised excited. and scared. √ B. B. They were surprised and scared. √ B. They were surprised and scared. √ C. They were angry. C. They were angry. C. TheyThey were can angry. Record: read the storyRecord: by themselves andread save the it for youby tothemselves listen to. and save it for you to listen to. They can story Record: They can read the story by themselves and save it for you to listen to. mselves and save it for you to listen to.

SUNSHINE CLASSICS Teaching Notes Level 18

Lizard’s Grandmother Lizard’s Grandmother

Lizard’s Grandmother

The Story The Story The Story Lizard loved to play tricks on theLizard other animals, but they of heranimals, pranks and loved to play tricksgot ontired the other but decided they got tired of her pranks and Lizard loved to play tricks on the other animals, but they got tired of her pranks and decided to trick nimals, but they got tired of her instead. pranks and decided to trick her instead. to trick her instead.

High-frequency Words High-frequency Words High-frequency Words again, always, closer, herself, mine, much, never, sometimes, yourself again, always, closer, herself,together, mine, much, never, sometimes, together, yourself again, always, closer, herself, mine, much, never, sometimes, together, yourself h, never, sometimes, together, yourself Reading the Text Reading the Text Reading the Text • Look at the cover. Ask: What sort of creature is that? AskWhat if anyone work out the title • Look at the cover. Ask: sort ofcan creature is that? Askof if anyone can work out t • Look at the cover. Ask: What sort of creature is that? Ask if anyone can work out the title of the book. Read names of the author and illustrator. book. Read the names of the author and illustrator. eature is that? Ask if anyone can workthe out the title of the the book. Read the names of the author and illustrator. • Go to pages 2–3. Ask: What can youtosee in the illustration? played theWho do you think has • Go pages 2–3. Ask: WhatWho can do youyou seethink in thehas illustration? and illustrator. • Go to pages 2–3. Ask: What can you see in the illustration? Who do you think has played the trick on andplayed zebra?the How students read listen to the textstudents and trickdoonyou theknow? giraffeHave and zebra? How dooryou know? Have read or listen to th e in the illustration? Who do the yougiraffe think has trick on the giraffe and zebra? How do you know? Have students read or listen to the text and discuss. Talk about any words students may have been stuck on and how they might work out discuss. Talk about any words students may have been stuck on and how they migh ou know? Have students read or listen to the text and discuss. Talk about any words students may have been stuck on and how they might work out the words. may have been stuck on and how they might work outthe words. the words. • Go to pages 4–5. Ask: What is happening in this Have students read the text • Go to pages 4–5.picture? Ask: What is happening in this picture? Have students read the t • Go to pages 4–5. Ask: What is happening in this picture? Have students read the text individually check for understanding. How didfor theunderstanding. animals describe Lizard’s individually andAsk: then check Ask: How did the animals describe L ng in this picture? Have students and readthen the text individually and then check for understanding. Ask: How did the animals describe Lizard’s What do you thinkgrandmother? the animal really Whatis?do you think the animal really is? nding. Ask: How did grandmother? the animals describe Lizard’s grandmother? What do you think the animal really is? • Talk through the illustrations and have students the text individually and then askthe text individually and the • Talk through theread illustrations and have students read mal really is? • Talk through the illustrations and have students read the text individually and then ask questions. For and help,then theyask can tapquestions. on the textFor to help, hear itthey read. can tap on the text to hear it read. students read the text individually questions. For help, they can tap on the text to hear it read. areabout funnypractical and which are–mean dangerous. • Talk jokes whichorare funny and which are mean or dangerous. ext to hear it read. • Talk about practical jokes – which • Talk about practical jokes – which are funny and which are mean or dangerous. • During a close reading of the story, students identify passages of direct speech.identify Encourage • During a close reading of the story, students passages of direct speech. En unny and which are mean or dangerous. • During a close reading of the story, students identify passages of direct speech. Encourage them to read aloudEncourage the words spoken. Spend up any confusion which up any confusion about them to readtime aloudclearing the words spoken. Spendabout time clearing dents identify passages of direct speech. them to Classics read aloud the words spoken. Spend time clearing up any confusion about which Sunshine Level 6 speech. are part of the18 direct They the speech. direct speech in speech bubbles words arecan partreproduce of the direct They can reproduce the direct speech in speech end time clearing upwords any confusion about which words are part of the direct speech. They can reproduce the direct speech in speech bubbles using speech the white text box. can reproduce the direct in speech bubbles using the white text box. using the white text box. • Go to page 8. Highlight the word called using the pen tool. Students find other words in the story with double letters that end in -ed. (pulled, stopped) © Wendy Pye Publishing Returning to the © Wendy Pye Publishing

© Wendy Pye Publishing Text • Discuss the fable genre. Have students brainstorm what fables are about. (A fable is a story where the characters learn a moral lesson.) Record their responses. Allow time for discussion. Focus on and discuss how Lizard’s behaviour changed when she learnt her lesson. Focus on the concept of writing to convey a message or a lesson of some sort. Ask: What is the message in the story? What is the author trying to tell the reader? Record their responses. • Have students reread the story with each other and by themselves, several times. In subsequent sessions students could take turns at being narrators and the animal characters. • Highlight the word tricks on page 2 and encourage students to “get their mouths ready” to say tr-. Have them suggest other words beginning with the same sound. • Students find words in the story beginning with gr- (grandmother), cr- (crocodile) and br(brown). They circle these with the pen tool. • Talk about how the illustrator gives clues to the action in the story. Have students look closely at the illustrations in the story and identify the emotions shown on the characters’ faces.

Writing • Students retell the story in comic-strip format. They collect examples of comic-strip stories as a model for their retelling. Together list the most common features of the genre and draft a simple layout to help planning. Students brainstorm which parts of the story to portray. They publish and share their finished work. Home/School Link Have students access the story at home and re-read it. They can then complete the interactive

• Go to page 8. Highlight the word called using the pen tool. Students find other words in the story with double letters that end in -ed. (pulled, stopped)

SUNSHINE CLASSICS Returning to the Text • Discuss the fable genre. Have students brainstorm what fables are about. (A fable is a story where the characters learn a moral lesson.) Record their responses. Allow time for discussion. Focus on and discuss how Lizard’s behaviour changed when she learnt her lesson. Focus on the concept of writing to convey a message or a lesson of some sort. Ask: What is the message in the story? What is the author trying to tell the reader? Record their responses. • Have students reread the story with each other and by themselves, several times. In subsequent sessions students could take turns at being narrators and the animal characters. • Highlight the word tricks on page 2 and encourage students to “get their mouths ready” to say tr-. Have them suggest other words beginning with the same sound. • Students find words in the story beginning with gr- (grandmother), cr- (crocodile) and br(brown). They circle these with the pen tool. • Talk about how the illustrator gives clues to the action in the story. Have students look closely at the illustrations in the story and identify the emotions shown on the characters’ faces.

Teaching Notes Level 18

Writing • Students retell the story in comic-strip format. They collect examples of comic-strip stories as a model for their retelling. Together list the most common features of the genre and draft a simple layout to help planning. Students brainstorm which parts of the story to portray. They publish and share their finished work. Home/School Link Have students access the story at home and re-read it. They can then complete the interactive activities: Words: Words ending in -ed Thinking: Answer five comprehension questions 1. What trick did Lizard play on Giraffe and Zebra? A. She tied their tails together. √ B. She pretended to be a crocodile. C. She hid their fruit. 2. Which of these sentences is not correct? A. Lizard and Crocodile both have long tails. B. Lizard and Crocodile both have lots of teeth. √ C. Lizard and Crocodile both have short legs. 3. Why did the animals play a trick on Lizard? A. They wanted Crocodile to eat her. B. They wanted to see if she could grow another tail. C. They were tired of Lizard’s tricks. √ 4. Why did Crocodile ask Lizard to come closer? A. She needed glasses. B. She wanted to teach Lizard to swim. C. She wanted to eat Lizard. √ 5. Why did the animals ask Lizard how her grandmother was? A. They wanted Lizard to visit Crocodile again. B. They wanted Lizard to remember her promise not to play tricks on them. √ C. They wanted to visit Lizard’s grandmother. Record: They can read the story by themselves and save it for you to listen to.

© Wendy Pye Publishing

SUNSHINE CLASSICS Teaching Notes Level 18

Sunshine Classics Level 18

7

Letters for Mr James The Story The children send letters to Mr James to cheer him up. High-frequency Words about, can’t, come, from, going, Mr, never, today, where, your Reading the Text • Read the title. Look at the cover illustration to say how they think the story will begin. Ask: What do you think might happen? Students look at the title page, link it the message on the cover illustration and predict what will happen next. Encourage them to use detail in illustrations to predict and confirm events in the story. • Ask students to focus on the plot as they listen to the story. They are learning to listen for detail about what is happening in the story. Ask questions about each page. For example, on page 2, why did Mr James say “Never! Never! Never!”? • Discuss with students the reasons people write letters or emails. • Have students construct their own version of the story. They work together to write an outline. Have them notice the repetition of someone telling someone else. Returning to the Text • Have students read the story. Ask questions about the punctuation and have students apply the answers to the way the story is read. • Students find opposites (antonyms) in the story. (big/little, fat/thin, to/from, man/woman) • Have students find words in the story that have two different meanings (letters). Ask: What does letters mean in the story? What else could letters mean? Students suggest other words that sound the same but have different meanings. They write them in a word bank and illustrate where possible. (knows/nose, flew/flu, way/weigh) Writing • Students refer to the story outline they did previously. They use arrows and labels to summarise the order. Then they rewrite the story using what they know about events in mind map form. • Students write a letter to Mr James or someone in the community who they think would like a letter. • Students write a letter to a friend or someone in their family. • Remind students that sometimes we write letters to show people we care, to thank people for helping or to share information. They can write letters to children in another school. They could become penpals or exchange letters between classes in their own school. Set up a post box to send and receive these. Home/School Link Have students access the story at home and re-read it. They can then complete the interactive activities: Words: Match words that are opposites Thinking: Answer five comprehension questions 1. What is the main idea of the story? A. People in town talk a lot. B. Children go to school. C. People are kind to other people in their town. √ 2. What does a postie do? A. brings letters √ B. posts letters C. writes letters

Returning to the Text • Have students read the story. Ask questions about the punctuation and have students apply the answers to the way the story is read. • Students find opposites (antonyms) in the story. (big/little, fat/thin, to/from, man/woman) • Have students find words in the story that have two different meanings (letters). Ask: What does letters mean in the story? What else could letters mean? Students suggest other words that sound the same but have different meanings. They write them in a word bank and illustrate where possible. (knows/nose, flew/flu, way/weigh)

SUNSHINE CLASSICS Teaching Notes Level 18

Writing • Students refer to the story outline they did previously. They use arrows and labels to summarise the order. Then they rewrite the story using what they know about events in mind map form. • Students write a letter to Mr James or someone in the community who they think would like a letter. • Students write a letter to a friend or someone in their family. • Remind students that sometimes we write letters to show people we care, to thank people for helping or to share information. They can write letters to children in another school. They could become penpals or exchange letters between classes in their own school. Set up a post box to send and receive these. Home/School Link Have students access the story at home and re-read it. They can then complete the interactive activities: Words: Match words that are opposites Thinking: Answer five comprehension questions 1. What is the main idea of the story? A. People in town talk a lot. B. Children go to school. C. People are kind to other people in their town. √ 2. What Classics does a Level postie18do?8 Sunshine A. brings letters √ B. posts letters C. writes letters 3. How does the woman from the bank feel? sorry 4.Wendy Find Pye thePublishing words that are a question. © “Where did they all come from?” 5. Find the words that show Mr James was happy. “They are for me!” Record: They can read the story by themselves and save it for you to listen to. A Magician’s House The Story If you ever rent a magician’s house, you’ll get lots of surprises. High-frequency Words always, around, full, little, middle, need, never, other, something, which Reading the Text • Look at the cover and title page illustrations. Ask: Who is the person? What does the sign say? (Discuss the meaning of rent). Read the title together. Discuss the use of the apostrophe for possession. • Read page 3 to the class, then walk through the illustrations, asking students to look for the surprises. Continue reading the story in an entertaining way. Ask them to comment on the house and what they liked best or disliked most. • Read the story together focussing on whether the surprises are little or big. Ask: How surprised would you be on each page? Rate or rank the words in order of the level of surprise. (surprised, very surprised, amazed, shocked, blown away, pleased) Add more to the list and present them in order on a timeline. Draw or label them with the thing that surprises on each page to match the level of surprise • Have students reread the story to a partner in an enthusiastic manner. Returning to the Text • Have students find compound words in the story and discuss their meaning. (sometimes,

Sunshine Classics Level 18

8

SUNSHINE CLASSICS 3. How does the woman from the bank feel? sorry 4. Find the words that are a question. “Where did they all come from?” 5. Find the words that show Mr James was happy. “They are for me!” Record: They can read the story by themselves and save it for you to listen to.

Teaching Notes Level 18

A Magician’s House The Story If you ever rent a magician’s house, you’ll get lots of surprises. High-frequency Words always, around, full, little, middle, need, never, other, something, which Reading the Text • Look at the cover and title page illustrations. Ask: Who is the person? What does the sign say? (Discuss the meaning of rent). Read the title together. Discuss the use of the apostrophe for possession. • Read page 3 to the class, then walk through the illustrations, asking students to look for the surprises. Continue reading the story in an entertaining way. Ask them to comment on the house and what they liked best or disliked most. • Read the story together focussing on whether the surprises are little or big. Ask: How surprised would you be on each page? Rate or rank the words in order of the level of surprise. (surprised, very surprised, amazed, shocked, blown away, pleased) Add more to the list and present them in order on a timeline. Draw or label them with the thing that surprises on each page to match the level of surprise • Have students reread the story to a partner in an enthusiastic manner. Returning to the Text • Have students find compound words in the story and discuss their meaning. (sometimes, something, popcorn, lighthouse) • Together choose words to clap and count the syllables of. (bront/o/saur/us (4), mag/ic/ian (3), never (2), sham/poo (2), house (1)) • Have students scan the text for opposites or antonyms and list them. (little/big; always/never) Writing • Students rewrite the story using a different magic, such as a magician’s car, truck, plane or caravan. They design and draw it with lots of new tricks or surprises. • Students write a story about their experience with a magician. They write instructions about how to do a trick or joke. • Have students write about the page they liked most in the book. They write what happens and why they liked it. Home/School Link Have students access the story at home and re-read it. They can then complete the interactive activities: Words: Match the words that are the same Thinking: Answer five comprehension questions 1. What is the main idea of the story? A. A magician’s house is full of surprises. √

© Wendy Pye Publishing

(surprised, very surprised, amazed, shocked, blown away, pleased) Add more to the list and present them in order on a timeline. Draw or label them with the thing that surprises on each page to match the level of surprise • Have students reread the story to a partner in an enthusiastic manner.

SUNSHINE CLASSICS Returning to the Text • Have students find compound words in the story and discuss their meaning. (sometimes, something, popcorn, lighthouse) • Together choose words to clap and count the syllables of. (bront/o/saur/us (4), mag/ic/ian (3), never (2), sham/poo (2), house (1)) • Have students scan the text for opposites or antonyms and list them. (little/big; always/never)

Teaching Notes Level 18

Writing • Students rewrite the story using a different magic, such as a magician’s car, truck, plane or caravan. They design and draw it with lots of new tricks or surprises. • Students write a story about their experience with a magician. They write instructions about how to do a trick or joke. • Have students write about the page they liked most in the book. They write what happens and why they liked it. Home/School Link Have students access the story at home and re-read it. They can then complete the interactive activities: Words: Match the words that are the same Thinking: Answer five questions Sunshine Classics Level 18 comprehension 9 1. What is the main idea of the story? A. A magician’s house is full of surprises. √ B. A magician’s house is full of kangaroos. C. A magician’s house can fly. 2. WhatPye comes out of the fridge? © Wendy Publishing A. chocolate milk B. a brontosaurus C. popcorn √ 3. What word tells that the family does not own the house? rent 4. Which tap is the chocolate milk coming out of? A. the one near the girl √ B. the one near the boy 5. Where was the house sitting at the end of the story? on top of a lighthouse Record: They can read the story by themselves and save it for you to listen to. Tracks in the Sand The Story All creatures leave tracks. Find out what they look like. High-frequency Words across, around, because, best, closely, everywhere, guess, keep, nearby, often Reading the Text • Look at the illustrations on the cover and title page. Students suggest what the title might be. Read the title together. • Students skim the contents page to get an idea of what will be in the book. They decide whether this is a fiction or a non-fiction book. Ask: What tells you? Students listen to the text. On pages 22-23 they match the tracks. •Read the text together. • Students choose one item from the index to read the pages to a partner then retell to the class. • Have students look for words starting with letter blends. If using the online text, they can use the pen tool to circle these. Returning to the Text • Students find compound words in the text. They say the words and discuss their meaning as single words and compound words. (everywhere, afternoon, nearby, footprints, tailprints, longhorn)

A. chocolate milk B. a brontosaurus C. popcorn √ 3. What word tells that the family does not own the house? rent 4. Which tap is the chocolate milk coming out of? A. the one near the girl √ B. the one near the boy 5. Where was the house sitting at the end of the story? on top of a lighthouse Record: They can read the story by themselves and save it for you to listen to.

SUNSHINE CLASSICS Teaching Notes Level 18

Tracks in the Sand The Story All creatures leave tracks. Find out what they look like. High-frequency Words across, around, because, best, closely, everywhere, guess, keep, nearby, often Reading the Text • Look at the illustrations on the cover and title page. Students suggest what the title might be. Read the title together. • Students skim the contents page to get an idea of what will be in the book. They decide whether this is a fiction or a non-fiction book. Ask: What tells you? Students listen to the text. On pages 22-23 they match the tracks. •Read the text together. • Students choose one item from the index to read the pages to a partner then retell to the class. • Have students look for words starting with letter blends. If using the online text, they can use the pen tool to circle these. Returning to the Text • Students find compound words in the text. They say the words and discuss their meaning as single words and compound words. (everywhere, afternoon, nearby, footprints, tailprints, longhorn) • Students clap and say words to count the syllables. (e-nor-mous (3), dis-a-ppear-ing (4), crisscross (2), track (1)) They write lists with a partner. • Students choose a heading and reread one section of the text to a partner. They summarize what they read with a main idea and supporting ideas or facts. Writing • Students Make a five-column table showing which animals’ tracks come under the categories Hooves, Paws, Reptiles, Tiny tracks, Birds’ track”. They illustrate where possible. • Students write a story about going tracking or about tracks they may have seen while out walking somewhere, at the beach or in the forest. This can be a true story or a made-up story called “Whose Tracks Are These?” Home/School Link Have students access the story at home and re-read it. They can then complete the interactive activities: Words: Match words that begin with the same letter blend

© Wendy Pye Publishing

On pages 22-23 they match the tracks. •Read the text together. • Students choose one item from the index to read the pages to a partner then retell to the class. • Have students look for words starting with letter blends. If using the online text, they can use the pen tool to circle these.

SUNSHINE CLASSICS Teaching Notes Level 18

Returning to the Text • Students find compound words in the text. They say the words and discuss their meaning as single words and compound words. (everywhere, afternoon, nearby, footprints, tailprints, longhorn) • Students clap and say words to count the syllables. (e-nor-mous (3), dis-a-ppear-ing (4), crisscross (2), track (1)) They write lists with a partner. • Students choose a heading and reread one section of the text to a partner. They summarize what they read with a main idea and supporting ideas or facts. Writing • Students Make a five-column table showing which animals’ tracks come under the categories Hooves, Paws, Reptiles, Tiny tracks, Birds’ track”. They illustrate where possible. • Students write a story about going tracking or about tracks they may have seen while out walking somewhere, at the beach or in the forest. This can be a true story or a made-up story called “Whose Tracks Are These?” Home/School Link Have students story at home and re-read it. They can then complete the interactive Sunshine Classics access Level 18the10 activities: Words: Match words that begin with the same letter blend Thinking: Answer five comprehension questions 1. What animal made these tracks? A. camel © Wendy Pye Publishing B. horse C. fox √ 2. What animal made these tracks? A. rabbit B. lizard C. hermit crab √ 3. Why does the green turtle make tracks in the sand? A. to go to sleep on the beach B. to lay eggs on the beach √ C. to find food on the beach 4. What do cows make tracks with? hooves 5. Why are camel tracks hard to see? a camel’s hooves don’t sink very far into the sand. Record: They can read the story by themselves and save it for you to listen to. Seeds The Story How seeds develop and grow. High-frequency Words another, downwards, grow, inside, need, ready, soon, still, them, upwards Reading the Text • Ask students what they know about seeds. Ask: Where do seeds come from? Where do plant shops get their seeds? What is inside a seed? Do all seeds grow at the same time? • Have students read the contents page and choose one entry to read to a partner. They retell the content they chose to the class. Talk about the headings and why they are there. • Discuss how you can read non-fiction. You can read a chapter or a page at a time, not necessarily in order. • Read the text together. Returning to the Text • Have students choose words from the index and read the pages related to the entry, for example, find the pages relating to seeds and read them. • Students create a chart with three headings: Plant, Seed, What it Looks Like. They include

2. Where do seeds get their food? A. from water B. from the soil C. from water and the soil √ 3. What do seeds need to become ripe? pollen 4. What are seeds doing when they start to grow upwards and downwards? germinating. 5. Find the words that tell what the seeds use to breathe. leaves and their roots. Record: They can read the story by themselves and save it for you to listen to.

SUNSHINE CLASSICS Teaching Notes Level 18

The Desert Machine The Story Find out how the camel has adapted to deserts. High-frequency Words cannot, give, little, live, make, most, other, very, where, without Reading the Text • Introduce the text by talking about what students know about camels. Ask: What is special about a camel? Where would you expect to find camels? Has anyone ever seen a real camel? What was it doing? • Have students look at the cover. Ask: What can you see in the photograph? What sort of text do you think this is going to be? Can anyone read the title or words in the title? Read it together. Read the author’s name to students. • Turn to the title and contents page. Have students demonstrate how to use the contents page. Refer to the index on page 16. • Go to pages 2 and 3. Ask students to point to the heading on this page. Read it together. Ask: What can you see in the photographs? Refer to the captions under the photographs and discuss how they provide an explanation about what is in the photo. Ask students to find the word survive. Talk about what the word means. Ask them to read the second paragraph and then question for understanding. Read to the group if necessary. • On pages 4 and 5, ask students to read the caption under the drawing to find out how many humps Bactrian camel has. SunshineaClassics Level 18 12 • On pages 6 and 7, read the heading together. Students read the text and find out how many litres of water a camel can drink at one time. • On pages 8 and 9, students read the text themselves and then discuss any words they had difficulty with. • On pages 10 and 11, students read the text, discuss and then read the labels on the diagram. •© On pages 12 and 13 students read the caption to find out when the camels can help people. Wendy Pye Publishing Discuss. Returning to the Text • Students read the text independently. Provide support where needed. • Have students find and discuss -ing words. They list them with their present tense form. Writing • Have students find three facts about camels in the book and write them in their own words. • Students write a caption for the picture on page 6. • Have students choose one heading from the contents page. They read the pages and summarise the topic in chart form. • Students write a paragraph about why you think the book is called The Desert Machine. They illustrate their paragraph and label it. Home/School Link Have students access the story at home and re-read it. They can then complete the interactive activities: Words: Match verbs with their -ing form Thinking: Answer five comprehension questions 1. How can you tell a Bactrian camel? A. It has one hump on its back. B. It has two humps on its back. √ C. It has no hump on its back. 2. Where do camels live?

Sunshine Classics Level 18

12

SUNSHINE CLASSICS • On pages 8 and 9, students read the text themselves and then discuss any words they had difficulty with. • On pages 10 and 11, students read the text, discuss and then read the labels on the diagram. • On pages 12 and 13 students read the caption to find out when the camels can help people. Discuss.

Teaching Notes Level 18

Returning to the Text • Students read the text independently. Provide support where needed. • Have students find and discuss -ing words. They list them with their present tense form. Writing • Have students find three facts about camels in the book and write them in their own words. • Students write a caption for the picture on page 6. • Have students choose one heading from the contents page. They read the pages and summarise the topic in chart form. • Students write a paragraph about why you think the book is called The Desert Machine. They illustrate their paragraph and label it. Home/School Link Have students access the story at home and re-read it. They can then complete the interactive activities: Words: Match verbs with their -ing form Thinking: Answer five comprehension questions 1. How can you tell a Bactrian camel? A. It has one hump on its back. B. It has two humps on its back. √ C. It has no hump on its back. 2. Where do camels live? A. in the forest B. on the beach C. in the desert √ 3. Why does a camel “zip-up”? A. to go to sleep B. to keep out the sand √ C. to keep warm 4. What is in the camel’s hump? fat 5. Why can camels walk on sand without sinking? Its wide, padded feet spread its weight. Record: They can read the story by themselves and save it for you to listen to. Bees The Story Find out all about honeybees. High-frequency Words each, live, make, most, must, other, special, stop, these, together Reading the Text • Look at the cover and ask students what they know about bees – where they live, what they do, and how they organise themselves. • Listen to the text together. Ask: What do you need to do to listen to stories properly? How important is it to listen well? What can you do to make yourself a good listener?

© Wendy Pye Publishing

B. on the beach C. in the desert √ 3. Why does a camel “zip-up”? A. to go to sleep B. to keep out the sand √ C. to keep warm 4. What is in the camel’s hump? fat 5. Why can camels walk on sand without sinking? Its wide, padded feet spread its weight. Record: They can read the story by themselves and save it for you to listen to.

SUNSHINE CLASSICS Teaching Notes Level 18

Bees The Story Find out all about honeybees. High-frequency Words each, live, make, most, must, other, special, stop, these, together Reading the Text • Look at the cover and ask students what they know about bees – where they live, what they do, and Classics how they organise Sunshine Level 18 13 themselves. • Listen to the text together. Ask: What do you need to do to listen to stories properly? How important is it to listen well? What can you do to make yourself a good listener? • Read the story together and ask students what new things they learnt on this second read. • Talk about non-fiction books. Ask: What is different about them? Is it the way they are written, thePublishing illustrations, the way information is presented? Are they all the same even when © Wendy Pye the subject is different? What non-fiction features does this book have? (Contents page, Headings, captions, index). Have students find these features and discuss their purpose and how they help with understanding the text. Returning to the Text • Reread the text. Have students sSummarise the chapter “Family of Bees” pages 4-11 in a “herringbone” organiser with the main idea in the centre and the supporting ideas and facts in the ribs. • Discuss how the bee is an insect and how there are many insects. Ask: What is an insect? What other social insects might you see every day? (ants) • Focus on page 16. Together discuss how people make themselves safe when working with bees. Show this in a problem/solution chart. • Students look for compound words in the text. (honeybees, beekeeper, beehive, honeycomb) They circle the two words using the pen tool. They say the words and discuss the meaning of the single words and the compound word. Writing • Students make a list of the important facts in the text. They can use this list to write their own personal “Did You Know?” section using pages 20-21 as a guide. • Have students write a short story about when they were stung by a bee or someone they were with was stung. What did they do? What happened to the bee? Did it hurt? Were they afraid? Is there a way to avoid being stung? What can be used to soothe the pain? • Students find an illustration in the text without a caption and write one for it. • Students research and write about the uses of honey. Brainstorm a mind map together. This can be expanded into an informational text. Home/School Link Have students access the story at home and re-read it. They can then complete the interactive activities: Words: Make compound words Thinking: Answer five comprehension questions 1. How do bees know their family? A. by look B. by colour C. by smell √ 2. Which is the most important bee in the hive? A. the worker B. the queen √

“herringbone” organiser with the main idea in the centre and the supporting ideas and facts in the ribs. • Discuss how the bee is an insect and how there are many insects. Ask: What is an insect? What other social insects might you see every day? (ants) • Focus on page 16. Together discuss how people make themselves safe when working with bees. Show this in a problem/solution chart. • Students look for compound words in the text. (honeybees, beekeeper, beehive, honeycomb) They circle the two words using the pen tool. They say the words and discuss the meaning of the single words and the compound word.

SUNSHINE CLASSICS Teaching Notes Level 18

Writing • Students make a list of the important facts in the text. They can use this list to write their own personal “Did You Know?” section using pages 20-21 as a guide. • Have students write a short story about when they were stung by a bee or someone they were with was stung. What did they do? What happened to the bee? Did it hurt? Were they afraid? Is there a way to avoid being stung? What can be used to soothe the pain? • Students find an illustration in the text without a caption and write one for it. • Students research and write about the uses of honey. Brainstorm a mind map together. This can be expanded into an informational text. Home/School Link Have students access the story at home and re-read it. They can then complete the interactive activities: Words: Make compound words Thinking: Answer five comprehension questions 1. How do bees know their family? A. by look B. by colour C. by smell √ 2. Which is the most important bee in the hive? A. the worker B. the queen √ C. the wild bee 3. What do the larvae eat? A. pollen B. pollen and honey √ C. honey 4. Where does the nectar come from? flowers 5. Who like to eat honey? A. bears, frogs and spiders B. bears, bees and people √ C. cats, frogs and dogs Record: They can read the story by themselves and save it for you to listen to.

© Wendy Pye Publishing