Dreaming of a city - Interparking

Dreaming of a city - Interparking

Dreaming of a city … ACTIVITIES REPORT 2012 Dreaming of … 8 an open, accessible city A coherent parking policy gives city authorities a tool to ma...

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Dreaming of a city … ACTIVITIES REPORT 2012

Dreaming of … 8

an open, accessible city

A coherent parking policy gives city authorities a tool to manage traffic flow, make inner cities more attractive and strengthen economic viability.

12 an intermodal city

Car parks at intermodal junctions provide smooth and trouble-free transfer from one mode of transport to another, whether it’s bus, tram, bike or train. Smart payment solutions further enhance this experience.

16 a sustainable city

Efficient car parks are good for the environment: they reduce the volume of traffic in the inner city and thus lower emissions of CO2.

20 a fair city

Free parking shifts hidden costs onto the whole of society. It’s much fairer if users pay a reasonable price for their parking spaces.

24 an inviting city

Car parks are a city’s welcome mat. A pleasant, safe, welcoming and client-friendly car park immediately sets the right tone.

28 a warm-hearted city

Interparking has its feet rooted in urban society. With us, successful entrepreneurship goes hand-in-hand with care for people and the environment. 32 34 36 38 40 46 48 50

Board of directors and management Management Report Consolidated balance sheet Consolidated profit and loss statement Appendices to the consolidated accounts Balance sheet Interparking S.A. Profit & loss statement Interparking S.A. Statutory auditor’s report

3 Foreword In 2012 the European and global economy continued to sail through choppy waters. Yet Interparking performed more than adequately: sales increased by 3,7 percent and operating results remained strong and stable. For this I want to thank first and foremost our customers and end-users for the trust they have shown in us. I thank our employees for the outstanding work that they have performed – sometimes in difficult circumstances. In 2012 we strengthened our activities in the European countries where we were already present – the Netherlands, ­Belgium, France, Germany, Austria, Spain and Italy. At the same time we launched our operations in Poland via our subsidiary Poland Car Parking (PCP). Furthermore, we opened our first car park in Romania; on the university square in Bucharest. Of course, it is our goal to continue to strengthen our presence in these nine countries. As such, we are maintaining our strategy of careful but ambitious growth, according to the inkstain principle. This should enable us to optimise synergies and develop intelligent pricing structures such as yield management. Interparking is not only spreading its activities in a geographical sense. We continue to prefer spreading our activities over several types of car parks: in city centres, hospitals and shopping centres, at railway stations and airports, in touristic destinations etc. In this regard we are giving greater focus to car parks at intermodal junctions. This fits into a modern vision of mobility in which different means of transport –  on foot, bicycle, motorbike, car, bus, tram, metro, airplane – fit together seamlessly. This is why Interparking is continuing to invest in intermodal payment cards (Pcard+). These allow our customers to pay not only for their parking space, but also for the shared bicycle (Villo!) and public transport, as the cards are compatible with the Brussels MOBIB network, for example. As market leader in the European car park sector, in 2012 Interparking continued to invest in the quality of its car parks. These efforts were rewarded with 126 European Standard Parking Awards (ESPA). In parallel we are investing in electric charging stations and our fleet of electric maintenance vehicles. That these efforts are effective is clearly demonstrated by the fact that Interparking Belgium, France and the Netherlands were all certified as carbon neutral at the beginning of 2013. In 2013 Interparking continues to invest in top-quality and environmentallyfriendly car parks, in order to ensure that cities are accessible, pleasant places to live in, and economically viable. Our 2.065 car park professionals in nine ­European countries are ready to outdo themselves once more! Roland Cracco Managing Director

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Our achievements Belgium

Operational achievements + 3 new car parks: •D  iscount Parking car park (Brussels Airport) • Oesterparking car park A + B (Bruges) • Bicycle Parking C ­ entrumZand (Bruges) + Renovations or redesigns: • Pavillions car park CentrumZand (Bruges) + Under construction: • Hopmarkt car park (Aalst) Technical achievements + New control room in Antwerp + Continuing roll-out of our own card technology (Pcard+ with RFID) + 30 electric charging stations for electric vehicles

The Netherlands Operational achievements + 2 new car parks: •Z  uidpark car park (Amsterdam) • Argentinië car park (Amsterdam) + Under construction: • Markthal car park (Rotterdam) Technical achievements 79 electric charging stations for electric vehicles Awards and certificates + 4 new European Standard Parking Awards

For 55 years Interparking has been designing, developing and managing public car parks; ‘off-street’ and more recently also ‘on-street’. In this period we have grown to become a European leader in the car park business. We have created a wide range of car parks: in the inner city; on the outskirts and at stations, airports and other intermodal junctions; and at hospitals, shopping centres and office complexes. Interparking operates in nine European countries. Our strategy is based on three pillars​​: mobility, quality and ecology. Every day our 2.065 employees serve the 85 million clients who annually use our 656 car parks in 350 cities.

France Operational achievements + 1 new car park: •A  lhambra car park (Paris) + Renovations or redesigns: • Ferrage car park (Cannes) • Parc Suquet Forville car park (Cannes) + Under construction: • Les Cordeliers (Albi) • Sulzer (Nice) Technical achievements + Energy-efficient lighting + 17 electric charging stations for electric vehicles Awards and certificates + Interparking France awarded the ‘CO2-neutral’ certificate Various + Cooperation with Renault for electric charging stations in Palais des Festival car park (Cannes), supplemented by car-sharing during the Film Festival. + Crazy Prices and special parking spaces for P Card holders.

First car park, created for the occasion of the World ­Exhibition in Brussels: Car Park 58.

1958

Germany Operational achievements + 43 new car parks: •1  8 Woolworth car parks in 16 cities • 7 car parks in Berlin • 2 car parks in Hamburg • 2 car parks in Zwickau • Bhf. Amberg (Amberg) • Dammer Tor Carré (Aschaffenburg) • Atrium (Bamberg) • Bad Godesberg RS (Bonn) • Galerie (Buchholz) • Bhf. UCI (Duisburg) • Bhf. Giessen (Giessen) • Kronengarten (Hilden) • Opernpassage (Keulen) • Löhrstrasse (Koblenz) • City Parkhaus (Limburg an der Lahn) • Bhf. Ludwigsburg (Ludwigsburg)

First foreign car park: Schouwburg car park in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

1966

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in 2012 Austria





 bf. Alicenstrasse (Mainz) H Hbf. Tiefgarage (Ulm) + 3 acquisitions: • Lungengasse (Keulen) • Parkhaus Zentrum (Zwickau) • Dürreplatz/Weinheim Galerie (Weinheim) + Under construction: • Car parks in Berlin • Car parks in Hamburg Technical achievements + Free Contipark Smartphone app + 39 electric charging stations for electric vehicles Awards and certificates +T  he Luisenplatz car park (­Potsdam – Berlin) wins the ‘ADAC car park test 2012’ + 8 new European Standard Parking Awards • •

Operational achievements + 4 new car parks: •C  ity Center (Salzburg) • Lehen IM 34 Interspar (Salzburg) • Unipark Nonntal (Salzburg) • KZP-zone (Zell am See) Awards and certificates + 3 new European Standard Parking Awards

Italy Operational achievements + Renovations or redesigns: •T  ronchetto car park (Venice) + Under construction: • Project Recanati: a combination of ‘on-street’ and ‘off-street’ parking.

Spain Technical achievements + New control room in Barcelona +6  electric charging stations for electric vehicles Awards and certificates + 2 new European Standard Parking Awards

Poland Operational achievements + 2 new car parks: •C  opernicus Airport car park (Wrocław) • Shopping centre Mokotow Gallery (Warschau) + Renovations or redesigns: • Expansion to Lech Walesa Airport car park (Gdansk) Technical achievements + 2 electric charging stations for electric vehicles

Romania Operational achievements + 1 new car park: •P  iata Universitatii car park (Bucharest) Technical achievements +2  electric charging stations for electric vehicles

Start of activities in Germany under the name Parkhaus Europa-Center GmbH, which Interparking operates today as Contipark.

Creation of the Uniparc subsidiary in France.

Start of activities in Austria, with Contipark Austria.

Acquisition of 50% of Contipark Spain, which later becomes Interparking Hispania.

1967

1975

1975

1995

6 Belgium 10 cities 71 car parks 42.094 spaces 48 car parks with ESPA

Interparking, a European group 9 countries 350 cities 656 car parks 2 065 employees 290 313 parking spaces 85 million clients in 2012

Netherlands 19 cities 49 car parks 22.109 spaces 15  car parks with ESPA

France 5 cities 24 car parks 13.021 spaces 7 car parks with ESPA

Spain 21 cities 50 car parks 20.991 spaces 10  car parks with ESPA

First hospital car park in the Netherlands: Rijnstate Hospital, Arnhem.

Italy 105 cities 6 car parks 69.794 spaces

Interparking Belgium launches the P Card.

Start of operations in Italy, through the acquisition of the Tronchetto car park in Venice.

P 1995

1998

2001

Interparking’s German subsidiary Contipark signs a cooperation agreement with Deutsche Bahn.

2006

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Germany 175 cities 399 car parks 98.717 spaces 43 car parks with ESPA

Poland 6 cities 12 car parks 8.190 spaces

Austria 8 cities 44 car parks 14.972 spaces 3 car parks with ESPA

126 ESPA awards

Romania 1 city 1 car park 425 spaces

As a long-term investor, ­Interparking is committed to quality in its car parks. Recognition has come our way: no fewer than 126 of our operations have been granted the European Standard Parking Award (ESPA) by the European Parking ­Association (EPA). Car parks wishing to gain an ESPA certificate are assessed against a detailed checklist. Aspects such as lighting, ease of use, safety, comfort, size and payment systems are ­thoroughly screened.

First concession contract signed in Bucharest, Romania.

Implementation of the first electric ­charging stations, in Knokke, ­Belgium.

Purchase of Poland Car Parking in Poland.

Interparking Belgium becomes 100% c ­ arbon neutral, the target of the whole group.

Interparking opens its first bicycle park, in Bruges.

2010

2010

2011

2011

2012

8 Dreaming …

of an open, accessible city VIABLE CENTRES Parking on the outskirts, downtown, underground or on-street? A coherent parking policy enables city authorities to control traffic flow, make city centres more attractive and promote economic vitality.

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ities do everything to keep their centres accessible, viable and economically ­vigorous. Congested inner cities are detrimental, as are run-down city centres and shopping centres. A sophisticated parking policy keeps cities accessible and flourishing. It regulates and modulates traffic, so that mobility is enhanced, inner cities remain attractive, and the economic vitality of city centres is boosted.

systems and sufficient underground car parks in the centre absorb motorists who otherwise drive around looking for a parking space. Car parks for hospitals, business centres and shopping centres capture incoming visitors, staff and shoppers. Finally, car parks next to railways and airports enable motorists to quickly switch to a ­different mode of transport.

Mix of solutions

Parking and city marketing

A differentiated parking policy requires a balanced mix of tailored solutions. Cheaper car parks on the outskirts near to tram, bus or metro stops keep cars out of the city centre. Efficient parking guidance

An increasing number of cities are realising that their parking policy forms a crucial part of their city marketing. Smooth parking guidance systems and inviting, comfortable car parks give visitors the feeling

that they are welcome. This positively affects their first impression of the city. When visitors can easily and safely park their cars, they will shop more often and longer – and happily return.

Accessible and attractive Interparking partners closely with local authorities and organisations wishing to develop such a coherent parking policy. We adapt public (off-street) car parks and on-street parking to the location: our car parks must make the destination accessible and attractive. It’s no coincidence that we are also present in tourist hot-spots such as Bruges, Venice or Cannes. Here, our strategically located car parks lessen

10 the impact of road traffic and keep the touristic centres attractive and economically viable.

Easily accessible shopping and business centres We also develop and implement customised car parks in shopping centres, event sites (congress centres, theatres) and office

Easy parking in downtown Bucharest Safe and comfortable parking in the vibrant centre of Bucharest? Thanks to Interparking, it is now possible. In this city of 2.7 million inhabitants, we opened our first car park in Romania – Bucharest’s first modern underground car park. The underground ‘Piata Universitatii’ car park has 425 spaces on three levels and is located in a highly strategic location. It’s situated on one of the busy thoroughfares, next to a metro station and right in the historical city centre – close to the pedestrian area of old Bucharest, the University, the National Theatre, the Coltea Hospital and several museums. The car park is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. It has charging stations for electric cars and energy-efficient sensor-controlled lights. Thanks to this underground car park, University Square – which previously was always jammed with parked cars – has been restored to a spacious and inviting town square.

Making Recanati more attractive for Recanati is a hilly town of about 21,000 inhabitants in the eastern part of Italy (Marche region), not far from the Adriatic Sea. It is best known as the birthplace of the world-famous Italian poet Giacomo Leopardi. In the coming years the centre of Recanati will undergo a radical metamorphosis. The urban renewal project Centro Città 2.0 will make the historic heart more attractive and accessible. Recanati suffers from an acute shortage of parking places. A parking policy therefore has a key role to play in the project. At the

11 complexes. We guide users quickly and easily from the car park to the entrance of the building, and pay attention to signs that are easy to read and smart payment options. We also ensure that parking is not an obstacle, so that personnel and visitors do not waste time.

Caring for hospitals Hospital complexes are

tourists edge of a central pedestrian zone, close to a new access road, Interparking has created 116 ‘on-street’ parking spaces, of which 16 are reserved for buses and camper vans. In the historic heart, 413 additional parking spaces are on the street. Near the access road, Interparking is building a two-storey underground car park with 300 parking bays. The car park will be completely integrated into the surroundings – it will be below a new park with trees, greenery and fountains. Lifts will take visitors from the car park directly to the Piazza Leopardi, the city’s central square.

continually growing in size and are increasingly concentrated in and around major cities, which increases the pressure on parking. Efficient and spacious car parks are therefore vital. Patients, visitors, physicians and medical staff already have enough to think about – Interparking ensures that they can park without further concerns.

12 Dreaming …

of an intermodal city PARKING AT TRANSFER HUBS Travelling increasingly involves switching – from car to train to bicycle; from car to plane to taxi. Car parks at intermodal junctions provide smooth and trouble-free transfer from one mode of transport to another,whether it’s bus, tram, bike or train. Smart payment solutions further enhance this experience.

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ar parks are increasingly growing to become hubs in a mobility network: alongside a ‘normal’ car park could also be a bike park, a bus or tram stop, a railway station, a place to car share or charge up an electric car etc. Such intermodal junctions help travellers to easily fit individual pieces of their journey together, with total freedom of movement.

Freedom of movement Alternatively, consider car parks in the outskirts of the city center, where motorists can easily transfer to public transport. A dense ­public transport network can tempt motor-

ists to park their cars and ride into the city by tram, bus or metro, thereby helping to free the city of congestion. Furthermore, modern railway stations include car and bike parks to enhance connectivity by tram, bus or metro.

Seamless switching The switch from private cars to public transport will become ­attractive when motorists are ­offered safe, easily accessible and clearly signposted car parks, close to airports and train, bus and metro stations. Allowing commuters to use their parking card to pay for public transport is another important incentive for

the use of intermodal transport. Indeed, it allows them to transfer quickly and painlessly from one mode of transport to another.

Client-friendly payment Interparking’s compatible payment systems guarantee ease of those payments. In Brussels, clients can use their Pcard+ – a debit card with a microchip – to pay in the car park as well as on the tram, bus and metro, and they can even use the same card to rent a bike and re-charge their electric car. This solution will soon be extended throughout the rest of Belgium. Users will then be able

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to use their Pcard+ to pay for their public transport ticket or subscription (bus, metro, train, tram). With the Pcard+, Interparking puts the client in pole position, not the car park: we do everything to grant him or her as much freedom of movement as possible.

Cooperation These smart payment solutions rely on partnerships with public transport companies. In Germany we work closely with Deutsche Bahn. The car parks at the main railway stations are run by DB BahnPark, a Joint Venture of Deutsche Bahn and Contipark, the German subsidiary of Interparking. Rail passengers get a preferential rate in the car park and can use a combined train and car park subscription.

15 The switch from private cars to public transport will only become attractive when motorists are offered safe, easily accessible and clearly indicated car parks.

Bruges Bike Park Gdansk: First Kiss & Fly Zones Some 10 kilometres outside Gdansk, the Polish city on the Baltic Sea, lies Gdansk Lech Wałesa Airport. Poland Car Parking – Interparking’s Polish subsidiary – has been managing the airport car park since 2001. It’s been enlarged several times, and currently has 1229 parking bays. In 2012 the entire car park

was revamped and a new car park management system was immediately put into use. The redesign created two Kiss & Fly Zones, a novelty in Poland. Together they offer 106 car park spaces, where cars can enjoy up to 10 minutes of free parking. Interparking is currently studying the possibility of a new 750-space car park.

Anyone wanting to stroll or shop in the centre of Bruges can now park their bike in a safe and dry place. Interparking has opened a bike park on level -1 of the Centrum ‘t Zand car park. This bike park is centrally located, easy to use, secure and free. It has room for 164 bicycles, is open 24 hours a day all year round, and is under constant camera surveillance. Whoever wants to use the bike park only needs a Pcard+. The Pcard+ gives cyclists access to a bicycle lift which takes them to the bike park on level -1. They use the card to open the security gate of the bike park and put their bike with a single click into one of the 164 safe bicycle racks. When they return to their bike, they simply use the Pcard+ to unlock their bike.

16 Dreaming …

of a sustainable city ECOLOGY Efficient car parks are good for the environment: they reduce the volume of traffic in the inner city and thus lower emissions of CO2. We operate our car parks in an as environmentally friendly way as possible. Furthermore, the Interparking Group is striving to become completely carbon neutral.

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Cannes turns green In Cannes, Interparking currently has three car parks equipped with charging stations for electric cars: parkings Palais des Festivals, Lamy and Forville. Thanks to a partnership with Renault, the maintenance teams in Cannes have an electric Kangoo at their disposal. This partnership will be extended to the car parks at Nice and Fontainebleau. In 2012 Interparking France became completely carbon neutral. This is due to a wide range of measures to improve its ecological

footprint: LED lighting, motion detectors, frequency controllers on the ventilation systems, new commercial vehicles that emit less than 100 grams of CO2, video confe­rences that cut the number of trips between Cannes and Paris, etcetera. Interparking France has other ‘green’ initiatives in the pipeline. One example is the development of a car sharing system together with Renault: customers commuting between Cannes, Nice and Menton will be able to do so by sharing an electric car.

18 In our car parks, we ourselves work in a manner that is as energy efficient and environmentally friendly as possible.

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ar parks in the outskirts of the city center as well as intermodal junctions reduce traffic congestion in the city – and thus also the pressure of traffic on the environment. Motorists driving around aimlessly, looking for a parking spot, account for 30 to 50 percent of traffic in the city. Efficient parking guidance systems help them to find a parking space quickly and easily, and cut their fuel consumption and emissions of CO2.

Promoting the electric car We fully support the growth of the CO2-free electric car by offering more electric charging stations. Drivers can charge car for free while being parked.

Energy efficient and environmentally friendly We don’t only promote green solutions for our customers. In our car parks, we ourselves work in a manner that is as energy ­efficient and environmentally friendly as possible. Various initiatives contribute to this. For all renovations and new projects we apply the best technical solutions and ­energetic ­concepts. We use as much green power as possible, which we generate ourselves – wherever possible – by installing photovoltaic cells on car park rooftops. Motion detectors switch the lights off when they do

not register movement. Internal parking guidance systems direct drivers to a parking space. This increases the speed of finding a free parking space and reduces CO2 emissions. Our intervention teams move around on foot, by bicycle or electric car. We also use ecofriendly paint for signage and opt for a forced air ventilation system.

Target: Carbon neutral In every country where it operates, Interparking’s goal is to become completely carbon neutral. In Belgium this is the case since the beginning of 2011. Interparking France went carbon neutral in 2012, followed by Interparking Netherlands in early 2013.

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Zuidpark, Amsterdam The Zuidpark car park is Interparking Netherlands’ fourth parking facility in Amsterdam. It has room for 450 cars and is right next to the Zuidpark business park, which is committed to sustainable entrepreneurship. The energy-efficient complex has a green roof, with space for urban farming. Zuidpark also hosts the largest charging station for electric cars in Europe, with 40 regular charging stations and four fast-chargers. Anyone recharging their car only pays the car park fee – the

electricity is free. Parking Zuidpark is also a base for TAXI-E, a newcomer in the market for electric taxis. In several car parks Interparking Netherlands provides charging stations for electric cars. In this way we are playing a role in the growth of energy-efficient vehicles. Interparking Netherlands is also committed to sustainable development as an organisation: in 2013 Interparking Netherlands became completely carbon neutral.

20 Dreaming … of a fair city

FLEXIBLE PRICING FORMULAS Free parking shifts hidden costs onto the whole of society. Motorists parking in the city take up valuable and expensive space and inevitably put pressure on the environment. This could be offset by a fair price.

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ost motorists like free parking. But free parking does not exist. Whoever parks in the city, occupies space that’s in short supply, emits CO2, produces noise, and affects the quality of the city experience. With free parking all the direct and indirect costs are passed onto society. Is it not fairer that the user of a parking space pays a ­reasonable price?

Regulating traffic flow Paying car parks help to regulate traffic. They minimise the number of cars looking for a parking spot,

cut congestion and promote traffic flow, so that noise and pollution are reduced. Their regulating role depends on a combination of factors: strategic location, size, but also pricing. If the price is right, we can ensure that car parks can optimise their regulating role.

Tailor-made Pricing should be customised. To implement a well-formulated ­pricing, information is needed about visitor segments, customer expectations and preconceived mobility goals that the pricing strategy must help achieve.

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Flexible formulas in Germany and Belgium Contipark Germany and Interparking Belgium want to attract new clients and reward existing ones. For example, in some car parks, P Card holders get a discount of 10 percent. We develop intelligent and flexible tariffs for shortand long-term parking. This involves sophisticated tariffs that are continually optimised. Our in-depth knowledge of the market allows us to differentiate and analyse various customer segments.

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A carefree trip to the cinema in Brussels and Antwerp In Antwerp and Brussels, Interparking uses particularly attractive rates for those who want to visit the city centre to watch a movie. Thanks to an agreement with the UGC cinema chain, cinema-goers now pay only 2.50 euros for 3 hours parking. They simply show their parking ticket at the box office. The special rate is valid from 6 pm to 2 am, and throughout Sundays and public holidays. In its car parks in Antwerp, close to the Stadsschouwburg and other theatres, Interparking uses

an advantageous evening rate which is ideal for those who want to combine an evening of theatre with a bite to eat and a drink: between 6pm and 2am they can park for a maximum price of only 5.90 euros. For some car parks in Brussels, Interparking Belgium has introduced a very advantageous night rate. From 6 p.m. to 5 a.m. an automatic evening rate of € 5 is applicable. This rate also applies to anyone who wants to enjoy an evening at the theatre, regardless of the duration of the show.

Incentives Financial incentives can help, for example by guiding street ­parkers to underground car parks. These incentives can discourage or correctly attract long-term parkers. Differentiated rates in a certain parking zone can help to connect car parks to the right ­customer segments.

Innovations Technological innovations make it possible to implement dynamic pricing formulas. Interparking also invests strongly in ICT solutions to increase the payment convenience for clients and enhance the smooth inflow and outflow to car parks.

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If the price is right, we can ensure that car parks can optimise their regulating role.

Stress-free parking in the hospital For many people, hospitals are associated with stress, anxiety, worry and tension. Patients, staff and visitors want to park as speedily as possible, without having to worry about rapidly rising parking rates. In Vic (Catalunya), Interparking manages the General Hospital’s car park.

The rates are calculated to minimise the impact on staff, patients and visitors. Staff can park for free. The rates are gradated: the first 20 minutes are free and then the rate gradually increases. Special rates are available for those who need overnight parking and for the emergency services.

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Dreaming … of an inviting city

SAFE, PLEASANT, EFFICIENT

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Car parks are a city’s welcome mat. They often are a first introduction to a city. A pleasant, safe, welcoming and client-friendly car park immediately sets the right tone.

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ar parks are no longer grey bunkers. Interparking offers its clients comfortable, safe, properly lighted, maintained and sign-posted car parks, stylishly integrated into their environment.

car parks are monitored around the clock and managed from central control rooms, to give clients immediate technical assistance at any time.

Finger on the pulse Quality requirements Interparking’s car parks meet the latest quality requirements: inviting and clearly visible entrances and exits, optimal layout, spacious parking bays, attractive pictograms and colour codes to indicate the levels, smooth floors with clearly visible markings, no-nonsense directions to ensure smooth inflow and outflow, and efficient, userfriendly equipment. More and more

Through customer satisfaction surveys – using anonymous customer testing as well as surveys – we keep our finger on the pulse of our clients. This gives us a good idea of what ​​ clients want from us and how they evaluate us. Usually the results are positive, but every study gives each car park an action list of improvements. Through education and trainings we try to raise the level of our service.

26 More and more car parks are monitored around the clock and managed from central control rooms.

Extra safety, thanks to central control rooms How to ensure safe parking and immediately provide assistance with technical problems, even at night and weekends? This is possible thanks to a central control room. By using the latest technology, in principle a car park can be managed and monitored completely remotely. In practice, the presence of staff in the car park is very important for comfort and a sense of security for our customers. A control room provides very valuable additional support. If, for example, a member of staff is busy at level −2,

he cannot see what is going on at level −3. Should an incident occur, the operator in the control room can warn the supervisor and take appropriate action remotely. The control rooms are in operation 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Clients experiencing problems are connected directly to operators in the control room via the intercom at the ticket machine or the information point at the barrier. Via security cameras the operators can observe incidents and directly help

customers with their problem: raise barriers, open gates, print a ticket remotely, and so on. If the problem cannot be solved from the control room, a mobile team can immediately be dispatched. Interparking has central control rooms in Belgium, Germany, France and more recently in Spain, where already three car parks – two in Valencia and one in Alcalá de Henares (Madrid) – are managed from a control room in Barcelona.

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Once more, Contipark has the best car park Every year ADAC – the largest car club in Germany and Europe – picks the best car park in Germany. The nominated car parks are screened according to criteria such as usability, accessibility, safety and pricing. In 2012 the winner was the Luisenplatz underground car park in Potsdam, near the Brandenburg Gate, a car park with 278 spaces. The car park is owned by Contipark, Interparking’s German subsidiary. A Contipark car park also received an ADAC award in 2010 and 2011. ADAC commended the Luisenplatz car park as being convenient, inviting, clean, bright and sizeable. The parking bays are spacious and there are no disturbing pillars. Bonus points were given for its clear signage, the visitor’s toilets and the attractive rates.

28 Dreaming …

of a warm-hearted city CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY A company is not an island. Interparking has its feet rooted in urban society and also wants to contribute to a sustainable society. With us, successful entrepreneurship goes hand-in-hand with care for people and the environment.

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orporate social responsibility aims to create added value in three dimensions: Profit, Planet and People. These are the three pillars that support sustainability. At Interparking, successful business goes hand in hand with caring for people and the environment. We are committed to making the cities of tomorrow accessible to traffic and at the same time attractive, viable, warm and welcoming for people.

the impact of the business on the environment – Interparking is committed to ease the negative impact of traffic on the environment and works toward environmentallyfriendly, energy-efficient and carbon neutral operations. We contribute to actions for ecological awareness and continually offer more charging stations for electric cars. For our clients we promote green solutions while we ourselves are increasingly energy-conscious.

Profit, Planet …

…and People

Profit stands for a corporation’s economic return on investment and financial health. Planet represents

People stands for the social dimension of entrepreneurship: the consequences of business actions for

30 mobiel dankzij

mobile grâce à

Interparking has its feet firmly rooted in urban society. Therefore we support goals that move the whole community forward.

Sponsorship of wheelchair tennis people both inside and outside the company. Our employees are the key to our success. Interparking creates local jobs, a pleasant work environment, comprehensive training opportunities and a workforce that reflects the diversity of our customers. Interparking has its feet rooted in urban society. In the cities where we operate, we support goals that help the entire local community: projects for equal opportunities, the homeless, sports for p ­ eople with disabilities, cultural and

touristic events, social initiatives, NGOs, patient groups and so on. This indeed is our role in society: to ensure that cities are vibrant places where people can meet. Consequently Interparking ­Belgium and Brussels supports the SAMU Social organisation, which shelters and advises homeless people. I­nterparking sponsored the purchase of an electric Renault Kangoo, which SAMU Social uses to transport food packages and homeless people.

In 2012 the Salzburg Tennis Club organised the 20th International Wheelchair Tennis Open Tournament. Eighty tennis players from 18 countries participated in this well-known and world-leading wheelchair tennis event. Contipark Austria is a loyal sponsor of the event. The sponsorship reinforces the social involvement of Interparking, and dovetails our concern for equality and diversity. With our support, we hope to contribute to the professionalisation of wheelchair tennis. Contipark also supports initiatives to help disadvantaged children and encourage them to participate in education even from a young age.

31

Multi-coloured Interparking In its recruitment policy, Interparking resolutely opts for diversity. After all, the clients of our car parks are increasingly diverse – and this should be reflected in our workforce. We want to give everyone equal opportunities regardless of gender, socio-cultural or ethnic background, education, sexual orientation, age, disability and so on. Only competencies and qualities count. This is why Interparking ­Belgium gives all its employees the opportunity to develop themselves and grow in his or

her job. To help them do this, we also invest in their training. For example, in 2006 in Brussels we founded the Interparking School. Here, newly recruited staff are p ­ repared for positions in our car parks: they learn the proper functional and client-oriented attitudes, and also receive a technical education. Experienced employees are also offered courses in the Interparking School; for example, on the latest developments in parking technology or how to work in an environmentallyfriendly manner.

32

Board Of Directors

Executive Committee Corporate Management

A Claude De Clercq Honorary Chairman Baudouin Ruquois Honorary Managing Director 1 Yves De Clercq* Chairman 2 Serge Fautré Vice-Chairman 3 Roland Cracco** Managing Director 4 Alain De Coster Director 5 Philippe Latour Director 6 Michel Mathieu Director 7 Xavier Pierlet*** Director 8 Jean-François van Hecke**** ­ Director 9 Marc Van Begin***** Director

9

7

3

2 1

8 6

Yves De Clercq Serge Fautré Xavier Pierlet Jean-François Van Hecke

Roland Cracco Managing Director Elisabeth Roberti Secretary General Edouard de Vaucleroy Chief Financial Officer Ilse De Graeve Budget & Control Koen Mackens Acquisitions & Marketing Olivier Maes IT Manager Marc Iannetta International Audit Manager

A

5 4

* Manager of CVA Yves De ­Clercq ** Manager of SPRL K ­ ingsdale Consulting *** Manager of SPRL X ­ avier Pierlet **** Manager of HECKE ­Partners S.A. ***** Manager of SPRL Marc Van Begin

33

Operational Management Michael Kesseler Germany / Austria Contipark Parkgaragen GmbH Rankestraße, 13 – 10789 Berlin T: 49-30-25 00 970 Contipark International Austria GmbH Reichenhaller Straße, 8 – 5020 Salzburg T: 43-662-80990-0

Davide Fornasiero (ad interim) Deputy General ­Manager ­Acquisitions Italy Interparking Italia S.R.L. Isola Nuova del Tronchetto 33/M 30135 ­Venezia T: 39-041-520 75 55

Nik Subramanian Belgium S.A. Interparking N.V. Bisschopsstraat,1 – 1000 Brussels T: 32-2-549 58 11

Johan Tol Netherlands Interparking Nederland B.V. Weena point A – Weena, 710-712 3014 DA Rotterdam (Postbus 501 – 3000 AM Rotterdam) T: 31-10-217 09 70

Marc Grasset France Interparking France S.A. Rue de Gramont, 30 – 75002 Paris T: 33-1-55 04 66 00

Robert Falecki Poland Poland Car Parking Sp. z o.o. 59/6 Koszykowa Str.  00-660 Warszawa, Polska T: 48-22-629 59 44

Ernesto Piera Spain / Romania Interparking Hispania S.A. Calle Valencia, 93 3° 2a 08029 Barcelona T: 34-93-451 66 24 Square Parking S.R.L. 010898 Str Fagaras, nr 6, Sector 1 T: 40-21-311 56 54

34 Management Report ON THE CONSOLIDATED ACCOUNTS FOR THE 2012 FINANCIAL YEAR

Dear Sirs, We have the pleasure of presenting to you the consolidated accounts of the Interparking Group as at 31 December 2012. Despite the current global crisis and the fact that several western continental ­European countries are in recession, the Group saw its revenues grow over the last fiscal period while it maintained its EBITDA virtually unchanged. Our Group’s activity is clearly linked to the economic trends affecting the European countries in which we are active and, more particularly, to private consumption indices. However, our diversification and long-term investment policy has ensured that our income is characterised by recognised stability thanks to the variety of needs with which our car park operations are a ­ ssociated (city centres, leisure, shopping, work, airports, train stations, hospitals, etc.) and the variety of

the policies pursued by the cities and regions in which we ­operate in Europe. In 2012, Interparking’s business i­ncreased in Germany, Austria and France whereas ­revenue in Spain, Italy and Belgium ­decreased overall. However, the Group’s consolidated sales increased overall from €317.4 million in 2011 to €329.2 million, that is, growth of 3.7%. What is more, in order to strengthen its diversification, Interparking confirmed its entry into Central Europe via the opening of a car park in the centre of Bucharest at the end of the year. As of 31 December 2012, and including this new acquisition, Interparking operates 656 car parks with nearly 290,000 parking places in 350 cities in nine European Union countries, of which seven are in Euroland. This compares to 613 car parks and 284,000 parking places in 2011.

The main specific risk that could affect the Group’s development is that associated with car access and the commercial, economic and cultural appeal of the sites where our car parks are established. Interparking therefore favours operations in quality cities that have a strong and d ­ iversified appeal. The Group made new investments in major cities in 2012, including Paris, Berlin, Bruges, Cologne and Nice. One of the main challenges facing our company is the diversity of mobility policies and the stakes involved in access to city centres. This had a particularly strong impact over the last fiscal year which saw some large cities take measures to make access by car more difficult. On the other hand, many medium-sized cities want to facilitate access and parking to improve their economic appeal. This has resulted in new contracts for Interparking, notably with Fontainebleau,

35 Over the last fiscal period, the Group saw its revenues grow while it maintained its EBITDA virtually unchanged.

Menton, Aalst and Recanati. These new operations will contribute to the revenues of future fiscal periods. Faced with customers whose purchasing power is under pressure, Interparking has developed new products like “Discount” parking at Zaventem and it has continued to implement its dynamic pricing policy at a number of its car parks. In order to meet the quality requirements of our customers, the Group has invested substantial amounts over the past several fiscal periods to improve signalling and user comfort and safety. As of the end of 2012, 126 of the Group’s car parks had been awarded with the ESPA (European Standard Parking Award) quality certification delivered by the EPA (European Parking Association). Interparking is taking steps to meet these challenges by developing dynamic panel systems and partnerships with public transport companies and cities.

The Group continued to step up the use of remote management centres in 2012, ­particularly in France and Spain, a ­ s well as the development of multi-car park products. The company is continuing its environmental efforts, notably by providing recharging stations for electric cars, by carrying out energy audits and by purchasing green energy. At the end of 2012, the Group’s Belgian, French and Dutch operations were all CO2 neutral. These items impacted the company’s operational expenses resulting in a consolidated Group EBITDA of €103.0 million compared to €104.2 million last year. Net financial charges, excluding depreciation on consolidation variances, fell by 4% from €11.8 million in 2011 to €11.3 million in 2012. This decrease in expenses was primarily due to lower interest rates. The Group has hedging contracts on a portion of its loans in Belgium and Spain to protect itself against potential rate increases.

The Group’s net debt is very low at €307 million, that is, nearly three times EBITDA. This contributes to the Group’s stability and strong capitalisation. Taking into account depreciation which increased by 4.2%, earnings before tax were €38.2 million in 2012 compared to €39.3 ­million the previous year. The Group’s share in after-tax ­earnings was €22.7 million in 2012 compared to €31.6 million in 2011. This difference is ­primarily due to an exceptional gain of €8.3 million from the sale of the ­Naberpassage car park to the city of ­Groningen in 2011 as part of the city centre renewal. No major event has occurred since the accounts for the 2012 financial year were closed that would be such as to significantly impact the company’s financial situation and results. Brussels, 20 February 2013 Board of directors

36 Consolidated balance sheet ASSETS in ,000 €

Fixed assets I. Formation expenses II. Intangible assets III. Consolidation differences

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

540.918

550.063

679.868

703.422

707.480

85

44

124

9



49.522

25.231

40.279

134.086

129.319

142.475

128.595

198.337

194.165

176.211

IV. Tangible assets

342.270

385.540

430.206

364.270

392.541

a. Land and buildings

272.911

318.024

353.702

285.080

301.732

19.357

20.615

25.293

29.569

31.257

b. Plant, machinery and equipment c. Furniture and vehicles

3.664

3.691

3.964

4.301

5.195

33.422

23.166

21.242

19.323

17.749

e. Other tangible assets

8.004

12.210

14.130

14.160

14.059

f. Assets under construction and advance payments

4.912

7.834

11.875

11.837

22.549

V. Financial assets

6.566

10.653

10.922

10.892

9.409

a. Companies valued by the equity method

1.098

1.180

1.319

1.443

1.750

d. Leasing and other similar rights

- Participation b. Other companies

1.098

1.180

1.319

1.443

1.750

5.468

9.473

9.603

9.449

7.659

- Participations, shares and units

1.213

1.433

1.216

1.062

862

- amounts receivable

4.255

8.040

8.387

8.387

6.797

51.180

120.216

57.126

73.629

76.283

2.295

1.894

1.704

1.608

769

Current assets VI. Amounts receivable after more than one year a. Trade receivables b. Other amounts receivable c. Deferred taxes VII. Inventories and contracts in progress a. Inventories











163

131

267

254

190

2.132

1.763

1.437

1.354

579

823

731

562

1.062

983

823

731

562

1.062

983

VIII. Amounts receivable within the year

18.330

19.421

25.674

24.867

29.982

a. Trade debtors

12.129

10.827

10.971

12.754

16.686

b. Other amounts receivable

6.201

8.594

14.703

12.113

13.296

IX. Treasury investments

2.169

71.137

292

1.257

1.547

a. Own shares b. Other investments and deposits X. Cash at bank and in hand XI. Deferred charges and accrued income Total assets











2.169

71.137

292

1.257

1.547

22.791

20.733

21.786

30.497

26.693

4.772

6.300

7.108

14.338

16.309

592.098

670.279

736.994

777.051

783.763

37

LIABILITIES in ,000 €

Capital and reserves

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

274.955

289.899

310.091

330.584

353.731

I. Share capital

15.885

15.885

15.885

15.885

15.885

a. Issued capital

15.885

15.885

15.885

15.885

15.885











II. Share premium account

38.729

38.729

38.729

38.729

38.729

IV. Consolidated reserves

211.052

225.795

245.476

266.179

288.850

3.577

3.577

3.577

3.577

3.577

b. Uncalled capital

V. Consolidation differences VI. Translation differences





(7)

(10)

130

VII. Investment grants





137





VIII. Minority interests

5.712

5.913

6.294

6.224

6.560

18.691

21.386

21.703

25.243

25.195

Provisions a. Provisions for liabilities and charges

3.102

2.842

2.935

4.946

5.079

- Pensions and similar obligations

1.913

2.034

1.725

1.879

2.423

- Taxes - Others liabilities and charges b. Taxation, including deferred taxation





367

367

5

1.189

808

843

2.700

2.651

15.589

18.544

18.768

20.297

20.116

Liabilities

298.452

358.994

405.200

421.224

404.837

X. Amounts payable after more than one year

118.417

229.777

280.465

322.109

230.650

a. Financial debts

114.274

221.185

272.052

308.079

218.369

- Subordinated loans











- Unsubordinated debenture loans











6.047

17.691

16.314

14.361

13.874

- Banks and financial institutions

- Leasing and other similar obligations

49.798

40.044

253.005

262.765

199.768

- Other loans

58.429

163.450

2.733

30.953

4.727

b. Trade debts











d. Other debts XI. Amounts payable after more than one year a. Amounts > one year which are payable within the year b. Financial debts - Banks and financial institutions - Other loans c. Trade debts d. Advances received on orders in hand e. Taxation, remuneration and social security - Taxes

4.143

8.592

8.413

14.030

12.281

162.596

112.631

109.721

78.137

152.497

59.408

46.023

42.009

15.539

93.559

37.685

16.404

11.773

6.376

10.805

11.112

16.360

11.636

6.328

10.803

26.573

44

137

48

2

27.926

24.117

27.545

28.743

31.565









81

18.148

11.315

13.151

12.434

13.282

12.682

6.529

8.622

7.811

7.914

5.466

4.786

4.529

4.623

5.368

f. Other amounts payable

19.429

14.772

15.243

15.045

3.205

XII. Accrued charges and deferred income

17.439

16.586

15.014

20.978

21.690

592.098

670.279

736.994

777.051

783.763

- Remunerations and social security costs

Total liabilities

38 Consolidated profit and loss statement in ,000 €

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

I. Operating income

286.566

284.299

304.467

317.421

329.221

a. Turnover

279.490

276.444

296.135

308.563

314.534

d. Other operating income II. Operating charges a. Raw materials and consumables

7.076

7.855

8.332

8.858

14.687

(219.038)

(218.925)

(234.309)

(249.523)

(262.146)

1.045

1.245

830

708

935

119.012

117.455

127.805

135.796

144.477

c. Remunerations, social security costs and pensions

56.088

56.968

58.541

61.135

65.477

d. Depreciation of and other amounts written off formation expenses, intangible and tangible fixed assets

29.956

30.694

33.660

36.261

35.962

67

125

(194)

8

138

b. Services and other goods

e. Amounts written off stocks f. Provisions for liabilities and charges

342

(275)

26

181

499

g. Other operating charges

12.528

12.713

13.641

15.434

14.658

III. Operating profit

67.528

65.374

70.158

67.898

67.075

926

812

900

797

344

9

14

7

7

10

142

66

32

40

45

IV. Financial income a. Income from financial assets b. Income from current assets c. Other financial income

775

732

861

750

289

(25.870)

(24.511)

(31.736)

(29.381)

(29.134)

a. Debt charges

12.042

9.952

13.781

11.494

9.779

b. Depreciation on consolidation adjustments

12.866

12.531

16.593

16.768

17.465











V. Financial charges

c. A  mounts written off current assets other than those mentioned under II. e. d. Other financial charges VI. Current income before tax

962

2.028

1.362

1.119

1.890

42.584

41.675

39.322

39.314

38.285

39 in ,000 €

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

36

121

6.825

8.691

149

a. Write-back of amounts written off on intangible and tangible fixed assets











b. W  rite-back of amounts written off on financial assets



3







c. Write-back of provisions for extraordinary liabilities and charges











36

29

331

8.392

73



89

6.494

299

76

(311)

(358)

(219)

(235)

(413)

35

16

37

39



c. Amounts written off financial fixed assets



10

1



3

d. Provisions for extraordinary liabilities and charges



(4)







VII. Extraordinary income

d. Capital gains on disposal of fixed assets e. Other extraordinary income VIII. Extraordinary charges a. Extraordinary depreciation and amounts written off on formation expenses, intangible fixed assets

e. Capital losses on disposal of fixed assets

2

73

55

59

117

274

263

126

137

293

42.309

41.438

45.928

47.770

38.021

X.

8.548

(3.086)

(743)

(1.578)

343

a. W  ithdrawals from deferred and latent taxation reserve

8.548

613

611

139

343

f. Other extraordinary charges IX. Profit or loss for the period before taxation



(3.699)

(1.354)

(1.717)



XI. Income taxes

(21.101)

(13.962)

(15.505)

(15.465)

(16.703)

a. Taxes

(21.104)

(13.969)

(15.522)

(15.478)

(16.788)

3

7

17

13

85

b. Transfers to deferred and latent taxation reserve

b. Adjustment of income taxes and write-back of tax provisions XII. Profit or loss for the period

29.756

24.390

29.680

30.727

21.661

XIII. P  roportion of the profit from companies valued by the equity method

1.068

1.151

1.291

1.416

1.724

a. Profits

1.068

1.151

1.291

1.416

1.724











30.824

25.541

30.971

32.143

23.385

720

790

954

561

714

30.104

24.751

30.016

31.581

22.671

b. Losses Consolidated profit Third party share of the profit Group share of the profit

40 Appendices to the consolidated accounts SCOPE OF CONSOLIDATION I. L  ist of fully consolidated companies in the Group

Rights

Contipark International

of the Group

Servipark International S.A.

Brussels

100,00%

BE 458 245 915

Serviparc S.A.

Brussels

100,00%

BE 441 030 096

Uniparc Belgique S.A.

Brussels

100,00%

BE 427 825 725

Beheercentrale N.V.

Antwerp

100,00%

BE 406 391 002

Parking Kouter N.V.

Brussels

100,00%

BE 460 024 775

Parking Monnaie S.A.

Brussels

100,00%

BE 403 459 721

Centre 58 S.A.

Brussels

99,55%

BE 812 274 337

Berlin

94,00%

Contipark Parkgaragen GmbH

Berlin

93,10%

Parking Bowling Green GmbH

Berlin

93,10%

Contipark Parkgarage Marienplatz

Berlin

93,10%

Berlin

88,36%

Salzburg

96,92%

Parking GmbH

München GmbH Contipark Parkgaragen Kurhaus Wiesbaden GmbH

Parking Roosevelt N.V.

Antwerp

87,50%

BE 406 715 456

Parking 2 Portes S.A.

Brussels

75,00%

BE 403 317 486

Ö Park Garagen GmbH

Vienna

96,92%

Interparking France S.A.

Paris

100,00%

Optimus GmbH

Vienna

96,92%

Interparking Services S.A.S

Paris

100,00%

Optimus Parkhausverwaltungs

Vienna

96,92%

Uniparc Cannes S.N.C.

Cannes

100,00%

GmbH & Co KG Salzburg

96,92%

Interparking Hispania S.A.

Barcelona

98,24%

Interparking Lleidatana S.A.

Lleida

91,81%

Alpha Parking S.R.L.

Bucarest

100,00%

SC Square Parking S.R.L.

Bucarest

58,95%

Poland Car Parking sp zoo

Warsaw

100,00%

Contipark International Austria GmbH

Solopark S.A.S

Nîmes

100,00%

Villacher Parkgaragen

Serviparc France S.A.S.

Paris

100,00%

GmbH & Co.KG

Parc Sulzer S.A.S.

Nice

95,01%

Interparking Nederland B.V.

Rotterdam

100,00%

Interparking Security B.V.

Rotterdam

100,00%

Uniparc Nederland B.V.

Rotterdam

100,00%

Interparking Italia S.R.L.

Venice

100,00%

Interparking Servizi S.R.L.

Venice

100,00%

SIS S.R.L.

Corciano

100,00%

Centre 85 Parkgaragen und

Berlin

100,00%

II. List of companies consolidated by the equity method

Immobilien GmbH

Immo TGV S.A.

Brussels

33,20%

Servipark Deutschland GmbH

DB BahnPark GmbH

Berlin

46,06%

Berlin

96,62%

BE 434 655 515

41 V. Scope of consolidation The consolidated accounts were produced according to the principles outlined in the Royal Decree of 6 March 1990 on consolidated accounts. As well as the accounts of the parent company, the consolidated accounts are containing the accounts of subsidiaries, for which various methods have been used: a. F  ull consolidation The companies of which the Group controls at least 50% of the share capital and which it manages on a day-to-day basis, are consolidated ­according to the full integration method. b. P  roportional consolidation The companies which the Group controls jointly are consolidated according to the proportional integration method. c. E  quity method The companies in which the Group directly or indirectly holds between 10% and 49% of the capital and which it does not manage on a ­day-to-day basis are consolidated using the equity method. d. U  nconsolidated companies Interests below 10% are not included within the scope of consolidation. The same applies to the companies in liquidation or in constitution.

VI. Criteria used for valuations in the consolidated accounts A. T  he valuation rules used by INTERPARKING S.A. as outlined in the appendices of the annual accounts, are applicable to the consolidated accounts subject to the following conditions: • The rates of depreciation of intangible and tangible assets: the accelerated depreciation mentioned in the company accounts of the Belgian companies within the Group are retreated as linear depreciations of the same duration in the consolidated accounts in order to take account of the economic lifetime of these assets. • The consolidation adjustments: at the time of integration of a new subsidiary into the consolidated balance sheet, or when an additional shareholding is acquired, the book value of shares and interests in these companies acquired by companies already included in the consolidation is compared to the share of capital and reserves that it represents, taking into account a re-assessment of the value of assets and liabilities where necessary. A consolidation difference is therefore calculated. If it is negative, it is recorded on the liabilities side of the balance sheet in the section

“consolidation differences”. If it is positive, it is recorded on the assets side of the balance sheet in the section “consolidation differences”. • The valuation rules applied by non-Belgian companies are not amended unless they represent a significant interest except for the leasing contracts. The closing rate is used as the method for translating balance sheet accounts, except the profit for the financial year which is converted at the average rate, and the average rate for the translation of the profit and loss accounts. Only positive consolidation adjustments are subject to annual amortisation and these are charged to a profit and loss account over a 20-year period (5% per annum). This amortisation is justified by the contribution, in a long-term perspective, of these sums to the increase in profits of the Group. Equity shall correspond with non-consolidated purchase price under deduction of appropriate write-down. Dividends relating to these are accrued in the year of their receipt. The value of corporate securities necessitating a re-appreciation of value shall correspond with the size of their contribution to the net situation of the issuing company, including the results of the financial year. The employees of the Group collect pensions according to the retirement systems provided by law and the practices of the countries in which the Group companies carry out their activity. In the event that formal retirement plans already exist and payments relating to these plans are made by the Group, the engagements concerned shall constitute an allowance. With regard to any possible early retirement agreements negotiated by some companies, the necessary allowances shall be organised, and the residual payments shall be re-evaluated, on a yearly basis. The financial statements of consolidated companies are closed on 31 December 2012. Closing rate

Average rate

Romanian Lei

(RON)

0,2257

0,2244

Polish Zloty

(PLN)

0,2446

0,2396

B. T  he deffered taxes are recorded on all the temporary differences, coming from charges and income included or excluded from the accounting result but deductible or reinstalled in the tax basis of the exercise in which these differences will reverse. Variable posting method is applied. The deffered taxes are calculated on the last known rate at the date of the accounts.

42 VII. Statement of formation expenses Opening balance

9

Movements in the year:



- New expenses incurred



- Depreciation

(9)

- Changes in scope



- Other movements



Closing balance



VIII. Statement of intangible assets a. Acquisition value Opening balance

Concessions

Goodwill

204.843

16.534

2.170



(37)

(396)





(1.287)

1.406

Movements in the year: - Acquisitions - Sales and disposals - Currency translation effect - Transfers from one heading to another - Other movements Closing balance





205.689

17.544

70.957

16.334

6.128

420

c. Depreciations and amounts written-down Opening balance Movements in the period: - Recorded - Written back as superfluous





(2)







77







Closing balance

77.160

16.754

Net book value

128.529

790

- Sales and disposals - Currency translation effect - Transfers from one heading to another - Other movements

43 IX. Statement of tangible fixed assets a. Acquisition value

Land and building

Plant machinery and equipment

Furniture and vehicule

Leasing and similar rights

Other tangible fixed assets

Assets under construction

Opening balance

568.236

73.926

16.427

35.187

42.659

11.837

29.079

7.556

2.315



1.959

16.938

(59)

(1.086)

(877)

-

(304)



7.435

(52)

709

(121)

(215)

(6.224)

Movements during the period: - Acquisitions - Sales and disposals - Transfers from one heading to another - Other movements

150

173

46

338

47

(2)

604.841

80.517

18.620

35.404

44.146

22.549

b. Revaluation surpluses

7.460











Closing balance

7.460

-

-

-

-

-

290.616

44.357

12.126

15.864

28.499

-

18.725

5.394

1.845

1.332

2.109



-

-









- Written down after sales and disposals

(242)

(820)

(728)



(224)



- Transfers from one heading to another

1.411

(69)

139

413

(321)



59

398

43

46

24















Closing balance

310.569

49.260

13.425

17.655

30.087



Closing net book value

301.732

31.257

5.195

17.749

14.059

22.549

Closing balance

c. Depreciations and amounts written-down Opening balance Movements during the period: - Recorded - Written back as superfluous

- Currency translation effect - Other movements

X. Statement of financial assets a. Acquisition value Opening balance

Companies valued by the equity method

Other enterprises

Receivables

1.443

1.062

8.388

Movements during the period: - Acquisitions - Sales and disposals - Other movements Closing balance

126

21

1.453



(221)

(3.043)







1.569

862

6.798







(2)











(2)





c. Amounts written down Opening balance Movements during the period: - Recorded - Written down after Sales and disposals Closing balance e. Movements in the capital and reserves Opening balance - Group share of the profit - Other movements Closing balance Closing net book value







1.724





(1.541)





183





1.750

862

6.798

44 XI. Statement of consolidated reserves Opening balance

266.179

Movements during the period: - Profit of the group to allocate

22.671

- Dividend to shareholders



- Other movements



Closing balance

288.850

XII. Statement of consolidation differences Opening balance

Positive consolidation differences

Negative consolidation differences

194.165

3.577

211



(700)



(17.465)



Movements during the period: - Changes in the scope due to an increase of percentage - Changes in the scope due to a decrease of percentage - Write downs - Other movements





176.211

3.577

Due within one year

Between one and 5 years

More than 5 years

93.559

168.921

49.448







Closing balance

XIII. Statement of amounts payable a. Breakdown Financial debts 1. Subordinated loans / debentures







85

2.698

11.176

4. Amounts due to credit institutions

65.013

165.429

34.339

5. Other loans

28.461

794

3.933



8.345

3.936

Financial liabilities





32.531

4. Amounts due to credit institutions





32.531

2. Unsubordinated loans / debentures 3. Leasing and similar obligations

Other debts b. Secured liabilities

Operating income per countries

213,5

218,0

224,5

2003

2004

2005

in million €

Spain Belgium

France

Netherlands

Poland

Germany

Austria

Italy

Romania

45 XIV. Operating profit a. Operating income per countries

Ebitda

1. Geographic breakdown - Belgium

30,9%

- Germany

32,9%

- Spain

11,4%

- France

8,9%

- Italy

7,3%

- Austria

4,7%

- Netherlands

2,7%

- Poland

1,3%

- Romania

0,0%

in million €

86,6

88,9

2005

2006

96,7

97,5

96,1

2007

2008

2009

103,8

104,2

103,0

2010

2011

2012

b. Staff costs 1. Fully consolidated companies Average number of staff

2.065

- Managers

124

- Salaried employees

1.669

- Hourly paid workers

NET Earning

272

Staff costs (in thousand Euro)

65.477

in million €

XV. Rights and commitments not reflected in the balance sheet A2.

Amount of real guarantees granted or irrevocably promised by the companies included in the consolidation on their shareholders assets, to secure respectively the debts and commitments : - in favour of the companies included in the consolidation a) Purchase commitments for fixed assets

31,6

24,8

24,8

22,7

69.928 –

a) C  ommitmentsresulting from interest rates derivatives

265,9

30,0



b) Transfer commitments for fixed assets A7.

23,0

30,1

140.553

- in favour of third parties A4.

29,1

2005

168.042

286,6

284,3

2008

2009

2006

304,5

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

317,4

329,2

2011

2012

239,6

2006

2007

2010

2012

46

Balance sheet Interparking S.A. ASSETS in ,000 €

Fixed assets I. Formation expenses

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

592.640

610.764

622.222

614.575

610.517











II. Intangible assets

18.588

16.625

14.548

12.393

10.554

III. Tangible assets

68.378

58.256

54.704

53.441

56.496

a. Land and buildings

59.107

45.157

41.350

39.443

39.272

198

113

100

241

178

1.075

1.154

1.238

1.437

1.541

924

819

713

218

175

6.351

9.920

10.873

9.773

9.609

723

1.093

430

2.329

5.721

IV. Financial assets

505.674

535.883

552.970

548.741

543.467

a. Affiliated entreprises

503.100

532.774

549.787

545.553

539.970

503.100

532.774

532.774

537.409

539.413





17.013

8.144

557

b. Other entreprises linked by participating interests

16

15

14

13

12

- Participations interests

16

15

14

13

12











2.558

3.094

3.169

3.175

3.485

610

611

613

620

623

1.948

2.483

2.556

2.555

2.862

b. Plant, machinery and equipment c. Furniture and vehicles d. Leasing and similar rights e. Other tangible assets f. Assets under construction and advance payments

- Participations interests - Amounts receivable

- Amounts receivable c. Other financial assets - Shares and units - Amounts receivable and cash guarantees Current assets

9.800

62.410

39.103

31.547

27.340

V. Amounts receivable after more than one year











b. Other amounts receivable











VI. Inventories and contracts in progress











a. Inventories











VII. Amounts receivable within the year

6.652

57.800

35.052

27.172

21.979

a. Trade debtors

5.713

4.729

3.762

3.733

7.209

b. Other amounts receivable

940

53.071

31.290

23.439

14.770

VIII. Treasury investments











a. Own shares











b. Other investments and deposits











IX. Cash at bank and in hand

1.719

1.315

1.279

1.498

1.467

X. Deferred charges and accrued income

1.429

3.295

2.772

2.877

3.894

602.440

673.174

661.325

646.122

637.857

Total assets

47 LIABILITIES in ,000 €

Share capital and reserves

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

212.181

220.927

229.895

246.219

276.273

I. Share capital

15.885

15.885

15.885

15.885

15.885

II. Share premium account

38.729

38.729

38.729

38.729

38.729

IV. Reserves

5.820

9.530

9.511

9.494

9.456

a. Legal reserve

1.589

1.589

1.588

1.589

1.588

10

9

9

9

9

c. Intaxed reserves

4.221

7.932

7.914

7.896

7.858

V. Reported profit

151.747

156.783

165.633

182.111

212.202





137



Provisions

300

2.188

2.170

2.204

2.155

a. Provisions for liabilities and charges

211

188

179

223

197

- Pensions and similar obligations

107

84

75

119

93

- Others

104

104

104

104

104

89

2.000

1.991

1.981

1.957

Liabilities

389.959

450.059

429.260

397.699

359.429

VIII. Amounts payable after more than one year

112.812

320.740

313.690

308.596

184.621

a. Financial debts

b. Unavailable reserves

VI. Investment grants

b. Taxation, including deferred taxation

110.687

314.171

307.364

301.873

178.147

- Subordinated loans











- Unsubordinated debentures











- Leasing and other similar obligations

1.555

1.531

1.502





- Banks and financial institutions

16.127

13.173

173.062

183.797

130.147

- Other loans

93.005

299.467

132.800

118.076

48.000

2.125

6.569

6.326

6.723

6.474

266.992

119.284

107.312

77.150

164.505

45.781

38.864

54.078

27.935

123.938

204.056

62.929

34.853

30.005

30.003

d. Other amounts payable IX. Amounts payable after more than one year a. A  mounts > one year which are payable within the year b. Financial debts - Banks and financial institutions

2.350

9.825

4.850





201.706

53.104

30.003

30.005

30.003

c. Trade debts

4.364

4.420

4.738

5.537

8.389

e. T  axation, remuneration and social security

2.751

3.060

3.295

2.793

2.173

- Taxes

1.295

1.592

1.835

1.295

507

- Remunerations and social security costs

1.456

1.468

1.460

1.498

1.666

f. Other amounts payable

10.040

10.016

10.348

10.880

2

X. Accrued charges and deferred income

10.155

10.030

8.258

11.953

10.303

602.440

673.174

661.325

646.122

637.857

- Other loans

Total liabilities

48 Profit & Loss statement Interparking S.A. in ,000 €

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

I. Operating income

88.133

82.158

84.441

90.497

89.811

a. Turnover

87.033

81.051

83.190

89.009

88.317

d. Other operating income II. Operating charges

1.099

1.107

1.251

1.488

1.494

(68.555)

(66.985)

(67.264)

(71.950)

(74.706)











b. Services and other goods

34.210

31.665

33.209

37.061

37.989

c. Remunerations, social security costs and pensions

15.530

16.409

16.074

16.370

18.215

d. D  epreciation of and other amounts written off formation expenses, intangible and tangible fixed assets

12.087

12.591

12.211

12.115

12.293

62

118

(201)





a. Raw materials and consumables

e. Amounts written off stocks contracts in progress and trade debtors f. Provisions for liabilities and charges

(40)

(23)

(9)

44

(25)

6.707

6.225

5.980

6.360

6.234

III. Operating profit

19.577

15.173

17.177

18.547

15.105

IV. Financial income

21.933

21.214

21.245

25.669

29.015

a. Income from financial fixed assets

21.438

20.790

19.745

24.550

28.580

107

88

1.182

843

223

g. Other operating charges

b. Income from current assets c. Other financial income V. Financial charges a. Debt charges

388

336

318

276

212

(19.503)

(14.165)

(18.275)

(13.543)

(11.003)

19.027

13.684

17.297

12.851

10.047







b. A  mounts written off current assets other than those mentioned under II. e c. Other financial charges

476

481

978

692

956

22.007

22.222

20.147

30.673

33.117

32

320

587

34

34

a. Adjustments to depreciation of and to other amounts written off intangible and tangible fixed assets intangible and tangible fixed assets











b. A  djustments to amounts written off financial fixed assets financial assets











c. Adjustments to provisions for extraordinary liabilities and charges











32

320

237

34

34





350





VI. Current income before tax

VII. Extraordinary income

d. Capital gains on disposal of fixed assets e. Other extraordinary income

49 in ,000 €

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

(3)

(106)

(19)

(49)

(72)

b. Amounts written off financial fixed assets

1

2

1

1

1

c. Provisions for extraordinary liabilities and charges











d. Losses on disposal of fixed assets

2

e. Other extraordinary charges



VIII. Extraordinary charges a. Amounts written off formation expenses, intangible and tangible assets

IX. Profit or loss for the financial year

18

48

71

104







22.036

22.436

20.715

30.658

33.079

X.

10

(1.910)

10

9

24

a. Withdrawals from taxation period, including deferred taxation

10

10

10

9

24



(1.920)







XI. Income taxes

(1.559)

(1.771)

(1.558)

(3.328)

(3.049)

a. Taxes

(1.559)

(1.771)

(1.575)

(3.340)

(3.049)





17

12



b. Transfers including deferred taxation

b. A  djustment of income taxes and write-back of tax provisions XII. Current income before tax

20.487

18.755

19.167

27.339

30.054

XIII.

20

(3.711)

18

18

37

a. Withdrawals to untaxed reserves

20

18

18

18

47



(3.729)





(10)

20.507

15.044

19.185

27.357

30.091

b. Transfer from untaxed reserves XIV. Profit or loss of the period

Valuation rules • Merger goodwill is depreciated over a 20 year period. • Tangible assets are recorded at their purchase or cost price. • Annual depreciation is calculated according to a depreciation plan based on the linear or degressive method. • Financial assets are valued at purchase price, possibly less write-downs in the case of participations, and at their nominal value in the case of amounts receivable featuring in this section, as well as amounts receivable after more than one year.

• Amounts receivable within the year are valued at their nominal value. Treasury investments are valued at their purchase price. • Provisions are made for amounts written off where necessary and under the conditions stipulated by law with regard to assets liable to depreciation. • Amount falling due after more than one year and within one year are classified in terms of their nominal value according to the balances evidenced in the accounts. • Provisions will be made if necessary.

50 Statutory Auditor’s

Report

STATUTORY AUDITOR’S REPORT TO THE GENERAL MEETING OF INTERPARKING SA FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2012

Free translation of unqualified statutory auditor’s report originally prepared in french and dutch

I

n accordance with the legal requirements, we report to you on the performance of our mandate of statutory auditor. This report includes our report on the consolidated accounts for the year ended 31 December 2012, as defined below, as well  as our report on other legal and ­regulatory requirements.

Report on the consolidated accounts We have audited the consolidated accounts of Interparking SA (‘the company’) and its subsidiaries (jointly ‘the group’) for the year ended 31 December 2012, prepared in accordance with the financial reporting framework applicable in Belgium. These ­consolidated accounts comprise the consolidated balance sheet as at 31 December 2012, the consolidated income statement for the year then ended and notes. The total of the consolidated balance sheet amounts

to EUR 783.763.356,24 and the consolidated income statement shows a profit (group share) for the year of EUR 22.670.819,30. Board of directors responsibility for the preparation of the consolidated accounts The board of directors is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these consolidated accounts in accordance with the financial reporting framework applicable in Belgium, and for such internal control as the board of directors determines, is necessary to enable the preparation of consolidated accounts that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. Statutory auditor’s responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated accounts based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance

with International Standards on Auditing. Those standards require that we comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated accounts are free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated ­accounts. The procedures selected depend on the statutory auditor’s judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material ­misstatement of the consolidated accounts, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the statutory auditor considers internal control relevant to the group’s preparation and fair presentation of the consolidated accounts in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the group’s internal control. An audit also

51

includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by the board of directors, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the consolidated accounts. We have obtained from the company’s officials and the board of directors the explanations and information necessary for performing our audit. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our unqualified opinion. Unqualified Opinion In our opinion, the consolidated accounts give a true and fair view of the group’s equity and consolidated financial position as at 31 December 2012 and of its consolidated financial performance for the year then ended in accordance with the financial reporting framework applicable in Belgium.

Report on other legal and regulatory requirements The board of directors is responsible for the preparation and the content of the annual report on the consolidated accounts. In the framework of our mandate our responsibility is, in all material aspects, to verify compliance with certain legal and regulatory requirements. On this basis, we provide the following additional comment

which does not modify our opinion on the ­consoli­dated accounts: •T  he annual report on the consolidated ­accounts includes the information required by law, is consistent, in all material aspects, with the consolidated accounts and does not present any material inconsistencies with the information that we became aware of during the performance of our mandate. Kontich, 1 March 2013

KPMG Réviseurs d’Entreprises/­ Bedrijfsrevisoren Statutory auditor represented by

Bossaert Moreau Saman & C° SPRL Commissaris represented by

Filip De Bock Michel Lange Réviseur d’Entreprises/ Réviseur d’Entreprises/ Bedrijfsrevisor Bedrijfsrevisor

Paul Moreau Réviseur d’Entreprises/ Bedrijfsrevisor

S.A. Interparking N.V. European headquarters 1, Rue de l’Évêque, 1000 Bruxelles, Belgique Bisschopsstraat 1, 1000 Brussel, België T +32 2 549 58 11 – F +32 2 511 02 09 www.interparking.com S.A. Interparking N.V. is a 90% subsidiary of AG Real Estate www.agrealestate.eu