EI NEW ENERGY - Acciona

EI NEW ENERGY - Acciona

Energy Intelligence www.energyintel.com EI NEW ENERGY S U P P L E M E N T Vol. IV, No. 43 October 29, 2015 Copyright © 2015 Energy Intelligence G...

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EI NEW ENERGY S U P P L E M E N T

Vol. IV, No. 43

October 29, 2015

Copyright © 2015 Energy Intelligence Group. All rights reserved.

EI New Energy Top 100 Green Utilities TOP 100 RANKINGS BASED ON CARBON EMISSIONS AND RENEWABLE ENERGY Rank 2015 2014* Points Company 1 NA 2 3 3 1 4 2 5 4 6 5 7 6 8 NA 9 7 10 9 11 10 12 12 13 11 14 8 15 30 16 17 17 13 18 NA 19 19 20 27 21 41 22 14 23 15 24 20 24 20 24 20 27 24 28 28 29 18 30 25 31 29 32 31 33 26 34 36 35 32 36 37 37 33 38 40 39 38 40 35 41 34 42 39 43 45 44 46 45 44 46 43 47 49 48 42 49 47 50 51

Country

Capacity Rank (GW) 2015 2014* Points Company

234 Acciona Spain 8.5 222 China General Nuclear (CGN) China 23.3 215 Iberdrola Spain 45.1 196 NextEra Energy US 44.9 180 Energias de Portugal (EDP) Portugal 22.5 173 Enel Italy 96.1 167 China Guodian China 125.2 143 China Three Gorges China 50.2 142 EDF France 136.2 124 Dong Energy Denmark 5.8 121 Exelon US 32.8 120 Berkshire Hathaway Energy US 28.1 118 Statkraft Norway 18.2 118 E.On Germany 58.9 114 China Power Investment (CPI) China 96.7 113 China Huaneng China 151.5 112 Verbund Austria 9.7 112 Axpo Switzerland 8.9 109 China Datang China 120.5 108 SSE UK 11.7 101 China Huadian China 122.5 101 Cemig Brazil 7.2 100 PG&E US 7.7 100 China National Nuclear Corp. China 9.8 100 Energoatom Ukraine 14.2 100 Rosatom Russia 26.3 100 Hydro-Quebec Canada 36.6 100 Ontario Power Generation Canada 17.1 99 GDF Suez France 81.3 98 BC Hydro Canada 12.6 97 Eletrobras Brazil 44.2 92 Gas Natural Fenosa Spain 14.7 91 Fortum Finland 14.6 87 A2A Italy 10.3 87 Vattenfall Sweden 40.1 85 Dominion Resources US 22.6 82 Public Service Ent. Group (PSEG) US 13.5 81 CEZ Czech Rep. 15.3 81 Calpine US 26.5 80 EuroSibEnergo Russia 19.5 80 AES US 34.7 80 Vietnam Electricity Vietnam 18.6 79 Energie Baden-Wurttemberg (EnBW) Germany 13.7 79 Tenaska US 6.7 78 Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) Mexico 41.5 77 Entergy US 27.8 77 Duke Energy US 61.6 76 RusHydro Russia 37.0 75 RWE Germany 48.9 71 Corpoelec Venezuela 24.0

51 50 52 54 53 48 54 64 55 52 56 NA 57 55 58 NA 59 57 60 69 61 59 62 62 63 58 64 NA 65 60 66 65 67 70 68 74 69 66 70 63 71 76 72 61 73 67 74 53 75 73 76 72 77 68 78 78 79 83 80 86 81 79 82 71 83 80 84 82 85 91 86 89 87 75 88 85 89 88 90 87 91 94 92 93 93 92 94 81 95 84 96 95 97 97 98 98 99 99 100 100

67 67 66 65 64 62 61 61 61 59 59 59 58 57 56 56 56 56 55 55 55 55 54 54 51 50 49 46 46 43 42 42 40 40 39 38 38 37 35 35 33 32 30 28 23 22 16 14 13 4

Country

Capacity (GW)

CLP Holdings China 19.4 TransAlta Canada 8.7 NRG Energy US 52.3 DTE Energy US 11.4 Egyptian Electricity Holding (EEHC) Egypt 28.8 Wec Energy US 7.2 Korea Electric Power Corp. (Kepco) S. Korea 77.1 Dubai Elec. & Water Authority (Dewa) UAE 9.7 Taiwan Power Taiwan 32.0 Kyushu Electric Power Co. Japan 23.1 Kansai Electric Power Co. Japan 43.3 Taqa UAE 9.5 Southern Co. US 46.5 Talen Energy US 17.6 Inter Rao UES Russia 35.0 Chubu Electric Power Co. Japan 34.1 FirstEnergy US 17.9 Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) US 33.3 Tohoku Electric Power Co. Japan 22.4 OGE Energy US 6.8 Acwa Power Saudi Arabia 11.7 Tata Power India 8.7 Tokyo Electric Power Co. (Tepco) Japan 66.1 AGL Australia 10.5 Tenaga Nasional Berhad (TNB) Malaysia 8.6 Egat Thailand 15.5 Tavanir Iran 37.1 Kahramaa Qatar 8.8 Xcel Energy US 17.1 Chugoku Electric Power Co. Japan 15.8 Hokuriku Electric Power Co. Japan 8.1 J-Power Japan 23.5 Mosenergo Russia 12.7 Hokkaido Electric Power Co. Japan 7.8 Ameren US 10.2 Israel Electric Corp. (IEC) Israel 13.6 Elektrik Uretim AS (EUAS) Turkey 21.9 Shikoku Electric Power Co. Japan 7.0 Sonelgaz Algeria 10.7 Saudi Electricity Co. Saudi Arabia 48.6 Perusahaan Listrik Negara (PLN) Indonesia 39.3 Energy Future Holdings US 13.8 American Electric Power (AEP) US 38.4 PPL US 8.0 Dynegy US 13.2 Min. of Electricity and Water (MEW) Kuwait 15.7 NTPC India 45.5 Polska Grupa Energetyczna (PGE) Poland 12.6 Eskom South Africa 42.1 Public Power Corp. (PPC) Greece 12.6

EI New Energy, Vol. IV, No. 43, October 29, 2015

Renewables Make Up 80% of New Power Capacity Once again, the top performer in EI New Energy’s annual ranking of 100 of the world’s top “green” power generators — measured by their emissions and renewable energy capacity — is Spanish. But instead of Iberdrola, an incumbent utility now in third place, this year’s winner, Acciona, is an independent power producer and a newcomer in the ranking. Originally a construction and engineering firm, Acciona started to invest in renewables two decades ago and now operates almost 9 gigawatts of wind, hydro, solar and biomass capacity. Meanwhile, Chinese companies continue to climb the ranking, with China General Nuclear (CGN) now a solid No. 2, three Chinese companies in the top 10, and six Chinese firms among the 10 biggest owners of renewable capacity (NE Aug.27’15). Companies at the bottom of the ranking own little or no renewable capacity, and tend to be located in coal- and oil-producing countries such as South Africa, Poland, India, Kuwait, the US, Indonesia and Saudi Arabia. The rankings are calculated using a system in which each company is awarded up to 300 points — up to 100 based on carbon dioxide emissions intensity, or CO2 per megawatt hour generated, and up to 200 based on non-hydro renewable capacity, in absolute and relative terms. The main table lists all 100 companies with points, their rank in 2015 and 2014, and their total capacity as an indication of size. Three other tables show the top 20 performers under each criterion — their CO2 emissions per MWh, the size of their renewable energy capacity in GW, and the proportion of nonhydro renewables in their total capacity. Renewable energy technologies accounted for almost 80% of new capacity added in 2014 by the companies in the ranking. While fossil fuels grew by 12 GW and nuclear stagnated, they commissioned or acquired some 17 GW of hydropower and 24 GW of non-hydro renewable capacity. Of the non-hydro additions, 16 GW or almost 70% were built by Chinese companies, compared to 4 GW in the US, 2 GW in Europe and 2 GW in the rest of the world. The 100 companies represent 55% of the world’s power generating capacity, with total sales last year amounting to around $2 trillion or $150 per MWh generated. New additions include Acciona, China Three Gorges (ranked 8) replacing its subsidiary China Yangtze, Switzerland’s Axpo (18), China National Nuclear Corp. (24), the US’ Wec Energy (56), Dubai Electricity and Water Authority or Dewa (58), and the newly created US company Talen Energy (64), which combines assets from utility PPL and investment fund Riverstone. Companies dropping out of the top 100 include Switzerland’s Alpiq and the US’ Alliant Energy, CMS Energy, Great Plains Energy, Pinnacle West Capital and Westar Energy. While Europe accounted for less than 10% of renewable capacity additions in the ranking last year, its companies continue to lead the ranking, with six of them in the top 10 and 11 in the top 20, including Spain’s Acciona (1) and Iberdrola (3), Portugal’s EDP (5), Italy’s Enel (6), France’s EDF (9), Denmark’s Dong Energy (10), Norway’s Statkraft (13), Germany’s E.On (14), Austria’s Verbund (17), Axpo (18) and the UK’s SSE (20) (NE Jul.16’15). Although three quarters of China’s electricity is still produced from coal, down from over 80% in 2012 and before, the country also performs well as its major generating companies keep invest-

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ing in wind energy despite slowing power demand and frequent grid connection issues (NE Aug.20’15). Four of the “Big Five” — China Guodian (7), China Power Investment (15), China Huaneng (16) and China Datang (19) — are now in the top 25, and the fifth one, China Huadian (21), is likely to join them soon. CGN (2) is a unique example of a company combining nuclear and wind plus some solar and hydro, without any form of fossil fuel generation. The US picture is diverse with three firms in the top 20, including NextEra Energy (4), the biggest wind owner in the country, Exelon (11), one of the world’s least carbon-intensive utilities thanks to a large nuclear fleet and significant wind and hydro capacity, and Berkshire Hathaway Energy (12), another top wind owner (NE Sep.3’15). Similarly, PG&E (23), Dominion Resources (36), PSEG (37), Entergy (46) and Duke Energy (47) combine sizable nuclear capacity with some hydro or renewable generation. They also operate many high-efficiency, low-emissions gas-fired plants, which are independent producers’ Calpine (39) and Tenaska (44) core business. More diversified independent generators such as NRG Energy (53), Talen Energy (64) and Dynegy (95) rank lower because they also operate coal plants. Similarly, while Midwest utilities typically tap into the region’s abundant wind resources through power purchase agreements, their own fleet mostly relies on local coal, which puts them at the end of the ranking. Companies in other big coal- or lignite-producing countries also rank low, such as India’s Tata Power (72) and NTPC (97), Australia’s AGL (74), Turkey’s EUAS (87), Indonesia’s PLN (91), Poland’s PGE (98), South Africa’s Eskom (99) and Greece’s PPC (100). Germany’s RWE (49), another lignite-heavy producer, also ranks lower than its Western European peers. While oil and gas are cleaner than coal, generators in Mideast producing countries, such as Iran’s Tavanir (77), Qatar’s Kahramaa (78), Algeria’s Sonelgaz (89), Saudi Electricity Co. (90) and Kuwait’s Ministry of Electricity and Water (96) perform equally low as they operate significant amounts of old steam cycle plants and own little renewable capacity, if any. By contrast, modern combined-cycle gas turbines, often associated with seawater desalination, allow the UAE’s Dewa (58) and Taqa (62) and Saudi Arabia’s Acwa Power (71) to achieve lower emissions levels and perform reasonably well. Among oil and gas producing countries, Mexico’s CFE (45), Venezuela’s Corpoelec (50) and Egypt’s EEHC (55) also take advantage of substantial local hydro resources. Hydro similarly allow companies in several parts of the world to achieve very low emissions levels, including Norway’s Statkraft (13), Brazil’s Cemig (22) and Eletrobras (31), and Canada’s HydroQuebec (27) (NE Oct.10’13). Likewise, nuclear specialists Ukraine’s Energoatom (24) and Russia’s Rosatom (24) also perform well because nuclear emits no CO2, and Canada’s Ontario Power Generation (28), Finland’s Fortum (33) and Sweden’s Vattenfall (35) combine significant nuclear capacity with hydropower. Japan, on the contrary, has been over 85% dependent on fossil fuel generation since the 2011 Fukushima accident, (NE Apr.30’15). All Japanese utilities are in the second half of the ranking, from Kyushu Electric (60) to Shikoku Electric (88). In the same region, Korea’s Kepco (57) and Taiwan Power (59) still rely on nuclear and rank higher. www.energyintel.com

EI New Energy, Vol. IV, No. 43, October 29, 2015

Top Utilities Ranked by Carbon Emissions Emissions Rank Points (kg CO2/MWh) Company 1 1 1 1 1 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 98 98 96 95 93 93 92 91 84 81 80

0 0 0 0 0 1 1 4 4 18 23 48 52 80 82 89 102 177 212 218

Top 10 Green Utilities 100%

Country

China General Nuclear (CGN) China EDP (2) China National Nuclear Corp. China China Three Gorges China Iberdrola (1) Energoatom Ukraine CGN (3) Rosatom Russia Hydro-Quebec Canada NextEra (4) Dong (7) Acciona Spain Statkraft Norway Ontario Power Generation Canada Berkshire BC Hydro Hathaway (10) Canada Cemig Brazil China Guodian (5) Axpo Switzerland Verbund Austria E.On (9) Eletrobras Brazil Enel (6) Exelon US PG&E US EDF (8) EDF France Fortum Finland Iberdrola Spain EuroSibEnergo Russia

Ranking of top 20 generators based only on emissions intensity of power generation, or the volume of carbon dioxide emitted per megawatt hour of electricity. 100 points = no emissions, 0 point = maximum emissions. Latest available data, usually 2014. Source: Energy Intelligence

(% Renewable Capacity)

90%

Acciona (1)

80% 70% 60% 50% CGN (2)

40% EDP (5)

30%

Iberdrola (3)

NextEra (4) Dong (10) 1

20% Ch. Guodian (7)

Enel (6) Ch. Three Gorges (8) EDF (9)

10% 0%

1,200 1,000 800 600 400 200 0 (kg CO2/MWh) EI New Energy top 10 green utilities are represented in dark color, with ranking. The other 90 are in light color. Size of bubble represents volume of renewable capacity in GW. Position on the chart represents % of renewable capacity and carbon emissions intensity. Best position = top right with large bubble. Source: Energy Intelligence

Top Utilities Ranked by Renewables Capacity (%)

Top Utilities Ranked by Renewables Capacity (Volume)

Renewables Rank Points % of Total

Renewables Rank Points (GW) Company

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

96 70 64 60 55 51 46 41 39 38 38 31 30 29 28 26 26 25 24 23

89% 44% 36% 32% 28% 24% 20% 17% 16% 15% 15% 11% 11% 10% 10% 9% 9% 8% 8% 8%

Company

Country

Acciona Spain China General Nuclear (CGN) China Energias de Portugal (EDP) Portugal Iberdrola Spain NextEra Energy US Dong Energy Denmark Berkshire Hathaway Energy US SSE UK China Guodian China TransAlta Canada Enel Italy CLP Holdings China China Power Investment (CPI) China AGL Australia E.On Germany China Datang China DTE Energy US China Huaneng China China Huadian China China Three Gorges China

Ranking of top 20 generators based only on % share of renewable power (excluding large hydropower) in total generating capacity. 100 points = 100% renewables; 0 point = 0% renewables. Latest available data, usually 2014. Source: Energy Intelligence

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

100 74 71 63 63 54 53 52 49 41 38 34 29 28 19 19 18 15 11 10

19.8 14.7 14.0 12.4 12.4 10.7 10.4 10.3 9.7 8.1 7.6 6.8 5.7 5.6 3.8 3.8 3.6 3.0 2.2 2.0

Country

China Guodian China Iberdrola Spain Enel Italy NextEra Energy US China Huaneng China China Datang China China Power Investment (CPI) China China General Nuclear (CGN) China China Huadian China Energias de Portugal (EDP) Portugal Acciona Spain EDF France Berkshire Hathaway Energy US E.On Germany GDF Suez France China Three Gorges China RWE Germany NRG Energy US CLP Holdings China Vattenfall Sweden

Ranking of top 20 generators based only on volume of renewable power generating capacity (excluding hydropower) in gigawatts. 100 points = greatest volume of renewables; 0 points = smallest volume. Latest available data, usually 2014. Source: Energy Intelligence

Chairman: Raja W. Sidawi. Vice Chairman: Marcel van Poecke. Chief Strategy Officer & Chairman Executive Committee: Lara Sidawi Moore. Editor-in-Chief: Thomas E. Wallin, Editorial Director: David Pike. Head Office: 5 East 37th St., NY 10016-2807.Tel.: (1 212) 532 1112. Fax: (1 212) 532 4479. Sales: [email protected] Circulation: [email protected] Bureaus: Dubai:Tel: (971) 364 2607. Houston:Tel.: (1 713) 222 9700. London:Tel.: (44 20) 7518 2200. Moscow:Tel.: (7 495) 721 1611/12/13. Singapore:Tel.: (65) 6538 0363. Washington, DC:Tel.: (1 202) 662 0700. Other publications: Petroleum Intelligence Weekly, Oil Daily, International Oil Daily, EI Finance, Energy Compass, Energy Intelligence Briefing, Jet Fuel Intelligence, Natural Gas Week, Nefte Compass, Nuclear Intelligence Weekly, Oil Market Intelligence and World Gas Intelligence. EDITOR: Lauren Craft ([email protected]). DEPUTY EDITOR: Ronan Kavanagh. EDITORIAL: US: Jason Fargo, Emily Meredith, Barbara Shook, Anthony Venezia. LONDON: Jason Eden. STRASBOURG: Philippe Roos. SINGAPORE: Kimfeng Wong. DUBAI: Amena Bakr, Oliver Klaus, Iain Packham. INDIA: Rakesh Sharma. DATA: Ed Feinberg. PRODUCTION: Michael Win. Published weekly. Copyright © 2015 by Energy Intelligence Group, Inc. ISSN 2168-5185. EI New Energy is a trademark of Energy Intelligence. All rights reser ved. Access, distribution and reproduction are subject to the terms and conditions of the subscription agreement and/or license with Energy Intelligence. Access, distribution, reproduction or electronic forwarding not specifically defined and authorized in a valid subscription agreement or license with Energy Intelligence is willful copyright infringement. Additional copies of individual ar ticles may be obtained using the pay-per-ar ticle feature offered at www.energyintel.com

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EI New Energy, Vol. IV, No. 43, October 29, 2015

How We Rank the Top 100 Green Utilities For this ranking, EI New Energy selected 100 of the largest power generators from around the world, based on total installed capacity, renewable capacity and the availability of information. Their capacity ranges from 150 gigawatts for China Huaneng, now bigger than France’s EDF, to just under 6 GW for Denmark’s Dong Energy, with non-hydro renewables ranging from China Guodian’s 20 GW, to zero or just a few megawatts for about 25 companies. In all, they total 3,100 GW, or 55% of the world’s total generating capacity, based on 2012 data from the International Energy Agency — including 87% of capacity in Japan, 68% in Europe, 60% in China, 56% in the Mideast and Africa, and 53% in the US. Some large utilities in terms of sales, such as New York’s Con Edison, are not included, as they only supply power without generating it. Conversely, pure generators without retail activity, such as Spain’s Acciona and the US’ Calpine, are included. Subsidiaries of larger groups such as renewable developers China Longyuan, part of China Guodian, EDF’s EDF Energies Nouvelles and Enel’s Enel Green Power, are excluded to avoid double counting. Big countries such as Australia, where the power sector is fragmented, are hardly represented or, as for Argentina, not represented at all. Similarly, most power generation in countries such as the UK, Belgium and the Netherlands has been taken over by foreign companies. To evaluate their “greenness,” each utility was awarded up to 300 points based on three criteria: • The first assesses direct greenhouse gas emissions, measured as carbon dioxide emissions per megawatt hour of electricity produced, with 100 points for the lowest emitters — such as pure renewable or nuclear generators — and zero for the highest emitter, Greece’s lignite-heavy PPC, at around 1,100 kilograms of CO2 per MWh. Other companies’ points are based on how they compare to the highest and

lowest emitters. Nuclear energy and renewable sources — including wind, solar and hydropower — are considered to be emission free, despite some controversies on indirect emissions. Emissions caused by generating the electricity companies may procure from independent generators are not taken into account. On average, companies in the ranking emit 520 kg CO2/MWh. • The second and third criteria measure a company’s renewable energy capacity in volume and in proportion to total capacity. These criteria exclude hydropower because large dams are controversial, since they flood large areas and drastically change rivers’ water patterns. The firm with the highest renewable capacity, China Guodian at 20 GW, earned 100 points in the second criterion, while companies without renewable generation were assigned zero points and the other companies were awarded points according to their relative performance — for example EDP, at 8 GW or 41% of China Guodian’s 20 GW, was given 41 points. Similarly in the third criterion, a company with 100% renewables would earn 100 points and companies without renewables would earn no points. Points under these two criteria are to some extent correlated, but large companies may own significant renewable capacity that only amounts to a modest share of total generation, while smaller ones may have a high proportion of renewable capacity without it being sizable in gigawatt terms. The ranking uses the latest available full-year data, usually fiscal 2014, mostly from official company sources. Since information on CO2 emissions can be hard to obtain, external sources were used for about 10 companies, such as the Air Emissions Benchmarking which a group of US companies and nonprofits publishes annually. For roughly 15 more companies, we produced our own estimates based on published or estimated fuel consumption data. Several entries from 2014 were revised with additional or corrected information, resulting in changes to rankings.

Top Green Utilities: Carbon-Free Generation Capacity (GW) Rank Company Country Nuclear Hydro Renewables 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Acciona China General Nuclear (CGN) China National Nuclear Corp. China Three Gorges Energoatom Rosatom Hydro-Quebec Cemig BC Hydro Eletrobras Statkraft Verbund Ontario Power Generation PG&E Axpo RusHydro EuroSibEnergo EDF Energias de Portugal (EDP) Exelon

Spain China China China Ukraine Russia Canada Brazil Canada Brazil Norway Austria Canada US Switzerland Russia Russia France Portugal US

0.0 11.6 9.8 0.0 13.8 26.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.0 0.0 0.0 6.6 2.2 3.3 0.0 0.0 73.5 0.2 19.3

0.9 1.5 0.0 46.4 0.3 0.0 36.1 6.9 11.4 37.8 14.8 7.7 7.4 3.9 3.4 28.6 15.0 21.8 7.7 1.6

7.6 10.3 0.0 3.8 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.3 0.8 0.4 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.1 0.0 6.8 8.1 1.9

Total CO2-free

CO2-free /Total

8.5 23.3 9.8 50.2 14.2 26.3 36.1 7.0 11.4 40.0 15.6 8.2 14.0 6.3 7.0 28.7 15.0 102.2 16.0 22.8

100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 99% 97% 91% 91% 86% 84% 82% 82% 79% 78% 77% 75% 71% 70%

Ranking of top 20 generators based on CO2-free generation, including nuclear, hydropower and renewables. Other generation emits CO2 and includes coal-, gas- and oil-fired capacity. Latest available data, usually 2014. Source: Energy Intelligence

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