FOODSERVICE PRODUCE HANDLING GUIDE

FOODSERVICE PRODUCE HANDLING GUIDE

THE FRESHER THE BETTER Foodservice Produce Handling Guide TABLE OF CONTENTS Our Quality Promise QUALITY CONTINUES WITH YOU 1 While some of the...

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THE FRESHER THE BETTER

Foodservice Produce Handling Guide

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Our Quality Promise

QUALITY CONTINUES WITH YOU

1

While some of the variables that affect fresh fruit and vegetable quality are out of your control, there are many you can control and are essential to optimizing produce quality

Temperature

2

and yields. The controllable variables are:

Ideal Storage Conditions

3

• Temperature • Product rotation

Fresh-Cut Lettuce Handling Overview

4

• Storage conditions • Proper handling

Banana Handling Overview

5 Dole has prepared this guide to give you assistance in

Fresh Fruit Ripening Guide

6

Fresh-Cut Vegetables

7

Foodservice Yields

8

maximizing the quality of the fresh produce you serve to your customers. You will also find useful yield and nutrition reference charts for many of the most popular fresh fruit and vegetable items used in foodservice operations. And, as a reminder – to serve the best, you must start with the best. Always count on Dole to provide the freshest

Nutritional Information

Product Listings

9

10

produce available!

We’re Keeping Our Promise. y, Inc. Food Compan

David H. Murdock Board Chairman of the Of ficer ve Chief Executi

: est fresh d Customers u with the fin o y g To Our Value in id v ro mitted to p le. Ensuring pany is com ucts availab d m o ro C ority. p d d o o o fo F Dole mber one pri ckaged u a n p ’s d n le a o D s le is b r products fruits, vegeta us foods fety of all ou a s d n a iding nutritio y v lit ro a p in s the qu y la p mmunicate role that Dole rt of our mission is to co e th ly s u o ri se rich in pa uilt on a diet We take very round the world. In fact, b is n o ti a d rs a hose foun to consume hy lifestyle w lt a e h a f o ts the benefi products kaged food etables. c g a e p v d d n n a a s s it le b d, and fru ever change fruits, vegeta n h s s a e h fr e E is L m O D ymous pro years, that is synon quality. That r y fo lit a ” For over 150 u rd q a d d n n a “gold sta , freshness have set the nce the taste e ri e p x e to u we invite yo LE name. O D e port. with th ess and sup in s u b d e u n r your conti Thank you fo Sincerely, rdock David H. Mu er EO and Own Chairman, C . c In y, ompan Dole Food C

1

IDEAL STORAGE TEMPERATURES 40º

Warehouse conditions short-term storage of 10 days or less 32º to 36º F

34º

Apples Apricots Artichokes Asparagus Avocados (ripe) Beets Berries Broccoli Brussels Sprouts Cabbage Cantaloupe Carrots Cauliflower Celery

Cherries Coconuts Corn Figs Garlic Gooseberries Grapes Greens Green Onions Herbs (except Basil) Lettuce Kiwifruit Mushrooms Nectarines

Parsley Peaches Pears Peas Plums Radishes Rhubarb Spinach Sprouts Strawberries Turnips Watercress

45º to 50º F Avocados (unripe) Basil (Fresh) Beans Chayotes Cranberries Cucumbers Eggplant

Grapefruit Honeydew Lemons Limes Mandarins Mangos (ripe) Melons

Oranges Peppers Pineapples Potatoes Squash (Summer) Watermelon

Leave out of Cold Room Bananas Onions (dry) Mangos (unripe) Papaya

Plantains Pumpkins Squash (Winter) Sweet Potatoes

Source: PMA Fresh Produce Manual November 2002

2

Tomatoes Yuca

IDEAL STORAGE CONDITIONS Effect on Produce Temperature is the single most important factor in maintaining and maximizing produce quality. Temperature abuse is the cause of most produce claims and losses. For every 10 degree increase in temperature, a produce item can lose up to half of its life causing it to be served in a less than optimal condition…especially produce served uncooked. Control Every foodservice operator must be aware of temperatures in their receiving, storage, and prep areas before they can effectively manage produce handling. These temperatures must be checked on a regular basis to ensure optimal product life! Rotation Proper rotation practices must be followed in order to keep produce fresh. Simply write the delivery date on the outside of every carton received and store the cartons so the date can be easily read. The oldest product should be used first according to the FIFO method (First-In, First-Out). Storage Hints to Prolong Life of Fresh Fruits & Vegetables Temperature fluctuates from front to back of the cooler due to the location of the cooling unit and the frequency of the door being opened. Divide the cooler into four areas and store as noted below:

COLD BOX / WALK-IN COOLER Foodservice — 48 hour storage

Front

45˚ to 43˚ F

42˚ to 40˚ F

Cabbage Radishes

Back-Center 39˚ to 37˚ F

Spinach Cauliflower Green Onions Asparagus

Back

36˚ to 34˚ F

Lettuce Broccoli Green Leafy Pre-cut (40˚ to 34˚ F)

FAN

DOOR

Bell Peppers Cucumbers Squash

Mid-Center

Celery Carrots Oranges Grapefruit Limes Lemons

Avocados Melons Pineapples

Kiwifruit Apples Cantaloupe

Grapes Strawberries Mushrooms

Source: 2006 Produce Marketing Association

3

FRESH-CUT LETTUCE HANDLING OVERVIEW

2118-

Effect of Temperature on Shelf Life of Fresh-Cut Products

1512-

• Store at 34º to 40° F; each degree higher reduces shelf life • Maximize shelf life with proper refrigeration • Keep time out of refrigeration to a minimum • Store product in original bags or shipping cartons

Shelf Life (days)

9630-

Optimal temperature range 34˚ 40˚

45˚ 50˚

55˚ 60˚

65˚ 70˚ 75˚ 80˚

Temperature (˚F)

DOLE QUALITY PROMISE Dole is committed to bringing you the safest, cleanest, and freshest produce available. Dole’s salad plants operate under a strict Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) program. Dole is the only company that the FDA partnered with to observe first hand, and understand HACCP in the prepackaged salad industry. Quality Issues to Watch For The following are some of the quality issues that affect fresh-cut lettuce. Finding defective pieces in a bag does not mean the entire bag is unusable. Use your best judgment in evaluating to what degree the product is affected and eliminate objectionable pieces when necessary. Dole has dedicated fields reserved specifically for fresh-cut lettuce products to assure the highest quality possible. Our strict processing standards and customized breathable packaging films work together to maximize the shelflife of the fresh-cut product quality. Wetness in the Bag Ideal storage temperature is 34º to 40° F. Every 10 degree increase in temperature causes the product to respire two times faster. Wetness can be linked to temperature abuse which causes the product to respire and deteriorate at a faster rate. Pink / Brown Discoloration A pink (and eventually brown) discoloration along the cut edges of the lettuce is generally caused by too much oxygen in the bag. The normal cause of this is a presence of a hole in the bag (no matter how small). Keep the product in the original carton until ready to use. Brown Pieces Small brown pieces are often caused by a quality defect in the raw product called tip burn. Lettuce needs to be grown in cool, mild climates. When temperatures increase above normal, the heat can burn the tips of the leaves. Most of the time this defect is inside the head and it is difficult to remove or eliminate 100% of the affected area before processing. Off Smell A sweet smell occurs when a film (bag) starves the product of oxygen, disrupting normal lettuce metabolism. The resulting oxygen/carbon dioxide mix leads to a “fruity” aroma and a bitter taste. Lower respiration (through proper temperature control) will minimize this problem. No Need to Wash All Fresh-Cut products from Dole go through a proprietary process which washes all cut products with chlorinated water during three different stages. This process thoroughly removes the substance from the cut cells which discolors and turns brown without using any preservatives. Along with a highly hygenic environment, when packaged, our products are clean and ready to use. No additional washing is needed. In order to minimize cross-contamination we highly recommend that our products be used as is. In the event that a shiny wet look is desirable, misting with a spray bottle filled with cold water is very effective.

4

BANANA HANDLING OVERVIEW Handling & Storage Ambient air temperature 55˚F 1. Bring bananas into storage area immediately upon arrival. In the winter, bananas can chill and turn gray if left in cold area. In 54˚F the summer, accumulated heat inside the boxes will accelerate 53˚F ripening and shorten shelf-life. 2. Closed boxes accumulate heat, accelerating ripening. Removing 50˚F the lids, pulling back the plastic and cross-stacking the boxes 1 5 24 allows ventilation. If bananas arrive at desired color stage, remove Number of hours to incur moderate chill damage box lids, place the box inside the lid and cross-stack. If bananas arrive a little greener than desired, leave the box top on until desired color is achieved. 3. Store bananas away from doors, windows, exterior walls, and cold or hot drafts. The ideal storage range is 56º – 60º F. Never store where temperatures will be under 56º F. 4. Limit handling the bananas. Every handling of the banana’s fingers may result in a brown or bruised spot. TROUBLESHOOTING • Dull skin color when fruit ripens: Indication of chill injury. To prevent chill, do not store below 56 degrees. • Flesh decay, poor color: Indication of high temperature injury. To prevent, maintain temperature range of 56-60 degrees. • Dark, discolored flesh: Indication of rough handling. To prevent, handle with care and do not drop shipping containers on the floor. AVAILABILITY: All Year Yield: Varies with fruit grade (thickness), length and shape: Sliced Mashed

6” 3/4 cup 1/3 cup

8” 1 cup 1/2 cup

10” 1 1/4 cup 3/4 cup

Nutrition Bananas are a Superfood for your heart because they are an excellent source of vitamin B6 and vitamin C and a good source of potassium, fiber and nutrients that help promote heart health. Calories Fat 110

0g

TransFat 0g

Cholesterol 0mg

Sodium 0mg

Potassium 450mg

Carbohydrate 29g

Vitamin C 20% DV

Vitamin B6 25% DV

Manganese 15% DV

SERVING TIPS Bananas are one of the most versatile fruits. They can be used in all parts of the day and in all kinds of recipes. They should never go to waste because even the ripest bananas are sweet and can be used in a variety of desserts and other treats. RIPENING Bananas continue to ripen at approximately 1/2 stage per day under the normal temperature range. The best time to eat a banana is from a stage 5 to a stage 7.

5 Stage 4

Stage 5

Stage 6

Stage 7

72

FRESH FRUIT RIPENING GUIDE Some fresh fruit continues to ripen after harvest while others do not. Whether or not a fruit continues to ripen is a key factor in determining its storage and shelf life. Fruits that require additional ripening should be stored at room temperature until ripe. Fruit that does not ripen after harvesting should be stored in a cool area until used. For an overview of ideal storage temperatures for specific fruits, please refer to page 2 of this booklet. Fruit That Ripens After Harvest Apples Apricot Avocados Banana

Kiwifruit Mango Nectarine Papaya

Peach Pear Plum

Fruit That Does Not Ripen After Harvest Berries Cherries

Citrus Grapes

Pineapple

Source: Management of Fruit Ripening, U.C. Davis – April 2003.

Ethylene Gas: Benefits and Effects of Exposure Ethylene is one of the most active plant hormones known. Fruit can be quickly ripened by introducing ethylene gas into a controlled environment. For example, it is often used to ripen bananas, tomatoes and avocados. By placing peaches in a closed bag, you are taking advantage of the fruits’ natural ethylene to speed softening. While ethylene is great for ripening some fruit, the gas can cause premature decay of other fruits and vegetables that are sensitive to it. To avoid deterioration or rapid ripening of sensitive commodities, you should avoid holding them in the same storage room or refrigerator compartment with products that emit a great deal of ethylene gas. Diseased or injured fruits generate substantially increased levels of ethylene, so remove injured produce immediately. If you have only one cooler, keep lids on storage boxes, store sensitive commodities as far away as possible from ethylene producers and rotate product properly. If your inventory turns quickly, ethylene should not cause quality problems. Fruit That Produces Large Quantities Of Ethylene Apples Honeydew Apricots Kiwifruit Avocados Mangos Bananas Nectarines Cantaloupe Papaya Figs Peaches

Pears Plantains Plums Tomatoes

Commodities That Are Sensitive To Ethylene Apples Apricots Asparagus Avocados Bananas (unripe) Basil Beans Broccoli Brussel Sprouts Cabbage Cantaloupe Carrots Cauliflower Celery

6

Chayotes Eggplants Greens Herbs (except Basil) Honeydew Kiwifruit Lettuce Mangos Nectarines Onions (Green) Papaya Peaches Pears Peas

Source: PMA Fresh Produce Manual November 2002

Peppers (Chili) Plantains Plums Potatoes Radishes Spinach Squash (Summer) Squash (Winter) Sweet Potatoes Turnips Watercess Watermelon

FRESH-CUT VEGETABLES Benefits — Time and Money Fresh-cut vegetables offer foodservice managers and operators many benefits. The most important advantage being time and money savings! Fresh-cut vegetables such as salad mixes, broccoli florets and shredded cabbages save hours in preparation. The following is an example of direct cost savings. Use the chart and worksheet together to compare your relative cost-savings by using fresh-cut products.

Dole Fresh-Cut Cost Analysis Worksheet Yield and Labor FOR MAXIMUM See how long it can take to hand-prep produce: SHELF LIFE, KEEP REFRIGERATED AT Products Raw Products/ Finished Fresh-Cut Yield in Labor in 34°F OR 1°C Gross Case Wt.* Product Lbs. Minutes Broccoli

14 ct. field pack/30 lbs.

1” - 2” florets

18

20

Cabbage

24 ct. field pack/50 lbs.

1/8” shredded

35

65

Carrots

Bulk medium/25 lbs.

2” peeled

15

90

40°F

Cauliflower

2 ct. field pack/28 lbs.

1” florets

10.5

22

34°F

Iceberg

24 ct. field pack/50 lbs.

1 1/2” chopped

30

35

Iceberg

24 ct. field pack/50 lbs.

1/8” shredded

28

65

Romaine

24 ct. field pack/37 lbs.

1/2” - 2” chopped

28

20

Spinach

24 ct. field pack/20 lbs.

Leaves, stemless

5

90

*Gross case weight for vegetables will vary. Calculations are based on gross case weights at time of testing.

Use this chart to compute how much you will save with Dole Fresh-Cut Produce. Step 1: Take hourly labor rate and multiply by 1.25 to include benefits, payroll taxes, etc.

_________

Step 2: Divide amount in #1 above by 60, then multiply by labor in minutes from Yield and Labor chart above

_________

Step 3: Insert cost of one box of product

_________

Step 4: Add up labor and product cost (add #2 and #3 and enter on line #4)

_________

Step 5: Divide #4 by yield in lbs., from chart above = ¢/lb.

_________

Step 6: Multiply #5 above by amount of pounds in a case of DOLE Fresh-Cut Product

_________

Step 7: Insert cost of DOLE Fresh-Cut Product and compare to actual cost above

_________



7

FOODSERVICE YIELDS YIELDS Food as Purchased (AP)

Lbs.

Serving Size

Servings (EP)

Cups

Apples (125 - 138 ct.)

1

1/2 cup raw, unpeeled

7.4

3 2/3

Apples (100 ct.)

1

1/2 cup raw, unpeeled

7.8

3 7/8

Avocados (48 ct. CA )

1

1/2 cup peeled, sliced raw

2.7

1

Avocados (approx 3.5”x 4.75” FL)

1

1/2 cup peeled, sliced raw

3.5

2

Bananas (150 ct.)

1

1 banana*

3.6

1 5/8

Bananas (100 - 120 ct.)

1

1/2 cup raw, 1/2” sliced fruit

3.5

1 3/4

Cantaloupe (18 ct.)

1

1/2 cup cubed or diced fruit

2.9

1 3/8

Grapefruit (27 - 32 ct.)

1

1/2 cup fruit sections, peeled

3.2

1 5/8

Grapes (Seedless, whole with stem)

1

1/2 whole fruit (about 14 lg.)

5.2

2 5/8

Honeydew

1

1/2 cup fruit cubes

2.4

1 1/8

Lemons

1

1/4 cup fruit juice*

3.1

3/4

Oranges (125 ct. FL or TX)

1

1 orange*

2.9

1 3/4

Pineapples

1

1/2 cup raw cubed fruit

3.2

1 1/8

Strawberries (Whole)

1

1/2 cup raw whole fruit

5.2

1 1/2

Broccoli (Spears, trimmed)

1

1/2 cup raw vegetables spears

8.5

4 1/4

Cabbage (Green, shredded RTU)

1

1/2 cup raw vegetable

13.5

6 3/4

Cabbage (Green, untrimmed whole)

1

1/2 cup raw chopped vegetable

8.8

6

Carrots (Fresh, without tops)

1

1/2 cup raw vegetable strips

5.1

3

Carrots (Shredded, RTU)

1

1/2 cup raw shredded vegetable

9.9

4 7/8

Cauliflower (Whole, trimmed)

1

1/2 cup raw vegetable florets

6.1

6

Celery (Fresh, trimmed)

1

1/2 cup raw, chopped vegetable

6.2

3 1/8

Iceberg Lettuce (Head, cleaned & cored)

1

1 cup vegetable pieces*

7.0

7 1/3

Iceberg Lettuce Salad Mix (RTU)

1

1/2 cup vegetable pieces

13.2

6 1/2

Onions (Fresh, all sizes, whole)

1

1/2 cup raw chopped vegetable

4.6

2 3/4

Tomatoes (Whole, all sizes)

1

1/2 cup vegetable wedges

5.2

2 1/2

Fresh Fruit

FRESH Vegetables

Source Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Programs, Revised November, 2001 *USDA Recommended serving sizes are 1/2 cup, except where noted

8

Pro tei n( g) Vit am in A% RDA Vit am in C% RDA Ca lci um % RDA Iro n% RDA

Apples

1 medium

154

80

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

22

5

16

0

2%

8%

0%

2%

Apricots

3 apricots

105

50

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

12

2

10

1

40%

15%

2%

2%

Artichokes

2/3 medium

85

45

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

80

10

5

1

3

4%

15%

4%

6%

Asparagus

5 medium spears

80

20

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

10

3

2

1

2

15%

10%

2%

4%

Avocados

1/5 medium

30

50

4.5

0.5

0.0

0

0

3

2

0

1

0%

6%

0%

0%

Bananas

1 medium

126

110

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

29

3

15

1

2%

20%

0%

2%

Beets

1 beet

82

35

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

65

8

2

6

1

0%

6%

2%

4%

Blueberries

1 cup

145

80

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

21

3

14

1

2%

25%

0%

2%

Broccoli

1 medium stalk

148

50

0.5

0.0

0.0

0

50

10

4

3

4

20%

220%

6%

6%

Brussel Sprouts

4 sprouts

84

35

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

20

8

3

2

3

15%

120%

4%

6%

Cabbage

4 medium leaves

92

20

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

15

5

2

3

1

4%

50%

4%

4%

Cantaloupe

1/4 medium

134

45

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

20

10

1

11

1

90%

80%

2%

2%

Carrots

1 medium

72

30

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

50

7

2

3

1

240%

8%

2%

2%

Cauliflower

1/6 medium

96

25

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

30

5

2

2

2

0%

70%

2%

2%

Celery

2 medium stalks

110

15

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

90

3

2

2

1

10%

6%

4%

2%

Cherries

1 cup (21 cherries)

140

90

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

22

3

18

1

2%

15%

2%

2%

Corn

kernals from 1 medium ear

90

80

1.0

0.0

0.0

0

15

17

2

3

3

4%

10%

0%

2%

Cranberries

1 cup

95

45

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

12

4

4

0

2%

20%

0%

2%

Cucumbers

1/3 medium

99

15

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

4

0

2

1

2%

4%

2%

2%

Eggplants

1/5 average

84

20

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

5

3

2

1

0%

4%

0%

2%

Figs

3 medium

150

120

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

31

2

15

1

20%

30%

0%

4%

Grapefruit

1/2 medium

154

60

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

16

6

10

1

15%

110%

2%

0%

Grapes

3/4 cup

126

90

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

23

1

20

1

2%

25%

2%

2%

Honeydew

1/10 medium

134

50

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

25

12

1

11

1

2%

40%

0%

2%

Kiwifruit

2 medium

148

90

1.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

22

4

13

2

2%

230%

6%

2%

Lemons

1 medium

58

15

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

5

2

1

1

0%

50%

2%

2%

Lettuce, Iceberg

6 large leaves

89

10

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

10

3

1

2

1

8%

4%

2%

2%

Lettuce, Romaine

3 outer leaves

85

15

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

5

3

2

1

1

90%

30%

2%

4%

Limes

1 medium

67

20

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

7

2

1

0

0%

30%

2%

2%

Mangos

1/2 mango

104

70

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

18

2

15

1

15%

50%

2%

0%

Mushrooms

5 medium

90

20

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

3

1

1

3

0%

4%

0%

2%

Nectarines

1 medium

140

60

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

15

2

11

1

10%

15%

0%

2%

Onions (White)

1 small

70

30

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

7

1

3

1

0%

8%

2%

0%

Onions (Green)

2 medium

30

10

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

2

1

1

1

6%

10%

2%

2%

Oranges

1 medium

154

80

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

19

3

13

1

8%

150%

6%

2%

Papaya

1/2 papaya

140

50

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

14

3

8

1

30%

140%

4%

0%

Peaches

1 large

147

60

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

14

2

12

1

10%

15%

0%

2%

Pears

1 medium

166

100

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

26

5

16

1

0%

10%

2%

2%

Peppers (Green)

1 small pepper

74

15

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

3

1

2

1

6%

100%

0%

2%

Pineapples

2 slices, 3 1/2” diameter, 1/2” thick

112

50

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

14

2

10

1

2%

70%

2%

2%

Plantains

1/2 medium

90

110

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

29

2

14

1

20%

30%

0%

4%

Plums

2 medium

151

70

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

17

2

15

1

10%

25%

0%

2%

Potatoes

1 medium

213

170

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

10

38

3

1

5

0%

70%

2%

10%

Radishes

9 large

81

15

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

30

3

1

2

1

0%

20%

2%

2%

Spinach

8 leaves

80

20

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

65

3

2

0

2

150%

35%

8%

10%

Sprouts (Alfalfa)

1 cup

33

10

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

1

1

0

1

2%

4%

2%

2%

Squash (Summer)

1 medium

196

30

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

7

2

4

2

8%

60%

2%

4%

Strawberries

12 medium

147

45

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

11

3

7

1

0%

140%

2%

4%

Sweet Potatoes

1 medium 5” long

130

110

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

70

26

4

5

2

370%

6%

4%

4%

Tangerines

1 medium

109

60

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

15

2

12

1

15%

50%

4%

0%

Tomatoes

1 medium

148

35

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

20

8

2

6

2

20%

60%

2%

4%

Watermelons

1/18 medium

259

80

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

0

20

1

16

2

30%

35%

2%

4%

Yuca

1/4 medium root

103

170

0.0

0.0

0.0

0

15

40

2

2

1

0%

25%

2%

2%

Ca lor ies

Serving Size

We igh t (g )

To tal Fa t (g ) Sa tur ate dF at (g) Tra ns fat (g) Ch ole ste rol (m g) So diu m (g) Ca rbo hy dra te (g) Die tar yF ibe r (g ) Su ga r (g )

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION

Source: Genesis® R&D SQL Nutrition Analysis program from ESHA Research, Salem, Oregon 2006

10 9

DOLE USA PRODUCT LIST DOLE Fresh Vegetables 60/30 Romaine Iceberg Blend 80/20 Iceberg Romaine Salad Blend American Salad Blend Broccoli Florets (Iced) Broccoli Florets Mini (Iceless) California Salad Blend Cauliflower Florets Cauliflower Florets (Mini) Chopped Lettuce Chopped Romaine Hearts Chopped Romaine Salad Classic Iceberg Salad Blend Classic Romaine Salad Blend Classic Romaine Salad Blend with Red Cabbage Classic Romaine Salad Blend with Red Cabbage & Carrots Cole Slaw with Carrots Crown Lettuce (Green Leaf) Crown Lettuce (Romain Leaf) Just Lettuce® Salad Blend Shredded Carrots Shredded Green Cabbage Shredded Lettuce Shredded Red Cabbage Spinach (Baby) Spinach (Flat Leaf) Spring Mix Salad Blend Whole Mini Carrots DOLE Fresh Picked Vegetables Artichokes Asparagus Broccoli Brussel Sprouts Carrots Cauliflower Celery Cilantro Green Onions Lettuce Mix Leaf Lettuce

Mushrooms Onions Potatoes Radishes Romaine Hearts Snow Peas DOLE Fresh Fruit Apples Avocado Bananas Bananas (Baby) Bananas (Red) Burro Bananas Cantaloupe Cherries Cranberries Chayote Figs Gooseberries Grapes Honeydew Mangos Manzanos Oranges Organic Bananas Organic Pineapple Peaches Pears Pineapple Plantains Plums Rambutan Strawberries Watermelon DOLE Dried Fruit Banana Chips Dates Prunes Raisins

Contact your Dole Foodservice Representative Fresh Fruit: 800-232-8888 Fresh Vegetables: 800-333-5454

DOLE Frozen Fruit Blackberries Blueberries Cherries (Dark Sweet) Cherries (Red Tart) Mango Chunks Pineapple Chunks Raspberries Sliced Peaches Sliced Strawberries in Sugar Tub Whole Strawberries Wild Blueberries Wildly Nutritious Mixed Berries Wildly Nutritious Mixed Fruit Wildly Nutritious Tropical Island Blend DOLE Packaged Fruit Canned Mandarin Oranges Canned Pineapple in Juice Canned Pineapple in Syrup Canned Tropical Fruit Salad Fruit Bowls - Mandarin Oranges Fruit Bowls - Mixed Fruit Fruit Bowls - Peaches Fruit Bowls - Pears Fruit Bowls - Pineapple Fruit Bowls - Tropical Fruit Salad Fruit Parfaits - Apples & Caramel Crème Fruit Parfaits - Peaches & Crème Fruit Parfaits - Pineapple & Crème Fruit Bowls in Gel - Mandarins in Orange Gel Fruit Bowls in Gel - Peaches in Strawberry Gel Fruit Bowls in Gel - Pineapple in Lime Gel Plastic Jars - Mandarin Oranges Plastic Jars - Mixed Fruit Plastic Jars - Pineapple Chunks Plastic Jars - Sliced Peaches Plastic Jars - Tropical Fruit Salad

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