framework for effective teaching - Newark Public Schools

framework for effective teaching - Newark Public Schools

FRAMEWORK FOR EFFECTIVE TEACHING Newark Public Schools Teacher Performance Evaluation A GUIDEBOOK FOR TEACHERS & ADMINISTRATORS 2014-2015 TABLE OF ...

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FRAMEWORK FOR EFFECTIVE TEACHING Newark Public Schools Teacher Performance Evaluation

A GUIDEBOOK FOR TEACHERS & ADMINISTRATORS 2014-2015

TABLE OF CONTENTS Letter from the Superintendent ........................................................................................... iii Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 1 Newark Public Schools Framework for Effective Teaching ............................................... 2 Teacher Evaluation in Newark Public Schools, 2014-15 .................................................. 15 Appendix A: Newark Public Schools Framework for Effective Teaching ...................... A1 Appendix B: Changes to the Framework from 2013-14 to 2014-15 ................................ A6 Appendix C: Glossary of Terms ....................................................................................... A7 Appendix D: Frequently Asked Questions ..................................................................... A10 Appendix E: Recommended Timelines .......................................................................... A17

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LETTER FROM THE SUPERINTENDENT Dear Colleagues, Great teachers—in every classroom, for every student, every day—put our students on a pathway to college and help our students realize their dreams. This district has been committed to ensuring that we recruit, grow, and retain our best teachers. One key lever to achieve this goal is the work contained in this guidebook – how to coach and evaluate teachers. The Framework for Effective Teaching sets clear and high expectations for our teachers and represent our shared vision of the most important things teachers in Newark can do to get great results for our students. After two years of implementing the Framework, these expectations are beginning to become part of everyday practice. College readiness for every student may be an ambitious goal, but it’s the only goal that makes sense in the 21st century. The Common Core State Standards, great teachers, and transformational schools are going to get us there. To ensure we continue to grow our teachers, the Framework will continue to be the basis for our teacher evaluation process in the 2014-15 school year. Principals and other evaluators consider observations (e.g., insights into teaching moments), artifacts (e.g., unit plans and student work) and quantitative data (e.g., standardized tests and writing assessments) as they assess a teacher’s performance. At the mid-year review and at the end of the year assessment, the evaluator assigns a score in each Competency, which leads to a single overall rating. The Framework, however, is about much more than creating a rating – it is about giving teachers opportunities to improve through specific and ongoing feedback. I fully expect and will hold administrators accountable for leading effective observation and evaluation processes. I will also support them in creating environments where adults model a culture of excellence, accountability, and support. One key role that teachers play in this work is to work with their teacher teams to review data as a group and to reach out to the School Improvement Panel if they have concerns about their evaluation. Schools with high levels of trust and collaboration between teachers and administrators retain good teachers and get better student outcomes. I look forward to visiting your classrooms this year and continuing our journey together in the rewarding work of bringing new opportunities to all our children in Newark. Thank you, as always, for your hard work and dedication. Cami Anderson Superintendent

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INTRODUCTION This guidebook is one of many tools created to support the coaching and evaluation of Newark’s teachers. The purpose of the guidebook is to provide both a comprehensive resource for the district’s evaluation tools and policies as well as a quick-reference tool for specific questions. The guidebook outlines the components, requirements and promising practices for coaching and evaluating teachers. Within the guidebook, you will find the following information: Overview of the Newark Public School’s 2014-2015 Framework for Effective Teaching and levels of performance Processes and best practices for conducting observations and evaluations Information about the online system used to share information and track progress at each stage of the observation and evaluation process Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) to serve as a quick-reference guide While the guidebook is intended to be used as a resource for learning about the NPS evaluation tools and processes, we recognize that questions or issues may arise that are not addressed here. In addition to the resources in this guidebook, the NPS website (http://www.nps.k12.nj.us/evaluation resources) will be continually updated with resources and tools to support you. Additionally, as always, your principal and other school leaders, Special Assistants for Teacher Quality, and Assistant Superintendents are excellent resources for your questions. Finally, you may always reach out to the Talent Office with your questions or feedback by emailing [email protected] We would love to hear from you!

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NEWARK PUBLIC SCHOOLS FRAMEWORK FOR EFFECTIVE TEACHING The Framework for Effective Teaching sits at the core of teacher evaluation in Newark Public Schools (NPS). (See Appendix A for the complete language of the Framework.) The Framework is intended to: Articulate our shared vision of effective instruction by clearly detailing our vision of effective instruction that leads to student mastery. Serve as a tool for teacher feedback and development by using clear, specific language to ensure specific, targeted feedback for teacher growth. Support instructional shifts required by the Common Core State Standards by focusing on fewer, clearer, and higher expectations for great teaching and by including explicit indicators that reflect the expectations of the CCSS. Set a high performance bar for teachers by holding all of our educators to high standards. Articulate expectations clearly and concisely by ensuring common understanding and expectations. The Framework focuses on the five most essential Competencies that can help teachers get great results for their students, as outlined in the graphic below.

In all five of these Competencies, the Framework sets high expectations that are aligned to the Common Core State Standards and focus on what students are learning, not just what the teacher is doing. The Framework serves as the foundation for teacher evaluation, and as such it provides a structure for teachers to receive regular, effective feedback on their performance and support in continuing to develop their practice In addition, the Framework was developed in accordance with current state regulations and statute. As a result, the New Jersey Department of Education has approved our Framework for use in evaluation. In this section, we review the Framework’s content in detail, including the 1) common themes contained in the Framework; 2) an overview of the Competencies and Indicators included in the Framework; 3) a review of the Framework’s linkages to the Common Core State Standards; 4) a summary of the language changes made in 2014-15 as a result of educator feedback; and 5) a description of the Framework’s linkages to professional development in the district.

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COMMON THEMES IN THE FRAMEWORK FOR EFFECTIVE TEACHING The Framework for Effective Teaching includes essential components for observing and evaluating teaching staff members. The following common themes cut across the Framework. Teaching for student mastery: The Framework focuses attention on teacher behaviors and student actions that lead to student mastery of content. The Framework focuses not just on what is being taught, but whether or not students are actually learning the content and concepts presented. High expectations: The Framework requires that teachers hold high expectations for all students to achieve at high levels. This includes establishing learning goals that reflect the critical thinking skills that will put students on the pathway to college, providing evidencebased feedback to students, and effectively interacting with students to establish a culture and expectation that all students can and will master the content. Elements observable in one lesson and over the course of the year: NPS recognizes that individual, discrete classroom observations do not provide a complete picture of a teacher’s teaching and students’ success at mastering content. The Framework articulates both behaviors that are observable in an individual classroom lesson as well as behaviors that are observable over the course of the school year. This over-time guidance allows teachers and observers to identify and assess teacher behaviors and student reactions that, as they build over the course of the year, lead to student mastery. Accommodating individual needs: Teachers should tailor instruction to address the diverse needs of all students and move all students toward mastery. This requires that teachers build relationships with their students and learn how to motivate and engage all students. Many students have special needs, which may be intellectual, emotional or physical. Each of these types of differences suggests different accommodations, from selecting instructional goals and designing instruction, to interacting with students and designing classroom norms. The Framework allows for, and encourages, this differentiation as critical to a teacher’s practice. Alignment to Common Core State Standards (CCSS): The Framework explicitly focuses and aligns to teacher strategies required for mastery of the CCSS (see Alignment to the Common Core State Standards section below). This alignment is focused on the pedagogical/instructional shifts (not specific content) required when implementing the CCSS.

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OVERVIEW OF THE FRAMEWORK FOR EFFECTIVE TEACHING This section provides a more granular look at the structure of the Framework for Effective Teaching and the content of each of the Framework’s competencies.

NPS FRAMEWORK FOR EFFECTIVE TEACHING 2014-2015 1. Lesson Design and Focus

Students sustain focus on a specific, standards-aligned objective that moves them toward mastery. In one lesson…. 1a. Lesson Sequence. Individual, standards-aligned lessons build on previous lessons and on students’ prior knowledge. 1b. Lesson Components. Lesson components are standards-aligned and move students toward mastery of an objective that is aligned to essential understandings in the standards. 1c. Pacing and Momentum. Teacher maximizes learning time. 1d. Clarity. Teacher clearly and accurately communicates content and instructions.

Over the course of the year… 1e. Coherent Planning. Lesson plans are standards-based, grade-level appropriate and reflect work toward annual student achievement goals. 1f. Progression of Instruction. Lesson objectives fit into a larger, coherent sequence that leads to student mastery of the appropriate standards. 2. Rigor and Inclusiveness

Instructional strategies challenge all students and provide multiple pathways to mastery. In one lesson…. 2a. Tailored Instruction. Teacher tailors instruction to move all students toward mastery. 2b. Questions & Tasks. Questions and tasks ensure student comprehension and ask for application, analysis and/or synthesis. 2c. Responsiveness. Teacher anticipates and responds to student reactions and misunderstandings by adjusting instructional strategies. 2d. Precision & Evidence. Teacher and students require precision and evidence in tasks and responses.

Over the course of the year… 2e. Revisions. Student work includes revisions based on teacher and peer feedback, especially revised explanations and justifications to demonstrate student movement toward mastery. 2f. Depth of Knowledge. Lesson objectives, tasks and materials require students to demonstrate the following skills: Recall & Reproduction; Basic Application of Concepts; Strategic Thinking; and Extended Thinking 3. Culture of Achievement

A learning-focused environment of shared high expectations promotes mastery. In one lesson…. 3a. Enthusiasm for Learning. Students express satisfaction in solving problems and mastering new material. 3b. Persistence. Students show persistence in confronting demanding concepts and tasks. 3c. Community. Classroom norms promote positive and productive teacher-student and student-student relationships. 3d. Attention. Teacher’s strategies and routines capture and maintain student attention on learning.

Over the course of the year… 3e. High Expectations. The teacher fosters a classroom culture that is consistently one of high expectations and hard work and the teacher models excellence. 3f. Peer Accountability. Students hold themselves and their peers accountable for learning and supporting the culture of the classroom.

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4. Student Progress Toward Mastery

Students show evidence of, and teacher monitors, growth. In one lesson…. 4a. Checks for Understanding. Teacher consistently checks for understanding. 4b. Feedback. Teacher and students give and receive timely, specific, and constructive feedback. 4c. Demonstration of Learning. Students know more at the end of the lesson than they did at the start.

Over the course of the year… 4d. Using Data. Teacher tracks assessment data to understand each student’s progress toward mastery and uses results to guide planning and instruction. 4e. Understanding of Growth. Teacher can articulate specifically (and with evidence) whether or not each student has internalized grade-level standards and, if not, what s/he still needs to learn. 4f. Progress Toward Goals. Data reflect that students are mastering the objectives of the focus areas, leading toward mastery of grade-level standards. 5. Commitment to Personal and Collective Excellence

The teacher demonstrates commitment to excellence and to the professional growth of his/her school and peers. Over the course of the year… 5a. Commitment to Continuous Improvement. Teacher accurately self-assesses strengths and substantive growth areas, seeks and incorporates feedback from others, and pursues his or her own growth and development. 5b. Collaboration. Teacher contributes ideas and expertise to further colleagues’ and the school’s growth and incorporates productive insights into his or her own instruction. 5c. Communication of Student Progress. Teacher communicates student progress clearly and consistently to students, families, and school leaders. 5d. Attendance and Promptness. Teacher is present and prompt, and attendance reflects his or her focus on student learning as a priority.

STRUCTURE As shown above, the structure of the Framework includes both competencies and, within each competency, several indicators. Competencies Five Competencies describe the overall expectations for each NPS teacher. These are the core professional standards to which teachers will be held accountable. The Competencies are:

1. Lesson Design and Focus: Students sustain focus on a specific, standards-aligned objective that moves them toward mastery. 2. Rigor and Inclusiveness: Instructional strategies challenge all students and provide multiple pathways to mastery. 3. Culture of Achievement: A learning-focused environment of shared high expectations promotes mastery. 4. Student Progress toward Mastery: Students show evidence of, and teacher monitors, growth. 5. Commitment to Personal and Collective Excellence: The teacher demonstrates commitment to excellence and to the professional growth of his/her school and peers.

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Indicators Indicators describe specific components or behaviors of the Competency. These may be visible during individual lessons or over the course of the year. For Competencies 1-4, there are both in-onelesson Indicators and over-time Indicators. For Competency 5, there are only over-time Indicators. Levels of Performance & Descriptor Language The Framework identifies what each Indicator looks like in practice at four levels of performance (see Appendix A for the rubric with this detail). For in-one-lesson Indicators, descriptors identify evidence of the Indicator at each of four levels of performance: Highly Effective, Effective, Partially Effective, and Ineffective:

Highly Effective: A Highly Effective teacher ensures exceptional rates of student growth. Such classrooms consist of a community of learners, with highly motivated and engaged students who assume considerable responsibility for their own learning. Highly Effective teachers have the knowledge, skills, and capacity to serve as models for other teachers. This performance level is reserved for teachers who are truly exceptional in their practice. Effective: An Effective teacher consistently meets the expectations set forth by the Framework. Effective teachers have a broad repertoire of strategies and activities to ensure students achieve mastery. Years of experience are not, in and of themselves, an indicator of effectiveness. Partially Effective: A Partially Effective teacher may meet some expectations articulated in the Framework, but either does not meet all expectations or is inconsistent in meeting these expectations. Typically, there are clear areas where the teacher might improve his or her practice to achieve effectiveness. Partially Effective performance should not denote meeting expectations. Ineffective: An Ineffective teacher is not meeting expectations for teaching in NPS. There are several clear areas where the teacher must improve his or her practice to achieve effectiveness. In some instances, performance at the Ineffective level represents teaching that is below the licensing standard of "do no harm." Immediate improvement is required for teachers at the Ineffective level to remain in NPS. There is no descriptor language for over-time Indicators. Instead, these Indicators are assessed by noting the frequency with which the teacher exhibits these behaviors. For Competencies 1-4, ratings are: Always, Frequently, Sometimes, and Rarely. Always: The teacher’s actions result in this behavior or outcome being consistently demonstrated throughout the school year. This behavior is standard operating procedure in the teacher’s classroom or practice. Frequently: The teacher’s actions result in this behavior being frequently demonstrated throughout the school year. Though there may be limited instances of conflicting evidence that demonstrate that this is not standard operating procedure in the teacher’s classroom or practice, this behavior is generally the norm.

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Sometimes: The teacher’s actions do not consistently result in the teacher or his or her students demonstrating this behavior throughout the school year. While there may be some evidence of this Indicator, it is not regular or consistent. Rarely: The teacher’s actions do not result in demonstration of this behavior. Where there is evidence of this behavior, it is rare and inconsistent. Competency 5 outlines the minimum behaviors expected in the teaching profession. This is separate from the other sections in the Framework because the Indicators have more to do with basic employment practice. Evidence of these Indicators is gathered from actions and behaviors seen in the school community and through other interactions with the teacher. Teachers are expected to meet these expectations. If teachers do not meet these expectations, there will be a negative effect on their overall annual rating. The four ratings are: Exceeds Expectations: The teacher consistently exceeds the baseline expectation for performance, as outlined in the rubric for the Framework, going above and beyond what is required or expected. This rating is reserved for the exceptional teacher. Meets Expectations: The teacher consistently meets the baseline expectations, as outlined in the Framework. Slightly Below Expectations: The teacher is inconsistent in meeting expectations in practice or frequency, as outlined in the Framework. Significantly Below Expectations: The teacher is not in compliance with the baseline expectation for performance, as outlined in the Framework. For all of these ratings, principals should share with their staff a common understanding of these metrics so that everyone at the school site clearly understands the meaning of these ratings. Teachers should engage in these conversations with their administrators if they feel there is a lack of clarity about what is expected of them at the school site.

COMPETENCY DETAIL Below is a detailed description of each Competency as well as key questions to consider for specific Indicators during observations. These questions are simply a starting point for observers; they are not meant to limit an observer’s assessment of a teacher’s performance. Competency 1: Lesson Design and Focus Competency 1 outlines how students sustain focus on a specific objective that moves them toward mastery. Competency 1 outlines behaviors that ensure students are focused on the right content, in the right order, at the right pace. Student mastery of the CCSS requires spiraling instruction to ensure that today’s learning builds on previous learning and prepares students for future learning. Competency 1 describes the expectations of the teacher focusing on the right content at the right time to bring the student to mastery of annual goals and objectives.

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The Indicators in Competency 1 assess whether the teacher’s lesson design is effective in focusing students on a clear and appropriate objective today while driving students towards mastery of grade level standards over time. Evidence of planning is observable in classroom observations and in planning documents like lesson plans and year-long plans and goals. Competency 1 prompts educators to observe and discuss how lesson components are connected AND to examine lesson and unit plans (as prompted by over-time Indicators). While the assessment of the teacher’s content knowledge is not explicit in the Framework, the teacher’s knowledge is apparent through the strategies they employ to teach the lesson and the clarity with which they communicate content.

Indicators In an individual lesson: 1a. Lesson Sequence: Individual standard-aligned lesson builds on previous lessons and on students’ prior knowledge. 1b. Lesson Components: Lesson components are standards-aligned and move students toward mastery of an objective that is aligned to standards. 1c. Pacing and Momentum: Teacher maximizes learning time. 1d. Clarity: Teacher clearly and accurately communicates content and instructions.

Key Questions Does the lesson teach the right content at the right time? Does the daily lesson connect previous learning to the new learning goal? Do lesson components flow naturally and build on one another? Is time well spent? Is information communicated clearly?

Over the course of a year: 1e. Coherent Planning: Lesson plans are standardsbased, grade-level appropriate, and reflect work toward annual student achievement goals. 1f. Progression of Instruction: Lesson objectives fit into a larger coherent sequence that leads to student mastery of the appropriate standards.

Can students understand and summarize what the teacher is teaching?

Competency 2: Rigor & Inclusiveness Competency 2 outlines how instructional strategies challenge all students and provide multiple pathways to mastery. Competency 2 articulates expectations for the rigor of the teacher’s instruction, the learning demands on students and the strategies the teacher uses to deliver content. Rigor is not about making things more difficult, but rather challenging all students to be inquisitive, thorough and precise so that they fully understand what is being taught. Building a rigorous classroom includes the teacher demanding precision in student responses and discussion and holding students accountable for providing evidence of their reasoning.

In addition to ensuring a rigorous classroom, Competency 2 also articulates characteristics of an inclusive classroom. This means that the teacher tailors instructional strategies to meet the learning needs of all students and holds all students to a high standard.

Indicators In an individual lesson: 2a. Tailored Instruction: Teacher tailors instruction to move all students toward mastery. 2b. Questions & Tasks: Questions and tasks ensure student comprehension and ask for application, analysis, and/or synthesis.

Key Questions Does the teacher use effective strategies to ensure students master content? Does the teacher use and adapt strategies to reach all students?

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2c. Responsiveness: Teacher anticipates and responds to student reactions and misunderstandings by adjusting instructional strategies. 2d. Precision & Evidence: Teacher and students require precision and evidence in tasks and responses. Over the course of a year: 2e. Revisions: Student work includes revisions based on teacher and peer feedback, especially revised explanations and justifications to demonstrate student movement toward mastery. 2f. Depth of Knowledge: Lesson objectives, tasks and materials require students to demonstrate the following skills: Recall & Reproduction; Basic Application of Concepts; Strategic Thinking; and Extended Thinking.

Are all students doing challenging work that will result in either student growth or student mastery of concept/skill? Do the teacher’s questions and tasks promote thinking and understanding? How does the teacher respond if students misunderstand?

Competency 3: Culture of Achievement Competency 3 outlines how a learning-focused environment of shared high expectations promotes mastery. The most effective classrooms have strong classroom cultures, and research shows that positive classroom culture is a strong pre-condition for learning. Classroom culture in the Framework is focused on three elements: Explicit, positive interpersonal norms: Norms of the classroom promote healthy relationships and positive classroom community agreements. Strong processes that maximize instructional time: This means that the teacher employs strategies and routines that minimize disruptions and maximize learning time. Joy in learning: While students must be held to high, rigorous standards for learning, the Framework also calls for the teacher to cultivate a positive classroom environment in which students enjoy learning.

In one lesson, evidence will include how students treat one another and the teacher in addition to how much time is spent on task. Over time, evidence includes classroom norms, routines, and assessments of how students feel about the classroom. Competency 3 also describes how the teacher is responsible for modeling the core values of the classroom, school, and district for students through the teacher’s behavior. The Framework does not include an explicit Indicator assessing the teacher’s management of the physical space in the classroom. However, evidence of this priority is considered as the teacher’s lesson design is assessed. Thoughtfully designing lesson components and planning for pacing and momentum includes thoughtfully using space to maximize learning. Taken together, these elements indicate a strong, learning-focused culture of high expectations in which students hold themselves and each other accountable for their learning.

Indicators In an individual lesson: 3a. Enthusiasm for Learning: Students express satisfaction in solving problems and mastering new material. 3b. Persistence: Students show persistence in confronting demanding concepts and tasks. 3c. Community: Classroom norms promote positive and productive teacher-student and student-student relationships.

Key Questions Does the classroom culture promote learning and positive relationships? Does the classroom culture address the academic, social, and emotional needs of students? Do students demonstrate a love of learning? Are classroom norms and relationships conducive to learning?

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3d. Attention: Teacher’s strategies and routines capture and maintain student attention on learning.

Can the teacher keep students focused on learning?

Over the course of a year: 3e. High Expectations: The teacher fosters a classroom culture that is consistently one of high expectations and hard work. 3f. Peer Accountability: Students hold themselves and their peers accountable for learning and supporting the culture of the classroom.

Competency 4: Student Progress toward Mastery Competency 4 outlines how students show evidence of, and teacher monitors, growth. In NPS, teachers are accountable for whether or not students learn – which is the ultimate focus of our role as educators. Competency 4 outlines mechanisms for identifying whether or not students are learningin one lesson and over the course of the year.

While NPS will always hold our students to high expectations and work towards ensuring college readiness for all students, we also recognize that some students may enter classrooms behind gradelevel. With this in mind, Competency 4 does not always require evidence that students master gradelevel content, but there must be evidence of significant student growth, which may include mastery of grade-level content, progression toward mastery, or in some cases, mastery of content beyond the students’ current grade level. Competency 4 not only calls for a teacher to measure and track students’ growth and progress, but to share that information with families and other stakeholders. In one lesson, this could be exit tickets, journals, quizzes, and verbal ways of assessing student mastery. Over time, this could include progress toward meeting student learning goals, progress on standardized tests where applicable, and other ways of assessing student learning. Students and their teachers should both be receiving constructive feedback that allows them to leverage their strengths and improve in the areas needing development. When done well, constructive feedback should be specific and focused, be based on what is observable, rather than assuming anything about attitude or motivation, and include some specific direction on how to make improvements if some are needed. In 2014-15, teachers will continue to use the Individual Professional Development Plan (IPDP) or Corrective Action Plan (CAP) to work with administrators to articulate a set of student learning goals and strategies to assess progress towards those goals throughout the year. The over-time Indicators of Competency 4 will be assessed based on students’ progress toward goals, including, but not limited to, those outlined in the IPDP. Indicators In an individual lesson: 4a. Checks for Understanding: Teacher consistently checks for understanding. 4b. Feedback: Teacher and students give and receive timely, specific, and constructive feedback. 4c. Demonstration of Learning: Students know more at the end of the year than they did at the start.

Key Questions Is the lesson, and sequence of lessons, targeting areas of focus that are standards-aligned? Does the teacher have strategies in place to continuously and consistently check for understanding? Does the teacher use this data to modify the instructional approach and plan as needed?

Over the course of a year:

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4d. Using Data: Teacher tracks assessment data to understand each student’s progress toward mastery and uses results to guide planning and instruction. 4e. Understanding of Growth: Teacher can articulate specifically (and with evidence) whether or not each student has internalized grade-level standards and, if not, what s/he still needs to learn. 4f. Progress Toward Goals: Data reflects that students are mastering the objectives of the focus areas, leading toward mastery of grade-level standards.

Do students receive effective feedback to help them improve? Do the students learn? Do the students “get it”?

Competency 5: Commitment to Personal and Collective Excellence Competency 5 captures how a teacher demonstrates commitment to his or her professional growth and development, and to that of his or her peers. In schools where teachers collaborate and push each other, students grow. The teacher’s commitment to this growth is assessed in Competency 5 through over-time Indicators. Specifically, the Indicators articulate expectations for the teacher to prioritize the continuous improvement of his or her own practice and that of his or her peers. Recognizing that students will not learn if teachers are not present, Competency 5 also includes the extent to which a teacher’s attendance and punctuality demonstrate his or her commitment to students’ learning and mastery.

Competency 5 articulates baseline expectations of professional behavior in any field and compliance with basic employment policies, rather than a standard to which teachers should aspire. This is the only instance in the Framework where strong performance will only slightly advance a teacher’s rating, but poor performance will lower a teacher’s overall rating. For more information, see the “Annual Evaluation” section.

Indicators Over the course of a year: 5a. Commitment to Continuous Improvement: The teacher accurately self-assesses strengths and substantive growth areas, seeks and incorporates feedback from others, and pursues his or her own growth and development. 5b. Collaboration: The teacher contributes ideas and expertise to further colleagues’ and the school’s growth and incorporates productive insights into his or her own instruction. 5c. Communication of Student Progress: Teacher communicates student progress clearly and consistently to students, families, and school leaders. 5d. Attendance and Promptness: The teacher is present and prompt and attendance reflects his/her focus on student learning as a priority.

Key Questions Is the teacher aware of his/her strengths and growth areas? Does the teacher seek and incorporate feedback into his/her practice? Does the teacher seek ongoing growth and development? Does the teacher contribute to colleagues’ and school improvement? Is the teacher consistently present and on time?

ALIGNMENT TO COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS The Framework is aligned to the CCSS both from a big picture perspective of creating fewer, clearer, and higher standards for teacher and from a more detailed perspective of what instructional shifts are required to implement the CCSS.

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First, in alignment with the CCSS, the Framework is focused on fewer, clearer, and higher practices that are most likely to drive dramatic gains in student achievement: Fewer: Every classroom is different, but great teaching looks the same regardless of grade level, subject, or student population. The Framework focuses on fewer Competencies, emphasizing the most important elements of teaching that will prepare students for college and career. Clearer: The Framework uses clear and concise language to describe what each Competency looks like in practice. It is written in plain language that clearly communicates priorities. The Framework is a roadmap for all educators (teachers and administrators) for good instruction, prioritizing those Competencies that will have the most impact on student mastery. Some language has been tweaked for the 2014-15 school year to ensure maximum clarity. Higher: We must have high expectations for our students to ensure that they leave our schools prepared for college, career, and life. The Framework elevates expectations and asks you, our educators, to push yourselves to be better, and aim higher, to ensure that rigorous instruction happens in every classroom so we can help our students move forward. Second, to successfully teach to the CCSS and ensure that students master rigorous content, instruction will need to shift. As instruction shifts, expectations for effective teaching must align with, and prioritize, those critical skills which are necessary for student success. The Framework articulates the most critical skills to advance students’ mastery of the CCSS through: The consideration of lesson design and focus as the first Competency: Several of the shifts in instruction required by the CCSS require thoughtfully designed and focused unit plans and lesson plans to drive students toward mastery of clear objectives. By including this element as the first Competency, the Framework sets this clear expectation for all teachers. The inclusion of rigor as a primary Competency: One of the central themes of the CCSS is more rigorous instruction that holds students to high expectations for their learning. As a result, the Framework focuses heavily on rigor, with a Competency devoted to Rigor and Inclusiveness. The focus on student mastery throughout: The CCSS require students to master fewer, clearer, and higher standards at each grade level. In turn, all behaviors in the Framework have the intent of moving students toward mastery. Expectations that are observed over the course of a year: Mastery of the CCSS requires building skills and learning over the course of a year through instruction which is planned and executed to maximize learning time. In addition, the CCSS encourage connections to different grade level work and subject matter. As a result, the Framework includes behaviors observable over the course of the school year in addition to behaviors that could be observed in just one lesson or classroom visit. There are several specific Indicators on the Framework that are aligned to the CCSS and expectations and skills necessary to successfully teach to the CCSS:

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Framework Indicator

CCSS Alignment

1e. Coherent Planning: Lesson plans are standards-based and reflect work toward annual student achievement goals.

Common Core aligned lessons and units must be focused on the key standards. Reading, writing, speaking and listening must be integrated so students apply and synthesize, advancing literacy skills. In Common Core aligned lesson plans, Standards for Mathematical Practice that are central to the lesson must be identified, handled in a grade-appropriate way, and well connected to the content being addressed.

1f. Progression of Instruction: Lesson objectives fit into a larger, coherent sequence that leads to student mastery of the appropriate standards. 2a. Tailored Instruction: Teacher tailors instruction to move all students toward mastery.

Common Core aligned lessons have a clear end performance, and a careful sequence of tasks and texts that allow students to be successful on the culminating task.

2b. Questions and Tasks: Questions and tasks ensure student comprehension and ask for application, analysis and/or synthesis.

The Common Core requires opportunities for multiple reads, and rich and rigorous evidence-based discussions and writing about common texts through a sequence of specific, thought-provoking, and textdependent questions. There must be an expectation that students draw evidence from texts to produce clear and coherent writing that informs, explains, or makes an argument in various written forms. The Common Core Mathematical Practices require students to show precision when answering questions and completing tasks.

2f. Depth of Knowledge: Lesson objectives, tasks and materials require students to demonstrate these skills: Recall & Reproduction; Basic Application of Concepts; Strategic Thinking; and Extended Thinking 3e. High Expectations: The teacher fosters a classroom culture that is consistently one of high expectations and hard work and the teacher models excellence.

Common Core aligned lessons must include opportunities for authentic learning, application of literacy or mathematical skills, and studentdirected inquiry, analysis, evaluation, and/or reflection.

In order to ensure the Common Core is accessible to all students, instruction must include scaffolds to enable all students to experience, rather than to avoid, complexity of texts. There must be appropriate supports in reading, writing, listening and speaking for students who are ELL, have disabilities, or read well below their grade-level text band. There must also be extensions and/or more advanced text available for students who read well above their grade level text band. In order to ensure the Common Core can be accessed by a broad range of learners, extra supports must be provided for those working below grade level in Math. For students with high interest or who are working above grade level in Math, extensions must be provided. Additionally, supports should be gradually removed, requiring students to demonstrate their mathematical understanding independently.

The Common Core requires promotion of high expectations for all students, and a cultivation of student interest and engagement in reading, writing and speaking about texts and content.

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WHAT HAS CHANGED WITH THE FRAMEWORK THIS YEAR? Since the Framework was first introduced to educators in 2012, NPS has had a continued commitment to collecting educator feedback and revising the Framework based on this feedback. The district collected feedback through focus groups with selected teachers, school administrators, and district administrators. We also collected feedback from a survey sent to all teachers. All changes were made keeping the fairness and objectivity of the Framework as a primary objective. After gathering this feedback, we made only a few minor revisions to the Framework for the 2014-15 school year, specifically in Competency 1. We believe the small number and nature of the changes this year reflects the clarity of the Framework. These minor changes reflect the commitment to a Framework that clearly articulates expectations for teacher performance. A summary of changes to Competency 1 is below; details of exactly which language has changed are included in Appendix B. Changes in Competency 1: Focus on Standards-Aligned Instruction Framework for 2013-14: Competency 1 referenced a focus on specific objectives, lesson components, and intentional planning without always referencing standards. Administrators reported that lesson and unit objectives, and lesson components clearly connected to those objectives, might be clear and sequenced but unaligned to important academic standards, including the CCSS. Framework for 2014-15: Language was added to explicitly reference standards-aligned, grade-level appropriate instruction. Rationale: The inclusion of standards-aligned, grade-level appropriate language makes it clear that all instruction should be CCSS- (or state standards) aligned, ensuring that objectives and components are always rooted in what’s most important for students to learn.

LINKAGES TO PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT The Framework for Effective Teaching also serves as the basis for teachers’ professional development in NPS by providing a common language through which all teachers can assess their own teaching and identify areas where they can improve, to ensure student mastery. Much like great teachers differentiate instruction for their students, principals and administrators should do the same for their teachers by providing individual feedback and support to help teachers reflect on their instruction and perfect their craft. Administrators should: Discuss and collaboratively plan the teacher’s professional development plan for the year, focusing on growth areas aligned to the Framework and grounded in student learning goals. Hold regular conversations, grounded in the Framework, to discuss and reflect on strengths and growth areas as well as assess progress towards student goals. Provide timely, honest, accurate, specific, and actionable feedback tailored to individual growth areas and student outcomes. Provide time for teachers to meet in teams to collaboratively plan for continuous improvement. Differentiate professional development and support based on each educator’s needs. Professional development can take many forms, including but not limited to formal training, mentoring, coaching, modeling, observing an effective teacher, co-planning, and collaboratively reviewing student work and data. Administrators and teachers should together identify the content and format that best meets each educator’s needs. With the implementation of the Framework for Effective Teaching, NPS is committed to ensuring that teachers are supported to improve their instruction and ensure mastery with all students. 14

TEACHER EVALUATION IN NEWARK PUBLIC SCHOOLS, 2014-15 Building on the solid foundation of the Framework for Effective Teaching and following state regulations that reinforce best practice in teacher evaluation, this section outlines the process for teacher evaluation in NPS for the 2014-15 school year. First we provide a brief overview of how the Framework is applied to evaluation. We then describe in detail the components of evaluation—some required, others recommended—for this school year.

APPLICATION OF THE FRAMEWORK

Our evaluation system examines teachers’ mastery of the Framework in several different ways, so that evaluations paint a complete picture of every teacher’s success. To that end, we focus on tangible actions or outcomes that can be seen and/or measured – through classroom observations, student work product, or student learning data. Specifically, as is shown in the graphic above: We consider what can be observed. This includes classroom observations, team meetings, interactions with students, and so on. We consider what can be seen in artifacts. This includes examining examples of the teachers’ and students’ work, such as unit or lesson plans, student work portfolios, planning tools, etc. We consider what can be seen through quantitative data, such as students’ progress on learning goals set at the beginning of the year, interim assessments, standardized tests, etc. Principals and observers use what they have seen through all of these lenses to assign each teacher a score in each Competency, which leads to a single overall evaluation rating. However, evaluation is about much more than just a rating. We believe that the evaluation process is a tool that helps teachers grow at every stage of their careers so that together we can achieve our goal of college and career readiness for every NPS student.

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OVERVIEW OF EVALUATION COMPONENTS The Framework for Effective Teaching allows educators to assess a wide variety of evidence in determining whether or not a teacher is meeting expectations and if his or her students have met their student learning goals. This means that observations are not the only mechanism by which observers can collect evidence of these Indicators. Indeed, student learning data, student work, and other artifacts of the teacher’s practice allow administrators and the teacher to have a more complete picture of the teacher’s effectiveness across all five Competencies. These different sources of evidence can inform the four major components of the arc of teacher evaluation: Goal-Setting Conference to develop student learning goals and professional development goals which are captured on the Individual Professional Development Plans or Corrective Action Plans; Classroom observations, including potentially pre- and post-observation conferences; Mid-year conferences to examine evidence and data to assess progress towards student learning and professional development goals; and Annual conferences to examine all evidence and assign final ratings on each of the five Competencies. Each of these activities is described in greater detail below. Please also refer to Appendix E for an overview of the suggested timeline for this work. Goal-Setting Conferences / Individual Professional Development Plans / Corrective Action Plans Teachers and administrators should start the yearly evaluation process with a goal-setting conference which will focus on setting both specific student learning goals (sometimes called Student Growth Objectives or SGOs) and professional development goals for the teacher.

In this meeting, administrators and teachers will determine which student learning goals they would like to achieve during the school year and how progress towards those goals will be measured. In order to set appropriate student learning goals, administrators and teachers should review the areas of focus for each of the teacher’s classes or groups of students, aligned to the standards and/or curricular objectives for each group. The Curriculum Office has developed guidance documents to support the development of student learning goals—in particular, there are K-12 instructional plans for teachers of English/Language Art sand Mathematics. These resources call out critical areas of focus by grade level and subject area as well as recommendations around tools to be leveraged as you assess student progress. These guidance documents can be found on the Instructional Resource Center (IRC) here: https://sites.google.com/a/nps.k12. nj.us/success/ipdp. Reference both IPDP and other available curricular guidance as you set goals for the year. Administrators and teachers should then discuss and agree on what students will be able to demonstrate at the end of the school year in order to show progress toward mastery of the focus area. Administrators and teachers should also discuss strategies and tools to track student progress toward the goal. In addition to student learning goals, administrators will also support teachers in crafting and finalizing their professional development goals, including plans and strategies for meeting those goals. The goals identified in this conversation are not the only areas on which the teacher should focus for the year but represent high leverage areas on which the teacher can improve to drive student learning. Both the student learning and professional development goals are captured in the teacher’s Individualized Professional Development Plan (IPDP) or Corrective Action Plan (CAP). Teachers

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must initiate the IPDP or CAP forms online in the BloomBoard system and share them with their administrator.1 IPDPs are for all teachers who received an Effective or Highly Effective on their Annual Summative rating in the 2013-14 school year or who are new to the district in 2014-15. IPDPs should be completed in BloomBoard and be on file at the school site by October 15th. CAPS replace the IPDP for those teachers who received a rating of Ineffective or Partially Effective on their Annual Summative rating for the 2013-14 school year. The content of the CAP related to goals closely resembles the content of the IPDP but is more robust to ensure struggling teachers receive the necessary support for their growth. CAPs must be completed and on file with their administrator by October 15th. By completing the IPDP or CAP during the goal-setting conference at the start of the year, teachers and administrators will have a shared tool to use in communicating about goals and anticipating growth areas. The IPDP or CAP will serve as a reference document for other evaluation conferences, feedback discussions, and professional development throughout the year. Classroom Observations Classroom observations require the identification of specific, tangible evidence related to actual teacher practice and student outcomes. Comparing data to objective benchmarks in the rubric allows both the teacher and the observer to make evidence-based judgments about the level of quality of instruction. This section describes the observation process, including activities in the following areas: 1) pre-observation conferences; 2) minimum requirements for observations; 3) short observations; 4) long observations; and 5) post-observation conferences.

Pre-Observation Conference (required for at least one observation) Announced observations may start with a pre-observation conference; at least one announced observation each year must have a pre-conference.2 The pre-observation conference should occur within the seven days before an observation. During this conference, the teacher and observer discuss the planned lesson, including lesson objectives, instructional strategies, anticipated outcomes, assessments such as quizzes and tests, resources, unique class characteristics, specific areas of growth to look for, etc. During this pre-observation conference, the observer can ask guiding questions to help the teacher consider the planned learning experience or suggest possible alternatives to enhance the lesson before it is delivered. Teachers may upload artifacts such as their lesson plan in the BloomBoard system prior to the preobservation conference. Questions to answer in a pre-observation conference could include: Is the teacher clear on what students should know and be able to do by the end of the class? Are the strategies and objectives aligned to the standards? Are the strategies the teacher is planning to use likely to ensure student mastery? How will the teacher know whether the students mastered the content? Has the teacher considered all students in the planning? Is there anything in particular the teacher would like feedback on as part of the observation?

1 2

N.J.A.C §§ 6A:9-3.3, 15.4 and § 6A:10-2.5. N.J.A.C. §§ 6A:10-2.2, 2.3, and 4.4.

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Minimum requirements for observations Observers are encouraged to observe teachers in the classroom as often as they think is helpful for the purposes of both providing feedback for the teacher’s development and collecting evidence to assign ratings at the mid-year review and annual evaluation. The frequency of observations may vary depending on the teacher’s development needs and the availability of sufficient evidence. However, the state does require certain activities around observations. Specifically, according to the New Jersey Administrative Code,3 Number of Observations: All teachers must have three observations; teachers on a CAP must have one additional observation for a total of four observations. Length of Observation: The state requires different length observations – “long” and “short” – depending on tenure status and years of experience in the district. Long observations are observations that are at least 40 minutes in length. Short observations are observations that are at least 20 minutes in length (i.e., 20-39 minutes). o Each non-tenured teacher in their first or second year of teaching must have at least two long observations and at least one short observation. o Each non-tenured teacher in their third or fourth year of teaching must have at least one long observation and at least two short observations. o Each tenured teacher must have at least three short observations. (These short observations may be replaced by long observations.) Announced and Unannounced Observations: Both long and short observations may be either announced (scheduled in advance with the teacher) or unannounced (not scheduled in advance). However, all teachers are required to have at least one unannounced and one announced observation. o Announced observations should have a pre-observation conference within seven teaching staff member working days of the observation. Co-Observations: Certain teachers are required to have more than one observer evaluate their practice. Co-observations might mean two administrators observing two separate lessons or observing the same lesson and providing two separate write-ups. Specifically: o All non-tenured teachers must be observed by at least two different observers over the course of the year. o Tenured teachers on a CAP should be observed by at least two different observers over the course of the year. Post-Observations: All observations must be followed by a post-observation conference within 10 calendar days. (The 10 days may be extended by the number of days that either party is absent.) Timing of Observations: All teachers must be observed at least once in each semester. Short Observations (required) Short observations are observations that are at least 20 (but less than 40) minutes in length, where the observer captures evidence of Indicators on the Framework for Effective Teaching. Short observations can serve as a complement to the long observation by increasing the frequency in which observers are in a given teacher’s classroom and supporting ongoing dialogue between teachers and observers.

3

N.J.A.C. §§ 6A:10-1.2, 2.2, 2.3 and 4.4.

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Outlined below is the number of short observations for tenured and non-tenured teachers, as required under the New Jersey Administrative Code4: Status of Teacher Non-tenured teachers in their 1st or 2nd year of teaching Non-tenured teachers in their 3rd and 4th year of teaching Tenured teachers with a CAP Tenured teachers

Short Observation Requirements Must have at least 1 Must have at least 2 Must have at least 2 (but can be replaced by long observations) Should have at least 3 (but can replaced by long observations)

Short observations may either be announced or unannounced. There is no limit to the number of short observations that can occur over the course of the year; observers may conduct as many as is necessary or helpful. During the observation, the observer should collect low-inference evidence. Low-inference evidence includes the exact teacher and student actions you see during the observation. These actions should be recorded without interpretation or assumption. After the observation, the observer should complete the short observation summary and ratings form in the BloomBoard online system, assigning evidence to the specific Indicators and Competencies as available. Before assigning a performance level to a Competency, it is critical to compare the objective observations with the Indicators stated in the rubric. As with all evaluation systems, there is some degree of judgment involved. However, the focus on evidence makes the system objective. Decisions regarding the designation of a performance rating for components as well as the overall lesson assessment need to be based on the data and evidence gathered during the lesson. The best quality judgments are based on actually observed classroom events, teacher and student statements and behaviors, teacher work, and student work. Short observations allow the administrator to focus on evaluating Competencies that are most relevant to the teacher’s growth and development or the areas where they find a preponderance of evidence based on the portion of the lesson that was observed. Unlike a long observation, an observer does not need to rate every Competency after a short observation. The observer may rate more than one Competency if he or she wishes. Indicator ratings may also be provided for Indicators for which the observer has a preponderance of evidence. Observers should then provide an overall rating for the short observation based on the preponderance of evidence for at least one Competency. The observer should share this summary with the teacher through BloomBoard and discuss during a post-observation conference. If necessary, the observer can update the form in BloomBoard and share a final version with the teacher in the system after the post-observation conference. The observer should then indicate in the system that the meeting has taken place, the content of the final plan was discussed, and a signature was obtained for the teacher. A copy of the short observation summary should be shared with the teacher through BloomBoard following both announced and unannounced short observations.

4

N.J.A.C. § 6A:10-4.4.

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Long Observations (Required for non-tenured teachers and teachers with CAPs) A long observation is an observation that is at least 40 minutes in length or the length of an entire lesson (whichever is shorter) where the observer gathers evidence of Indicators on the Framework. Outlined below is the number of long observations for tenured and non-tenured teachers and teachers with CAPs, as required under the New Jersey Administrative Code5: Status of Teacher

Long Observation Requirements Must have at least 2 Must have at least 1 Must have at least 2 No minimum requirement; but observers can replace short observations with long observations

Non-tenured teachers in their 1st or 2nd year of teaching Non-tenured teachers in their 3rd or 4th year of teaching Teachers with a Corrective Action Plan All other tenured teachers

Long observations may either be announced or unannounced. At least one long observation should be announced and preceded by a pre-observation conference within seven teacher staff member working days of the observation. There is no limit to the number of long observations; observers may conduct as many as is necessary or helpful. During the observation, the observer should record low-inference evidence. After the long observation, the observer must complete the long observation summary in the BloomBoard system, including rating each of the first four Competencies of the Framework. Space is provided for the observer to record evidence-based strengths and growth areas for each Competency. Similar to the short observation, it is critical to compare the objective observations with the Indicators stated in the rubric before assigning any ratings. As with all evaluation systems, there is some degree of judgment involved. However, the focus on evidence makes the system objective. Decisions regarding the designation of a performance rating for components, as well as the overall lesson assessment, need to be based on the data and evidence gathered during the lesson. The best quality judgments are based on actually observed classroom events, teacher and student statements and behaviors, and student work. After a long observation, the observer chooses a performance level for each Competency based on a preponderance of low-inference evidence collected in that lesson. Observers may choose to report ratings for specific Indicators as well. Each Competency performance level has a corresponding numerical score: Competency Rating Highly Effective Effective Partially Effective Ineffective

5

Points 4 3 2 1

N.J.A.C. § 6A:10-4.4.

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Competencies 1, 2, 3 and 4 are all weighted equally for observations. To determine the overall rating for a long observation, the system will add up the scores for each of the four Competencies. This total (a number between 4 and 16) dictates the long observation rating: Observation Rating Highly Effective Effective Partially Effective Ineffective

Total Score 15-16 points 11-14 points 6-10 points 4-5 points

The observer should then share this summary with the teacher through BloomBoard and discuss during a post-observation conference. If necessary, the observer can update the form in BloomBoard after the post-observation conference and share a final version with the teacher in the system. The observer should then indicate in the system that the meeting has taken place, the content of the final plan was discussed, and a signature was obtained for the teacher. A copy of the long observation summary must be shared with the teacher through BloomBoard following both announced and unannounced long observations.

Post-Observation Conference (Required) Following an observation—whether long or short, announced or unannounced—the observer must meet with the teacher to reflect on the lesson together.6 This reflection process provides opportunity for dialogue around professional growth, refinement of instruction, and continuous improvement. The post-observation conference must take place within 10 calendar days after the observation (though it is recommended within 3 days of the lesson in order to provide timely feedback). To guide this process of reflection and collaborative analysis, the teacher is encouraged to record their reflections in BloomBoard in preparation for the post-observation conference between the teacher and the administrator. Teachers may choose whether to share this written copy of their reflections with the administrator. These reflections may form the basis for the post-observation conference, and the administrator may record teacher responses as part of the process to collect evidence of teacher reflection. At the post-observation conference, the teacher and administrator review all evidence and final Competency ratings to be assigned by the administrator. This teacher reflection should serve as the impetus for the refinement of future planning and the delivery of effective instructional practices. This may involve selecting additional strategies or approaches to refine the lesson, implementing additional resources to enrich the learning experience, and/or establishing a direction for professional growth and development. The administrator and teacher should review the teacher’s IPDP during this conference and make adjustments to it based on the outcome of the observation. This review is required for teachers with CAPs, and has a dedicated section on the Observation Summary Form.7 The teacher must sign the observation summary form, indicating that he or she has reviewed the ratings. (The teacher’s signature indicates that the teacher has received and had an opportunity to 6 7

N.J.A.C. § 6A:10-4.4. N.J.A.C. § 6A:10-2.5.

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read the summary, not agreement with the ratings.) A signed observation summary must be kept on file at the school by the principal; the teacher may also request a signed hard copy at that meeting. The administrator should then indicate in the online BloomBoard system that the observation is complete and signatures have been obtained. The New Jersey Administrative Code permits post-observation conferences for tenured teachers rated Effective or Highly Effective at the end of the 2013-14 school year to be informal.8 This means that feedback may be shared with the teacher in writing, including over email or through BloomBoard, rather than in a formal meeting. This is only permissible with consent from the teacher. The teacher should still sign a hard copy of the form, indicating they have seen the content of the form. Mid-Year Review Conference (Strongly recommended for all; required for teachers on a Corrective Action Plan) The mid-year review is an opportunity for the administrator and teacher to reflect on performance to date and discuss strategies and priorities for the remainder of the school year. At the mid-year review, the administrator and teacher should review progress toward student learning and teacher professional development goals and refine strategies and plans where needed in order to meet those goals by the end of the year. The administrator considers evidence gathered through all short and long observations completed to date, evidence of over-time Indicators, and evidence of progress towards student learning goals. Based on this evidence, the administrator assigns a performance level to all Competencies (1-5), focusing on Competencies that are most critical in order for the teacher to meet his/her goals. A performance rating is calculated based on the teacher’s performance on each of the five Competencies, which indicates which rating the teacher is on track to receive at the end of the school year. Although only teachers on CAPs are required to have mid-year reviews, they are strongly recommended for all teachers.9

The mid-year review conference is an opportunity for the administrator and the teacher to discuss the teacher's progress toward student and professional goals set at the start of the school year. We recommend that all mid-year conferences take place by mid-February; for teachers on a CAP, it is required that a mid-year conference take place by February 15th. Using the Framework for Effective Teaching, the mid-year review conference is an opportunity for the administrator to identify strengths, provide encouragement, and share suggestions for improvement based on evidence collected throughout the year. The conference also provides an opportunity to review and/or modify the teacher’s IPDP or CAP. The mid-year rating is a formative rating, rather than summative, and indicates the rating that the teacher is on track to receive at the end of the school year. The mid-year rating serves as one piece of evidence for the annual review rating and is an important element of formative feedback for the teacher. If a mid-year review conference takes place, the teacher should sign the mid-year review form. The teacher’s signature indicates that the teacher has received and had an opportunity to read the summary, but does not indicate agreement with the ratings.) At the mid-year review, the administrator should consider all evidence collected during the entire school year through long and short observations, progress towards student learning goals,

8 9

N.J.A.C. § 6A:10-4.4(b)(3). N.J.A.C. §§ 6A:10-2.2 and 2.5.

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conferences, and other interactions with the teacher. To determine an overall rating for both the midyear review and annual evaluation, the administrator: Selects a performance level for each of the Competencies 1-5: o Reviews the descriptor language of each Indicator, and o Reviews the preponderance of evidence (observations, artifacts, and quantitative data) for both in-one-lesson and over-time Indicators for each competency o For the over-time Indicators in Competency 4, an administrator should utilize the evidence specifically around the teachers’ progress in meeting student learning goals in the teacher’s IPDP or CAP. o Selects the performance level (Highly Effective, Effective, Partially Effective, Ineffective) for each Indicator that best describes the available low-inference evidence. o Reflects on these Indicator ratings to select a performance level for each Competency Adds the scores for Competencies 1-5 to arrive at an overall score between 0 and 19. At the mid-year and annual review, the scoring calculation is slightly different than that used for classroom observations. The ratings for Competencies 1-3 are the same: Points for Competencies 1, 2 & 3 4 Highly Effective 3 Effective 2 Partially Effective 1 Ineffective

This year, Competency 4, with its focus on student progress toward mastery, has a greater weight for a teacher’s overall mid-year and annual summative rating. The points for Competency 4 are: Points for Competency 4 Highly Effective Effective Partially Effective Ineffective

6 5 2 1

For Competency 5, the points will remain on the same scale as last year – from (-6) points to 1 point. This point range means that a teacher whose performance is Slightly Below Expectations for Competency 5 cannot be rated higher than Effective. A teacher whose performance is Significantly Below Expectations in Competency 5 cannot be rated higher than Partially Effective. Points for Competency 5 Exceeds Expectations Meeting Expectations Slightly Below Expectations Significantly Below Expectations

1 0 (-2) (-6)

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The teacher’s overall rating is then determined based on the following range of scores: Overall Rating Highly Effective Effective Partially Effective Ineffective

Total Score (Competencies 1-5) 17-19 points 13-16 points 8-12 points 0 to 7 points10

Annual Evaluation (Required) A summative performance review must be completed for each teacher on an annual basis. 11 This evaluation is a summative statement which incorporates the data and evidence gathered throughout the year. At the annual evaluation, the administrator completes a final assessment of progress towards both the teacher’s professional goals and the student learning goals that were set at the start of the school year. The administrator considers evidence gathered through all short and long observations completed during the year, as well as evidence of over-time Indicators.

For all non-tenured teachers, annual evaluations should be completed by April 15 th. (The required state deadline is April 30th.) For tenured teachers on a CAP, annual evaluations should be completed by May 15 th. (The required state deadline is the end of the school year.) For tenured teachers who have an IPDP, annual evaluations should be completed by June 15th. (The required state deadline is the end of the school year.) The annual evaluation summary form should be completed in BloomBoard by the administrator and shared with the teacher. Based on this evidence, the administrator assigns a performance level to Competencies 1-5, specifically reflecting on the teacher’s progress on their student learning goals in Competency 4. The final summative rating is calculated based on the teacher’s performance on all of the five Competencies. The scoring and evidence-based review process is the same as described above for the mid-year review. The teacher and administrator should then meet for an annual conference. At this conference, the teacher and the administrator will: Discuss the teacher’s overall performance and evidence-based ratings Review the teacher’s IPDP or CAP to: o Discuss the final assessment of progress towards student learning goals o Review progress made on the professional goals set at the beginning of the year, and his or her overall professional growth o Identify growth areas for focus during the next school year The administrator will then revise (if necessary) or complete the Annual Evaluation based on this conference. The teacher and administrator will sign off on the final Annual Evaluation.

10 11

Note that it is possible to score a -1 or -2 on the total evaluation score; in these cases, the score is rounded up to 0. N.J.A.C. § 6A:10-2.4

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BLOOMBOARD: CAPTURING AND SHARING THE EVALUATION PROCESS ONLINE

To ensure teachers are active participants in the evaluation process and have full access to their evaluation information throughout the school year, NPS is continuing its partnership with BloomBoard Inc. The BloomBoard system (located at: https://apps.bloomboard.com).provides a performance evaluation and professional development management platform that captures all required components of the teacher evaluation process. Every school administrator and every teacher in the district is provided with their own BloomBoard account. Specifically, teachers are expected to utilize the BloomBoard system to: Create their Individualized Professional Development Plan or Corrective Action Plan. All teachers must complete the IPDP or CAP directly in the system once the goal-setting conference has been scheduled by their administrator. Teachers are also responsible for sharing their plan through the system with their administrator prior to finalizing it. Log in to their accounts on a regular basis to review evaluation materials. Because all final documentation from observations, mid-year reviews, and annual evaluations will be shared with the teacher within the system, including electronic copies of the summary forms and ratings, teachers should log in regularly to view this information. Teachers should access the system to review this information at the conclusion of each evaluation activity throughout the school year. Review and sign-off on final documentation of all events captured in the system. The paper copies and physical signatures will remain the official record of all evaluation activities as in previous years. However, we also encourage teacher to indicate their review of these materials through the system itself by applying their electronic signature at the conclusion of an evaluation event. More guidance and step-by-step instructions for utilizing the system to fulfill these expectations are available on the Evaluation Resources section of the NPS website here: http://www.nps.k12.nj.us/evaluation-resources/bloomboard-resources/. In addition to maintaining records of all teacher evaluation activities, BloomBoard also provides teachers with an extensive library, or “Marketplace”, of professional development resources. The Marketplace can be accessed directly through the teacher’s home screen, and resources can be found by searching for different skills or topics. Teachers should work with their administrator to determine which resources are most useful for their own growth. In addition to the guidance and instructions that NPS makes available throughout the year, teachers and administrators may continue to contact the BloomBoard Help Desk at any time for technical support on the system. The Help Desk may be reached at [email protected] or 888-4181595.

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ENSURING A FAIR AND VALID EVALUATION The district is committed to ensuring that teachers receive an accurate, fair, and unbiased evaluation. To this end, we have created formal processes to ensure equity in the evaluation process including: 1) Peer Validators; 2) a district Peer Oversight Committee; 3) School Improvement Panels at each school site; and 4) a rebuttal process. Peer Validators Peer Validators provide an opportunity for independent peer review and support. Peer Validators may include current teachers, former teachers, administrators from NPS or other school systems, academics, or other outside experts. Peer Validators may provide additional observations for teachers of all performance levels, but with a focus on teachers in danger of receiving an Ineffective rating, and suggest areas and techniques to improve teacher practice based on their observations. The Superintendent consults with the NTU President on candidates for Peer Validators, but the Superintendent retains ultimate authority over the selection criteria, selection process, and management of Peer Validators. Peer Oversight Committee The Peer Oversight Committee is a consultative body whose primary responsibility is to advise on the implementation of the peer validation process and evaluation system and make suggestions for improvement. The POC, comprised of five representatives of NTU and five representatives of NPS, meets quarterly. The POC should be apprised where specific schools have particularly high or low ratings as compared to other schools in NPS and may request that Peer Validators validate ratings of teachers at specific sites. School Improvement Panels In alignment with New Jersey Administrative Code, each school will have a School Improvement Panel (SIP) to provide input into the implementation of the teacher evaluation and teacher development at their school.12 SIPs should consist of the school principal or his/her designee (i.e., someone serving in a supervisory capacity), a vice principal (or another administrator if the school does not have a vice principal), and a teacher with a demonstrated record of effectiveness. The principal or his/her designee is the Chair of the SIP. The principal may appoint additional members, as long as teachers make up at least one-third of the total representation. Teacher members must remain on the SIP for at least one academic year but no more than three.

The SIP should meet at least once a semester. At the start of the academic year, the SIP should establish goals related to its duties to guide its work throughout the year. Throughout the year, SIP should consult and advise on the school’s implementation of teacher evaluation and development, including mentoring, professional development opportunities, and evaluation processes (e.g. midyear reviews, annual evaluations, and peer validation requests.) Rebuttals A teacher who feels that their rating does not accurately reflect their performance may submit an official rebuttal for their evaluation within 10 working days of receiving the rating. Rebuttals should be submitted to [email protected] In the rebuttal, teachers should provide detailed evidence as to why the rating does not reflect their practice. The Assistant Superintendent or his/her designee 12

N.J.S.A. 18A:6-120; N.J.A.C. §§ 6A:10-2.4(b), 2.5(j), 3.1, and 3.2.

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may review the rebuttal letter, mid-year evaluation, or annual rating, and supporting documents and if the rating is inconsistent with the documentation. The Assistant Superintendent may, in his/her sole discretion, change the overall evaluation rating after reviewing the documentation with the principal .

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APPENDIX A: NEWARK PUBLIC SCHOOLS’ FRAMEWORK FOR EFFECTIVE TEACHING 2014-2015 1. Lesson Design and Focus Students sustain focus on a specific, standards-aligned objective that moves them toward mastery. Highly Effective Effective Partially Effective Students communicate how lesson Teacher connects lesson to all of Teacher connects lesson to at connects to previous learning, unit the following: previous learning, least one of the following: objectives, and long-term goals. unit objectives, and long-term previous learning, unit objectives, goals. or long-term goals.

Ineffective Teacher does not or only partly connects lesson to previous learning, unit objectives, or longterm goals.

1b. Lesson Components Lesson components are standardsaligned and move students toward mastery of an objective that is aligned to essential understandings in the standards.

All/nearly all lesson components are organized and delivered to move students toward mastery of the objective.

Most of the lesson components are organized and delivered to move students toward mastery of the objective.

Some lesson components are aligned to the objective and are organized to move students toward mastery of the objective.

Lesson components are not aligned to the objective and do not move students toward mastery of the objective.

1c. Pacing and Momentum Teacher maximizes learning time.

All/nearly all students work productively to maximize their learning. Teacher spends appropriate amount of time on each component of the lesson. Lesson has a clear structure, and all/nearly all students know what they should be doing.

Most students work productively to maximize their learning. Teacher spends appropriate amount of time on each component of the lesson. Lesson has a clear structure, and most students know what they should be doing.

Teacher spends too much or too little time on one component. Structure may be inconsistent or some students are left without clear understanding of what to do.

Overall lesson pace is too slow or too fast or students may sit idle with no clear understanding of what to do.

1d. Clarity Teacher clearly and accurately communicates content and instructions.

Content and instructions are communicated clearly and accurately in a way that anticipates student misconceptions.

Content and instructions are communicated clearly and accurately.

Content and instructions are sometimes unclear or inaccurate.

Content and instructions are unclear or inaccurate.

In one lesson… 1a. Lesson Sequence Individual, standards-aligned lessons build on previous lessons and on students’ prior knowledge.

Over the course of the year… 1e. Coherent Planning: Lesson plans are standards-based, grade-level appropriate and reflect work toward annual student achievement goals.

Always

Frequently

Sometimes

Rarely

1f. Progression of Instruction: Lesson objectives fit into a larger, coherent sequence that leads to student mastery of the appropriate standards.

Always

Frequently

Sometimes

Rarely

Overall Rating based on preponderance of evidence

Highly Effective

Effective

Partially Effective

Ineffective

4

3

2

1

A1

2. Rigor and Inclusiveness In one lesson… 2a. Tailored Instruction Teacher tailors instruction to move all students toward mastery. 2b. Questions & Tasks Questions and tasks ensure student comprehension and ask for application, analysis and/or synthesis. 2c. Responsiveness Teacher anticipates and responds to student reactions and misunderstandings by adjusting instructional strategies.

2d. Precision & Evidence Teacher and students require precision and evidence in tasks and responses.

Instructional strategies challenge all students and provide multiple pathways to mastery. Highly Effective Effective Partially Effective Teacher consistently tailors Teacher often tailors strategies Teacher sometimes tailors strategies that reflect knowledge that reflect knowledge of students strategies that reflect knowledge of of students and lead to mastery and lead to mastery for most students. Some strategies lead to for all/nearly all students. students. mastery for some students.

Ineffective Teacher does not tailor strategies or strategies do not lead to student mastery.

Questions and tasks consistently ensure student comprehension as well as application, analysis and synthesis.

Questions and tasks often ensure student comprehension as well some application, analysis and synthesis.

Questions and tasks promote student comprehension and minimal or inconsistent application, analysis and synthesis.

Questions and tasks are not challenging or teacher does not ask any questions.

Teacher has anticipated student reactions and misunderstanding(s) as evidenced by effective instructional strategies and immediate adjustments when misunderstandings occur. Adjustments effectively reach all/nearly all students.

Teacher quickly recognizes misunderstanding(s) and employs alternative strategies to reach most students. Adjustments effectively reach most students.

Teacher sometimes recognizes student misunderstanding(s) and adjusts instructional strategy. Adjustments are somewhat effective.

Teacher does not recognize misunderstanding or rarely adjusts instructional strategies based on student reactions.

Teacher and students provide, and demand of each other, wellstructured arguments, rationale and evidence in their responses. Students use evidence to selfcorrect.

Teacher demands students provide well-structured arguments, rationale and evidence in their responses.

Teacher sometimes demands supporting evidence or precision from students.

Teacher does not correct inaccurate responses or does not demand supporting evidence from students.

Over the course of the year… 2e. Revisions: Student work includes revisions based on teacher and peer feedback, especially revised explanations and justifications to demonstrate student movement toward mastery. 2f. Depth of Knowledge: Lesson objectives, tasks and materials require students to demonstrate the following skills: Recall & Reproduction: Recall of a fact, term, principle, or concept; perform a routine procedure; build on prior knowledge Basic Application of Concepts: Use of information and conceptual knowledge to select appropriate procedures for a task; identify two or more steps with decision points along the way; solve routine problems; organize/display information Strategic Thinking: Develop a plan or sequence of steps to approach an abstract, complex, or non-routine problem using reasoning, decision making and justification; show success in approaching problems with more than one possible answer Extended Thinking; Undertake an investigation or application to real world; requires time to research, problem solve, and process multiple conditions of the problem or task; requires non-routine manipulations across disciplines/content areas/multiple sources

Overall Rating based on preponderance of evidence

Always

Frequently

Sometimes

Rarely

Always

Frequently

Sometimes

Rarely

Highly Effective

Effective

Partially Effective

Ineffective

4

3

2

1

A2

3. Culture of Achievement In one lesson… 3a. Enthusiasm for Learning Students express satisfaction in solving problems and mastering new material.

3b. Persistence Students show persistence in confronting demanding concepts and tasks. 3c. Community Classroom norms promote positive and productive teacher-student and student-student relationships.

3d. Attention Teacher’s strategies and routines capture and maintain student attention on learning.

A learning-focused environment of shared high expectations promotes mastery. Highly Effective Effective Partially Effective All/nearly all students Most students consistently Some students demonstrate consistently demonstrate demonstrate enthusiasm about enthusiasm or students enthusiasm about solving solving problems and mastering infrequently demonstrate problems and mastering new new materials and are engaged in enthusiasm. Some students materials. They are passionate the tasks. appear indifferent or bored. about meeting the goal.

Ineffective Few students demonstrate enthusiasm or students rarely demonstrate enthusiasm. Most students appear indifferent or bored.

All/nearly all students persist in confronting demanding concepts and tasks to meet the objective without reliance on the teacher.

Most students persist in confronting demanding concepts and tasks to meet the objective without reliance on the teacher.

With the teacher’s assistance, students try to confront demanding concepts and tasks, yet not all students meet the objective.

Students do not attempt to confront demanding concepts and tasks and teacher does not provide strategies to overcome challenges.

Teacher and students consistently use positive, productive language and promote classroom values and norms.

Teacher and students often use positive, productive language and promote classroom values and norms.

Teacher sometimes uses positive, productive language. Classroom values and norms are inconsistently reinforced.

Teacher rarely uses positive, productive language or uses negative and unsupportive language. Classroom values and norms do not exist or are not reinforced.

All/nearly all students are on task throughout the lesson. Students do not engage in off task behavior, or rare off-task behavior is effectively redirected with no lost instructional time.

Most students are on task throughout the lesson. Occasional off-task behavior is effectively redirected so that little instructional time is lost.

Some students are on task through the lesson. Off-task behavior is inconsistently redirected resulting in some lost instructional time.

Few students are on task throughout the lesson. Off-task behavior is ineffectively redirected.

Over the course of the year… 3e. High Expectations: The teacher fosters a classroom culture that is consistently one of high expectations and hard work and the teacher models excellence. 3f. Peer Accountability: Students hold themselves and their peers accountable for learning and supporting the culture of the classroom. Overall Rating based on preponderance of evidence

Always

Frequently

Sometimes

Rarely

Always

Frequently

Sometimes

Rarely

Highly Effective

Effective

Partially Effective

Ineffective

4

3

2

1

A3

4. Student Progress Toward Mastery In one lesson… 4a. Checks for Understanding Teacher consistently checks for understanding.

4b. Feedback Teacher and students give and receive timely, specific, and constructive feedback.

4c. Demonstration of Learning Students know more at the end of the lesson than they did at the start.

Students show evidence of, and teacher monitors, growth. Highly Effective Effective Partially Effective Checks for understanding are Checks for understanding are Checks for understanding occur consistent, aligned to the objective completed throughout the lesson only sometimes or may not be and fully integrated into the and are aligned to the objective. aligned with the objective. Checks lesson. Teacher gathers varied Teacher gathers evidence from the provide incomplete evidence from evidence from the whole class and whole class and individual the whole class and individual individual students. Evidence students. Evidence gathered students. gathered provides a clear provides a clear understanding of understanding of all/nearly all most students’ level of students’ level of comprehension. comprehension.

Ineffective Checks for understanding are not used or are not aligned to the lesson objective. Checks provide limited or no evidence to assess progress.

Teacher feedback is academically focused, appropriate, and specific, tailored to the learning needs of each student, and allows for independent corrections and improvements. Students give feedback to one another.

Most teacher feedback is academically focused, appropriate, and specific, tailored to the learning needs of each student, and allows for independent corrections and improvements.

Teacher feedback is academically focused and appropriate, but is not tailored to the unique needs of each student or is often teacherdirected.

Teacher feedback, if it exists, is not academically focused and not tailored to the students. Feedback may be inappropriate.

All/nearly all students consistently master the objective that moves them toward grade-level standards. Students can explain why the objective is important.

Most students master the objective that moves them to grade-level standards.

Some students master the objective or master some of the objective. Objective may be unclear, too broad, or not measurable.

There is inconsistent or no evidence that students master the objective. There is no clear and measurable objective.

Over the course of the year… 4d. Using Data: Teacher tracks assessment data to understand each student’s progress toward mastery and uses results to guide planning and instruction. 4e. Understanding of Growth: Teacher can articulate specifically (and with evidence) whether or not each student has internalized grade-level standards and, if not, what s/he still needs to learn. 4f. Progress Toward Goals: Data reflect that students are mastering the objectives of the focus areas, leading toward mastery of grade-level standards. Overall Rating based on preponderance of evidence

Always

Frequently

Sometimes

Rarely

Always

Frequently

Sometimes

Rarely

Always

Frequently

Sometimes

Rarely

Highly Effective

Effective

Partially Effective

Ineffective

4

3

2

1

A4

5. Commitment to Personal and Collective Excellence The teacher demonstrates commitment to excellence and to the professional growth of his/her school and peers. Over the course of the year… 5a. Commitment to Continuous Improvement: Teacher accurately self-assesses strengths and substantive growth areas, seeks and incorporates feedback from others, and pursues his or her own growth and development.

Exceeds Expectations

Meets Expectations

Slightly Below Expectations

Significantly Below Expectations

5b. Collaboration: Teacher contributes ideas and expertise to further colleagues’ and the school’s growth and incorporates productive insights into his or her own instruction.

Exceeds Expectations

Meets Expectations

Slightly Below Expectations

Significantly Below Expectations

5c. Communication of Student Progress: Teacher communicates student progress clearly and consistently to students, families, and school leaders.

Exceeds Expectations

Meets Expectations

Slightly Below Expectations

Significantly Below Expectations

5d. Attendance and Promptness: Teacher is present and prompt, and attendance reflects his or her focus on student learning as a priority.

Exceeds Expectations

Meets Expectations

Slightly Below Expectations

Significantly Below Expectations

Overall Rating based on preponderance of evidence

Exceeds Expectations (+1)

Meets Expectations (0)

Slightly Below Expectations (-2)

Significantly Below Expectations (-6)

A5

APPENDIX B: CHANGES TO THE FRAMEWORK FOR EFFECTIVE TEACHING FROM 2013-14 TO 2014-15 SCHOOL YEARS Indicator/Competency

1. Lesson Design and Focus

1a. Lesson Sequence

1b. Lesson Components

1e. Coherent Planning:

Level

13-14 Language 14-15 Language Changes to Clarify Focus of Standards-Aligned Lessons

Competency Language

Students sustain focus on a specific objective that moves them toward mastery.

Indicator Language

1a. Lesson Sequence Individual lesson builds on previous lessons and on students’ prior knowledge.

Indicator Language

1b. Lesson Components Lesson components move students toward mastery of an objective that is aligned to essential understandings in the standards.

Indicator Language

1e. Coherent Planning: Lesson plans are standards-based and reflect work toward annual student achievement goals.

Students sustain focus on a specific, standards-aligned objective that moves them toward mastery. 1a. Lesson Sequence Individual, standards-aligned lessons build on previous lessons and on students’ prior knowledge. 1b. Lesson Components Lesson components are standards-aligned and move students toward mastery of an objective that is aligned to essential understandings in the standards.

Rationale

The inclusion of standards-aligned, gradelevel appropriate language makes it clear that all instruction should be Common Core State Standards (or other state standards where relevant) aligned, ensuring that lesson objectives and components are always rooted in what is most important for students to learn.

1e. Coherent Planning: Lesson plans are standards-based, grade-level appropriate and reflect work toward annual student achievement goals.

A6

APPENDIX C: GLOSSARY OF TERMS Always The teacher’s actions result in this behavior or outcome being consistently demonstrated throughout the school year. This behavior is standard operating procedure in the teacher’s classroom or practice. Annual evaluation Annual evaluations are required by the New Jersey Administrative Code for all teachers.13 At the annual evaluation, the administrator and teacher complete a final assessment of progress towards both the teacher’s professional goals and the student learning goals that were set at the start of the school year. The administrator considers evidence gathered through all short and long observations completed during the year, as well as evidence of over-time Indicators. Based on this evidence, the administrator assigns a performance level to Competencies 1-5, specifically reflecting on the teacher’s progress on their student learning goals in Competency 4. The final summative rating is calculated based on the teacher’s performance on each of the five Competencies. BloomBoard Newark Public Schools has a partnership with BloomBoard Inc. to provide a performance evaluation and professional development management platform. BloomBoard is a web-based tool that allows schools to keep track of goal-setting documents, short and long observations, mid-years, over-time evidence and annual evaluations all in one place online. The system also has resources for a teacher’s professional development. Every teacher and school administrator in the district should have a BloomBoard account. Competency The five competencies in Framework for Effective Teaching outline the overall expectation of performance of each NPS teacher. Corrective Action Plan (CAP) A plan co-developed by the teacher and administrator, which provides specific goals and recommendations for areas of improvement to a teacher who has been rated Ineffective or Partially Effective on their annual summative evaluation rating in the prior year. The CAP shall include specific metrics for monitoring progress toward goals, timelines for corrective action, responsibilities of the individual teaching staff member and his/her administrator for implementing the plan, and specific support that the district shall provide. Some metrics could include: indicator ratings during classroom observations and mid-year evaluations; student feedback; and administrator or mentor review of lesson and unit plans. The administrator and teacher should check-in on progress in growth areas during each post-observation and evaluation conferences. In addition to these regular check-ins, they may decide to implement additional processes to monitor growth areas, like periodic meetings with the teacher, any mentor teachers, and the administrator. Effective An Effective teacher consistently meets the expectations set forth by the Framework. Effective teachers have a broad repertoire of strategies and activities to ensure students achieve mastery. Years of experience are not, in and of itself, an indicator of effectiveness. Exceeds Expectations The teacher consistently exceeds the baseline expectation for performance, going above and beyond what is required or expected. This rating is reserved for the exceptional teacher. Frequently The teacher’s actions result in this behavior being frequently demonstrated throughout the school year. Though there may be limited instances of conflicting evidence that demonstrate that this is not standard operating procedure in the teacher’s classroom or practice, this behavior is generally the norm.

13

N.J.A.C. § 6A:10-2.4.

A7

Goal-setting Conference All teachers should have a Goal‐Setting Conferences at the beginning of the school year in order to determine which student learning goals and professional development goals they would like to achieve during the school year and how progress towards those goals will be measured. The meeting allows administrators to support teachers in crafting and finalizing their professional development goals, including plans and strategies for meeting those goals. All goals are captured in the teacher’s Individual Professional Development Plan (IPDP) or Corrective Action Plan (CAP). Highly Effective A Highly Effective teacher is a teacher whose classroom operates at a qualitatively different level from those of other teachers. This teacher ensures exceptional rates of student growth. Such classrooms consist of a community of learners, with highly motivated and engaged students who assume considerable responsibility for their own learning. Highly Effective teachers have the knowledge, skills, and capacity to serve as models for other teachers. This performance level is reserved for teachers who are truly exceptional in their practice. Indicators Indicators are the foundation of the Framework for Effective Teaching and describe specific components or behaviors of each competency. For each of Competencies 1‐4, there are three or four in‐one‐lesson indicators and two or three over‐ time indicators. For Competency 5, there are four over‐time indicators. In‐one‐lesson indicators describe behaviors that should be observed in all lessons. Over‐time indicators describe behaviors that are observed over the course of the school year, but not necessarily in lessons. Individual Professional Development Plan (IPDP) The Individual Professional Development Plan is a tool to outline and track a teacher’s specific student learning and professional development goals. The student learning goals in the IPDP are co-developed by the teacher and administrator after examining student performance and establishing targets for teacher’s classes or group of students. The professional development goals in the IPDP are then developed by identifying growth areas that are linked to the Framework for Effective Teaching and aligned to the teacher’s student learning goals. IPDPs are discussed during Goal‐Setting Conferences at the start of the school year and serve as a living document that helps the teacher and his/her supervisor to continuously reflect and improve on their practice. Ineffective An Ineffective teacher is not meeting expectations for teaching in Newark Public Schools. There are several clear areas where the teacher must improve his or her practice to achieve effectiveness. In some instances, performance at the Ineffective level represents teaching that is below the licensing standard of "do no harm." Immediate improvement is required for teachers at the Ineffective level to remain in Newark Public Schools. Long observation Long observations are observations that are at least 40 minutes in length or a full class period (whatever is shorter). Long observations are required for non-tenured teachers and teachers on a CAP. Meets Expectations The teacher consistently meets the baseline expectations, as outlined in the Framework for Effective Teaching. Mid-year Review Conference The Mid‐Year Review Conference is an opportunity for the teacher and administrator to discuss the teacher's progress toward student, classroom, school, and district performance goals and the implementation and alignment of the Framework for Effective Teaching. It is strongly recommended for all teachers and required for teachers on a CAP. Partially Effective A Partially Effective teacher may meet some expectations articulated in the Framework, but either does not meet all expectations or is inconsistent in meeting these expectations. Typically, there are clear areas where the teacher might improve his or her practice to achieve effectiveness. Partially Effective performance should not be considered to be meeting expectations.

A8

Peer Validators Peer Validators provide an opportunity for independent peer review and support by conducting additional observations of teachers (with a focus on those in danger of receiving an Ineffective rating), suggesting areas and techniques to improve teacher practice and reviewing instances where specific schools have particularly high or low ratings as compared to other NPS schools. Peer Validators may include current teachers, former teachers, administrators from NPS or other school systems, academics, or other outside experts. Post-observation Conference Post-observation conferences are required to follow observations—whether long or short, announced or unannounced. The observer must meet with the teacher to reflect on the lesson together. This reflection process and collaborative analysis is the centerpiece of professional growth, refinement of instruction, and continuous improvement. This conference must be held within 10 teaching staff member working days after the observation (though it is recommended within 3 days of the lesson in order to provide timely feedback). Pre-observation Conference The pre-observation conference must precede at least one announced observation each year and should occur up to seven days before a long observation. The pre-observation conference provides the teacher and observer an opportunity to discuss the lesson that is to be observed including lesson objectives, instructional strategies, anticipated outcomes, assessments such as quizzes and tests, resources, unique class characteristics, specific areas of growth to look for, etc. Professional Development Goals Each teacher will co-develop with his/ her administrator a set of professional development goals that are specific to the teacher, will support teacher’s execution of the student learning goals, and be aligned to the Framework. Rarely The teacher’s actions do not result in demonstration of this behavior. Where there is evidence of this behavior, it is rare and inconsistent. Short observation Short observations are observations that are at least 20 (but less than 40) minutes in length. Significantly Below Expectations The teacher is not in compliance with the baseline expectation for performance, as outlined in the Framework for Effective Teaching. Slightly Below Expectations The teacher is inconsistent in meeting expectations in practice or frequency, as outlined in the Framework for Effective Teaching. Sometimes The teacher’s actions do not consistently result in the teacher or his or her students demonstrating this behavior throughout the school year. While there may be some evidence of this Indicator, it is not regular or consistent. Student Learning Goals Student Learning Goals are set at the beginning of the year during the Goal Setting Conferences. In order to set appropriate student learning goals, administrators and teachers should review the areas of focus for each of the teacher’s classes or groups of students, ensuring they are aligned to the standards and/or curricular objectives for each group. Administrators and teachers will identify the starting points for each group of students. They will then set a Student Learning Goal which is the agreed upon “end point” or goal for the students’ progress toward mastery of the focus area over the course of the year. Together, administrators and teachers will review curricular materials and resources that will support student progress towards goals, and will come to an agreement on what students will know (or be able to demonstrate) at the end of the school year.

A9

APPENDIX D: FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS Framework Details & Changes Why is there no option for “no evidence” on the Framework rubric? “No evidence” is not included as an option on the Framework rubric. Different elements of the evaluation system require different types of data to be formally reported and shared. Overall, though, observers are expected to provide ratings on Competencies and Indicators based on a preponderance of evidence. It is expected that all evidence of all Competencies can be captured during a long observation. During long observations, lack of evidence is actually negative evidence. For example, if the observer does not observe the teacher asking any questions, the observer should rate the teacher on Indicator 2b, Questions and Tasks, accordingly. In this instance, the absence of any questions from the teacher means the teacher receives an Ineffective rating on this Indicator. However, during short observations teachers may genuinely not have had the opportunity to demonstrate his or her performance in a particular Indicator or Competency. In these instances, the observer will determine if the lack of evidence is negative evidence or if there was no opportunity for the teacher to provide evidence. Observers are responsible for collecting sufficient evidence to rate on each element at the appropriate times, and are expected to collect sufficient evidence by the mid-year and annual review points to provide ratings on each Competency and (at the annual review) each Indicator. In long observations and at the mid-year and annual conferences, observers are expected to be able to collect enough evidence to rate each Competency based on that evidence. In short observations (2039 minutes), observers are not required to rate every Competency, but should collect enough evidence to provide a rating for at least one Competency. Where does the Framework address planning and preparation? All good instruction begins with solid planning. The Framework contains Competencies that explicitly outline the observable elements of planning, most notably in Competency 1: Lesson Design & Focus. Where does the Framework address classroom management? Effective classroom management is an inherent component of responsive and engaging instruction focused on student mastery. Therefore our Competencies do not call out classroom management as a separate Indicator; teachers have varied strategies and methods that ensure a learning-focused environment. Elements of classroom management are implicit throughout the tool, but are most apparent in Competency 3: Culture of Achievement. Where does the Framework address the teachers’ management of physical space? Maintaining a clean and orderly classroom is a baseline expectation for teacher performance. If a teacher’s classroom is not orderly and somewhat clean, it is unlikely that s/he is meeting other expectations outlined in the Framework. While physical space is not explicit in the Framework, planning (as assessed in Competency 1) should include how the teacher leverages and maintains physical space to support their lesson design and focus. The physical space should also mirror the teacher’s goals for his or her students, both in terms of learning goals and in expectations of their performance (Competency 3). What does all/nearly all, most, some, few mean? “All/nearly all” students means all students in the classroom with the exception of one or two students who may be having a bad day or not performing at their potential. Teachers should be sure that it is not the same student who is not performing at any given time. “Most” students means the majority of students in the classroom. “Some” students means half or less than half of the students in the classroom. “Few” students means few, if any, students in the classroom. How will the evaluation system address differences in classes for special education students? The Framework for Effective Teaching describes what the essential components of effective teaching should look like in every classroom, including classrooms of students with disabilities.

A10

Goal-Setting, IPDPs & CAPs What are student learning goals? A student learning goal is a long-term objective on which the teacher will focus for his/her classes or groups of students. Each objective or focus area should be a skill or behavior critical to the students’ success in the course and be aligned to the standards and/or curricular objectives. The goals should measurable and based on available student learning data. How are student learning goals set? Teachers and administrators start the yearly evaluation process with a goal-setting conference where they review both student performance and teacher performance from the previous school year. The administrator and teacher begin the goal-setting process by identifying areas of focus, examining student performance in those areas, and establishing what the students need to know and be able to do by the end of the year to master the standards. Together, the teacher and administrator determine which assessment tools will be employed by the teacher to track their students’ progress. Finally, the administrator and teacher will identify what additional resources the teacher will use to support student progress towards goals. All of this information will be captured in the Student Learning Plan portion of the IPDP or CAP form. What if the goals need to be revised? The IPDP (or CAP) should be considered a living document that helps the teacher and his/her supervisor to continuously reflect and improve on their practice. Therefore, goals included in the IPDP can be revised up until February 15 th. The teacher and administrator should spend a portion of the mid-year review conference reflecting on the teacher’s goals and determining if any changes should be made. Goals should be considered final once the mid-year review form is submitted. What is the purpose of professional development goals? Because all goals should be anchored in improving student performance, a teacher’s IPDP should be aligned to and derived from the student learning goals. Using the student learning goals as a guide, the teacher and administrator agree on professional development goals that will support teacher’s execution of the student learning goals. Together, the teacher and administrator identify Indicators from the Framework for Effective Teaching where the teacher either needs to improve and/or can leverage to support the group of students to achieve the goals the teacher set for them. Why do we have to participate in a goal-setting conference? The goal-setting conference ensures that goals are established collaboratively between teachers and administrators. Once the teacher and administrator have finalized the teacher’s student learning goals and IPDP or CAP, the goal-setting process is complete. However, tracking progress toward goals is a year-long endeavor, and goals should be revisited consistently throughout the year. The IPDP and CAP provide teachers and administrators with a shared tool for communicating about goals and anticipating growth areas, and they will serve as a reference document for other evaluation conferences, feedback discussions, and professional development over the course of the year. What is the difference between a CAP and an IPDP? IPDPs and CAPs both serve to support teachers in helping increase student learning and to support teacher growth in their professional practice. Both processes capture the teachers’ Student Learning and Professional Development Plans— created in collaboration with their principal or administrator—based on specific needs and interests identified during the goal setting process at the beginning of the year. Teachers meet with their administrator three times every year to reflect on their classroom performance, student progress and discuss development goals. CAPs are further tailored for teachers who require additional support because they have been rated ineffective or partially effective on their summative evaluation last year. In addition to establishing growth areas and strategies for growth, the CAP will also explicitly capture the metrics and processes for monitoring growth as well as the role the administrator will play in the teacher’s development. Can a teacher have both a CAP and an IPDP? No. A teacher either should have a CAP or an IPDP, depending on their rating from the previous year.

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Who must receive a CAP? Teachers who were rated Partially Effective or Ineffective on their Annual Evaluation in the 2013-14 school must receive a CAP in the 2014-15 school year. What if a teacher already wrote a CAP with their school leader at the end of 2013-14? The teacher and his or her principal should review the CAP they drafted at the end of 2013-14 and update the CAP with the Student Learning Plan appropriate for the teacher. This must be entered into the BloomBoard system, as it will serve as the basis for the teacher’s professional growth over the course of the year. The teacher and principal might also take this time to review professional goals set in the spring to ensure they are the highest leverage goals to support the teacher’s development. How is the CAP used throughout the year? The CAP is a living document that should be referenced and updated throughout the year. At each post-observation conference and the mid-year review, the teacher and principal should review the goals outlined in the CAP and assess the teacher’s progress towards meeting those goals. The CAP is the main format by which the teacher and the principal collect and report evidence of the teacher’s growth and improvement. What is the responsibility of a teacher on a CAP? A teacher on a CAP is responsible for the development goals outlined in his or her CAP with the principal. These development goals should be specific and time-based; the teacher should use these goals to guide his or her activities and efforts to develop. In addition to being responsible for implementing these goals and actions in order to improve, the teacher will also participate in professional growth opportunities, reflect on his/her growth areas and request additional support when needed. What is the administrator’s responsibility to support a teacher on a CAP? An administrator with a teacher on a CAP is responsible for reviewing and co-developing the CAP with the teacher and then supporting the teacher in meeting the development goals outlined in the CAP. The CAP should explicitly articulate actions the administrator will take to directly support the teacher. The administrator is also responsible for conducting classroom observations to collect evidence of progress towards goals, ensuring the teacher has opportunities and guidance on how to access and participating in professional learning opportunities throughout the year, and for sharing clear, regular feedback with the teacher about his or her development. Where do I send a completed CAP? The teacher evaluation data system, BloomBoard, will include a CAP form. Teachers and principals will use this form to record development goals and progress towards those goals throughout the year. This will serve as the official form of record for the teacher and must be submitted by the teacher through the BloomBoard system. How many observations must a teacher on a CAP receive? A teacher on a CAP is required to receive four observations – one additional observation compared to all other teachers. In addition, a teacher on a CAP must be observed by more than one observer. This means at least one observation must be conducted by an observer other than the teacher’s main observer. Must a teacher on a CAP receive a mid-year review? Yes. Every teacher on a CAP should receive a mid-year review by February 15, 2015. What are timeline dates to consider for a teacher on a CAP? There are several recommended dates to consider for teachers on a CAP: October 15, 2014: the date by which any teacher rated Partially Effective or Ineffective must have a completed CAP in the BloomBoard system October 31, 2014: the date by which a teacher on a CAP should receive first observation November 30, 2014: the date by which a teacher on a CAP should receive second observation January 31, 2015: the date by which all teacher with a CAP should receive third observation February 15, 2015: the date by which all teachers with a CAP must receive a mid-year review March 31, 2015: the date by which a teacher on a CAP should receive fourth observation April 15, 2015: the date by which a non-tenured teacher on a CAP should have annual evaluation May15, 2015: the date by which a tenured teacher on a CAP should have annual evaluation A12

What constitutes good evidence on a CAP? Good evidence of teachers’ progress towards meeting development goals meets the following characteristics: Is specific and includes dates where applicable Includes clear examples from classroom observations and other interactions Is directly linked to the goals in the CAP. What happens if a teacher on a CAP is rated Effective or Highly Effective at the end of 2014-15? If a teacher’s performance improves and he or she is rated Effective or Highly Effective at the end of 2014-15, s/he is no longer on a CAP for 2015-16 and instead will receive an IPDP. What happens if a teacher on a CAP is rated Partially Effective or Ineffective at the end of 2014-15? While every effort will be made to support both tenured and non-tenured teachers to meet the goals of their CAP, if a teacher fails to improve, his or her principal may decide to place them on a CAP again for the following school year or, if the teacher is non-tenured, may decide not to continue the teacher’s contract next year. If a tenured teacher fails to improve, the district may file a charge of inefficiency against the teacher. Evaluation Policy & Process What are the main components of the NPS teacher evaluation process? The main components of the teacher evaluation process are: 1. IPDP/CAP 2. Goal-setting meeting between teacher and administrator to agree on the IPDP/CAP goals 3. Observations a. Pre-observation conference(s) b. Short observation(s) c. Long observation(s) d. Post-observation conference(s) 4. Mid-year review 5. Over-time evidence collected outside of classroom observation 6. Annual evaluation How many observations must a teacher have? 1. Non-tenured teachers in their 1st or 2nd year of teaching must have at least two (2) long observations and one (1) short observation. 2. Non-tenured teachers in their 3rd or 4th year of teaching must have at least one (1) long observation and two (2) short observations. 3. Tenured teachers should have at least three (3) short observations; however, long observations can replace any short observation. Beyond these minimum requirements, observers may conduct as many observations as deemed necessary to gather sufficient evidence to inform mid-year and annual evaluation ratings. Do all teachers need to be observed by multiple observers? Non-tenured teachers and teachers with a CAP need to be observed by at least two different observers (either within one observation or across different observations). Tenured teachers may be observed by multiple observers, though this is not a requirement. How are teachers who serve students currently performing below grade level being evaluated? All teachers will be evaluated using the Framework for Effective Teaching. The Framework describes what the essential components of effective teaching should look like in every classroom. We have purposefully defined practices universal enough that teachers of all students, at all grade levels and in all subjects, may be fairly evaluated on them. Student learning goals are based on the academic growth that occurs over the course of the year, rather than attainment by the end of the year. By focusing on growth, we can ensure that teachers with students who begin the year below grade A13

level may be fairly assessed. For example, a 5th grade teacher may have a student who enters her class on a 2nd grade level. At the end of the year, the student is on a 4th grade level. From a student growth perspective, the teacher can get “credit” for moving the student two years (from 2nd to 4th grade) in one school year. Why the emphasis on student growth rather than just attainment/proficiency? NPS will continue to pursue the goal of ensuring that all students graduate with the skills necessary to succeed in college and careers. At the same time, NPS believes it is critical to focus on growth when evaluating educators because growth considers each student’s starting point and more accurately captures the educator’s impact. What do school leaders need to know to evaluate a teacher’s performance? All school leaders responsible for staff evaluation are trained to ensure that they are fluent and consistent in their use of the Framework and in the methods for collecting evidence. School leaders will be held responsible for using the Framework to observe, evaluate, support, and develop their teachers. How can teachers be assured that the evaluation system is being implemented in a high-quality way? School leaders will participate in continued training and norming throughout the school year to ensure they are fully supported in understanding and using the rubric to evaluate teachers. In addition to ongoing training, NPS will provide other resources and guidance. Peer validators may also conduct validation observations to provide additional data on a teacher’s performance and ensure that the evaluation system is fair and accurate. Finally, the School Improvement Panel at each school and the Peer Oversight Committee in general will advise on the implementation of a fair and equitable evaluation system. Does the evaluation system look different for veteran teachers and novice teachers? The evaluation system was designed to encompass measures that could be applied to all NPS teachers, regardless of tenure or years of experience. The Framework describes elements of instruction that any school leader should be able to observe at any point in a teacher’s career. The only difference between veteran and novice teachers is the number of observations that will be conducted for tenured and non-tenured teachers. Is a pre-observation conference mandatory for all observations? No. All teachers are required to have at least one observation that is announced prior to the observation and is accompanied by a pre-observation conference. Pre-observation conferences may provide helpful context and information as part of the observation process. Do all five Competencies have to be assessed for every observation? Competencies 1-4 are required to be assessed during all long observations. During short observations, administrators may choose to focus on the specific Competency or Competencies relevant to the portion of the lesson that they observe. Competency 5 should only be rated during mid-year reviews and annual evaluations, not during lesson observations. However, progress on all five Competencies may be discussed at post-observation conferences. Do all five Competencies have to be assessed as part of the mid-year review? Yes, teachers should receive a rating on each Competency at the mid-year review. However, the discussion at a mid-year review conference may center specifically on Competencies that are most relevant to a teacher’s performance and development. Do all five Competencies have to be assessed as part of the annual review? Yes, all five Competencies must be assigned a performance level as part of the annual review. How are Competencies weighted? For observations, each of the first four Competencies is weighted the same and should be viewed as having the same importance. For mid-years and annuals, each of the first three Competencies is weighted the same and should be viewed as having the same importance. Competency 4 is weighted more given the importance of ensuring student progress toward mastery. A14

Competency 5, while worth fewer points, is important in determining the teachers’ overall evaluation score because a teacher not meeting expectations in Competency 5 will have a lower overall score. How are individual Indicators within the Framework for Effective Teaching rated in the evaluation process? Indicators are the foundation of the Framework for Effective Teaching and describe the specific practices that define effectiveness. Indicators do not carry a numeric value for any part of the teacher evaluation process. However, they may be rated during a short or long observation or the mid-year review if there is a preponderance of evidence that dictates a rating for a given Indicator or a certain Indicator is of particular focus for a teacher’s growth and development. During the annual review, all Indicators must be rated. How are over-time Indicators considered? Over time Indicators are formally considered during the mid-year review and the annual evaluation. At this point, the administrator considers all of the evidence accumulated through short and long observations, progress toward student learning goals and professional goals, artifacts of the teachers’ practice such as unit and lesson plans, as well as other interactions with the teacher. The administrator identifies a rating for each of the over-time Indicators for Competencies 14 based on evidence gathered during the year. Then, the administrator identifies performance levels for each Competency for Competencies 1-4 based on a preponderance of evidence for both types of Indicators. For Competency 5, the administrator identifies whether the teacher’s performance Exceeds Expectations, Meets Expectations, is Slightly Below Expectations, or is Significantly Below Expectations. Then, based on a preponderance of evidence, the administrator selects whether or not the teacher meets the standard on the overall Competencies. The administrator may consider or discuss evidence towards over-time Competencies at conferences other than the midyear and annual reviews. However, they are only formally rated at these two points. For example, the administrator and teacher may discuss evidence of 1f. Progression of Instruction at a post-observation conference discussion about the teacher’s planning. The administrator would not rate Indicator 1f at that observation, however. How long after an observation must the post-observation conference be held? The post-observation conference must be held within 10 calendar days following the long observation, and is recommended within three (3) school days. At this meeting, the teacher and observer collaboratively analyze the lesson and the instructional process and discuss the evidence leading to the ratings. Should all observations have a post-observation conference? Yes, all observations, regardless of whether they are short or long, announced or unannounced, must be followed by a post-observation conference. For tenured teachers, an informal post-observation process is permissible, using email and/or sharing the form on BloomBoard, on the condition that the teacher agrees to forego the in-person meeting. What is an “informal” post-observation conference? Tenured teachers rated Effective or Highly Effective at the end of the 2013-14 school year may have an informal postobservation conference. This means the administrator may share his or her feedback with the teacher in writing rather than in person, through the BloomBoard system. The teacher must agree to an informal post-observation conference. What is the difference between an announced and unannounced observation? An announced observation is one in which the teacher is given advance notice of the observation before an observer comes to conduct the observation. A pre-observation conference may or may not precede an announced observation. An unannounced observation is one in which the teacher is not given any prior notice of the observation by an observer. A pre-observation conference will not precede an unannounced observation. Can someone who is not the principal observe and evaluate teachers? Yes. Any person who is appropriately certified may observe and evaluate teachers. How does the mid-year review rating factor into the annual evaluation rating? The mid-year review rating and conference is an opportunity for teachers and administrators to discuss the teachers’ performance to date, and the progress the teacher has made towards his or her goals. The observer will consider evidence from long and short observations, student learning and growth, artifacts of the teacher’s work such as unit and lesson plans, and other interactions to inform the mid-year rating and discussion. This rating is formative in nature. At the annual A15

review, the observer considers all observations, information from conferences, including the mid-year conference, final assessment of student learning goals, and other evidence to assign the annual evaluation rating. This rating is a summative rating of the teacher’s performance over the entire year, and does have stakes connected to the rating. The mid-year rating is only one of a variety of items considered in the determination of the annual rating. Does signing the observation or annual evaluation form mean agreement? No. Signing the observation report or annual evaluation is only an acknowledgement that it was received and discussed. Will the observation rating or annual evaluation rating still stand even if the teacher does not sign the form? Yes. What is the process for a teacher who disagrees with their observation, Mid-Year, or Annual rating? If a teacher disagrees with his or her score, he or she still has to sign the form to indicate receipt, but not agreement. In the event that a teacher refuses to sign the form, a witness signature must be obtained indicating the refusal to sign. Teachers have the opportunity to object to the observation in writing within 10 days of the post-observation conference. The Assistant Superintendent (or his/her designee) may review the rebuttal letter, mid-year evaluation or annual rating, and supporting documents and if the rating is inconsistent with the documentation, then the Assistant Superintendent may, in his/her sole discretion, change the overall evaluation rating after reviewing the documentation with the principal. Where do I access BloomBoard? You can access the online system that captures all of your evaluation information at http://apps.bloomboard.com. For support at any time, please email [email protected], or visit https://support.bloomboard.com/home. What are the full current legal requirements for teacher evaluation? While this Guidebook is an attempt to synthesize the information around the legal requirements for teacher evaluation, the state’s requirements around teacher evaluation can be found here: http://www.state.nj.us/education/AchieveNJ/

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APPENDIX E: RECOMMENDED TIMELINES Most of the dates below are not absolute deadlines but are included here to support you in sequencing the steps in the evaluation system over the course of the year to make the process as valuable for you and for your teachers as possible. Required dates are highlighted in bold. We recognize that professional development will be happening in an ongoing basis and should be embedded throughout the process. Non-tenured Teachers

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

Conduct goal-setting conference to develop IPDP which includes professional growth and student learning goals, by October 15 Complete first observation, including post-observation conference (and preobservation conference if is an announced visit) Complete second observation, including post-observation conference (and preobservation conference if is an announced visit) Mid-Year reviews begin; examine progress towards goals on IPDP at the review

Jan

Feb

Complete third observation, including post-observation conference (and preobservation conference if is an announced visit) Mid-Year reviews conclude by February 15

Mar

Apr

May

June

Annual evaluation conference and rating assigned by April 15

Tenured Teachers Conduct goal-setting conference to develop IPDP which includes professional growth and student learning goals, by October 15

Complete first observation, including post-observation conference (and preobservation conference if is an announced visit)

Mid-Year reviews begin; examine progress towards goals on IPDP at the review Complete second observation, including post-observation conference (and preobservation conference if is an announced visit) Mid-Year reviews conclude by February 15

Tenured Teachers with a Corrective Action Plan Conduct goal-setting conference to develop CAP, which includes professional growth and student learning goals, by October 15 Complete first observation, including post-observation conference that explicitly discusses the CAP (and preobservation conference if is an announced visit) Complete second observation, including postobservation conference that explicitly discusses progress on the CAP (and preobservation conference if is an announced visit) Mid-Year reviews begin; examine progress towards goals on CAP at the review

Complete third observation, including post-observation conference that explicitly discusses progress on the CAP

Non-tenured Teachers with a Corrective Action Plan Conduct goal-setting conference to develop CAP, which includes professional growth and student learning goals, by October 15 Complete first observation, including post-observation conference that explicitly discusses the CAP (and preobservation conference if is an announced visit) Complete second observation, including post-observation conference that explicitly discusses progress on the CAP (and pre-observation conference if is an announced visit) Mid-Year reviews begin; examine progress towards goals on CAP at the review Complete third observation, including post-observation conference that explicitly discusses progress on the CAP Mid-year reviews conclude by February 15

Mid-year reviews conclude by February 15

Complete third observation, including post-observation conference (and preobservation conference if is an announced visit)

Complete fourth observation, including postobservation conference that explicitly addresses progress on the CAP

Final evaluation rating (including 3 observations) complete by June 15

Annual evaluation conference and rating assigned by May 15 Work with Talent Office to pursue tenure charges if applicable;

Complete fourth observation, including post-observation conference that explicitly addresses progress on the CAP Annual evaluation conference and rating assigned by April 15

Work with Talent Office to pursue tenure charges if applicable;

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