Fulton County Greenways and Open Space - County of Fulton, PA

Fulton County Greenways and Open Space - County of Fulton, PA

CONNECTIONS IN OUR LANDSCAPE The Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan Blair County Final – May 2007 Bedford County Cambria C...

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CONNECTIONS IN OUR LANDSCAPE

The Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan Blair County

Final – May 2007

Bedford County

Cambria County

Fulton County

Huntingdon County

Somerset County

The Southern Alleghenies Planning and Development Commission

Executive Summary Executive Summary

Background The Southern Alleghenies region, situated in south-central Pennsylvania between Pittsburgh and Harrisburg, features 4,600 square miles of various man-made and natural resources such as the historic Town of Bedford, the Laurel Highlands and the Juniata River. These resources provide the region’s 470,000 residents with opportunities for cultural and natural resource preservation, recreation and economic development. The region is made up of the following six counties: Bedford, Blair, Cambria, Fulton, Huntingdon and Somerset.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Conserve important natural resources; Expand recreation opportunities; Celebrate cultural heritage; Bolster economic development; Increase pedestrian and bicycle mobility; and 6. Promote healthy lifestyles. Specific goals were also developed in association with the six purposes collectively. These goals and purposes guided the Plan’s analyses, recommendations and actions that emerged during the planning process.

The Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan (the Plan) outlines a series of policies and projects for linking existing natural and man-made resources within the region’s six counties. By connecting these assets into a comprehensive greenway network, the region’s natural resources are leveraged to promote and strengthen their value to the region for a range of purposes. In addition to delineating the elements that make up the greenway network, the Plan identifies a strategic framework for implementation and management. This framework provides an overall strategy for prioritizing greenways or project corridors as well as a palette of potential implementation tools and a summary of support and funding sources. Purpose and Goals The Plan was developed to achieve the following purposes:

information has been made available to each of the counties for use on other planning projects. As a compliment to the technical nature of the GIS analysis, an extensive public involvement process was incorporated into the planning process so that review and feedback from residents of the counties and other key stakeholders could be gathered and incorporated. To guide the process, the Southern Alleghenies Regional Greenways Committee was formed with representatives from each county, the Allegheny Ridge Corporation, the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy, Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission, Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) and Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR). Additionally, public meetings and work sessions were held as the Plan progressed to gather additional input from community groups, conservation organizations, local political leadership and interested citizens.

Analyzing Opportunities Previous planning efforts and the mapping of other data compiled for the Plan have revealed a number of opportunities and challenges for the region. The key issues that emerged include: Opportunities: • • • • • •

Challenges: • • • •

Figure 1: The Ridges and Valleys of the Southern Alleghenies Region

Planning Approach In order to define a network of resource-based greenways, geographical information system (GIS) mapping was used as the project’s primary analytical tool. This analysis was completed through three key phases: the compilation of background mapping, establishing planning objectives and greenway criteria and the identification of potential greenway elements and corridors. The resulting data as well as the background

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

Wealth of natural resources; Unique landscapes; Existing projects underway; Abundance of existing/potential public lands; Development pressures are generally localized; and Committed residents and engaged political leadership.

• •

Majority of existing open space is unconnected; Limited regulatory tools are available for implementation; Environmental issues; Funding and staffing resources for implementation; Lack of a coordinated implementation approach; and Develop marketing and educational materials to build awareness of the greenways vision.

Figure 2: Bedford Public Meeting

i

Executive Summary Greenways and Open Space Greenways and Open Space Vision Through an iterative planning process, an Vision

overall vision for the Plan was developed that both builds upon the region’s many opportunities and addresses its challenges. Within this vision, greenways are comprised of two major elements: corridors and hubs. corridors are linear elements that, depending on their characteristics, are suitable for recreation or preservation purposes. Hubs are typically non-linear sites that possess a common natural or man-made asset, which makes them significant. Natural hubs are considered habitat areas while man-made hubs are deemed destinations. Criteria developed through the planning process determined whether a corridor is suitable for recreation or preservation and whether a hub is a destination or habitat. Analysis of the mapping associated with each of these criteria delineated an open space network that feature recreation and preservation corridors as well as destinations and habitats. From this overall open space network, a series of greenway or project corridors for each individual county were established. As the project corridors were developed, significant corridors that spanned multiple counties interconnected to other regions were designated as Regional Projects. These projects, while more complex and difficult to implement, represent a grand vision of an integrated regional greenways network. For example, the proposed Allegheny Crossing traverses over 75 miles as it connects the Great Allegheny Passage in Somerset across the region to eastern Fulton County. The counterpart to the Regional Projects, County Projects connect places of county-level significance to regional projects or to other parts of the county. For example, the proposed

ii

Schellsburg creates a two-mile greenway to ProjectConnector Corridors link Schellsburg (Bedford County) to the Allegheny Crossing greenway via Shawnee State Park (Bedford County). These two levels of greenway corridors – County and Regional – were carefully optimized to balance the desire for a long-term vision and the need for projects that can be initiated and completed at the local level by grass root efforts.

Project Corridors The greenways and open space networks as well as the specific project corridors established throughout the planning process defined a vision for an integrated system of greenways that connect the region’s numerous natural, historic and cultural assets. The project corridors seek to: •



• •

Link existing regional assets such as biodiversity areas, State Forests, parks, gamelands, steep slope complexes, stream valleys urban places and historic sites to establish the greenways network. Distinguish greenway elements as either conservation or recreation-oriented depending upon the types of features that comprise the greenway elements and their sensitivity to human activity. Delineate project corridors that can be implemented as discrete or individual projects. Develop a balance of regional and countysignificant project corridors to create a comprehensive network of greenways. The balance proposed within the Plan is summarized in the table below.

County Bedford Blair Cambria Fulton Huntingdon Somerset Total

Figure 3: Laurel Hill Creek

Figure 6: Bike Trails

(www.gryphel.com)

Figure 4: Greenwood Furnace Amish Buggies

Figure 7: Glendale Lake at Prince Gallitzin State Park

Figure 5: Barronvale Covered Bridge

Figure 8: Laurel Hill Greenway

Project Corridors County Regional 23 6 4 18 5 13 3 15 5 27 5 96 28

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Executive Summary

Regional Greenways Plan

CLEARFIELD

CENTRE

LEGEND Southern Alleghenies Boundary County Boundary

SGL166

SGL118

Cr

s

SUMMIT

Pa

ss

ag

Tr

NORTHAMPTON

ai SGL82 l

SGL48

FAIRHOPE W

ills

Cre

e

SGL82

Mi d l E State xt e ns ion st B

ee k Cr on e St ing

k ee Cr g

k wic gh Au Li ttle h nc

Sout

h

Bra

25,000 Acres 10,000 Acres

BUCHANAN STATE SGL124 FOREST

SGL49

UNION

0

12,500' 25,000'

SGL124 THOMPSON

Town

GREENVILLE

WELLERSBURG

To Washington D.C.

GARRETT

St a

ic k hw

k re e C

SGL128

BETHEL MANN

50,000 Acres

NORTH

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

LARIMER SOUTHAMPTON

SALISBURY

k

ek Cre

l Hil

de lin g

Lick in hC re Bru s

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST SOUTHAMPTON

ra T ra il

Tr ail dS

CUMBERLAND VALLEY

ELK LICK

SGL231 ADDISON

Mi

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

ek

Creek

SGL271

SGL49

HYNDMAN

MEYERSDALE

AYR

BELFAST

SGL97

LONDONDERRY

k

SGL104

ek

la nd

CALLIMONT

ADDISON

MCCONNELL PARK

MCCONNELLSBURG Meadow Grounds Lake

Tono low

ny

TODD

SGL65

MONROE

gh

FRANKLIN

COWANS GAP

FULTON

SGL49

Hi

GARRETT

he

LICKING CREEK

C re

y

il

SGL53

gH ill

en

a Tr

BRUSH CREEK

RAINSBURG

e lin

le g

SGL48

ch S id

gh

e

tat e

wn

COLERAIN

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

FORBES STATE FOREST

CONFLUENCE

BERLIN

BROTHERS VALLEY

er URSINA

Ra

ysto

Al

ALLEGHENY

ran

elm

an

at

le

to

WEST PROVIDENCE

We

ss Ca

Riv

To Pittsburgh, PA

G re

Riv er

y

Al

HARRISON

e-

k Bi

ek

ch CASSELMAN

k Pi

Ev it

en

SOMERSET

BLACK

MANNS CHOICE

Riv er

Bra n

k r ee

ROCKWOOD

UPPER TURKEYFOOT

SGL50

VALLEY HI

EAST PROVIDENCE

EVERETT

g Cre ek

Ju n

NEW iata BALTIMORE

BEDFORD

aro

JUNIATA

sC Co xe

k ree rel

Hil

lC

NEW CENTERVILLE

La u

gh

DUBLIN

Tus c

SHAWNEE

STONYCREEK

TURKEYFOOT

gh io

ing nn

Indian Lake

TAYLOR

Si

ek C re

SHANKSVILLE

SOMERSET

To Harrisburg, PA

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

k

LAUREL HILL

MILFORD

LAUREL RIDGE STATE PARK

Yo u

Lower Juniata Water Trail

SNAKE SPRING

BEDFORD

ts C ree

SEVEN SPRINGS

DUBLIN

SGL81

SGL261

Shawnee

MIDDLECREEK

To Ohiopyle State Park LOWER SGL111

SPRINGFIELD

WELLS SGL73

SCHELLSBURG Lake

INDIAN LAKE

SOMERSET

SHADE GAP

SGL121

BROADTOP

HOPEWELL

BEDFORD

NAPIER

THREE SPRINGS

SGL73

HOPEWELL

NEW PARIS

SGL228

CROMWELL BROAD TOP CITY

CLAY

KOOSER JEFFERSON

FORBES STATE FOREST

Trails - the location of existing or planned state or national-scale recreation trails including land based pedestrian

CENTRAL CITY

Flight 93 National Memorial

H

FAYETTE

Du

ek River Sto nycre

Stony Creek Water Trail

SGL251

SALTILLO

DUDLEY

WOOD

SGL73

EAST ST CLAIR

ORBISONIA

ay Cree

E

Multi-Use Hub Destination/ Habitat

ROCKHILL

SGL81

COALDALE

Tra i

il) Tr a id ge lR ur e La A (A K il Tr a ik in g H nd s

ID G

SHADE

ig h

la

LR

SGL99

COALMONT

SAXTON WARRIORS PATH LIBERTY

Creek

RE

Recreation Corridors/ Destinations

k

U LA

Preservation Corridors/ Habitats TELL

SHIRLEYSBURG

CASSVILLE

CARBON

Yello w

ST CLAIRSVILLE

LINCOLN

K

SHIRLEY SGL251

ROTHROCK STATE FOREST

Historic Site GREENWAY NETWORK

ee

HOOVERSVILLE

STOYSTOWN AR EP AT ST

CASS

SGL67

WOODBURY

SGL73

SOUTH WOODBURY WEST ST CLAIR

BOSWELL

QUEMAHONING

SGL71

HOPEWELL

SGL41

PLEASANTVILLE

ek

JENNERSTOWN

FORBES STATE FOREST

SGL41

KING

OGLE

re de C

Quemahoning Resevoir

BLOOMFIELD

GALLITZIN STATE FOREST

PAINT

Sha

Historic Sites - the location of historic districts or sites as defined by the PA Historic and Museum Commission.

ail

to w n ks

bs

JENNER BENSON

NORTH WOODBURY

Fra

Bo

SGL42

ROTHROCK STATE FOREST

LINCOLN

WINDBER

LAUREL RIDGE STATE PARK

MARTINSBURG

TUSCARORA STATE FOREST

TODD KIMMEL

PAINT

Hubs - the locations of urban activity or cultural tourism opportunities.

ROTHROCK STATE TROUGH FOREST CREEK

LINCOLN

k

PAVIA

SGL71

ree

River

BLUE KNOB SGL26

SCALP LEVEL

CONEMAUGH

ROARING SPRING

TAYLOR

JUNIATA

UNION

gh C ro u at T

h

ADAMS RICHLAND

FERNDALE

LAUREL RIDGE STATE PARK SGL42

GREENFIELD

ug

GEISTOWN

MOUNT UNION

MARKLESBURG

Gre

ma

SGL26

Historic District

MAPLETON

Tr SUMMERHILL

ne Co

tle Lit

PENN

Mi d

uth

er

So

rk

Riv

River

Fo

LORAIN STONYCREEK

WESTMORELAND

CROYLE

DALE

SOUTHMONT UPPER YODER

SGL42

HUSTON

FREEDOM

DAISYTOWN

WESTMONT

SGL147

ia ta

h

JOHNSTOWN

Multi-use Hub/ Destination/Habitat

PORTAGE

L

SOUTH FORK

St ate

SUMMERHILL

NEWRY

HISTORIC SITES

HUNTINGDON

SGL118

BLAIR

JUNIATA

EDWARDSVILLE ittle

ne Li CONEMAUGH inEAST ail MaCONEMAUGH TrFRANKLIN

MIDDLE TAYLOR

SGL198

er

Jun

au g

EAST TAYLOR

Riv

nB ran c h

n em Co

E G ID K R AR EL E P R T U ALOWER LA ST YODER

h ug ma ne CoWILMORE

Sensitive Biological Diversity Areas Less Sensitive Biological Diversity Areas

BRADY

SGL112

MILL CREEK

JUNIATA

SGL147

WASHINGTON

CASSANDRA GALLITZEN STATE FOREST

SGL112

WOODBURY

DUNCANSVILLE

Water Trail BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY AREAS

k lo

LILLY

re e

SMITHFIELD WALKER

WILLIAMSBURG

SGL147

FRANKSTOWN

Existing State/National /Regional Trail Proposed State/National /Regional Trail

SGL112

CANOE CREEK

HOLLIDAYSBURG

JACKSON

WEST TAYLOR

M ill

SGL198 ALLEGHENY

HENDERSON

Cr

TUNNELHILL

MIFFLIN

ONEIDA

HUNTINGDON

R

SANKERTOWN

TRAILS

ee k

BRUSH RUN COUNTY PARK

GALLITZIN

CRESSON

To Pittsburgh, PA

SGL322

CATHARINE

VALLEY VIEW PARK ALTOONA

BLAIR

MUNSTER

Recreation Corridors/Destinations corridors of natural, cultural and recreational features linked by land based and/or water based trails.

SGL322

SGL118

MILLER

Upper Juniata Water Trail

Au g

SGL279

SGL79 NANTY GLO

nd

er R iv ta nia

ALEXANDRIA

Littl e LOGAN

LORETTO

EBENSBURG

Active Railroad

River/Lake/Stream PETERSBURG

PORTER GALLITZIN

Major Highway

GREENWOOD FURNACE

Inactive Railroad

LOGAN

un

VINTONDALE

WEST

MORRIS

ALLEGHENY

CAMBRIA

BARREE

Bla c

k ree ld C

ck Bla

ch Bra n h Nort

BLACKLICK Ghost Town Trail

SGL79

Interstate Highway JACKSON

TYRONE

SGL267

ASHVILLE

CAMBRIA

d Mi

ai l Tr

BELLWOOD

DEAN

SGL184

CHEST SPRINGS

e

ate St

SPRUCE CREEK

Ju

Creek

EAST CARROLL

DUMAN LAKE PARK

lic k

CLEARFIELD

CARROLLTOWN

uc

k ee Cr

Juniata River

To Dilltown, PA

r Sp

ANTIS

SGL108

Cle

a

Preservation Corridors/Habitats corridors intended to conserve the benefit of environmental sections or biological diversity areas; they generally do not include improved trails.

PATTON WEST CARROLL

Riv er

FRANKLIN

BIRMINGHAM

ann

INDIANA

TYRONE

WHITE

SGL108

Municipal Boundary

WHIPPLE DAM

SGL108

a rfie

h que Su s

SGL79

WARRIORS MARK

SGL158

PRINCE GALLITZIN STATE PARK

rC

ch

BARR

READE

ROTHROCK STATE FOREST

SNYDER

Li n kT rail

HASTINGS

n Bra

Greenway Network

Glendale Lake

CHEST

st

ek Chest Cre

We

GALLITZIN STATE FOREST

ve

SGL120 ROCK RUN RECRATION ELDER AREA

SUSQUEHANNA

Sh a

Susquehanna River Water Trail - West Branch

NORTHERN CAMBRIA

Biological Diversity Areas - high priority habitat areas identified in the specific county Natural Heritage Inventory

To The Grand Canyon of Pennsylvania/ Ansonia, PA

Pennsylvania Maryland

ALLEGANY

To Green Ridge Hiking Trail

WASHINGTON

To Hancock, MD

C & O Towpath

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

iii

Executive Summary Actions The efforts for implementing the Southern Alleghenies region’s greenways and open space vision (Plan for Action) consists of four parts: an overall implementation strategy, a summary of the project priorities expressed during the planning process, a list and description of available regulatory tools and a summary of available resources for technical and funding support. The implementation strategies recommended primarily include regional

coordination, county support and nongovernment organization participation intertwined in order to best achieve the Plan over a period of time. They are based on several factors including the high number of resources are already hard at work in the region making aspects of the vision a reality, the commitment of the counties involved and the position of SAP&DC as a regional planning body. The Plan for Action (Part Five) includes details regarding county and regional project priorities, regulatory and other specific implementation tools and funding sources.

Southern Alleghenies Planning and Development Commission

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Task Force

DCNR Circuit Rider

Regional Project Coordination with Counties, Agencies, and Partners

County Project Assistance to Counties

Prioritize Projects and Work Plan

Figure 9: Implementation Partners Organization Chart

iv

Technical Assistance with Southern Alleghenies RC & D

Work Plan and Outreach Activities

Marketing Coordination with SA Regional Tourism Confederation

The key recommendations of the Plan for Action include: 1. Create a Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Task Force from members of the Planning Advisory Committee and other stakeholders to guide the long-term implementation of the Plan. 2. Pursue the hiring of a DCNR supportedCircuit Rider to assist the Task Force to manage the detailed implementation plan, coordinate projects in the region and pursue funding opportunities. 3. Encourage and support the counties to develop, acquire and construct projects identified in this Plan. 4. Position the SAP&DC as the technical clearinghouse for GIS data and corridor planning in the region. 5. Host periodic summits or workshops to build capacity at the local level. 6. Utilize the technical expertise of the Southern Alleghenies Resource Conservation and Development Council to provide grant writing support. 7. Assist the counties to implement the Plan and provide technical support by leveraging the resources of the SAP&DC, Southern Alleghenies Resource Conservation and Development Council, county planners and State agencies. 8. Use existing regulatory tools, where available and appropriate, to implement portions of the Plan. 9. Continue to track implementation progress and prioritize projects based on available funding, opportunities and needs.

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Resolutions Resolutions

COUNTY OF _____________, PENNSYLVANIA 5.

The Task Force should guide and oversee implementation of the regional recommendations of the Plan and should make recommendations to the Board of County Commissioners regarding the implementations of the Plan; and

6.

The County supports the implementation structure identified in the Plan as a means of implementing the ______ County-specific elements of the Plan.

RESOLUTION NO. ______ RESOLUTION OF COUNTY OF ________, PENNSYLVANIA, RECOGNIZING AND ADOPTING VARIOUS ELEMENTS OF THE SOUTHERN ALLEGHENIES GREENWAYS AND OPEN SPACE NETWORK PLAN (THE PLAN); AGREEING TO PARTICIPATE IN THE FORMATION OF A REGIONAL TASK FORCE TO IMPLEMENT REGIONAL ELEMENTS; AND DETERMINING THE IMPLEMENTATION STRUCTURE FOR COUNTY-SPECIFIC ELEMENTS OF THE PLAN. Whereas the Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan (the Plan) includes greenway and open space preservation related policies applicable to the entire Southern Alleghenies Region as well as individual counties within the region; Whereas the Plan describes regional and county-specific project corridors intended to be used for recreation or open space preservation purposes; Whereas the Plan includes a detailed strategy for implementation of the regional and countyspecific project corridors; Whereas the Plan includes an implementation structure for both regional and county-specific elements; and Whereas the Plan outlines a palette of tools that can be used for implementation of the Plan’s various recommendations; Now therefore, be it resolved by the Board of County Commissioners of the County of _______ that: 1.

The County recognizes the importance and potential benefits of the Plan’s regional and county-specific elements;

2.

______ County-specific elements of the Plan are adopted as the County’s Greenways and Open Space Plan;

3.

______ County-specific portions of the Plan are hereby incorporated into the County’s Comprehensive Land Use Plan; as adopted in ______________,__ ____;

4.

The County supports the formation of the Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Task Force (Task Force) and the inclusion of the Planning Advisory Committee (PAC) members in the Task Force membership;

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

v

Resolutions

vi

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Acknowledgements Acknowledgements

General The Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan (the Plan) project is managed by the Southern Alleghenies Planning and Development Commission (SAP&DC). The Plan was financed in part by a grant from the Community Conservation Partnerships Program under the administration of the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR), Bureau of Recreation and Conservation. Additional funding was provided by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT).

Contributors The following organizations and individuals have made the development of the Plan possible: Planning Advisory Committee (PAC) Members: Michelle Adams – SAP&DC Chris Allison – Transportation Program Manager SAP&DC Brad Beigay – Planning Director, Cambria County Frank J. Burggraf – Senior Planner, Bedford County Planning Commission John Dubnansky – Formerly with SAP&DC Cindy Dunlap – Recreation and Parks Advisor, DCNR Richard Haines – Planning Director, Blair County

Jeff Kloss – Executive Director, Bedford County Planning Commission

Ronald Seybert, P.E - Trans Associates Engineering Consultants, Inc.

Diane Kripas – Chief Recreation and Parks Supervisor, DCNR Fred Query – Assistant Director, Planning and Community Development SAP&DC Brandon Carson – SAP&DC Dean Roberts – PennDOT Mary K. Seville – Planning Director, Fulton County Jane Sheffield – Executive Director, Allegheny Ridge Corporation Gary Smith – Regional Park Manager, DCNR Richard Stahl – Planning Director, Huntingdon County Jeff Wagner – County Natural Heritage Coordinator, Western Pennsylvania Conservancy Brad Zearfoss – Director, Somerset County Planning Commission

Planning Team Jack R. Scholl, AICP, AIA – Senior Principal, Environmental Planning & Design, LLC Andrew JG Schwartz, RLA, AICP – Managing Principal, Environmental Planning & Design, LLC

Christopher D. Brown – Associate, Environmental Planning & Design, LLC Davitt B. Woodwell, JD – Vice President, Pennsylvania Environmental Council Hannah Hardy, Pennsylvania Environmental Council

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

vii

Acknowledgements

viii

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Table of Contents Table of Contents

Executive Summary ....................................... i Background.............................................. i Purpose and Goals .......................... i Planning Approach......................... i Analyzing Opportunities ............... i Greenways and Open Space Vision .... ii Project Corridors .................................... ii Actions .................................................... iv Resolutions..................................................... v Acknowledgements ....................................vii General................................................... vii Contributors.......................................... vii Planning Team...................................... vii Table of Contents...........................................1 Preface ..............................................................5 The Southern Alleghenies Region ........5 Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission ............5 What are Greenways?.............................5 Importance of Greenways......................6 The Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan .....6 Purpose and Goals .........................................7 Purposes of the Plan ...............................7 Goals .........................................................7 Plan Components ...........................................9 Part One – Planning Approach .............9 Part Two – Regional Profile...................9 Part Three – Analyzing Opportunities 9 Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision.....................................9 Part Five – A Plan for Action.................9 Bibliography ............................................9 Appendix A: Background Data.............9 Appendix B: GIS Data Dictionary.........9 Appendix C: Public Participation Summary ..........................................9 Appendix D: Conservation Easement..9 Appendix E: Riparian Forest Buffer Agreement........................................9

Appendix F: Trail Easement Agreement ............................................................9 Appendix G: Water Quality Improvement Easement ..........................................9 Appendix H: Natural Infrastructure Data Layers Needed.................................9 Part One – Planning Approach..................11 Philosophy .............................................11 General Methodology.................. 11 Implementation ............................ 11 Public Participation Process ................11 PAC Meetings............................... 11 October 2005 Public Meetings .... 11 April 2006 Public Meetings......... 11 October/November 2006 County Meetings .................................... 12 2007 County Adoption Meetings12 Part Two – Regional Profile .......................13 The Region .............................................13 Bedford County............................ 13 Blair County.................................. 13 Cambria County........................... 13 Fulton County............................... 13 Huntingdon County .................... 13 Somerset County .......................... 13 Summary of Previous Planning Efforts13 Trail and Greenway Projects ...... 13 Watershed Studies ....................... 15 Opportunities and Challenges for the Region .............................................15 Opportunities................................ 15 Challenges ..................................... 15 Part Three – Analyzing Opportunities ....17 Base Mapping ........................................17 Criteria ....................................................17 Initial Criteria ............................... 17 Criteria Scoring............................. 19 Refinements .................................. 20 Greenway Elements..............................20 Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision .....................................................27

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

Project Corridors ...................................27 Defining Project Corridors.......... 27 Corridor Types ............................. 27 Bedford County Project Corridors29 Blair County Project Corridors .. 34 Cambria County Project Corridors36 Fulton County Project Corridors 40 Huntingdon County Project Corridors ..................................................... 43 Somerset County Project Corridors ..................................................... 46 Regional Project Corridors.......... 51 Part Five – A Plan for Action......................55 Implementation Strategy .....................55 Goals for the Implementation Strategy ..................................................... 55 Background................................... 55 Key Issues...............................................56 Existing Project Base is Strong ... 56 Coordination is Already Strong in Certain Areas ............................ 56 Projects Have Different Needs ... 56 Projects are at Different Stages of Development ............................ 56 Implementation Will Take Time 56 Implementation Will Take Money56 Public Input................................... 56 Reasons for Coordinating ........... 56 Potential Downsides/Difficulties to Coordination............................. 57 Examples of Coordinated Efforts........57 By Region or Area ........................ 57 By Corridor ................................... 57 By Project Type............................. 57 Summary ................................................57 Stakeholders...........................................58 SAP&DC........................................ 58 Counties......................................... 58 Citizen Groups ............................. 58

Southern Alleghenies Resource Conservation and Development Council (RC&D) ....................... 58 Southern Alleghenies Regional Tourism Confederation ........... 58 DCNR............................................. 58 PennDOT....................................... 58 PA Game Commission ................ 58 US Army Corps of Engineers ..... 58 National Park Service .................. 58 The Allegheny Ridge Corporation ..................................................... 58 The Central Pennsylvania Conservancy ............................. 58 Conemaugh Valley Conservancy ..................................................... 58 Western Pennsylvania Conservancy ............................. 58 Somerset County Conservancy.. 58 Southern Alleghenies Conservancy ............................. 58 Roles and Responsibilities ...................59 SAP&DC........................................ 59 Southern Alleghenies Greenways Task Force ................................. 59 Counties......................................... 59 Agencies ........................................ 59 Project Partners............................. 59 DCNR Circuit Rider..................... 59 Activities.................................................60 Immediate ..................................... 60 Year One ........................................ 60 On-Going....................................... 61 Project Specific Implementation Strategies ........................................61 Examples of Greenway Implementation .............................62 Scenario One ................................. 62 Scenario Two ................................ 62 Project Corridor Priorities....................64 Overview ....................................... 64

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Table of Contents Initial PAC Review ...................... 64 Public Participation...................... 64 Initial Priorities............................. 64 Final Priorities .............................. 65 Recreation Corridors ................... 65 Preservation Corridors ................ 65 Demonstration Projects ........................65 Regional Demonstration Projects ..................................................... 65 County Demonstration Projects. 65 Implementation Tools ..........................67 Overview ....................................... 67 Land Management ....................... 67 Regulation ..................................... 67 Acquisition .................................... 69 Easements...................................... 69 Deed Restriction/Purchase of Development Rights ................ 69 Purchase/Sale/Lease Back ......... 69 Option/First Right of Refusal .... 69 Condemnation .............................. 69 Implementation Resources ..................69 Pennsylvania Funding Sources.. 70 Federal Funding Sources ............ 72 Other Funding Sources ............... 73 Bibliography .................................................75 Appendix A: Protected Areas.................. A1 Overview .............................................. A1 State Parks/Natural Landmarks .................................................... A1 State Forests and Natural Areas A6 State Gamelands.......................... A7 Federal Sites ................................. A9 Recreation Trails/Corridors ...... A9 Appendix B: GIS Data Dictionary ..........B1 Appendix C: Public Participation Summary...............................................C1 Individual County Meetings Summary, October 2005 .................................C1 Overview .......................................C1

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Individual County Meetings Summary, April 2006 ......................................C1 Overview .......................................C1 Fulton County (April 18, 2006)...C1 Huntingdon County (April 18, 2006) .....................................................C1 Bedford County (April 20, 2006)C2 Cambria County (April 20, 2006)C2 Somerset County (April 20, 2006)C3 Appendix D: Conservation Easement ... D1 Appendix E: Riparian Forest Buffer Protection Agreement......................... E1 Appendix F: Trail Easement Agreement F1 Appendix G: Water Quality Improvement Easement .............................................. G1 Appendix H: Natural Infrastructure Data Layers Needed .................................... H1 List of Tables Table 1: Purpose Rankings............................8 Table 2: Initial Criteria Weighing Table.....19 Table 3: Final Criteria Table.........................20 Table 4: Bedford County Projects Summary32 Table 4: Bedford County Projects Summary (Continued) ............................................33 Table 5: Cambria County Projects Summary38 Table 5: Cambria County Projects Summary (Continued) ............................................39 Table 6: Fulton County Projects Summary42 Table 7: Huntingdon County Projects Summary ................................................45 Table 8: Somerset County Projects Summary ..................................................................49 Table 8: Somerset County Projects Summary (Continued) ............................................50 Table 9: Regional Projects Summary ..........54 Table 10: Implementation Responsibilities & Priorities .................................................63 Table 11: Implementation Toolbox.............67 Table 12: Protected State Lands ................ A1 Table 13: State Parks Summary................ A1

Table 14: State Forests Summary ............. A6 Table 15: State Gamelands Summary...... A8 Table 16: Mileage of Off-road Trails...... A28 List of Maps Regional.......................................................... iii Regional Base Map........................................14 Initial Criteria Map .......................................18 Final Criteria Map.........................................19 Bedford County Greenways Plan ...............21 Cambria County Greenways Plan ..............22 Fulton County Greenways Plan..................23 Huntingdon County Greenways Plan .......24 Somerset County Greenways Plan .............25 Regional Greenways Plan............................26 Bedford County Project Corridors..............29 Blair County Project Corridors ...................34 Cambria County Project Corridors.............36 Fulton County Project Corridors ................40 Huntingdon County Project Corridors......43 Somerset County Project Corridors............46 Regional Project Corridors...........................51 Landform Analysis ................................... A15 Ridgeline..................................................... A16 Slope Analysis ........................................... A17 Watersheds................................................. A18 Hydric Soils................................................ A19 Prime Agricultural Soils........................... A20 Abandoned Mine Drainage ..................... A21 General Stream Quality............................ A22 Other Water Pollution .............................. A23 Wetlands and Floodplains ....................... A24 State Parks, Forests and Gamelands ...... A25 Biological Diversity Areas ....................... A26 Important Bird Areas-Important Mammal Areas ................................................... A27 Off-road Trails ........................................... A28 On-road Bike Trails................................... A29 Transportation Routes.............................. A30 Water Trails................................................ A31 Sewer Service ............................................. A32

Utility corridors......................................... A33 Water Service ............................................. A34 Water Source Map..................................... A35 Historic Sites .............................................. A36 Land Coverage .......................................... A37 Municipal Ordinance Status.................... A38 Population Density ................................... A39 List of Figures Figure 1: The Ridges and Valleys of the Southern Alleghenies Region ................ i Figure 2: Bedford Public Meeting................ i Figure 3: Laurel Hill Creek .......................... ii Figure 4: Greenwood Furnace Amish Buggies .................................................... ii Figure 5: Barronvale Covered Bridge......... ii Figure 6: Bike Trails ...................................... ii Figure 7: Glendale Lake at Prince Gallitzin State Park................................................. ii Figure 8: Laurel Hill Greenway .................. ii Figure 9: Implementation Partners Organization Chart ............................... iv Figure 10: The Southern Alleghenies Region .......................................................5 Figure 11: Blue Knob State Park....................5 Figure 12: October 2005 Public Meeting in Fulton County........................................11 Figure 13: Bedford County Meeting Held April 2006 ...............................................12 Figure 14: View of Juniata River from one of the Region’s Ridges ..........................13 Figure 15: Stream Showing Discoloration due to Abandoned Mine Drainage.....15 Figure 16: GIS Process Diagram.................17 Figure 17: Corridor Type I ..........................27 Figure 18: Corridor Type II.........................27 Figure 19: Corridor Type III .......................28 Figure 20: Corridor Type IV .......................28 Figure 21: Corridor Type V.........................28 Figure 22: Sideling Hill Creek ....................31

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Table of Contents Figure 23: Segment of the Ghost Town Trail in Cambria County ......................37 Figure 24: Aerial of Meadow Grounds Lake41 Figure 25: Meadow Grounds Lake ............41 Figure 26: View of Jack’s Mountain from the Link Trail .........................................44 Figure 27: View of Raystown Lake............44 Figure 28: Youghiogheny River Lake........47 Figure 29: Great Allegheny Passage trail in Somerset County ...................................48 Figure 30: View of the Cassleman River in Somerset County ...................................48 Figure 31: Rail Trail Development.............52 Figure 32: Along the Laurel Hill Greenway52 Figure 33: Tunnel along the Great Allegheny Passage ................................53 Figure 34: Public Meeting in Huntingdon County ....................................................56 Figure 35: Implementation Partners Organization Chart ...............................60 Figure 36: Example of Buffer Signage .......61 Figure 37: Example of Buffer Signage .......61 Figure 38: Bedford Meeting ........................64 Figure 39: Public Voting..............................64 Figure 40: Blue Knob State Park............... A2 Figure 41: View from Blue Knob State ParkA2 Figure 42: Autumn Foliage at Blue Knob State Park.............................................. A2 Figure 43: Fishing at Blue Knob State ParkA2 Figure 44: View from Blue Knob State ParkA2 Figure 45: Cowan’s Gap State Park ......... A2 Figure 46: View of Crooked Run from Headache Hill ...................................... A4 Figure 47: Kayaking at Prince Gallitzin State Park.............................................. A4 Figure 48: Prince Gallitzin State Park...... A4 Figure 49: ATV Riders ............................... A5 Figure 50: Balanced Rock at Trough Creek State Park.............................................. A5 Figure 51: Pedestrian Bridge at Trough Creek State Park .................................. A5

Figure 52: Beach at Whipple Dam State Park ................................................................ A6 Figure 53: View of Rothrock State Forest A7

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

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Table of Contents

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Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Preface Preface

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

The Southern Alleghenies Region The Southern Alleghenies Region spans the Laurel Highlands and Allegheny Front in the west across the Appalachians to the east. It is comprised of Blair, Bedford, Cambria, Fulton, Huntingdon and Somerset Counties. These counties, working together through the auspices of the Southern Alleghenies Planning and Development Commission (SAP&DC) have developed a Greenways and Open Space Network Plan for their region and individual plans for five of the six counties (Blair County is currently preparing a greenways plan as a part of its County-wide comprehensive land use plan).

The SAP&DC is an Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) designated Local Development District (LDD), a US Economic Development Administration (EDA) designated Economic Development District (EDD), a Pennsylvania designated Workforce Investment Board (SAWIB) and a Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) designated Rural Planning Organization (RPO). Within the SAP&DC area are the member counties of Bedford, Blair, Cambria, Fulton, Huntingdon and Somerset. Recently, the entire region was branded as “The Alleghenies,” as part of a regional marketing strategy.

Figure 10: The Southern Alleghenies Region

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The mission of SAP&DC is to promote economic and cultural progress throughout the region, tofoster cooperation among communities and the agencies that serve them and work to make the Alleghenies a better place in which to live, work and do business. SAP&DC is governed by a board of directors comprised of county commissioners from each of the member counties along with representation from the private sector. Numerous other public and private sector representatives provide valuable guidance through participation on advisory committees.

What are Greenways? Generally, greenways are linear corridors of land that connect key resources and open space within a region. Open spaces are blocks of land that are generally self-contained with limited connections or linkages to other areas. The DCNR defines greenways as the following:

“Linear corridors of public and private land that serve as the linkages between specifically identified natural resourcebased or manmade features. They can be either land or water based and serve a variety of functions and benefits including recreation, transportation, community revitalization and economic development, natural resource conservation, environmental protection, wildlife habitat and migration and education. These corridors often follow old railways, canals, ridge tops, rivers and stream valleys.” Further, the DCNR defines a greenway network as: “A greenways network includes greenways as well as hubs of specifically identified natural resources or open space and manmade features or destinations that influence the development of the linear greenway corridor.”

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Figure 11: Blue Knob State Park

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Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

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Preface Importance of Greenways As the links between a region’s open space opportunities, greenways are critically important to leveraging the existing resources of a region and adding new opportunities at the State level, DCNR has set a goal of developing a greenway plan for each county in the State to leverage previous State and local investments. Benefits of developing greenways include: • • • • •

Additional recreation opportunities for residents; Enhanced attractiveness of region for tourism; Transportation opportunities/connections; Ecological benefits of connected habitats; and Riparian/water quality benefits from protected stream corridors.

Public participation and polling have indicated a strong desire for the types of trails and recreation opportunities associated with greenways. Most recently, these preferences have been documented in the results of a 2003 survey conducted as part of the revision to the State Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP). The results indicate that walking and bicycling paths are generally the preferred recreation facilities State-wide. Trails of all types were ranked higher in importance than other popular recreational activities such as hunting, fishing, boating and camping.

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The Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

and connectivity between important historical, cultural and heritage amenities that are popular among residents and tourists.

The Greenway Plans that cover the counties of the Southern Alleghenies region follow these definitions. Furthermore, the greenways plans differentiate between corridors for recreation and human use and those for preservation purposes. The land and open spaces used to create this plan currently exist, however they may be controlled by a public entity, a private land trust or be under private ownership. This Plan weaves these spaces together into a comprehensive network without regard to current control or ownership. The Plan for action includes a list of tools available to protect land that is privately held so that it can be incorporated into the overall network. The Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan is unique within the State for both its size and scope as a six-county regional plan. It is the first regional plan in the State, covering about 1/10 of the Commonwealth. The Plan is designed to be both a regional plan and a component of the comprehensive land use plans of Bedford, Cambria, Fulton, Huntindon and Somerset Counties. The development of a regional greenways plan for the region will ultimately bolster local economic development by promoting tourism and recreation opportunities. Previously, the Southern Alleghenies region has seen the benefits of greenway development in projects such as the Ghost Town Trail, the Great Allegheny Passage and the Laurel Highlands Heritage Trail. New greenways can leverage these successes and further increase mobility

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Purpose and Goals Purpose and Goals

The Southern Alleghenies region is home to a wide range of precious resources including an extensive supply of natural and recreation areas. These resources include 31,000 acres of State Parks, 240,000 acres of gamelands, 171,000 acres of State Forests and 24,000 acres of Federally preserved land. Within the region there are hundreds of miles of major trails that extend beyond the region and numerous miles of designated water trails on the region’s rivers and streams. In addition to these protected and designated resources, a number of areas have been identified as Biological Diversity Areas with unique habitats or endangered species, some of which are located within existing State, county or Federal lands. Beyond these quantitative statistics, the Southern Alleghenies region is a unique area within the Commonwealth characterized by ridges and valleys, prime farmlands, extensive forests and high quality streams and rivers for fishing and boating. The nature of this landscape changes from the edge of the Appalachian plateau in Cambria and Somerset Counties to the ridge and valley formations in the remainder of the region. These two different landscapes result in different resources, land use patterns and recreational experiences. In short, the Southern Alleghenies region contains a rich tapestry of natural features available for the use and enjoyment of the region’s residents as well as for those from well beyond the region’s boundaries. Given the breadth of the resources that the region possesses, the overall goal of this

plan is to create an integrated network of greenways that links and leverages these resources into a comprehensive system of open space and greenway connections. Once integrated, the overall network will form a “whole that is greater than the sum of its parts.”

Purposes of the Plan Upon evaluating issues in the region, it was recognized that the Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan (the Plan) will have a multitude of purposes. As a part of the planning process, a series of goals have been established to guide the development of the plan for each individual county. One purpose of the Plan is to create physical connections between various regionally- and County-significant areas such as heritage sites and existing and planned recreation facilities. Another purpose is to identify opportunities for protecting other resources including sensitive natural land.

2005. Most counties ranked conservation and recreation as the Plan’s two most important purposes. Unlike many other greenway efforts, equal interest exists in the Southern Alleghenies region to ensure the conservation of animal and plant habitat areas as to provide new and expanded recreation opportunities. Table 1, as outlined below summarizes the rankings expressed during these meetings. The sixth purpose, “promote healthy lifestyles,” was added to the list as a result of public input gathered during the October 2005 public meetings.

Goals The development and prioritization of the overall purposes for the Plan led to the following related goals: Purpose 1: Conserve important natural resources.

Building on these two overarching purposes, the Plan also seeks to:

Goal 1A: Protect the region’s most sensitive and unique natural areas and habitats by reserving sensitive and contiguous lands for greenways and open space areas.

1. 2. 3. 4.

Goal 1B: Identify and manage watershed issues within the region to minimize negative impacts on natural resources and waterways.

Conserve important natural resources; Expand recreation opportunities; Celebrate cultural heritage; Bolster economic development opportunities; 5. Expand mobility through alternative transportation opportunities; and 6. Promote healthy lifestyles. The importance of each purpose was ranked at individual county meetings held in October

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

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Goal 1C: Designate protected areas for wildlife habitat and migration patterns.

Purpose 2: Expand recreation opportunities. Goal 2A: Leverage the broad range of existing committed open space investments within the region’s recreation network. Goal 2B: Delineate a formal system of land and water trails to link regionally significant recreation assets and heritage sites. Purpose 3: Celebrate cultural heritage. Goal 3A: Establish formal linkages between cultural resources to increase tourism and awareness within the region. Goal 3B: Create educational opportunities and increase the visibility of cultural assets by integrating them into a publicly accessible trail network. Purpose 4: Bolster economic development. Goal 4A: Capitalize on nationally and State-significant efforts, such as the Great Allegheny Passage, the Rock Run Recreation Area, Main Line Canal Greenway™ and the Flight 93 National Memorial, to strengthen regional economic development. Goal 4B: Expand local economic opportunities through the interconnection of various existing and future natural and cultural attractions, urban areas and historic sites.

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Purpose and Goals Purpose 5: Increase pedestrian mobility. Goal 5A: Construct connections between county and regional trails to improve east-west travel. Goal 5B: Utilize existing railroad corridors, ridge tops and stream valleys to expand the region’s trail network. Purpose 6: Promote healthy lifestyles. Goal 6A: Expand trail opportunities to enhance physical, mental and spiritual wellness among the region’s residents. Goal 6B: Develop a natural resourcebased network of greenways and open spaces that provides for recreation uses such as hiking or cycling. Table 1: Purpose Rankings Bedford

Cambria

Fulton

Huntingdon

Somerset

Cambria Co. Average

Overall Average (using Cambria average)

Conservation

1

3.7

1

1

1

1.53

Recreation

2

2.0

2

2

2

2.00

Cultural Heritage

3

3.7

3

3

3

3.13

Economic Development

4

3.0

4

5

4

4.00

Transportation

5

2.7

5

4

5

4.33

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Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Plan Components Plan Components

This Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Plan (the Plan) has been organized into the following five parts and a series of appendices. The parts represent the primary steps or work tasks completed as part of the planning process. The parts are chronologically organized and generally describe the key data sets, planning criteria, policies or projects that have developed as part of that step. Maps, tables and images have been included to further summarize or illustrate the information. Throughout each part, key notes or points have been highlighted in light grey boxes.

Part One – Planning Approach Outlines the overall approach used to develop the Plan, which includes an emphasis on the resource-based opportunities that exist in the region. The Plan was developed through the use of extensive geographical information system GIS-based mapping and analysis, includes a detailed action plan and incorporates an extensive public review process.

Part Two – Regional Profile Provides a summary overview of the region, its counties and its natural and man-made resources. Much more detail about these resources can be found in Appendix A; an overview of the key findings is provided here. This section also includes a brief overview of previous planning efforts that have been conducted.

Part Three – Analyzing Opportunities Describes the process used to sift through all of the GIS mapping and other data to establish potential greenway corridors and then to define the individual project corridors.

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision Presents the final greenways plans and project corridors for each county which are then integrated into a regional plan. It includes a description of each corridor type as well as mapping and descriptions of the greenway plans and project corridors for each of the five counties as well as for the entire region.

Part Five – A Plan for Action Proposes an overall implementation strategy for developing the Plan and structure for the implementation partners. It also includes descriptions of potential implementation techniques and resources.

Bibliography Outlines the plans, studies, reports and other literature sources used to compile this report.

Appendix A: Background Data Contains descriptions of the existing features of the region (State Parks, Forests and Gamelands, Federal lands, on and off-road trails and water trails). Additionally, the full range of mapping prepared over the course of the project has been included along with summaries and descriptions.

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

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Appendix B: GIS Data Dictionary Lists the GIS datasets used to prepare the base mapping including the type and contents of each layer.

Appendix C: Public Participation Summary Summarizes the public meetings held over the course of the project.

Appendix H: Natural Infrastructure Data Layers Needed Provides a summary of the GIS data layers needed to complete a natural infratructuretype computer mapping database. The natural infrastructure data layers were defined in conjunction with the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

Appendix D: Conservation Easement A sample conservation easement agreement based on a model agreement developed by the Pennsylvania Land Trust Association.

Appendix E: Riparian Forest Buffer Agreement A sample riparian forest bugger agreement based on a model agreement developed by the Pennsylvania Land Trust Association.

Appendix F: Trail Easement Agreement A sample trail easement agreement based on a model agreement developed by the Pennsylvania Land Trust Association.

Appendix G: Water Quality Improvement Easement A sample water quality improvement easement agreement based on a model agreement developed by the Pennsylvania Land Trust Association.

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Plan Components

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Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part One – Planning Approach Part One – Planning Approach

Philosophy This Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan (the Plan) links existing resources by utilizing both natural and man-made environmental features found within the six counties. By incorporating these elements into the greenways network, the region’s natural resources are harnessed to create a comprehensive and interconnected network of related elements. In addition to delineating the elements of the greenway network, the Plan identifies individual project corridors and provides a clear strategy for implementing them. The Plan provides an overall framework for prioritizing among the many project corridors as well as a range of potential tools and support sources. General Methodology In order to define a network of resourcebased greenways, a geographical information system (GIS) was used as the project’s primary analytical tool. This analysis was developed through three key phases: the compilation of background mapping, establishing greenway criteria and the identification of potential greenway elements and corridors. These phases included the following: Background Mapping Building on available data, a comprehensive series of GIS maps was prepared to document the natural and manmade resources of the Southern Alleghenies region. Twenty-seven unique maps were

created to clearly portray the location and extent of the region’s various resources. These maps and the GIS data used to create them have been made available to each of the counties and the Southern Alleghenies Planning and Development Commission (SAP&DC) for their use. Greenway Criteria To identify those areas of the region that are most appropriate for inclusion in the greenways network, a series of criteria were identified. These criteria, selected from the resources mapped as part of the background data, included elements such as ridge tops and steep slopes which could be used to establish the extents of potential greenway elements. Greenway Elements and Corridors Geographic areas most appropriate for inclusion into the greenways network were those with a number of overlapping criteria as well as those located such that they could be used to link existing or potential areas of the network. Implementation In addition to clearly defining a network of greenway corridors that are directly related to the landscape of the Southern Alleghenies region, this Plan includes a realistic implementation strategy. This strategy, built on interaction with the Planning Advisory Committee (PAC) and public meetings in each county, has been tailored to the government structure and political realities of the Southern Alleghenies region.

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

Public Participation Process As a compliment to the technical nature of the GIS data gathered, a public review process was incorporated into the planning process so that review and feedback from residents of the counties and other interested parties could be incorporated. This process was sponsored by the SAP&DC. To steer the project through the development of the plan a PAC was formed. The PAC includes the following members: the planning director of each county, the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy, the SAP&DC, the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) and the Allegheny Ridge Development Corporation. A brief description of each of the major public participation events (meetings) conducted throughout the process follows:

PAC Meetings Bi-monthly meetings were held with the PAC and typically included reviews of the initial data analyses, draft products and discussion of methods and ideas as they were being developed. October 2005 Public Meetings Over the course of 2 days (October 12th and 13th), Planning Team members conducted meetings in the following five counties: • • • • •

The purpose of the meetings was to discuss three key aspects of the Plan: the overall purpose and intent of the greenway plan, the proposed dual nature of the plan (recreation and conservation) and the elements and scoring used to develop the plan. Figure 12: October 2005 Public Meeting in Fulton County

April 2006 Public Meetings Over the course of 2 days (April 18th and 20th), Planning Team members conducted meetings in the following five counties: • •

May 2007

Somerset (October 12th at 1:00pm in Somerset) Cambria (October 12th at 4:00pm in Ebensburg) Bedford (October 12th at 7:00pm in Bedford) Fulton (October 13th at 1:00pm in McConnellsburg) Huntingdon (October 13th at 4:00pm in Mill Creek)

Fulton (April 18th at 1:00pm in McConnellsburg) Huntingdon (April 18th at 4:00pm in Mill Creek)

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Part One – Planning Approach • • •

Somerset (April 20th at 1:00pm in Somerset) Cambria (April 20th at 4:00pm in Ebensburg) Bedford (April 20th at 7:00pm in Bedford)



Huntingdon (November 2nd at 7:00pm in Huntingdon)

The purpose of these meetings was to solicit feedback on the draft plan prior to completion of the plan. The Fulton County meeting was held concurrently with a meeting for the ongoing County Comprehensive Plan. 2007 County Adoption Meetings The final draft of the Plan will be formally incorporated into the comprehensive recreation and open space plan for each of the participating counties. Adopted resolutions from each of the counties will be incorporated into the Plan document itself.

Figure 13: Bedford County Meeting Held April 2006

The purpose of the meetings was to solicit public feedback regarding: additional corridor suggestions, greenway related activities and current needs and opportunities. October/November 2006 County Meetings In late October and early November, meetings were held in the following counties: • • • •

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Fulton (October 25th at 7:00pm in McConnellsburg) Somerset (October 26th at 10:00am in Somerset) Cambria (November 2nd at 1:30pm in Ebensburg) Bedford (November 2nd at 7:00pm in Bedford)

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Two – Regional Profile Part Two – Regional Profile

The Region The Southern Alleghenies region, situated in southcentral Pennsylvania between Pittsburgh and Harrisburg, features 4,600 square miles of various man-made and natural resources such as the historic Town of Bedford, the Laurel Mountains/Highlands and the Juniata River. These resources provide the region’s 470,000 residents with opportunities for preservation, recreation and economic development. The Southern Alleghenies Region is made up of the following six counties: Bedford, Blair, Cambria, Fulton, Huntingdon and Somerset. Bedford County Bedford County is the south central county in the region and encompasses 38 municipalities within its 1,015 square mile area. The County’s population increased 4.3% (47,919 to 49,984) from 1990 to 2000. Although Bedford County’s population is more concentrated in boroughs such as Bedford (the County Seat), Everett, Schellsburg and Hyndman, 83% of the population live in the more rural townships. Some of the County’s unique natural features include: Blue Knob, which is the State’s second highest point in elevation and the Raystown Branch of the Juniata River, which is part of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. Blair County Blair County is the north central county in the region and features 24 municipalities within its 527 square mile area. The County’s population decreased from 130,542 in 1990 to 129,144 in 2000 (-1.1%).

While the County’s major population center is Altoona, residents are also concentrated in boroughs such as Hollidaysburg (the County Seat) and Tyrone. The Frankstown Branch of the Juniata River and Brush Mountain are two of the County’s unique natural features. Cambria County Cambria County, the northwestern most county in the region, includes 63 municipalities within its 694 square mile area. The County’s population decreased from 163,029 in 1990 to 152,598 in 2000 (-6.4%). The County’s major population center is Johnstown. However, residents are also concentrated in boroughs such as Ebensburg (the County Seat) and Carrolltown. Some of the County’s unique natural features include Prince Gallitzin State Park and the Conemaugh River. Fulton County Fulton County is the southeastern county in the region and features 13 municipalities within its 438 square mile area. The County’s population increased 3.1% (13,837 to 14,261) from 1990 to 2000. This population is concentrated in boroughs such as McConnellsburg (the County Seat). Buchanan State Forest, Licking Creek and Meadow Grounds Lake are three of the County’s most notable landscapes. Huntingdon County Huntingdon County, the northeastern most county in the region, includes 48 municipalities within its 890 square mile area. The County’s population increased 3.2% (44,164 to 45,586) from 1990 to 2000. The majority of the population base is concentrated in boroughs such as Huntingdon (the County Seat) and

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

Mount Union. Raystown Lake and Rothrock State Forest are two of the County’s unique natural features.

Figure 14: View of Juniata River from one of the Region’s Ridges

Somerset County Somerset County is the southwestern county in the region and encompasses 50 municipalities within its 1,082 square mile area. The County’s population increased 2.4% (78,128 to 80,023) from 1990 to 2000. The County’s population is concentrated in boroughs such as Somerset (the County Seat), Indian Lake, Jennerstown and Windber. Some of the County’s distinguished natural and recreation areas include the Youghiogheny River and Indian Lake. In addition, Somerset County is home to the Flight 93 National Memorial and a portion of the Great Allegheny Passage.

Summary of Previous Planning Efforts Recent efforts to conserve resources and protect sensitive natural areas throughout the Southern Alleghenies region have developed a wide range of projects and plans. Many of

these plans have focused on watershed resources through multi-municipal or multi-jurisdictional efforts. The following is a brief overview of major ongoing and recently completed planning efforts in the region. Additional reports and studies have been listed in the bibliography section of this report. Trail and Greenway Projects The Pittsburgh-to-Harrisburg Main Line Canal Greenway™: Pennsylvania’s Millennium Trail aspires to coordinate individual efforts to protect historic, cultural, natural and recreational resources into a larger project. The project area includes four major watersheds but focuses primarily on the greenway corridor, which extends one mile to either side of the river that it travels along. The finished greenway will include linked water and land trails crossing approximately 320 miles from southwestern to central Pennsylvania (Pittsburgh to Harrisburg). As one of the longest proposed greenway corridors in the State, it is considered a ‘mega’-greenway by DCNR. These ‘mega’-greenways comprise the State level greenway network. The Great Allegheny Passage is a hikebike trail that will ultimately extend approximately 150 miles from Pittsburgh, PA to Cumberland, MD where it connects with the C & O Canal and continues to Washington, D.C. . Along this journey, the trail passes through the Southern Alleghenies region. Currently, the Great Allegheny Passage features 100 contiguous miles of constructed trail. Nearly the entire trail segment within the Southern Alleghenies region is constructed. Like the

13

Part Two – Regional Profile from Bedford to Huntingdon and is generally 5 miles wide. LEGEND

CLEARFIELD

The Trolley Trail Feasibility Study analyzes the possibility of reforming the historic Johnstown Trolley Line as a rail trail corridor. The project is part of the Stoneycreek-Quemahoning Initiative. The study breaks development of the 7.4 mile trail into three phases and considers connections to various adjacent recreation and cultural attractions.

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The Raystown, Huntingdon and Broad Top Greenway Feasibility Study and Plan highlights 100 miles of natural and cultural resources to be conserved and protected. The proposed greenway corridor extends

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The Fulton County Trails Master Plan identifies over 400 miles of trails oriented towards pedestrians and various vehicles. These trails generally leverage one of the County’s major assets, its rural character, to enhance users’ experiences along the trails. The focus of the plan is to create linkages between points of interest and population centers.

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The Pike 2 Bike Trail, straddling Bedford and Fulton counties, covers 8.5 miles of the original Pennsylvania Turnpike that was eventually bypassed in 1968. The land was turned over to the Southern Alleghenies Conservancy in 2001 for use as a bike trail. The Trail passes through Buchanan State Forest and features two tunnels (approximately 0.7 and 1.3 miles long) along its overall length.

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Main Line Coral Greenway, the Great Allegheny Passage is considered a ‘mega’greenway.

THOMPSON

Pennsylvania Maryland

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Regional Base Map

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Two – Regional Profile The Lower Trail Feasibility Study evaluates the extension of the Lower Trail from Alfarata to Huntingdon. The study was completed in 1995. This 8 miles trail expansion is an important part of the Mainline Canal Greenway. The Rock Run Recreation Area is a DCNR–funded project that evolved through the Allegheny Ridge Corporation’s RidgeRIDER Program and is owned and operated by the Cambria County Conservation and Recreation Authority and the Rock Run Recreation Area Advisory Board. This coalition of partners seeks to develop a large brownfield site in Cambria County with off-highway recreational vehicle trails and supporting facilities. The area will provide a State-wide destination for ATV, snowmobile and other such recreational activities. Watershed Studies • • • • • • • • • •

Black Lick Creek North and South Watershed Assessment Coldwater Heritage Watershed Assessment Evitts Creek Watershed Assessment Kiski-Conemaugh River Basin Conservation Plan Juniata Watershed Management Plan Piney Creek, Blair County Coldwater Heritage Conservation Plan Quemahoning Creek - AMD Treatment Plan Rhodes and Ickes Run Coldwater Heritage Conservation Plan Shawnee Lake Watershed Assessment Shober's Run Watershed Assessment Plan

• • • • • •

South Fork Branch of the Little Conemaugh - Coldwater Heritage Conservation Plan Spruce Creek Watershed Assessment Stonycreek River Economic Impact Study Three Sisters Conservation Plan - Potomac Watershed Upper West Branch Susquehanna River Conservation Plan Will Creek Joint Study

Opportunities and Challenges for the Region Previous planning efforts and the mapping and other data compiled for this Plan have revealed a number of opportunities and challenges for the region. The following listing of these opportunities and challenges represents the key issues to be addressed as part of the Greenways and Open Space Network Plan. Opportunities Wealth of Natural Resources The region contains a vast array of high-quality streams and waterways, ridges, valleys and unique wildlife habitats. Unique Landscapes The position of the region within the State results in a range of unique landscape experiences from the Allegheny Plateau of Cambria and Somerset counties to the ridge and valley formations in the eastern portions of the region. Existing Projects Underway Several trail and greenway projects such as the Great Allegheny Passage are already complete

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

or underway and have proven to be widely popular recreational destinations.

land use regulation and may preclude their use even where available.

Large Amount of Publicly-Held Land Large portions of the region’s open spaces are held in the form of State Parks, State Forests, Gamelands, Federal Lands or County Parks. Additional land is held by conservancies or other preservation-oriented groups. Localized Development Pressures Development pressure varies greatly throughout the region, sometimes high adjacent to cities and boroughs and sometimes high in very rural areas. For example, in Huntingdon County the highest growth areas are rural townships near Raystown Lake. Development pressure is increasing along the region’s ridges and valleys, and particularly in areas near public land. Committed Residents and Leadership County residents and leadership have been supportive of the overall goals of the Greenways and Open Space Network. Challenges Majority of Existing Open Space is Unconnected Although the region contains large amounts of publicly and privately held open space, it is currently not linked together in any meaningful way. Limited Regulatory Tools are Available for Implementation The large majority of the region’s 236 municipalities lack zoning or other land development regulations that could potentially be used to protect elements of a greenways network. Local attitudes are reticent towards

Figure 15: Stream Showing Discoloration due to Abandoned Mine Drainage

Environmental Issues Like much of post-industrial Pennsylvania, the Southern Alleghenies region faces issues such as abandoned mine drainage, industrial discharges, uncontrolled sedimentation, agricultural run-off, strip

15

Part Two – Regional Profile mining, poor forestry practices and other forms of water pollution. Funding and Staffing Resources for Implementation Although some funding and staff are dedicated to implementing trails and greenway elements in the region, the amount of funding and staff available does not match the needs of the region. Lack of a Coordinated Implementation Approach Prior to this Plan there was not a coordinated effort to develop a regional greenway network.

16

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Three – Analyzing Opportunities Part Three – Analyzing Opportunities

Base Mapping This section describes the general principles guiding the data gathering and analysis process used to develop the Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan (the Plan). The process is generally described in chronological order; however the overall process was iterative in nature. The overall goals, key assumptions and criteria for the planning process were continually revisited to permit reflection, refinement and the analysis to be reevaluated. Background information was gathered and mapping prepared within each county using a computer-based geographic information system (GIS). More than 27 datasets ranging from population and land use to steep slopes, ridgetops and biological diversity areas (BDAs) were gathered and mapped. Using GIS software, the background maps were overlaid and relationships were subsequently analyzed. The background mapping and GIS software formed the basis for the analysis process used to define greenway elements. Figure 16: GIS Process Diagram

Data from a wide range of sources was compiled to create the background mapping. Sources included State and Federal agencies, county GIS inventories, the Southern Alleghenies Planning and Development Commission (SAP&DC) and nongovernmental organizations such as the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy. In some cases where data was not available in a digital format, GIS mapping was created by digitizing paper maps and other sources. One example of this is the ridgelines dataset – this information was visually identified using United States Geological Survey and other topographic information and digitized from these sources. Data Sources National Park Service National Register of Historic Places National Wetlands Inventory Penn State University, Environmental Resource Research Institute Pennsylvania Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey (DCNR) Pennsylvania Bureau of State Parks (DCNR) Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection Pennsylvania Department of Health, Bureau of Health Statistics Pennsylvania Department of Transportation Pennsylvania Game Commission Southern Forest Experiment Station (US Department of Agriculture) United States Environmental Protection Agency United States Geological Survey Western Pennsylvania Conservancy

One of the most important pieces of background mapping for this project was the topography of each county and the region. The location of stream valleys, ridge tops and other

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

landform features proved to be a key component used to define the extents of potential greenway corridors. Prior to beginning this project, digital topographic information was not available at the same level of detail for the entire region. To ensure compatibility among the counties and consistency among greenway plans, topographic data was compiled at the same level of detail for the entire region. To do so, the highest quality available data that was common to all counties was used to prepare a comprehensive GIS inventory of topography for the entire region. Because this information was in USGS quadrangle map format, it had to be digitized and matched at the edges of each quadrangle. Previously existing data of the same quality was integrated with newly digitized data to create the comprehensive coverage necessary. The complete topographic coverage included 3-D elevation information which allowed for a much wider range of analysis. This dataset is a significant improvement over the data previously available to the region. While it formed the basis of the Plan, the mapping information developed for this project, including the topography, is also available for future county and regional projects.

Criteria Initial Criteria Following review of the background mapping for each of the counties and the region, the Planning Advisory Committee (PAC) selected several aspects of the mapping as appropriate for inclusion in the greenways network. These elements, such as existing trails, ridgelines and

steep slopes, represented resources that were felt to be the most appropriate for integration in a greenways network. The preferences of each county were incorporated into the criteria, however, to maintain a consistent greenway network throughout the region the same criteria were applied within each county and throughout the region. Following multiple discussions with the PAC the initial list of criteria selected was as follows: Corridors • State Forests, Gamelands and Parks, Federal Parks/Lands, County/Local Parks • Flood Plains • Wetlands • Streams (100' buffer) • Slopes > 25% • Off-Road Trails (750' buffer) • On Road Bike Routes (750' buffer) • Water Trails (750' buffer) • Abandoned Railroad Grades (100' buffer) • Railroads (100' buffer) • Ridge-Tops (1,500' buffer) • Utility corridors (100' buffer) • Reservoir Watersheds • Exceptional Value Watersheds Hubs • State Forests, Gamelands and Parks, Federal Parks/Lands, County/Local Parks • Biological Diversity Areas • Cultural Resource Sites/Historic Districts • Population Centers (> 3 people/acre)

17

Part Three – Analyzing Opportunities The buffers associated with linear criteria represent the distance on either side of the middle or centerline of a particular natural feature. Buffer widths were determined to establish the physical limits of each particular resource and represent the average width of that particular element type. For example, ridge-tops were given a buffer of 1,500’ as this was the distance the PAC felt best encompassed the unique aspects of the ridge-tops found in the region. These buffers were incorporated into the GIS data used to create the initial mapping of the criteria.

to visualize the extent and density of the selected criteria and its location within each of the counties and the region. It represents a first pass at developing potential hubs and corridors throughout the

Although discussed as an issue at numerous public meetings, wind turbine sites were not included in this analysis. Data on existing and potential sites was not available for use at the time of this analysis. Further, the GIS data available to complete a site specific analysis was too course-grain in scale and could not provide an accurate assessment of potential impacts or opportunities. A related analysis should be conducted within the areas once data becomes available. The purpose of the initial mapping was to provide an overview of where the selected criteria occurred in the region and the extent to which criteria overlapped within a given geographic area. To best present this information, a map of overlapping criteria was created. The initial map, shown on the following page, represents the presence of a criterion with a green shade. Areas of darker green represent multiple, overlapping criteria. Light green or white areas are those with a few or no criteria present. This map allowed PAC members

18

Initial Criteria Map

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Three – Analyzing Opportunities region and determining how natural and man-made resources could be interwoven into a system. By viewing the data in this manner, the PAC was able to assess the validity of the criteria selected and refine the list accordingly. Criteria Scoring Following review of the initial criteria mapping, it was felt that certain criteria should have greater influence on the location than others. To reflect this, a second series of criteria mapping was created with a specific weight applied to each criterion. Weighting for the criteria was determined by the PAC and refined based on review of maps created for each weighting system. The final weighting of the criteria is summarized in Table 2.

The weighting clearly indicates the priority placed on natural resource-related elements by the PAC. Elements such as steep slope areas and ridgetops were weighted as among the most significant elements of a greenways plan. To reflect the weighting system, the criteria mapping was adjusted to incorporate the weight of each criterion by adjusting the shading to match the total score within a specific area.

Table 2: Initial Criteria Weighing Table Number 1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

Criteria State Forest, Gamelands and Parks; Federal Parks/Lands; County/Local Parks Exceptional Quality Streams Biological Diversity Areas High Quality Streams Flood Plains Off-Road Trails Water Trails Normal Streams Slopes > 25% Ridge-Tops Abandoned Railroads Wetlands On Road Bike Trails Active Railroads Utility Corridors Reservoir Watersheds

Score

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5 points

300 ft.

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100 ft. 100 ft. 500 ft. 500 ft. 100 ft. 1,500 ft. 100 ft. 500 ft. 100 ft. 100 ft. -

Final Criteria Map

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

19

Part Three – Analyzing Opportunities Refinements The weighted criteria and mapping were reviewed by the PAC and presented at public meetings in each of the five counties in October of 2005. There was general agreement on the criteria included and their overall position within the weighting. As a further refinement of the analysis process, the criteria was subdivided into two related greenway network types; one for recreation based uses and a second for preservation purposes. Recreation Corridors/Destinations Greenway elements for recreational use were labeled as ‘Recreation corridors’ for connectors and ‘Destinations’ for hubs or nodes. Criteria that could comprise these recreation-based elements included existing trails, abandoned railroad grades and historic or cultural sites. Preservation Corridors/Habitats Greenway elements for preservation purposes were labeled as ‘Preservation corridors’ for connectors and ‘Habitats’ for nodes or hubs. Criteria that could comprise these preservation-based elements included ridge tops, high-quality streams and biological diversity areas (BDAs). The criteria selected for inclusion in each of the greenway types is summarized in the table below. The status of gamelands was much discussed during PAC meetings as it was felt that the use of these areas could fit within the nature of either corridor type. Ultimately it was decided to view gamelands as a component of both corridor types.

20

Greenway Elements The elements of the Greenways Plan were delineated using the final corridor criteria to link together similar destinations and habitats. Delineating these elements required balancing the inclusion of areas that met the required criteria and connecting the region’s existing or potential resources. For example, not every area that possessed one or more criteria was included as a greenway element; only those areas that possessed criteria and could be used to link resources were integrated into the overall network. The nature of the criteria used to create the corridor and the resources connected by the corridor determined its status as a recreation or preservation-oriented

corridor. It was not always possible to maintain purely recreation or preservation elements within a corridor; both often co-exist within close proximity. In these cases, the type of greenway element was determined by the overall nature of that area and its characteristics. For example, there are several sensitive BDAs within the general area of Raystown Lake, however, the overall nature of the Raystown Lake area is recreation oriented. Consequently, the Raystown-area greenway was designated as recreation-oriented. To preserve the nature of the sensitive BDAs, a more focused strategy such as a site specific management plan should be developed as a complement to the Greenway Plan. In this

case, the United States Corps of Engineers could be a partner in developing such a management plan. Mapping of the greenway elements within each county and the region has been included on the following pages. The areas within the two shades of green define the extents of the greenway elements. Areas in the lighter shade of green represent recreation-based elements while darker areas are preservation-based.

Table 3: Final Criteria Table B. Hubsa

A. Corridors Recreation corridors: provides human access and interconnects destinations Preservation corridors: minimize human access and interconnects habitats

Green and Grey Infrastructure 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Riparian Buffers Ridge Flood Plains Trails (land) Trails (water) Slopes >25% Utility Corridors Abandoned Railroads On-Road Bike Routes/Scenic Roads Active Railroads (likely to be abandoned)

Lt. Green Recreation Corridors

Dk. Green Preservation Corridors

U U U U U U U U U U

U U U U U U

Typical Green and Grey Infrastructure Bio-diversity Areas - No Impact (BDA-1) Bio-diversity Areas - Low Impact (BDA-2) Bio-diversity Areas - Moderate Impact (BDA-3) Bio-diversity Areas - High Impact (BDA-4) Boroughs and Villages Cultural Sites Sensitive Public Water Supply Watersheds Municipal, County, State, Federal Parks and Recreation Areas 9 State Forests 10 Important Bird Areas 11 State Gamelandsb 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Lt. Green Destinations

Dk. Green Habitats U U

U U U U U U U U U

Footnotes a b

Agro-tourism and public access points have not been included - data not available or provided Gamelands treated as special case - contains both recreation and preservation elements, management plans to determine specific locations / access.

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Three – Analyzing Opportunities

Bedford County Greenways Plan

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

21

Part Three – Analyzing Opportunities

Cambria County Greenways Plan

22

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Three – Analyzing Opportunities

Fulton County Greenways Plan

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

23

Part Three – Analyzing Opportunities

Huntingdon County Greenways Plan

24

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Three – Analyzing Opportunities

Somerset County Greenways Plan

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

25

Part Three – Analyzing Opportunities CLEARFIELD

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WOODBURY

SGL73

PLEASANTVILLE

WEST ST CLAIR

LINCOLN

K

SGL41

KING

OGLE

BOSWELL

QUEMAHONING

AR EP AT ST

Sha

JENNERSTOWN

FORBES STATE FOREST

SGL41

GALLITZIN STATE FOREST

PAINT BENSON

Quemahoning Resevoir

Preservation Corridors/ Habitats TELL

SHIRLEYSBURG

HOPEWELL

LINCOLN

WINDBER JENNER

LAUREL RIDGE STATE PARK

ROTHROCK STATE FOREST

Historic Site GREENWAY NETWORK

TODD KIMMEL

PAINT

SGL42

Tr ai

to w Fra

b Bo

SCALP LEVEL

CONEMAUGH

BLOOMFIELD

SHIRLEY SGL251

CASSVILLE

ek

PAVIA

ROTHROCK STATE FOREST

NORTH WOODBURY

nks

BLUE KNOB SGL26

MARTINSBURG

TAYLOR

SGL71

CASS

Cre

River

RICHLAND

FERNDALE

ROTHROCK STATE TROUGH FOREST CREEK

LINCOLN

TUSCARORA STATE FOREST

g

au

GREENFIELD

JUNIATA

SGL71

gh rou at T

SGL26

m

ADAMS

ROARING SPRING

Gre

ne Co

GEISTOWN

LAUREL RIDGE STATE PARK SGL42

l

SUMMERHILL

MOUNT UNION UNION

hw

th

tle Lit

Historic District

MAPLETON

MARKLESBURG

Mi d

u So

rk

Riv er

River

Fo

DALE

STONYCREEK

WESTMORELAND

CROYLE

LORAIN

UPPER YODER

HUSTON

FREEDOM

DAISYTOWN

SOUTHMONT

SGL147

ia ta

gh

JOHNSTOWN WESTMONT

SGL42

PORTAGE

St ate

SUMMERHILL

MIDDLE TAYLOR

PENN

Ju n

au

EAST TAYLOR

EDWARDSVILLE Little e SOUTH Li n FORK inEASTail CONEMAUGH r MaCONEMAUGH T FRANKLIN

NEWRY

HISTORIC SITES

HUNTINGDON

SGL118

BLAIR

JUNIATA

nB ran ch

n em Co

E G ID K R AR EL P R TE U ALOWER A T YODER L S

SGL198

er

Sensitive Biological Diversity Areas Less Sensitive Biological Diversity Areas

BRADY

SGL112

MILL CREEK

JUNIATA

SGL147

WASHINGTON

CASSANDRA

R iv

SGL112

WOODBURY

DUNCANSVILLE

Water Trail BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY AREAS

k

ill

LILLY

h ug ma ne CoWILMORE

ee

SMITHFIELD WALKER

WILLIAMSBURG

SGL147

FRANKSTOWN

Existing State/National /Regional Trail Proposed State/National /Regional Trail

SGL112

CANOE CREEK

HOLLIDAYSBURG

JACKSON

WEST TAYLOR

M

SGL198 ALLEGHENY

HENDERSON

HUNTINGDON

Cr

TUNNELHILL

CRESSON

MIFFLIN

ONEIDA

ee k

BRUSH RUN COUNTY PARK

TRAILS

Cr ee

VALLEY VIEW PARK ALTOONA

GALLITZIN

SANKERTOWN

GALLITZEN STATE FOREST

SGL322

CATHARINE

BLAIR

MUNSTER

To Pittsburgh, PA

SGL322

SGL118

un

SGL279

SGL79 NANTY GLO

nd

er R iv Littl e

ALEXANDRIA

SGL166

MILLER

Upper Juniata Water Trail

Au g

ck Bla

ch Bra n h Nort VINTONDALE

LOGAN

LORETTO

EBENSBURG

Active Railroad

River/Lake/Stream LOGAN PETERSBURG

PORTER GALLITZIN

Major Highway

GREENWOOD FURNACE

Inactive Railroad

MORRIS

ALLEGHENY

CAMBRIA

WEST

Juniata River

BLACKLICK Ghost Town Trail

SGL79

BARREE

TYRONE

SGL267

ASHVILLE

CAMBRIA

d Mi

Interstate Highway JACKSON

BELLWOOD

DEAN

SGL184

CHEST SPRINGS

ce

ate St

St a

Cre EAST CARROLL

nia ta

Cree k k

CLEARFIELD

CARROLLTOWN

arf

n na

To Dilltown, PA

ru Sp

k ee Cr

SPRUCE CREEK

Cle

eha

River

SGL108

ek

PATTON WEST CARROLL

DUMAN LAKE PARK

lic

BIRMINGHAM ANTIS

Ju

qu Su s

INDIANA

WHITE

ai l Tr

Bla ck lo

ch

SGL79

FRANKLIN

SGL108 SGL108

Municipal Boundary

WHIPPLE DAM

TYRONE

Cr

n Bra

BARR

WARRIORS MARK

SGL158

PRINCE GALLITZIN STATE PARK

Tra il

HASTINGS

NORTHERN CAMBRIA

READE

ROTHROCK STATE FOREST

SNYDER

Lin k

CHEST

st

ek Chest Cre

We

GALLITZIN STATE FOREST Glendale Lake

av er

SGL120 ROCK RUN RECRATION ELDER AREA

SUSQUEHANNA

Sh

Susquehanna River Water Trail - West Branch

To Washington D.C.

Pennsylvania Maryland

ALLEGANY

To Green Ridge Hiking Trail

WASHINGTON

To Hancock, MD

C & O Towpath

Regional Greenways Plan

26

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision

Project Corridors The Greenways and Open Space vision for the Southern Alleghenies region transforms the final greenway analysis into the basic building blocks for implementation of the “corridor” and “hub” system. As part of this transformation, a series of generalized project corridors has emerged. The following section provides a general synopsis of these project corridors and an explanation of their pertinence or relationship to the overall implementation of the Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan (the Plan). Defining Project Corridors Defining project corridors serves two purposes. Firstly, these corridors present a simple abstraction of the greenways and open space network plans prepared for each county. As part of this abstraction, discrete greenway segments or project corridors are defined where greenway and open space improvements could occur. Secondly, project corridors identify the general suitability and patterns of recommended recreation and preservation efforts throughout the Southern Alleghenies region. In general, recreationoriented corridors highlight areas with opportunity to introduce more intensive use of land and/or water resources. Preservation corridors are generally envisioned to be areas that largely remain in their current natural State to protect important open space and wildlife areas. Project corridors are important to each County as well as to the overall region. As part of this system, county-specific project

corridors connect various areas within the boundary of an individual county. Some examples of a county-scale recreation project corridor include an improved surface trail between two communities or a maintained dirt trail between a State Park and a nearby State Gameland. An example of a county-scale preservation project corridor includes a riparian buffer area within a stream valley that connects two biological diversity areas (BDAs). Regional project corridors can either transcend county boundaries within the Southern Alleghenies region or can serve to join the region with noteworthy projects in surrounding regions. Similar to the county project corridors, regional project corridors can be either recreation- or preservation-oriented. An example of a regional recreation project corridor is designating a link that extends to the C&O trail in Western Maryland or to the Main Line Canal Greenway™ heading to Pittsburgh or Harrisburg. A wildlife corridor connecting various biological diversity areas in different counties is an example of a regional preservation project corridor. Corridor Types Upon defining the basic system of project corridors, the Planning Advisory Committee (PAC) further developed the hierarchy of its Greenway and Open Space Network by conceptualizing the types and extent of improvements that could someday possibly be constructed or developed within this framework. Ultimately, five types of potential project corridor enhancements or improvements were defined and are assigned accordingly to each project corridor based upon the nature of the existing underlying greenway elements (recreation and

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

preservation) as well as the nature of the hubs, or destinations, that each of these greenways connects.

Type II: Maintained Dirt Trail Light impact trails; blazed/marked; pedestrian trail approximately 2' wide.

Consequently, the five types of improvements formulated as part of the Southern Alleghenies project corridors include: Type I: Open Space No constructed trails; unblazed/unmarked; public access permitted.

Figure 17: Corridor Type I

Figure 18: Corridor Type II

27

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision Type III: Improved/Maintained Dirt Trail Medium impact trails; blazed/marked; multipurpose trail approximately 6' wide.

Figure 19: Corridor Type III

28

Type IV: Improved/Maintained Crushed Aggregate/Asphalt Trail High impact trails; blazed/marked; multipurpose trail approximately 6'-10' wide.

Figure 20: Corridor Type IV

Type V: Water Trail Mapped and identified water routes with public access points at least every five miles.

Figure 21: Corridor Type V

On the following pages, each County’s specific greenways or project corridors are described and illustrated. While there are locations where county project corridors intersect regional project corridors, crossover or duplication of these county and regional segments does not exist. Presenting many opportunities that vary in scale and impact, the overall project corridors system delineates a basic but comprehensive framework intended to stimulate interest from a wide range of organizations and entities that will ultimately be responsible for the project corridors’ implementation. More detailed discussion on the ways in which they could be implemented is outlined in Part Five. An accompanying matrix also presents each project corridor’s type, general length and a basic unit cost (by type) for acquisition and improvement. However, because a large portion of the Southern Alleghenies greenway and open space system is located on land and water that is publicly accessible today, land acquisition costs will likely be a smaller consideration of the Plan’s overall costs in the future as compared to other Pennsylvania regions. The approximate amounts of these spaces are shown within each county’s matrix as “Secured/ Committed Land.” Also where suitable, costs for formal physical improvements, such as trail construction and surfacing, are also summarized as part of this evaluation. These factors culminate in an overall “ballpark” cost (in 2006 dollars) associated with potential implementation for each project corridor. Those ballpark costs should be used to establish priorities, prepare grant applications, county and

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision regional planning, and as a basis for initiating feasibility studies. Bedford County Project Corridors Bedford County features the following regional greenway project corridors: E.

Allegheny Front Wildlife Corridor;

F.

Five Mountains Wildlife Corridor;

G.

Mid State Greenway;

H.

Potomac to Raystown Greenway North;

I.

Potomac to Raystown Greenway South (actual location is situated within Fulton County); and

K.

The Allegheny Crossing.

Corridor to Osterburg and Reynoldsdale. The corridor, which is intended to include a maintained dirt trail, also intersects the Mud Run Trail and the Boiling Spring Run Trail.

County project corridors within Bedford County are described below. B-1. Pavia Connector The Pavia Connector is a recreational corridor that extends approximately 1.5 miles north from the Allegheny Front Wildlife Corridor. The corridor is entirely situated within Blue Knob State Park and State Gameland #26. The corridor is envisioned to consist of a maintained dirt trail. B-2. Bob’s Creek Trail Bob’s Creek Trail is an approximately 7 mile recreational corridor than stretches southeast from Blue Knob State Park and the proposed Allegheny Front Wildlife

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

Bedford County Project Corridors

May 2007

29

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision B-3. Mud Run Trail This recreational corridor extends 1 mile north from Osterburg. The corridor could someday accommodate a maintained dirt or asphalt trail. B-4. Boiling Spring Run Trail This recreational corridor extends nearly 1.5 mile northeast from Osterburg. The corridor is intended to consist of a maintained dirt trail. B-5. Dunning Creek Trail The Dunning Creek Trail runs nearly 14 miles northwest from Bedford to Gallitzin State Forest. This recreation corridor, which is intended to someday accommodate a maintained dirt trail, intersects the New Paris Connector and Bob’s Creek Trail. B-6. New Paris Connector This recreational corridor links the Dunning Creek Trail to New Paris. The approximately 1.5 mile corridor is envisioned to include a maintained dirt trail. B-7. Morrison Cove Wildlife Corridor The Morrison Cove Wildlife Corridor is an approximately 5 mile preservation corridor extending north from the Mid State Greenway to State Gameland #41. The corridor, which is partially situated within State Gameland #73, is intended to interconnect existing blocks of publicly accessible open space. B-8. New Enterprise Connector This nearly 2 mile recreational corridor connects New Enterprise to the Mid State Greenway. The corridor is envisioned to be characterized by a maintained dirt trail.

30

B-9. Yellow Creek Trail The Yellow Creek Trail connects the Mid State Greenway to the Potomac to Raystown Greenway. The recreational corridor, which runs approximately 6 miles, is largely situated within State Gameland #73. The corridor could someday accommodate a maintained dirt trail. B-10. River Bends Bypass The River Bends Bypass connects the Mid State Greenway to the Potomac to Raystown Greenway. The bypass passes through Everett, Tatesville and Cypher Station. The recreational corridor, which runs nearly 5 miles, could include a maintained dirt trail and/or asphalt trails. B-11. Schellsburg Connector This recreational corridor passes completely through Shawnee State Park as it connects Schellsburg to the Allegheny Crossing. The approximately 2 mile corridor will include a maintained dirt trail that runs along the Shawnee Branch of the Juniata River to Shawnee Lake. B-12. Tussey Mountain Connector The Tussey Mountain Connector extends 8.5 miles south from Bedford and links to Buchanan State Forest. The recreational corridor, which is intended to be a maintained dirt trail, also connects to State Gameland #97 as well as the Mid State Greenway, Evitts Mountain Wildlife Corridor and Evitts Mountain South Trail.

B-13. Evitts Mountain Wildlife Corridor The Evitts Mountain Wildlife Corridor also extends 8.5 miles south from Bedford to Buchanan State Forest. The preservation corridor, which is intended to interconnect existing tracts of publicly accessible open space, also intersects the Tussey Mountain Connector and Evitts Mountain South Trail. B-14. Brush Creek Wildlife Corridor The Brush Creek Wildlife Corridor is envisioned to consist of publicly accessible open space and stretch approximately 4 miles from the intersection of the Allegheny Crossing and the Raystown Branch to the County’s eastern border. B-15. Tiger Run Wildlife Corridor This preservation corridor stretches nearly 2.5 miles to connect the Wills Mountain Crossing and State Gameland #48 to State Gameland #104. The Corridor links several tracts of publicly accessed land. B-16. Wills Mountain Crossing This approximately 3 mile recreation corridor links Centerville to the Tiger Run Wildlife Corridor. A majority of this corridors’ length is situated within State Gameland #48. A maintained dirt trail is envisioned to be included within the corridor.

B-18. Tussey Mountain South Trail The Tussey Mountain South Trail traverses the Tussey Mountain ridge top for nearly 6 miles. The corridor could be improved as a maintained dirt trail stretching from the Mid State Greenway to the County’s southern border. The entire corridor is situated within Buchanan State Forest. The Tussey Mountain South Trail intersects the Black Valley Gap Trail. B-19. Black Valley Gap Trail This recreational corridor connects the Tussey Mountain South Trail and the Town Creek Wildlife Corridor to the Mid State Greenway and links various portions of Buchanan State Forest. The approximately 3 mile recreational corridor is envisioned to include a maintained dirt trail and is largely situated within Buchanan State Forest. B-20. McKees Gap Wildlife Corridor This 1.3 mile preservation corridor links the Sideling Creek Valley Crossing to State Gameland #49. The Corridor is intended to interconnect existing tracts of publicly accessible open space.

B-17. Cumberland Valley Wildlife Corridor The Cumberland Valley Wildlife Corridor is envisioned to be a 6 mile publicly accessible open space corridor. The preservation corridor extends south from Centerville to the southern border of the County.

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision B-21. Sideling Creek Valley Crossing This recreational corridor stretches through the southeastern portion of the County linking the Mid State Greenway, Buchanan State Forest and State Gameland #49. The approximately 8 mile corridor is envisioned to consist of a maintained dirt trail and is largely situated within either Buchanan State Forest or State Gameland #49.

Figure 22: Sideling Hill Creek

B-22. Evitts Mountain South Trail Evitts Mountain South Trail runs from the intersection of the Mid State Greenway and the Tussey Mountain Connector to the County’s southern border. This 10.5 mile recreational corridor is intended to include a maintained dirt trail that travels through Buchanan State Forest for most of its length. B-23. Town Creek Wildlife Corridor The Town Creek Wildlife Corridor is an approximately 3 mile corridor located in the southern portion of the County along Town Creek. The preservation corridor intersects the Black Valley Gap Trail and is intended to consist of publicly accessible open space.

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

31

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision Table 4: Bedford County Projects Summary

Project / Corridor Type of Corridor # Name Regional Project Corridors (within Bedford County) E Allegheny Front Wildlife Corridor I

Total Project Length (mi)

Length of Trail Constructed (mi.)¹

Length of Water Trail (mi.)

11.1

9.3

Unimproved/ Unsecured Project / Corridor Area (acres)

Low and High Corridor Acquisition Cost Estimates²

629.0 $

Water Trail Improvement Cost Estimate

Low and High Total Cost Estimates (Acquisition and Improvement)

142,000

to

$

425,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

142,000 to

$

425,000

$

3,919,000

to

$

11,769,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

3,919,000 to

$

11,769,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

to

$

-

F

Five Mountains Wildlife Corridor

I

53.9

15.5

G

Mid State Greenway

II

44.6

44.6

H

Potomac to Raystown Greenway North The Allegheny Crossing

I, II, V

15.4

3.0

15.3

6,586.9

$

1,481,000

to

$

4,446,000

$

19,000

to

$

19,000

$

30,500 $

1,530,500 to

$

4,495,500

IV, V

33.8

3.4

14.5

9,142.8

$

2,055,000

to

$

6,171,000

$

1,216,000

to

$

2,736,000

$

29,000 $

3,300,000 to

$

8,936,000

33,794.0

$

7,597,000

to

$

22,811,000

$

1,235,000

to

$

2,755,000

$

59,500

$

to

$

to

$

to

$

to

$

to

$

to

$

K

Regional Project Corridors Subtotal

158.8

75.8

17,435.3

Low and High Land Trail Improvement Cost Estimates

-

29.8

County Project Corridors B-1 Pavia Connector

II

1.3

1.3

0.0

-

B-2

Bob's Creek Trail

II

7.2

0.9

0.0

2,413.6 $

B-3

Mud Run Trail

II

1.2

1.2

0.0

-

B-4

Boiling Spring Run Trail

II

1.7

-

0.0

643.6 $

145,000

to

$

434,000

$

3,000

to

$

B-5

Dunning Creek Trail

II

13.8

7.2

0.0

2,494.1 $

561,000

to

$

1,684,000

$

10,000

to

B-6

New Paris Connector

II

1.4

-

0.0

523.0 $

118,000

to

$

353,000

$

2,000

B-7

Morrison Cove Wildlife Corridor

I

4.9

0.2

0.0

1,770.0 $

398,000

to

$

1,195,000

$

B-8

New Enterprise Connector

II

1.7

0.4

0.0

482.7 $

109,000

to

$

326,000

B-9

Yellow Creek Trail

II

6.0

1.1

0.0

1,850.5 $

416,000

to

$

B-10

River Bends Bypass

II

5.3

2.3

0.0

1,126.4 $

253,000

to

$

B-11

Schellsburg Connector

II

1.9

to

$

B-12

Tussey Mountain Connector

II

8.4

to

$

32

1.9 6.9

-

$

$

563.2 $

542,000 -

127,000

-

$

25,625,500

to

$

-

to

$

to

$

$

-

$

$

-

$

3,000

$

-

$

148,000

to

$

437,000

$

10,000

$

-

$

571,000

to

$

1,694,000

to

$

2,000

$

-

$

120,000

to

$

355,000

7,000

to

$

7,000

$

-

$

405,000

to

$

1,202,000

$

2,000

to

$

2,000

$

-

$

111,000

to

$

328,000

1,249,000

$

7,000

to

$

7,000

$

-

$

423,000

to

$

1,256,000

760,000

$

4,000

to

$

4,000

$

-

$

257,000

to

$

764,000

to

$

$

-

$

to

$

to

$

$

-

$

to

$

-

380,000

$

$ $

-

2,000

10,000 -

2,000

-

to

$

10,000

-

8,891,500

-

$

-

$

-

$

1,629,000

$

$

552,000 -

129,000

1,639,000 -

382,000

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision Table 4: Bedford County Projects Summary (Continued)

Project / Corridor Type of Corridor

Length of Trail Constructed (mi.)¹

Length of Water Trail (mi.)

# B-13

Name Evitts Mountain Wildlife Corridor

I

Total Project Length (mi) 8.5

B-14

Brush Creek Wildlife Corridor

I

4.3

-

B-15

Tiger Run Wildlife Corridor

I

2.6

0.3

B-16

Wills Mountain Crossing

II

3.0

2.8

B-17

I

6.2

B-18

Cumberland Valley Wildlife Corridor Tussey Mountain South Trail

II

B-19

Black Valley Gap Trail

B-20

-

Unimproved/ Unsecured Project / Corridor Area Low and High Corridor Acquisition Cost (acres) Estimates² 3,218.2 $ 723,000 to $ 2,172,000

Low and High Land Trail Improvement Cost Estimates $ to $ -

Water Trail Improvement Cost Estimate $ -

$

Low and High Total Cost Estimates (Acquisition and Improvement) 723,000 to $ 2,172,000

1,609.1 $

362,000

to

$

1,086,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

362,000

to

$

1,086,000

844.8 $

190,000

to

$

570,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

190,000

to

$

570,000

0.0

80.5 $

18,000

to

$

54,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

18,000

to

$

54,000

-

0.0

2,333.2 $

524,000

to

$

1,575,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

524,000

to

$

1,575,000

6.0

6.0

0.0

-

to

$

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

to

$

II

3.2

3.0

0.0

80.5 $

18,000

to

$

54,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

18,000

to

$

54,000

McKees Gap Wildlife Corridor

I

1.3

0.5

0.0

281.6 $

63,000

to

$

190,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

63,000

to

$

190,000

B-21

Sideling Creek Valley Crossing

II

7.7

4.9

0.0

1,045.9 $

235,000

to

$

706,000

$

4,000

to

$

4,000

$

-

$

239,000

to

$

710,000

B-22

Evitts Mountain South Trail

II

10.4

8.2

0.0

852.8 $

192,000

to

$

576,000

$

3,000

to

$

3,000

$

-

$

195,000

to

$

579,000

B-23

Town Creek Wildlife Corridor

I

3.3

-

0.0

1,247.0 $

280,000

to

$

842,000

$

to

$

$

-

$

280,000

to

$

842,000

-

$

5,328,000

to

$

15,889,000

$

14,219,500

to

$

41,514,500

$

-

-

-

-

County Project Corridors Subtotal

111.2

49.0

-

23,460.6

$

5,274,000

to

$

15,835,000

$

54,000

to

$

54,000

$

Project Corridors Total (Regional + County)

270.0

124.8

29.8

57,254.6

$

12,871,000

to

$

38,646,000

$

1,289,000

to

$

2,809,000

$

59,500

-

-

1: Also includes portions of project corridors that are under public control or have been committed to future trail improvements. 2: Acquisition costs estimated at $900 per acre (low = 25% of full cost, high = 75% of full cost). While the location of regional greenway project corridor I is illustrated on the map, the corridor's statistical data has not been included as it is located in Fulton County Corridor Type: I: Open Space - unblazed / unmarked; public access permitted (price: n/a) II: Maintained Dirt Trail - blazed / marked; pedestrian trail approximately 2' wide (price: $1,500/mile) III: Improved / Maintained Dirt Trail - blazed / marked; multipurpose trail approximately 6' wide (price: $10,000-$15,000/mile) IV: Improved / Maintained Crushed Aggregate / Asphalt Trail - blazed / marked; multipurpose trail approximately 6'-10' wide (price: $40,000-$90,000/mile) V: Water Trail - public access points (price: $10,000 per access point approximately every 5 miles)

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

33

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision Blair County Project Corridors The project corridors map on this page was created by Pashek Associates as part of the Blair County Comprehensive Land Use Plan Study. Blair County features the following county greenway project corridors: Conservation Corridors 1.

Tussey Mountain Conservation Greenway

2.

Dunning, Short, Loop and Lock Mountain Conservation Greenway

3.

Canoe Creek Conservation Greenway

4.

Brush Mountain and Bald Eagle Ridge Conservation Greenway

5.

Little Juniata/Bald Eagle Creek/Big Fill Run Conservation Greenway

6.

Allegheny Front Conservation Greenway

7.

Main Line Canal Greenway™

Drinking Water Protection Corridors 8.

Allegheny Front (North) Drinking Water Greenway

9.

Allegheny Front (South) Drinking Water Greenway

10. Kettle Reservoir Drinking Water Greenway;

34

Blair County Project Corridors

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision Recreation and Transportation Corridors 11. The Mid-State Trail 12. The Pennsylvania Millennium Trail Frankstown Branch Recreational Trail 13. Frankstown Branch and Mid-State Trail Link 14. North-South Link from Hollidaysburg to Tyrone and beyond to Cambria County 15. Frankstown Branch Water Trail 16. Beaverdam Branch Water Trail 17. Little Juniata Water Trail

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

35

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision Cambria County Project Corridors Cambria County features the following regional greenway project corridors: A.

Ghost Town Trail Connector;

B.

Main Line Canal Greenway™;

C.

Laurel Hill Greenway (extremely limited in scope in Cambria County);

D.

Quemahoning Greenway; and

E.

Allegheny Front Wildlife Corridor.

C-3. Vintondale - Susquehanna Trail This trail extends 15.5 miles from Vintondale to the Susquehanna Trail. The recreation corridor passes through State Gameland #79 and intersects the Nanty Glo North Trail. A maintained dirt trail is intended to run the length of the corridor.

County project corridors within Cambria County are described below. C-1. Susquehanna Trail The Susquehanna Trail is an approximately 15 mile corridor that runs from the northwestern corner of the County to an intersection with the Ghost Town Trail. The Trail is envisioned to consist of a maintained dirt trail in combination with a water trail along the West Branch Susquehanna River. Intersections with the Carrolltown Trail and the Vintondale Susquehanna Trail also occur along the corridor. C-2. Carrolltown Trail The Carrolltown Trail, traversing nearly 5 miles, is a recreation trail connects the Susquehanna Trail to Carrolltown. It is envisioned to include an improved/maintained dirt trail.

Cambria County Project Corridors

36

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision C-4. Gameland to Gameland Trail The Gameland to Gameland Trail connects State Gamelands #108 and #158 via a recreational trail that is nearly 3.5 miles long. The corridor is envisioned to consist of a maintained dirt trail.

C-9. Blacklick Creek Wildlife Corridor Planned as a nearly 7 mile long preservation corridor that terminates at the Ghost Town Trail Connector. The preservation corridor is envisioned to be characterized by publicly accessible open space.

C-5. Clearfield Creek Wildlife Corridor Clearfield Creek Wildlife Corridor is delineated to link existing blocks of publicly accessible open space. This Corridor stretches 16 miles across the northeastern portion of the County. Moreover, the Corridor passes through State Gamelands #184 and 108 as well as Gallitzin State Forest and intersects the Wildwood Springs Trail. C-6. Colver Connector This 5.5 mile recreation corridor links Colver to the Nanty Glo North Trail. The corridor is intended to include an improved/maintained dirt trail. C-7. Nanty Glo North Trail The Nanty Glo North Trail transverses nearly 7 miles northwest from Nanty Glo and the Ghost Town Trail Connector to the Vintondale - Susquehanna Trail. The improved/maintained dirt trail also intersects the Colver Connector. C-8. Williams Run Trail This recreational corridor runs northeast from the Ghost Town Trail Connector near Nanty Glo to an intersection with the Blacklick Creek Wildlife Corridor. The corridor is 7.5 miles long and could someday accommodate a maintained dirt trail.

Figure 23: Segment of the Ghost Town Trail in Cambria County

C-10. Wildwood Springs Trail The Wildwood Springs Trail runs 7.5 miles to Gallitzin. The corridor intersects the Clearfield Creek Wildlife Corridor and the Little Conemaugh Trail and passes through State Gameland #279. Wildwood Springs Trail is envisioned to be a maintained dirt trail. C-11. Laurel Run Trail The Laurel Run Trail extends south from Vintondale to an intersection with the Main Line Canal Greenway™ north of Johnstown. The 9.5 mile recreational corridor could be improved to include a maintained dirt trail. C-12. Little Conemaugh Trail This corridor stretches approximately 4.5 miles from the Wildwood Springs Trail to the Main Line Canal Greenway™. The Little

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

Conemaugh Trail accesses State Gameland #279 and is envisioned to consist of a maintained dirt trail. C-13. Lilly Reservoir Wildlife Corridor The Lilly Reservoir Wildlife Corridor is characterized by publicly accessible open space. The corridor extends southeast from the Main Line Canal Greenway™ to the eastern border of the County. A portion of the corridor is situated within State Gameland #198. C-14. Johnstown - Portage Trail This recreational corridor generally extends east from Johnstown to an intersection with the Main Line Canal Greenway™. The nearly 12 mile long corridor, which intersects the Flood Memorial Wildlife Corridor, is envisioned to include a maintained dirt trail. C-15. Flood Memorial Wildlife Corridor This approximately 12 mile preservation corridor extends southeast from the Main Line Canal Greenway™ and the Johnstown Flood National Memorial to the Allegheny Front Wildlife Corridor and the County’s southeastern border. Portions of the Corridor are situated within State Gameland #26 and Gallitzin State Forest. The Corridor is intended to include publicly accessible open space. C-16. Portage South Trail This recreational corridor extends southeast from Portage and terminates in State Gameland #26. The approximately 5.5 mile corridor is envisioned to consist of a maintained dirt trail.

C-17. Scalp Level Loop The Scalp Level Loop extends north from Scalp Level 2.5 miles. This recreational corridor is intended to include a maintained dirt trail. C-18. Rock Run Connector This recreational corridor extends from the Clearfield Creek Wildlife Corridor west to the Rock Run Recreation Area. The entire corridor is situated within previously secured lands including State Gameland #108, Prince Gallitzin State Park and the Rock Run Recreational Area. The nearly 10 mile corridor is planned to include a maintained dirt trail. The corridor has been planned for only pedestrian and/or bicyclists. The local communities have expressed concern regarding the use of ATV’s within the corridor due to the potentially adverse impacts on adjoining residential properties and Prince Gallitzin State Park. C-18 ALT. Rock Run Connector Alternative This alternate route bypasses State Gameland #108 and most of Prince Gallitzin State Park. This 9 mile corridor is envisioned to include a marked and maintained dirt trail. C-19 Duman Dam Connector This recreational corridor is intended to link the Colver Connector Greenway to Duman Lake. This approximately 5-mile corridor is envisioned to include a marked and maintained dirt trail.

37

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision Table 5: Cambria County Projects Summary

Project / Corridor Type of Corridor # Name Regional Project Corridors (within Cambria County) A Ghost Town Trail Connector IV B

Total Project Length (mi)

Length of Trail Constructed (mi.)¹

Length of Water Trail (mi.)

$

436,000

to

$

1,309,000

$

466,000

to

$

1,049,000

$

-

$

902,000 to

$

2,358,000

30.0

28.4

492.3

$

111,000

to

$

332,000

$

65,000

to

$

147,000

$

-

$

176,000 to

$

479,000

938.4

$

211,000

to

$

633,000

$

47,000

to

$

71,000

$

9,460 $

267,460 to

$

713,460

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

III, V

4.7

0.0

E

Allegheny Front Wildlife Corridor

I

4.0

4.0

61.2

C-2

Carrolltown Trail

C-3

Low and High Total Cost Estimates (Acquisition and Improvement)

1,938.6

D

II, V

Water Trail Improvement Cost Estimate

10.8

IV

County Project Corridors C-1 Susquehanna Trail

Low and High Corridor Acquisition Cost Low and High Land Trail Improvement Cost Estimates Estimates²

22.5

Main Line Canal Greenway: Pennsylvania Millennium Trail Quemahoning Greenway

Regional Project Corridors Subtotal

Unimproved/ Unsecured Project / Corridor Area (acres)

43.2

4.7

4.7

$

-

to

$

-

3,369.3

$

758,000

to

$

2,274,000

$

578,000

to

$

1,267,000

$

9,460

$

1,345,460

to

$

3,550,460

4,309

$

1,280,309

to

$

3,791,309

14.8

-

2.2

5,578.2

$

1,254,000

to

$

3,765,000

$

22,000

to

$

22,000

$

III

5.2

3.7

0.0

581.1

$

131,000

to

$

392,000

$

15,000

to

$

23,000

$

-

$

146,000

to

$

415,000

Vintondale - Susquehanna Trail

II

15.4

3.7

0.0

4,416.1

$

993,000

to

$

2,981,000

$

18,000

to

$

18,000

$

-

$

1,011,000

to

$

2,999,000

C-4

Gameland to Gameland Trail

II

3.5

-

0.0

1,336.4

$

300,000

to

$

902,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

300,000

to

$

902,000

C-5

Clearfield Creek Wildlife Corridor I

16.0

8.0

0.0

3,021.5

$

679,000

to

$

2,040,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

679,000

to

$

2,040,000

C-6

Colver Connector

III

5.5

-

0.0

2,091.8

$

470,000

to

$

1,412,000

$

8,000

to

$

8,000

$

-

$

478,000

to

$

1,420,000

C-7

Nanty Glo North Trail

III

6.8

-

0.0

2,556.7

$

575,000

to

$

1,726,000

$

10,000

to

$

10,000

$

-

$

585,000

to

$

1,736,000

C-8

Williams Run Trail

II

7.4

4.2

0.0

1,220.2

$

274,000

to

$

824,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

274,000

to

$

824,000

C-9

Blacklick Creek Wildlife Corridor

I

7.1

-

2,672.9

$

601,000

to

$

1,804,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

601,000

to

$

1,804,000

C-10

Willdwood Springs Trail

II

7.4

0.9

2,440.5

$

548,000

to

$

1,647,000

$

to

$

$

-

$

558,000

to

$

1,657,000

38

10,000

10,000

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision Table 5: Cambria County Projects Summary (Continued)

Project / Corridor Type of Corridor

Length of Trail Constructed (mi.)¹ 1.1

Length of Water Trail (mi.)

Unimproved/ Unsecured Project / Low and High Corridor Acquisition Cost Low and High Land Trail Improvement Corridor Cost Estimates Area (acres) Estimates² 3,195.8 $ 718,000 to $ 2,157,000 $ 13,000 to $ 13,000

# C-11

Name Laurel Run Trail

II

Total Project Length (mi) 9.5

C-12

Little Conemaugh Trail

II

4.6

0.5

1,568.9

$

353,000

to

$

1,059,000

$

C-13

Lilly Reservoirs Wildlife Corridor

I

2.5

1.7

290.5

$

65,000

to

$

196,000

$

C-14

Johnstown - Portage Trail

II

11.7

11.7

to

$

C-15

Flood Memorial Wildlife Corridor

I

11.7

-

0.0

4,416.1

$

993,000

to

$

C-16

Portage South Trail

II

5.4

0.3

0.0

1,917.5

$

431,000

to

C-17

Scalp Level Loop

III

2.5

0.9

0.0

581.1

$

131,000

C-18

Rock Run Connector

III

10.2

10.2

0.0

C-18 alt. C-19

Rock Run Connector Alternate

III

9.2

4.0

0.0

1,963.5

$

Duman Dam Connector

III

5.5

-

0.0

2,076.8

0.0

-

-

$

-

$

359,000

to

$

1,065,000

65,000

to

$

196,000

to

$

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

2,981,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

993,000

to

$

2,981,000

$

1,294,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

431,000

to

$

1,294,000

to

$

392,000

$

to

$

$

-

$

133,000

to

$

394,000

to

$

to

$

$

-

$

to

$

441,000

to

$

1,325,000

$

8,000

to

$

8,000

$

-

$

449,000

to

$

1,333,000

$

467,000

to

$

1,402,000

$

55,000

to

$

83,000

$

-

$

522,000

to

$

1,485,000

$

-

-

-

-

$

2,000 -

6,000

Low and High Total Cost Estimates (Acquisition and Improvement) $ 731,000 to $ 2,170,000

to

$

6,000

Water Trail Improvement Cost Estimate $ -

2,000 -

-

-

-

-

County Project Corridors Subtotal

161.9

50.9

2.2

41,925.5

$

9,424,000

to

$

28,299,000

$

167,000

to

$

203,000

$

4,309

$

9,595,309

to

$

28,506,309

Project Corridors Total (Regional + County)

223.1

94.1

6.9

45,294.8

$

10,182,000

to

$

30,573,000

$

745,000

to

$

1,470,000

$

13,769

$

10,940,769

to

$

32,056,769

1: Also includes portions of project corridors that are under public control or have been committed to future trail improvements. 2: Acquisition costs estimated at $900 per acre (low = 25% of full cost, high = 75% of full cost). The statistical data for regional greenway project corridor C is not included as it is extremely limited in scope in Cambria County. Corridor Type: I: Open Space - unblazed / unmarked; public access permitted (price: n/a) II: Maintained Dirt Trail - blazed / marked; pedestrian trail approximately 2' wide (price: $1,500/mile) III: Improved / Maintained Dirt Trail - blazed / marked; multipurpose trail approximately 6' wide (price: $10,000-$15,000/mile) IV: Improved / Maintained Crushed Aggregate / Asphalt Trail - blazed / marked; multipurpose trail approximately 6'-10' wide (price: $40,000-$90,000/mile) V: Water Trail - public access points (price: $10,000 per access point approximately every 5 miles)

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

39

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision Fulton County Project Corridors Fulton County features the following regional greenway project corridors: I.

Potomac to Raystown Greenway South;

J.

Tuscarora Greenway; and

K.

The Allegheny Crossing.

County project corridors within Fulton County are described below. F-1. Southern Trough Creek Wildlife Corridor This Corridor, which generally follows the Great Trough Creek, is situated within the northwestern portion of the County. The Corridor provides a link to the Potomac to Raystown Greenway at the Corridor’s southern terminus. Portions of Buchanan State Forest are included within the Corridor, which is envisioned to contain limited access open space without formed trails. F-2. Link Trail Alternate Connector The approximately 8 mile Link Trail Alternate Connector extends north into Huntingdon County from the intersection of the Allegheny Crossing and the Potomac to Raystown Greenway. The Link Trail, proposed to be renamed The Standing Stone Trail during publication of this Plan, currently extends nearly 68 miles through Fulton and Huntingdon Counties. The entire length of the Connector is situated within Buchanan State Forest, which includes several existing trails that match the maintained dirt character envisioned for

40

Fulton County Project Corridors

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision the Connector. This corridor is part of a trail proposed to connect to the Link Trail. F-3. Fort Littleton Trail This Trail meanders northeast from Fort Littleton into Huntingdon County before arching back into Fulton County. The Trail which is nearly 4.5 miles in length, could be developed someday as a maintained dirt trail. Portions of the Trail include areas situated within Buchanan State Forest and could subsequently link to the internal trails and roads. F-4. Sideling Hill Wildlife Corridor This open passive space corridor extends along Sideling Hill in Western Fulton County. The 23 mile long corridor passes through portions of Buchanan State Forest and State Gameland #65. The northern terminus is located at the Southern Great Trough Creek Wildlife Corridor; the southern terminus occurs at the southern border of the County. F-5. Link to Tuscarora Connector The Link to Tuscarora Connector is envisioned to be an approximately 13 mile maintained dirt trail. The trail crosses the County from west to east connecting the Potomac to Raystown Greenway with the Tuscarora Greenway. The Connector passes through State Gameland #53 and interconnects two regional trails/corridors and four county trails/corridors. A large portion of this project is part of a trail proposed to connect to the Link Trail.

F-6. Little Scrub Ridge Wildlife Corridor The Little Scrub Ridge Wildlife Corridor is envisioned to be an open space corridor which runs within the eastern portion of Fulton County linking the Tuscarora Trail to the Allegheny Crossing. The nearly 25 mile corridor passes through State Gameland #53 and 124 and accesses Meadow Grounds Lake.

Most of the corridor is situated within State Gameland #53 and is near Meadow Grounds Lake.

Figure 25: Meadow Grounds Lake

Figure 24: Aerial of Meadow Grounds Lake

F-7. Tonoloway Creek Wildlife Corridor The Corridor transverses 26 miles along Tonoloway Creek. It runs south from the Potomac to Raystown Greenway and the Allegheny Crossing to the County’s southern border. The Tonoloway Creek Wildlife Corridor has been designed to interconnect existing open space areas that feature public access. Furthermore, the Corridor connects to two other county wildlife corridors. F-8. Meadow Grounds Lake Wildlife Area This approximately 4 mile stretch of open wildlife area connects the Allegheny Crossing with the Little Scrub Ridge Wildlife Corridor. The entire length of the corridor is near the trail proposed to connect to the Link Trail.

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

F-9. Back Run Trail Back Run Trail is anticipated to be a maintained dirt trail extending 5.5 miles from the Tuscarora Greenway to the relocated Link Trail which passes in close proximity to McConnellsburg.

F-12. Little Tonoloway Wildlife Link The Little Tonoloway Wildlife Link is an approximately 0.5 mile long wildlife corridor that links Warfordsburg to the region’s greenway and open space network. The short corridor connects directly to the Cove Ridge Wildlife Connector. The corridor is envisioned to be a passive underdeveloped linkage that connects several tracts of publicly accessible open space. F-13. Cove Ridge Wildlife Connector This open space wildlife corridor connects the Tonoloway Creek Wildlife Corridor to the Little Tonoloway Wildlife Link and ultimately to Warfordsburg. The corridor is approximately 4 miles long and terminates at the southern border of the County.

F-10. Licking Creek Wildlife Corridor The Licking Creek Wildlife Connector generally follows Licking Creek and connects to the Tonoloway Creek Wildlife Corridor, the Chestnut Flat Wildlife Corridor and the Tuscarora Greenway. The Corridor is approximately 15 miles long and links existing publicly accessible open space areas. F-11. Chestnut Flat Wildlife Corridor This Corridor connects the Little Scrub Ridge Wildlife Corridor with the Licking Creek Wildlife Corridor. The Corridor is nearly 2 miles long and is anticipated to be publicly accessible open space.

41

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision Table 6: Fulton County Projects Summary

Project / Corridor Type of Corridor # Name Regional Project Corridors (within Fulton County) I Potomac to Raystown Greenway I, II South J Tuscarora Greenway II K

The Allegheny Crossing

IV, V

Regional Project Corridors Subtotal

Total Project Length (mi)

Length of Trail Constructed (mi.)¹

Length of Water Trail (mi.)

Unimproved/ Unsecured Project / Corridor Area (acres)

Low and High Corridor Acquisition Cost Low and High Land Trail Improvement Cost Estimates Estimates²

22.5

13.9

4,568.3 $

22.0

22.0

-

19.0

3.9

63.5

39.9

Water Trail Improvement Cost Estimate

1,027,000

to

$

3,084,000

$

13,000

to

$

13,000

$

-

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

4,513.5

$

1,015,000

to

$

3,047,000

$

600,000

to

$

1,350,000

$

-

-

9,081.8

$

2,042,000

to

$

6,131,000

$

613,000

to

$

1,363,000

506,000

to

$

1,521,000

$

-

to

$

to

$

$

-

to

$

Low and High Total Cost Estimates (Acquisition and Improvement) $

1,040,000 to

$ $

-

to

1,615,000 to

$

3,097,000

$ $

4,397,000

$

-

$

2,655,000

to

$

7,494,000

-

$

-

$

506,000

to

$

1,521,000

-

$

-

$

to

$

County Project Corridors F-1 Southern Great Trough Creek Wildlife Corridor F-2 Link Trail Alternate Connector

I

6.8

0.9

0.0

2,252.7 $

II

8.2

8.2

0.0

-

F-3

Fort Littleton Trail South End

II

4.5

-

0.0

1,689.5 $

380,000

to

$

1,140,000

$

7,000

to

$

7,000

$

-

$

387,000

to

$

1,147,000

F-4

Sideling Hill Wildlife Corridor

I

23.1

14.8

0.0

3,134.1 $

705,000

to

$

2,116,000

$

12,000

to

$

12,000

$

-

$

717,000

to

$

2,128,000

F-5

Link to Tuscarora Connector

II

13.4

2.2

0.0

4,223.9 $

949,000

to

$

2,851,000

$

17,000

to

$

17,000

$

-

$

966,000

to

$

2,868,000

F-6

Little Scrub Ridge Wildlife Corridor I

24.5

7.2

0.0

6,516.8 $

1,465,000

to

$

4,399,000

$

26,000

to

$

26,000

$

-

$

1,491,000

to

$

4,425,000

F-7

Tonoloway Creek Wildlife Corridor I

26.0

-

0.0

9,815.5 $

2,206,000

to

$

6,625,000

$

39,000

to

$

39,000

$

-

$

2,245,000

to

$

6,664,000

F-8

I

3.9

3.9

0.0

-

to

$

to

$

$

-

$

to

$

F-9

Meadow Grounds Lake Wildlife Area Back Run Trail

II

5.4

-

0.0

2,051.6 $

461,000

to

$

1,385,000

$

8,000

to

$

8,000

$

-

$

469,000

to

$

1,393,000

F-10

Licking Creek Wildlife Corridor

I

14.9

-

0.0

5,631.8 $

1,266,000

to

$

3,801,000

$

22,000

to

$

22,000

$

-

$

1,288,000

to

$

3,823,000

F-11

Chestnut Flat Wildlife Corridor

I

1.7

0.2

0.0

563.2 $

127,000

to

$

380,000

$

2,000

to

$

2,000

$

-

$

129,000

to

$

382,000

F-12

Little Tonoloway Wildlife Link

I

0.3

-

0.0

120.7 $

27,000

to

$

81,000

$

to

$

$

-

$

27,000

to

$

81,000

F-13

Cove Ridge Wildlife Connector

I

3.8

-

0.0

1,448.2 $

326,000

to

$

978,000

$

6,000

to

$

6,000

$

-

$

332,000

to

$

984,000

$

$

-

-

-

-

$

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

County Project Corridors Subtotal

136.7

37.5

-

37,447.9

$

8,418,000

to

$

25,277,000

$

139,000

to

$

139,000

$

-

$

8,557,000

to

$

25,416,000

Project Corridors Total (Regional + County)

200.1

77.3

-

46,529.8

$

10,460,000

to

$

31,408,000

$

752,000

to

$

1,502,000

$

-

$

11,212,000

to

$

32,910,000

1: Also includes portions of project corridors that are under public control or have been committed to future trail improvements. 2: Acquisition costs estimated at $900 per acre (low = 25% of full cost, high = 75% of full cost). Corridor Type: I: Open Space - unblazed / unmarked; public access permitted (price: n/a) II: Maintained Dirt Trail - blazed / marked; pedestrian trail approximately 2' wide (price: $1,500/mile) III: Improved / Maintained Dirt Trail - blazed / marked; multipurpose trail approximately 6' wide (price: $10,000-$15,000/mile) IV: Improved / Maintained Crushed Aggregate / Asphalt Trail - blazed / marked; multipurpose trail approximately 6'-10' wide (price: $40,000-$90,000/mile) V: Water Trail - public access points (price: $10,000 per access point approximately every 5 miles)

42

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision Huntingdon County Project Corridors Huntingdon County features the following regional greenway project corridors: B.

Main Line Canal Greenway™;

G.

Mid State Greenway;

H.

Potomac to Raystown Greenway North; and

J.

Tuscarora Greenway.

County project corridors within Huntingdon County are described below. H-1. Little Juniata Connector The Little Juniata Connector is located in the northwest portion of the County, extending from Tyrone and Bald Eagle Mountain to the Frankstown Branch of the Juniata River near Petersburg. This greenway corridor connects with the MidState Greenway and Shavers Creek Greenway. This 13 mile corridor should be developed as a water trail with public access. H-2. Shavers Creek Corridor The approximately 16 mile Shavers Creek Corridor connects the Main Line Canal Greenway™ and Little Juniata Connector with the Rothrock Loop. This Corridor is intended as a passive area with access to Shavers Creek. H-3. Rothrock Loop This approximately 3 mile long recreation corridor, which extends through Rothrock State Forest, originates and terminates at

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

Huntingdon County Project Corridors

May 2007

43

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision the Mid-State Greenway. The corridor is envisioned to consist of a maintained dirt trail and incorporate portions of existing trails within the State Forest. H-4. Pulpit Rocks Corridor This nearly 4 mile recreation corridor is intended to serve as an alternative route for the Main Line Canal Greenway™ between Alexandria and Huntingdon. The Corridor follows the route of the Lewistown, Cambria and Indiana Turnpike on SR 4005. The Corridor is envisioned to be a paved multi-use trail parallel to the existing highway. H-5. Stone Creek Corridor This conservation corridor links Huntingdon with the Alan Seegar Natural Area in Rothrock State Forest in the northern portion of Huntingdon County. The nearly 23 mile corridor is envisioned as a water trail with wildlife conservation and improved public access for fishing. H-6. Jacks Mountain Wildlife Corridor Jack’s Mountain Greenway runs approximately 12 miles along the County’s eastern border, extending to the Mifflin County line. This Corridor is intended principally as a conservation corridor without trail development.

H-9. Terrace Mountain Greenway This approximately 22 mile greenway runs from Saxton to the Main-Line Canal Greenway. Closely paralleling the Potomac to Raystown Greenway, this recreation corridor is primarily located on land owned by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The Terrace Mt. Trail already follows this route. It is envisioned that this trail be extended to connect with the Main-Line Canal Greenway near Huntingdon. Figure 26: View of Jack’s Mountain from the Link Trail

H-7. Raystown West Corridor This is approximately 4.5 mile corridor links the Mid-State Greenway with Raystown Lake at Raystown Resort. This recreation corridor is envisioned to contain a dirt trail. H-8. Raystown East Corridor The Raystown Corridor East extends from Raystown Lake southeast to the Broad Top Greenway, a distance of approximately 10 miles. This recreation corridor is envisioned to contain a dirt trail.

H-10. Sidling Hill Wildlife Corridor The Sidling Hill Wildlife Corridor connects the Broad Top Mountain Corridor to the MainLine Canal Greenway. This nearly 17 mile corridor connects several tract of public land for conservation purposes. H-11. Broad Top Mountain Corridor This recreation corridor connects Saxton and Orbisonia along the routes of the Huntingdon and Broad Top Mountain Railroad and East Broad Top Railroad. This 18 mile long corridor is envisioned to contain either a maintained dirt or improved crushed aggregate trail, providing access to State Gamelands #67, #99 and #121 as well as remains of historic railroads.

H-13. Blacklog Mountain Wildlife Corridor This approximately 18 mile long open space corridor runs from the Tuscarora State Forests south to the Tuscarora Greenway near Shade Gap. No trail development is envisioned in this Corridor. H-14. Shade Mountain Wildlife Corridor The Shade Mountain Wildlife Corridor runs approximately 20 miles from the State Gamelands #81 south to the Fulton County Line. No trail development is envisioned in this Corridor. H-15. Tuscarora Mountain Wildlife Corridor This approximately 17 mile long open space corridor runs along the Franklin/ Huntingdon County Line south to the Tuscarora Trail near Burnt Cabins. While no trail development is envisioned in the northern portion of the Corridor, the Tuscarora Trail is maintained within the Corridor near Cowen’s Gap State Park.

H-12. Aughwick Creek Wildlife Corridor The Aughwick Creek Wildlife Corridor consists of a 19 mile long, publicly accessible open space area. The Corridor extends from the Main Line Canal Greenway™ to the Tuscarora Greenway, intersecting the Broad Top Mountain Corridor. This Corridor also closely parallels the historic East Broad Top Railroad from Rockhill to Mount Union. Figure 27: View of Raystown Lake

44

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision Table 7: Huntingdon County Projects Summary Project / Corridor Type of Corridor # Name Regional Project Corridors (within Huntingdon County) IV, V B Main Line Canal Greenway: Pennsylvania Millennium Trail G Mid State Greenway II H J

Potomac to Raystown Greenway North Tuscarora Greenway

Total Project Length (mi)

Length of Trail Constructed (mi.)¹

Length of Water Trail (mi.)

31.8

4.7

31.0

31.0

I, II, V

21.3

20.1

II

46.0

46.0

Regional Project Corridors Subtotal

130.1

101.8

22.8

Unimproved/ Unsecured Project / Corridor Area (acres)

8,150.7 $ 637.4 -

22.8

Low and High Corridor Acquisition Cost Estimates²

8,788.1

Low and High Land Trail Improvement Cost Estimates

1,832,000

to

$

5,502,000

$

1,084,000

to

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

to

$

143,000

to

$

430,000

2,000

to

$

-

to

$

-

-

to

$

1,975,000

to

$

5,932,000

$

1,086,000

to

$

$ $

$

2,439,000

$ $

Water Trail Improvement Cost Estimate $

45,500

-

$

-

2,000

$

-

-

$

-

$

2,441,000

Low and High Total Cost Estimates (Acquisition and Improvement) $ $ $ $

$

45,500

$

2,961,500 145,000

to

$

to to

$ $ $

7,986,500 432,000

-

to

-

3,106,500

to

$

8,418,500

County Project Corridors H-1 Little Juniata Connector

I, V

13.1

2.5

8.3

4,002.6 $

900,000

to

$

2,702,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

16,600

$

916,600

to

$

2,718,600

H-2

Shavers Creek Corridor

I, V

16.3

2.1

16.3

5,361.9 $

1,205,000

to

$

3,619,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

32,600

$

1,237,600

to

$

3,651,600

H-3

Rothrock Loop

II

3.0

-

0.0

1,132.8 $

255,000

to

$

765,000

$

5,000

to

$

5,000

$

-

$

260,000

to

$

770,000

H-4

Pulpit Rocks Corridor

IV

3.9

0.7

0.0

1,208.3 $

272,000

to

$

816,000

$

128,000

to

$

288,000

$

-

$

400,000

to

$

1,104,000

H-5

Stone Creek Corridor

I, V

22.6

2.9

22.6

7,438.7 $

1,672,000

to

$

5,021,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

$

1,717,200

to

$

5,066,200

H-6

Jacks Mountain Wildlife Corridor

I

7.7

5.3

0.0

906.2 $

204,000

to

$

612,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

204,000

to

$

612,000

H-7

Raystown West Corridor

II

4.4

-

0.0

1,661.4 $

373,000

to

$

1,121,000

$

7,000

to

$

7,000

$

-

$

380,000

to

$

1,128,000

H-8

Raystown East Corridor

II

9.6

1.0

0.0

3,247.4 $

730,000

to

$

2,192,000

$

13,000

to

$

13,000

$

-

$

743,000

to

$

2,205,000

H-9

Terrace Mountain Greenway

II

21.6

7.6

0.0

5,286.4 $

1,188,000

to

$

3,568,000

$

21,000

to

$

21,000

$

-

$

1,209,000

to

$

3,589,000

H-10

Sidling Hill Wildlife Corridor

I

16.5

4.3

0.0

4,606.7 $

1,036,000

to

$

3,110,000

$

to

$

$

-

$

1,036,000

to

$

3,110,000

H-11

Broad Top Mountain Corridor

III

18.3

2.6

0.0

5,928.3 $

1,333,000

to

$

4,002,000

$

to

$

$

-

$

1,490,000

to

$

4,238,000

H-12

Aughwick Creek Wildlife Corridor I, V

18.9

1.3

18.9

6,645.8 $

1,494,000

to

$

4,486,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

$

1,531,800

to

$

4,523,800

H-13

18.0

1.6

0.0

6,192.6 $

1,392,000

to

$

4,180,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

1,392,000

to

$

4,180,000

H-14

Blacklog Mountain Wildlife I Corridor Shade Mountain Wildlife Corridor I

19.9

-

0.0

7,514.2 $

1,689,000

to

$

5,072,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

1,689,000

to

$

5,072,000

H-15

I

0.0

1,510.4 $

340,000

to

$

1,020,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

340,000

to

$

1,020,000

Tuscarora Mountain Wildlife Corridor County Project Corridors Subtotal

Project Corridors Total (Regional + County)

16.5

12.5

157,000

236,000

45,200

37,800

210.3

44.4

66.1

62,643.8

$

14,083,000

to

$

42,286,000

$

331,000

to

$

570,000

$

132,200

$

14,546,200

to

$

42,988,200

340.4

146.2

88.9

71,432.0

$

16,058,000

to

$

48,218,000

$

1,417,000

to

$

3,011,000

$

177,700

$

17,652,700

to

$

51,406,700

1: Also includes portions of project corridors that are under public control or have been committed to future trail improvements. 2: Acquisition costs estimated at $900 per acre (low = 25% of full cost, high = 75% of full cost). Corridor Type: I: Open Space - unblazed / unmarked; public access permitted (price: n/a) II: Maintained Dirt Trail - blazed / marked; pedestrian trail approximately 2' wide (price: $1,500/mile) III: Improved / Maintained Dirt Trail - blazed / marked; multipurpose trail approximately 6' wide (price: $10,000-$15,000/mile) IV: Improved / Maintained Crushed Aggregate / Asphalt Trail - blazed / marked; multipurpose trail approximately 6'-10' wide (price: $40,000-$90,000/mile) V: Water Trail - public access points (price: $10,000 per access point approximately every 5 miles)

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

45

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision Somerset County Project Corridors Somerset County features the following regional project corridors: C.

Laurel Hill Greenway;

D.

Quemahoning Greenway;

E.

Allegheny Front Wildlife Corridor;

K.

The Allegheny Crossing; and

L.

Great Allegheny Passage.

County project corridors within Somerset County are described below. S-1. Allwine Creek BDA This approximately 1 mile open space corridor is situated in the northeastern portion of the County. The corridor is intended to link the South Fork Trail to the Allwine Creek BDA. S-2. South Fork Trail The South Fork Trail is a 12 mile long recreation trail in the northwestern portion of the County. The corridor could someday be improved with a maintained dirt path. The Trail provides links to the Quemahoning Greenway, Allwine Creek BDA and Roaring Run/Beaverdam Wildlife Preserve. S-3. Roaring Run/Beaverdam Wildlife Preserve This corridor connects the Quemahoning Greenway to the Laurel Hill Greenway while intersecting the South Fork Trail and Reservoir Trail. The 17 mile corridor,

46

Somerset County Project Corridors

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision which terminates in Laurel Ridge State Park, is intended to be preserved open space with public access. S-4. Reservoir Trail The approximately 27 mile long improved/maintained dirt path will link several population centers within the County including Somerset, Jennerstown and Boswell. The Trail links the Great Allegheny Passage to the Allegheny Crossing and intersects the Roaring Run/Beaverdam Wildlife Preserve, Dempsey Run Wildlife Corridor and the South Glade Creek Wetlands BDA. S-5. Paint Creek Trail The Paint Creek Trail extends nearly 14 miles along Paint Creek in the northeastern portion of the County. Portions of the Trail are situated within Gallitzin State Forest and State Gameland #26. The Trail could be improved as a maintained dirt path that provides connectors with the Quemahoning Greenway and the Gallitzin Connector. S-6. Gallitzin Connector This 5.5 mile long recreational corridor is situated in the northeastern portion of the County. The corridor could accommodate a maintained dirt trail, to link the Paint Creek Trail to the Shade Creek Wildlife Connector. The corridor generally passes through Gallitzin State Forest. S-7. Shade Creek Wildlife Connector The Shade Creek Wildlife Connector is intended to be a passive open space corridor that stretches approximately 15.5 miles from the Quemahoning Greenway to

the Allegheny Front Wildlife Corridor and accesses State Gameland #228.

Glade Creek Wetlands BDA. The corridor is planned to remain as preserved open space.

S-8. Memorial Trail This recreational corridor could be improved as a crushed aggregate or asphalt trail. Only 1.5 miles in length, the corridor is a significant economic opportunity because it connects the Quemahoning Greenway to the Flight 93 National Memorial.

S-14. Tubs Run Wetland BDA The 3 mile corridor extends from the Allegheny Crossing to Tubs Run Wetland BDA. The corridor is envisioned to consist of preserved open space.

S-9. Indian Lake Trail The approximately 2 mile long Indian Lake Trail runs along Indian Lake and provides a recreational connection with the Allegheny Crossing. S-10. Buck Swamp BDA This 3 mile long preservation corridor connects the Allegheny Crossing with the Buck Swamp BDA. S-11. Laurel Hill Creek Trail The Laurel Hill Creek Trail stretches nearly 20 miles along Laurel Hill Creek and connects Laurel Hill State Park with the Great Allegheny Passage. The recreational corridor passes through Ursina, Forbes State Forest and State Gameland #111. S-12. Dempsey Run Wildlife Corridor The Dempsey Run Wildlife Corridor branches from the Reservoir Trail and runs 6 miles to the east. The wildlife corridor is situated southeast of Somerset with its majority within State Game Land #20. S-13. South Glade Creek Wetlands BDA This corridor is approximately 1.5 miles long and connects the Reservoir Trail with the South

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

S-15. Hillegas Run Wildlife Corridor The Hillegas Run Wildlife Corridor transverses nearly 8 miles in the southeastern portion of the County. The Corridor links the Allegheny Front Wildlife Corridor to the Wills Creek Wildlife Corridor and should remain as a passive open space area.

S-20. Blue Lick Creek Trail This Trail transverses 1.5 miles from the Great Allegheny Passage along Blue Lock Creek. S-21. Youghiogheny River Lake Trail The Youghiogheny River Lake Trail extends approximately 8 miles from the Great Allegheny Passage (near Confluence, PA) to the County’s southern border. An improved/maintained dirt trail is envisioned to someday be connected with the corridor.

S-16. Garrett Mud Flats BDA This corridor extends from the Great Allegheny Passage to the Garrett Mud Flats BDA. The approximately 2 mile corridor is envisioned to consist of preserved open space. S-17. Isers Run Wildlife Corridor The 5.5 mile open space corridor is envisioned to extend from the Great Allegheny Passage to Whites Creek Valley Trail. The Corridor provides access to Forbes State Forest from Casselman. S-18. Bigby Creek Trail This Trail extends 1 mile from the Great Allegheny Passage along Bigby Creek. S-19. Buffalo Creek Trail The Trail runs 1 mile from the Great Allegheny Passage along Buffalo Creek.

Figure 28: Youghiogheny River Lake

S-22. Whites Creek Valley Trail The corridor is intended to include a future dirt trail and stretches from the Great Allegheny Passage to Isers Run Wildlife Corridor. The Trail intersects the Cucumber Run Trail and Braddock’s Run Trail along its approximately 16.5 mile long journey. The Trail will also provide access to Forbes State Forest.

47

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision S-23. McClintock Run BDA This corridor extends from the Great Allegheny Passage to the McClintock Run BDA. The nearly 2 mile long corridor is envisioned to consist of preserved open space. S-24. Cucumber Run Trail The Cucumber Run Trail could be improved in the future as a maintained dirt trail for recreational purposes. The 5 mile long corridor links the Great Allegheny Passage with the Whites Creek Valley Trail. Most of the length of the corridor is situated within State Gameland #27.

river trail. The nearly 6.5 mile long corridor connects Salisbury to the Great Allegheny Passage.

Figure 30: View of the Cassleman River in Somerset County

S-27. Wills Creek Wildlife Corridor The Wills Creek Wildlife Corridor stretches 12 miles from the Great Allegheny Passage to the County’s eastern border. The Corridor, located in the southeastern portion of the County should remain as an open space with public access. Much of the corridor is situated within State Gamelands #82 and 104.

Figure 29: Great Allegheny Passage trail in Somerset County

S-25. Braddock’s Run Trail Braddock’s Run Trail is approximately 4.5 miles long that is intended to consist of a maintained dirt trail. This corridor, situated in the southwestern portion of the County, links the Youghiogheny River Lake Trail with the Whites Creek Valley Trail. S-26. Casselman River Trail The Casselman River Trail is envisioned to consist of both a maintained dirt trail and a

48

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision Table 8: Somerset County Projects Summary

Project / Corridor Type of Corridor # Name Regional Project Corridors (within Somerset County) C Laurel Hill Greenway II

Total Project Length (mi)

Length of Trail Constructed (mi.)¹

Length of Water Trail (mi.)

21.8

21.8

D

Quemahoning Greenway

III, V

23.7

0.0

E

Allegheny Front Wildlife Corridor

I

34.1

K

The Allegheny Crossing

IV, V

L

Great Allegheny Passage

IV

Regional Project Corridors Subtotal

Unimproved/ Unsecured Project / Corridor Area (acres) -

$

-

Water Trail Improvement Cost Estimate

to

$

-

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

4,696.1

$

1,056,000

to

$

3,170,000

$

237,000

to

$

355,000

$

4.6

10,202.1

$

2,293,000

to

$

6,886,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

24.2

0.0

7,273.3

$

1,635,000

to

$

4,910,000

$

967,000

to

$

2,176,000

$

39.6

35.0

1,383.7

$

311,000

to

$

934,000

$

184,000

to

$

414,000

$

23,555.3

$

5,295,000

to

$

15,900,000

$

1,388,000

to

$

2,945,000

to

$

to

$

to

$

to

$

to

$

to

$

to

$

143.3

61.4

23.7

Low and High Corridor Acquisition Cost Low and High Land Trail Improvement Cost Estimates Estimates²

23.7

Low and High Total Cost Estimates (Acquisition and Improvement) $

47,340 $

-

to

$

-

1,340,340 to

$

3,572,340

$

2,293,000 to

$

6,886,000

-

$

2,602,000 to

$

7,086,000

-

$

495,000 to

$

1,348,000

$

47,340

$

6,730,340

to

$

18,892,340

$

-

$

105,000

to

$

314,000

$

-

$

1,124,000

to

$

3,198,000

$

-

$

1,424,000

to

$

4,275,000

$

-

$

2,541,000

to

$

7,227,000

$

-

$

to

$

$

-

$

478,000

to

$

1,420,000

$

-

$

1,123,000

to

$

3,373,000

County Project Corridors S-1 Allwine Creek BDA

I

1.2

-

0.0

464.8 $

105,000

to

$

314,000

$

S-2

South Fork Trail

III

11.8

-

0.0

4,474.2 $

1,006,000

to

$

3,020,000

$

S-3

17.2

0.5

0.0

6,333.6 $

1,424,000

to

$

4,275,000

$

S-4

Roaring Run / Beaverdam Wildlife I Preserve Reservoir Trail III

26.8

-

0.0

10,110.5 $

2,273,000

to

$

6,825,000

$

S-5

Paint Creek Trail

III

13.8

13.8

0.0

-

to

$

S-6

Gallitzin Connector

II

5.5

-

0.0

2,091.8 $

470,000

to

$

1,412,000

$

S-7

Shade Creek Wildlife Connector

I

15.4

2.2

0.0

4,997.1 $

1,123,000

to

$

3,373,000

$

S-8

Memorial Trail

IV

1.4

-

0.0

523.0 $

118,000

to

$

353,000

$

55,000

to

$

125,000

$

-

$

173,000

to

$

478,000

S-9

Indian Lake Trail

III

1.8

-

0.0

697.3 $

157,000

to

$

471,000

$

18,000

to

$

28,000

$

-

$

175,000

to

$

499,000

S-10

Buck Swamp BDA

I

2.8

-

0.0

1,045.9 $

235,000

to

$

706,000

$

to

$

$

-

$

235,000

to

$

706,000

S-11

Laurel Hill Creek Trail

II

19.7

9.0

3.6

4,020.9 $

904,000

to

$

2,714,000

$

to

$

$

7,244 $

927,244

to

$

2,737,244

S-12

Dempsey Run Wildlife Corridor

I

5.8

3.5

0.0

871.6 $

196,000

to

$

588,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

196,000

to

$

588,000

S-13

South Glade Creek Wetlands BDA I

1.4

-

0.0

523.0 $

118,000

to

$

353,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

118,000

to

$

353,000

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

$

-

-

$

118,000 268,000 8,000 -

16,000

178,000 402,000 8,000 -

16,000

-

-

49

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision Table 8: Somerset County Projects Summary (Continued)

Unimproved/ Unsecured Project / Low and High Corridor Acquisition Cost Low and High Land Trail Improvement Corridor Area (acres) Estimates² Cost Estimates 1,220.2 $ 274,000 to $ 824,000 $ to $ -

I

Total Project Length (mi) 3.2

Length of Trail Constructed (mi.)¹ -

Hillegas Run Wildlife Corridor

I

8

-

3,021.5 $

679,000

to

$

2,040,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

679,000

to

$

2,040,000

S-16

Garrett Mud Flats BDA

I

1.8

-

697.3 $

157,000

to

$

4,710,003

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

157,000

to

$

471,000

S-17

Isers Run Wildlife Corridor

I

5.5

-

$

470,000

to

$

1,412,000

$

-

to

$

-

$

-

$

470,000

to

$

1,412,000

S-18

Bigby Creek Trail

II

1.2

-

0.0

464.8 $

105,000

to

$

314,000

$

2,000

to

$

2,000

$

-

$

107,000

to

$

316,000

S-19

Buffalo Creek Trail

II

1.2

-

0.0

464.8 $

105,000

to

$

314,000

$

2,000

to

$

2,000

$

-

$

107,000

to

$

316,000

S-20

Blue Lick Creek Trail

II

1.4

-

0.0

523.0 $

118,000

to

$

353,000

$

2,000

to

$

2,000

$

-

$

120,000

to

$

355,000

S-21

Youghiogheny River Lake Trail

III

7.7

-

0.0

2,905.3

$

653,000

to

$

1,961,000

$

77,000

to

$

115,000

$

-

$

730,000

to

$

2,076,000

S-22

Whites Creek Valley Trail

II

16.6

-

0.0

6,275.5

$

1,411,000

to

$

4,236,000

$

25,000

to

$

25,000

$

-

$

1,436,000

to

$

4,261,000

S-23

McClintock Run BDA

I

1.8

-

0.0

697.3 $

157,000

to

$

471,000

$

to

$

$

-

$

157,000

to

$

471,000

S-24

Cucumber Run Trail

II

4.8

2.3

0.0

929.7 $

209,000

to

$

628,000

$

4,000

to

$

4,000

$

-

$

213,000

to

$

632,000

S-25

Braddock's Run Trail

II

4.6

-

0.0

1,743.2

$

392,000

to

$

1,177,000

$

7,000

to

$

7,000

$

-

$

399,000

to

$

1,184,000

S-26

Casselman River Trail

II, V

6.6

-

6.6

2,498.6 $

562,000

to

$

1,687,000

$

10,000

to

$

10,000

$

13,234 $

585,234

to

$

1,710,234

S-27

Wills Creek Wildlife Corridor

I

12.3

8.5

0.0

1,452.7

$

327,000

to

$

981,000

$

to

$

$

-

$

327,000

to

$

981,000

# S-14

Project / Corridor Name Tubs Run Wetland BDA

S-15

Type of Corridor

Length of Water Trail (mi.)

2,091.8

-

-

-

-

Water Trail Improvement Cost Low and High Total Cost Estimates Estimate (Acquisition and Improvement) $ - $ 274,000 to $ 824,000

County Project Corridors Subtotal

201.6

39.8

10.2

61,139.2

$

13,748,000

to

$

45,512,003

$

612,000

to

$

924,000

$

20,478

$

14,380,478

to

$

42,217,478

Project Corridors Total (Regional + County)

345.0

101.2

33.9

84,694.4

$

19,043,000

to

$

61,412,003

$

2,000,000

to

$

3,869,000

$

67,818

$

21,110,818

to

$

61,109,818

1: Also includes portions of project corridors that are under public control or have been committed to future trail improvements. 2: Acquisition costs estimated at $900 per acre (low = 25% of full cost, high = 75% of full cost). Corridor Type: I: Open Space - unblazed / unmarked; public access permitted (price: n/a) II: Maintained Dirt Trail - blazed / marked; pedestrian trail approximately 2' wide (price: $1,500/mile) III: Improved / Maintained Dirt Trail - blazed / marked; multipurpose trail approximately 6' wide (price: $10,000-$15,000/mile) IV: Improved / Maintained Crushed Aggregate / Asphalt Trail - blazed / marked; multipurpose trail approximately 6'-10' wide (price: $40,000-$90,000/mile) V: Water Trail - public access points (price: $10,000 per access point approximately every 5 miles)

50

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision Regional Project Corridors A. Ghost Town Trail Connector The Ghost Town Trail Connector is an approximately 18 mile recreational corridor that is situated within Cambria and Indiana Counties. The corridor runs through State Gameland #79 and near Ebensburg. Approximately 30% of the entire project length in Cambria County has been improved with a land trail. The Ghost Town Trail Connector is envisioned to extend the approximately 8-10 foot wide asphalt path of the existing Ghost Town Trail. The proposed corridor extends beyond the Trail’s current proposed terminus at Ebensburg to join the proposed Allegheny Crossing corridor. B. The Pittsburgh-to-Harrisburg Main Line Canal Greenway™: Pennsylvania’s Millennium Trail The Main Line Canal Greenway™, a significant DCNR investment and Statewide ‘mega’-trail, is a multipurpose recreational corridor that connects Pittsburgh to Harrisburg. As a millennium trail, it is part of a set of trails across the country that have been recognized as a nationally significant link of cultural and heritage sites. The corridor traverses approximately 97 miles of the Southern Alleghenies region through Cambria, Blair and Huntingdon counties and consists of both water and land trails. The Main Line Canal Greenway™ corridor has been approximately 45% improved within the Southern Alleghenies region and also includes 38 miles of water trail (the Upper Juniata Water Trail). The corridor connects

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

Regional Project Corridors

May 2007

51

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision the Laurel Highlands Hiking Trail in neighboring Westmoreland County to the Tuscarora State Forest in Huntingdon County. Furthermore, the corridor provides direct access to Johnstown, Hollidaysburg and Huntingdon as well as the following State Gamelands: #198, #147, #118, #322 and #71. C. Laurel Hill Greenway The Laurel Hill Greenway is a 46 mile long recreational corridor connecting Ohiopyle State Park and Seward, near Johnstown. The Greenway is situated in Cambria, Fayette, Somerset and Westmoreland Counties, following the Laurel Ridge. The corridor includes the existing improved Laurel Highlands Hiking Trail (aka Laurel Ridge Trail), extending the entire length of the corridor. The trail connects several recreational hubs including Laurel Ridge State Park, Hidden Valley and Seven Springs Resorts, Kooser State Park, Laurel Hill State Park and Ohiopyle State Park. The Laurel Hill Greenway connects the Mainline Canal Greenway on the north with the Great Allegheny Passage on the south.

D. Quemahoning Greenway The Quemahoning Greenway follows the Stony Creek River through Cambria and Somerset counties linking Johnstown with the proposed Allegheny Crossing corridor (#10 below). Within Johnstown it could incorporate the proposed Sandyvale Memorial Gardens. The corridor covers approximately 28 miles along the Stonycreek River Valley and accesses unique historical features such as the Flight 93 National Memorial. While the corridor is envisioned to include a land trail, the Stonycreek Water Trail currently transverses the entire length of the Quemahoning Greenway.

Figure 32: Along the Laurel Hill Greenway

Figure 31: Rail Trail Development

52

E. Allegheny Front Wildlife Corridor The Allegheny Front Wildlife Corridor is planned to protect nearly 84 miles within Cambria, Blair, Bedford and Somerset counties. The Corridor follows the Allegheny Front, the geological feature that divides the Appalachian Plateau from the Ridge Valley province of the Appalachian Mountains, and extends from Centre County, PA to Maryland. This north/south preservation corridor accesses

several sensitive BDAs, Gallitzin State Forest, Blue Knob State Park as well as numerous State Gamelands. The Corridor is envisioned to contain limited access open space areas without formalized or improved trails to maximize the protection of sensitive resources within the Corridor.

proposed Allegheny Crossing. This Greenway is also defined by the Pennsylvania Audubon Society as Important Bird Area #81, The Great Tussey Mountain IBA, a flyway for many species of birds, including raptors (6,000 + preseason) as well as the Golden Eagle.

F. Five Mountains Wildlife Corridor The Five Mountains Wildlife Corridor is a preservation corridor situated within Bedford, Blair and Huntingdon Counties. The Corridor passes near Bedford and Altoona on its 118 mile north/south journey from the Maryland border to Centre County. State Gamelands #48, #41, #147 and #166 are accessible along the Five Mountains Wildlife Corridor. The Corridor travels along the ridges of Bald Eagle Mountain, Brush Mountain, Lock Mountain, Dunning Mountain, Evitts Mountain and other smaller mountains on its north/south path. Like the Allegheny Front Wildlife Corridor, the Five Mountains Wildlife Corridor is envisioned to contain limited access open space without improved trails.

H-I. Potomac to Raystown Greenway The Potomac to Raystown Greenway encompasses approximately 60 miles within Fulton, Bedford and Huntingdon counties. It is divided into two sections by the Allegheny Crossing which it follows to cross over Rays Hill. The northern portion covers 37 miles from the Allegheny Crossing to Raystown Lake while the southern portion covers 23 miles from the Allegheny Crossing, near Huntingdon, south to the Fulton County/Maryland State line. The corridor provides access to Raystown Lake, a major recreational attraction within the region and could potentially extend a short distance through Maryland to reach the Potomac River. The Greenway also includes a large portion of the Lower Juniata Water Trail south of Raystown Lake. The Potomac to Raystown Greenway interconnects the Main Line Canal Greenway™ and the Allegheny Crossing and provides access to State Gamelands #128, #65, #261, #78 and #67 as well as Rothrock State Forest, Buchanan State Forest and Trough Creek State Park.

G. Mid State Greenway The Mid State Greenway is a recreational corridor that runs north/south through Bedford, Blair and Huntingdon Counties. The 91 mile corridor includes the Mid State Trail and Mid State Trail Extension, both existing improved land trails that together run the entire length of the corridor. These Trails are part of a larger network that extends into both Maryland and Central Pennsylvania, near State College. The Mid State Greenway offers access to State Gamelands #97, #73 and #118 as well as Rothrock State Forest and Buchanan State Forest. The Mid State Greenway interconnects the Main Line Canal Greenway™ and the

J. Tuscarora Greenway The 82 mile Tuscarora Greenway, which includes the existing Link and Tuscarora Trails, is a recreational corridor situated within Fulton and Huntingdon counties. The Greenway extends from Greenwood

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision Furnace State Park to Cowan’s Gap State Park. The Tuscarora Greenway inter connects the Main Line Canal Greenway™ and the Allegheny Crossing and provides access to State Gamelands #124, #81, #99, #71 and #112 as well as Rothrock State Forest and Buchanan State Forest. K. The Allegheny Crossing The Allegheny Crossing is a 77 mile recreational corridor extending from the Allegheny Highlands Trail, near Myersdale, in Somerset County to the Tuscarora Trail in Fulton County. The eastern portion of this corridor includes the Pike to Bike Trail. While the corridor is envisioned to include a land trail, the corridor includes an existing portion of the Lower Juniata Water Trail. The Allegheny Crossing provides connections to seven other regional corridors as well as access to Indian Lake, Shawnee Lake, Buchanan State Forest and State Gamelands #97 and #81. As a major east-west connection across the region, the Allegheny Crossing could be considered a State-wide ‘mega’-trail.

Park through Myersdale to Cumberland, MD. The corridor provides access to State Gameland #111 as well as Forbes State Forest.

Figure 33: Tunnel along the Great Allegheny Passage

L. Great Allegheny Passage The Great Allegheny Passage and Laurel Highlands Trail is part of a greater network of existing improved trails that extends from Pittsburgh to Washington D.C. It is also considered to be a Pennsylvania ‘mega’-trail by DCNR. The approximately 42 mile segment in Somerset County includes 35 miles of existing improved trail; the remaining 7 miles is scheduled for completion by 2008 and will consist of crushed aggregate limestone in the same character as existing improvements. This Greenway extends from Ohiopyle State

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

53

Part Four – Greenways and Open Space Vision Table 9: Regional Projects Summary

# A

Project / Corridor Name Ghost Town Trail Connector

Type of Corridor

Total Project Length (mi)

Unimproved/ Unsecured Project / Corridor Area (acres)

Length of Trail Constructed (mi.)¹

Probable Project / Corridor Acquisition Cost Probable Land Trail Improvement Cost

Probable Water Trail Improvement Cost

Probable Total Cost (Acquisition and Improvement)

IV

17.8

7.4

1,730.6 $

389,000

to

$

1,168,000 $

416,000

to

$

936,000 $

IV, V

97.1

49.0

14,477.5 $

3,254,000

to

$

9,772,000 $

1,925,000

to

$

4,332,000 $

C

Main Line Canal Greenway: Pennsylvania Millennium Trail Laurel Hill Greenway

II

45.9

45.9

-

to

$

to

$

-

D

Quemahoning Greenway

III, V

28.4

-

5,634.6 $

1,266,000

to

$

3,803,000 $

to

$

426,000 $

57,000 $

E

Allegheny Front Wildlife Corridor I

83.6

35.5

16,654.5 $

3,744,000

to

$

11,242,000 $

-

to

$

-

$

-

F

Five Mountains Wildlife Corridor I

118.4

41.7

34,852.5 $

7,834,000

to

$

23,525,000 $

-

to

$

-

$

G

Mid State Greenway

II

90.9

90.9

-

to

$

-

to

$

-

$

H

I, II, V

36.7

23.1

7,224.3 $

1,624,000

to

$

4,876,000 $

20,000

to

$

20,000 $

31,000 $

I, II

22.5

13.9

4,568.3 $

1,027,000

to

$

3,084,000 $

13,000

to

$

13,000 $

-

$

J

Potomac to Raystown Greenway North Potomac to Raystown Greenway South Tuscarora Greenway

II

81.9

81.9

-

to

$

to

$

-

-

$

K

The Allegheny Crossing

IV, V

76.9

7.3

20,929.7 $

4,705,000

to

$

14,128,000 $

2,783,000

to

$

6,262,000 $

L

Great Allegheny Passage

IV

41.7

37.1

1,383.7 $

311,000

to

$

934,000 $

184,000

to

$

414,000 $

741.8

433.6

107,455.6 $

24,154,000

to

$

72,532,000 $

5,625,000

to

$

12,403,000 $

B

I

$

-

$

-

$

-

-

-

-

$

$

$

284,000

-

$

$

-

$

805,000

to

$

2,104,000

76,000 $

5,255,000

to

$

14,180,000

to

$

1,607,000

to

$

4,286,000

$

3,744,000

to

$

11,242,000

-

$

7,834,000

to

$

23,525,000

-

$

to

$

1,672,000

to

$

4,927,000

1,068,000

to

$

3,097,000

to

$

7,519,000

to

$

20,419,000

$

495,000

to

$

1,348,000

193,000 $

29,999,000

to

$

85,128,000

-

$

29,000 $ -

-

-

-

-

-

-

1: Also includes portions of project corridors that are under public control or have been committed to future trail improvements. Corridor Type: I: Open Space - unblazed / unmarked; public access permitted (price: n/a) II: Maintained Dirt Trail - blazed / marked; pedestrian trail approximately 2' wide (price: $1,500/mile) III: Improved / Maintained Dirt Trail - blazed / marked; multipurpose trail approximately 6' wide (price: $10,000-$15,000/mile) IV: Improved / Maintained Crushed Aggregate / Asphalt Trail - blazed / marked; multipurpose trail approximately 6'-10' wide (price: $40,000-$90,000/mile) V: Water Trail - public access points (price: $10,000 per access point approximately every 5 miles)

54

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Five – A Plan for Action Part Five – A Plan for Action

Implementation Strategy The following Plan for Action presents a comprehensive strategy for implementing the Southern Alleghenies region’s Greenways and open space vision. The Plan for Action consists of four parts: an overall implementation strategy, a summary of the project priorities expressed during public review meetings, a list and description of available regulatory tools and a summary of available resources for technical and funding support. Goals for the Implementation Strategy To achieve the vision of the Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan (the Plan) through the implementation of regional projects identified in that Plan. The implementation strategies recommended herein consist primarily of regional coordination, county support and non-government organization participation intertwined in order to best achieve the Plan over a period of time. Background The true success of any plan lies in the extent to which it is implemented successfully. It has been clear from the start of this project that the Southern Alleghenies Planning and Development Commission (SAP&DC), its member counties and the members of the Planning Advisory Committee (PAC) are deeply committed to seeing the proposals contained in this Plan brought to completion.

While many plans and visions end up sitting on shelves in planning offices, this cannot be allowed to happen with the Plan. Therefore, it is imperative that a realistic implementation strategy be developed as a critical part of the Plan and that a wide range of stakeholders – from municipal officials to county commissioners, from small volunteer groups through well-established non-profits and from county conservation districts through State agencies – agree with both the Plan and the strategies. The Plan is a bold and ambitious vision for a region that is blessed with a wealth of natural resources and unique opportunities for developing, managing and/or conserving its natural and recreational infrastructure. Implementation of the Plan will add greatly to the region’s future economic well being and environmental sustainability and serve as the basis for maintaining a high quality of life for its residents. Some of the challenges specific to this Plan include the fact that it addresses the needs of six counties and proposes over a dozen regional projects and several dozen county and local projects. In addition, there is wide diversity of project types in the Plan including: open space conservation, habitat conservation, on-road biking trails, off-road biking trails, hiking trails, water trails and ATV/snowmobile areas. These difficulties are both compounded and simplified by the fact that there is a myriad of implementing agencies and organizations including local, county and State governments as well as non-profit and volunteer groups. A Draft Implementation Chart (Table 10) begins

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

to serve as a management tool for understanding and tracking the projects and responsibilities set forth in the Plan. While there are challenges to the successful implementation of the Plan, there are also a great number of opportunities presented in the Plan that, coupled with current efforts in the region, offer a bright outlook on achieving much of the Plan’s vision. These include the facts that: • Several of the regional projects identified in the Plan are already underway; • There is a great deal of public land already under control and/or management in the area; • Development pressures in the region are relatively localized leaving time to act on the Plan; and • Residents and agencies in the region are committed to the vision of the Plan. The implementation strategies set forth below draw on the strong existing organizational infrastructure that exists in the region, augments it and sets forth recommended processes and procedures for moving projects forward. Clearly, the leading force behind the development of the Plan was and is the SAP&DC along with its member counties. As such, both SAP&DC and the individual counties play a critical role in achieving the vision that they have defined. That being said, there are a number of partners at the State, regional and local levels that will also be called upon to step-up as this process moves forward.

55

Part Five – A Plan for Action Key KeyIssues Issues

Existing Base is Strong In light ofProject the Plan’s multitude of recommendations, there are aStrong numberin of issues Coordination is Already Certain that are critical to understand in developing an Areas effective implementation strategy. Projects Have Different Needs Existingare Project Base is Strong Projects at Different Stages of Given the ongoing Development successes of projects in the region such as the Great Allegheny Passage, the Implementation Will Takethe Time Main Line Canal Greenway™, Stonycreek Quemahoning Initiative, the Link Trail, Implementation Will Take Moneythe Ghost Town Trail, the Laurel Ridge Trail and the Public Inputof the Rock Run Recreation Area, it development is clear that the Plan is not starting from scratch. Rather, it provides a strategic overlay to more clearly link these projects into a workable and manageable network for the region.

Coordination is Already Strong in Certain Subareas and on Certain Projects Many of those same projects identified above also point to the fact that project coordination is very strong in some areas and on certain projects. Some of these will be discussed in more detail.

Projects Have Different Needs Projects in the region have a wide diversity of need and support; varying from a project like the Link Trail which identified technical assistance as its goal to a capital intensive project like the Pike 2 Bike that will need potentially millions of dollars of investment to be realized.

Projects are at Different Stages of Development Projects also differ in terms of their current status from the Great Allegheny Passage which is completed in the region, through the Main Line Canal Greenway™, which is being implemented in stages, to the ridge top corridors identified in the Plan that are yet to be adopted as projects.

Implementation Will Take Time Everyone involved must remember that achieving the vision of the Plan will take time, perhaps decades, and that keeping up the energy and support of the vision will take long-term

56

commitment, patience and a willingness to suffer setbacks as well as successes. At times, some projects will appear to surge ahead while others may be perceived as languishing.

Implementation Will Take Money Many of the projects in the Plan will take financial commitment from a variety of sources. The unfortunate reality is that funds are tight at all levels of government. Having a common regional vision, like that in the Plan, can be a critical tool in helping to leverage funding from a variety of sources.

Public Input Much of the discussion at the five public meetings held around the region in April 2006 focused on questions related to implementation and project needs. Answers, approaches and options varied from county to county. However, there were common themes throughout and an implementation strategy for the Plan, laid out below, has been developed based on that input as well as input from the PAC. The lessons from those public meetings included the following: • Implementation is critical to long-term success • There is a great deal of effort and energy already in place o Link Trail o Great Allegheny Passage o Main Line Canal Greenway™ o Stonycreek – Quemahoning Initiative o Pike 2 Bike Trail • There are different levels of interest in collaboration and coordination from groups in the region • There is great interest in technical assistance from organizations in the region • Implementation strategies suggested include o No coordination o Coordination by county o Some counties interested in that role, others not o Coordination by type of project o Coordination by region o SAP&DC is seen in this role o Southern Alleghenies RC&D is seen as helping in this role

Reasons for Coordinating The interest, need and benefit of coordination expressed by meeting participants varied along the way but was generally seen as a critical piece in achieving the vision of the Plan. It is important to note that coordination can mean a great number of different things; from simply talking with each other to managing all projects under a single entity. It was clear from discussions at the meetings as well as from practical experience that the most effective level of coordination in the Southern Alleghenies lies somewhere between these two ends.

Figure 34: Public Meeting in Huntingdon County

One of the primary benefits of coordination among and between projects is a common knowledge base and a sharing of information, tactics and solutions. This can also help to identify additional linkages, gaps and opportunities through shared knowledge as information flows more freely and is interpreted by different organizations.

Coordination also allows the region to present a unified message of its vision, goals, objectives, strategies and needs to a full range of audiences including: • • • •

Public Legislators Agencies Funders

By presenting this unified message, the audiences better understand the importance of the individual projects and are, one hopes, more willing to invest in those projects whether through volunteer time, specialized services, political support or funding. Priority setting through coordination can also be beneficial to the region as a whole. By tracking projects, their status and need, an organization, county, region and/or agency can determine the most effective use of its investment at a given time. For instance, a trail project might become a higher priority for immediate funding because of the abandonment of a railroad corridor and a tight time frame, while another trail project may be able to forego a grant request for construction for a period of time. Given limited resources, such prioritization can help achieve greater implementation of the Plan over time. Perhaps most importantly to achieving the vision of the Plan, coordination has the potential to greatly heighten the region’s ability to leverage funds. Projects that were, at one time, disconnected are now linked and creative funding solutions can be developed to match local, State and Federal

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Five – A Plan for Action funding sources. As an example, there are instances where trail construction has doubled as treatment of abandoned mine drainage by using a limestone base for the trail that buffers the acidic discharge as well as supporting recreational uses. In such a case, one could fashion a way in which to couple available remediation funding sources to trail construction sources to capitalize the project. Similar approaches might also be fashioned for conservation areas that will serve both recreational and habitat needs. Potential Downsides/Difficulties to Coordination All of this being said, there are potential downsides to coordination. In some cases, well-established groups may not want to participate due to real or perceived “loss of clout” and a feeling that they may potentially lose some of their access to funding by working with others. Additionally, independent-minded groups may wish to remain independent and “chafe” at the idea that someone else may be calling the shots. Therefore, it is imperative in developing the proper level of coordination that the interests of all groups be taken into account so as to encourage participation.

Examples of Coordinated Efforts By Region or Area The Stonycreek-Quemahoning Initiative brings together over a dozen projects from the Quemahoning Reservoir down the Stonycreek to Johnstown and “packages” them as a single initiative. Projects include

such seemingly diverse interests as abandoned mine drainage remediation, trail development, economic development, art history, white water paddling and municipal planning. Through the efforts of the Initiative, a common vision of the area has been developed and, while individual projects continue to move forward on their own, concerted fundraising from State, Federal and private sources has taken place. Because the broad themes of the Initiative are commonly adopted by over 70 supporting groups, the effort has gained the attention of legislators, policy makers, funders and the media. This level of attention is much greater than what any of the individual project sponsors would have garnered on its own. By Corridor While its vision of linking Pittsburgh and Washington, DC by trail is almost complete, the Allegheny Trail Alliance (“ATA”) and its member organizations have labored long and hard to achieve their goal. The success of the ATA is steeped in commitment and coordination. Made-up of seven individual trail organizations, the ATA has thrived for a variety of reasons, including the coordination of those seven local groups and their understanding of how the efforts of each on their own section of the trail contribute to the overall vision. While each trail group continues to focus on its section of the Great Allegheny Passage, the ATA as a group is able to look at the broader needs and implications for the overall goal and help to identify and secure funding

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

opportunities in the most efficient and effective manner. By Project Type For about ten years, the Allegheny Land Trust has been coordinating the annual requests of a number of trail groups to the Allegheny County Regional Asset District (“RAD”). This arrangement came about after the RAD realized that it was fielding multiple requests each year for trail funding and was unable without indepth research to determine the relative merits of the requests. The Allegheny Land Trust now annually convenes the trail groups within Allegheny County that wish to apply for RAD funding and the group as a whole determines the relative amounts that each group “deserves” from the RAD funding. A single request is then submitted to the RAD Board for consideration. Could some projects have done better over the years if they had been on their own? Perhaps. But the County’s trail network is better off because of the cooperation and priority setting undertaken by the trail groups.

Summary Summary The implementation strategy for the Plan is based on the following:

• There is a need for a coordinated message about the vision and Plan • There is a strong desire for increased technical assistance The Plan for Action proposes the following structure for moving the Plan forward: • SAP&DC leads the effort by transforming the PAC into the Southern Alleghenies Greenway and Open Space Task Force. The Task Force should include members of the PAC, the Planning Director from each County as well as representatives of other key partners • The Task Force develops a work plan consistent with achieving the vision • SAP&DC hires a DCNR Circuit Rider who reports to the Task Force to achieve its work plan Collectively, the following organizational strategies are based both upon existing capacities in the region and reasonably achievable additions to those capacities. This approach puts the impetus on the SAP&DC to take a number of steps to begin the implementation phase.

• SAP&DC is well-positioned to oversee the implementation of the vision • Many resources are already hard at work in the region making aspects of the vision a reality • Counties are committed to participating fully in achieving the vision • There is a need for better coordination among stakeholders at all levels

57

Part Five – A Plan for Action Stakeholders What follows is a listing of some of the major agencies and organizations that are currently or should be in the future involved with implementing the Plan. This is not an exhaustive list and will need to be expanded and updated as implementation begins. In fact, one of the first actions will be to fully understand all of the organizations at work in the region. SAP&DC Since 1967, SAP&DC and the counties of Bedford, Blair, Cambria, Fulton, Huntingdon and Somerset have worked cooperatively to develop and implement programs for their region. SAP&DC is the sponsor of this Plan and will play the key role in facilitating implementation of the Plan. Counties Each of the counties involved in the Plan has available resources, knowledge and capacity that will be critical to achieving the vision of the Plan. These include their planning departments, conservation districts and economic development agencies. Citizen Groups The implementation of this plan hinges on the support of a local project sponsor. Local and regional citizen groups are anticipated to serve as the primary advocates for a project.

58

Southern Alleghenies Resource Conservation and Development Council (RC&D) The purpose of the RC&D Program is to promote the conservation and use of natural resources to improve economic conditions and enhance the quality of life in Bedford, Blair, Cambria, Fulton, Huntingdon and Somerset counties. Southern Alleghenies Regional Tourism Confederation A private/public advisory board of the SAP&DC made up of local/county convention and visitors bureaus, heritage preservation groups and State heritage parks. DCNR A major landowner in the region, the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR) owns and operates State Parks and Forests and works closely with local governments and nonprofits to achieve conservation and recreation goals and projects. PennDOT The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) has been a major funder of this project. PennDOT can provide funding and technical assistance for trail and other transportation-related projects.

National Park Service National Park Service manages the Allegheny Portage Railroad National Historic site, Johnstown Flood National Memorial and the Flight 93 National Memorial and has designated the Great Allegheny Passage as a National Scenic Trail. The Allegheny Ridge Corporation A private, non-profit corporation that develops, interprets and restores the historic, cultural and natural resources in Blair, Cambria, Somerset and Huntingdon Counties. The Corporation is the prime implementer of the Main Line Canal GreenwayTM project.

the important biological and natural habitats in the region. Somerset County Conservancy The Somerset County Conservancy has conserved nearly 500 acres on Somerset County to date. It could serve as a partner for future projects in the County. Southern Alleghenies Conservancy Southern Alleghenies Conservancy is a land trust focused primarily on the area included in the Plan and works to conserve important lands as well as to restore water quality.

The Central Pennsylvania Conservancy The Central Pennsylvania Conservancy (CPC) is a non-profit land trust that primarily operates in Cumberland, Dauphin, Juniata, Perry, Huntingdon and Mifflin counties. The CPC strives to conserve natural resources and open space for the benefit of current and future generations through the acquisition and preservation of lands with natural, scenic, cultural and agricultural value.

PA Game Commission Another major landowner within the region, the Pennsylvania Game Commission owns and operates State Gamelands

Conemaugh Valley Conservancy The Conemaugh Valley Conservancy has preserved nearly 300 acres in Cambria and Somerset Counties. Its mission is to conserve and preserve natural and cultural resources along the Conemaugh River corridor. The Conservancy s the leading force behind the Stonycreek Quemahoning Initiative.

US Army Corps of Engineers The Corps is responsible for Raystown Lake and Dam, a major recreational center in the region, as well as a number of other projects.

Western Pennsylvania Conservancy Western Pennsylvania Conservancy has conserved over 250,000 acres of land in Western Pennsylvania and focuses much of its work on

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Five – A Plan for Action Rolesand andResponsibilities Responsibilities Roles SAP&DC

SAP&DC will have primary responsibility for SAP&DC seeing that the Plan is implemented. Because it Southern Greenways representsAlleghenies all of the member counties,Task the Force Commission is perfectly situated to sheppard the vision over the long-term. While greenways and Counties open space planning are a new undertaking for Agencies the Commission, these activities fit perfectly with Project Partners SAP&DC’s transportation, economic DCNR Circuitand Rider development tourism roles. In addition, because of its ongoing contacts with State and Federal officials and agencies, SAP&DC can continually monitor the interplay between the Plan and other projects that may be developing using PennDOT, Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED) or other funding streams.

Southern Alleghenies Greenways Task Force In order to effectively manage the implementation of the Greenways Plan, it is recommended that SAP&DC form a Greenways Task Force. This Task Force will be responsible for deploying and coordinating, on behalf of the Commission, the resources and activities necessary to achieve the Plan’s vision over the long-term. The Southern Alleghenies Greenways Task Force will be a committee of SAP&DC made up of key stakeholders committed to achieving the vision of the Plan. Members of the Task Force should include members of the PAC, key State agencies and regional organizations like the Tourism Confederation and the Southern Alleghenies Resource Conservation and Development Council. Additional members may include representatives of regional organizations, and interested citizens. The Task Force will be the

caretaker of the Plan for the region. As such, it will: • •







Develop a Five Year Plan for achieving the vision; Interact with a broad range of stakeholders interested in development of the greenways and open space network; Prioritize projects and funding opportunities on a periodic basis as related to the vision’s regionalscale greenways and open space projects; Ensure that agencies and organizations implementing projects are receiving the needed technical assistance; and Report regularly to SAP&DC on its efforts.

Counties The counties of the Southern Alleghenies have already shown leadership by implementing projects within their own jurisdictions. In addition, county commissioners, planners, conservation district staff and economic development staff are “in the field” every day working on a wide variety of projects. This knowledge and experience must be harnessed for the Plan to succeed. Therefore, as stated above, the counties, through their planning directors, should form the nucleus of the Task Force. While the planning directors already interact on a number of levels, the format of the Task Force will allow them to both focus on and collaborate specifically on the greenway and open space projects in the region. Agencies Several State agencies are critical to the implementation of the Plan. Chief among these is the DCNR. Not only does the DCNR manage the State Parks and State Forests in the region, it is also the agency primarily responsible for funding land conservation programs, trail development, ecotourism and other recreation programs. Because of this, it is highly recommended that the Task Force include a member from the DCNR who can serve as an advisor of, explainer to, and advocate for the region’s efforts. In addition, the Task Force should maintain close contact with representatives of the A

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

Game Commission, PennDOT, DCED, and the PA Fish and Boat Commission.

• •

Project Partners Project partners are defined as those organizations and/or individuals that are working to implement regional projects. Because of the importance of these groups in completing those projects, it is recommended that a few partners be included on the Task Force. This will ensure that the Task Force is able to consider issues from all points of view. DCNR Circuit Rider Staffing of the Task Force is a primary concern in implementing the Plan. It is not clear that any organization currently has the capacity to provide the necessary staff support to the Task Force. Therefore, it is highly recommended that the SAP&DC oversees the hiring of a “Circuit Rider” to assist the Task Force and serve as its staff. The DCNR sponsors a Circuit Rider program to help build local and multi-municipal capacity for implementing projects like the Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network. As of 2006, DCNR has extended the Circuit Rider program to counties, it is no longer limited to municipality or non-profit organizations. Circuit Rider grants provide four-years of scaled funding to allow the hiring of a full-time employee to share services through an intergovernmental cooperative effort. Available grant funding for the Circuit Rider's salary decreases from 100 percent the first year to 75 percent the second, 50 percent the third and 25 percent the fourth year thereby allowing the grantee to build the fiscal support necessary to sustain the position. By the fifth year the Circuit Rider shall be supported 100% by SAP&DC and its member counties. The Circuit Rider funding would be applied for by SAP&DC and the Circuit Rider would be employed by the agency and report to the Task Force. Responsibilities of the Circuit Rider would include, but not be limited to:

• •

• •

Work with the Task Force to develop the full work plan for implementation of the Plan; Work with the Southern Alleghenies RC&D to develop a summit of all stakeholders in the Plan; Coordination with the primary project sponsors in the region; Coordination with State agencies, especially DCNR, PennDOT, DCED, and the Game Commission regarding project status and funding opportunities; Work with the RC&D to implement a technical assistance program for groups undertaking projects in the region; and Development, in coordination with the Southern Alleghenies Regional Tourism Confederation, of an outreach program to promote the greenways and open space in the region.

In addition, it is recommended that the SAP&DC pursue the development of a working partnership with the RC&D to explore the feasibility and practicality of using some of that organization’s capacities in pursuing the implementation of the Plan. These efforts should focus on the provision of technical support and grant writing expertise to local groups such as watershed organizations and trail associations, etc.

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Part Five – A Plan for Action capitalizing the Circuit Rider position in years 2 through 5.

Figure 35: Implementation Partners Organization Chart Southern Alleghenies Planning and Development Commission

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Task Force

DCNR Circuit Rider

Regional Project Coordination with Counties, Agencies, and Partners

County Project Assistance to Counties

Prioritize Projects and Work Plan

Activities It is critical to understand that a vision does not begin from a standing start. There are several items or actions that should be addressed prior to any planning, programming, educational or grant writing efforts by key stakeholders or the Task Force. These actions can be grouped into 3 generalized timeframes: • • •

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Immediate Activities Year One Activities On-Going Activities

Technical Assistance with Southern Alleghenies RC & D

Marketing Coordination with SA Regional Tourism Confederation

Work Plan and Outreach Activities

Immediate Prior to formally organizing the Task Force, the members of the PAC should approach the regional and State representatives of the DCNR to discuss the feasibility of obtaining a DCNRsponsored Circuit Rider. Prior to the DCNR dialogue, the PAC should evaluate the staff capacity of SAP&DC as well as each county planning/recreation department. Subsequently, the PAC should expand the general job description for the Circuit Rider position defined in this Plan, establish general operating/communication procedures and protocols for the Circuit Rider and identify potential funding streams (by county) for

After the PAC approaches DCNR, the agency will form a Peer Review Group of recreation professionals from across the Commonwealth to evaluate the region’s current staff capacity as well as the anticipated staff demands most likely to be generated by the Plan recommendations. The Peer Review Group will meet with the PAC to discuss their review and to make recommendations relative to the Circuit Rider position. If the Peer Review Group feels that a Circuit Rider is needed to support the region’s greenway implementation efforts, formal agreements between SAP&DC, the Counties and DCNR should then be prepared. An additional immediate activity is the completion of the Southern Alleghenies natural Infrastructure GIS database. SAP&DC and the DCNR have had preliminary discussions to complete the compilation and mapping of a series of additional natural resource features. DCNR has tentatively pledged additional funding to capitalize this effort. These new datasets, along with the data compiled as part of the greenway planning process, should be provided to DCNR for integration into the State’s GIS database. See Appendix H for a summary of the datasets to be compiled/created for the National Infrastructure effort. Year One The first activity of Year One should be the formal recognition of the Task Force. As previously suggested, the Task Force should include members of the PAC and should be expanded to include key implementation stakeholders related to the region’s greenway

network. Formal authorization of the Task Force through resolution should clearly define membership structure, member duties, voting rights, recommendation status and other pertinent guidelines. The second Year One activity should be the review of each project corridor and the identification of project status. There are a number of projects in the Plan. Therefore, it is critical for the Task Force to understand the status of each of these projects and to be able to support those with the best chance of completion. Because of this, it is critical that one of the Task Force’s first undertakings be a review of the project prioritization contained herein. This task must fit into a broader Five-Year work plan developed by the Task Force in consultation with a range of stakeholders. Because this activity would take place before a Circuit Rider could be put in place, it is suggested that the Task Force work closely with the RC&D to develop this operating strategy. The RC&D is wellpositioned to undertake such a task. Overall, the Five-Year work plan should be aimed at implementing the projects recommended in the Plan by: • • •

Continuing to support the strengths of existing initiatives Convening a regional open space, trails and greenways “Summit” to Developing analyses of existing projects and their status o Technical assistance needs o Funding needs o Timing o Identify critical gaps

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Five – A Plan for Action •







Creating a clearinghouse for technical assistance through the Task Force and RC&D Preparing a publication or “sales pitch” for the open space, trails and greenways vision Convening group presentations to SAP&DC, State agencies and the regional legislative delegation to apprise them of the projects, progress and needs of the region Create a greenway identification signage system to inform the public of greenway locations. The signage could also provide the opportunity to convey information related to ecological importance, historic value, etc. Such signage improvements could be placed at ridgelines, stream crossings, trailheads etc.

Figure 36: Example of Buffer Signage

and Open Space Network Plan every ten years and revise the corresponding Plan for Action. The revised Plan for Action should then serve as the basis for the proceeding set of Five-Year Plans.

Figure 37: Example of Buffer Signage1

On-Going The Task Force should update the Five-Year Plan every two or three years. This update can be completed internally within the Task Force and presented to SAP&DC and each county as appropriate. The update should focus on identifying the current status of all projects (including any funding received to date) and outlining the implementation activities or efforts anticipated in the next five years. While the vision defined by this Plan was planned and designed for a specific set of conditions, the Plan for Action has been designed to compensate for unexpected opportunities and the reality of implementation. As regional development patterns unfold and corridor conditions change, it is imperative to its long-term viability that this Plan’s vision be periodically reassessed and refined. It is recommended that the Task Force update the Regional Greenway

(cleanwatermn.org) 1

Nikki Brand, Addressing concerns with the Chesapeake Bay Tributary Strategy (Keystone Builder, 2007) 14.

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

As part of the on-going activities, the Task Force should also organize, host and facilitate a Regional Summit for greenway planning coordination and implementation. This summit should convey the key stakeholders throughout all six counties of the SAP&DC region as well as the abutting counties (for instance Indiana and Westmoreland Counties).

Project Specific Implementation Strategies Because of the range of project types, municipal governments and citizen support throughout the region, there is no single strategy for achieving the completion of a greenway, trail or land conservation project. These projects come in all shapes and sizes with implementation efforts to match. One benefit now experienced by the Southern Alleghenies region is the completion of the first regional greenway and open space vision in the Commonwealth. Even within the Southern Alleghenies region there are a number of different successful implementation strategies both underway and completed. These range from: •

The Main Line Canal Greenway™ and Great Allegheny Passage that represent highly coordinated and relatively well-funded corridor projects wherein the sponsors worked diligently at the local, regional and State levels to secure support.



The Stonycreek-Quemahoning Initiative, which represents an agglomeration of different types of relatively local projects, combined to present a stronger case for economic and recreational development building on prior and continuing environmental restoration efforts.



The Link Trail which is volunteer-based and represents a discreet project within Pennsylvania that is planned to join with a larger, national trail.

As the work plan for implementing the vision is developed and as the individual projects move forward, it must be recognized that some projects will receive local and State governmental support, some will be pursued by non-profit organizations with or without governmental support and that some will be pursued on a truly local basis by community volunteers. While none of these approaches precludes the others, it is most likely that the work plan will identify priority projects for the region and, perhaps, individual counties. In those corridors or project areas where there is currently no identified strategy for project implementation, it is recommended that the Task Force identify a project sponsor and work with that person, agency, or group to develop a practical strategy that includes: • •

A project feasibility analysis or study; Cost estimates for planning, development and operations and maintenance;

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Part Five – A Plan for Action • • •

Challenges and opportunities to completing the project; A funding strategy; and An outreach strategy to involve landowners (public or private), local and State government, SAP&DC and the public.



• • •

Examples of Greenway Implementation As an aid to local governments or organizations contemplating the implementation of a project corridor or a portion of a corridor, two implementation scenario examples are summarized below. The scenarios represent the hypothetical examples and are provided only as a guideline for developing detailed and customized Plans of Action for specific project corridors. The scenarios outline the key actions or steps needed to initiate implementation and describe the potential collaborative discussions between the project’s various stakeholders. Scenario One A greenway corridor has been planned along a waterway connecting two towns. No public open space currently exists in this area with the exception of community parks in each town.

• • •

Scenario Two The greenway corridor follows the top of a mountain ridge, providing a route for an existing long distance hiking trail. There are several large tracts of gamelands along the ridge, separated by large tracts of private land. Action: •





Action: • •

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Present the greenway concept to local governments and citizens along the greenway corridor, demonstrating its value to the community.

Identify ecological and cultural resources in the corridor which will benefit from preservation. Identify possible river access points for public acquisition. Acquire and develop river access points at intervals of approximately five miles. Acquire riparian easements along the river to protect river frontage from development. Develop a trail feasibility study to identify possible trail locations. Acquire land for the trail corridor. Build a multi-use trail between the two towns.



Present the greenway concept to local governments and citizens along the greenway corridor, demonstrating its value to the community. Identify ecological and cultural resources in the corridor which will benefit from preservation. Discuss the possible acquisition of the missing links with conservancies, the trail organization and the Game Commission. Identify property owners with an interest in preserving open space (environmentalists, hunting camps, local government). Negotiate conservation easements over large tracts of land for wildlife conservation and low impact hiking trails.

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Five – A Plan for Action Table 10: Implementation Responsibilities & Priorities Nature of Strategy

ID

Responsible Party(ies)

Timing

Funding Source(s)

Conduct DCNR-sponsored peer review group to evaluate feasibility of utilizing a Circuit Rider

DCNR approval of Circuit Task Force Rider and formal application executed

Immediate

SAP&DC

2

Convene Southern Alleghenies Greenways & Open Space Task Force Development of Work Plan to achieve Vision

Task Force by-laws and mission statement

SAP&DC

Immediate

SAP&DC

Work Plan

Task Force

4 5 6 7

8

9 Involvement of Partners

Outcome(s)

1

3 Stewardship of the Plan

Action

10 11

12

Facilitate annual Task Force meeting with surrounding counties Analyze the status of existing projects

Coordination of implemtation efforts Understanding of projects and their status, timeline, and various needs Develop additional Natural Complete development of Infrastructure GIS map for the region GIS layers to Natural Infrastructure standards Compile inventory of quasi-public Develop a uniform protected lands protected/conservation lands GIS layer

ID

Action

13

Develop Clearinghouse for Technical Assistance to projects

Complete within SAP&DC 3 months of convening

14

Create a Greenway specific job description and hire a Circuit Rider

Task Force

Annually

SAP&DC

15

Prepare marketing materials for the Vision

Task Force

In synch with the Work Plan (above) Immediate

SAP&DC

SAP&DC

DCNR & PennDOT

16 Outreach SAP&DC

Shared goals and Task Force & commitment to the Vision RC&D and Plan Regional Summary of project needs Identification of critical gaps Development of on-going strategy for project coordination Determine ownership of greenway Continued stewardship of Task Force elements (state, county, conservation greenway plan elements group, etc.) Task Force & Coordinate bicycle and pedestrian Additional recreation enhancements with larger scale opportunities / corridors SAP&DC transportation projects within the greenway network Example for the Task Force Demonstrate appropriate land preparation of a greenwaymanagement techniques within publicly held (or quasi-public) lands oriented management to implement portions of the plan greenway network Convene Regional Summit

Consistent planning for Promote the incorporation of appropriate greenway network and the greenway network recreation provisions in County and Municipal planning efforts

Nature of Strategy

Immediate

DCNR & PennDOT

Two months following completion of Work Plan

SAP&DC & RC&D

18 Ongoing

Varies

Ongoing

SAP&DC & PennDOT

One year following completion of work plan

DCNR, Game Commission, US Park Service, Conservation District, Western Pennsylvania Conservancy SAP&DC

Task Force & Ongoing County Planners

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

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May 2007

Outcome(s)

Responsible Party(ies)

One stop shop for groups RC&D looking for assistance on project development, funding, etc Home of the Circuit Rider (below) Deployment of a resource RC&D & person to aid regional SAP&DC partners in successful completion of projects

Task Force A unified message to funders, agencies, legislators, media, and the public regarding the vision, its status, and progress Encourage agriculture and woodland Incorporation of Task Force & area property owners to make land additional lands for County Planners avaiable to hunters througn nthe recreational and Pennsylvania Game Commission's preservation use Farm Game / Safety Zone Program Develop Regional “Ask” for priority A clear message to projects identified in Vision and legislators, funders, and Work Plan agencies showing the value of their investment in the region and the commitment of local partners to working together in achieving the Vision Create a greenway signage system to Erection of Greenway identify project corridors where identification signs at some form of implementation has stream/road occurred corrsing/bridge crossings/trail heads, etc.

Timing

Funding Source(s)

Immediate

Multiple

Immediate

50% DCNR 50% local match

Complete for the Regional Summit

In-Kind from local businesses and partners

Ongoing

PA Game Commission

SAP&DC & Task Following Force completion of Work Plan and success of the Regional Summit

Multiple

Task Force, SAP&DC & RC&D

Multiple/Private Sponsorship

Long-Term

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Part Five – A Plan for Action Project Corridor Priorities Overview As project corridors were determined for the region and each of the counties, the relative priority of each project was determined through a process guided by the project’s PAC with input from the public. The priorities establish the projects most in need of further study, design or funding. The priorities were established based on public support, importance to the overall network, current status (amount developed, ownership, etc.), current management and the extent to which the project corridor is threatened by development or other incompatible uses. Initial PAC Review As project corridors were developed for the Plan, they were prioritized by the PAC. They were modified, added or eliminated as necessary based on the PAC’s review of the initial list potential project corridors. For example, some project corridors were removed due to regional desires to discourage ATV usage within the greenway network and the preference to concentrate this type of recreation in designated ATV areas. Moreover, the PAC analyzed the project corridors to determine which could best serve as regional opportunities and which best serve local or county interests. A hierarchical system of regional and countylevel project corridors resulted from this process. After several iterations of this process, a complete network of regional project corridors and county-level project corridors were defined.

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Public Participation Along with the initial prioritization by the PAC, public input was sought through a series of meetings held in each of the counties. This input was obtained during the individual county meetings in April, 2006. Residents were asked to rank or “vote” on the project corridors that they preferred to see implemented in the near future. Tallying the votes revealed which project corridors were the most and least desirable as well as residents’ general

preferences. Residents were asked to vote first on county-level project corridor priorities and secondly on regional project corridor priorities. A brief summary of these meetings follows: Initial Priorities The results of the individual county workshop’s first exercise are described below. These results include county-level project corridors in each specific county and regional project preferences within each of the counties. Bedford County The Yellow Creek Trail and the Sideling Creek Valley Crossing were the two most popular project corridors in the County. Each of these project corridors are recreation oriented and received more than 20% of the total votes. The third most preferred project corridor was the Cumberland Valley Wildlife Corridor, a preservation corridor. All other county-level project corridors received less than 10% of the votes.

Figure 38: Bedford Meeting

Figure 39: Public Voting

Of the regional projects proposed, the Five Mountains Wildlife Corridor had the strongest support within Bedford County (36% of total votes). It was closely followed by The Allegheny Crossing (30%) and the Mid-State Greenway (27%) Cambria County The two most preferred project corridors in Cambria County, with 19% and 16% of the total votes respectively, were the Laurel Run Trail and the Johnstown – Portage Trail. The Rock Run – Gallitzin Connector and the Blacklick Creek Wildlife Corridor followed in popularity with 9% of the total votes each. Three of these four project corridors are recreation oriented.

Within Cambria County, the regional project receiving the most total votes was the Main Line Canal Greenway™ (36%). This was followed by the Quemahoning Greenway (25%) and the Ghost Town Trail Connector (17%). Fulton County Fulton County’s three most popular project corridors were the Link to Tuscarora Connector (60% of votes), the Little Scrub Ridge Wildlife Connector and the Southern Great Trough Creek Wildlife Corridor. Two of these three project corridors are preservation oriented. No other countylevel project corridors received votes. At the regional level, half of Fulton County residents voted for the Tuscarora Greenway. The Allegheny Crossing Greenway received the second largest number of votes (25%). Huntingdon County The prioritization process in Huntingdon County incorporated an additional cycle of input and refinement. In the first stage, residents of the County ranked the Raystown Extension and the Raystown Connector East as the most favored County-specific project corridors with 10% of the total votes each. Each of the following project corridors received 8% of the votes: Raystown Connector West, Central Huntingdon Wildlife Corridor, Shade Mountain Wildlife Corridor, Southern Trough Creek Wildlife Connector and the Link Trail Alternate. Only 3 of the 22 County-level project corridors identified at the time of the

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Five – A Plan for Action April 2006 Workshop did not receive any votes.

This was followed by the Great Allegheny Passage (25%).

In addition to the project corridors that were ranked by the public, residents suggested a number of additional potential corridor connections. These suggestions were recorded and evaluated by the PAC and the Huntingdon County planning staff to determine their overall feasibility. Some of the suggested corridors proved to be difficult or impractical to implement and were removed from further consideration. The remaining suggestions were viewed as practical projects and were ultimately incorporated into the Huntingdon County plan.

Final Priorities Building on the initial public prioritization of project corridors, the PAC held additional workshops to further discuss project corridor priorities. As part of prioritizing the project corridors, the PAC determined that different criteria should be used to prioritize recreation versus preservation corridors.

Of the regional projects proposed, the Main Line Canal Greenway™ received the most votes from Huntingdon County residents (28%). The Potomac to Raystown Greenway received the second most votes (17%), followed closely by the Tuscarora and MidState Greenways (14% each). Somerset County The two most preferred project corridors in Somerset County as per the April 2006 Workshop were the Memorial Trail and the Reservoir Trail with 31% and 29% of the total votes respectively. Each of these project corridors are recreation-oriented. However, the only other project corridor to receive more than 10% of the votes, the Roaring Run/Beaverdam Wildlife Trail, is preservation oriented. Within Somerset County, the Quemahoning Greenway received the most votes (50%).

Recreation Corridors The PAC discussed what criteria should be used to prioritize the recreation project corridors. Ultimately the criterion used included sponsorship, project management and designation. To rank the various project corridors, a score of one to three was determined for each of the criteria so that a project corridor could have a maximum score of nine points. The ranking and scoring was determined as follows: • • • • • •

Main Line Canal Greenway™ (9 points) Great Allegheny Passage (9 points) Ghost Town Trail Connector (8 points) Raystown Greenway (7 points) Quemahoning Greenway (6 points) The Allegheny Crossing (3 points)

Preservation Corridors Similar to the recreation corridors, the PAC discussed the criteria to be used to prioritize the regional preservation corridors. The criteria used were sponsorship, threat and Biological Diversity Areas. The sponsorship criterion was broken into two categories: advocate groups and public ownership. These two subgroups were given a score of one to three as were threat and Biological Diversity Areas. To reflect the importance of the threat criteria to the

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

preservation nature of these corridors, the score for threat was weighed as double for the final score. Consequently, each project corridor could have a maximum score of 15 points. The ranking and scoring was determined as follows: • • • • • •

Laurel Hill Greenway (13 points) Allegheny Front Wildlife Corridor (12 points) Tuscarora Greenway (11 points) Mid-State Greenway (10 points) Five Mtns Wildlife Corridor (10 points) Potomac Greenways (10 points)

Demonstration DemonstrationProjects Projects Regional Demonstration The overall prioritizationProjects of the project corridors described above provides a basis for County Demonstration Projects implementation efforts and determining Quemahoning Greenway (Project Corridornext #4) steps as the development of the greenways Main Line Canal Greenway (Project Corridor #2)— network progresses. Beyond this overall Lower Trail prioritization, the PAC selected several Pike-to-Bike Trail (withinThese Project Corridor #10) demonstration projects. ‘ready-to-go’ Link Trailhave Shelters (within Corridor #9) projects already beenProject generally defined, have public support and are ready for a feasibility study or engineering work as a next step. Regional Demonstration Projects The PAC selected four regional demonstration projects: two feasibility studies and two engineering studies. Quemahoning Greenway (Project Corridor D) Prepare a feasibility study for the entire length of this proposed greenway including alignments, ownership and access points. Determine the range of potential costs and next steps for implementing the project.

Main Line Canal Greenway (Project Corridor B)—Lower Trail Prepare a feasibility study for the Lower Trail segment of the Main Line Canal Greenway. The Lower Trail is a proposed land trail located in northwestern Huntingdon County in the area of Alexandria. Determine alignments, ownership, potential access points, the range of potential costs and next steps for implementing the project. Pike-to-Bike Trail (within Project Corridor K) Prepare engineering for the remaining portions of this trail to allow for its completion. Ultimately, this trail will form a key link in the Allegheny Crossing regional greenway. Link Trail Shelters (within Project Corridor I) Prepare engineering for the construction of trail shelters along the Link Trail in the area of State Gamelands 71 and 81. These shelters will add to the amenities along the Link Trail within the Tuscarora Greenway. County Demonstration Projects In addition to the regional demonstration projects, each of the County Planners selected the highest priority project or projects within their county.

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Part Five – A Plan for Action BedfordCounty County Bedford Within Bedford Cambria County County, the highest priority projects are as follows: Fulton County Huntingdon County 1. Pike 2 Bike Trail (a segment of regional project corridor K—the Allegheny Crossing) Somerset County 2. Potomac to Raystown Greenway (regional project corridors H and I) 3. Bedford to Old Bedford Village Trail (a segment of project corridor B-5—Dunning Creek Trail) 4. Bedford to Everett Trail (a segment of Pike 2 Bike Trail, a segment of regional project corridor K—the Allegheny Crossing) 5. Dunning Creek Trail (B-5) 6. Bob’s Creek Trail (B-2) 7. Tussey Mountain Connector (B-12) 8. Evitts Mountain South Trail (B-22) 9. Sideling Creek Valley Crossing (B-21) The following projects would support or extend the high priority projects listed above, and are listed as a secondary priority: 10. Upon the completion of the Potomac to Raystown Greenway(regional project corridors H and I): a. Yellow Creek Trail (B-9) b. Rivers Bends Bypass (B-10) 11. Upon the completion of the Bedford to Old Bedford Village and Bedford to Everett trail segments: a. Old Bedford Village to Manns Choice Trail(a segment of regional project corridor F—Five Mountains Wildlife Corridor to be developed as a lowimpact trail) b. Manns Choice to Hyndman Trail (a segment of regional project corridor F—

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Five Mountains Wildlife Corridor to be developed as a low-impact trail) c. Hyndman to State Line Trail (a segment of regional project corridor F—Five Mountains Wildlife Corridor to be developed as a low-impact trail) 12. Upon the completion of the Dunning Creek and Bob’s Creek Trails: a. Pavia Connector (B-1) b. Mud Run Trail (B-3) c. Boiling Spring Run Trail (B-4) d. New Paris Connector (B-6) Cambria County Within Cambria County, the proposed project corridors have been ranked as follows: 1. Rock Run Connector (C-18) 2. Nanty Glo North Trail (C-7) 3. Duman Dam Connector (C-19) 4. Colver Connector (C-6) 5. Susquehanna Trail (C-1) 6. Johnstown – Portage Trail (C-14) 7. Vintondale – Susquehanna Trail (C-3) 8. Clearfield Creek Wildlife Corridor (C-5) 9. Portage South Trail (C-16) 10. Carrolltown Trail (C-2) 11. Gameland to Gameland Trail (C-4) 12. Williams Run Trail (C-8) 13. Blacklick Creek Wildlife Corridor (C-9) 14. Wildwood Springs Trail (C-10) 15. Laurel Run Trail (C-11) 16. Little Conemaugh Trail (C-12) 17. Lilly Reservoirs Wildlife Corridor (C-13) 18. Flood Memorial Wildlife Corridor (C-15) 19. Scalp Level Loop (C-17)

Fulton County Within Fulton County, the following high-priority projects have active support from several trail or conservation groups: 1. Pike 2 Bike Trail (a segment of regional project corridor K—the Allegheny Crossing) 2. Link to Tuscarora Connector (project corridor F-5) 3. Link Trail Alternate Connector (F-2) The remaining projects in the County have been prioritized as follows: 4. Meadow Grounds Lake Wildlife Area (F-8) 5. Little Tonoloway Wildlife Link (F-12) 6. Cove Ridge Wildlife Connector (F-13) 7. Chestnut Flat Wildlife Corridor (F-11) 8. Fort Littleton Trail South End (F-3) 9. Rays Hill Ridge Wildlife Corridor (F-4) 10. Southern Great Trough Creek Wildlife Corridor (F-1) 11. Back Run Trail (F-9) 12. Licking Creek Wildlife Corridor (F-10) 13. Little Scrub Ridge Wildlife Corridor (F-6) 14. Tonoloway Creek Wildlife Corridor (F-7)

9. Broad Top Mountain Corridor (H-11) 10. Raystown East Corridor (H-8) 11. Tuscarora Mountain Wildlife Corridor (H-15) 12. Blacklog Mountain Wildlife Corridor (H13) 13. Shade Mountain Wildlife Corridor (H14) 14. Sidling Hill Wildlife Corridor (H-10) 15. Jack’s Mountain Wildlife Corridor (H-6) Somerset County Within Somerset County, the following three projects have been designated as high priority and are seen as the closest to implementation: 1. Paint Creek Trail (S-5) 2. Indian Lake Trail (S-9) 3. Blue Lick Creek Trail (S-20)

Huntingdon County Within Huntingdon County, the project corridors have been prioritized as follows: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Stone Creek Corridor (H-5) Little Juniata Connector (H-1) Pulpit Rocks Corridor (H-4) Terrace Mountain Greenway (H-9) Aughwick Creek Wildlife Corridor (H-12) Rothrock Loop (H-3) Shavers Creek Corridor (H-2) 8. Raystown West Corridor (H-7)

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Five – A Plan for Action

Land Management Land management tools provide specific policies for managing valuable resources. Land Management Plan Land management plans establish a specific set of policies for the use of publicly owned land such as a State Park or a gameland. Management plans typically identify valuable natural, historic and heritage resources; determine compatible uses for the land; determine the administrative needs of the land, such as maintenance, security and funding requirements; and identify recommended short-term and long-term strategies/actions for the treatment and protection of identified resources. Because land management plans are commonly prepared for publicly owned land, few or no other regulatory or acquisition-related tools are necessary to ensure implementation of the plan’s policies. Example: A State Park could implement a land management plan that identifies areas of specific importance due to existing natural resources as well as areas suitable

Conservation strategies on lands that are not publicly owned must be implemented using regulatory or acquisition related tools. Regulation Land may be protected through government regulation, which controls land use and development through legislative powers. Examples of various land use and development ordinances and components of these ordinances, which regulate community growth and protect natural resources, are as listed below: Dedication/Density Transfers The dedication/density transfer tool allows a developer/landowner to transfer allowable development density from one portion of his or her parcel/development to another portion. In exchange for the increase in allowable density, the landowner must dedicate the undeveloped open space portion to the municipality/county. This tool is applicable for a single parcel or contiguous parcels of land that are part of a common development plan. Use of this tool requires that a community have a zoning ordinance in place. Example: A portion of land included within a subdivision/development could potentially provide an integral link for the municipal trail system. The municipal planning commission could grant the developer increased allowable

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

B. Regulation 1. Dedication / Density Transfer

2.

Transfer of Development Rights

3. 4.

Fee-in-Lieu Buffer / Transition Zones

5.

Zoning / Overlay Zones

6.

7.

Conservation Subdivision

Subdivision Exaction

C. Acquisition 1. Donation

2.

Fee Simple Purchase

3.

Easements - Conservation

4.

5.

6.

7. 8.

9.

Easements - Preservation

Easements - Public Access

Easements - Purchase

Deed Restriction / Purchase of Development Rights Purchase / Lease Back

Option / Right of First Refusal

10. Condemnation

Description

Legal Agreement

Implementation Tool A. Land Management 1. Management Plan

Other Ordinance

Table 11: Implementation Toolbox Subdivision Ordinance

Overview Several techniques for implementing the the Plan are described below. Although not all of these techniques may be appropriate for the Southern Alleghenies region, the full range allowable under Pennsylvania law has been described. These tools range from creating land management policies and land use controls to purchasing rights to land.

for development of trail/greenway facilities. The plan could include recommended actions that would result in the preservation of the natural resources and the development of the trail.

Zoning Ordinance

Implementation Tools

Established set of policies for publicly-owned lands

Transfer of allowable development density from dedicated lands to other parcels Sales of development rights from one area (to be preserved) to another area (to be developed) Payment in lieu of land dedication Setback / landscape area required between varying uses Regulations established in addition to an underlying zoning classification Special development requirements that encourage open space preservation Provision of park or open space as a condition of subdivision development

Only applicable for lands under State/County/Municipal/NGO control















Transfer of density should be coordinated with Comprehensive Plan Transfer of density should be coordinated with Comprehensive Plan Flexible spending of proceeds Limited applicability Can include stream setbacks, steep slope restrictions, etc



Can include stream setbacks, steep slope restrictions, etc



Pre-determined amount of open space dedication, usually per dwelling unit, etc.



Land donated to a County/MunicipalityNGO for no cost Outright purchase of property by a County/Municipality/NGO

Tax incentive for seller

Permanently limits development on all or a portion of a property



Establishes a management program for all or a portion of a property Allows access and passage through a portion of a property





Outright purchase of an easement for any of the uses above Land owner exchanges the right to develop property for payment Outright purchase of property by a County/Municipality/NGO which is then leased back to the owner for use with restrictions Allows County / Municipality / NGO a window to hold a property before it can be sold to others Taking of private lands by the State/County/Municipality

Applications / Notes

✔ ✔



Straightforward approach; typically purchased for fair market value although can be for less (tax incentives for seller) AKA Deed restriction/covenant, Limits impact/purchase to specific need AKA Deed restriction/covenant, Limits impact/purchase to specific need AKA Deed restriction/covenant, Limits impact/purchase to specific need Straightforward approach that limits the impact / purchase to the specific need Works well for agriculture / open space uses Works well for agriculture / open space uses

Temporary ✔ ✔

Last resort

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Part Five – A Plan for Action density on appropriate portions of his or her site in exchange for dedicating the remaining portions of the land for preservation purposes. Transfer of Development Rights (TDR) TDR allows communities to provide additional density in areas where growth is desired and discourage growth/ development in areas desirable as preserved open space. The community identifies an area to be developed and an area to be preserved. The municipality’s comprehensive plan is a useful guide for identifying these areas. Owners within the area to be preserved are given development credits that can be sold to land owners in the “target area” where development is encouraged. In order to sell these credits, landowners must place a permanent conservation easement on their property. The purchasing landowner within the target area to be developed may then develop at a density that is higher than previously allowed by the municipality. As with density transfers, use of this tool requires that a community have a zoning ordinance in place. Example: A municipality contains a portion that is experiencing increased development pressures and another area with sensitive and important natural resources. The municipal comprehensive plan identifies the former as a future growth area and the latter as a preferred conservation area. The municipality could adopt a TDR policy allowing landowners in the preservation area to sell development credits to the growth area. This action optimizes the development of the growth area and the

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preservation of the communities’ most significant natural area.

municipality/county)in order to implement land conservation projects.

Negotiated Dedications In instances where parcels are deemed beneficial to the protection and preservation of greenways, a municipality/county may request that a landowner enter into negotiations for those specific parcels. Additionally, during the subdivision review process, the municipality/county may ask for the dedication of land in order to provide public open spaces. Such dedication should be proportionate to the impact the subdivision will have on the services provided by the municipality.

Example: Applying fee-in-lieu techniques along with a form of negotiated dedication increases the options presented to developers within the municipality. The developer then has a choice of dedicating the appropriate portion of land to the municipality or paying a lump sum fee to the municipality in lieu of the dedication of land.

Example: A subdivision/development plan requires the extension of existing municipal infrastructure such as sanitary sewer lines. The municipality can request that the developer dedicate a portion of the property to the municipality in exchange for the extension of municipal infrastructure and services. The size of the dedication should be relative to the impact on existing municipal services. Fee-in-Lieu Fee-in-lieu can be coordinated with negotiated dedications to bolster the effectiveness of a municipality’s land conservation opportunities. Using this tool, landowners have the option to make a financial contribution to the municipality/county, in an amount relative to the density at which they are developing instead of dedicating the appropriate portion of their land for preservation. The municipality/county may then utilize these funds to acquire land elsewhere (within the same

Buffer/Transition Zones Buffer/transition zones are formally identified within the municipality’s zoning ordinance. The situation of these zones is determined by potential interaction of incompatible land uses. Open space is then preserved along these potential interaction points in order to provide a buffer or transition between the incompatible uses. Example: Buffer/transition zones could be used in instances where land zoned for intense uses such as highway commercial or manufacturing abut less intense properties or open spaces. The buffer/transition zone could be situated along the border of the two zones so as not to unduly make large portions of each unusable, but could be large enough to effectively screen one use from the other. The area within the buffer/transition zone could be used to situate a trail. Zoning/Overlay Zones Also identified within a municipality’s zoning ordinance, zoning overlays allow a municipality to introduce specific controls related to land conservation, or enhance the underlying zone’s existing land use regulations. Examples of these

controls include increased setbacks, reduced maximum allowable land coverage, etc. Example: Zoning overlays could be applied along potential key trail corridors. By increasing setbacks and reducing land coverage, more open space can be provided along these key corridors than would be provided by the underlying zoning districts. 2

Conservation Subdivision Municipal and county subdivision ordinances may contain requirements related to public park sites, trails and greenways. The municipal agency then works with landowners to secure necessary right of way for trail etc. Example: A conservation subdivision could allow an overall density bonus in exchange for clustering development and creating open space and trail facilities. Subdivision Exaction This tool requires, as a condition of development approval, that the developer provide public facilities or the financing for the provision of public facilities. The size of the facility or amount of financing should

2

These requirements can be placed in a municipal or county subdivision and land development ordinance. “Real world” examples include Upper Salford Township, Montgomery County and Lower Makefield Township, Bucks County. For more information, refer to DCNR’s publication: Growing Greener, a Conservation Planning Workbook for Municipal Officials in Pennsylvania.

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Five – A Plan for Action be relative to the impact that the development will have on existing public facilities and/or the demand for additional public facilities that the development will create. The facilities, which can include open space, are then dedicated to the municipality/county. Example: A developer could be required to build a park or reserve an area of his land for open space because the number of new residents generated by the development will cause an existing park to exceed its service capacity and/or create need for additional park facilities. Acquisition Property may be acquired outright as a way of protecting/creating land for open space purposes. In general, all of the following techniques can be applied in order to acquire property or rights of way for the purposes of creating greenways. Donation/Tax Incentives Landowners can dedicate their property to the municipality and typically realize tax benefits such as Federal and State deductions on personal income as well as the ability to avoid inheritance taxes, capital gains taxes and recurring property taxes. This tool results in the municipality/county receiving fee-simple title to a parcel of land at minimal cost. Fee Simple Purchase This is the outright purchase of land by the municipality/county where it receives feesimple title to a parcel of land.

Easements Easements can be used by the municipality/county to acquire explicit rights to certain areas of a property. Easements result in local government receiving a specific interest in a parcel while the property owner retains responsibility for all taxes associated with the property, less the value of the easement granted. Easements are generally categorized by their interest in a property. Conservation Typically, conservation easements are designed to protect natural resources and permanently limit the use and/or development intensity of land. These easements are generally applied to the entire property or relatively large portions of the property. Benefits to property owners who participate in a conservation easement include potential qualification for Federal income tax deductions and/or State tax credits. See Appendix D for an example of a conservation easement. Preservation Preservation easements can be used to protect significant built and/or natural features of a property. When applied for the purposes of protecting built assets, the easement’s general intent is the preservation of a structure’s historical value and integrity. Additionally, when used in concert with best management practices, these easements can protect important elements of the property’s landscape. These easements can be applied to the entire property or specific portions of the property. Tax incentives for preservation easements are similar to those associated with conservation easements. See Appendix E

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

through G for a range of natural resource preservation-related easement examples. Public Access The general intent of public access easements is to provide passage and access through a property in order to link to assets/amenities on adjacent properties. These easements are typically applied to portions of a property rather than the entire property. Public access clauses may be included within conservation and preservation easements or the public access easement may be utilized individually. Easement Purchase Negotiations with property owners may fail to yield desired donations of land for the purposes of various easements. In these instances, a municipality/county may purchase an easement on the desired portions of the property. Because easements typically do not affect the entire property or the entire bundle of rights, the purchase price will be less than the title’s value. Deed Restriction/Purchase of Development Rights A municipality/county can encourage protection of sensitive resources, such as prime agricultural land, by instituting a purchase of development rights program. Under such a program, the property owner would forfeit any further rights to develop his or her land in exchange for payment from the municipality/county. This type of program includes the fair market value purchase of property development rights from an owner and is typically reciprocated by the landowner including development restrictions beyond the current use within the deed to the land. The property owner continues to utilize the

property and keeps all ownership rights associated with the land in its current condition. Purchase/Sale/Lease Back A municipality/county can purchase land and lease it back to the original owner with additional use and development restrictions. Option/First Right of Refusal Owners who intend to sell their property can agree to give the municipality/county the right to decide whether they want to purchase the land before the owner sells to a private entity. When coupled with other tools, this technique can allow the municipality time to acquire funds necessary to purchase a property for greenway use. Condemnation Condemnation could be used in instances where property or property rights are unusually difficult to acquire. This is usually the result of unclear ownership or the unavailability of the owner. Condemnation is not always warranted as other techniques may achieve the desired result.

Implementation Resources The following funding sources provide financial assistance for purposes ranging from planning to land acquisition and generally take the form of grants and/or loans. The programs described are categorized into Statewide, Federal and other sources, as well as by the agency that provides the funding.

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Part Five – A Plan for Action This comprehensive funding source list provides many possible venues of funding for implementation of various aspects of the Plan. Not all of the funding sources listed below are applicable to all aspects of the Plan. Applicability is dependent on which projects are being pursued to be implemented. Pennsylvania Funding Sources Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR) 3 The DCNR is responsible for the Statewide Greenways Action Plan developed by the Governor's Greenways Partnership Commission in 2001. This plan outlines a strategic approach for developing an interconnected system of greenways in the Commonwealth. The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania provides several services of grant moneys through the Community Conservation Partnership Program (C2P2) to municipal and county governments to support greenway and park planning, acquisition, design and development. In September 2006 DCNR awarded a number of regional grants through the C2P2, including a $200,000 grant to SEDA-Council of Governments to coordinate, manage and provide outreach for the Susquehanna Greenway Strategic Plan and $50,000 for the Lehigh County Conservation District to prepare a watershed conservation plan for the Saucon Creek watershed in Bucks,

Lehigh and Northampton counties, among other grants Statewide. In brief, the grants available include: Heritage Park Grants are available to municipalities or nonprofit organizations for promoting public-private partnerships that preserve and enhance natural, cultural, historic and recreation resources to stimulate economic development through heritage tourism. The grants are awarded for feasibility studies, management action plans for heritage park areas, specialized studies, implementation studies, revolving loan grant funds and the hiring of heritage park managers. The heritage regions for District 9-0 include The National Road Heritage Corridor and the Lincoln Highway State Heritage Corridor. Applications 4 are available on the DCNR website. Land Trust Grants provide funds to land trust and conservancies to acquire land for areas that face imminent loss. Land must be open to public use and priority is given to habitats for threatened species exist. Grants are awarded to non-profit land trusts, and applications are due in October. Rails-to-Trails Grants are potential funding services for municipal and nonprofit organizations to finance the planning, acquisition, protection or re-development of bridge and pedestrian trails from abandoned railroad corridors. The applicant can submit one application per funding cycle.

Community Grants are awarded to municipalities for recreation, park and conservation projects. The applicant can submit to one project type per funding cycle, and project types include: Circuit Riders, comprehensive recreation, park and open space plans, conservation/sound land use, feasibility studies, greenways, master site plans, county natural areas inventories and peer-to-peer technical assistance. Rivers Conservation Grants are available to municipalities, counties, municipal and intermunicipal authorities and river support groups to conserve and enhance river resources. Conservation planning and implementation grants are available to develop or carry out projects or activities defined in an approved river conservation plan. Some eligible projects include river access investigation, water quality monitoring, river resource identification, threat identification and recommended actions. Pennsylvania Recreational Trails Program Grants provide funds to develop and maintain recreational trails and trail related facilities for motorized and non-motorized recreation. Eligible applicants include Federal and State agencies, local governments and private organizations. Eligible projects include: maintenance, restoration, development, construction of new recreational trails and acquisition of easements or property for recreational trails or recreational trail corridors. Approximately $1 million is available in grants for this cycle, with 40% for diverse trail use, 30% for motorized recreation and 30% for non5 motorized recreation.

The Technical Assistance Program also provides consultations, workshops and publications to help assist local governments, land trusts, rail-to-trail and river conservation groups and other organizations. In addition to providing grants and loans, the DCNR provides a handbook detailing how to Finance Municipal Recreation and Parks, including instruction for the grant 6 application process. Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED)7 DCED offers a number of grants that have a relationship to greenways, including economic development, travel and tourism, technical assistance and community development. The website offers a funding & program finder that helps locate applicable grants, loans and initiatives offered through DCED. Some of the funds available for the Plan include: The Land Use Planning and Technical Assistance Program (LUPTAP) provides grant funds for the preparation of community comprehensive plans and the ordinances to implement them. Multimunicipal ventures are given priority within this fund. LUPTAP funds could be

6

http://www.dcnr.State.pa.us/brc/Finance_Handbook.p df (accessed 10/3/06) 7

3

http://www.dcnr.State.pa.us/news/newsreleases/2006/ 0906-c2p2grants.doc (accessed 10/1/06)

70

http://www.newpa.com/programFinder.aspx(accessed 10/2/06)

4

http://www.dcnr.State.pa.us/brc/heritageparks/2300-FMRC0029.pdf (accessed 10/1/06)

5

http://www.dcnr.State.pa.us/brc/grants/rectrails.aspx (accessed 10/2/06)

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Five – A Plan for Action used to implement greenway components of municipal comprehensive plans.

Pennsylvania Historical and Museum 8 Commission (PHMC)

The Community Revitalization Program provides grant funds to support local initiatives that promote community stability and quality of life.

The Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission (PHMC) offers funding specifically targeted for historic preservation and development projects. The PHMC Grants and Planning Program have a number of different grants available, including the Keystone Historic Preservation Grant Program. These grants are available for the preservation, rehabilitation and restoration of historic properties and sites.

Floodplain Land Use Assistance Program provides grants and technical assistance to encourage the proper use of land and the management of floodplain lands within Pennsylvania. The State Planning Assistant Grant provides funding to municipalities for preparation and maintenance of community development plans, policies and for plan implementation. Priority is given to projects with regional participation. The Small Communities Planning Assistance grant is given to municipalities with 10,000 people or fewer, and offers a no-match funding source. This funding can be used for community conservation and neighborhood revitalization. Community Development Block Grants provide funds and technical assistance for any type of community development, including public services, community facilities and development and planning and the amount of funding is set by formula. 70% of each community development block grant must be used for activities that benefit low- and moderateincome persons.

PA Fish and Boat Commission9 The PA Fish and Boat Commission offers grant programs to support fishing, boating and aquatic resource conservation. The commission website offers grant details and applications for a number of available programs and grants, including: The Boating Facility Grant Program is available for county and municipal governments to develop access points on municipally-owned land. The Fish and Boat Commission also provides in-kind engineering services for the creation of these access points, and are used for major site improvements and not for routine maintenance or operation activities. The Coldwater Heritage Partnership (CHP) provides leadership, coordination, technical assistance and funding support for the

evaluation, conservation and protection of Pennsylvania’s coldwater streams. The CHP offers a grant program for non-profit organizations such as watershed groups, conservation districts, municipalities and local chapters of Trout unlimited. The plans help to identify problems and locate opportunities for stream conservation. The State Wildlife Grant Program (SWG) provides Federal funding for high-priority conservation projects impacting endangered threatened and at-risk species across Pennsylvania. Nearly $2 million are available in Federal monies for these species in 2006, made available to the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat and 10 Game Commission through SWG.

Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Growing Greener11 The Growing Greener Program is the largest single investment of State funds in Pennsylvania history to address environmental concerns. The funds are distributed among the Department of Agriculture for farmland preservation projects; the DCNR for State Park renovations and improvements; and the Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Authority for water and sewer system upgrades. A number of Growing Greener grants have recently been awarded in the 12 Southern Alleghenies region, including : •

The Landowner Incentive Program (LIP) is administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The LIP awards grants to establish or supplement programs that protect and restore wildlife habitats on private lands. The Fish and Boat Commission also supports a Water Trail Brochure Program. The program encourages and promotes water trails by creating brochures that delineate water trail locations and access points for any interested water trail group. These groups must provide a map of the water trail and content for the brochure. The Fish and Boat Commission provides in-kind graphic design and printing layout expertise as well as reproduction services, which are available for a nominal fee.





A $60,000 grant for stream improvement for the Frankstown Branch of the Little Juniata Rivers in Huntington County in 2005 A $50,000 grant to the Fulton County Conservation District for implementation of stormwater management design in 2005 A $187,000 grant to Broad Top Township in Bedford County to treat abandoned mine drainage for the Raystown Branch of the Juniata River and Lake Raystown in 2003

The DEP also awards Environmental Education Grants, which are funded by the pollution fines and penalties collected in the Commonwealth each year. Non-profit 11

8

http://www.phmc.State.pa.us/(accessed 10/2/06) http://sites.State.pa.us/PA_Exec/Fish_Boat/grants.htm (accessed 10/2/06) 9

10

http://sites.State.pa.us/PA_Exec/Fish_Boat/promo/grants/swg/0 0swg.htm (accessed 10/2/06)

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

http://www.depweb.State.pa.us/growinggreener/site/d efault.asp?growinggreenerNav=| (accessed 10/2/06) 12 http://www.dep.State.pa.us/grants/growgreen.asp (accessed 10/3/06)

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Part Five – A Plan for Action conservation/education organizations and county conservation districts may apply for the grants, which usually range between $1,000 and $20,000.

categories, and also have a relationship to the surface transportation system are eligible for funding. The twelve eligible categories include:

Federal Funding Sources



The Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act – Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU)13 is a $244.1 billion fund for numerous transportation programs to improve the Nation’s transportation infrastructure, enhance economic growth and protect the environment. Two major provisions of the act target environmental stewardship and environmental streamlining. A total of $370 million is provided through 2009 to develop and maintain recreational trails in the Country, among other environmental initiatives. A portion of Pennsylvania’s SAFETEA-LU funds, administered through PennDOT, go to greenway projects with ties to transportation, historic preservation, bicycle/pedestrian improvements and/or environmental quality.



The Transportation Enhancements, Home Town Streets and Safe Routes to School 14 Program is funded by the SAFETEA-LU ACT and administered by PennDOT. This program is a cost reimbursement program, and is available for any Federal or State agency, county or municipal government, school district or non-profit organization. Projects that fall into one or more of twelve



13

http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/safetealu/ (accessed 10/3/06) 14

ftp://ftp.dot.State.pa.us/public/Bureaus/Cpdm/WEB/HT S%20-%20SRTS-TE-2005-06.pdf (accessed 10/3/06)

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• • • • • • • • •

Provision of facilities for pedestrians and bicycles Provision of safety and educational activities for pedestrians and bicyclists Acquisition of scenic easements and scenic or historic sites Scenic or historic highway programs Landscaping or other scenic beautification Historic preservation Rehabilitation and operation of historic transportation building, structures or facilities Preservation of abandoned railway corridors (including conversion and use, thereof for pedestrian or bicycle trails) Control and removal of outdoor advertising Archaeological planning and research Environmental mitigation of runoff pollution and provision of wildlife connectivity Establishment of transportation museums

Projects are selected in a collaborative process involving PennDOT and other State agencies, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) and Regional Planning Organizations (RPOs). Each MPO and RPO is responsible for ranking the projects in a priority order, and must also be included in the Commonwealth’s TwelveYear Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) and on an MPO’s or RPO’s TIP. Funds

from other Federal agencies may be used for the non-Federal or local match for the project. Typically, the local agency is responsible for funding the engineering of the project, and PennDOT subsequently provides the construction costs for the project. The 2005-2006 funding round is now closed, with the next funding round anticipated to begin in 2007. 15

The Pennsylvania Infrastructure Bank (PIB) is another PennDOT-implemented program that provides low interest loans for transportation projects in Pennsylvania. Funds can be used for Hometown Streets/Safe Routes to School programs, pedestrian improvements and any other capital projects. Loan applications are considered on an ongoing basis, and applications are available on the PennDOT website. The Transportation, Community and System Preservation Program (TCSP) addresses the relationships among transportation, community and system preservation plans and practices and identifies private sector-based initiatives to improve relationships. State and local governments, as well as MPOs are eligible for $270 million in grants through 2009 as part of the SAFETEA-LU initiative. 16

The Land and Water Conservation Fund provides matching grants to States and local governments for the acquisition and development of public outdoor recreation areas and facilities, including trails and greenways. This fund is tied directly to the DCNR, and the State develops a selection criteria and ranking procedure for all statewide projects. The contact 15

ftp://ftp.dot.State.pa.us/public/pdf/Final%20PIB%20Brochure. pdf (accessed 10/3/06) 16 http://www.ncrc.nps.gov/lwcf/ (accessed 10/3/06)

person for this fund is the Deputy Secretary of Conservation and Engineering at the DCNR. The Conservation Reserve Program17, funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, has funds to address soil, water and related natural resource concerns in an environmentally beneficial and costeffective manner. This program can be used to fund the maintenance of open space and non-public use greenways along water bodies and ridge lines. The Recreational Trails Program18 (RTP) is an assistance program of PennDOT’s FHWA that provides assistance by making funds available to the States to develop and maintain recreational trails and trail-related facilities for both non-motorized and motorized recreational trail uses. The program works closely with the National Park Service, the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the USDA Forest Service. RTP funds have recently been used in the Southern Alleghenies Region, including a $100,000 local grant in 2003 for the Allegheny Highlands Trail in Somerset County and a $24,000 grant for the Cherry Trail in Somerset County for the DCNR 19 Bureau of Forestry .

17

http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/programs/crp/ (accessed 10/3/06) 18 http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/environment/rectrails/ (accessed 10/3/06) 19 http://www.funoutdoors.info/rtpfaq.html (accessed 10/3/06)

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Part Five – A Plan for Action The Farm and Ranch Lands Protection Program20 provides funds to help purchase development rights to keep productive farmland in agricultural uses. Working through existing programs, USDA joins with State, tribal or local governments to acquire conservation easements or other interests from landowners. Proposals for funding should be submitted to the Pennsylvania Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) State office, and funding is available through the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC). The National Park Service operates the Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance (RTCA) Program21, which is aimed at conserving land and water resources for communities. Eligible projects include conservation plans for protecting these resources, trail development and greenway development. RTCA funding is determined through a competitive process, and the deadline for projects set to start the next fiscal year is August 1. 22 The Wetlands Reserve Program is a voluntary program in which the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) provides technical and financial support to help landowners with their wetland restoration efforts and providing the opportunity to protect, restore and enhance wetlands on their property. There are three program participation options: 10-

year restoration cost-share agreements, 30-year conservation easements and permanent easements. Program funding comes through the CCC, and implementation is handled by the NRCS. The Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement (CMAQ) Program 23 provides funding for transportation projects and programs that will reduce transportationrelated emissions in air quality non-attainment and maintenance areas, as part of TEA-21. Eligible project types include bicycle and pedestrian facilities programs and inspection and maintenance programs, among others. Other Funding Sources24 In addition to Federal and State funding, there are a number of local initiatives that can provide funding for the Plan. Bond referendums have been successfully placed on local ballots throughout the United States to support greenway development. Extensive information campaigns greatly enhance the success rate of referendum votes because of increased public and voter support. Land donations from private parties, whether fee-simple or in the form of easements, supply municipalities with usable land for little to no expense and offer the landowner tax incentives.

The Kodak American Greenways Awards Program25 provides grants to stimulate the planning and design of greenways in communities throughout the United States. Grants are available for local, regional or statewide nonprofit organizations, and usually range between $500 and $1,500. Applications are due on June 1 of each calendar year. A sales tax can be implemented to fund greenway acquisitions and improvements. Precedence has been set in other States, such as Georgia and Oklahoma.

or non-profit organizations to acquire land and/or develop trails. Volunteers can be solicited to help with all facets of greenway construction, including construction, maintenance and fund raising. A number of advocacy groups would be receptive to volunteering, including pedestrian and bicyclist groups, local historic societies, school groups, conservationists, church groups and civic clubs.

Local governments can impose one-time impact fees to new development in a region. The money levied from impact fees can finance greenways outside of the area of new development. Private foundations, corporations and other benefactors can be solicited to provide funding for greenways in communities. Local businesses may provide support through cash donations to specific greenway segments; donations of services to reduce cost of greenway; and donations equipment, labor and material for greenway construction and installation. Smaller donations from individuals and businesses can be accepted in the form of trail amenities, such as benches, trash receptacles and picnic areas. Implementation requires planning and organization with design standards and costs associated with each amenity. Charitable organizations such as land trusts or foundations can provide funds to municipalities

20

http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/programs/frpp/ (accessed 10/3/06) 21 http://www.nps.gov/rtca/ (accessed 10/3/06) 22 http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/PROGRAMS/wrp/ (accessed 10/3/06)

23

http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/environment/cmaqpgs/ (accessed 10/3/06) 24 http://www.pagreenways.org/funding-local.htm (accessed 10/3/06)

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

25

http://www.conservationfund.org/?article=2372 (accessed 10/3/06)

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Part Five – A Plan for Action

74

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Bibliography Bibliography

Articles, Books and Publications 1000 Friends of Minnesota. Land Conservation Tools. (Word document) Aaron Ward for the Fulton County Conservation District. Licking and Tonoloway Creek Watershed Assessment - update. (Word Document): May 2005 Allegheny Portage Railroad. (Tourism Pamphlet) Allegheny Ridge corporation. Main Line Canal Greenway. (CD): June 2004 Bedford County Pennsylvania-2005 Visitors Guide. (Booklet - color) Bicycle PA Route S Cue Sheet. (Word Document) Brad Clemenson & Mark Antonik. Stonycreek River Economic Impact Study. (Hard Copy &Project Files (?)) Brand, Nikki. Addressing Concerns with the Chesapeake Bay Tributary Strategy. Keystone Builder. 2007 Broad Top Area Coal Miners Historical Society, Inc. Broad Top Area Coal Miners Historical Society (Description and Membership Form) Bureau of Forestry. Link Trail-Map of existing Trail within the Rothrock State Forest. (Folded Map) Cambria conservation and Recreation Authority (CCCRA). Upper West Branch Susquehanna River Conservation Plan, Cambria County Recreation and

Conservation Authority (includes Clearfield Creek, Moshannon Creek, Chest Creek, Anderson Creek, Little Clearfield Creek). (Spiral Bound Book): June 1905 Cambria County - Duman Lake County Park. (Photo copied brochure) Cambria County Alliance for Business and Industry. Cambria County Priority Projects List for 2005. (Word Document - 8 pages): January 2005 Cambria County Board of Commissioners. Cambria County, Pathways to Progress, The First Master Plan - A Summary. (Three-Ring Binder): January 2000 Cambria County Census data. (Word Document 12 pages): June 1905 Cambria County GIS Center. Cambria County Agricultural Security Areas. (81/2 x 11 Color Map) Cambria County Master Plan-Pathways to Progress-2001-2002 Status Report. (Color Brochure) Cambria County Planning Commission. Cambria County Drinking Water Reporting System. (Extensive documentation including GIS map, Water Supply Plan and Source information) Cambria County Planning Commission. Cambria County land Use Plan GIS Update. (Word Document with accompanying tables and color map): December 1999 Cambria County Planning Commission. Cambria County Long Range Transportation Plan

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

2003-2022. (Word Document plus maps and charts): February 2003 Cambria County Planning Commission. Cambria County Major Recreation features. (11x17 color map): July 1999 Cambria County Planning Commission. Cambria County Natural and Historic Resources Plan. Cambria County Planning Commission. Cambria County Water Supply Plan. (Word Document plus maps and charts) Cambria County Planning Commission. Corridor 'N' (U.S. Route 219) Development Analysis Executive Summary. (Spiral bound book, 12 pages)

Carl E. Lawrence. Link Trail-Map of proposed Trail within the Rothrock State Forestry. (Map with notation): April, 2005 Centre County Planning Office. Nittany and Bald Eagle Greenways Plan, Centre County. (Spiral Bound Book with maps): June 1905 Chesapeake Bay Gateways Network Susquehanna River Water Trail. (Map and descriptive packet) Fulton County Comprehensive Plan. Pennsylvania. (CD): May 2000 DCNR. County Greenways and Open Space Network Planning. (Word Document, 6 pages): March 2003

Cambria County Transit Authority. (Rider Schedule)

DCNR. Kiski-Conemaugh River water Trail. (Color brochure)

Cambria County Transit Authority. Cambria County Road Systems. (81/2 x 11 Maps): April 2003

DCNR. Pennsylvania Rail Trails 2005. (11x 17 map): June 1905

Cambria Somerset Authority. Cambria/Somerset Public Recreation Opportunities. (Word Document with small map) Cambria County Transit Authority-Cam Tran. (Booklet): August 2003 Carl E. Lorence. New Vision for Hiking/Foot Trails in PA. (Word Document) Carl E. Lorence. Re-location of the Link Trail. (Map with notation): April 2005

DCNR. Pennsylvania Snowmobile and ATV Guide. (Word Document, 21 pages) Debra Wolf Goldstein, Esq., General Counsel Heritqge Conservancy. Conservation Easements to Preserve Open Space-A guide for Pennsylvania’s Municipalities. (Word Document) Delta Development Group and Gannett Fleming. Huntingdon County Comprehensive Economic Analysis. EADS Recreation Engineering and Planning. Stonycreek River Heritage Corridor. (Spiral Bound Book and CD)

75

Bibliography Ebensburg PA (Cambira) Tourism and Business Map. (Tourism Pamphlet) Eight County Bicycle Off Road Network. (Black and white 81/2 x 11 map) Forbes State Forest Area. (81/2 x 11 downloaded maps-black and white) Fulton Conservation District. LickingTonoloway Creek. (Word Document): December 1992 Fulton county Economic Development corporation. Fulton county Trails Master Plan. (Spiral Bound Book with maps, photos and extensive bibliography): May 1996 GAI Consultants, Kiski-Conemaugh River Basin Alliance, and Enviroinmental Information Services . Final KiskiConemaugh River Basin Conservation Plan. (Spiral Bound Book): July 1999

County Continuity Through Conservation II: Comprehensive Plan . (Spiral Bound Book): July 2000 Greater Huntingdon Camber of Commerce 2004-05 Membership Directory & Business Guide. (Booklet, 57 pages): December 2004 Greater Johnstown/Cambria County Convention & Visitors Bureau. Johnston PA Newsletter. December 2004 Greenways Incorporated for the Allegheny Ridge Corporation. Main Line Canal Greenway: Pennsylvania's Millennium Trail. (Spiral bound book printed in black and white, includes tables, diagrams, Illustrations, photos and maps ): June 2004 Hemlock Hideaway and Campground. (Campground near Raystown Lake)

Ghost Town Trail. (Tourism Pamphlet)

Heritage Conservancy. Land Conservation Strategies: Landowner's Options for Protecting Family Lands. (Word Document-11x17 black and white ): October 2005

Governor’s Center for Local Government Services. Land Use In Pennsylvania: Practices and Tools. (Book): 1st Edition – January, 2000

Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service, U.S. Department of Interior. A Guide to Designing Accessible Outdoor Recreation Facilities. (Book, 57 pages): January 1980

Graney, Grossman, Ray and Associates for Huntingdon County Planning Commission and Board of Commissioners. Huntingdon County Continuity Through Conservation II: Comprehensive Plan Supplement to Phase I, Background Studies. (Spiral Bound Book): November 1999

Heritage Discovery Center-Johnstown . (Tourism Pamphlet)

Graney, Grossman, Ray and Associates for Huntingdon County Planning Commission and Board of Commissioners. Huntingdon

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Heritage Trails - Strengthening a Regional Community. (Book): August 1995 Huntingdon County. Agricultural Security Areas. (Word Document - 1 page): February 2002

Huntingdon County Bed & Breakfasts. (List and descriptions)

Johnston Flood National Memorial. (Tourism Pamphlet)

Huntingdon County Heritage Guide. (Tourism Pamphlet)

Johnstown Visitors Guide. (Tourism Pamphlet): May 2005

Huntingdon County Planning and Development Department. Huntingdon County Enterprise Zone. (Brochure showing KOZ sites and Enterprise Zones)

Juniata Clean Water Partnership. Raystown Huntingdon and Broad Top Greenway Feasibility Study and Plan. (Spiral Bound Book, 37 pages plus extensive appendices): December 2001

Huntingdon County Planning and Development Department. Huntingdon County Farmland Facts. (Agricultural Security Areas includes map of locations) Huntingdon County Planning and Development Department. Huntingdon County Heritage Plan. (Spiral Bound Book, 57 pages plus extensive appendices): July 1996 Huntingdon County Planning Commission. Huntingdon County 2002 Annual Report. (81/2 x 11 Newsletter): March 2003 Huntingdon County Planning Commission. Huntingdon County 2003 Annual Report. (81/2 x 11 Newsletter): March 2004 Huntingdon County Planning Commission. Huntingdon County Comprehensive Economic Analysis. (Booklet): July 2003

Juniata River Access Sites. (Color map with annotated descriptions - downloaded from internet): July 2005 Kiski Conemaugh River Water Trail. (Map & Guide) Larson Design Group for DCNR. Pennsylvania Trail Design Manual for OffHighway Recreational Vehicles. (Spiral Bound Book, 123 pp plus appendixes): March 2004 Little Conemaugh Watershed Association, Cambria Conty. South Fork of the Little Conemaugh. (One page description of project) Lower Trail Extension Feasibility Study: 1995

International Mountain Bicycling Association. Trail Solutions - IMBA's Guide to Building Sweet Singletrack. (Book, 272 pages)

Martin Shields. Cambria County-Economic Profile of Cambria County - 1969 -1997 with Projections to 2005. (Sprial Bound Book)

Jeff Picot in Land Lines, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy. “Reinventing Conservation Easements”. (article): April 2005

Maryland Greenways Commission. Maryland Atlas of Greenways, Water Trails and Green Infrastructure. (Spiral Bound Book with Color Maps): August 2000

Johnston Flood Museum. (Tourism Pamphlet)

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Bibliography Natural Lands Trust (for the DCNR). Growing Greener, A Conservation Workbook for Municipal Officials in Pennsylvania. (3-ring binder): October, 1998 PA Statewide Greenways Plan 2004-08. (Word Document) Penn State Center for Watershed Stewardship. Spruce Creek (Huntingdon County) Watershed Assessment and Stewardship Plan. (Spiral Bound Book and disc): December 2003

Prepared by Aqua-Link, Inc. Shawnee Lake Watershed Assessment, Bedford County. (Spiral Bound Book and Disc) Rails to Trails Conservancy. “Rails to Trails.” (Magazine Article): October 2005 Rails-to-Trails Conservancy. Guide to America's Rail-Trails. (Book, 68 pages): June 1905 Raystown Branch Juniata River Water Trail-Trail Guide. (Map and descriptive packet)

PENNDOT. BicyclePA Route S. (Color map)

Raystown Lake Region. (Color Brochure)

PENNDOT. Bicycling Directory of Pennsylvania. (36 Page Booklet)

Richard C. Sutter & Associates for Huntingdon County Planning Commission and Board of Commissioners. Huntingdon County Continuity Through Conservation II: Comprehensive Plan Phase I, Background Studies. (Spiral Bound Book): June 1905

PENNDOT. Cambria County, PA -0 General Highway Map. (Large Color Map - includes detailed street patterns): June 1905 PENNDOT. Trucker's Handbook. (Booklet, 57 pages): April 2005 PENNDOT/Rodale Press. Pennsylvania Bicycle Driver's Manual. (37 Page Booklet): January 1998 Pennsylvania Greenways Partnership Commission. Pennsylvania Greenways-An Action Plan for Creating Connections. (Spiral Bound Book, 81 pages): June 2001 Piney Creek, Blair County. Coldwater Heritage Partnership Conservation Plan. ( 2 page description of project) Pleasant Hills Campground. (Raystown Lake location)

Roaring Run Watershed Association . Roaring Run Watershed Association Trail. (Word Document): January 1996 Rothrock State Forest/Greenwood Furnace State Park. (11x17 black and white map) Russ Johnson, Pennsylvania Environmental Council and others for the Pennsylvania Greenways Partnership. Creating ConnectionsThe Pennsylvania Greenways and Trails Howto Manual. (Spiral Bound Book, 102): June 2001 S. Patz & Associates, Inc for Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission. Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Six County Southern Alleghenies Region. (Word Document): July 2002

Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

Shoup's Run Watershed Association. (Description of Association Purpose and Activities) Simone and Jaffe Incorporated for Fulton County Economic Development Corporation. Fulton County Trails Master Plan. (Black and White Copy of Book): May 1996 Southern Alleghenies Conservancy. “Pike to Bike Trail” (Superhighway Trail). (Xeroxed article): June 2005 Southern Alleghenies Planning and Development Commission. Fulton County Drinking Water Source List. (List and Color GIS Map): October 2005 Southern Alleghenies Planning and Development Commission. Huntingdon County Drinking Water Source List. (List and Map): October 2005 Southern Alleghenies Planning and Development Commission. Somerset County Off Road Trails Map. (Hand Drawn Trails on Color Map) Southern Alleghenies Planning and Development Commission. Somerset County Sanitary Sewer Service Areas. (GIS 11x17 Map): October 2005 Southwestern PA Heritage Preservation Commission, U.S. Department of the Interior and others. Plan for the Allegheny Ridge. (Spiral Bound Book, -downloaded black and white copy (text cut in some areas) with photos, diagrams and maps) Spring Run Watershed Assessment Report. (Sprial Bound Book): June 2004

Susquehanna Greenway Partnership Susquehanna Greenway. (Spiral Bound Booklet): June 2004 Susquehanna Greenway Partnership River Conections. (Spiral Bound photo copy): March 2002 The FisherWorks Consulting Project Team for Conemaugh Township, Somerset County. Somerset County Trolley Trail Feasibility Study. (Spiral Bound Book) The Northern Group Trail Club. Atlantic Crest Trail-A Concept Plan. (Word Document): May 2005 The Pennsylvania Rivers conservation Program. Juniata Watershed Management, Plan, (Spiral Bound Book): September 2000 The Southern Alleghenies Conservancy Potter Creek Watershed. Yellow Creek Drainage - Coldwater Heritage Final Preliminary Watershed Assessment. (Spiral Bound Book): January 2005" USDA Soil Conservation Service. Cambria County Soil Survey. (Book) USDA Soil Conservation Service. Fulton County Soil Survey. (Book) VanLandingham consulting for Huntingdon County Planning Commission. Huntingdon County Quality of Life Survey. (Spiral Bound Booklet): September 1999 West Penn Trail Kiski Extension. (Brief description and map)

77

Bibliography Western PA Conservancy Magazine. “Conserving High Priority Landscapes.” (Magazine Article): April 2005

Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission.

Western PA Conservancy Magazine. Huntingdon County Natural Heritage Inventory. (Blue three ring binder)

Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission, State Wildlife Grants.

Electronic Resources All-Terrain Vehicles, Information on ATV use in Pennsylvania. Minnesota Water, Let’s Keep it Clean. September 2006 DCNR Community Conservation Partnerships Program Grants. Pennsylvania Heritage Areas Program Grant Application. Community Conservation Partnership Program, Pennsylvania Recreational Trails Program. Funding and Program Finder.

Growing Greener. Growing Greener Grants Awarded. US Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration. < http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/safetealu> Transportation Enhancements, Home Town Streets and Safe Routes to School Program. Frequently Asked Questions about the Pennsylvania Infrastructure Bank. National Park Service Land and Water Conservation Fund.

US Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration Recreational Trails Program. Natural Resources Conservation Service Farm and Ranch Lands Protection Program. National Park Service Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance Program. Natural Resources Conservation Service Wetlands Reserve Program. US Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement. Pennsylvania Greenways Local Government Funding Sources. The Conservation Fund Kodak American Greenways Awards - Grants Guidelines.

Natural Resources Conservation Service Conservation Reserve Program.

Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.

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Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix A: Background Data Appendix A: Protected Areas

State Parks/Natural Landmarks Pennsylvania's State Park system was established in 1893 and has continuously expanded to become one of the nation’s largest State Park systems. Today, Pennsylvania’s State Park system includes 116 outdoor recreational areas, over 283,000 acres of property, 606 full-time employees and over 1,600 part-time employees. Yearly, the State Park system serves an estimated 36 million visitors offering over 7,000 family campsites, 286 cabins, nearly 30,000 picnic tables, 56 major recreational lakes, 10 marinas, 61 beaches for swimming, 17 swimming pools and over 1,000 miles of trails.

Overview Approximately 477,180 acres or 16% of the Southern Alleghenies region is protected in some form. This protection ranges from Federally-owned areas to State-owned parks, forests and game lands to county and municipally-owned parks to quasi-public lands owned by conservation groups such as the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy (WPC). Table 12 below summarizes the amount of protected land in each county and the region. The remainder of this section provides brief descriptions of the publiclyowned lands in the region. Table 12: Protected State Lands Acreage

State Parks

County Parks

State Forests

State Gamelands

Federal Lands

Quasi Public Lands

Total Acreage

Bedford Blair Cambria Fulton Huntingdon Somerset Total

8,946 933 9,691 978 1,174 9,106 30,828

0 48 4,278 <1 0 0 4,326

31,021 6 4,210 30,991 71,294 33,053 170,575

53,829 54,901 41,577 19,272 39,321 31,276 240,176

0 691 636 0 20,195 2,313 23,835

168 0 0 139 7,070 63 7,440

93,964 56,579 60,392 51,380 139,054 75,811 477,180

Percent of Region

1.04%

0.15%

5.74%

8.08%

0.80%

0.25%

16.05%

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May 2007

In 1929, legislation established the Bureau of State Parks with a commitment to provide outdoor recreation facilities in a natural setting, to preserve park areas and to provide environmental education opportunities. The establishment of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in 1933, a depression era government program for unemployed men, brought growth in the size and diversity of the park system. The greatest period of growth in the State Park system occurred between 1955 and 1970. The CCC work was performed to guidelines embraced by the National Park Service.

Table 13: State Parks Summary State Parks and Natural Landmarks

County

Blue Knob State Park

Bedford County

Canoe Creek State Park

Blair County

Cowan’s Gap State Park

Fulton County

Greenwood Furnace State Park

Huntingdon County

Kooser State Park

Somerset County

Laurel Hill State Park

Somerset County

Laurel Mountain State Park

Somerset County

Laurel Ridge State Park

Cambria and

Laurel Summit State Park

Somerset County

Ohiopyle State Park

Somerset County

Prince Gallitzin State Park

Cambria County

Shawnee State Park

Bedford County

Trough Creek State Park

Huntingdon County

Warriors Path State Park

Bedford County

Whipple Dam State Park

Huntingdon County

Summarized below are designations of the sixteen State Parks presently situated within the Southern Alleghenies Greenways study area. In addition, brief descriptions outline each park’s amenities. The descriptions have been summarized in alphabetical order.

A-1

Appendix A: Background Data Blue Knob State Park, in Bedford County, offers year-round wilderness adventures on 6000+ acres of predominantly woodland areas. The Park is in the northwest tip of Bedford County, west of I-99. Altoona, Johnstown and Bedford are within 25 miles of the Park. Blue Knob is named for its majestic dome-shaped mountain. At 3,146 feet above sea level, it is the second highest mountain in Pennsylvania; just 67 feet less than Mount Davis in Somerset County. Situated on a spur of the Allegheny Front and overlooking the scenic Ridge and Valley Province to the east, Blue Knob possesses spectacular views. Unique photographic opportunities are available during low humidity weather and with changes of season. In addition to the views, Blue Knob offers swimming, group cabin camping, mountain biking, horseback riding snowmobiling, cross county skiing and backpacking along the Lost Turkey Trail which is a 26 mile trail that transverse the State Park and adjoins the neighboring State Forest, State game and private land. Approximately 5,000 acres are open to hunting, trapping and the training of dogs during established seasons. Common game species include deer, squirrel, turkey and grouse. The Park is adjacent to the 12,000 acre State Gameland 26. Trout fishing enthusiasts frequent Bob’s Creek and its tributaries. Streams within the Park are home to native brook trout and stocked trout placed through a cooperative nursery program operated by the Pavia Sportsmen Club, Inc. The Park leases the summit for downhill skiing area to Blue Knob Recreation, Inc. Ski Blue Knob is one of the

A-2

most challenging ski slopes in Pennsylvania offering a vertical drop of 1,050 feet.

Figure 40: Blue Knob State Park

Figure 43: Fishing at Blue Knob State Park

Figure 41: View from Blue Knob State Park

Figure 44: View from Blue Knob State Park

Figure 42: Autumn Foliage at Blue Knob State Park

Figure 45: Cowan’s Gap State Park

Canoe Creek State Park is located 12 miles east of Altoona and is a modern, day use facility. The vast openness of this 958 acre park is exemplified with a panoramic view when cresting the hill on Canoe Creek Road. A 155 acre lake provides excellent year-round fishing, a popular swimming area and enjoyment for small pleasure boaters. Fields and woodlots are managed to provide a diversified habitat for many game species and a variety of wildlife. Canoe Creek’s proximity to nearby communities allows local residents to take a short pleasure drive and enjoy an evening of fishing, picnicking or walking. Eight modern cabins overlook the lake. The 155 acre Lake is stocked with walleye, muskellunge, bass, trout, chain pickerel, catfish, crappie and other panfish. Ice fishing is a popular winter activity during the extended trout season. Some of the amenities include: a 350-foot long sand beach, bathhouse with showers and dressing booths, picnicking, biking, horseback riding, hiking, cross-country skiing, ice fishing, ice skating and iceboating. Approximately 550 acres are open to hunting trapping and the training of dogs. Common game species are deer, pheasant and rabbit. Cowan’s Gap State Park consists of 1,085 acres in the Allens Valley of Fulton County. Popular activities include: picnicking, fishing, hunting, boating, hiking, ice skating, cross-country skiing and camping at any of the 224 sites. The Cowan’s Gap Lake offers excellent trout, perch, panfish

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix A: Background Data and bass fishing from an accessible fishing pier. There are two boat launches and 68 mooring spaces on the Cowan’ s Gap Lake for electric motor boats along with a 500-foot sandy beach. The South Branch of Little Aughwick Creek offers good trout fishing. About 630 acres are open to hunting, trapping and the training of dogs during established seasons. Common game species include deer, turkey and squirrel. The Park borders Buchannan State Forest, which is open to hunting, trapping and dog training. Greenwood Furnace State Park is nestled in the Seven Mountain region of northeastern Huntingdon County and offers a unique recreational experience for visitors. A walk through historic Greenwood Furnace evokes images of an industrial community that flourished between 1834 and 1904. The community’s once thriving iron making activities flourished as a busy industrial complex. Today, only a handful of its 127 buildings remain. A self-guided walking tour allows visitors to explore a portion of the historic district including parts of the town, tramway, historic roads and charcoal hearths. Greenwood Furnace State Park is an area of rugged beauty, abundant wildlife, spectacular vistas and peaceful solitude. The park covers 423 acres, including a six-acre lake which is surrounded by 80,000contiguous acres of the Rothrock State Forest. Ice skating, fishing, camping and swimming are popular activities. About 320 acres of the Park are open to hunting, trapping and the training of dogs during established seasons.

Kooser State Park in Somerset County lies in the heart of the Laurel Highlands at an altitude of 2,600 feet. Kooser State Park derives its name from John Kooser, who in 1867 settled in the western end of the Park near what is now known as Kooser Spring. The land for Kooser State Park was acquired by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in 1922. Today the Park attracts visitors year round to its 250 acres of forest and the trout stream that flows the full length of the Park. The Park’s original design character was created by the CCC project in the 1930’s. During this period, the CCC constructed the existing lake, most of its use areas as well as its architecture and site details. Recreational activities include camping or cabin rentals, swimming, fishing and crosscountry skiing. The 1.5 mile Kooser Trail is popular due to its heavy snowfalls. It is a wellmarked trail and classified as “easiest” for cross-country skiing. Another popular trail is the Kincord Trail, which was named after an Irish priest. Many short trails are in the day use area and cross-country ski trails are also available for hiking. A 350-foot beach area exists for swimmers. The four-acre Kooser Lake provides good fishing for trout, bass and bluegill. Laurel Hill State Park in Somerset County consists of 3,935 acres of mountainous terrain in Somerset County. In 1935, the Federal Emergency Relief Administration began purchasing marginal agricultural and forest land so that it could be converted to better use. The 63-acre Laurel Hill Lake is a focal point of the Park and is stocked with bass, trout, catfish, sucker, bluegill, perch, crappie and

Southern Allegheny Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

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sunfish. Laurel Hill is surrounded by thousands of acres of pristine State Park and State Forest lands. An extensive trail system invites you to hike and explore the Park and observe a diversity of plants and wildlife. A beautiful stand of old growth hemlocks lies along the Hemlock Trail. In addition to the lake, Laurel Hill Creek and Jones Mill Run are excellent trout streams. About 2,100 acres are open to hunting, trapping and training of dogs during established seasons. Summer activities include: picnicking, boating, camping and swimming on a 1,200 foot sandy beach. Winter recreation includes: ice fishing, ice boating and snowmobiling on a ten mile trail system in the park that connects it with over 60 miles of trails in Forbes State Forest. Laurel Hill Lodge is tucked away in a secluded area of Laurel Hill State Park. The lodge, while possessing modern amenities, has a rustic charm. The Laurel Hill Recreational Demonstration Area Historic District includes numerous CCC constructed buildings and structures that retain a significant degree of integrity. The District contains 202 buildings on 1,352 acres of land, and is the largest collection of CCC architecture within all Pennsylvania State Parks. Laurel Mountain State Park was opened in 1939, and was one of the first ski areas in Pennsylvania. High atop the Laurel Ridge, at close to 3,000 feet in elevation, Laurel Mountain State Park features a family-oriented downhill skiing area and beautiful views of the rolling countryside of the Ligonier Valley. The slopes and trails provide opportunity for skiers and snowboarders of all levels. The lodge is a

cozy place to eat and enjoy the view. Seven Springs is currently operating the ski area at Laurel Mountain. Activities include: skiing, snowboarding and snow tubing, as well as children’s programs. Laurel Ridge State Park is 13,625 acres stretching along the Laurel Mountain is from the Youghiogheny River at Ohiopyle to Conemaugh Gorge near Johnstown. This large park spans Cambria, Fayette, Somerset and Westmoreland counties. The main feature of the Park is the 70 mile Laurel Highlands Hiking Trail which features trail shelters for overnight camping. The Trail interconnects several State Parks, State Forests, State Gamelands and other public and private lands. The Laurel Highlands Hiking Trail is a segment of the Potomac Heritage National Scenic Trail. There is approximately 35 miles of trail open to cross-country skiing. A 20 mile cross-country ski touring concession was constructed adjacent to Route 653. Almost all of Laurel Ridge State Park is open to hunting, trapping and training of dogs with a fall archery season. Common game species are deer, turkey and grouse. Laurel Summit State Park in Somerset County is a scenic picnic area operated by the Bureau of State Parks. The six-acre area offers picnic tables, a pavilion, potable water source and restrooms. The area is 2,739 feet above sea level and is typically several degrees cooler than the nearby towns. The area also provides trailhead parking for the Spruce Flats Bog Trail and Wolf Rocks Trail.

A-3

Appendix A: Background Data Ohiopyle State Park is located in both Fayette and Somerset counties and encompasses about 19,000 acres of rugged natural beauty. Ohiopyle State Park serves as the gateway to the Laurel Mountain region. The focal point of the area is the 14-mile-long Youghiogheny River Gorge that passes through the heart of the Park. The “Yough” provides some of the best white water boating for all experience levels in the eastern U.S., accompanied with amazing scenery. Ohiopyle Falls is a central attraction to the Park because of the power and beauty of a 20-foot waterfall. The Cascades, Cucumber Falls, Jonathan Run Falls and Meadow Run Waterslides are favorite places of photographers, geologists and recreation enthusiasts. Warm weather sports involve camping, fishing, picnicking and natural waterslides. The Youghiogheny River is home to native brook trout and other stocked trout fishing in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission. Meadow Run also provides fine trout fishing for anglers who prefer smaller stream fishing. Over 18,000 acres are open to hunting, trapping and the training of dogs during established seasons. Snowmobiling, mountain biking, cross-country skiing and sledding/tobogganing are preferred activities during the winter season.

A-4

Prince Gallitzin State Park consists of 6,249 acres located in Cambria County within an area known as the Scenic Allegheny Plateau Region of Pennsylvania. Large portions of the Park can be seen from several easily accessible vistas. The major attractions to the Park are the 1,600 acre Glendale Lake and the large campground. Glendale Lake is a warm-water fishery with bass, pike and muskellunge as the most common game fish. The lake has nine public boat launching areas and three public mooring facilities for sailboats, pontoon boats and runabouts. About 4,600 acres are open to hunting, trapping and the training of dogs during established seasons. Common game species are deer, turkey and small game. Trails, horseback riding, on-road biking, mountain biking, hiking, camping and a sandy beach for swimming are enjoyed by visitors during the summer season. Cross-country skiing and snowmobiling are popular wintertime activities.

Figure 46: View of Crooked Run from Headache Hill

Figure 48: Prince Gallitzin State Park

.

Figure 47: Kayaking at Prince Gallitzin State Park

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix A: Background Data Rock Run Recreation Area is a newly developed recreation area designed in response to the desires of the Commonwealth’s approximately 150,000 registered ATV riders. The recreation area, a former strip mine situated in Cambria County, is envisioned to be a first class motorized recreation complex with trails and support facilities. Approximately 140 miles of trail will traverse the recreation area’s approximately 5,800 acres at completion. The first phase of the recreation area’s development was completed in the Fall of 2006.

Figure 49: ATV Riders (dcnr.state.pa.us)

Shawnee State Park in Bedford County encompasses 3,983 acres within Pennsylvania’s scenic Ridge and Valley Province. Ten miles west of historic Bedford along US 30, Shawnee has recreational facilities that are convenient and fit into the natural environment. Shawnee State Park is named for American Indians who lived for a short time in the vicinity of the park during their westward migration from the Potomac in the early 1700s. General Forbes camped his army within the boundaries of the Park while building the Forbes Road in the

campaign of 1758 against the French at Fort Duquesne (Pittsburgh). One can still walk along remnants of the Forbes Trail within the Park. Several of the Park’s existing buildings belonged to John Bowman’s “Water Brooks Farm.” He was the president and chancellor of the University of Pittsburgh and was the driving force behind the building of the Cathedral of Learning. Lakeside Lodge is centrally located on an island in the middle of the Park. This threestory house offers year round accommodations with panoramic view of Shawnee Lake and the countryside. A focal point of the Park is the 451-acre Shawnee Lake, which includes fishing on the lake that is stocked with warm-water game fish such as small mouth bass and bluegill. The Lake also includes several boat launch areas and houses 183 mooring spaces.

of open hunting, trapping and dog training during established seasons. Stream fishing in Great Trough Creek includes a variety of fish species such as trout, small mouth bass, rock bass, sucker and panfish. Warrior’s Path State Park in Bedford County is a 349 acre park that lies near the famous path used by the Iroquois Indians for raids and wars with the Cherokee and other American Indians in southern Pennsylvania. Figure 51: Pedestrian Bridge at Trough Creek State Park

This Park is encircled on three sides by the Raystown Branch of the Juniata River, which empties into Raystown Lake approximately one mile downstream. The unique shape of the Park was formed as a result of “river meandering”. This section of the river exhibits some of the best examples of natural stream meandering in the Commonwealth. In addition to the river meandering, a fresh water swamp follows the long axis of the Park adjacent to the river bottomland. Across the river from the swamp is an example of weathered shale cliffs and the unique trees, plants and animals associated with this environment.

Shawnee State Park has 7.5 miles of trails for bicycling; approximately 3,000 acres are open to hunting, trapping and dog training during established seasons. Other recreational activities include: swimming, snowmobiling, sledding/tobogganing, ice fishing and ice skating. Trough Creek State Park is a 554 acre scenic gorge created as the Great Trough Creek cut through Terrace Mountain and emptied into Raystown Lake in Huntingdon County. Rugged hiking trails lead to wonders like Balanced Rock and Rainbow Falls. Rothrock State Forest and Raystown Lake Recreation Area border the Park, creating 87,868 acres of contiguous public land area reserved for recreation. Recreational amenities in Trough Creek State Park include: camping, picnicking, snowmobiling and fishing and nearly 100 acres

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Figure 50: Balanced Rock at Trough Creek State Park

Whipple Dam State Park in Huntingdon County is a legacy in the history of Pennsylvania’s parks. The land was purchased from the Iroquois Confederation Proprietary Government of Pennsylvania on July 6, 1754 and became part of the Monroe Iron Works where charcoal was produced for use in the iron furnace. In 1868, Osgood Whipple purchased a large block of land and constructed a dam and sawmill downstream of the current park

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Appendix A: Background Data dam. It was known locally as “Whipples Dam” until Whipple left the lumber business in 1897. In 1928 a new dam was constructed upstream at a better location for a shallow pool and recreational activities. In the early 1930’s, Whipple Dam was listed as a State Forest Public Camp.

game species are deer, pheasant, rabbit, grouse and squirrel.

Southern Alleghenies Counties Bedford County Fulton County Somerset County Cambria County Somerset County Somerset County Huntingdon County Huntingdon County

In 1987, the 32-acre day use park area was designated as the Whipple Dam National Historic District. This entry on the National Register of Historic Places recognizes, protects and preserves the work site of one of the most important CCC projects. Corps members built pavilions, roads, a beach and restrooms. Figure 52: Beach at Whipple Dam State Park

The 256-acre Whipple Dam State Park utilizes native materials and a rustic architectural look that exemplifies the idea that parks should harmonize with the natural setting. The lake is a perfect place to participate in various leisure activities, bird watch or just relax. Some of the most utilized recreational activities include: swimming along side a 300-foot sand beach; fishing in 22 acres of lake stocked with trout by the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission; boating; canoeing or sailing on Whipple Lake. A portion of the Park is dedicated to hunting, trapping and the training of dogs during established seasons. The Park’s recreational activities include a boat ramp for boating, canoeing and rafting; fishing; cross-country skiing and hiking along six miles of trails; picnic areas and pavilions with nearby restrooms; hunting; trapping and dog training during established seasons. The Park’s common

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Table 14: State Forests Summary

State Forests and Natural Areas Pennsylvania’s 2.1 million acres of State Forest provide clean water, recreational opportunities, habitat for wildlife and places to enjoy nature’s tranquility. With more than 2,500 miles of trails, outdoor enthusiasts find endless opportunities for hiking, cross-country skiing, mountain biking, horseback riding, snowmobile and ATV riding. Many of the best hunting grounds, finest fishing streams and grandest views in the Commonwealth are found in its State Forests. Most State Forests also have one or two picnic areas equipped with tables, fireplaces, potable water and parking. State Forests play an important role in maintaining natural biological diversity and protecting special plant and animal species. Pennsylvania’s State Forests contain some of the world’s most valuable timber. The sale of timber products from State Forests returns money to the Commonwealth and provides a stable resource base for the forest products industry.

State Forests Buchanan State Forest Buchanan State Forest Forbes State Forest Gallitzin State Forest Gallitzin State Forest Mt. Davis Natural Area Rothrock State Forest Tuscurora State Forest

Buchanan State Forest in Bedford and Fulton Counties was named in honor of James Buchanan, the 15th President of the United States. In Bedford County, there is a saltpeter cave within the Sweet Root Natural Area where saltpeter has been produced for gunpowder before and during the American Revolution. Close by are the Resettlement Lands containing several old cemeteries that date back to pre-Civil War days. The Military highway known as the Forbes or Forbes-Burd Road winds through Allens Valley and westward over Sideling Hill in Fulton County. Hidden in Woodridge Hollow is an aqueduct or culvert, a masterpiece of native sandstone measuring approximately 15-feet wide, 10-feet high and 199-feet in length. It was meant to carry the waters of Woodridge Run beneath the South Penn Railroad, which would have traversed northern Fulton County via tunnels through Sideling Hill and Rays Hill. The South Penn line was never finished however, but much of the route, including the two tunnels, was utilized by the Pennsylvania Turnpike.

Forbes State Forest was named in honor of General John Forbes who in 1757 ordered the construction of a road from Bedford to Fort Pitt for the movement of an expeditionary Army. The Forbes State Forest contains over 20 separate tracts of State Forest Land in Fayette, Somerset and Westmoreland Counties. The total acreage is over 50,000 acres with most of Forbes State Forest located along the Laurel Ridge. This area is a favorite of people from the greater Pittsburgh area and is heavily used for all types of outdoor recreation. Six State Parks and three State Forest picnic areas have been developed to play host to the millions of visitors to this area. Gallitzin State Forest consists of two separate areas of State Forest land located in Bedford, Cambria, Indiana and Somerset Counties. The total area of State Forest land is 15,336 acres. The Babcock Division situated in Northern Somerset County with 13,482 acres is the largest division of the Gallitzin State Forest. The Clear Wild Area, the John P. Savior Trail and the Lost Turkey Trail are located in this Division and can be generally found south of Route 56. Mt. Davis Natural Area comprises 581 acres in Elk Lick Township, Somerset County surrounding the rock known as Mt. Davis on the summit of Negro Mountain which is the highest point in Pennsylvania. An interesting geologic feature of the area is the scattering of small concentric stone rings caused by localized frost. Each ring surrounds a spot in the soil which is a little softer and looser than the adjacent ground. A picnic area is located about one mile from Mt. Davis along L.R. 55008. Hiking trails

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix A: Background Data connect the picnic area at Mt. Davis and lead into the lower elevations of the natural area. Rothrock State Forest is named after Dr. Joseph Trimbel Rothrock, a native of Mifflin County, and is recognized as the Father of Forestry in Pennsylvania. Six of the CCC camps were located in the present-day Rothrock State Forest where State personnel planned and supervised work projects. In 1955, Pennsylvania’s entire State Forest system was placed under a scientific timber management plan. Rothrock timber management became very important as large stands of oak and hickory grew. Water activities near Rothrock include Raystown Lake, an 8,300 acre flood control reservoir located adjacent to the southern portion of the State Forest. Fish and wildlife are one of the many resources the Forest provides. The little Juniata River which flows through the Little Juniata Natural Area is an excellent trout fishery. Deer, bear and turkey are plentiful, along with many other species of game. The diverse and extensive forest habitat provides sportsmen and naturalists opportunities to observe a number of rarely seen species. There are approximately 350 leased ¼ acre campsites in Rothrock State Forest. Vistas or scenic overlooks are a major attraction for many of the Forest’s visitors. The best known is the Jo Hayes Vista atop Tussey Mountain along PA Route 26 at the Centre/Huntingdon County Line. It was named after the late State Senator Jo Hayes of State College and is located on land jointly maintained by PennDOT and the Bureau of Forestry.

Figure 53: View of Rothrock State Forest

Tuscarora State Forest derives its name from Tuscarora Mountain, a mountain named for the Tuscarora Indians who were a tribe that were adopted by the Iroquois Nation and migrated to this region in the early eighteenth century. Comprised of 91,165 acres, Tuscarora State Forest is located in Cumberland, Franklin, Huntingdon, Juniata, Mifflin and Perry counties. Six CCC camps were located within Tuscarora State Forest. Fishing is plentiful along the many miles of small- to medium-sized streams housing native and stocked trout. The Tuscarora Trail is the northern portion of an extensive 220 mile bypass route of the Appalachian Trail in Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia and Virginia. Approximately 23 miles of this hiking trail cross the Tuscarora State Forest. Backpack camping is also permitted along the State Forest portion. Hunting for deer and turkey is extremely popular in the State Forest. A total of 157 miles of State Forest roads provide access to some of the finest scenic views in Pennsylvania and ample opportunities to observe wildlife.

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State Gamelands In 1898 the Pennsylvania Game Commission set up its first game preserve. By 1910, the Commission was winning praise across the nation for its restocking and management of the State’s growing deer herd. To fund more preserves, the Commission asked the State legislature to pass a law requiring each hunter to pay a dollar for a license to hunt, a measure that the State’s sportsmen bitterly opposed. Passed in 1913, the Resident Hunter’s Law provided the Commonwealth money to purchase and maintain its public game preserves, to protect endangered wildlife and to restore species native to the State.

Missouri and Kansas, quail from Mexico, beaver from Canada, ruffed grouse, raccoons and other species, within the Commonwealth’s more than 1.3 million acres of gameland. With the regrowth of Pennsylvania’s forests and the efforts of the Commission, the wildlife has returned, and with it, the hunters. In 1985, Pennsylvania licensed more than a million hunters, the third-highest total in the nation.

By 1919, Pennsylvania had twenty State Gameland reserves, but most animal populations were still distressingly low. That year, Governor William C. Sproul signed a law authorizing purchase of land specifically for game reserves. Later that year the Commission purchased 6,288 acres in Elk County from the Wright Chemical Company for State Gamelands Preserve Number 25. In the next five years, the Commission acquired another 86,000 acres, and managed a game reserve system that covered an additional 100,000 acres of publicly owned and private lands. In the following decades the Commission’s “miniature Yellowstone Parks” of the State Gamelands would be the heart of Pennsylvania’s wildlife-management programs. By 1927 Pennsylvania was a national leader in game conservation. More than 500,000 hunters paid a $2 annual fee, the proceeds of which the Commonwealth used to purchase and maintain game refuges. The Commission began to restock cottontail rabbits from

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Appendix A: Background Data Table 15: State Gamelands Summary State Gameland No. Bedford Location

Blair Cambria

26

41

• • •



42

48

49





50

53

55

60

65



• •









Location

State Gameland No.

9,300

6,310

3,158

5,928

2,474

20,817

6,073

5,724

4,122

20,817

81

82

97

99

104

108

111

112

118

121

124

128

131







• •



• •







• •

Location





3,533

6,708

7,312

3,448

8,182

20,043

10,520

5,770

6,029

2,207

6,835

1,695

309

147

158

166

184

198

228

231

251

261

267

271

278

279

• •

Cambria

• •

• •

• •

• •

• •

Fulton



Huntingdon Somerset Size (acres)

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7,445



Bedford Blair



14,618

Cambria

Somerset Size (acres)





Blair

Huntingdon

• 2,627

• •

79



11,926

Bedford

Fulton

73

• •

Huntingdon

State Gameland No.

71



Fulton

Somerset Size (acres)

67

6,074

15,632

10,440

• 4,298

6,950





3,461

429

• •

4,221

3,248

1,041

1,856

1,947

461

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix A: Background Data Federal Sites Allegheny Portage Railroad National Historic Site is located between Johnstown and Hollidaysburg, approximately 12 miles west of Altoona. It is situated in the Allegheny Mountains with elevations ranging from 1,135 to 2,408 feet above sea level. The Allegheny Portage Railroad played a vital role in the nation’s industrialization during the first half of the nineteenth century by linking the eastern United States to the west. Ten inclined planes allowed the Railroad to overcome grades up to 5¾ degrees along the rugged terrain of the Allegheny Mountains, as the boats from the Pennsylvania Main Line Canal were portaged over the mountains. Stretching across 36.6 miles, the Park is narrow and linear. Natural resources common to the northeastern Appalachian region, such as oak forests and white-tailed deer, can be seen along the historic railroad and throughout the surrounding lands. Today’s park covers 1,249 acres. The main portion of the park contains the Summit Level Visitor Center, the historic Lemon House;,Engine House #6 Exhibit Shelter, the Skew Arch Bridge, picnic area and hiking trail. The Staple Bend Tunnel unit is located approximately four miles east of Johnstown. Bird watching, hiking, picnicking, crosscountry skiing, interpretive programs and nature walks provide recreation. Flight 93 National Memorial, located in Somerset County, will be a place to learn about the events of September 11, 2001 and find meaning and inspiration in the

experience of Flight 93’s passengers and crew who courageously gave their lives thwarting a planned attack on our Nation’s Capital. The Flight 93 National Memorial will be a permanent site to commerate the heroes on that plane. Since September 2001, a 40-foot-long section of fence at the Memorial Site has been home to flowers, letters and artwork left by more than 150,000 annual visitors. A group of local residents known as the Ambassadors, volunteer at the Temporary Memorial 8-10 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year giving information and help to visitors. Travelers from all 50 States and 34 countries have visited this site to pay their respects to the heroes of Flight 93. Johnstown Flood National Memorial is located in Southwestern Pennsylvania, about 10 miles northeast of Johnstown. The park contains nearly 165 acres and preserves the remains of the South Fork Dam and portions of the former Lake Conemaugh. The Johnstown Flood National Memorial tells the story of the 1889 flood that devaStated Johnstown. This is known as one of the worst single day disasters in United States history, where over 2,200 people perished in this flood. Starting at the Visitor’s Center, one can view the exhibits and an award winning film. You can follow up with a visit to the remains of the dam, just a short walk on an accessible trail. Nearby, in the community of Saint Michael, remain some of the original buildings of the South Fork Fishing and Hunting Club.

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Raystown Lake, situated in Huntingdon County, PA, is the commonwealth’s largest lake. It was created by the United States Army Corps of Engineers between 1968 and 1978 at a cost of $76 million by the damming of the Raystown Branch Juniata River, which created a shallow lake in the river valley. The primary purpose of the 8,300 acre Lake is to control flooding, provide electricity and support recreational activities. The Corps operates and maintains 12 public access areas. Facilities include beaches, boat launches, campgrounds, trails and hunting and fishing. Approximately 1.5 million visitors per year engage in the many activities that Raystown Lake offers. The Pennsylvania Game Commission is responsible for enforcement of State game laws at Raystown Lake, and manages a 3,000 acre mitigation area under a lease agreement with the Corps. The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission is responsible for enforcement of State fishing and boating laws at Raystown Lake. By agreement, this commission manages the fishery at Raystown Lake in cooperation with the Corps. Boating, swimming and fishing are all popular activities on the Lake. There are many campsites on the Lake, as well as several boat launches, restaurants and trails. Firework displays are held at the Raystown Lake Resort on Memorial Day Weekend, Independence Day and the Sunday night before Labor Day.

Recreation Trails/Corridors On-Road Bike Routes Apple Barrel Orchard Tour is an on-road route in Bedford County, and is rated “challenging.” The route runs 39.5 miles past scenic rolling hills, farmland, apple orchards, covered bridges and country stores. The cycling trail begins in Breezewood and passes through some of the finest scenic views Bedford County has to offer. Bituminous Blast Tour is an on-road 19.9 mile, “moderate” rated route in Cambria County. Coal mining was the major source of industry for this region. Cycling through villages, small towns and farmlands presents spectacular views of country life. Gallitzin Tunnels and Seldom Seen Tourist Mine provide unique rest stops along the way. Ten camping and recreational vehicle areas also provide solace to travelers. Cove Loop is an on-road bike route located in Fulton County and provides access to many other opportunities for trail hiking and nature observation. Hiking is offered along the Todd Trail, Narrows, Loop and Cove Trail. A hike on the Ellisic and Bird Run Trail provides great adventure. The Forbes Road Trail and Allen Trail will let you absorb the natural beauty of the area. The Kittatinny Mountain towers over the Cove Trail and Allens Valley proves an interesting place to visit not far away. For a spectacular view of the area visitors can climb Sidneys Knob. Covered Bridge Scenic Journey in Bedford County is a 16.4 mile on-road bike route,

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Appendix A: Background Data rated “moderate” that runs through covered bridges, rural farmland and quaint rural residential areas. The terrain is mostly flat to rolling hills including an uphill climb. Castle Tower Tour is an on-road bike route in Cambria County that begins in Cresson and winds through 20.6 miles of country settings, farmhouses, unspoiled farmlands and rural highlands. The route includes a scenic view of the Castle Tower located in Loretto, which was built by Charles Schwab for his own water supply. St. Francis Monastery Gardens offers the cyclist a break to smell the flowers. This trail’s rating is “moderate”. Fort Roberdeau Loop in Blair County is a 21.9 mile “moderate” rated on-road bike route that consists of flat to rolling terrain. Fort Roberdeau was used as protection for the settlers from Indian attacks and protected miners whose job was to mine lead for Continental Army musket balls. Beginning in Tyrone, this classic tour ventures through scenic Mennonite farmland and offers site seeing opportunities that include caverns, enchanting Arch Springs and Tytoona Cave. Horse and Buggy Tour is a 33.7 mile, “moderate” rated on-road bike route that begins in Williamsburg and affords the cyclist a view of the Grand Williamsburg Blue Hole Quarry. The tour continues through Martinsburg, PA, where an abundance of scenic rolling hills and green pastures of cornfields and farmland set the stage for this fabulous tour. Horses and buggies will share the road with you along with spectacular memories.

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Majestic Mountain Mystery Tour is a 55.1 mile on-road bike route beginning in Somerset and continuing through the rural Borough of Berlin whose claim to fame is their famous stone chimneys and maple sugar production. This Tour leads through country roads, farmlands and mysterious mountainous ridges. Manns Choice Challenge Loop is an on-road bike route in Manns Choice/Bedford County, Pennsylvania. The route’s rating is “moderate” with 15.7 miles of ridge views, a steep decent and the Turner Covered Bridge. The ride starts at Manns Choice, passes Coral Caverns and ends at Sulphur Springs proving to be an exciting loop of the natural wonders of this interesting region. Marina Mania Loop is an 18.7 mile on-road bike route on rolling to flat terrain. The tour begins at Prince Gallitzin State Park and takes the cyclist through the Allegheny Plateau Region of Northern Cambria County. The Park boasts 1,600 acres of beautiful unspoiled green pastures and forests, with a 26 mile lake shoreline. Activities include a side trip to Seldom Seen Tourist Mine, swim in Lake Glendale or a stay overnight in one of the authentic log cabins. Nine Mile Town Historic Tour is a 7.7 mile on-road bike route beginning in Schellsburg. This town was known to the founding fathers as the “Nine Mile Town” with scenic countryside roads and rural rustic settings. This tour offers a side trip to Shawnee State Park for some swimming, picnicking or resting.

Path of Progress is a 500 mile rolling to hilly national heritage driving route that winds through nine southwestern Pennsylvania counties. The tour route is the link to discovering the industrial and cultural heritage of Southwestern Pennsylvania and its influence on the development of the nation. Along the route you can explore four National Parks, 18 State Parks and many other State and private historical sites to discover the story of a people who helped a nation to grow, from the American Revolution through the Industrial Revolution and into the future. Raging Rapids Adventure Tour is an onroad bike route in Somerset County at the highest elevation (2,190 feet) of any county in Pennsylvania. The route begins in historic Somerset where you ride through countrysides and covered bridges built over 150 years ago. Cycling upon this mountain “pass” you can view the Allegheny Mountains on the east, the Laurel Hills on the west and the raging rapids of the Youghogheny River. Rivers and Bridges Scenic Tour is an onroad bike route in Somerset County that extends 57.6 miles and has an “advanced” rating. The ride begins at the Somerset Historical Center, which includes a log house, smokehouse barn, covered bridge, scenic views, wooded regions and maple sugar camp. Also, the route passes the Flight 93 National Memorial site, which allows the opportunity to pay homage to the heroes. The route winds up in Jennerstown near the Jennerstown Speedway, Mountain Playhouse as well as other scenic historic sights.

Route G is a designated Bicycle PA Route that connects Tioga County, PA and the Corning, NY area in the north; with Bedford, PA and Cumberland, MD in the south. The 235 mile route follows numerous northeastsouthwest oriented stream valleys and surprisingly flat terrain. It offers a convenient connection to New York State Bike Route 17 on the north, the C & O Canal Towpath and the Allegheny Passage on the south. A highlight is the Grand Canyon of Pennsylvania in Tioga County. The route specifically travels through Bedford County, through Blair County, then Huntingdon County, into Centre County, Lycoming County and finally exits by way of Tioga County Pennsylvania into New York. Route S is the longest BicyclePA Route in the Commonwealth extending 435 miles from Washington County to Washington Crossing Military Park on the Delaware River in Bucks County. The route skirts the metropolitan areas of Pittsburgh, York, Lancaster and Philadelphia. Part of the route includes 65 miles along the Youghiogheny River and the Allegheny Highlands. The trip through southwest Pennsylvania is a beautiful ride that saves thousands of vertical feet of steep climbing. A recently added attraction is the Pike-to-Bike Trail which is an 8.5 mile long route located just east of Breezewood. This route incorporates an abandoned section of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, including two tunnels totaling 2.0 miles in length. Spelunker Tour is an on-road bike route in Huntingdon Township and offers Lincoln Caves and Indian Caverns which make this route a bicyclist’s hit. The route begins at Riverside Park along the rippling Juniata

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix A: Background Data River adjacent to historic downtown Huntingdon, Pennsylvania. Spelunker Tour is approximately 45 miles long and meanders through farmland and valleys from flat to rolling terrain of quaint small towns and villages. Time Travelers Path is a 72 mile bike route that is rated ”challenging.” The Time Travelers Path is situated within Huntingdon County and celebrates the industrial history of Broad Top Mountain and Southern Huntingdon County. Cultural sites abound along the route and take riders back to the era of “King Coal” and the steam-powered East Broad Top Railroad which carried freight and passengers between Robertsdale/Wood and Mount Union known as the “Silica Brick Capital of the World.” Scenic vistas, coal miner’s museum, railroads, electric trolley and sweeping valleys exist along the area’s country hamlets for cyclists and visitors to relax. Tuscarora Mountain Challenge is 32.6 miles of on-road bike route with a rating of “advanced to challenging.” The route originates in McConnellsburg Borough and offers several challenging and difficult climbs and downhill grades through beautiful farmland, rolling hills and mountain views. When the cycling day is over, take a trip to Burnt Cabins Grist Mill to purchase freshly ground flour or shop Overly Raker Outlet. Fisherman’s Tour is a 64.8 mile, “moderate to advanced” rated on-road cycling route that starts at Riverside Park along the Juniata River. Travel is quiet along the scenic areas of South Huntingdon until you reach Raystown Lake National Recreation Area and Trough

Creek State Park. Here fishing, swimming, camping and boating activities provide recreation in a rolling to flat terrain.

and Route 219 between Garrett and Meyersdale. Nearby, you can see the Green Mountain Wind Farm.

Whiskey Rebellion Tour is an 18.2 mile, “moderate” rated on-road cycling route situated in Bedford County. The Espy House, where George Washington’s headquarters were in 1794 during the Whiskey Rebellion, is where the cycling adventure begins. Rolling terrain, with a few sharp curves, wind between rural and residential areas nestled between farmlands. A side trip to one of the many quaint specialty shops or Old Bedford Village takes you back to Colonial Days.

The major access point is the town of Rockwood, which is located about 25 minutes south of Somerset or 25 minutes south-east of the Hidden Valley and Seven Spring Resorts.

Off-Road Trails Allegheny Highlands Trail is the missing link in the soon to be completed Great Allegheny Passage. The 400 mile trail connects Pittsburgh and Washington DC. The Trail provides a traffic free bikeway through some of the Mid-Atlantic’s most rugged terrain. Twenty three miles of the Trail pass through an area of Pennsylvania known as the Laurel Highlands. The Trail’s nearly flat surface is composed of crushed limestone and runs along the south shore of the Casselman River. There are currently several landmarks on this trail. The first point of interest is the Pinkerton Tunnel and its two trestles. The tunnel, located about a mile south of Markleton, is only 800 feet long. A 1.5 mile detour was recently opened around the Pinkerton Horn. The other major landmark is the 100 foot high, quarter mile long Salisbury Trestle, which spans the Casselman Valley

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Ghost Town Trail currently totals 36 miles in length and is situated within Indiana and Cambria Ccounties. The Trail was established in 1991 and is designated as a National Recreation Trail by the U.S. Department of the Interior. The Ghost Town Trail derived its name from the numerous mining towns that once existed along an old industrial railroad corridor. The Trail is open to hiking, bicycling and cross country skiing. The Ghost Town Trail is open year-round and is composed of a crushed limestone surface which is ideal for non-motorized activities. Laurel Highlands Hiking Trail, also known as the Laurel Ridge Trail is situated in Somerset County. The Trail is a major 70 mile hiking and backpacking trail connecting Ohiopyle to near Johnstown and is the main attraction of Laurel State Park. The Trail traverses several State Parks, State Forests, State Gamelands, other public lands and private lands. A snowmobile trail system over 70 miles is open daily after the end of the antlerless deer season in late September. Approximately 35 miles of trail are available for cross-country skiing. Large wooden signs mark trail access points at every major highway crossing. There are eight overnight shelter areas along the Trail. Six 30-car parking areas provide starting points. The

most notable characteristic of the Trail is that it is a part of the Potomac Heritage National Scenic Trail. This National Scenic Trail was established in 1983 and consists of six interconnected regional trails that form a 770 mile recreation corridor linking Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia. Link Trail (proposed to be renamed the Standing Stone Trail at the time of the Southern Alleghenies and Open Space Network Plan’s [the Plan] publication) is one of Pennsylvania’s newest hiking trails. It was first laid out between 1978 and 1982. In its original route, it was 68.1 miles in length. Over time the Trail was reclaimed by the forest. Extensive work has been done in the last two or three years to rehabilitate the Trail. In its new and improved route, the Link will be 72 to 75 miles long with several loop trails for the day hiker. There is also a 10 mile stretch of trail designed for the cross country skier. The rehabilitated trail was completed and opened on Labor Day, 1996. The Link Trail runs through Huntingdon, Mifflin and Fulton Counties with its northern terminus at Greenwood Furnace State Park. The Trail runs through four State Gamelands, two State Forests and one Natural Area. Its southern terminus is Cowan’s Gap State Park. The route links the Mid State Trail to the Tuscorora Trail; hence the name Link Trail. This Trail consists of many of the old logging trails, log slides and railroad grades that were used to take the logs to the charcoal pits where it was burned (turned into charcoal) and then carted to furnaces and ultimately

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Appendix A: Background Data used as fuel to melt iron ore. The Trail will take you by more than 7 charcoal pits and the remains of one logging camp. Another major point of interest, and perhaps the highlight of this Trail, is the 1,000 steps (closer to 1,100) that was built in the 1930’s by quarry workers who cut away a large slice of Jacks Mountain, where they mined the ganister stone used to make fire bricks. This is located in Jack’s Narrows near Mount Union, Huntingdon County. There are several routes for cross-country skiing along Link Trail. Namely, north, central and south trails. At the time this report was produced, the Link Trail was re-named to the Standing Stone Trail. The Lower Trail is an approximately 16.5 mile trail that runs along the Frankstown Branch of the Juniata River from Alfarata (Near Alexandria) in Huntingdon County to Flowing Spring (Near Canoe Creek) in Blair County. The Trail is composed of crushed limestone and asphalt for pedestrian and bicycle use. Currently, trailheads are situated at Alfarata Station (Near Alexandria), Mt. Etna Station, Cove Dale Station, Williamsburg Station, Grannis Station and Flowing Spring Station. Amenities along the Trail include: portable toilets; food in Alexandria and Williamsburg; bike rentals in Williamsburg; and bed and breakfast lodging in Alexandria and Williamsburg. TM Main Line Canal Greenway is Pennsylvania’s designated Millennium Legacy Trail. The Millennium Legacy Trails are part of a set of trails that traverse the United States to link heritage, culture and

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recreation assets that are considered to be nationally significant. The Main Line Canal Greenway™ is a 320 mile long, two mile wide corridor that follows the path of the historic Pennsylvania Main Line Canal as it connects Pittsburgh to Harrisburg. Recreational activities include walking, biking, natural area study, exploration of historically and culturally significant sites, boating, fishing, horseback riding and driving tours. The Greenway will serve as a physical connector that encompasses all of these facilities, sites and opportunities. Connectivity between the resources will be enhanced to bring together noteworthy locations and destinations. Efforts to protect the natural habitat and water quality along the corridor will also be enhanced. The corridor or project area flows across four major watersheds that once supported the Canal: The Allegheny, KiskiConemaugh, Juniata and Susquehanna. The rivers and their surrounding landscape were the setting of the original Pennsylvania Main Line Canal and today serve as the spine of this Greenway Corridor. The Allegheny Ride Corporation led a grassroots coalition in the late 90s that culminated in the 1998 Allegheny Ridge Trail Initiative document, subsequent discussion regarding the development of the Main Line Canal Greenway™ and designation as Pennsylvania’s Millenium Legacy Trail. In 2001, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania adopted a Statewide Greenways Action Plan, and funding was made available to support the initiative.

Mid State Trail is a 260 mile long distance hiking trail within the Southern Alleghenies region. The Trail traverses Pennsylvania in a north-south fashion. The current northern end is at the West Rim Trail on Bohen Run north of Blackwell and the southern end is a junction with Green Ridge Hiking Trail in Maryland at the Mason-Dixon Line. The Mid State Trail is almost entirely on public land, State Forests, Gamelands and State Parks. It links or traverses a Turnpike roadside rest stop, a covered bridge built in 1879, Huntingdon and Broad Top Railroad Grade, two scout camps, two fire towers, three State Forest wild areas, eight State Forests, four State Gamelands, four State Forest picnic areas, eight State Parks, and the Stone Valley Recreation Area. The Frankstown to Burnt Cabins Indians Path is crossed, and the Great Island Indian Path is followed in part by Mid State Trail. Principal features of the Mid State Trail are its many views, side trails and a fragile illusion of isolation and wilderness. The narrow ridges afford views and provide a false impression of remoteness and solitude in the second most industrialized State in the nation. The level of usage is still low. If you hike, along the way you may meet more bears than people, thus it is recognized as “The Wildest Trail in Pennsylvania.” Water Trails Kiski-Conemaugh River Water Trail runs 50 miles from Johnstown, Cambria County to Freeport, Westmoreland County. The water trails traverse the Kiskiminetas and Conemaugh Rivers and possess water that is good for novice and/or family canoe and

kayaking activities. The entire KiskiConemaugh River basin is a recovering waterway, from years of post-industrial pollution. Fishermen are encouraged to practice catch and release so that the fishery can continue its rebound. From 1834 to 1857, the Pennsylvania Main Line Canal operated as an economic engine within the Commonwealth and connected Pittsburgh to Harrisburg. Today, there are a number of elements of the Canal along the entire length of the Water Trail, with some only visible at low water. After the Canal’s demise and the rise of the railroad, western Pennsylvania boomed during the Industrial Age. The Kiski-Conemaugh corridor played a key role transporting coal, steel and other goods to markets across the Country and around the world. A number of bridges cross the Water Trail, and paddling under them provides visitors a new perspective. The headwaters of the Conemaugh originate around 3,000 feet above sea-level, then the course of the river drops to 957 feet above sea-level at the mouth of the Kiski and Allegheny River. This drop has carved out canyons and gaps along the water trail, including Conemaugh Gorge and Packsaddle Gap. A majority of the KiskiConemaugh River Water Trail is forested, reflecting the recovery of the river. A mosaic of eastern hardwoods lining the river includes black cherry, oak, maple, hemlock, sycamore, mountain laurel and rhododendron. Black bears, deer, wild turkeys, muskrats along with blue herons, grouse, wood ducks, mallards and Canada geese all make their home along the waterway and are regularly seen by boaters. Raystown Branch Juniata River Water Trail is sponsored by the Southern Alleghenies

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix A: Background Data Conservancy and was established as a partnership of the Southern Alleghenies Conservancy and the Bedford County Conservation District. The Raystown Branch is the Juniata River’s longest and largest tributary. It is classified by the PA DEP as a high quality stream. Wildlife is abundant and fish such as trout, smallmouth bass, muskellunge and panfish provide a variety of angling opportunities. Flowing east from its headwaters on the Allegheny Front in Somerset County, the Raystown Branch drains almost 1,000 square miles of southcentral Pennsylvania and traverses a distance of 118 miles before it joins the main stem of the Juniata River at Huntingdon. It is part of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Its name is rooted in local history: “Juniata” is an Indian word meaning “standing stone” and “Raystown” originates from Robert MacRay, a Revolutionary War settler who established a trading post in the region. The River cuts through the mountain ridges and played a role in defining land transportation routes and the location of settlements. Native Americans followed the Juniata and its tributaries for centuries with an established network of foot trails. The Commonwealth’s present-day interState highways follow the same route. Ironmaking, coal mining, limestone, quarrying, lumbering, milling, tourism and farming are all industries that relied heavily on these waterways. The Bedford portion of the Trail includes the best canoeing waters in the westernmost section of the Branch and begins in the historic Bedford area. It runs 55 tangled miles to Saxton, the County’s northernmost

settlement. Saxton was chosen as the eastern terminus for the Trail because it marks the point where most powerboats begin to use the river as it forms Raystown Lake. Boating on the river between the headwaters and Saxton is almost exclusively reserved for canoes and rowboats. The Trail itself is characterized by slow pools interrupted by fast but shallow riffle-style rapids. It is a Class 1 river, easily navigated with minimal skills. It is ideal for the beginner to intermediate canoeist or kayaker. The Trail is easily accessible between Bedford and Saxton. All listed points are identified on the map marked with signs. Many bridges cross the Water Trail route and serve as informal access points and landmarks. The Water Trail offers many waysides and points of interest including: covered bridges, campgrounds and RV parks, museums, lowhead dams, Juniata Woolen Mills, Mill State hiking trail, historic Everett (known for canoe races and triathlons), Warriors Path State Park and much more. Juniata River Water Trail is a 100 mile riveroriented water trail that flows through central Pennsylvania to where it joins the Susquehanna (a Chesapeake Bay tributary) above Harrisburg. Opportunities abound for seasonal flat-water paddling and visitors to experience the unique cultural, natural and historical aspects of the waterway. The developing Juniata River Water Trail will be an important link in the Main Line Canal Greenway™, which connects and promotes stewardship efforts, recreational opportunities and heritage development projects throughout the corridor.

Southern Allegheny Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

Stonycreek Water Trail follows the Stonycreek River, which is 43 miles long, drains 466 square miles and meets the Little Conemaugh River at Johnstown to form the Conemaugh River. It begins in Berlin, south of the Pennsylvania Turnpike. For the first nine miles, the stream flows through plateau pasture land with limited vegetative cover, so although part of the stream here is stocked with trout, the water gets too warm to be a good fishery. Then the Stony takes its first plunge - dropping about 500 feet in elevation over its next nine miles. This area, called the Upper Gorge, is by many estimates the best fishery in the Upper Kiski Basin. In years past, it suffered from mine drainage, but in recent years has been featured in national fishing magazines and books as one of the Nation's best reclaimed fisheries. This area is stocked with fingerlings only, and has holdover trout up to 16 or 18 inches long. Currently, there are several access points on the Stonycreek River. One can launch a canoe at the newly developed Greenhouse Park along Rt. 403 between Benscreek and Tire Hill, in Riverside at the end of the Jim Mayer Trail under the railroad bridge and the Army Corps of Engineers maintenance ramps. One of these ramps is located behind Team Chevrolet in the Hornerstown neighborhood, and the other is just past the Johnstown Inclined Plane on the right side, where an access ramp leads down to river from Route 56 - the same spot often used as a put-in for paddling Conemaugh Gap. Some paddlers experience both the Stonycreek and Conemaugh Gap sections in one day. The proposed Stonycreek Whitewater Park is planned to become part of Greenhouse Park

in Tire Hill, Somerset County (PA route 403 about 2 miles south of Johnstown, PA). Greenhouse Park has had several improvements in the last two years and is home to the annual Stonycreek Rendezvous a weekend party/celebration of the local rivers attended by hundreds of whitewater enthusiasts from all over the country. Susquehanna River Water Trail-West Branch is a 228 mile long navigable water trail and Pennsylvania’s first formal water route. The Susquehanna River is the sixteenth longest river in North America and the longest river lying entirely in the United States that flows into the Atlantic Ocean. The Susquehanna River and its hundreds of tributaries drain 27,500 square miles, an area nearly the size of South Carolina and cover portions of western New York, Pennsylvania and Maryland. The Susquehanna River is the “mother” river to the Chesapeake Bay, providing 50 percent of all the freshwater entering the great estuary. The Susquehanna River is a vibrant, natural corridor whose wildlife includes: white-tail deer, river otters, beaver, muskrat, snapping turtles, mink or water snake. Cottontail rabbits, striped skunks, woodchucks, raccoons, foxes, brown bats and eastern coyotes live where the habitat is suitable. The clear waters house small mouth bass, suckers, catfish, musky and walleye. The River supports a diversity of fish species and is famous for small mouth bass fishing. The Water Trail is accessible at three formal trail heads, which are owned by the PA Fish and Boat Commission; and at other municipal or private access points. All boats, including canoes and kayaks, use the formal trail heads

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Appendix A: Background Data at Halifax, Amity Hall and Fort Hunter. The Water Trail begins in northern Cambria County near the village of Cherry Tree (Indiana County). The Water Trail terminates at Harrisburg’s City Island. The Tuscarora Trail is an approximately 250 mile trail that was originally created as a new route for the Appalachian Trail. It first departs the Appalachian Trail at the top of Blue Mountain in Deans Gap. It travels along ridge tops, southwesternly, to Maryland, where it connects to the Big Blue Trail before joining the Appalachian Trail again in Shenandoah National Park. Within the Southern Alleghenies region, the Tuscarora Trail crosses through Fulton and Huntingdon counties.

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Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix A: Background Data Upper West Branch Susquehanna Watershed

CLEARFIELD

Landform Analysis The landform map depicts the basic topographic form of the Southern Alleghenies region. The map depicts a sequential hierarchy of elevation layers that occur every 400 feet of elevation and are each represented by a different color. Topographic contours are also illustrated at 100 foot intervals. This map utilizes digital topographic data generated by the United States Geologic Survey, Land Info International, LLC.

Upper Juniata Watershed

CENTRE

LEGEND Southern Alleghenies Boundary County Boundary Existing 100' Topography

nt

ai n

WATERSHED

Br u

sh

M

ou

Major Watershed Sub-Watershed

ELEVATION > 3,200' > 2,800' - 3,200'

INDIANA

> 2,400' - 2,800'

MIFFLIN CAMBRIA

> 2,000' - 2,400' > 1,600' - 2,000' >1,200' - 1,600'

BLAIR

> 800' - 1,200'

HUNTINGDON

Mo un ta

in

< 800'

Loc k

Lower Juniata Watershed

Conemaugh Watershed

un ta

ain nt

Mo k's

Mo u

Ja c

de

FULTON lin gH

FRANKLIN

nt a

Mou ntain

in

Sid e

Ra y

n

Mo u

M

50,000 Acres

rou n d

se y

ws G Mea do

Ev i

tts

Tu s

W ills

Mo

un t

ain

ou nt ai

Bu ffa lo

M ou nt a

Hil

in

l

ill

BA Y

O F

CH E

SOMERSET

G UL F

FAYETTE

BEDFORD

SA PE AK E

M EX IC O

Alle gh

e ny

F ro nt

Du nnin g

Mo un

tain

Jack 's

WESTMORELAND

Sh a

M ou n tain

in

JUNIATA

25,000 Acres 10,000 Acres NORTH 12,500' 25,000'

To wn

Hil

l

0

Youghiogheny Watershed

GARRETT

ALLEGANY

WASHINGTON

Landform Analysis

Potomac Watershed

Southern Allegheny Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

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Appendix A: Background Data Ridgelines Ridgelines are drawn along the portions of the region’s mountain ranges with the highest elevation. These lines were interpreted using topographic information such as elevation and slope. Each ridgeline includes a 1,500 foot offset to define a ridgeline corridor.

LEGEND

CLEARFIELD

CENTRE

Southern Alleghenies Boundary County Boundary Interstate Highway

Glendale Lake

Major Highway ek Cr e

River/Lake

ne

ek re

St o nd ing

100' Contours

Sta

C

Sh av er C

M ou

e uc

Ridgeline (1500' Buffer)

Cle a rf

ield C

MAJOR MUNICIPALITY

Jun iata

Riv

er

Creek

River

ALTOONA

North

Ç I

¨ I

M ill

Ru n

EBENSBURG

¨ I

CAMBRIA

HUNTINGDON

HUNTINGDON

Mo unta in

HOLLIDAYSBURG

er Riv

Raystown Lake

Loc k

a nem Co

h ug ma ne Co

BLAIR

MIFFLIN

Juniata River

Bra nch

Littl e

Bla ck lic k

INDIANA

r Sp

ek re

Br us h

ree k

na ha n que Sus

nt ain

ek

nch Bra

Chest Cre

We st

JUNIATA

ugh

e Littl

e Cre

un tain

Du nnin gM

Shad

oun tain

$ j " !

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Mo

Ja ck 's

Sh ad eM

¼ I

ou nta in

Jack 's Mou ntain

ek

Fran ks

C re

k ee Cr bs Bo

ß K

Bla ck log Cr ee k

Au gh w

iver Jun iata R B ra n ch

ugh

River

WESTMORELAND

ro at T Gre

h ug ma ne Co

tle Lit

tow n

uth So

ick Cr e

ek

River

JOHNSTOWN

Fo rk

ek

Cre ek

BEDFORD

Hill

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Creek

Du nn ing Cre ek

Yellow

Au gh wic k

Littl e Bra nc h

Ra yH ill

Sout h

Mou nt

und

reek

Meadow Grounds Lake

gH ill C

ß K

25,000 Acres 10,000 Acres NORTH 12,500' 25,000'

k

$ ` " !

Tonolow ay Cree

nH

ill

0 To w

ranch Side lin

50,000 Acres

Town C reek

Wes tB

FRANKLIN

MCCONNELLSBURG Meado ws G ro

C re ek Bru sh

FULTON

ain

reek

Tu ss ey

Lickin gC

Mo un ta in

M s Mo un tain

ree k

© I

ou n

ta in

Mo un Wil ls

k

Wil ls C

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er Riv

an lm sse Ca

SOMERSET Evit ts

River

Yo ug hio gh en y

Sid eli ng Hil l

River

ta in

h nc Bra Ra ysto wn

La ure l

Hil lC ree k

Co xe sC ree k

$ a " !

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Bu ffa lo

SOMERSET

$ a " !

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Indian Lake

Ev itt

FAYETTE

Cr e

ek

Sid

eli ng

© I

Pennsylvania

Ridgeline

Maryland

GARRETT

A-16

ALLEGANY

WASHINGTON

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix A: Background Data Slope Analysis The slope map indicates the severity of the region’s hillside slopes. Slopes have been categorized into 5 gradients of steepness and are calculated based on a 10-foot contour interval. The region’s slope characteristics have been approximated using digital topographic data provided by the United States Geologic Survey, Land Info International, LLC and third party computational software.

Slope Analysis

Southern Allegheny Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

A-17

Appendix A: Background Data Watersheds Watersheds are important natural features, based on topography, that determine the direction of water runoff flow and subsequently influence the paths of waterways within them. Watersheds are typically bounded by hillsides, ridgelines, stream valleys and river basins. The region contains 15 watersheds that range in size from approximately 8,900 acres (Kishacoquillas – Jacks Creek) to approximately 420,000 acres (Stony Creek).

LEGEND

CLEARFIELD

CENTRE

Southern Alleghenies Boundary County Boundary

ee k

River WATERSHEDS Chest - Anderson Creek

ing

Cr

Cr

C

k ree

Clearfield Creek

St an d

ree k

Dunning Creek Frankstown Branch of the Little Juniata River

Riv er

Cle arf ield C

Crooked - Standing Stone Creek

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er Ri v

Cheat Cree k

na

nch

n eha

Bra

ce

Sh av er

st We

squ Su

ru Sp

k ee

St on e

Glendale Lake

Jun

BLAIR

Litt le

Raystown Branch of the Juniata River

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INDIANA

MIFFLIN

Aughwick Creek

River

Tuscorora - Buffalo Creek Kishacoquillas - Jacks Creek Stony Creek

CAMBRIA

Conemaugh River - Black Lick Creek Wills - Town Creek Licking - Tonoloway Creek

Ju nia ta

Raystown Lake

Casselman River Upper Youghiogheny River

ree k gC

ree k

ick C

ek R iver

Du nn ing

BEDFORD Cr ee k

SOMERSET

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FAYETTE

ta nia Ju

ch Bran

Ri

r ve

Cr e ek

Quemahoning Resevoir

Ston ycre

Hi gg in

s

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k ee Cr

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k

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ATA

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Town C reek

NORTH

Pennsylvania

A-18

ALLEGANY

0

12,500' 25,000'

Watersheds

Maryland

GARRETT

50,000 Acres

Tonolo w

C

t Br

ills W

ek re

FRANKLIN

25,000 Acres

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Cre

ek

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FULTON

Sid ling

ve r

anc h

Ri

Cree k

Yo ug hio Ri gh ve en r y

an

Evitts

Ca ss elm

ing

n stow Ray

WASHINGTON

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix A: Background Data Hydric Soils Hydric soils display characteristics such as low permeability and high water retention levels. Soils exhibiting greater than 60% hydric content (by map unit) were considered hydric soils for the purposes of this map. In general, these soils are concentrated in the lower lying areas of the region such as in Somerset, Cambria and Huntingdon counties. Hydric soils are based on GIS data provided by the United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service.

CLEARFIELD

LEGEND

CENTRE

Southern Alleghenies Boundary County Boundary Major Highway

Glendale Lake

State Highway ek Cr e nd ing Sta

MAJOR MUNICIPALITY HYDRIC SOILS Hydric Soils

Bla ck

lic k

HUNTINGDON

North

BLAIR ALTOONA

¨ I

EBENSBURG ill M

¨ I

Ru

MIFFLIN

Juniata River

Bra nch

CAMBRIA Ç I

River/Lake

St on e

ek re

ce ru Sp

k ee Cr

Cle a rf

River

Creek

r ive

ield

na

INDIANA

R

C re ek

an ueh Susq

tle Lit

ta n ia Ju

Sh av er C

ek

nch Bra

Chest Cre

We st

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n

HOLLIDAYSBURG Raystown Lake

nem Co

gh au nem Co

er Riv

h aug

JUNIATA

e Littl

k ee Cr

¼ I

w ic Bla ck

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ß K

log Cr ee k

Au gh

iver iata R Jun ran c h

reek

nB

River

tow

tl e

gh C Trou Great

Lit

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WESTMORELAND

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River

JOHNSTOWN

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Quemahoning Resevoir

ek

Cre ek

BEDFORD

Hill

Sto nycre

Du nn ing Cre ek

Creek

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Yellow

© I

SOMERSET

FAYETTE

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BEDFORD

FULTON reek Lickin gC

ree k hC Bru s

50,000 Acres

MCCONNELLSBURG Meadow Grounds Lake

reek

ß K

gH ill C Town Creek

NORTH

$ ` " !

12,500' 25,000'

k

0 Tonolow ay Cree

ree k

ranch Sid elin

Wil ls C

West B

er Riv

ss Ca

an elm

Cre ek

ny

Evit ts

iog he

25,000 Acres 10,000 Acres

River

Yo ug h

FRANKLIN

© I

$ a " !

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Co xe sC ree k

$ a " !

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Indian Lake

SOMERSET

Pennsylvania Maryland

GARRETT

Southern Allegheny Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

ALLEGANY

WASHINGTON

Hydric Soils

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Appendix A: Background Data Prime Agricultural Soils Prime agricultural soils meet various criteria that indicate a soil is of exceptional value for agricultural use. These criteria include recognition as having State importance, slopes less than 8% and pH between 5.5 and 6.5. Prime agricultural soils within the region are concentrated in Blair, Bedford, Huntingdon and Fulton counties. Prime Agricultural Soils are based on GIS data provided by the United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service.

CLEARFIELD

LEGEND

CENTRE

Southern Alleghenies Boundary County Boundary Major Highway

Glendale Lake

State Highway

h Bra nc North

ek Cr e St o

Prime Agricultural Soils

ALTOONA

¨ I

EBENSBURG

MIFFLIN

Juniata River

BLAIR

HUNTINGDON

n Ru ill M

¨ I

nd ing

PRIME AGRICULTURAL SOILS

HUNTINGDON

CAMBRIA Ç I

MAJOR MUNICIPALITY

Sta

e uc

k

River/Lake

ne

ek C re er

ield C

r Sp

ee Cr

Cle a rf

River

Creek

r ive

Bla ck lic k

INDIANA

R

ree k

a a nn ueh Susq

tle Lit

ta n ia Ju

Sh av

nch Bra

ek Chest Cre

We st

HOLLIDAYSBURG Raystown Lake er Riv

h

JUNIATA

e Cr ek

¼ I ek e Cre Shad

Cre ek

k

Du nn ing Cre ek

Cr ee

BEDFORD

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Sto nycre ek River

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© I

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FRANKLIN

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C re ek

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NORTH 0

$ ` " !

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Town

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ranc h Sid elin gH ill C

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Evit ts

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25,000 Acres 10,000 Acres

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River

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tl e Lit

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River

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kC re ek

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iver

Littl

aug

Jun iata R

h aug nem Co

nem Co

Pennsylvania Maryland

GARRETT

A-20

ALLEGANY

WASHINGTON

Prime Agricultural Soils

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix A: Background Data LEGEND

Abandoned Mine Drainage This map describes the locations of the region’s abandoned mines and the impacts on regional waterways through abandoned mine drainage. The region currently contains approximately 111 abandoned mines. Acidic drainage from these mines has impacted approximately 250 miles of the region’s streams beyond the point of supporting fish. Abandoned mine drainage has also caused approximately 115 miles of the region’s streams to have reduced fish habitats. The region’s abandoned mines and subsequently impacted streams are concentrated in the western portion of the region along the Laurel Ridge.

CLEARFIELD

CENTRE

Southern Alleghenies Boundary County Boundary

ek Bru

/

Creek

Bear

/

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/

Cr e on e St g nd in Sta ek Cr e ick Au gh w

log Cr ee k Bla ck

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$ ` " !

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Creek

/

t Pain

k ee Cr bs Bo

ch an Br

tle Lit

ek

/

k ee Cr

Fo rk

Run

/ //

JUNIATA

/

re de C Sha

// / /

Quemahoning Resevoir

/ /

River

¼ I

/ /

Raystown Lake

/

h ug ma ne Co

ek Cre

Known Abandoned Mine

HOLLIDAYSBURG

Ru n

iver

uth So

WESTMORELAND

Normal Stream

/

HUNTINGDON

iata R

River

un

JOHNSTOWN Solomon

/ / /

/

Jun

Lit tl

/

/

Clap boa rd R

er Riv

ALTOONA

Burg oon

Sugar Run

B ra n ch

La ur

h aug

el Ru n

nem Co

/

/ //

ne Co

h ug ma

Rock

Some Fish (Reduced Number of Species of Fish or Reduced Productivity)

er

/ /

¨ I

No Fish

MIFFLIN

Fran

Nort h

/

¨ I

Run

Blacklick

/

EBENSBURG

k ee Cr

IMPACT OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE

Juniata River

Ç I

/

un gR

Br an ch

BLAIR

nin

/

South

CAMBRIA

/

/

MAJOR MUNICIPALITY

HUNTINGDON

ksto wn

k lic

ta n

// /

ck Bla

ce

k

/

un

Kit

nch Bra

ba ke rR

Lit tl e

Cle ar fie

ld

Cr

ee k

River

ru Sp

/

e re

Sh av er C

/ /

/

n Ru rel Lau

INDIANA

Major Highway

C

R iv

na ha n que Sus

/// /

/ /

iata

/

Interstate Highway

Jun

/

nch Bra

/ /

/

un rR be Tim en n Fall Ru l Powel

Littl e

We st

ek Chest Cre

/ /

Bru baker

Run

/ Glendale Lake

/ Pennsylvania Maryland

GARRETT

ALLEGANY

WASHINGTON

Abandoned Mine Drainage

Southern Allegheny Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

A-21

Appendix A: Background Data General Stream Quality Stream quality is an indicator of aquatic habitat and has a direct relationship with fish and invertebrate species. Stream quality is related to a number of factors such as water clarity, movement, acidity, temperature and heavy metal content. Stream quality can be impacted by industrial discharges, sedimentation, acid mine drainage or other water-borne pollutants. The stream quality map illustrates the location and extent of exceptional value and high quality streams as defined by Chapter 93 of the Pennsylvania Code. Approximately 470 miles (5%) are considered exceptional value streams; an additional 2,782 miles (29%) are classified as high quality streams.

CLEARFIELD

LEGEND

CENTRE

Southern Alleghenies Boundary County Boundary Interstate Highway

Glendale Lake

Major Highway

River

Cr e ne St o Sta

nd ing

GENERAL STREAM QUALITY Exceptional Value Stream High Quality Stream Normal Stream

eJ un

iata

Bla ck lic k

Riv

er

Creek

e

MAJOR MUNICIPALITY

Cle a rfie ld C

ree k

a a nn ueh Susq

uc

re ek

nch Bra

INDIANA

r Sp

k ee Cr

Sh av er C

t

ek

ek Chest Cre

We s

North

ALTOONA EBENSBURG Ru

HUNTINGDON

M ill

CAMBRIA

¨ I

¨ I

BLAIR

n

Ç I

Juniata River

Bra nch

Littl

MIFFLIN

HOLLIDAYSBURG Raystown Lake Cr ee k

JUNIATA

Riffle Run

Bens Creek

Cr e ick

ß K

$ j " !

de Sha

de Sha k Cree

Quemahoning Resevoir

log Cr ee k

Fra n ks

Cre ek

¼ I

Ro arin gR un

Clear

o rk

reek

k ee Cr bs Bo

North Fork

So uth F

gh C Trou Great

River

Allw ine Cre ek

WESTMORELAND

Jun iata

h ug ma ne Co

tl e Lit

B ra n ch

Fo rk

tow n

uth So

JOHNSTOWN

HUNTINGDON

Rive r

River

Mill Cre ek

ek

e

Au gh w

Littl

h ug

Bla ck

h aug nem Co

ma ne Co

Be ns

er Riv

n Cub Ru Yellow

Ra ys

m Swa

ek Cre

Cre ek gH

ill C

ick

10,000 Acres

Bru sh

ß K

NORTH

$ ` " !

12,500' 25,000'

Creek

0

Tonolow ay

ranc hS idelin gH ill C Bra reek nc h Sid elin gH il l C ree k Sid e lin

25,000 Acres

ree k

un ed R Crook

50,000 Acres

ree k

Be ar C

Town Creek

West B

r

Pennsylvania

Ea st

Cre ek

ree k

Pin ey

Wil ls C

Cre ek

Run

FRANKLIN

MCCONNELLSBURG Meadow Grounds Lake

Isers

Evit ts

River

e Riv

ss Ca

un pR

Sout h

tow n

FULTON ve Co

an elm

Bra nc h

© I

River

La ure l

Hil lC ree k

Co xe sC ree k

ek Cre

Bra nc h

le Ho

Ju nia ta

Little

BEDFORD

$ a " !

reek

e

SOMERSET

$ a " !

Lickin gC

s ne n Jo Ru ill M

Blu

Yo ug hio gh en y

BEDFORD

Shawnee Lake Indian Lake

Au gh w

SOMERSET

FAYETTE

Cr ee k

Sid e li ng

Hill

Sto nycre

Cre ek

ek River

Creek

© I

Maryland

GARRETT

A-22

ALLEGANY

WASHINGTON

General Stream Quality

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix A: Background Data CLEARFIELD

County Boundary

Ru n

Cr e

MAJOR MUNICIPALITY

St on e

re ek

k

nd in

g

OTHER WATER POLLUTION

Sta

ree k ield C

e uc

e re

Bruba ker

Impaired Stream

Cle a rf

Run

River

Known Point of Discharge with Unacceptable Level of Pollutants Normal Stream

eJ un

Bla ck

iata

lic k

Riv er

Creek

r Sp

C

Sh av er C

ek

Ç I

Run

ing

ALTOONA Burg oon

Sug ar Run

¨ I

BLAIR

Run

EBENSBURG

MIFFLIN

Littl

nn

Run

North

Kit ta

Mil lR un

ek Cre

hi te Gle nw

Bra nch

Major Highway ek

Chest Cre

na ha n que Sus

Elk

Interstate Highway

Bold Ea Cre gle ek

Glendale Lake

n Ru

nch Bra

INDIANA

Southern Alleghenies Boundary

Mud dy

Dutch Run

ck Ro

We st

LEGEND

CENTRE

Juniata River

Other Water Pollution In addition to Abandoned Mine Drainage, Section 303(d) of the Federal Clean Water Act regulates industrial-related water pollution within streams and rivers. The Clean Water Act requires States to prepare a list of all surface waters for which beneficial uses of the water, such as for drinking, recreation, aquatic habitat and industrial use, are impaired by pollutants. In short, these are estuaries, lakes, rivers and streams that fall short of the surface water quality standards and are not expected to improve within a two-year period. The region contains two known points of discharge that contain an unacceptable level of pollutants. Both of these points are situated within the western portion of the region along with the largest concentration of impaired streams.

HUNTINGDON

CAMBRIA

¨ I

HOLLIDAYSBURG Raystown Lake nem Co

a em

ugh

s

Cr

ee

k

Cre ek

Run

re de C Sha ek

Sandy

Hill

hw ic

k

$ a " !

Sout h

Creek Lickin g

Ra ysto

ree k

ß K

NORTH 0

$ ` " !

12,500' 25,000'

Tonolow ay Cree k

ranch Side ling Hill C West B

25,000 Acres

Town Creek

Cre ek Evit ts

Gladde ns Run

50,000 Acres

10,000 Acres

Bru sh C

reek

k Cre e

ree k

Evit ts

Wil ls C

FRANKLIN

MCCONNELLSBURG Meadow Grounds Lake

yR un er Riv

s Ca

an lm se

ch

FULTON

Pin e gh en y

Littl e

© I

River

Bra n

Bra nc h

Ju nia ta

Au g

BEDFORD

$ a " !

River

Yo ug hio

Cr ee k

BEDFORD

Shawnee Lake Indian Lake

wn

Co xe sC ree k

Run

t an as Ple

La ure

lH ill C re e k

rly

Run

Va lle y

Im le rto w n

n Ru

n

SOMERSET

Run

Sid e li ng

Creek Run

© I

Run

Run

SOMERSET Ru

gs Lon

Cre ek

Sto nycre ek River

Creek

al Co

s

n Ru

Sixmile

Beaverdam

Run

bert Lam

Kimbe

ek

Sh ou p

$ j " !

Yellow

ck Bu

Au g

ß K

¼ I

Quemahoning Resevoir

FAYETTE

log Cr ee k

Fran

k ee Cr bs Bo

Fork

ns Be

reek

River

So uth

hw ick Cr e

Jun iata R B ra n ch

Beaverdam Run Reservoir

gh C Trou Great

h ug ma ne Co

tle Lit

HUNTINGDON

ksto wn

Fo rk

k ee Cr

uth So

iver

r

River

JOHNSTOWN

WESTMORELAND

JUNIATA

e Halt

e Lit tl

Bla ck

h aug

n Co

Be n

er Riv

Pennsylvania Maryland

GARRETT

Southern Allegheny Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

ALLEGANY

WASHINGTON

Other Water Pollution

A-23

Appendix A: Background Data Wetlands and Floodplains Wetlands are critical natural resources related to groundwater recharge, water quality, vegetative cover and habitat. There are three types of wetlands: lake edge (Lacustrine); marshes or bogs (Palustrine); and river edge (Riverine). Floodplains also serve an integral role in water quality through groundwater recharge and stormwater runoff. This map documents the location and extent of wetlands and floodplains within the region. These lands are spread throughout the region with concentrations in flat areas near bodies of water.

CLEARFIELD

LEGEND

CENTRE

Southern Alleghenies Boundary County Boundary Major Highway

Glendale Lake

ield C

r Sp

uc

e

k

Cle a rf

Marsh Related (Palustrine)

Bla ck lic k

Bra nch

BLAIR ¨ I

EBENSBURG i M

River Related (Riverine)

MIFFLIN

Juniata River

North

St o

Lake Related (Lacustrine)

ALTOONA

¨ I

WETLANDS AND FLOODPLAINS

HUNTINGDON

CAMBRIA Ç I

nd ing

ee Cr

MAJOR MUNICIPALITY

ne

re ek

ree k

a a nn ueh River

Creek

r ive

Sta

q Sus

INDIANA

R

Sh av er C

nch Bra

tle Lit

ta n ia Ju

Cr ee k

State Highway

ek Chest Cre

We st

Floodplain

HUNTINGDON

un ll R

HOLLIDAYSBURG Raystown Lake

nem Co

er Riv

JUNIATA

¼ I

Au gh w ic kC re log Cr ee k

reek

k ee Cr bs Bo

River

ß K

Bla ck

er Riv Jun iata

tl e

gh C Trou Great

Lit

h ug ma ne Co

WESTMORELAND

Fo rk

B ra n ch

uth So

River

JOHNSTOWN

ek

e

ksto wn

Littl

ugh

Fran

h aug

a nem Co

$ j " ! re de C Sha

Quemahoning Resevoir

ek

Cre ek

Du n

BEDFORD

Hill

Sto nycre

nin gC ree k

Creek

ek River

Yellow

© I

SOMERSET es Cre ek

BEDFORD

FRANKLIN

© I

$ a " !

FULTON Bru sh

Lickin g

Cre ek

La ure lH il l C ree k

Co x

$ a " !

Shawnee Lake

Indian Lake

SOMERSET

Creek

FAYETTE

ng eli Sid

50,000 Acres

MCCONNELLSBURG Meadow Grounds Lake

10,000 Acres

West B

NORTH 0

$ ` " !

12,500' 25,000'

k

r

Town C reek

ß K Tonolow ay Cree

ranc hS idelin gH ill C

ree k

Cre ek

Wil ls C

Evit ts

e Riv

ss Ca

an elm

reek

River

Yo ug hio gh en y

25,000 Acres

Pennsylvania Maryland

GARRETT

ALLEGANY

WASHINGTON

Wetlands and Floodplains

A-24

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix A: Background Data LEGEND

State Parks, Forests and Gamelands This map documents the location and extent of existing parks, State Forests, State Gamelands and Federal lands within the region. These lands are spread throughout the region with concentrations along ridges and near bodies of water. Parks, State Forests, State Gamelands and Federal lands comprise nearly 470,000 acres (approximately 16%) of the region.

CLEARFIELD

CENTRE

Southern Alleghenies Boundary County Boundary

SGL278 SGL120 GALLITZIN STATE FOREST ROCK RUN RECRATION AREA

Glendale Lake

St on e

River/Lake

ing

GREENWOOD FURNACE

Federal Land Quasi Public Lands

Cle a

a

er

County and State Park

Riv

DUMAN LAKE PARK

un iata

ck

SGL184

State Forest

Littl eJ

Bla

ck li

SGL267

SGL118

MIFFLIN

SGL322

Juniata River

Bra nc

h

SGL166

VALLEY VIEW PARK

North

ALTOONA EBENSBURG

M ill R un

nem Co aug

m ne Co

Riv

gh au

SGL118

HUNTINGDON

SGL147

SGL112

SGL112

HOLLIDAYSBURG SGL147

SGL198 GALLITZEN STATE FOREST

Raystown Lake

er

SGL118

JUNIATA

h

e Littl

ROTHROCK STATE FOREST

Au gh wic k gC re ek

tow

k ee Cr bs Bo

Fra nks

BLUE KNOB

SGL42

reek hC

River

SGL26

LAUREL RIDGE STATE PARK

TUSCARORA STATE FOREST ROTHROCK STATE FOREST

g Trou

h SGL26

at Gre

g au

SGL42

SGL71

Bla ck lo

Rive

r

ROTHROCK STATE FOREST

TROUGH CREEK

iata

m ne Co

tle Lit

Jun

th

JOHNSTOWN

SGL71

SGL147

Fo rk

nB ranc h

u So

River

K

Cr ee k

E R

State Gameland

MAJOR MUNICIPALITY

SGL112

CANOE CREEK

BLAIR

SGL198

SGL322

HUNTINGDON

BRUSH RUN COUNTY PARK

SGL279

CAMBRIA

WESTMORELAND

Cr e

ek

k ld C ree

SGL108

SGL79

G

e

rfie

ann River

SGL79

ID R A EL P R E U AT LA ST

Major Highway

nd

h que Sus

c ru Sp

k ee Cr

St a

SGL131

Cr ee k

ch

SGL108

Sh av er

n Bra

Creek

WHIPPLE DAM SGL158

SGL108

SGL79

INDIANA

Interstate Highway

ROTHROCK STATE FOREST

SGL278

PRINCE GALLITZIN STATE PARK

ek Chest Cre

We st

SGL278

SGL99

SGL251

SGL73

SGL41

SGL67

SGL41

SGL251

SGL42 GALLITZIN STATE FOREST WARRIORS PATH

de Sha

LAUREL RIDGE STATE PARK

Cree

Quemahoning Resevoir

SGL121

k

EL

GE

Cre ek SGL261

K SGL228

Flight 93 National Memorial

SGL73

C re ek

KOOSER

SGL81

ng

R ID

SGL81

Sid eli

UR

BEDFORD

SGL73

SGL73

Hill

Du nn ing C

ek River Stonycre

LA

AR EP AT ST

Creek

ree k

Yellow FORBES STATE FOREST

Shawnee Lake

BEDFORD

FORBES STATE FOREST

h Bra nc g Cre ek

wn

Lickin

Co xe

Ra ysto

k lC

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST MCCONNELL PARK

Bru sh C ree k

SGL97

reek

NORTH

gH ill C

ek

SGL124 BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

Bra

SGL128 SGL49

SGL124

Town

Creek

SGL231

12,500' 25,000'

Tonolow

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

FORBES STATE FOREST SGL271

We st

SGL82

0

k

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

ay Cree

elin

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

Sid

SGL48

k

Cre

Cre e

10,000 Acres

nch

SGL82

25,000 Acres

Meadow Grounds Lake

SGL49

SGL104

Wil ls

Evit ts

an

FULTON

SGL49

SOMERSET

River

er Riv

s Ca

lm se

SGL65

50,000 Acres

MCCONNELLSBURG SGL53

SGL48

SGL111

Yo ug hio gh en y

FRANKLIN

COWANS GAP

La ure l

Hil

River

ta

SGL50

sC

ree k

Br an ch

Ju nia

ree

LAUREL RIDGE STATE PARK

k

SHAWNEE

Little

SOMERSET

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

Au gh wic

Indian Lake

h

LAUREL HILL

Sout

FAYETTE

Pennsylvania

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

Maryland

GARRETT

ALLEGANY

WASHINGTON

State Parks, Forests and Gamelands

Southern Allegheny Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

A-25

Appendix A: Background Data LEGEND

CLEARFIELD

CENTRE

Southern Alleghenies Boundary County Boundary Major Highway

Glendale Lake

ek

ne

re

St o nd ing Sta

TYPES OF HUBS Habitat - Type Biological Diversity Area (Sensitivity = 1 or 2) Destination - Type Biological Diversity Area (Sensitivity = 3 or 4)

Littl e

Jun

Bla ck lic k

iata

Riv er

Creek

River

North

¨ I

ALTOONA

Ç I

BLAIR

M ill Ru n

EBENSBURG

MIFFLIN

Juniata River

CAMBRIA

Bra nch

River/Lake

MAJOR MUNICIPALITY

Cle a rf

ield C

a a nn ueh

ree k

Susq

ce

Sh av er C

nch Bra

INDIANA

ru Sp

k ee Cr

Cr ee k

State Highway

ek Chest Cre

We st

BDA SENSITIVITY CODES

HUNTINGDON

1 - No Recreational Activity 2 - Nature Observation / No Trails 3 - Passive Recreation (Hiking Trails, X-Country Trails, etc.) 4 - Active Recreation (Motor Biking, ATV, Snowmobile, etc.)

¨ I HOLLIDAYSBURG Raystown Lake nem Co

n Co

h ug

er Riv

JUNIATA

e

River

¼ I

k Cr ee log Cr ee k

k ee Cr bs Bo

Fran

reek

River

WESTMORELAND

Au gh w

iver B ra n ch

gh C Trou Great

h ug ma ne Co

tl e Lit

Jun iata R

Fo rk

ksto wn

uth So

JOHNSTOWN

HUNTINGDON

ick

Littl

a em

ß K

Bla ck

h aug

$ j " ! de Sha

Quemahoning Resevoir

Creek

Cre ek

Du nn in

gC ree

Sto nycre ek River

k

Yellow k Cree

Hill

BEDFORD

© I

$ a " !

ick

Shawnee Lake

FAYETTE

BEDFORD

Little

© I Bra

Sout h

Lickin g

Creek

Ra ysto wn

FULTON

MCCONNELLSBURG

Bru sh

Hill C

NORTH 0

12,500' 25,000'

Tonolow ay Cree k

ranc hS idelin g

25,000 Acres 10,000 Acres

ß K $ ` " !

50,000 Acres

Town C

reek

West B

er Riv

ree k

Evit ts

Wil ls C

Cre ek

reek

River

Cre ek

Meadow Grounds Lake

an lm sse Ca

FRANKLIN

nc h

River

Bra n

ch

Ju nia ta

La u re

lH il l C ree k

Co xe sC ree k

$ a " !

SOMERSET

Au ghw

Indian Lake

SOMERSET

Yo ug hio gh en y

C re ek

Sid e li ng

Biological Diversity Areas A Biological Diversity Area (BDA) contains plants, animals or natural communities recognized as species of special concern by the State or Federal Government and/or high quality examples of natural communities supporting exceptional native diversity. The BDAs Map illustrates the location of these sensitive natural areas within the region. BDAs are mapped according to a sensitivity code. This code describes the amount of human interaction that the BDA can accommodate. The code’s four categories range from supporting no recreational activity to supporting active recreation such as ATVs and snowmobiles. The map depicts two BDA categories, habitats and destinations, which each envelop two BDA sensitivity codes. Habitat-type BDAs account for approximately 4,670 acres (32% of all BDAs) and can support the least human interaction. Destination-type BDAs make up approximately 10,095 acres (68% of all BDAs) and can support the greatest human interaction. This map was produced using sensitivity scores determined by the WPC.

Pennsylvania Maryland

GARRETT

ALLEGANY

WASHINGTON

Biological Diversity Areas

A-26

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix A: Background Data LEGEND

CLEARFIELD

Important Bird Areas-Important Mammal Areas This map illustrates the location of important bird areas (IBAs) and important mammal areas (IMAs) in relation to BDAs of various sensitivity (see biological diversity areas above). IBAs are generally situated near Tuscarora Mountain in Fulton and Huntingdon Counties, Brush Mountain in Blair and Huntingdon Counties and Laurel Hill in Somerset County. IMAs are dispersed throughout the region with large portions in Blair, Somerset and Huntingdon Counties.

CENTRE

Southern Alleghenies Boundary County Boundary Major Highway

Glendale Lake

ek

ne

re

St o nd ing Sta

HABITAT Importatnt Bird Areas

Riv er

Creek

River

Littl e

Jun

Bla ck lic k

iata

Important Mammal Areas

North

¨ I

ALTOONA

Ç I

BLAIR

M ill Ru n

EBENSBURG

MIFFLIN

Juniata River

CAMBRIA

Bra nch

River/Lake

MAJOR MUNICIPALITY

Cle a rf

ield C

a a nn ueh

ree k

Susq

ce

k

Sh av er C

nch Bra

INDIANA

ru Sp

ee Cr

Cr ee k

State Highway

ek Chest Cre

We st

BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY AREAS Habitat - Type Biological Diversity Area (Sensitivity = 1 or 2) Destination - Type Biological Diversity Area (Sensitivity = 3 or 4)

HUNTINGDON

BDA SENSITIVITY CODES 1 - No Recreational Activity 2 - Nature Observation / No Trails 3 - Passive Recreation (Hiking Trails, X-Country Trails, etc.) 4 - Active Recreation (Motor Biking, ATV, Snowmobile, etc.)

¨ I HOLLIDAYSBURG Raystown Lake nem Co

h ug

JUNIATA

e

River Jun iata R k ee Cr bs Bo

Fran

¼ I

k Cr ee

reek

River

WESTMORELAND

log Cr ee k

B ra n ch

gh C Trou Great

h ug ma ne Co

tl e Lit

Au gh w

iver

HUNTINGDON

ksto wn

uth So

JOHNSTOWN

Fo rk

ick

Littl

ma

ß K

Bla ck

h aug

ne Co

er Riv

$ j " ! de Sha Creek

Quemahoning Resevoir

Cre ek

Du nn in

gC ree

Sto nycre ek River

k Cree

k

Yellow

$ a " !

ick

Shawnee Lake

FAYETTE

BEDFORD

Little

© I Bra

MCCONNELLSBURG

Cre ek Bru sh

10,000 Acres NORTH 0

12,500' 25,000'

Tonolow ay Cree k

ranc hS idelin g

Hill C

ß K $ ` " !

25,000 Acres

Town C

reek

West B

Evit ts

er Riv

ree k

Cre ek

reek

River

Wil ls C

50,000 Acres

Sout h

Lickin g

Creek

Ra ysto wn

FULTON

Meadow Grounds Lake

an lm sse Ca

FRANKLIN

nc h

River

Bra n

ch

Ju nia ta

La u re

lH il l C ree k

Co xe sC ree k

$ a " !

SOMERSET

Au ghw

Indian Lake

SOMERSET

Yo ug hio gh en y

C re ek

Sid e li ng

Hill

BEDFORD

© I

Pennsylvania Maryland

GARRETT

ALLEGANY

WASHINGTON

Important Bird Areas-Important Mammal Areas

Southern Allegheny Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

A-27

Appendix A: Background Data Off-road Trails The off-road trails map describes three different types of trails that exist within the region. State and National trails typically connect the region to neighboring regions and beyond. Regional trails generally connect between State and National trails within the region or span multiple counties within the region. Local trails, which comprise the majority of the off-road trail network, usually include loops within parks and other short segments of trails. Consequently, most local trails are concentrated in large State Park-type facilities while regional and State and National trails are likely to be found near existing thoroughfares.

CLEARFIELD

To The Grand Canyon of Pennsylvania/ Ansonia, PA

CENTRE

LEGEND Southern Alleghenies Boundary

SGL278 SGL120

County Boundary GALLITZIN STATE FOREST

C

k

ne

River/Lake

S to g

GREENWOOD FURNACE

in

County and State Parks, State Forests, State Gamelands, and Federal Lands

Sta

Cre

ek

re

ek

State Highway ee

d

arf

er Riv nia ta Ju Lit tle

wm Pa obile th

Sn o

ALTOONA

ill R

un

BLAIR

SGL198

SGL118

HUNTINGDON

SGL147

Local Trails Proposed National/State Trails Proposed Regional Trails

SGL112

Proposed Local Trails

SGL147

Raystown Lake SGL118

St a te

b Bo

ek re kC wic gh

k ee Cr

SGL99

sC

Fra

TUSCARORA STATE FOREST

ROTHROCK STATE FOREST

g

BLUE KNOB

nks

River

tow

gh SGL26

LAUREL RIDGE STATE PARK

re ek gh C Trou

au

nB ran ch

m SGL26

Au

Gre at

ne Co

SGL42

TROUGH CREEK ROTHROCK STATE FOREST

Bla ck lo

uth

Mi d

er

So

Riv

River

iata

h

tle Lit

SGL71 SGL71

Jun

ug

JUNIATA

Tr a

ma

il

er

SGL147

rk

SGL112

HOLLIDAYSBURG

Little

Fo

Regional Trails

SGL112

CANOE CREEK

M ne Co

ne Co

ne Li in il Ma Tra

R iv

gh

SGL322

HUNTINGDON

SGL279

SGL198

u ma

MIFFLIN

SGL322

Lin kT rail

nc h Bra North

State/National Trails SGL118

Juniata River

EBENSBURG

JOHNSTOWN

ROTHROCK STATE FOREST

re

SGL251

ek

Table 16: Mileage of Off-road Trails

Mi

SGL166

CAMBRIA

WESTMORELAND

ek

Cle

Creek

k lic Bla

ck

SGL267

GALLITZEN STATE FOREST

E K

re

TRAILS

SGL79

G ID R AR EL P R E U AT LA ST

C

SGL108

SGL184

SGL79

To Pittsburgh

e

ield

n na Rive r

Ghost Town Trail

To Dilltown

uc

nd

ueha Susq

r Sp

WHIPPLE DAM

il ra Cr

ek

nch

SGL131

T ate St

ve r

Bra

SGL108 SGL108

SGL79

INDIANA

Major Highway

SGL158

Sh a

st

SGL278

PRINCE GALLITZIN STATE PARK

Chest Cre

We

ROTHROCK STATE FOREST

SGL278

Glendale Lake

SGL42

SGL73

SGL41

SGL67

SGL41

SGL251

SGL42

te n

sio

te Mi d

Ex

kT rail

ek

k re e

Shawnee Lake

Indian Lake

BEDFORD nia

ta

k Pi

r R ive

e-

t

B o-

ik

e

a Tr

COWANS GAP

ag

FORBES STATE FOREST

e

Tr SGL82 ai l

Bra n

ls C

ek SGL48

ree

k

h Sout

ail ra T r Tus c

W il

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

SGL124 BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

k

ss

ds

a ro

hC

Pa

SGL49

SGL104

la n

Bru s

SGL97

gh

SGL82 BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

SGL271

SGL128 SGL49

25,000 Acres 10,000 Acres NORTH 0

12,500' 25,000'

ay Cree

ny

Hi

Cre

y

ree

k

gh e

Meadow Grounds Lake

gH ill

lle

FULTON

Tonolow

* Miles of trail completed

tA

elin

er

To Pittsburgh

re a

S id

G

an

nch

elm ss Ca

B ra

he ny

en

SGL49

Wes t

io g

SGL65

gh

ek

gh

Lick in

Tr a St a te Mi d

La u Yo u

R iv

Clearfield Creek Wildlife Corridor, Little Conemaugh Trail and Johnstown - Portage Trail

lle

C re

59.2

SGL48

A SGL111

50,000 Acres

MCCONNELLSBURG

SGL53

Ev it ts

Snow Mobile Path

To Ohiopyle State Park

r Rive

Link Trail

g C re ek

il

wn

ree sC

Ra y sto

Potomac to Raystown Greenway South

lC

57.7

H il

Laurel Hill Greenway

FRANKLIN

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

rel

21.2

ree

LAUREL RIDGE STATE PARK

Laurel Ridge Trail

SGL50

k

Ghost Town Trail Connector

Co xe

8.2

k

Ghost town Trail

Bra

nc

ch

h

Ju

il

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

SHAWNEE

SOMERSET

FORBES STATE FOREST

REGIONAL TRAILS

Tra il

ek C re ing Du nn

C

SOMERSET LAUREL HILL

Lin

Tuscarora Greenway

SGL73

ic k

33.3

SGL261

SGL228

hw

Tuscarora Trail

H

STATE PARK

KOOSER

FAYETTE

To Harrisburg, PA

Au g

Mid State Greenway

SGL81

SGL81

Little

103.0

BEDFORD

C re

Mid State Trail

ds an hl ig

l ai Tr LAUREL RIDGE

SGL73

SGL73

l

56.2

g in ik H

Yellow FORBES STATE FOREST

Hil

Main Line Trail

Mainline Canal Greenway: Pennsylvania Millennium Trail

SGL121

eli ng

Great Allegheny Passage

Quemahoning Resevoir

WARRIORS PATH

Sid

44.0

Allegheny Highlands Trail

K (A

A

R

l) ai Tr

Creek

NATIONAL/STATE TRAILS

el ur La

ge id

reek Riv er

Project/Corridor

Stonyc

Miles of Trail*

ek

Type of Trail

re de C

Trail Name

Sta

Sha

LAUREL RIDGE STATE PARK

n

GALLITZIN STATE FOREST

SGL124

To w n

C reek

SGL231

Pennsylvania To Washington D.C.

GARRETT

Maryland

ALLEGANY

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

To Green Ridge Hiking Trail

WASHINGTON

To Hancock, MD

C & O Towpath

Off-road Trails

A-28

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix A: Background Data On-road Bike Trails This map details where various on-road bicycle routes exist throughout the region. Two major types of bicycle trails run throughout the region: BicyclePA Routes and other routes. BicyclePA Routes G and S service the region and generally follow major transportation thoroughfares. Other routes run along more lightly traveled thoroughfares within the region. These other routes comprise the majority of the on-road bike trail length within the region.

LEGEND

CLEARFIELD

CENTRE

Southern Alleghenies Boundary

SGL278 SGL120

er Riv nia ta

k lic

Ju

Bra North

ALTOONA SGL279

ee k

ek C re

er

ee k on e St

ek

ek

l

eli ng

ek re C hw

ic k k re e

SGL49

Au g h So ut

FULTON

Meadow Grounds Lake

Tuscarora Mountain Challenge Tour

ree

10,000 Acres

0

12,500' 25,000'

k

ch S

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

ran

SGL128 SGL49

Tono low

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

FORBES STATE FOREST SGL271

25,000 Acres

SGL124 BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

st B

SGL82

50,000 Acres

NORTH

ill C BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

FRANKLIN

ay Cree

k

SGL65

gH

re e

id elin

er

To West Virginia

Little

h nc Bra

k

SGL49

ek

ls C

SGL48

SGL82

Li ck in

ard Or ch SGL97 SGL104

Wil

To New Jersey

MCCONNELLSBURG

SGL53

rre l

SGL48

Ba

Rou te G

Magical Mountain Tour

an

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

g C re ek

Br an wn Ra ysto

COWANS GAP

We

Riv

e lm ss Ca

S

ts C re

en y

R iv er

Ev it

gh

iata

s gres of Pro il Path Tra Bike

BEDFORD e ic p ho o C Lo s e n' n g n a le M hal C

R iv er

gh io

Co xe

k re e lC re l

Hil

ids Rap our ing T Rag nture e Adv

La u

of Bik Prog e T ress rail

Yo u

Pat h

SGL111

Ro ute

SGL50

sC

r ee

k

ch

Ju n

SHAWNEE

r

FORBES STATE FOREST

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

Tou

Indian Lake

SOMERSET

Shawnee Lake

Nile Mile Town Historic Tour

hC

FAYETTE

SGL73

Route S

SOMERSET

LAUREL RIDGE STATE PARK

SGL261

H il

KOOSER

LAUREL HILL

SGL81

Sid

Whiskey Rebellion Tour

SGL228

Bru s

R

BEDFORD

SGL81

K

Ap pl e

EL

SGL73

SGL73

Cre

Du nn

in g

ree k Riv Stonyc

UR

AR EP AT ST

SGL251

SGL121

Ye llo w C reek

LA

E IDG

an

SGL67

Covered Bridge Scenic Journey

ek

FORBES STATE FOREST

SGL251

SGL73

WARRIORS PATH

Cre

Quemahoning Resevoir

of Bik Pro e T gre rai ss l

ee k

ROTHROCK STATE FOREST

Time Travelor's Path

de Sha

Pa th

TUSCARORA STATE FOREST

ROTHROCK STATE FOREST

GALLITZIN STATE FOREST LAUREL RIDGE STATE PARK

Cr

k ee Cr

The Fisherman's Tour

SGL99

Co ve AL Loo TC p

Cr SGL41

SGL71

re

ROTHROCK STATE FOREST

(Ho

nks

bs

Fra

Bo

SGL41

JUNIATA

SGL71 TROUGH CREEK

rse Cov an e Lo d B op ug gy

Riv ia ta Jun nB ran ch

River

to w

of Bik Prog e T ress rail

reek gh C Tr ou

h

SGL42

G

ug

WESTMORELAND

Pat h

Gre at

ma BLUE KNOB

g id SGL42 Br u r nd To s a nic r ve c e Ri S

SGL112

Raystown Lake SGL118

ute

ne Co SGL26

es

SGL112

op Cove Lo ALT B

Ro

th

SGL26

LAUREL RIDGE STATE PARK

Other On-Road Bike Route

SGL112

HUNTINGDON

SGL147

er

u So

SGL42

BicyclePA Route

Cr

River e

MIFFLIN

SGL322

ic k

ug h

tl Lit

ON-ROAD BIKE ROUTES

SGL322

hw

ma

rk

MAJOR MUNICIPALITY

p Loo ve Co LT A A

SGL147

Fo

r

gC

er

e Littl

JOHNSTOWN

ou rT

HUNTINGDON

To ur)

Riv

h

ke l un

SGL118

n p) w to oo ks op L an o nd Fr L mo ia D he (T

ne Co

ug

SGL118

SGL147

HOLLIDAYSBURG SGL198

ma

e Sp

Au g

CAMBRIA ne Co

Tr

County and State Parks, State Forests, and State Gamelands

ck lo

M i ll

R

un

BLAIR

SGL198

GALLITZEN STATE FOREST

River/Lake GREENWOOD FURNACE

CANOE CREEK

SGL79

E G ID K R AR EL P R E U AT LA ST

R t. (F

ry au na de er tio ob oop elu . R L ev R Ft au de er SGL166 ob

l) ai

Juniata River

nch

Littl e

Bla

ck

SGL267

EBENSBURG

State Highway

St

ie ld a rf SGL184

SGL79

ek

Sh

ek

Creek

C le

nn a

er ow eT r st l Ca Tou

R iv er

re

SGL108

C re

e ha

SGL79

ru

C

g

Sp

SGL108

ce

WHIPPLE DAM

Bla

qu Su s

Marina Mania Loop

SGL131

Major Highway

G

er

ch

INDIANA

SGL158

ROTHROCK STATE FOREST

av

n Bra

SGL108

e ut Ro

SGL278

PRINCE GALLITZIN STATE PARK

ek Chest Cre

Bituminous Blast Tour

We st

County Boundary

To New York

SGL278

din

GALLITZIN STATE FOREST

Glendale Lake

SGL124

To wn

C reek

SGL231

Pennsylvania To Maryland

GARRETT

Southern Allegheny Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

Maryland

ALLEGANY

May 2007

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

WASHINGTON

On-road Bike Trails

A-29

Appendix A: Background Data Transportation Routes The Transportation System map details existing transportation facilities ranging from local streets to scenic and interState highways and includes active and inactive railroads, airports and heliports and lakes and streams.

CLEARFIELD

CENTRE LEGEND Southern Alleghenies Boundary

Ô K r A

 A

r A

County Boundary

× ? A þ

_ J

_ J

f ?

h A

÷ ? } A

Primary Highways

î ?

_ J

Secondary Highways

³ A

Ä A

Tertiary Highways Other State Road

_ J

Railroad

INDIANA

Inactive Railroad

EBENSBURG

!

¨HUNTINGDON I

l

_J J _

CAMBRIA } A

J _ _ J

_ J

õ A

HUNTINGDON

Ô K

l

WESTMORELAND

÷ ? ¼ I

Í A _ J

$ j " !

§ ?

à A

829

l A

Ù A

Heliport

A j

JUNIATA

Ý A

ü A

Ü A

l

Airport

_ J

l i A

ï A

JOHNSTOWN h ?

l

MAJOR MUNICIPALITY

HOLLIDAYSBURG

f ?

Scenic Highway River/Lake

_ J

BLAIR

l

¨ I

!

Ç I

J _ _ J

!

!

!

MIFFLIN

!

ö A

!

ALTOONA

ô A ß K

k A

È A

¡ A

l A

ï A

ö ?

î ?

Õ A z A

Í A

SOMERSET FAYETTE l

l

© I

l

ò ?

$ a " !

BEDFORD

SOMERSET

_ J

_ J

SEVEN SPRINGS AIRPORT

£ A

© I

$ a " !

FULTON

£ A

Ç A Ù A

!

! ! ! !

!

!

î ?

ß K

× A

NORTH 12,500' 25,000'

¨ A

¢ A

!

ã A

!

!

Pennsylvania

!

Maryland

GARRETT

A-30

25,000 Acres

0

$ ` " ! ï A

!

50,000 Acres

10,000 Acres

Ý A

§ ?

´ A

¬ I

MCCONNELLSBURG

ç ?

£ A

!

BEDFORD

ò ?

Û A

FRANKLIN

ALLEGANY

WASHINGTON

Transportation Routes

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix A: Background Data Water Trails Several delineated water trails exist within the region. Two of these water trails, the Upper Juniata Water Trail and Lower Juniata Water Trail, are situated along the Juniata River. The Upper Juniata Water Trail services Blair and Huntingdon Counties while the Lower Juniata Water Trail primarily services Bedford County.

LEGEND

CLEARFIELD

CENTRE

Southern Alleghenies Boundary

SGL278

County Boundary

SGL120

a

ee k Cr

ek

on e g in St a

arf ield

ann

Cre

ek

h qu e

C le

R iv

er

Cree k

MAJOR MUNICIPALITY

nia ta

k lic

Ju Lit tle

Bla

ck

WATER TRAILS SGL118

MIFFLIN

SGL322

North

Bra

Juniata River

nc h

SGL166

ALTOONA EBENSBURG

M ill R

un

BLAIR

SGL198

ne Co

Riv

h

SGL118

HUNTINGDON

SGL147

SGL112

SGL112

SGL147

SGL198

ug

SGL112

HOLLIDAYSBURG

GALLITZEN STATE FOREST

ma

ma

Raystown Lake

er

SGL118

ug h

JUNIATA

e Littl

Cr ic k hw

k ee Cr g

BLUE KNOB

SGL99

sC

Fra

b Bo

k lo

tow n ks

River

nB

gh SGL26

LAUREL RIDGE STATE PARK

TUSCARORA STATE FOREST

ROTHROCK STATE FOREST

Bla c

au

reek gh C Tr ou

ROTHROCK STATE FOREST

ran ch

m SGL26

Au g

iata

ne

SGL42

SGL71

Great

Co

tle Lit

Jun

th

rk

R iv er

u So Fo

TROUGH CREEK

ee k

River

SGL71

SGL147

JOHNSTOWN

Designated Water Trail

CANOE CREEK

CAMBRIA ne Co

SGL322

HUNTINGDON

SGL279

SGL79

ROTHROCK STATE FOREST

re

WESTMORELAND

County and State Parks, State Forests, State Gamelands and Federal Lands

Juniata River Water Trail

SGL267

SGL79

E G ID K R AR L E P R E U AT L A ST

River/Lake GREENWOOD FURNACE

nd

Su s R iv er

State Highway

St

e

ek

SGL108

SGL184

INDIANA

c ru Sp

re

re

nc h

SGL131

C

rC

Bra

SGL108 SGL108

SGL79

Major Highway

WHIPPLE DAM SGL158

ve

st

ROTHROCK STATE FOREST

SGL278 SGL278

PRINCE GALLITZIN STATE PARK

ek Chest Cre

We

GALLITZIN STATE FOREST

Glendale Lake

Sh a

Susquehanna River Water Trail - West Branch

SGL251

ek

SGL42

SGL73

SGL41

SGL67

SGL41

SGL251

SGL42 GALLITZIN STATE FOREST

Shad

LAUREL RIDGE STATE PARK

SGL121

WARRIORS PATH

re eC

Quemahoning Resevoir

ek

ek

l Hil SGL228

SGL73

k re e C

Shawnee Lake

Au g

hw

SHAWNEE

FORBES STATE FOREST

iata

BEDFORD

Riv er

nc Bra g C re ek

wn

xe Co

Li ck in

rel La u

SGL65

SGL97

k

SGL49

SGL124 BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

12,500' 25,000'

k

ran st B

SGL128 SGL49

Tono low

We

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

FORBES STATE FOREST SGL271

0

ay Cree

er

SGL82

25,000 Acres

NORTH

ill C BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

idelin

k

gH

SGL48

re e

ch S

ls C

ek

Wil SGL82

Cre

an

Ev it ts

Riv

e lm ss Ca

50,000 Acres

10,000 Acres

ree

SGL104

en y

Meadow Grounds Lake

Bru s

Riv er gh

FULTON

hC

SGL49

ree

k

SGL111

gh io

MCCONNELLSBURG

SGL53 SGL48

Yo u

FRANKLIN

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

Ra y sto

k Hil

lC

COWANS GAP

SGL50

sC

r ee

k

Bra n

ch

Ju n

ree

LAUREL RIDGE STATE PARK

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

ic k

Indian Lake

Li ttle

LAUREL HILL

h

SOMERSET

FAYETTE

h

ES

KOOSER

Sout

IDG

SGL81

SGL261

K

eli ng

LR

BEDFORD

SGL81

SGL73

Si d

RE

R PA

Raystown Branch Juniata River Water Trail

SGL73

Cre

Du nn

ing

C re

ek River Sto nycre

U LA

TE TA

C reek

ek

Yellow FORBES STATE FOREST

SGL124

Town

Creek

SGL231

Pennsylvania Maryland

GARRETT

Southern Allegheny Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

ALLEGANY

May 2007

BUCHANAN STATE FOREST

WASHINGTON

Water Trails

A-31

Appendix A: Background Data LEGEND

CLEARFIELD

Sewer Service A utility such as sanitary sewer service is typical within urbanized areas. The presence of sanitary sewer service infrastructure in undeveloped areas lowers the barriers to the construction of improvements within that area. The sanitary sewer service map describes areas with existing service and those where sanitary sewer infrastructure is proposed to be constructed. In general, the portions of the region that contain existing or proposed sanitary sewer service are situated around Johnstown and Altoona.

CENTRE

Southern Alleghenies Boundary County Boundary Interstate Highway

Glendale Lake

i M

ma ug h

Cre ek

River bs Bo ek

ek e Cre Shad

Saxton Coalmont ! ! Dudley !

!

! Hopewell

New Baltimore Ju ! niat

!

© I

River

FULTON C reek

Bra nc h

Valley-Hi !

Everett !

Lickin g

Berlin !

Meadow Grounds Lake

on e

10,000 Acres

Salisbury ! Wellersburg !

ß K $ ` " !

NORTH 0

12,500' 25,000'

Town Creek

Wes tB

Callimont !

25,000 Acres

Tonolow ay Cree k

! Confluence

Addison !

hC

ree k

Hyndman !

ranch Side ling Hill Cre ek

Wil ls C ree k

Meyersdale !

ts C ree k

er Riv

ss Ca

Ursina !

50,000 Acres

!

Garrett !

an elm

Evit

River

gh en y

FRANKLIN

MCCONNELLSBURG

Bru s

Rainsburg !

ek

hw ick

BEDFORD

e Cr

$ a " !

Ra ysto wn

k Co xe sC ree

Hil lC ree k La ure l

a

Casselman !

Yo ug hio

g

Au g

Indian Lake

Manns Choice !

SOMERSET

Rockwood !

in

Little

Shawnee Lake

!

New Centerville !

el

Schellsburg !

Indian Lake

$ a " !

St

Hill

BEDFORD

Bra nc h

Shanksville !

SOMERSET

ek

Coaldale

Sout h

FAYETTE

Saltillo ! Three Springs !

Broad Top City

Cre ek

ree k Du nnin

gC

River

Creek

Stonycre ek

!

Yellow

Sid

!

Au gh w ic kC re

Orbisonia !! Rockhill Furnace

Woodbury !

Shade Gap !

© I Seven Springs !

St an din g

Fran

e Cr

ß K

St. Clairsville !

New Paris !

Central City !

Friedens !

Shirleysburg !

Cassville !

Pleasantville !

Hooversville !

Stoystown !

Martinsburg !

Claysburg !

Bra n ch

Salix-Beauty Line Park !

Roaring Spring !

JUNIATA

Cr ee k

!

HUNTINGDON gh Trou Great

ne Co

tle Lit

Mount Union !

log

uth So

F

Mapleton !

Marklesburg !

!Spring Hill

Benson !

! Boswell

k

Raystown Lake

Newry !

Portage

$ j " !

Quemahoning Resevoir

Jennerstown !

Mill Creek !

ksto wn

River

Jerome !

!

!

R ive r

h aug

Co Wilmore Ehrenfeld ! e Summerhill Littl ! ! South Fork

HUNTINGDON

Williamsburg !

Jun iata

nem Co

¼ I

un ll R

!Cassandra !

Scalp Level Paint ! ! Windber !

Davidsville !

¨ I

BLAIR

Duncansville !

er Riv

gh au nem!

! ork St. Michael-Sidman

MIFFLIN

HOLLIDAYSBURG

Lilly !

WESTMORELAND

Cr ee

R iv er iata eJ un

Sankertown ! Cresson !

Vinco !

!Daisytown ! Dale Lorain ! Geistown ! Elim Ferndale ! ! !Belmont

Proposed Sanitary Sewer Service

Alexandria

Lit tl

Bra nch North

Nanty-Glo !

JOHNSTOWN

!

! Gallitzin ! Tunnelhill !

!

! ! Westmont ! Southmont !

Existing Sanitary Sewer Service

Altoona

Loretto !

Ebensburg

River/Lake

MAJOR MUNICIPALITY

Petersburg !

Juniata River

CAMBRIA

Franklin ! East Conemaugh !

Cr e

ek

ield C

Ashville !

¨ I

Brownstown

C

Bla ck

Creek

Chest Springs !

Ç I

e uc

SANITARY SEWER SERVICE

Colver !

Vintondale !

r Sp

Bellwood !

Cle a rf

Carrolltown ! River

Bla ck lic k

INDIANA

Tipton !

ek re

ree k

na han que Sus

Patton !

Birmingham !

ve r

nch Bra

!

Sh a

Hastings !

Major Highway

Tyrone !

ek Chest Cre

We st

Pennsylvania Maryland

GARRETT

A-32

ALLEGANY

WASHINGTON

Sewer Service

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix A: Background Data Utility Corridors Utility corridors shown on this map include rights-of-way utilized for the transmission of electricity and transportation of natural gas, fuel or oil. Electricity is typically transmitted through above ground power lines while natural gas, fuel and/or oil are typically pumped through underground pipelines. These rights-of-way and infrastructure influence adjacent land’s aesthetic and environmental quality as natural vegetation is removed to clear access to the rights-of-way. They also provide potential corridors for linking greenway elements. In general, these corridors run east/west through the region.

LEGEND

CLEARFIELD

CENTRE

Southern Alleghenies Boundary County Boundary Interstate Highway

Glendale Lake

k ee

ie ld a rf

na

C le

ill

un

!Spring Hill

C reek

Bo ee k

re de C

ek C re

!

Everett !

Berlin !

nc Bra

k ree sh C Bru

k

May 2007

Cr e on

ay Cree k To nolow

We

Pennsylvania Maryland

Southern Allegheny Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

12,500' 25,000'

Creek

Wellersburg !

GARRETT

NORTH 0

Town

Salisbury !

Addison !

ß K $ ` " !

25,000 Acres 10,000 Acres

re e ra n

er

Callimont !

50,000 Acres

! Meadow Grounds Lake

ill C

ek

Hyndman !

Meyersdale !

! Confluence

re

MCCONNELLSBURG

gH

Wil ls C re

e lin

an

ch S id

elm

k

ss

st B

Riv

Ca

Ursina !

ts C ree

ny

FRANKLIN

h Sout

C reek

SOMERSET

h

FULTON

Evit

he

ek

w ic

© I

New Baltimore !

Rainsburg !

re

gh

BEDFORD

Manns Choice !

C

$ a " ! Valley-Hi !

Garrett !

River iog

g

Lick in g

k Cr ee

Co x

es

k il l C r ee lH ure La gh

in

Au

Indian Lake

Casselman !

Yo u

el

Littl e

Shawnee Lake

$ a " ! Rockwood !

kC

Hil

l

BEDFORD

Schellsburg !

Indian Lake

!

New Centerville !

w ic

Cre

Du

Shanksville !

SOMERSET

gh

Coaldale

! Hopewell

nn

ing

ek Riv er

!

Yello w Creek

FAYETTE

Saltillo ! Three Springs !

Broad Top City

k

ek

Stonycre

!

Sid

!

St

Fra

Cr

n kst

bs

S ha

Saxton Coalmont ! ! Dudley !

Shade Gap !

New Paris !

Central City !

Friedens !

k

River

Orbisonia !! Rockhill Furnace

Woodbury !

St. Clairsville !

© I Seven Springs !

ß K

Pleasantville !

Hooversville !

Stoystown !

Shirleysburg !

Cassville !

ee

gh

gh Trou

au

Jun

m

Martinsburg !

Cr

er Riv

ne

Claysburg !

Great

Co

!

ia ta

uth

tl e

JUNIATA

Au

So L it

Salix-Beauty Line Park !

Mount Union !

HUNTINGDON

Roaring Spring !

nc h

River

F

Mapleton !

Marklesburg !

ek

Newry !

Portage

Bra

h

Wilmore C Ehrenfeld e ! !Summerhill Lit tl ! South Fork

Raystown Lake

er

!

log

Riv

h

Benson !

! Boswell

ing

Mill Creek !

! Duncansville !

ow n

au g

Jennerstown !

nd

Williamsburg !

HOLLIDAYSBURG

$ j " !

Quemahoning Resevoir

ek

!

Bla

g au m!

Scalp Level Paint ! ! Windber !

¼ I

C re

er R iv ta nia Ju tl e

M

R

HUNTINGDON

BLAIR

ek

Bra North

n em

Davidsville ! Jerome !

¨ I

!Cassandra

Co

WESTMORELAND

MIFFLIN

Lit

Sankertown ! Cresson !

! o rk St. Michael-Sidman

Pipe Line (natural gas, fuel oil, etc.)

Alexandria

!

Gallitzin ! Tunnelhill !

!

e on

!Daisytown ! Dale Lorain ! Geistown ! Elim Ferndale ! ! !Belmont

!

ck

Creek

lic k Bla

ck

Ebensburg

Nanty-Glo !

JOHNSTOWN !

Electric Transmission Line Petersburg !

Altoona

Loretto !

Lilly !

!

River/Lake

MAJOR MUNICIPALITY

Juniata River

nch

CAMBRIA

! Southmont !

re

C re

h an

Ashville !

Franklin ! East Conemaugh !

C

UTILITY CORRIDORS

Chest Springs !

Vinco !

Westmont

ce

Bellwood !

¨ I

Brownstown

ru

ek

que

Carrolltown ! River

Ç I

Sp

Sta

Sus

Tipton !

Colver !

Vintondale !

Birmingham !

ek

ch

Patton !

er

n Bra

INDIANA

Major Highway ek

av

Hastings ! !

Sh

st

Tyrone !

Ch est Cre

We

ALLEGANY

WASHINGTON

Utility Corridors

A-33

Appendix A: Background Data Water Service A utility such as potable water service is typical within urbanized areas. The presence of potable water service infrastructure in undeveloped areas lowers the barriers to the construction of improvements within that area. The potable water service map describes areas with existing service and those where water service infrastructure is proposed to be constructed. In general, the portions of the region that contain existing or proposed potable water service are situated around Johnstown and Altoona.

LEGEND

CLEARFIELD

CENTRE

Southern Alleghenies Boundary County Boundary Interstate Highway

Glendale Lake

ield C

a an n ueh

Cle a rf ek Cre

!

Creek Lickin g

Ra ysto wn

ree k

Salisbury !

Addison !

Wellersburg !

Cr ee k ne k

NORTH

hC Bru s

12,500' 25,000'

Tonolow ay Cree k

0

Town Creek

West B

Callimont !

25,000 Acres 10,000 Acres

ß K $ ` " !

50,000 Acres

! Meadow Grounds Lake

Hill Cre ek

Cre e

Hyndman !

ranc hS idelin g

! Confluence

k

Wil ls C ree k

Meyersdale !

FRANKLIN

MCCONNELLSBURG

Garrett !

an elm

Evit ts

River er Riv

ss Ca

Bra nc h

FULTON

Bra n

ch

© I

River

Sout h

New Baltimore J u ! niata

Valley-Hi !

Everett !

wic

BEDFORD

Manns Choice !

Au gh

Indian Lake

k ee Cr

$ a " ! Littl e

Shawnee Lake

Rainsburg !

Ursina !

St o

Hill

BEDFORD

Casselman !

Yo ug hio gh en y

hw ic Au g

ksto wn

! Hopewell

Du nn

Stonycre ek

ing

River

sC ree k

Co xe

Hil lC re e k

Coaldale

Berlin !

Rockwood !

Saltillo ! Three Springs !

Broad Top City

Shade Gap ! !

Yellow Creek

Indian Lake

$ a " !

La ure l

re ek

k ee Cr bs Bo

!

SOMERSET

!

Schellsburg !

!

New Centerville !

Saxton Coalmont ! ! Dudley !

Orbisonia !!

g in el Sid

Shanksville !

SOMERSET

Woodbury !

St. Clairsville !

New Paris !

Central City !

Friedens !

FAYETTE

ß K Rockhill Furnace

Pleasantville !

© I Seven Springs !

Shirleysburg !

Cassville !

gh C

River

B ra n ch

Claysburg !

Hooversville !

Stoystown !

Martinsburg !

$ j " !

JUNIATA

log Cr ee k

iver

Salix-Beauty Line Park !

Mount Union !

HUNTINGDON

Roaring Spring ! Trou Great

h ug ma ne Co

!

Jun iata R

uth So

tl e

Mapleton !

kC re ek

!Spring Hill

ek e Cre Shad

! Boswell

nd ing

Raystown Lake

Marklesburg !

Fran

River

Jennerstown !

Mill Creek !

!

Benson !

Quemahoning Resevoir

!

Duncansville !

F

Lit

HUNTINGDON

Williamsburg !

Newry !

Scalp Level Paint ! ! Windber !

¼ I

un ll R

Cre ek

Bra nch North

Ehrenfeld ! e Summerhill Lit tl ! ! South Fork

h aug

Jerome !

¨ I

BLAIR

!Cassandra

nem Co

Davidsville !

ek

ive r iata R

Bla ck lic k

Jun Littl e

i M

er Riv h Portage aug m! ! ne Co Wilmore

! ork St. Michael-Sidman

MIFFLIN

HOLLIDAYSBURG

Lilly !

JOHNSTOWN

Proposed Potable Water Service

Alexandria

!

Gallitzin ! Tunnelhill ! Sankertown ! Cresson !

¨ I

WESTMORELAND

!

Bla ck

Creek

Ebensburg !

!Daisytown ! Dale Lorain ! Geistown ! Elim Ferndale ! ! !Belmont

Existing Potable Water Service

Altoona

Loretto !

Nanty-Glo !

River/Lake

MAJOR MUNICIPALITY

Petersburg !

Juniata River

CAMBRIA

Franklin ! East Conemaugh !

e

POTABLE WATER SERVICE

Ashville !

Vinco !

Brownstown ! ! Westmont ! Southmont !

uc

Bellwood !

Chest Springs !

Ç I

r Sp

ree k

Susq

Carrolltown ! River

Colver !

Vintondale !

Birmingham !

Tipton !

Sta

h

Patton !

re

nc Bra

INDIANA

Major Highway k ee Cr

Sh av er C

Hastings ! !

Tyrone !

ek Chest Cre

We st

Pennsylvania Maryland

GARRETT

ALLEGANY

WASHINGTON

Water Service

A-34

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix A: Background Data Water Source Map Residents of the region acquire potable water from various sources. Three major sources are described on the water source map. Areas with greater population densities such as cities and boroughs typically have a public water system, which either draws from ground or surface sources such as aquifers, reservoirs and rivers. Denser areas make up a small portion of the region. Other less dense areas do not have access to public water systems. Consequently, most areas within the region utilize private wells and springs.

LEGEND

CLEARFIELD

CENTRE

Southern Alleghenies Boundary County Boundary

SNYDER ELDER

SUSQUEHANNA

CHEST

Municipal Boundary

READE

WHITE

WARRIORS MARK

Major Highway

FRANKLIN

TYRONE

HASTINGS

NORTHERN CAMBRIA

JACKSON

PATTON

WEST CARROLL

BARR

CLEARFIELD

LOGAN MORRIS

Ç I

LOGAN

CAMBRIA

¨ HUNTINGDON I

BLAIR

GALLITZIN SANKERTOWNTUNNELHILL

SMITHFIELD

HOLLIDAYSBURG CASSANDRAWASHINGTON

WILMORE SUMMERHILL EDWARDSVILLE MIDDLE TAYLOR SOUTH FORK EAST CONEMAUGH CONEMAUGH CROYLE FRANKLIN

JOHNSTOWN

PENN

NEWRY

MOUNT UNION

FREEDOM ROARING SPRING

SUMMERHILL

HUNTINGDON

LINCOLN

TAYLOR ADAMS

MARTINSBURG

TELL

SCALP LEVEL PAINT

CONEMAUGH

¼ I

JENNER

HOPEWELL

WOODBURY

LINCOLN

PAINT

$ j " !

PLEASANTVILLE

HOOVERSVILLE

CENTRAL CITY

WOOD

SPRINGFIELD HOPEWELL

DUBLIN

BROADTOP

BEDFORD

NAPIER

WELLS TAYLOR DUBLIN

JEFFERSON

FAYETTE

SCHELLSBURG

INDIAN LAKE

SOMERSET

SEVEN SPRINGS

$ a " !

MIDDLECREEK

NEW CENTERVILLE

$ a " !

SNAKE SPRING EVERETT

EAST PROVIDENCE

© I

NEW BALTIMORE

LICKING CREEK TODD

WEST PROVIDENCE

FULTON

ALLEGHENY

25,000 Acres

BROTHERS VALLEY

BRUSH CREEK

RAINSBURG MONROE

AYR

BELFAST

NORTHAMPTON

ß K

FAIRHOPE

SUMMIT

12,500' 25,000'

CUMBERLAND VALLEY

CALLIMONT

SOUTHAMPTON

ELK LICK

BETHEL

LARIMER SOUTHAMPTON SALISBURY

MANN

UNION

THOMPSON

GREENVILLE WELLERSBURG

Pennsylvania Maryland

GARRETT

Southern Allegheny Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

NORTH 0

$ ` " !

HYNDMAN

MEYERSDALE

ADDISON

10,000 Acres

LONDONDERRY

GARRETT

ADDISON

50,000 Acres

COLERAIN

CASSELMAN

URSINA CONFLUENCE

FRANKLIN

MCCONNELLSBURG

BERLIN

BLACK

VALLEY HI

MANNS CHOICE

HARRISON

SOMERSET

ROCKWOOD

LOWER TURKEYFOOT

BEDFORD

JUNIATA STONYCREEK

MILFORD

BEDFORD

SHANKSVILLE

SOMERSET

UPPER TURKEYFOOT

SHADE GAP

CLAY

HOPEWELL

NEW PARIS

© I

THREE SPRINGS

COALDALE

EAST ST CLAIR

QUEMAHONING

CROMWELL

SALTILLO

ST CLAIRSVILLE

SHADE

STOYSTOWN

CARBON

SOUTH WOODBURY

WEST ST CLAIR

BOSWELL

ORBISONIA ROCKHILL

SAXTON COALMONT DUDLEY BROAD LIBERTY TOP CITY

KING

OGLE

JENNERSTOWN

LINCOLN

ß K

TODD

KIMMEL

WINDBER

BENSON

SHIRLEYSBURG

CASSVILLE

NORTH WOODBURY

PAVIA BLOOMFIELD

WESTMORELAND

SHIRLEY

CASS

GREENFIELD

LORAIN

JUNIATA

UNION

HUSTON

DAISYTOWN SOUTHMONT DALE GEISTOWN STONYCREEK RICHLAND FERNDALE

MAPLETON

MARKLESBURG

PORTAGE

WESTMONT UPPER YODER

MILL CREEK

JUNIATA

BLAIR JUNIATA

EAST TAYLOR

WOODBURY

DUNCANSVILLE

Private Ground Related

BRADY

FRANKSTOWN

LILLY

Public Ground Related

HENDERSON

WALKER

WILLIAMSBURG

ALLEGHENY

CRESSON

¨ I

CATHARINE

ALTOONA

LORETTO

MUNSTER

WEST TAYLOR

MIFFLIN

PORTER GALLITZIN

NANTY GLO

JACKSON

PETERSBURG ALEXANDRIA

ALLEGHENY

EBENSBURG

VINTONDALE

Public Surface Related

MILLER

ONEIDA

CAMBRIA

LOWER YODER

PRIMARY WATER SUPPLY SOURCES

TYRONE

CHEST SPRINGS ASHVILLE

BLACKLICK

MAJOR MUNICIPALITY

BELLWOOD

DEAN EAST CARROLL

INDIANA

River WEST

SPRUCE CREEK

CARROLLTOWN

State Highway

BARREE

BIRMINGHAM ANTIS

May 2007

ALLEGANY

WASHINGTON

Water Source Map

A-35

Appendix A: Background Data Historic Sites The region’s rich history is expressed through significant sites and features throughout the region. The Historical Sites and Landmarks map exhibits sites and landmarks on the National Register of Historic Places as well as significant historic districts. These features are scattered throughout the region and are situated within both urban and rural areas.

LEGEND

CLEARFIELD

CENTRE

County Boundary SNYDER

a rf

er R iv J un

un

DUNCANSVILLE

m gh bs ee

in el Sid

BETHEL SOUTHAMPTON

SALISBURY

g h

ADDISON

g h

Creek

LARIMER

UNION

g h

k

ee Cr e on St g in

ee Cr

C k w ic gh Au Littl e

h

h

THOMPSON

Pennsylvania Maryland

GARRETT

12,500' 25,000'

g h

GREENVILLE WELLERSBURG

MANN

NORTH 0

$ ` " !

st B

SOUTHAMPTON

ELK LICK

re

ek C re

ek

CUMBERLAND VALLEY

10,000 Acres

ay Cr ee k

MEYERSDALE

25,000 Acres

Tonolow

g h

HYNDMAN CALLIMONT

ADDISON

ree

k k

ß K

gH ill C

ree

hS idelin

ls C

AYR

BELFAST

sh

MONROE

ranc

er

g h

50,000 Acres

MCCONNELLSBURG g h Meadow Grounds Lake

ek

NORTHAMPTON SUMMIT

URSINA CONFLUENCE

FRANKLIN

BRUSH CREEK

LONDONDERRY

FAIRHOPE Wil

TODD

C reek Lickin g

wn Ra

COLERAIN

We

elm

FULTON

gh h g

nc

Bra

WEST PROVIDENCE

ALLEGHENY

g h

an

LICKING CREEK

Town

ss

VALLEY HI

© I

g h

Riv er

EAST PROVIDENCE

EVERETT

Bra

MANNS CHOICE

g h

ts C re

Riv

Ca

DUBLIN

Sout

h

g h h BEDFORD g h g

g h

River

g h

ny

TAYLOR

$ a " !

RAINSBURG

GARRETT

nd

l Hil

g

WELLS

Bru

CASSELMAN

DUBLIN

g h

SNAKE SPRING

BEDFORD

Ev it

he

BROADTOP ek

ing

nn

Du

HOPEWELL

BROTHERS VALLEY

BLACK

GAP

CLAY

WOOD

y sto

Co x

g h

h g g h SHADE

SPRINGS

Cre

ek

C re

ek Riv er

Stonycre

nc

g h

NEW Ju nia BALTIMORE ta

g h

g h

g h

k ee Cr es

k

ee Cr il l lH ure

BERLIN

ROCKWOOD

La

Creek

iog

g h

HARRISON

SOMERSET

k

k

$ a " ! NEW CENTERVILLE

g THREE h

SPRINGFIELD

BEDFORD Shawnee Lake

JUNIATA

CROMWELL

SALTILLO

BROAD TOP CITY

HOPEWELL

SCHELLSBURG

STONYCREEK

MILFORD

g h

COALDALE

Ye llow

EAST ST CLAIR

Indian Lake

SHANKSVILLE

MIDDLECREEK

gh

SAXTON COALMONT DUDLEY

g h

ST CLAIRSVILLE

NAPIER

g h

g h

g h

Yo u

g h

SOUTH WOODBURY

NEW PARIS

INDIAN LAKE

g h SOMERSET g h

LOWER TURKEYFOOT

ek

Cr

SEVEN SPRINGS

UPPER TURKEYFOOT

LIBERTY

g h

ORBISONIA ROCKHILL

CARBON

g h SOMERSET

h g g h

F ra

Bo

FAYETTE

g h

g h

CENTRAL CITY

© I JEFFERSON

TELL

g h ß K

g h

g h

SHADE

h g g h

C re ek

River

WEST ST CLAIR

HOOVERSVILLE

STOYSTOWN

g h

SHIRLEYSBURG

CASSVILLE

TODD

KING

QUEMAHONING LINCOLN

HOPEWELL

BLOOMFIELD

WOODBURY

PLEASANTVILLE

BOSWELL

g h

g h

$ j " !

OGLE

reek de C

g h

PAINT Sha

JENNERSTOWN

NORTH WOODBURY

SHIRLEY

CASS

gh Trou

au

BENSON

g h

MARTINSBURG

KIMMEL LINCOLN

WINDBER

Quemahoning Resevoir

HUNTINGDON

LINCOLN

TAYLOR

JUNIATA

g h

log

ne

¼ I

JENNER

ROARING SPRING

Great

Co

ta R iv

uth

PAVIA

SCALP LEVEL PAINT

CONEMAUGH

MOUNT UNION

er

So

WESTMORELAND

ch J unia

River

GREENFIELD

ran

h

ADAMS

g h

MAPLETON UNION

nB

aug

tl e

tow

n em

Lit

g h

PENN

HUSTON

FREEDOM

hh g g

g gh h g h hDAISYTOWN g

g h

NEWRY

MARKLESBURG

g h

SOUTHMONT DALE LORAIN GEISTOWN STONYCREEK RICHLAND FERNDALE

Raystown Lake

n ks

Co

UPPER YODER

JUNIATA

MILL CREEK

JUNIATA

g h

BLAIR

g h

u EAST ma ne Co WILMORE TAYLOR EDWARDSVILLE MIDDLE e PORTAGE SUMMERHILL Lit tl TAYLOR SOUTH EAST CONEMAUGH FORK CONEMAUGH CROYLE FRANKLIN Fo SUMMERHILL rk

JOHNSTOWN

WOODBURY

h g

BRADY

gh h g

k

R i ll

HOLLIDAYSBURG

g h

gh

g h

SMITHFIELD

FRANKSTOWN

LILLY

WEST TAYLOR

HUNTINGDON

WALKER

WILLIAMSBURG

ALLEGHENY

CASSANDRAWASHINGTON er Riv

BLAIR

re

JACKSON

M

g h CRESSON

¨ I

h g g h

ck

GALLITZIN SANKERTOWNTUNNELHILL

Historic District

kC

g h

( !

Nationally Registered Historic Sites Nationally Registered Historic Landmark

HENDERSON

Bla

g h

EBENSBURG g h g h

¨ I

g h

MIFFLIN

ONEIDA

g h

g h

PORTER CATHARINE

g h

w ic

Ç I

MUNSTER

WESTMONT

g h

tl e

LORETTO

g h

MILLER

ALEXANDRIA

Lit

CAMBRIA

LOGAN

LOGAN PETERSBURG

gh

Cle

iata

Creek lic k ck Bla

nch Bra North

GALLITZIN

HISTORIC SITES AND LANDMARKS

g h MORRIS

g hh g ALTOONA g h

ALLEGHENY

NANTY GLO

LOWER YODER

g h

Juniata River

CAMBRIA

River MAJOR MUNICIPALITY

g h

TYRONE

g h

Major Highway

g h

Sta

ek

a

BELLWOOD

DEAN

CHEST SPRINGS ASHVILLE

BLACKLICK

WEST

SPRUCE CREEK

ield

an n

EAST CARROLL

C

BARREE

g h

Sp

ANTIS

C re

ueh

River

ce

JACKSON

ek

Au

Susq

CLEARFIELD

ru

re

er

ek

nc h

h g g h

BIRMINGHAM

CARROLLTOWN

INDIANA

g h

g h

av

Bra

BARR

Interstate Highway

FRANKLIN

g h

PATTON

WEST CARROLL

Municipal Boundary

g h

WARRIORS MARK TYRONE

Chest Cre

HASTINGS

NORTHERN CAMBRIA

READE

WHITE

Cr ee

CHEST

st

g h

Sh

Glendale Lake

ELDER

SUSQUEHANNA

We

VINTONDALE

A-36

Southern Alleghenies Boundary

ALLEGANY

WASHINGTON

Historic Sites

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix A: Background Data Land Coverage The land coverage map indicates how a portion of the region’s land is currently being used. The map includes eight unique land cover types: agriculture; residential; commercial; public; undeveloped; industrial; forested land; and park. The land coverage map incorporates the unique mapping from each individual county. The counties utilized various data sources (e.g. satellite imagery, property assessment records, field inventories, etc.) to create unique land coverage categories and criteria. The land coverage map assimilates these unique categories based on fundamentally similar characteristics. Consequently, notable variations between dominant land coverage categories exist between the six counties within the region. The region’s four largest land coverage categories are: agriculture; forest land; park; and undeveloped.

Land Coverage

Southern Allegheny Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

A-37

Appendix A: Background Data LEGEND

CLEARFIELD

Municipal Ordinance Status This map describes the various land userelated codes that municipalities within the region currently administer. The categories depicted are county subdivision ordinances, municipal subdivision ordinances and municipal zoning ordinances as well as an Interchange Zoning Ordinance at the intersection of PA 219 and the Pennsylvania Turnpike. Currently, only Somerset County has a county-level subdivision ordinance. Several municipalities in Cambria, Blair, Huntingdon and Bedford counties do not administer land use codes.

CENTRE

Southern Alleghenies Boundary County Boundary

SNYDER

ive r ta R eJ

M ill

e li ng

WELLS

ek

TAYLOR

Sid

DUBLIN

La ure l

Bra n

FULTON

C reek

ALLEGHENY COLERAIN

Meadow Grounds Lake

ß K

Wes t Town C reek

SALISBURY

GREENVILLE WELLERSBURG

MANN

UNION

10,000 Acres NORTH 12,500' 25,000'

k

$ ` " ! BETHEL

SOUTHAMPTON

25,000 Acres

0

SOUTHAMPTON

ELK LICK LARIMER

ADDISON

Cre ek

reek

CUMBERLAND VALLEY

CALLIMONT

50,000 Acres

Tonolow ay Cree

ree k

HYNDMAN

MEYERSDALE

ADDISON

ills C

nch Side ling Hill C

URSINA CONFLUENCE

k

FAIRHOPE W

Cre e

NORTHAMPTON SUMMIT

AYR

BELFAST

Bru sh

MONROE LONDONDERRY

GARRETT

FRANKLIN

MCCONNELLSBURG

BRUSH CREEK RAINSBURG

an lm

ek

TODD

BROTHERS VALLEY

BLACK

Cr e ick hw Au g

WEST PROVIDENCE HARRISON

Bra

er Riv

sse Ca

LICKING CREEK

© I

River

CASSELMAN River

LOWER TURKEYFOOT

VALLEY HI

MANNS CHOICE

BERLIN

ROCKWOOD

UPPER TURKEYFOOT

Yo ug hio gh en y

SOMERSET

Ra ysto wn

Co xe sC re e k

Hil lC ree k

MILFORD

ch

$ a " !

MIDDLECREEK

Ju nia

NEWta BALTIMORE

EAST PROVIDENCE

EVERETT

Little

STONYCREEK

NEW CENTERVILLE

BEDFORD

JUNIATA

Bra nc h

Indian Lake

Sout h

SHANKSVILLE

SOMERSET

$ a " !

SNAKE SPRING

Lickin g

SEVEN SPRINGS

BEDFORD

Shawnee Lake

Evit ts

FAYETTE

Cr e

Hil l

BEDFORD

SCHELLSBURG

INDIAN LAKE

St on e

DUBLIN

BROADTOP

JEFFERSON SOMERSET

g

SPRINGFIELD HOPEWELL

HOPEWELL

NAPIER

SHADE GAP

CLAY

Cre ek

Du nn ing Cre ek

ST CLAIRSVILLE

EAST ST CLAIR

NEW PARIS

© I

THREE SPRINGS

COALDALE

Yellow

CROMWELL

SALTILLO

BROAD TOP CITY WOOD

SOUTH WOODBURY

Creek

CENTRAL CITY

nd in

ß K ORBISONIA ROCKHILL

CARBON SAXTON COALMONT DUDLEY

log Cr ee k

k ee Cr bs Bo

ek River

reek

River

reek de C Sha

PLEASANTVILLE

SHADE

Sto nycre

TELL SHIRLEYSBURG

CASSVILLE

TODD

LIBERTY

JUNIATA

ick Cr ee k

iver h ug ma ne Co

SHIRLEY

CASS

HOPEWELL

BLOOMFIELD

KING

WEST ST CLAIR

STOYSTOWN

NORTH WOODBURY

$ j " !

OGLE

HOOVERSVILLE

QUEMAHONING

MARTINSBURG

TAYLOR

WOODBURY

LINCOLN

PAINT

JENNERSTOWN

HUNTINGDON

LINCOLN

KIMMEL

WINDBER

BENSON

BOSWELL

PAVIA

SCALP LEVEL PAINT

Quemahoning Resevoir

LINCOLN

ADAMS

GREENFIELD

ROARING SPRING

gh C Trou Great

SUMMERHILL

LORAIN

¼ I

MOUNT UNION

HUSTON

tle Lit

GEISTOWN STONYCREEK RICHLAND FERNDALE

MAPLETON UNION

FREEDOM

Jun iata R

uth So

Fo rk

DAISYTOWN SOUTHMONT DALE

PENN MARKLESBURG

PORTAGE

Bra n ch

River

JOHNSTOWN WESTMONT

MILL CREEK

JUNIATA

NEWRY

tow n

ugh

EDWARDSVILLE MIDDLE e SUMMERHILL Littl TAYLOR SOUTH EAST CONEMAUGH FORK CONEMAUGH CROYLE FRANKLIN

JUNIATA

BRADY

Raystown Lake

BLAIR

er Riv

Fran ks

a nem Co

gh au nemWILMORE Co

EAST TAYLOR

WOODBURY

Municipal Zoning Ordinance

Au gh w

CASSANDRA WASHINGTON

JENNER

SMITHFIELD

DUNCANSVILLE

County Subdivision Ordinance Municipal Subdivision Ordinance

No Municipal Land Use Regulations Exist

WALKER

WILLIAMSBURG

HOLLIDAYSBURG LILLY

CONEMAUGH

ek

Littl

JACKSON

HENDERSON

HUNTINGDON

FRANKSTOWN

ALLEGHENY

CRESSON

¨ I

¨ I

BLAIR

Ru n

GALLITZIN SANKERTOWNTUNNELHILL

MIFFLIN

ONEIDA CATHARINE

ALTOONA

EBENSBURG MUNSTER

WESTMORELAND

MILLER

PETERSBURG ALEXANDRIA

Bla ck

Bla ck lic k

h Bra nc North

Ç I

NANTY GLO

UPPER YODER

LOGAN MORRIS

PORTER LOGAN

LORETTO

CAMBRIA

VINTONDALE

LOWER YODER

LAND USE REGULATIONS

TYRONE

ALLEGHENY GALLITZIN

River

MAJOR MUNICIPALITY

Juniata River

CAMBRIA

Major Highway

BELLWOOD

DEAN

CHEST SPRINGS ASHVILLE

BLACKLICK

WEST TAYLOR

WEST

SPRUCE CREEK

un ia

Creek

EAST CARROLL

ce

Interstate Highway

BARREE

k ee Cr

Sta

ree k

nna eha

River

ru Sp

ANTIS

rfie ld C

qu Sus

CLEARFIELD

CARROLLTOWN

INDIANA

FRANKLIN

BIRMINGHAM

PATTON

WEST CARROLL

JACKSON

WARRIORS MARK TYRONE

Cle a

nch Bra

BARR

Municipal Boundary

READE

WHITE

re

HASTINGS

NORTHERN CAMBRIA

CHEST

ek Chest Cre

We st

Sh av er C

Glendale Lake

ELDER

SUSQUEHANNA

THOMPSON

Pennsylvania Maryland

GARRETT

ALLEGANY

WASHINGTON

Municipal Ordinance Status

A-38

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix A: Background Data Population Density Population density is a measure of persons per geographic area, usually acres or square miles, that highlights the situation of large amounts of population. The population density map describes the population concentrations within the region and expresses them as a measurement of persons per acre. The region’s greatest population concentrations are located in and around Johnstown and Altoona.

CLEARFIELD

CENTRE

LEGEND Southern Alleghenies Boundary County Boundary

Tyrone !

Hastings ! Northern Cambria ! Patton !

Interstate Highway Birmingham !

Tipton !

Major Highway Urbanized Area

Carrolltown !

Bellwood ! Chest Springs !

INDIANA

Alexandria !

Colver !

Ç EBENSBURG I

ALTOONA !

Loretto !

Ehrenfeld South Fork ! !

JOHNSTOWN

Duncansville !

WESTMORELAND Jerome !

6.01 - 9.80

Mill Creek !

!

Newry !

Wilmore Portage ! ! Spring Hill !

Mapleton !

Marklesburg !

! Summerhill

Claysburg !

Cassville !

!

Shirleysburg

ß K

$ j " !

Benson !

Orbisonia !! Rockhill Furnace

Woodbury !

Saxton Coalmont ! Dudley ! !

Saltillo ! Three Springs !

Broad Top City !

Pleasantville ! JennerstownBoswell ! !

JUNIATA

Martinsburg !

Salix-Beauty Line Park !

Scalp Level Paint ! ! ! Windber

¼ I

Mount Union !

Roaring Spring !

St. Michael-Sidman ! Beaverdale-Lloydell !

Daisytown ! !Dale Lorain ! !Geistown Belmont Ferndale ! !

3.01 - 6.00

Williamsburg !

East Conemaugh ! Franklin !

Brownstown ! ! Westmont ! Southmont ! Elim !

1.01 - 3.00

HOLLIDAYSBURG

Lilly ! Cassandra !

0.34 - 1.00

!

¨ I Vinco !

0.00 - 0.33

MIFFLIN

¨ HUNTINGDON I

Gallitzin ! Tunnelhill Sankertown ! ! Cresson !

! Nanty-Glo !

POPULATION DENSITY (per acre)

Petersburg !

Ashville !

Vintondale !

Davidsville !

MAJOR MUNICIPALITY

Shade Gap !

Coaldale !

St. Clairsville !

Hooversville !

Hopewell ! Central City !

Stoystown !

New Paris !

© I Friedens !

FAYETTE

Seven Springs !

Indian Lake !

Schellsburg !

BEDFORD

Shanksville !

SOMERSET

!

!

Manns Choice !

© I

New Baltimore !

$ a " !

FRANKLIN

New Centerville !

MCCONNELLSBURG

Berlin !

Rockwood !

$ a " !

Valley-Hi !

Everett !

50,000 Acres

!

25,000 Acres Rainsburg !

Casselman !

10,000 Acres

Garrett !

ß K Ursina Confluence! !

Hyndman !

Meyersdale !

NORTH 0

$ ` " !

12,500' 25,000'

Callimont !

Salisbury !

Addison !

Wellersburg !

Pennsylvania Maryland

GARRETT

Southern Allegheny Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

ALLEGANY

WASHINGTON

Population Density

A-39

Appendix A: Background Data

A-40

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix B: GIS Data Dictionary Appendix B: GIS Data Dictionary

SAG GIS covers the counties of Bedford, Blair, Cambria, Fulton, Huntingdon and Somerset. SAG GIS was developed using ArcView GIS software. SAG GIS uses the PA Stateplane South projection, NAD 1983, and the units are in feet. GIS Coverage

Coverage Type

GIS Coverage

Coverage Description

SAG_100K_USGS_Maps SAG_2001_Urban Areas

-(Polygon) -(Polygon)

1:100,000 USGS Map Boundaries 2001 Urban Areas

SAG_airpt_r1

-(Point)

Location of Licensed Airports

SAG_cbndyr1 SAG_cntypks SAG_glandr1 SAG_helipt SAG_inthgwys SAG_lakesr1 SAG_locrds SAG_mjrhgwysr1 Traffic Network

-(Polygon) -(Polygon) -(Polygon) -(Point) -(Line) -(Polygon) -(Line) -(Line)

County Boundaries County Park Boundaries State Gameland Boundaries Location of Licensed Heliports Interstate Highways (derived from SAG_stroads) Lakes and Ponds Local Roads Major Highways (derived from SAG_stroads)

primary_highwaysr2 -(Line) secondary_highwaysr1 -(Line) tertiary_highways -(Line) SAG_mcd -(Point) SAG_natparks -(Polygon) SAG_netstreams -(Line) -(Point) SAG_places -(Polygon) SAG_quads Railroads SAG_inactralrdr1 -(Line) SAG_actralrdr1 -(Line) SAG_riverr2 -(Line) SAG_stforestsr2 -(Polygon) -(Line) SAG_sbndy -(Polygon) SAG_stparksr1 SAG_stroads -(Line)

High Traffic Highways Medium-High Traffic Highways Medium Traffic Highways Municipal Boundaries National Park Boundaries Networked Streams US Populated Place Points 1:24,000 USGS Quad Map Boundaries Inactive Rail Lines Active Rail Lines Rivers State Forest Boundaries Pennsylvania State Line State Park Boundaries State Maintained Roads

SAG_streams

-(Line)

Chapter 93 Streams

SAG_sabndyr1

-(Polygon)

Southern Alleghenies Study Area Boundary

mask_clip -(Polygon) SAG_Surrounding_cbndy_line -(Line)

Coverage Description

FLT93_point -(Line)

Approximate Location of the Flight 93 Crash Site Memorial

FLT_93_memr1 -(Polygon)

Approximate Boundary of the Flight 93 Crash Site Memorial

Forest

-(Grid Coverage) Forest Density

For_density

-(Grid Coverage) Forest Type

Historic Districts BL_hist_zones-pt -(Polygon)

Blair County Historic Districts

HU_histdistr1-pt -(Polygon)

Huntingdon Historic Districts

Hydric Soils BE_hydric_soilsr1 -(Polygon)

Bedford County Hydric Soils (derived from BE_soils)

BL_hydric_soilsr1 -(Polygon)

Blair County Hydric Soils (derived from BL_soils)

CA_hydric_soilsr1 -(Polygon)

Cambria County Prime Hydric Soils (derived from CA_soils)

FU_hydric_soilsr1 -(Polygon)

Fulton County Hydric Soils (derived from FU_soils)

HU_hydric_soilsr1 -(Polygon)

Huntingdon County Hydric Soils (derived from HU_soils)

SO_hydric_soilsr1 -(Polygon)

Somerset County Hydric Soils (derived from SO_soils)

Impaired Waters sag_303d_a -(Polygon)

River and Stream Segments Listed under Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act.

sag_303d_line -(Polygon)

Lakes and Estuaries Listed under Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act.

sag_303d_p -(Polygon)

Point Events Listed under Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act.

Land Use BE_LU -(Polygon)

Bedford Land Use (derived from Bedford County Land Use Data)

Blair Altoona_LU -(Polygon) BL_LU -(Polygon) BL_LU_Parks -(Polygon)

Adjacent Counties SAG_Surrounding_cbndy -(Polygon)

Coverage Type

Flight 93 Memorial

Adjacent County Mask

Altoona Land Use (derived from Blair County Tax Parcel Data) Blair County Land Use (derived from Blair County Tax Parcel Data) Forested Land in Public Land Use (derived from palulc2000)

Cambria

Adjacent Counties

CA_LUr1 -(Polygon) CA_Forest -(Polygon)

Adjacent Counties - lines

SAG_104_wshed

-(Polygon)

SAG_abandoned_mines

-(Point)

Abandoned Mine Land - Coal Mine Related Problems

SAG_amd_fisheries

-(Line)

Fisheries Impacted by Acid Mine Drainage

SAG_basins

-(Polygon)

Water Basins (derived from SAG_104_wshed)

Existing Land Use digitized from Comprehensive Plan Forested Land in Undeveloped Landuse (derived from palulc2000)

104 Major Watersheds defined on The State Water Plan

Bedrock Geology

CA_LU_parks -(Polygon) CA_PALUC_clip -(Polygon)

Forested Land in Public Land Use (derived from palulc2000) Land Use Gaps filled in with PALUC2000 Land Use

FU_LU -(Polygon)

Existing Land Use digitized from Comprehensive Plan

HU_LU -(Polygon)

Huntingdon County Land Use (derived from Huntingdon County Tax Parcel Data)

Huntingdon

SAG_pagarc_r1 -(Line) SAG_pagpoly_r1 -(Polygon)

Contacts, Dikes, and Fault Lines Bedrock Geology of Pennsylvania

Census

HU_Forest -(Polygon)

SAG_blkgrp_r2 -(Polygon) SAG_tracts_r2 -(Polygon)

Forested Land in Undeveloped Landuse (derived from palulc2000)

2000 US Census Block Groups 2000 US Census Tracts

HU_LU_add1 -(Polygon)

Land Use Gaps filled in with PALUC2000 Land Use

SAG_dams

-(Point)

Location of Dams.

HU_LU_parks -(Polygon)

Forested Land in Public Land Use (derived from palulc2000)

SAG_floodr2

-(Polygon)

River and Coastal Floodplains

Somerset SO_LU -(Polygon)

Somerset County Land Use (derived from Somerset County Tax Parcel Data)

SO_Forestr1 -(Polygon) SO_LU_parks -(Polygon) SAG_landuse_regulationsr2

Southern Allegheny Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

-(Polygon)

Forested Land in Undeveloped Landuse (derived from palulc2000) Forested Land in Public Land Use (derived from palulc2000) Municipalities with Zoning and/or Subdivision Ordinances

B-1

Appendix B: GIS Data Dictionary GIS Coverage

Coverage Type

Coverage Description

Historic Districts

GIS Coverage

Bedford County National Registry Of Historic Places

BL_NRHP -(Point)

Blair County National Registry Of Historic Places

palulc2000_sp83

SAG_water_servicer1 -(Polygon)

Cambria County National Registry Of Historic Places Fulton County National Registry Of Historic Places

SAGwetlands_poly_r2

-(Polygon)

National Wetland Inventory Wetland Boundaries

Huntingdon County National Registry Of Historic Places

SAG_wmu

-(Polygon)

Pennsylvania Game Commission Wildlife Management Units

Somerset County National Registry Of Historic Places

SAG_Woodlands

-(Polygon)

Forested Land (derived from palulc2000_sp83

-(Polygon)

WATER_SERVICE -(Polygon)

Bedford County Prime Agricultural Soils (derived from BE_soils)

BL_prime_ag_soilsr2 -(Polygon)

Blair County Prime Agricultural Soils (derived from BL_soils)

CA_prime_ag_soilsr2 -(Polygon)

Cambria County Prime Agricultural Soils (derived from CA_soils)

FU_prime_ag_soilsr2 -(Polygon)

Fulton County Prime Agricultural Soils (derived from FU_soils)

HU_prime_ag_soilsr2 -(Polygon)

Huntingdon County Prime Agricultural Soils (derived from

Topography 20' Contours BE_20_topo_r1 -(Line)

HU_soils) SO_prime_ag_soilsr2 -(Polygon)

Somerset County Prime Agricultural Soils (derived from SO_soils)

raystown_rec_area

-(Polygon)

Raystown Recreation Area Boundary

reservoir_wshed-all

-(Polygon)

Watersheds Containing or Feeding a Surface Water Supply Surface Water Supply Reservoir (derived from SAG_lakesr1)

Ridge Line ridgeliner3 -(Line) ridgeline1500r3 -(Polygon)

Ridge Lines 1500' Buffer of ridgeliner3

SAG_Rock_Run_Rec_Area

-(Line)

Rock Run Recreation Area Boundary

SAG_scenhgwys

-(Line)

State Designated Scenic Highways

dcnr_apptrail_2003

-(Line)

Appalachin National Scenic Trail Centerline

SA_SEWER_83 -(Polygon) SEWER_SERVICE -(Polygon)

HU_100_topo_r1 -(Line)

Huntingdon County 100' Contours

SO_100_topo_r1 -(Line)

Somerset County 100' Contours

BE_200_topo -(Line)

Bedford County 200' Contours

BL_200_topo -(Line)

Blair County 200' Contours

Landform BE_20_Landform BL_20_Landform CA_20_Landform FU_20_Landform HU_20_Landform

Bedford County SSURGO Soil Database Blair County SSURGO Soil Database Cambria County SSURGO Soil Database

FU_soils -(Polygon)

Fulton County SSURGO Soil Database

HU_soils -(Polygon)

Huntingdon County SSURGO Soil Database

-(Polygon) -(Polygon) -(Polygon) -(Polygon) -(Polygon)

Water Subbasins (derived from SAG_104_wshed) Pittsburgh-Harrisburgh Greenway Off-Road Trails Directly Adjacent To the SAG Study Area Off-Road Trails On-Road Bike Trails PADOT Designated On-Road Bike Trails

Bedford County Landform Analysis (derived from BE_20_topo_r1) Blair County Landform Analysis (derived from BL_20_topo_r1) Cambria County Landform Analysis (derived from CA_20_topo_r1) Fulton County Landform Analysis (derived from FU_20_topo_r1) Huntingdon County Landform Analysis (derived from HU_20_topo_r1)

SO_20_Landform -(Polygon)

Somerset County Landform Analysis (derived from SO_20_topo_r1)

Somerset County SSURGO Soil Database STATSGO Soils and MUID Database

Trails

-(Line)

Fulton County 100' Contours

Somerset County 200' Contours

CA_soils -(Polygon)

padot-bike_trails -(Line)

Cambria County 100' Contours

FU_100_topo_r1 -(Line)

Huntingdon County 200' Contours

BL_soils -(Polygon)

SAG_water_trails -(Line)

Blair County 100' Contours

CA_100_topo_r1 -(Line)

SO_200_topo -(Line)

Soils

SAG_on-road_trailsr1 -(Line)

Bedford County 100' Contours

BL_100_topo_r1 -(Line)

HU_200_topo -(Line)

Streams

SAG_off-road_trails_r2 -(Line)

BE_100_topo_r1 -(Line)

County Ski Slope Locations

SAG_off-road_adjacentr1 -(Line)

Somerset County 20' Contours

Blair County Sewer Service Area Boundaries

Sewer Service Area Boundaries For SAG Counties Other than Blair

9,895 Watersheds indicated in the Pennsylvania Gazeteer of

SAG_pitts-harris_grnwy -(Polygon)

Huntingdon County 20' Contours

SO_20_topo_r1 -(Line)

Cambria County 200' Contours

-(Line)

-(Polygon)

Fulton County 20' Contours

Fulton County 200' Contours

-(Polygon)

SO_soils -(Polygon)

FU_20_topo_r1 -(Line) HU_20_topo_r1 -(Line)

FU_200_topo -(Line)

Blair County Sewer Service Additions

SAG_smwshed

SAG_statsgo_r1 -(Polygon)

Cambria County 20' Contours

CA_200_topo -(Line)

SAG_ski_slopes

BE_soils -(Polygon)

Blair County 20' Contours

CA_20_topo_r1 -(Line)

200' Contours

Sewer Service BE_sewer_additions -(Polygon)

Bedford County 20' Contours

BL_20_topo_r1 -(Line)

100' Contours

Reservoir (derived from SAG_smwshed) -(Polygon)

Blair County Water Service Area Boundaries

Pennsylvania Satellite Land Cover, 2000

BE_prime_ag_soilsr2 -(Polygon)

SAG_reservoirs

Water Service Area Boundaries For SAG Counties Other than Blair

FU_NRHP -(Point)

Prime Agricultural Soils

B-2

.

County

CA_NRHP -(Point) nrhsite -(Point)

SAG_Utility

Coverage Description

Water Service BE_NRHP -(Point)

SO_NRHP -(Point)

SAG_subbasins

Coverage Type

Slopes BE_20_Slopes -(Polygon)

Bedford County Slope Analysis (derived from BE_20_topo_r1)

BL_20_Slopes -(Polygon)

Blair County Slope Analysis (derived from BL_20_topo_r1)

CA_20_Slopes -(Polygon)

Cambria County Slope Analysis (derived from CA_20_topo_r1)

FU_20_Slopes -(Polygon)

Fulton County Slope Analysis (derived from FU_20_topo_r1)

HU_20_Slopes -(Polygon) SO_20_Slopes -(Polygon)

Huntingdon County Slope Analysis (derived from HU_20_topo_r1) Somerset County Slope Analysis (derived from SO_20_topo_r1)

Designated Water Trails Major Utility Lines (Pipelines, Transmission Lines, etc.)

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix C: Public Participation Summary Appendix C: Public Participation Summary

The following discussion describes key aspects of the public participation process featured as part of the Southern Alleghenies Greenways and Open Space Network Plan (the Plan). Specifically, this section of the Plan highlights the purposes, contents and results of two sets of individual public meetings, which were held within the participating counties during October 2005 and April 2006.

Individual County Meetings Summary, October 2005 Overview Over the course of 2 days (October 12th and 13th), Planning Team members conducted meetings in the following five counties: • • • • •

Somerset (October 12th at 1:00pm in Somerset) Cambria (October 12th at 4:00pm in Ebensburg) Bedford (October 12th at 7:00pm in Bedford) Fulton (October 13th at 1:00pm in McConnellsburg) Huntingdon (October 13th at 4:00pm in Mill Creek)

The purpose of the meetings was to discuss three key aspects of the Plan: the overall purpose and intent of the Plan, the proposed dual nature of the Plan (recreation and conservation) and the elements and scoring used to develop the current Plan.

1. Purposes of the Greenway Plan Five purposes of the plan, developed by the steering committee, were presented for comment; they were conservation, cultural heritage, economic development, recreation and transportation. Each of the groups was asked to rank the importance of these purposes relative to the greenway plan for their particular county. For the majority of the counties conservation and recreation ranked first and second, respectively. 2. Dual Preservation/Conservation Plans As currently envisioned, the Plan will be comprised of two complimentary networks – one for human use or recreation and another for maintaining natural areas and habitats or conservation. Because this approach is unique among greenway plans developed in Pennsylvania to date, it was presented to each of the counties for discussion. During the course of these discussions, there was seemingly unanimous support for the idea of two parallel networks for recreation and conservation. 3. Plan Elements and Scoring In addition to discussing the purposes of the Plan, the elements and their scoring were reviewed. There was consensus regarding the criteria used and the weight given to each. Attendees at meetings in Bedford and Fulton Counties felt that reservoir watersheds should be given a much higher weight. Similarly, those who attended in Bedford and Huntingdon Counties felt that ridge-tops should be more highly weighted. In Bedford and Huntingdon County, it was suggested that

Southern Allegheny Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

26 Important Bird Areas (IBAs) be included as a criteria.

Individual County Meetings Summary, April 2006 Overview th th Over the course of 2 days (April 18 and 20 ), Planning Team members conducted meetings in the following five counties: • • • • •

Fulton (April 18th in McConnellsburg) Huntingdon (April 18th in Mill Creek) Somerset (April 20th in Somerset) th Cambria (April 20 in Ebensburg) Bedford (April 20th in Bedford)

The purpose of the meetings was to discuss the project corridors that were identified, additional project corridor suggestions, current efforts, current needs and opportunities present within the county. The following details the comments and describes the discussions that took place at each individual meeting. Fulton County (April 18, 2006) Comments None Additional Corridor Suggestions •

Cowan's Gap (4 miles) north at Tuscarora Trail

What's Happening Now • •

• • • •

Pike to Bike grant application Tuscarora Trail: Pennsylvania Appalachian Trails group active with private owners/partners on protection and adding shelters Link Trail: currently getting GPS coordinates on the Trail's current trace and its proposed changes Link Trail: extending State Game Land #81 with CPAC helping with the landowner May possibly establish Burnt Cabin as a trail town Relationship with the County is good; more difficult relationships with landowners and PA Game Commission (State Game ands)

Needs • • •

Funding Resource informational clearinghouse Need a Southern Alleghenies Planning position to support effort

Opportunities • •

Very cooperative County Commissioners McConnellsburg recreational group is looking for a county-wide recreational director

Huntingdon County (April 18, 2006) Comments None

26

The Important Bird Area program is a “global effort to identify areas that are most important for maintaining bird populations, and focus conservation efforts at protecting these sites.” In the US and Pennsylvania it is compiled by the Audubon Society.

Additional Corridor Suggestions 1. Little Juniata (Tyrone to Frankstown Branch)

C-1

Appendix C: Public Participation Summary 2. Standing Stone Creek (Greenwood Furnace to Huntingdon) 3. Shavers Creek (Lake Perez to Little Juniata River) 4. Trough Creek (Lake to Calvin, Lake to Robertsdale) 5. Tuscarora Mountain (entire length) 6. Raystown Lake Water Trail (linking Raystown Water Trail to Juniata River water trail) 7. Link Trail to Cowans Gap State Park 8. Cowans Gap to the Pike to Bike 9. Kiski Conemaugh Water Trail What's Happening Now Link Trail: • Landscape architect is currently flagging the potential relocated trail • Looking at potential shelter locations • Taking GPS coordinates of the Trail • Link Trail Club working with County Planning Commission to incorporate trail into County Plan • There are caretakers for every mile of the Trail • Water trail exists in Huntingdon County portion of Main Line Canal but not in other sections • Main Line trail consistent with County Plan Needs • • • • • •

Quick agency buy-in Obtain easements Game Commission agreement on (Link) Trail location Publicity Outreach and education Technical assistance and information dissemination

C-2

• •

Safety of visitors (at 1,000 Steps) Main Line walking trail nonexistent (acquisition need)

Bedford County (April 20, 2006) Comments • •

“Shellsburg” should be “Schellsburg” Question the ranking of ridge tops @ #10. The ridges are one of this areas most distinguishing natural resources.

Additional Corridor Suggestions 1. Connect on bike route G to Great Allegheny Passage in Maryland – along PA 96 or other parallel route. What's Happening Now • • •

Pike to Bike (run by Advisory Committee) Southern Allegheny Conservancy Project – Cumberland Two alternatives for the Great Eastern Trail are currently under consideration

Needs • • • • • • • • •

Overlay of wind turbines, both planned and proposed Multi-use trails (non motorized) to include equine use Government ownership of Pike to Bike Funding Identify and map who owns properties Look at location siting vs. funding availability Protect ridge tops; corridors need advocates Need for technical assistance and guidance; what are available techniques and mechanisms Incorporate the Plan into the Comprehensive Plan

• • • • • •

Tourism promotion agencies can be key in promotion Promote secondary economic development benefits that add to quality of life Tap into multi county and multi State organizations with staff to address capacity issues Need umbrella organization to help with coordination and fund development Secondary school “property curriculum” RC&D as a possible coordinator throughout the region

• • • • •

Needs • •

Cambria County (April 20, 2006) Comments



• •



Priorities are interdependent Direct and indirect economic development are both important (i.e., quality of life impacts = indirect)

Additional Corridor Suggestions 1. Johnstown is earmarked to become a regional trail hub joining Path of Flood, Iron Street Trail (to the Cambria Iron Works Landmark and Cambria City Historic District), the Incline Sculpture Trail and Jim Mayer Trail (north and south) to Johnstown and northern Somerset County. Based on the existing Heritage Route and Ghost Town Trail/Main Line Flood Trail connecting Ghost Town to the Johnstown, the hub would provide a route that would tie all purposes of the greenways together.

• •

• • • • • • • •

What's Happening Now

Cambria Township is embarking on several projects that tie into County projects (at the Feasibility Study stage) There are no safe trails in the area Johnstown Park is a special place Johnstown is an important hub for trails to meet at Johnstown projects are underway

Put Main Line Trail on a fast track County Planning Commission can be a facilitator County Recreation Authority needs more staff for planned projects and future maintenance (capacity issue) Need for a functional regional alliance with member groups maintaining their identities Maintenance capacity is a very important need Develop an operation and maintenance (O&M) strategy Get municipalities involved early Look for opportunities to share services Ownership by counties and municipalities has benefits (funding, liability, O&M) Southern Alleghenies Resource Conservation and Development Council has a role in implementing Tourism promotion agencies, biking groups and Off Road Vehicle Groups are missing from the process Coordinate among State agencies

Wind farm investigations are ongoing in the Plan's preservation corridors To date the wind turbine ordinances have not dealt with ecological impacts

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Appendix C: Public Participation Summary Somerset County (April 20, 2006) Comments •





How does tourism/economic development demand impact/affect the Greenway corridors – are some more significant than others Allegheny Front is identified as a preservation corridor; yet is the site of major wind farm developments – conflict: preservation or industrial Should complete greenways currently under construction before new projects are started

• • • • •

Create coalition of multiple interests focussed on quality of life Southern Alleghenies RC&D can help empower smaller groups from an RC&D perspective Technical assistance for smaller groups Somerset, Cambria and Blair Counties have hotel tax to potentially help groups Survey data and case studies can help create backing for and help justify green

Additional Corridor Suggestions None What's Happening Now • • • •

All 42 miles of the Great Allegheny Passage are completed in Somerset County No mileage is completed on the Paint Creek Trail (still proposal stage) Stoney Creek engineering and design this fall Upper Shade Creek AMD remediation pending

Needs • • •



Volunteers for trail and AMD treatment maintenance Political support needed for Stoney Creek County owns part of the Great Allegheny Passage; need to identify capacity for other owners (i.e., conservancies) County should adopt Greenway Plan into County Plan

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Appendix C: Public Participation Summary

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Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix D: Conservation Easement Appendix D: Conservation Easement

Outlined below is a sample conservation easement agreement. The sample agreement is based on a model agreement developed by the Pennsylvania Land Trust Association. THIS CONSERVATION EASEMENT dated as of ___________ (the “Easement Date”) is by and between ________________ (“the undersigned Owner or Owners”) and ________________ (the “Holder”). Article I. Background 1.01 Property The undersigned Owner or Owners are the sole owners in fee simple of the Property described in Exhibit “A” (the “Property”). The Property is also described as: Street Address: Municipality: County: State: Pennsylvania Parcel Identifier: Acreage:

Objectives”) for the Property set forth below: (a) Resource Protection Objectives (i) Water Resources. This Conservation Easement seeks to protect the quality of water resources by maintaining buffer within the vicinity of streams, wetlands and other water resources described in the Baseline Documentation. Barnyard runoff controls and preservation of conservation cover on Steep Slopes are also implemented to protect water resources. These measures help to protect water resources from sediment and non-point pollution and promote the infiltration, detention and natural filtration of storm water. The restrictions also preserve habitat for Native Species dependent on water resources.

1.02 Conservation Plan Attached as Exhibit “B” is a survey or other graphic depiction of the Property (the “Conservation Plan showing, among other details, the location of one or more of the following areas – the Highest Protection Area, the Standard Protection Area and the Minimal Protection Area.

(ii) Forest and Woodland Resources. This Conservation Easement seeks to promote biological diversity and to perpetuate and foster the growth of a healthy and unfragmented forest or woodland. Features to be protected include Native Species; continuous canopy with multi-tiered understory of trees, shrubs, wildflowers and grasses; natural habitat, breeding sites and corridors for the migration of birds and wildlife. Species other than Native Species often negatively affect the survival of Native Species and disrupt the functioning of ecosystems. Trees store carbon, offsetting the harmful by-products of burning fossil fuels and trap air pollution particulates, cleaning air.

1.03 Conservation Objectives This Conservation Easement provides different levels of protection for the areas shown on the Conservation Plan so as to achieve the goals and resource protection objectives (collectively, the “Conservation

(iii) Wildlife Resources. This Conservation Easement seeks to protect large intact areas of wildlife habitat and connect patches of wildlife habitat. Large habitat patches typically support greater biodiversity and can maintain more ecosystem processes than small patches. Large

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intact habitats allow larger, healthier populations of a species to persist; thus, increasing the chance of survival over time. Fragmentation of large habitats often decreases the connectivity of systems, negatively affecting the movement of species necessary for fulfilling nutritional or reproductive requirements. (iv) Scenic Resources. This Conservation Easement seeks to preserve the relationship of scenic resources within the Property to natural and scenic resources in its surrounds and to protect scenic vistas visible from public rightsof-way and other public access points in the vicinity of the Property. (v) Sustainable Land Uses. This Conservation Easement seeks to ensure that Agriculture, Forestry and other uses, to the extent that they are permitted, are conducted in a manner that will neither diminish the biological integrity of the Property nor deplete natural resources over time nor lead to an irreversible disruption of ecosystems and associated processes. Agricultural and Forestry activities are regulated so as to protect soils of high productivity; to ensure future availability for Sustainable uses; and to minimize adverse effects of Agricultural and Forestry uses on water resources described in the Conservation Objectives. (vi) Compatible Land Use and Development. Certain areas have been sited within the Property to accommodate existing and future development taking into account the entirety of the natural potential of the Property as well as its scenic resources.

(b) Goals (i) Highest Protection Area. This Conservation Easement seeks to protect natural resources within the Highest Protection Area so as to keep them in an undisturbed State except as required to promote and maintain a diverse community of predominantly Native Species. (ii) Standard Protection Area. This Conservation Easement seeks to promote good stewardship of the Standard Protection Area so that its soil and other natural resources will always be able to support Sustainable Agriculture or Sustainable Forestry. (iii) Minimal Protection Area. This Conservation Easement seeks to promote compatible land use and development within the Minimal Protection Area so that it will be available for a wide variety of activities, uses and Additional Improvements subject to the minimal constraints necessary to achieve Conservation Objectives outside the Minimal Protection Area. 1.04 Baseline Documentation As of the Easement Date, the undersigned Owner or Owners and Holder have signed for identification purposes the report (the “Baseline Documentation”), to be kept on file at the principal office of Holder, that contains an original, full-size version of the Conservation Plan and other information sufficient to identify on the ground the protection areas identified in this Article; that describes Existing Improvements; that identifies the conservation resources of the

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Appendix D: Conservation Easement Property described in the Conservation Objectives; and that includes, among other information, photographs depicting existing conditions of the Property as of the Easement Date. 1.05 Structure of Conservation Easement This Conservation Easement is divided into eight Articles. Articles II, III and IV contain the restrictive covenants imposed by the undersigned Owner or Owners on the Property. In Article V the undersigned Owner or Owners grant to Holder and Beneficiaries (if any) certain rights to enforce the restrictive covenants in perpetuity against all Owners of the Property (“Enforcement Rights”). Article V also contains the procedure for Review applicable to those items permitted subject to Review under Articles II, III and IV. Article VI details the procedures for exercise of Enforcement Rights. Article VII contains provisions generally applicable to both Owners and Holder. The last Article entitled “Glossary” contains definitions of capitalized terms used in this Conservation Easement and not defined in this Article I. 1.06 Federal Tax Items (a) Qualified Conservation Contribution This Conservation Easement has been donated in whole or in part to Holder by the undersigned Owner or Owners. It is intended to qualify as a charitable donation of a partial interest in real eState (as defined under §170(f)(3)(B)(iii) of the Code, a “Qualified Conservation Contribution”) to a qualified organization (as defined in §1.170(A-14(c)(1) of the Regulations, a “Qualified Organization”).

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(b) Public Benefit The Baseline Documentation identifies public policy Statements and other factual information supporting the significant public benefit of this Conservation Easement as defined in §1.170A-14(d)(4)(iv) of the Regulations. (c) Mineral Interests No Person has retained a qualified mineral interest in the Property of a nature that would disqualify the Conservation Easement for purposes of §1.170A-14(g)(4) of the Regulations.

subject to Review under this Conservation Easement, Owners agree to notify Holder before exercising any reserved right that may have an adverse impact on the conservation interests associated with the Property. (f) Qualification under §2031(c) of the Code To the extent required to qualify for exemption from Federal eState tax under §2031(c) of the Code, and only to the extent such activity is not otherwise prohibited or limited under this Conservation Easement, Owners agree that commercial recreational uses are not permitted within the Property.

(d) Property Right In accordance with §1.170A-14(g)(6) of the Regulations, the undersigned Owner or Owners agree that this Conservation Easement gives rise to a property right, immediately vested in the Holder, that entitles the Holder to compensation upon extinguishment of the easement. The fair market value of the property right is to be determined in accordance with the Regulations; i.e., it is at least equal to the proportionate value that this Conservation Easement as of the Easement Date bears to the value of the Property as a whole as of the Easement Date (the “Proportionate Value”). If the Proportionate Value exceeds the compensation otherwise payable to Holder under Article VI, Holder is entitled to payment of the Proportionate Value. Holder must use any funds received by application of this provision in a manner consistent with the Conservation Objectives.

1.07 Beneficiaries As of the Easement Date, no Beneficiaries of this Conservation Easement have been identified by the undersigned Owner or Owners and Holder.

(e) Notice Required under Regulations To the extent required for compliance with §1.170A-13(g)(4)(ii) of the Regulations, and only to the extent such activity is not otherwise

(b) Transfer to Qualified Organization Subdivision to permit the transfer of a portion of the Property to a Qualified Organization for use by the Qualified Organization for park,

Article II. Subdivision 2.01 Prohibition No Subdivision of the Property is permitted except as set forth below. 2.02 Permitted Subdivision The following Subdivisions are permitted: (a) Lot Line Change Subdivision resulting in (i) no additional Lot; and (ii) no material decrease in the acreage of the Property; or (iii) subject to Review, other change in the boundary of the Property or any Lot not creating any additional Lot.

nature preserve, public trail or other conservation purposes consistent with and in furtherance of Conservation Objectives. (c) Agricultural Lease Transfer of possession (but not ownership) of land by lease for Sustainable Agriculture or Sustainable Forestry purposes in compliance with applicable requirements of this Conservation Easement. 2.03 Subdivision Requirements (a) Establishment of Lots; Allocations. Prior to transfer of a Lot following a Subdivision, Owners must (i) furnish Holder with the plan of Subdivision approved under Applicable Law and legal description of the each Lot created or reconfigured by the Subdivision; (ii) mark the boundaries of each Lot with permanent markers; and (iii) allocate in the deed of transfer of a Lot created by the Subdivision those limitations applicable to more than one Lot under this Conservation Easement. This information will become part of the Baseline Documentation incorporated into this Conservation Easement. (b) Amendment Holder may require Owners to execute an Amendment of this Conservation Easement to reflect changes and allocations resulting from Subdivision that are not established to the reasonable satisfaction of Holder by recordation in the Public Records of the plan of Subdivision approved under Applicable Law.

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Appendix D: Conservation Easement Article III. Improvements 3.01 Prohibition Improvements within the Property are prohibited except as permitted below in this Article. 3.02 Permitted Within Highest Protection Area The following Improvements are permitted within the Highest Protection Area: (a) Existing Improvements Any Existing Improvement may be maintained, repaired and replaced in its existing location. Existing Improvements may be expanded or relocated if the expanded or relocated Improvement complies with requirements applicable to Additional Improvements of the same type. (b) Existing Agreements Improvements that Owners are required to allow under Existing Agreements are permitted. (c) Additional Improvements The following Additional Improvements are permitted: (i) Fences, walls and gates. (ii) Regulatory Signs. (iii) Habitat enhancement devices such as birdhouses and bat houses. (iv) Trails covered (if at all) by wood chips, gravel, or other highly porous surface. (v) Subject to Review, footbridges, stream crossing structures and stream access structures. (vi) Subject to Review, Access Drives and Utility Improvements to service Improvements within the Property but only

if there is no other reasonably feasible means to provide access and utility services to the Property. 3.03 Permitted Within Standard Protection Area The following Improvements are permitted within the Standard Protection Area: (a) Permitted under Preceding Sections Any Improvement permitted under a preceding section of this Article is permitted. (b) Additional Improvements The following Additional Improvements are permitted: (i) Agricultural Improvements. (ii) Utility Improvements and Site Improvements reasonably required for activities and uses permitted within the Standard Protection Area. (c) Limitations on Additional Improvements Additional Improvements permitted within the Standard Protection Area are further limited as follows: (i) The Height of Improvements must not exceed ___ feet except for Utility Improvements (such as windmills) providing alternative sources of energy approved by the Holder after Review. (ii) Impervious Coverage must not exceed a limit of ___ square feet per roofed Improvement. Impervious Coverage must not exceed a limit of ___ square feet in the aggregate for all Improvements within the Standard Protection Area. The limitation on aggregate Impervious Coverage excludes Impervious Coverage associated with ponds and Access Drives.

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(iii) Access Drives and farm lanes are limited to __ feet in width and are further limited, in the aggregate, to ___ feet in length. (iv) Ponds are limited, in the aggregate, to ___ square feet of Impervious Coverage. (v) In addition to Regulatory Signs, signs are limited to a maximum of ___ square feet per sign and ___ square feet in the aggregate for all signs within the Property. (vi) Utility Improvements must be underground or, subject to Review, may be aboveground where not reasonably feasible to be installed underground or where used as a means of providing alternative sources of energy (such as wind or solar). The following Utility Improvements are not permitted unless Holder, without any obligation to do so, approves after Review: (A) exterior storage tanks for petroleum or other hazardous or toxic substances (other than reasonable amounts of oil, petroleum or propane gas for uses within the Property permitted under this Conservation Easement); and (B) Utility Improvements servicing Improvements not within the Property. 3.04 Permitted Within Minimal Protection Area The following Improvements are permitted within Minimal Protection Area: (a) Permitted under Preceding Sections Any Improvement permitted under a preceding section of this Article is permitted. (b) Additional Improvements The following Additional Improvements are permitted: (i) Residential Improvements.

(ii) Utility Improvements and Site Improvements servicing activities, uses or Improvements permitted within the Property. Signs remain limited as set forth for the Standard Protection Area. (c) Limitations (i) Not more than ___ Improvements (whether an Existing Improvement or Additional Improvement) may contain Dwelling Units (if any) permitted under Article IV. (ii) Additional Improvements are subject to a Height limitation of __ feet. Article IV. Activities; Uses; Disturbance of Resources 4.01 Prohibition Activities and uses are limited to those permitted below in this Article and provided in any case that the intensity or frequency of the activity or use does not materially and adversely affect maintenance or attainment of Conservation Objectives. 4.02 Density Issues under Applicable Law (a) Promoting Development outside the Property Neither the Property nor the grant of this Conservation Easement may be used under Applicable Law to increase density or intensity of use or otherwise promote the development of other lands outside the Property. (b) Transferable Development Rights Owners may not transfer for use outside the Property (whether or not for compensation) any development rights

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Appendix D: Conservation Easement allocated to the Property under Applicable Law. 4.03 Permitted Within Highest Protection Area The following activities and uses are permitted within the Highest Protection Area: (a) Existing Agreements Activities, uses and Construction that Owners are required to allow under Existing Agreements. (b) Disturbance of Resources (i) Cutting trees, Construction or other disturbance of resources, including removal of Invasive Species, to the extent reasonably prudent to remove, mitigate or warn against an unreasonable risk of harm to Persons, property or health of Native Species on or about the Property. Owners must take such steps as are reasonable under the circumstances to consult with older prior to taking actions that, but for this provision, would not be permitted or would be permitted only after Review. (ii) Planting a diversity of Native Species of trees, shrubs and herbaceous plant materials in accordance with Best Management Practices. (iii) Removal and disturbance of soil, rock and vegetative resources to the extent reasonably necessary to accommodate Construction of and maintain access to Improvements within the Highest Protection Area with restoration as soon as reasonably feasible by replanting with a diversity of Native Species of trees, shrubs and herbaceous plant materials in

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accordance with Best Management Practices. (iv) Vehicular use (including motorized vehicular use) in connection with an activity permitted within the Highest Protection Area or otherwise in the case of emergency. (v) Except within Wet Areas, cutting trees for use on the Property not to exceed ___ cords per year. (vi) Subject to Review, removal of vegetation to accommodate replanting with a diversity of Native Species of trees, shrubs and herbaceous plant materials. (vii) Other resource management activities consistent with maintenance or attainment of Conservation Objectives and conducted in accordance with the Resource Management Plan approved for that activity after Review. (c) Release and Disposal (i) Application of substances (other than manure) to promote health and growth of vegetation in accordance with manufacturer’s recommendations and Applicable Law. Within Wet Areas only substances approved for aquatic use are permitted. (ii) Piling of brush and other vegetation to the extent reasonably necessary to accommodate an activity permitted within the Highest Protection Area under this Conservation Easement. (d) Recreational and Educational Uses Activities that do not require Improvements other than those permitted within the Highest Protection Area and do not materially and adversely affect maintenance or attainment of Conservation Objectives such as the following: (i) walking, horseback riding on trails, crosscountry skiing on trails, bird watching, nature study, fishing and hunting; and (ii) educational

or scientific activities consistent with and in furtherance of the Conservation Objectives. 4.04 Permitted Within Standard Protection Area The following activities and uses are permitted within the Standard Protection Area: (a) Permitted under Preceding Sections Activities and uses permitted under preceding sections of this Article are permitted within the Standard Protection Area. (b) Agricultural and Forestry Uses; Disturbance of Resources (i) Uses and activities that maintain continuous vegetative cover (other than Invasive Species) such as pasture and grazing use, meadow, turf or lawn. (ii) Sustainable Agricultural uses that do not maintain continuous vegetative cover (such as plowing, tilling, planting and harvesting field crops, equestrian, horticultural and nursery use) if conducted in accordance with a Soil Conservation Plan furnished to Holder. (iii) Removal of vegetation and other Construction activities reasonably required to accommodate Improvements permitted within the Standard Protection Area. (iv) Sustainable Forestry uses in accordance with a Resource Management Plan approved after Review.Woodland Areas within the Standard Protection Area may not be used for or converted to Agricultural uses unless Holder, without any obligation to do so, approves after Review. (v) Subject to Review, Sustainable Agricultural uses within Steep Slope Areas if conducted in accordance with a Soil Conservation Plan implementing measures to minimize adverse

effects on water resources such as a conservation tillage system, conservation cover, conservation cropping sequence, contour farming or cross slope farming. (vi) Subject to Review, Agricultural uses that involve removal of soil from the Property (such as sod farming and balland-burlap nursery or tree-farming uses) if conducted in accordance with a Resource Management Plan providing for, among other features, a soil replenishment program that will qualify the activity as a Sustainable Agricultural use. (vii) Subject to Review, removal or impoundment of water for activities and uses permitted within the Standard Protection Area under this Conservation Easement but not for sale or transfer outside the Property. (c) Release and Disposal (i) Piling and composting of biodegradable materials originating from the Property in furtherance of Agricultural Uses within the Property permitted under this Article. Manure piles must be located so as not to create run-off into Wet Areas. (ii) Subject to Review, disposal of sanitary sewage effluent from Improvements permitted under Article III if not reasonably feasible to confine such disposal to Minimal Protection Area. (d) Recreational and Open-Space Uses Non-commercial recreational and openspace uses that do not require Improvements other than those permitted within the Standard Protection Area; do not materially and adversely affect scenic views and other values described in the Conservation Objectives; and do not

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix D: Conservation Easement require vehicular use other than for resource management purposes. 4.05 Permitted Within Minimal Protection Area The following activities and uses are permitted within the Minimal Protection Area: (a) Permitted under Preceding Sections Activities and uses permitted under preceding sections of this Article are permitted within the Minimal Protection Area. (b) Disturbance of Resources Disturbance of resources within the Minimal Protection Area is permitted for residential landscaping purposes and other purposes reasonably related to uses permitted within the Minimal Protection Area. Introduction of Invasive Species remains prohibited. (c) Release and Disposal (i) Disposal of sanitary sewage effluent from Improvements permitted under this Article. (ii) Other piling of materials and noncontainerized disposal of substances and materials but only if such disposal is permitted under Applicable Law; does not directly or indirectly create run-off or leaching outside the Minimal Protection and Area; and does not adversely affect Conservation Objectives applicable to the Minimal Protection Area including those pertaining to scenic views. (d) Residential and Other Uses

(i) Residential use is permitted but limited to not more than ___ Dwelling Units. (ii) Any occupation, activity or use that is wholly contained within an enclosed Improvement permitted under Article III is permitted. Subject to Review, exterior vehicular parking and signage accessory to such uses may be permitted by Holder. Article V. Rights and Duties of Holder and Beneficiaries 5.01 Grant to Holder (a) Grant in Perpetuity By signing this Conservation Easement and unconditionally delivering it to Holder, the undersigned Owner or Owners, intending to be legally bound, grant and convey to Holder a conservation servitude over the Property in perpetuity for the purpose of administering and enforcing the restrictions and limitations set forth in Articles II, III and IV in furtherance of the Conservation Objectives. (b) Superior to all Liens The undersigned Owner or Owners warrant to Holder that the Property is, as of the Easement Date, free and clear of all Liens or, if it is not, that Owners have obtained and attached to this Conservation Easement as an Exhibit the legally binding subordination of any Liens affecting the Property as of the Easement Date. 5.02 Rights and Duties of Holder The grant to Holder under the preceding section gives Holder the right and duty to perform the following tasks: (a) Enforcement To enforce the terms of this Conservation Easement in accordance with the provisions of

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Article VI including, in addition to other remedies, the right to enter the Property to investigate a suspected, alleged or threatened violation. (b) Inspection To enter and inspect the Property for compliance with the requirements of this Conservation Easement upon reasonable notice, in a reasonable manner and at reasonable times. (c) Review To exercise rights of Review in accordance with the requirements of this Article as and when required under applicable provisions of this Conservation Easement. (d) Interpretation To interpret the terms of this Conservation Easement, apply the terms of this Conservation Easement to factual conditions on or about the Property, respond to requests for information from Persons having an interest in this Conservation Easement or the Property (such as requests for a certification of compliance), and apply the terms of this Conservation Easement to changes occurring or proposed within the Property. 5.03 Other Rights of Holder The grant to Holder under this Article also permits Holder, without any obligation to do so, to exercise the following rights: (a) Amendment To enter into an Amendment with Owners if Holder determines that the Amendment is consistent with and in furtherance of the Conservation Objectives; will not result in any private benefit prohibited under the Code; and

otherwise conforms to Holder’s policy with respect to Amendments. (b) Signs To install one or more signs within the Property identifying the interest of Holder or one or more Beneficiaries in this Conservation Easement. Any signs installed by Holder do not reduce the number or size of signs permitted to Owners under Article III. Signs are to be of the customary size installed by Holder or Beneficiary, as the case may be, and must be installed in locations readable from the public right-ofway and otherwise reasonably acceptable to Owners. 5.04 Review The following provisions are incorporated into any provision of this Conservation Easement that is subject to Review: (a) Notice to Holder At least thirty (30) days before Owners begin or allow any Construction, activity or use that is subject to Review, Owners must notify Holder of the change including with the notice such information as is reasonably sufficient to comply with Review Requirements and otherwise describe the change and its potential impact on natural resources within the Property. (b) Notice to Owners Within thirty (30) days after receipt of Owners’ notice, Holder must notify Owners of Holder’s determination to (i) accept Owners’ proposal in whole or in part; (ii) reject Owners’ proposal in whole or in part; (iii) accept Owners’ proposal conditioned upon compliance with conditions imposed

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Appendix D: Conservation Easement by Holder; or (iv) reject Owners’ notice for insufficiency of information on which to base a determination. If Holder gives conditional acceptance under clause (iii), commencement of the proposed Improvement, activity, use or Construction constitutes acceptance by Owners of all conditions set forth in Holder’s notice. (c) Failure to Notify If Holder fails to notify Owners as required in the preceding subsection, the proposal set forth in Owners notice is deemed approved. (d) Standard of Reasonableness Holder’s approval will not be unreasonably withheld; however, it is not unreasonable for Holder to disapprove a proposal that may adversely affect natural resources described in the Conservation Objectives or that is otherwise inconsistent with maintenance or attainment of Conservation Objectives. 5.05 Reimbursement Owners must reimburse Holder for the costs and expenses of Holder reasonably incurred in the course of performing its duties with respect to this Conservation Easement other than monitoring in the ordinary course. These costs and expenses include the allocated costs of employees of Holder. Article VI. Violation; Remedies 6.01 Breach of Duty (a) Failure to Enforce If Holder fails to enforce this Conservation Easement, or ceases to qualify as a

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Qualified Organization, then the rights and duties of Holder under this Conservation may be (i) exercised by a Beneficiary or a Qualified Organization designated by a Beneficiary; and/or (ii) transferred to another Qualified Organization by a court of competent jurisdiction. (b) Transferee The transferee must be a Qualified Organization and must commit to hold this Conservation Easement exclusively for conservation purposes as defined in the Code. 6.02 Violation of Conservation Easement If Holder determines that this Conservation Easement is being or has been violated or that a violation is threatened or imminent then the provisions of this Section will apply: (a) Notice Holder must notify Owners of the violation. Holder’s notice may include its recommendations of measures to be taken by Owners to cure the violation and restore features of the Property damaged or altered as a result of the violation. (b) Opportunity to Cure Owners’ cure period expires thirty (30) days after the date of Holder’s notice to Owners subject to extension for the time reasonably necessary to cure but only if all of the following conditions are satisfied: (i) Owners cease the activity constituting the violation promptly upon receipt of Holder’s notice; (ii) Owners and Holder agree, within the initial thirty (30) day period, upon the measures Owners will take to cure the violation;

(iii) Owners commence to cure within the initial thirty (30) day period; and (iv) Owners continue thereafter to use best efforts and due diligence to complete the agreed upon cure. (c) Imminent Harm No notice or cure period is required if circumstances require prompt action to prevent or mitigate irreparable harm or alteration to any natural resource or other feature of the Property described in the Conservation Objectives. 6.03 Remedies Upon expiration of the cure period (if any) described in the preceding Section, Holder may do any one or more of the following: (a) Coercive Relief Seek coercive relief to specifically enforce the terms of this Conservation Easement; to restrain present or future violations of this Conservation Easement; and/or to compel restoration of natural resources destroyed or altered as a result of the violation. (b) Civil Action Recover from Owners or other Persons responsible for the violation all sums owing to Holder under applicable provisions of this Conservation Easement together with interest thereon from the date due at the Default Rate. These monetary obligations include, among others, Losses and Litigation Expenses. (c) Self-Help Enter the Property to prevent or mitigate further damage to or alteration of natural resources of the Property identified in the Conservation Objectives.

6.04 Modification or Termination If this Conservation Easement is or is about to be modified or terminated by exercise of the power of eminent domain (condemnation) or adjudication of a court of competent jurisdiction sought by a Person other than Holder the following provisions apply: (a) Compensatory Damages Holder is entitled to collect from the Person seeking the modification or termination, compensatory damages in an amount equal to the increase in Market Value of the Property resulting from the modification or termination plus reimbursement of Litigation Expenses as if a violation had occurred. (b) Restitution Holder or any Beneficiary is entitled to recover from the Person seeking the modification or termination, (i) restitution of amounts paid for this Conservation Easement (if any) and any other sums invested in the Property for the benefit of the public as a result of rights granted under this Conservation Easement plus (ii) reimbursement of Litigation Expenses as if a violation had occurred. 6.05 Remedies Cumulative The description of Holder’s remedies in this Article does not preclude Holder from exercising any other right or remedy that may at any time be available to Holder under this Article or Applicable Law. If Holder chooses to exercise one remedy, Holder may nevertheless choose to exercise any one or more of the other rights or

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Appendix D: Conservation Easement remedies available to Holder at the same time or at any other time. 6.06 No Waiver If Holder does not exercise any right or remedy when it is available to Holder, that is not to be interpreted as a waiver of any non-compliance with this Conservation Easement or a waiver of Holder’s rights to exercise its rights or remedies at another time. 6.07 No Fault of Owners Holder will waive its right to reimbursement under this Article as to Owners (but not other Persons who may be responsible for the violation) if Holder is reasonably satisfied that the violation was not the fault of Owners and could not have been anticipated or prevented by Owners by reasonable means. 6.08 Multiple Owners; Multiple Lots If different Owners own Lots within the Property, only the Owners of the Lot in violation will be held responsible for the violation. 6.09 Multiple Owners; Single Lot If more than one Owner owns the Lot in violation of this Conservation Easement, the Owners of the Lot in violation are jointly and severally liable for the violation regardless of the form of ownership. 6.10 Continuing Liability If a Lot subject to this Conservation Easement is transferred while a violation remains uncured, the transferor Owners remain liable for the violation jointly and severally with the transferee Owners. This

provision does not apply if Holder has issued a certificate of compliance evidencing no violations within thirty (30) days prior to the transfer. It is the responsibility of the Owners to request a certificate of compliance to verify whether violations exist as of the date of transfer. Article VII. Miscellaneous 7.01 Notices (a) Requirements Each Person giving any notice pursuant to this Conservation Easement must give the notice in writing and must use one of the following methods of delivery: (i) personal delivery; (ii) certified mail, return receipt requested and postage prepaid; or (iii) nationally recognized overnight courier, with all fees prepaid. (b) Address for Notices Each Person giving a notice must address the notice to the appropriate Person at the receiving party at the address listed below or to another address designated by that Person by notice to the other Person. If to Owners: __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ If to Holder: __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________

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7.02 Governing Law The internal laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania govern this Conservation Easement. 7.03 Assignment and Transfer Neither Owners nor Holder may assign or otherwise transfer any of their respective rights or duties under this Conservation Easement voluntarily or involuntarily, whether by merger, consolidation, dissolution, operation of law or any other manner except as permitted below. Any purported assignment or transfer in violation of this Section is void. (a) By Holder Holder may assign its rights and duties under this Conservation Easement, either in whole or in part, but only to a Qualified Organization that executes and records in the Public Records a written agreement assuming the obligations of Holder under this Conservation Easement. The assigning Holder must deliver the Baseline Documentation to the assignee Holder as of the date of the assignment. Holder must assign its rights and duties under this Conservation Easement to another Qualified Organization if Holder becomes the Owner of the Property. (b) By Owners This Conservation Easement is a servitude running with the land binding upon the undersigned Owners and, upon recordation in the Public Records, all subsequent Owners of the Property or any portion of the Property are bound by its terms whether or not the Owners had actual notice of this Conservation Easement and whether or not the deed of transfer specifically referred to the transfer being under and subject to this Conservation Easement.

7.04 Binding Agreement Subject to the restrictions on assignment and transfer set forth in the preceding Section, this Conservation Easement binds and benefits Owners and Holder and their respective personal representatives, successors and assigns. 7.05 No Other Beneficiaries This Conservation Easement does not confer any Enforcement Rights or other remedies upon any Person other than Owners, Holder and the Beneficiaries (if any) specifically named in this Conservation Easement. Owners of Lots within or adjoining the Property are not beneficiaries of this Conservation Easement and, accordingly, have no right of approval or joinder in any Amendment other than an Amendment applicable to the Lot owned by such Owners. This provision does not preclude Owners or other Persons having an interest in this Conservation Easement from petitioning a court of competent jurisdiction to exercise remedies available under this Conservation Easement for breach of duty by Holder. 7.06 Amendments, Waivers No Amendment or waiver of any provision of this Conservation Easement or consent to any departure by Owners from the terms of this Conservation Easement is effective unless the Amendment, waiver or consent is in writing and signed by an authorized signatory for Holder. A waiver or consent is effective only in the specific instance and for the specific purpose given.

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Appendix D: Conservation Easement 7.07 Severability If any provision of this Conservation Easement is determined to be invalid, illegal or unenforceable, the remaining provisions of this Conservation Easement remain valid, binding and enforceable. To the extent permitted by Applicable Law, the parties waive any provision of Applicable Law that renders any provision of this Conservation Easement invalid, illegal or unenforceable in any respect.

(b) Glossary If any term defined in the Glossary is not used in this Conservation Easement, the defined term is to be disregarded as surplus material.

7.08 Counterparts This Conservation Easement may be signed in multiple counterparts, each of which constitutes an original, and all of which, collectively, constitute only one agreement.

(d) Conservation and Preservation Easements Act This Conservation Easement is intended to be interpreted so as to convey to Holder all of the rights and privileges of a holder of a conservation easement under the Conservation Easements Act.

7.09 Indemnity Owners must indemnify and defend the Indemnified Parties against all Losses and Litigation Expenses arising out of or relating to (a) any breach or violation of this Conservation Easement or Applicable Law; and (b) damage to property or personal injury (including death) occurring on or about the Property if and to the extent not caused by the negligent or wrongful acts or omissions of an Indemnified Party. 7.10 Guides to Interpretation (a) Captions Except for the identification of defined terms in the Glossary, the descriptive headings of the articles, sections and subsections of this Conservation Easement are for convenience only and do not constitute a part of this Conservation Easement.

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(c) Other Terms (i) The word “including” means “including but not limited to”. (ii) The word “must” is obligatory; the word “may” is permissive and does not imply any obligation.

(e) ReStatement of Servitudes This Conservation Easement is intended to be interpreted so as to convey to Holder all of the rights and privileges of a holder of a conservation servitude under the ReStatement (Third) of Servitudes. 7.11 Entire Agreement This is the entire agreement of Owners, Holder and Beneficiaries (if any) pertaining to the subject matter of this Conservation Easement. The terms of this Conservation Easement supersede in full all Statements and writings between Owners, Holder and others pertaining to the transaction set forth in this Conservation Easement. 7.12 Incorporation by Reference The following items are incorporated into this Conservation Easement by means of this reference:

• • •

The Baseline Documentation The legal description of the Property attached as Exhibit “A” The Conservation Plan attached as Exhibit “B”

7.13 Coal Rights Notice The following notice is given to Owners solely for the purpose of compliance with the requirements of the Conservation Easements Act: NOTICE: This Conservation Easement may impair the development of coal interests including workable coal seams or coal interests which have been severed from the Property. Article VIII. Glossary 8.01 Access Drive(s) Roads or drives providing access to and from Improvements or Minimal Protection Areas and public right -of-way. 8.02 Additional Improvements All buildings, structures, facilities and other improvements within the Property other than Existing Improvements. The term Additional Improvements includes Agricultural Improvements, Residential Improvements, Utility Improvements and Site Improvements. 8.03 Agricultural Improvements Improvements used or usable in furtherance of Agricultural uses such as barn, stable, silo, spring house, green house, hoop house, riding arena (whether indoor or outdoor), horse walker, manure storage pit, storage buildings, feeding and irrigation facilities.

8.04 Agricultural or Agriculture Any one or more of the following and the leasing of land for any of these purposes: (a) Farming (i) Production of vegetables, fruits, seeds, mushrooms, nuts and nursery crops (including trees) for sale. (ii) Production of poultry, livestock and their products for sale. (iii) Production of field crops, hay or pasture. (iv) Production of sod to be removed and planted elsewhere. (b) Equestrian Boarding, stabling, raising, feeding, grazing, exercising, riding and training horses and instructing riders. 8.05 Amendment An amendment, modification or supplement to this Conservation Easement signed by Owners and Holder and recorded in the Public Records. 8.06 Applicable Law Any Federal, State or local laws, statutes, codes, ordinances, standards and regulations applicable to the Property or this Conservation Easement as amended through the applicable date of reference. 8.07 Beneficiary Any governmental entity or Qualified Organization that is specifically named as a Beneficiary of this Conservation Easement under Article I.

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Appendix D: Conservation Easement 8.08 Best Management Practices A series of guidelines or minimum standards (sometimes referred to as BMP’s) recommended by Federal, State and/or county resource management agencies for proper application of farming and forestry operations, non-point pollution of water resources and other disturbances of soil, water and vegetative resources and to protect wildlife habitats. Examples of resource management agencies issuing pertinent BMP’s as of the Easement Date are: the Natural Resource Conservation Service of the United States Department of Agriculture (with respect to soil resources); the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (with respect to soil erosion, sedimentation and water resources) and the following sources of BMP’s with respect to forest and woodland management: the Forest Stewardship Council principles and criteria, Sustainable Forestry Initiative standards, Forest Stewardship Plan requirements, American Tree Farm standards and Best Management Practices for Pennsylvania Forests. 8.09 Code The Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended through the applicable date of reference. 8.10 Conservation Easements Act The Pennsylvania Conservation and Preservation Easements Act, Act 29 of 2001, Pub. L. 390 as amended through the applicable date of reference.

alteration, installation or erection of temporary or permanent Improvements; and, whether or not in connection with any of the foregoing, any excavation, dredging, mining, filling or removal of gravel, soil, rock, sand, coal, petroleum or other minerals. 8.12 Default Rate An annual rate of interest equal at all times to two percent (2%) above the “prime rate” announced from time to time in The Wall Street Journal. 8.13 Dwelling Unit Use or intended use of an Improvement or portion of an Improvement for human habitation by one or more Persons (whether or not related). Existence of a separate kitchen accompanied by sleeping quarters is considered to constitute a separate Dwelling Unit. 8.14 Existing Agreements Easements and other servitudes affecting the Property prior to the Easement Date and running to the benefit of utility service providers and other Persons that constitute legally binding servitudes prior in right to this Conservation Easement. 8.15 Existing Improvements Improvements located on, above or under the Property as of the Easement Date as identified in the Baseline Documentation. 8.16 Existing Lots Lots existing under Applicable Law as of the Easement Date.

8.11 Construction Any demolition, construction, reconstruction, expansion, exterior

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8.17 Forestry Planting, growing, nurturing, managing and harvesting trees whether for timber and other useful products or for water quality, wildlife habitat and other Conservation Objectives. 8.18 Height The vertical elevation of an Improvement measured from the average exterior ground elevation of the Improvement to a point, if the Improvement is roofed, midway between the highest and lowest points of the roof excluding chimneys, cupolas, ventilation shafts, weathervanes and similar protrusions or, if the Improvement is unroofed, the top of the Improvement. 8.19 Impervious Coverage The aggregate area of all surfaces that are not capable of supporting vegetation within the applicable area of reference. Included in Impervious Coverage are the footprints (including roofs, decks, stairs and other extensions) of Improvements; paved or artificially covered surfaces such as crushed stone, gravel, concrete and asphalt; impounded water (such as a man-made pond); and compacted earth (such as an unpaved roadbed). Excluded from Impervious Coverage are running or non-impounded standing water (such as a naturally occurring lake); bedrock and naturally occurring stone and gravel; and earth (whether covered with vegetation or not) so long as it has not been compacted by nonnaturally occurring forces. 8.20 Improvement Any Existing Improvement or Additional Improvement.

8.21 Indemnified Parties Holder, each Beneficiary (if any) and their respective members, directors, officers, employees and agents and the heirs, personal representatives, successors and assigns of each of them. 8.22 Invasive Species A plant species that is (a) non-native (or alien) to the ecosystem under consideration; and (b) whose introduction causes or is likely to cause economic or environmental harm or harm to human health. In cases of uncertainty, publications such as “Plant Invaders of the Mid-Atlantic Natural Areas”, by the National Park Service National Capital Region, Center for Urban Ecology and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Chesapeake Bay Field Office are to be used to identify Invasive Species. 8.23 Lien Any mortgage, lien or other encumbrance securing the payment of money. 8.24 Litigation Expense Any court filing fee, court cost, arbitration fee or cost, witness fee and each other fee and cost of investigating and defending or asserting any claim of violation or for indemnification under this Conservation Easement including in each case, attorneys’ fees, other professionals’ fees and disbursements. 8.25 Losses Any liability, loss, claim, settlement payment, cost and expense, interest, award, judgment, damages (including punitive damages), diminution in value, fines, fees

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Appendix D: Conservation Easement and penalties or other charge other than a Litigation Expense. 8.26 Lot A unit, lot or parcel of real property separated or transferable for separate ownership or lease under Applicable Law. 8.27 Market Value The fair value that a willing buyer, under no compulsion to buy, would pay to a willing seller, under no compulsion to sell as established by appraisal in accordance with the then-current edition of Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice issued by the Appraisal Foundation or, if applicable, a qualified appraisal in conformity with §1.170A-13 of the Regulations. 8.28 Native Species A plant or animal indigenous to the locality under consideration. In cases of uncertainty, published atlases, particularly The Vascular Flora of Pennsylvania: Annotated Checklist and Atlas by Rhoads and Klein and Atlas of United States Trees, vols. 1 & 4 by Little are to be used to establish whether or not a species is native. 8.29 Owners The undersigned Owner or Owners and all Persons after them who hold any interest in all or any part of the Property. 8.30 Person An individual, organization, trust or other entity.

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8.31 Public Records The public records of the Office for the Recording of Deeds in and for the County in which the Property is located. 8.32 Qualified Organization A governmental or non-profit entity that (a) has a perpetual existence; (b) is established as a public charity for the purpose of preserving and conserving natural resources, natural habitats, environmentally sensitive areas and other charitable, scientific and educational purposes; (c) meets the criteria of a Qualified Organization under the Regulations; and (d) is duly authorized to acquire and hold conservation easements under Applicable Law. 8.33 Regulations The provisions of C.F.R. §1.170A-14 as amended through the applicable date of reference. 8.34 Regulatory Signs Signs (not exceeding one square foot each) to control access to the Property or for informational, directional or interpretive purposes. 8.35 Residential Improvements Dwellings and Improvements accessory to residential uses such as garage, swimming pool, pool house, tennis court and children’s play facilities. 8.36 Resource Management Plan A record of the decisions and intentions of Owners prepared by a qualified resource management professional for the purpose of protecting natural resources described in the Conservation Objectives during certain operations potentially affecting natural

resources protected under this Conservation Easement. The Resource Management Plan (sometimes referred to as the “RMP”) includes a resource assessment, identifies appropriate performance standards (based upon Best Management Practices where available and appropriate) and projects a multi-year description of planned activities for identified operations to be conducted in accordance with the plan. 8.37 Review Review and approval of Holder under the procedure described in Article V. 8.38 Review Requirements Collectively, any plans, specifications or information required for approval of the Subdivision, activity, use or Construction under Applicable Law (if any) plus (a) the information required under the Review Requirements incorporated into this Conservation Easement either as an Exhibit or as part of the Baseline Documentation or (b) if the information described in clause (a) is inapplicable, unavailable or insufficient under the circumstances, the guidelines for Review of submissions established by Holder as of the applicable date of reference. 8.39 Site Improvements Unenclosed Improvements such as driveways, walkways, boardwalks, storm water management facilities, bridges, parking areas and other pavements, lighting fixtures, signs, fences, walls, gates, man-made ponds, berms and landscaping treatments.

8.40 Soil Conservation Plan A plan for soil conservation and/or sedimentation and erosion control that meets the requirements of Applicable Law. 8.41 Steep Slope Areas Areas greater than one acre having a slope greater than 15%. 8.42 Subdivision Any transfer of an Existing Lot into separate ownership; any change in the boundary of the Property or any Lot within the Property; and any creation of a unit, lot or parcel of real property for separate use or ownership by any means including by lease or by implementing the condominium form of ownership. 8.43 Sustainable Land management practices that provide goods and services from an ecosystem without degradation of biodiversity and resource values at the site and without a decline in the yield of goods and services over time. 8.44 Utility Improvements Improvements for the reception, storage or transmission of water, sewage, electricity, gas and telecommunications or other sources of power. 8.45 Wet Areas Areas within 100-feet beyond the edge of watercourses, springs, wetlands and nonimpounded standing water. 8.46 Woodland Areas Area(s) designated on the Conservation Plan and subject to use limitations intended

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Appendix D: Conservation Easement to allow the maintenance or growth of hedgerows or other wooded areas within a portion of the Property that would otherwise be available for Agricultural use. INTENDING TO BE LEGALLY BOUND, the undersigned Owner or Owners and Holder, by their respective duly authorized representatives, have signed and delivered this Conservation Easement as of the Easement Date. Witness/Attest: ________________________________ Owner’s Name: ________________________________

This document is based on the Pennsylvania Conservation Easement (4/20/06 ed.) provided by the Pennsylvania Land Trust Association. This document should not be construed or relied upon as legal advice or legal opinion on any specific facts or circumstances. The Pennsylvania Conservation Easement must be revised to reflect specific circumstances under the guidance of legal counsel. COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA COUNTY OF ___________________________. ON THIS DAY _____________, before me, the undersigned officer, personally appeared ___________________________, known to me (or satisfactorily proven) to be the person(s) whose name(s) is/are subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowledged that he/she/they executed the same for the purposes therein contained.

COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA : COUNTY OF _____________________________ ON THIS DAY _______________ before me, the undersigned officer, personally appeared _____________________________, who acknowledged him/herself to be the ______________________ of _________________________, a Pennsylvania non-profit corporation, and that he/she as such officer, being authorized to do so, executed the foregoing instrument for the purposes therein contained by signing the name of the corporation by her/himself as such officer. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I hereunto set my hand and official seal. _______________________________________ Notary Public Print Name:

Owner’s Name: ________________________________

By: ________________________________ Name: Title:

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I hereunto set my hand and official seal. ________________________________________ Notary Public Print Name:

Acceptance by Beneficiary: [NAME OF BENEFICIARY] ________________________________

By: ________________________________ Name: Title:

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Appendix D: Conservation Easement

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Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix E: Riparian Forest Buffer Agreement Appendix E: Riparian Forest Buffer Protection Agreement

Outlined below is a sample riparian forest buffer protection agreement. The sample agreement is based on a model agreement developed by the Pennsylvania Land Trust Association. THIS RIPARIAN FOREST BUFFER PROTECTION AGREEMENT (this “Protection Agreement”) dated as of _____________ (the “Agreement Date”) is by and between ___________________ (the “undersigned Owner or Owners”) and __________________ (the “Holder”). Article I. Background 1.01 Property The undersigned Owner or Owners are the sole owners in fee simple of the Property described in Exhibit “A” (the “Property”). The Property is also described as: Street Address: Municipality: County: Parcel Identifier: 1.02 Purpose (a) Conservation Objectives The undersigned Owner or Owners and Holder are entering into this Protection Agreement to establish a riparian forest buffer (the “Riparian Buffer”) along ___________ Creek (the “Creek”) for the following purposes (collectively, the “Conservation Objectives”): to maintain and improve the quality of water resources associated with the Creek; to perpetuate and foster the growth of healthy forest; to preserve habitat for Native Species dependent on water resources or forest; and

to ensure that activities and uses in the Riparian Buffer are sustainable, i.e., they neither diminish the biological integrity of the Riparian Buffer nor deplete the soil, forest and other natural resources within the Riparian Buffer over time. (b) Riparian Buffer Area The Riparian Buffer consists of the strips of land stretching _______ (##) feet landward from the Top of the Banks of the Creek, together with the banks and bed of the Creek, to the extent that the strips, banks and bed are contained within the Property. (c) Baseline Documentation The report (the “Baseline Documentation”), to be kept on file at the principal office of Holder, describes the conservation values of the Riparian Buffer identified in the Conservation Objectives, describes existing conditions of the Riparian Buffer including Existing Improvements as of the Agreement Date, and includes, among other information, photographs depicting the Riparian Buffer. 1.03 Owners’ Control Owners reserve all rights and responsibilities pertaining to their ownership of the Property but for the rights specifically granted to Holder in this Protection Agreement. No public access is granted by virtue of this Protection Agreement. 1.04 Defined Terms Initially capitalized terms used and not otherwise defined in this Article I are defined in the last Article of this Protection Agreement (the “Glossary”).

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Article II. Restrictive Covenants: Improvements No Improvements are permitted within the Riparian Buffer except as set forth in this Article II. 2.01 Existing Improvements Any Existing Improvement may be maintained, repaired and replaced in its existing location. An Existing Improvement may be expanded or relocated if the expanded or relocated Improvement complies with requirements applicable to an Additional Improvement of the same type set forth in this Article. 2.02 Additional Improvements Only the following Additional Improvements are permitted within the Riparian Buffer: (a) Existing Agreements Improvements that Owners are required to allow under Existing Agreements. (b) Other Additional Improvements (i) Fences, walls and gates along the perimeter of the Riparian Buffer; signs not exceeding one squarefoot each; and habitat improvement devices such as birdhouses and bat houses. (ii) Trails of highly porous surface and footbridges for non-motorized use. (iii) Subject to Review, fish passage, fish habitat improvement and stream bank stabilization structures. (iv) Subject to Review, irrigation facilities accessory to agricultural use of the Property. (v) Subject to Review, stream crossing and access structures and associated access corridor for the purpose of allowing passage across the Riparian Buffer by livestock, horses and agricultural equipment to cross the Creek or

access water in the Creek in a specified location. It is Owners’ responsibility to install fencing whenever necessary to prevent grazing within or other unrestricted access to the Riparian Buffer by horses or livestock. (vi) Subject to Review, access drives and utility lines but only if there is no other reasonably feasible means to provide access and utility services to the Property except via the Riparian Buffer. Article III. Restrictive Covenants: Activities; Uses; Disturbance of Resources No activities, uses or disturbances of resources are permitted within the Riparian Buffer except as set forth in this Article III. 3.01 Existing Agreements Activities, uses and Construction that Owners are required to allow under Existing Agreements are permitted. 3.02 Other Activities and Uses Except as provided in the preceding section, activities and uses within the Riparian Buffer are limited to those permitted below and provided in any case that the intensity or frequency of the activity or use does not have the potential to materially and adversely impair maintenance or attainment of Conservation Objectives. (a) Disturbance of Resources (i) Cutting trees, Construction or other disturbance of resources, including removal of Invasive Species, to the extent reasonably prudent to remove, mitigate or warn against an unreasonable risk of harm to Persons, property or health of Native

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Appendix E: Riparian Forest Buffer Agreement Species on or about the Riparian Buffer. Owners must take such steps as are reasonable under the circumstances to consult with Holder prior to taking actions that, but for this provision, would not be permitted or would be permitted only after Review. (ii) Planting native species but no monoculture. (iii) Removal of Invasive Species to accommodate replanting with Native Species. (iv) Sustainable forestry in accordance with a Resource Management Plan approved for that activity after review but not within fifty (50) feet of the top of the bank of the Creek. (v) Agricultural use is limited to passage of horses, livestock and equipment via a corridor (if any) permitted under Article II to access water at a specified location or stream crossing structures (if any) permitted under Article II. (vi) Subject to review, stream bank stabilization, dam removal and other habitat improvement activities. (vii) Other resource management activities consistent with conservation objectives and conducted in accordance with the Resource Management Plan approved for that activity after Review. (viii) Subject to review, removal and disturbance of soil, rock and vegetative resources to the extent reasonably necessary to accommodate Construction of and maintain access to Improvements within the Riparian Buffer with restoration as soon as reasonably feasible by replanting with native species. (ix) Vehicular use (including motorized vehicular use) in connection with an

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activity permitted within the Riparian Buffer or otherwise in the case of emergency. (b) Recreational and Educational Uses Activities that do not require Improvements other than those permitted within the Riparian Buffer and do not have the potential to materially and adversely affect Conservation Objectives such as (i) walking, nature study, bird watching, fishing and hunting; and (ii) other educational or scientific activities consistent with maintenance or attainment of the Conservation Objectives. Article IV. Rights and Duties of Holder and Beneficiaries 4.01 Grant to Holder By signing this Protection Agreement and unconditionally delivering it to Holder, the undersigned Owner or Owners, intending to be legally bound, grant and convey to Holder a conservation servitude over the Riparian Buffer in perpetuity for the purpose of administering and enforcing the restrictions and limitations set forth in this Protection Agreement. The undersigned Owner or Owners warrant to Holder that the Riparian Buffer is, as of the Agreement Date, free and clear of all Liens or, if it is not, that Owners have obtained and attached to this Protection Agreement as an exhibit the legally binding subordination of any Liens affecting the Riparian Buffer as of the Agreement Date. 4.02 Rights and Duties of Holder The grant to Holder under the preceding section gives Holder the right and duty to perform the following tasks:

(a) Enforcement To enforce the terms of this Protection Agreement in accordance with applicable provisions of this Protection Agreement including, in addition to other remedies, the right to enter the Property to investigate a suspected, alleged or threatened violation.

that the amendment is consistent with and in furtherance of the Conservation Objectives; will not result in any private benefit prohibited under the Internal Revenue Code; and otherwise conforms to Holder’s policy with respect to amendments of conservation servitudes.

(b) Inspection To enter the Property and inspect the Riparian Buffer for compliance with the requirements of this Protection Agreement upon reasonable notice, in a reasonable manner and at reasonable times.

(b) Signs To install one or more signs identifying the protected status of the Riparian Buffer which may be located (i) within the Riparian Buffer or (ii) in another location within the Property readable from the public right of way and otherwise reasonably acceptable to Owners.

(c) Review To exercise rights of Review in accordance with the requirements of this Article as and when required under applicable provisions of this Protection Agreement. (d) Interpretation To interpret the terms of this Protection Agreement, apply the terms of this Protection Agreement to factual conditions on or about the Riparian Buffer, respond to requests for information from Persons having an interest in this Protection Agreement or the Riparian Buffer (such as requests for a certification of compliance), and apply the terms of this Protection Agreement to changes occurring or proposed within the Riparian Buffer. 4.03 Other Rights of Holder The grant to Holder under this Article also permits Holder, without any obligation to do so, to exercise the following rights: (a) Amendment To enter into an amendment of this Protection Agreement with Owners if Holder determines

4.04 Review The following provisions are incorporated into any provision of this Protection Agreement that is subject to Review: (a) Notice to Holder At least thirty (30) days before Owners begin or allow any Construction, activity or use that is subject to Review, Owners must notify Holder of the change including with the notice such information as is reasonably sufficient to comply with Review Requirements and otherwise describe the change and its potential impact on natural resources within the Riparian Buffer. (b) Notice to Owners Within thirty (30) days after receipt of Owners’ notice, Holder must notify Owners of Holder’s determination to (i) accept Owners’ proposal in whole or in part; (ii) reject Owners’ proposal in whole or in part; (iii) accept Owners’ proposal conditioned

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Appendix E: Riparian Forest Buffer Agreement upon compliance with conditions imposed by Holder; or (iv) reject Owners’ notice for insufficiency of information on which to base a determination. If Holder gives conditional acceptance under clause (iii), commencement of the proposed Improvement, activity, use or Construction constitutes acceptance by Owners of all conditions set forth in Holder’s notice. (c) Failure to Notify If Holder fails to notify Owners as required in the preceding subsection, the proposal set forth in Owners’ notice is deemed approved. (d) Standard of Reasonableness Holder’s approval will not be unreasonably withheld; however, it is not unreasonable for Holder to disapprove a proposal that may adversely affect Conservation Objectives. 4.05 Beneficiaries Owners and Holder grant and convey to any of the Persons identified below (collectively, the “Beneficiaries”) the right to exercise Holder’s rights and duties under this Protection Agreement should Holder fail to uphold and enforce in perpetuity the restrictions under this Protection Agreement. • The conservation district of the county in which the Property is located. • The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania acting through the Department of Environmental Protection.

Article V. Violation; Remedies 5.01 Breach of Duty If Holder fails to enforce this Protection Agreement, or ceases to qualify as a Qualified Organization, then the rights and duties of Holder under this Protection Agreement may be (i) exercised by a Beneficiary or a Qualified Organization designated by a Beneficiary; and/or (ii) transferred to another Qualified Organization by a court of competent jurisdiction. 5.02 Violation of Protection Agreement If Holder determines that this Protection Agreement is being or has been violated or that a violation is threatened or imminent then the provisions of this Section will apply: (a) Notice Holder must notify Owners of the violation. Holder’s notice may include its recommendations of measures to be taken by Owners to cure the violation and restore features of the Riparian Buffer damaged or altered as a result of the violation. (b) Opportunity to Cure Owners’ cure period expires thirty (30) days after the date of Holder’s notice to Owners subject to extension for the time reasonably necessary to cure but only if all of the following conditions are satisfied: (i) Owners cease the activity constituting the violation promptly upon receipt of Holder’s notice; (ii) Owners and Holder agree, within the initial thirty (30) day period, upon the measures Owners will take to cure the violation; (iii) Owners commence to cure within the initial thirty (30) day period; and

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(iv) Owners continue thereafter to use best efforts and due diligence to complete the agreed upon cure.

the Riparian Buffer identified in the Conservation Objectives in clear violation of the terms of this Protection Agreement.

(c) Imminent Harm No notice or cure period is required if circumstances require prompt action to prevent or mitigate irreparable harm to natural resource within the Riparian Buffer described in the Conservation Objectives in clear violation of the terms of this Protection Agreement.

(d) Restitution Seek restitution of any amounts paid for this Protection Agreement if the Riparian Buffer is the subject of a taking in eminent domain or other civil action seeking modification or termination of this Protection Agreement or release of the Riparian Buffer from this Protection Agreement.

5.03 Remedies Upon expiration of the cure period (if any) described in the preceding Section, Holder may do any one or more of the following: (a) Coercive Relief Seek coercive relief to specifically enforce the terms of this Protection Agreement; to restrain present or future violations of this Protection Agreement; and/or to compel restoration of natural resources destroyed or altered as a result of the violation. (b) Civil Action Recover from Owners or other Persons responsible for the violation all sums owing to Holder under applicable provisions of this Protection Agreement together with interest thereon from the date due at an annual rate of interest equal at all times to two percent above the “prime rate” announced from time to time in The Wall Street Journal. These monetary obligations include, among others, Losses and Litigation Expenses. (c) Self-Help Enter the Property to prevent or mitigate irreparable harm to natural resources within

5.04 Remedies Cumulative The description of Holder’s remedies in this Article does not preclude Holder from exercising any other right or remedy that may at any time be available to Holder under this Article or otherwise under Applicable Law. If Holder chooses to exercise one remedy, Holder may nevertheless choose to exercise any one or more of the other remedies available to Holder at the same time or at any other time. 5.05 No Waiver If Holder does not exercise any right or remedy when it is available to Holder, that is not to be interpreted as a waiver of any non-compliance with this Protection Agreement or a waiver of Holder’s rights to exercise its rights or remedies at another time. 5.06 No Fault of Owners Holder will waive its right to reimbursement under this Article as to Owners (but not other Persons who may be responsible for the violation) if Holder is

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Appendix E: Riparian Forest Buffer Agreement reasonably satisfied that the violation was not the fault of Owners and could not have been anticipated or prevented by Owners by reasonable means.

receiving party at the address listed below or to another address designated by that Person by notice to the other Person: If to Owners:

5.07 Continuing Liability If the Riparian Buffer is transferred while a violation remains uncured, the transferor Owners remain liable for the violation jointly and severally with the transferee Owners. This provision does not apply if Owners (a) notify Holder of the names and address for notices of the transferees and, if less than the entirety of the Property is transferred, furnish Holder with a survey and legal description of the portion of the Property transferred; and (b) Holder has issued a certificate of compliance evidencing no violations within thirty (30) days prior to the transfer. It is the responsibility of the Owners to notify Holder of the transfer and request a certificate of compliance to verify whether violations exist as of the date of transfer.

_______________________________________

Article VI. Miscellaneous 6.01 Notices (a) Requirements Each Person giving any notice pursuant to this Protection Agreement must give the notice in writing and must use one of the following methods of delivery: (i) personal delivery; (ii) certified mail, return receipt requested and postage prepaid; or (iii) nationally recognized overnight courier, with all fees prepaid. (b) Address for Notices Each Person giving a notice must address the notice to the appropriate Person at the

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_______________________________________ _______________________________________ If to Holder: __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ 6.02 Governing Law The internal laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania govern this Protection Agreement. 6.03 Binding Agreement This Protection Agreement binds and benefits Owners and Holder and their respective personal representatives, successors and assigns. 6.04 Amendments, Waivers No amendment or waiver of any provision of this Protection Agreement or consent to any departure by Owners from the terms of this Protection Agreement is effective unless the amendment, waiver or consent is in writing and signed by an authorized signatory for Holder. A waiver or consent is effective only in the specific instance and for the specific purpose given.

6.05 Severability If any provision of this Protection Agreement is determined to be invalid, illegal or unenforceable, the remaining provisions of this Protection Agreement remain valid, binding and enforceable. To the extent permitted by Applicable Law, the parties waive any provision of Applicable Law that renders any provision of this Protection Agreement invalid, illegal or unenforceable in any respect. 6.06 Counterparts This Protection Agreement may be signed in multiple counterparts, each of which constitutes an original, and all of which, collectively, constitute only one agreement. 6.07 Indemnity Owners must indemnify and defend the Indemnified Parties against all Losses and Litigation Expenses arising out of or relating to: (a) any breach or violation of this Protection Agreement or Applicable Law; (b) damage to property or personal injury (including death) occurring on or about the Riparian Buffer if and to the extent not caused by the negligent or wrongful acts or omissions of an Indemnified Party.

the word “may” is permissive and does not imply any obligation. (c) Conservation and Preservation Easements Act This Protection Agreement is intended to be interpreted so as to convey to Holder all of the rights and privileges of a holder of a conservation easement under the Pennsylvania Conservation and Preservation Easements Act, Act 29 of 2001, Pub. L. 390. (d) ReStatement of Servitudes This Protection Agreement is intended to be interpreted so as to convey to Holder all of the rights and privileges of a holder of a conservation servitude under the ReStatement (Third) of Servitudes. 6.09 Entire Agreement This is the entire agreement of Owners, Holder and Beneficiaries (if any) pertaining to the subject matter of this Protection Agreement. The terms of this Protection Agreement supersede in full all Statements and writings between Owners, Holder and others pertaining to the transaction set forth in this Protection Agreement.

6.08 Guides to Interpretation (a) Captions Except for the identification of defined terms in the Glossary, the descriptive headings of the articles, sections and subsections of this Protection Agreement are for convenience only and do not constitute a part of this Protection Agreement.

6.10 Incorporation by Reference The following items are incorporated into this Protection Agreement by means of this reference: • The Baseline Documentation • The legal description of the Property attached as Exhibit “A”

(b) Terms The word “including” means “including but not limited to”. The word “must” is obligatory;

6.11 Coal Rights Notice The following notice is given to Owners solely for the purpose of compliance with

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Appendix E: Riparian Forest Buffer Agreement the requirements of the Pennsylvania Conservation and Preservation Easements Act, Act 29 of 2001, Pub. L. 390:

NOTICE: This Protection Agreement may impair the development of coal interests including workable coal seams or coal interests which have been severed from the Riparian Buffer. Article VII. Glossary 7.01 Additional Improvements All buildings, structures, facilities and other improvements within the Riparian Buffer other than Existing Improvements. 7.02 Applicable Law Any Federal, State or local laws, statutes, codes, ordinances, standards and regulations applicable to the Riparian Buffer or this Protection Agreement as amended through the applicable date of reference. 7.03 Beneficiary or Beneficiaries The Persons (if any) designated as a Beneficiary under Article IV. 7.04 Construction Any demolition, construction, reconstruction, expansion, exterior alteration, installation or erection of temporary or permanent Improvements; and, whether or not in connection with any of the foregoing, any excavation, dredging, mining, filling or removal of gravel, soil,

rock, sand, coal, petroleum or other minerals. 7.05 Existing Agreements Easements and other servitudes affecting the Riparian Buffer prior to the Agreement Date and running to the benefit of utility service providers and other Persons that constitute legally binding servitudes prior in right to this Protection Agreement. 7.06 Existing Improvements Improvements located on, above or under the Riparian Buffer as of the Agreement Date as identified in the Baseline Documentation. 7.07 Improvement Any Existing Improvement or Additional Improvement. 7.08 Indemnified Parties Holder, each Beneficiary (if any) and their respective members, directors, officers, employees and agents and the heirs, personal representatives, successors and assigns of each of them. 7.09 Invasive Species A plant species that is (a) non-native (or alien) to the ecosystem under consideration; and (b) whose introduction causes or is likely to cause economic or environmental harm or harm to human health. In cases of uncertainty, publications such as “Plant Invaders of the Mid-Atlantic Natural Areas”, by the National Park Service National Capital Region, Center for Urban Ecology and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Chesapeake Bay Field Office are to be used to identify Invasive Species.

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7.10 Lien Any mortgage, lien or other encumbrance securing the payment of money. 7.11 Litigation Expense Any court filing fee, court cost, arbitration fee or cost, witness fee and each other fee and cost of investigating and defending or asserting any claim of violation or for indemnification under this Protection Agreement including in each case, attorneys’ fees, other professionals’ fees and disbursements. 7.12 Losses Any liability, loss, claim, settlement payment, cost and expense, interest, award, judgment, damages (including punitive damages), diminution in value, fines, fees and penalties or other charge other than a Litigation Expense. 7.13 Native Species A plant indigenous to the locality under consideration. In cases of uncertainty, published atlases, particularly The Vascular Flora of Pennsylvania: Annotated Checklist and Atlas by Rhoads and Klein and Atlas of United States Trees, vols. 1 & 4 by Little are to be used to establish whether or not a species is Native. 7.14 Owners The undersigned Owner or Owners and all Persons after them who hold any interest in all or any part of the Riparian Buffer. 7.15 Person An individual, organization, trust or other entity. 7.16 Resource Management Plan A record of the decisions and intentions of Owners prepared by a qualified resource

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management professional for the purpose of protecting natural resources described in the Conservation Objectives during certain operations potentially affecting natural resources protected under this Protection Agreement. The Resource Management Plan includes a resource assessment, identifies appropriate performance standards and projects a multi-year description of planned activities for identified operations to be conducted in accordance with the plan. 7.17 Review Review and approval of Holder under the procedure described in Article IV. 7.18 Review Requirements Collectively, any plans, specifications or information required for approval of an activity, use or Construction under Applicable Law (if any) plus (a) the information required under the Review Requirements incorporated into this Protection Agreement either as an exhibit or as part of the Baseline Documentation or (b) if the information described in clause (a) is inapplicable, unavailable or insufficient under the circumstances, the guidelines for Review of submissions established by Holder as of the applicable date of reference. 7.19 Top of the Bank The elevation at which rising waters begin to inundate the floodplain. In case of ambiguous, indefinite or nonexistent floodplain or question regarding location, the Top of the Bank shall be the bankfull water elevation as delineated by a person trained in fluvial geomorphology and

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Appendix E: Riparian Forest Buffer Agreement utilizing the most recent edition of Applied River Morphology by Dave Rosgen or reference book of greater stature. INTENDING TO BE LEGALLY BOUND, the undersigned Owner or Owners and Holder, by their respective duly authorized representatives, have signed and delivered this Protection Agreement as of the Agreement Date. Witness/Attest: _______________________________________ Name: _______________________________________ Name: Title: COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA: COUNTY OF___________________________ ON THIS DAY _____________, before me, the undersigned officer, personally appeared ___________________________, known to me (or satisfactorily proven) to be the person(s) whose name(s) is/are subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowledged that he/she/they executed the same for the purposes therein contained.

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IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I hereunto set my hand and official seal. __________________________________________ Notary Public Print Name: COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA : COUNTY OF_____________________________ ON THIS DAY _______________ before me, the undersigned officer, personally appeared _____________________________, who acknowledged him/herself to be the ______________________ of _________________________, a Pennsylvania non-profit corporation, and that he/she as such officer, being authorized to do so, executed the foregoing instrument for the purposes therein contained by signing the name of the corporation by her/himself as such officer. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I hereunto set my hand and official seal. __________________________________________ Notary Public Print Name: This document is based on the Pennsylvania Riparian Forest Buffer Agreement (4/25/06 ed) provided by the Pennsylvania Land Trust Association. This document should not be construed or relied upon as legal advice or legal opinion on any specific facts or circumstances. The Pennsylvania Conservation Easement must be revised to reflect specific circumstances under the guidance of legal counsel.

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Appendix F: Trail Easement Agreement Appendix F: Trail Easement Agreement

Outlined below is a sample trail easement agreement. The sample agreement is based on a model agreement developed by the Pennsylvania Land Trust Association. THIS TRAIL EASEMENT AGREEMENT (“this Agreement”) dated as of ___________ (the “Agreement Date”) is by and between __________________ (“the undersigned Owner or Owners”) and _________________ (the “Holder”). Article I. Background; Grant of Easement 1.01 Property The undersigned Owner or Owners are the sole owners in fee simple of the property described below (the“Property”):Street Address:Municipality: County: State: Pennsylvania Parcel Identifier: Acreage: 1.02 Trail Area; Trail Plan A certain portion of the Property (the “Trail Area”) is the subject of this Agreement and is described in Exhibit “A.” The Trail Area is ____ (##) feet wide and is located on the Property as shown on a survey or other graphic depiction attached as Exhibit “B” (the “Trail Plan”). 1.03 Trail A trail for use by the general public may be established in the Trail Area (the “Trail”).

1.04 Grant of Easement and Right-of-Way By signing this Agreement and unconditionally delivering it to Holder, the undersigned Owner or Owners, intending to be legally bound, grant and convey to Holder an exclusive easement and right-of-way over, under, and across the Trail Area in perpetuity, for the purpose and subject to the limitations set forth in Article II and the reserved rights of Owners set forth in Article III. 1.05 Purchase Price The undersigned Owner or Owners acknowledge receipt of the sum of ______________ in consideration of the grant of easement to Holder under this Agreement.

Article II. Limitations The grant of easement under this Agreement is subject to the limitations set forth in this Article. 2.01 Limitation on Activities and Uses (a) Purpose The Trail Area may be used only for noncommercial recreational, educational and open-space purposes.

1.07 Existing Agreements The undersigned Owner or Owners warrant to Holder that there are no easements or other servitudes affecting the Trail Area prior to the Agreement Date and running to the benefit of Persons that constitute legally binding servitudes prior in right to this Agreement.

(b) Use Access to the Trail Area by the general public is subject to the following limitations: (i) The Trail may be used only for walking, horseback riding, cross-country skiing, nature study, and the like. (ii) Motorized vehicles are prohibited except in the case of emergency or in connection with the construction, maintenance, or patrol of the Trail Area or by persons confined to motordriven wheelchairs. (iii) Use is limited to the hours between dawn and dusk. (iv) Smoking or lighting of fires is prohibited. (v) Consumption of alcoholic beverages is prohibited. (vi) Trapping or hunting is prohibited. (vii) Swimming is prohibited. (viii) Holder may impose additional reasonable limitations upon the time, place and manner of use. (ix) No fee may be charged for use of the Trail Area.

1.08 Beneficiaries Owners and Holder grant and convey to the Persons, if any, identified below (the “Beneficiaries”) rights as indicated with respect to this Agreement. (There are no Beneficiaries.)

(c) Disturbance Soil, rock, and vegetative resources may be removed, cut or otherwise disturbed only to the extent reasonably necessary to accommodate construction, maintenance and

1.06 Liens and Subordination The undersigned Owner or Owners warrant to Holder that the Trail Area is, as of the Agreement Date, free and clear of all Liens or, if it is not, that Owners have obtained and attached to this Agreement as an exhibit the legally binding subordination of any mortgage, lien, or other encumbrance affecting the Trail Area as of the Agreement Date.

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patrol of the Trail and maintenance of access to the Trail Area. When vegetative cover is removed, it must be restored as soon as reasonably feasible by replanting with grasses or native species of trees, shrubs, and plant materials. (d) Construction Prior to commencing initial construction of the Trail or relocation of more than 200 linear feet of the Trail within the Trail Area, Holder must: (i) Provide Owners with at least 30 days notice. (ii) Obtain legally binding waivers of mechanics liens from all Persons furnishing labor or materials in connection with construction. (iii) Obtain certificates evidencing liability insurance coverage with respect to Holder and all Persons entering the Property for the purpose of construction. (iv) Obtain, at Holder’s cost and expense, all permits and approvals required for the construction. 2.02 Limitation on Improvements Improvements within the Trail Area are limited to the following: (a) Trail (i) The Trail, including steps and railings and other trail surface structures as well as bridges and culverts for traversing wet areas within the Trail Area. (ii) The Trail may not exceed ____ (##) feet in width. (iii) The Trail may be covered, if at all, by wood chips, gravel, or other porous surface, or paved or covered with other material as may be required by Applicable Law.

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Appendix F: Trail Easement Agreement (b) Accessory Facilities (i) A reasonable number of benches, picnic tables, and wastebaskets [and bicycle racks]. (ii) Signs to mark the Trail and provide information regarding applicable time, place, and manner restrictions. (iii) Signs for interpretive purposes and to indicate the interest of Holder and Beneficiaries in the Trail Area. (iv) Fencing, gates and barriers to control access. 2.03 No Expense to Owners Owners are not responsible for costs associated with construction and maintenance of improvements in the Trail Area except for improvements resulting from Owners exercising a reserved right. Holder must promptly pay as and when due all costs and expenses incurred in connection with construction and maintenance. Article III. Reserved Rights of Owners The easement granted to Holder under this Agreement is exclusive. This means that Owners have no rights to enter or use the Trail Area except to exercise rights accorded to the general public and except as provided in this Article. Owners reserve the following rights: 3.01 Owner Access Owners may enter the Trail Area by foot at any time except when construction and maintenance activities could present a danger. 3.02 Mitigating Risk Owners may cut trees or otherwise disturb resources only to the extent reasonably

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prudent to remove or mitigate against an unreasonable risk of harm to Persons on or about the Trail Area; however, Owners do not assume any responsibility or liability to the general public for failing to do so. 3.03 Fencing Owners may install fencing, at Owners’ expense, along the perimeter of the Trail Area, not to exceed four (4) feet in height and constructed of post-and-rail or other open weave construction that preserves scenic views from the Trail. Owners must not impede access to or discourage use of the Trail. 3.04 Hunting Owners may close public access to the Trail Area for public safety reasons from the Monday after Thanksgiving through the month of December so as to reasonably accommodate hunting by or under control of Owners within the Trail Area. Article IV. Federal Tax Items [If there is no donation or if the undersigned Owner or Owners will not be pursuing Federal tax benefits for the donation, the content below the caption of this Article can be deleted and replaced with the following: “The undersigned Owner or Owners and Holder confirm that the grant to the Holder of the easement under this Agreement is not intended to be a qualified conservation contribution under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended through the applicable date of reference.”] 4.01 Qualified Conservation Contribution The easement granted under this Agreement has been donated in whole or in part to Holder by the undersigned Owner or Owners. It is intended to qualify as a charitable donation of a partial interest in real eState (as defined

under §170(f)(3)(B)(iii) of the Code) to a qualified organization (as defined in §1.170A14(c)(1) of the Regulations). 4.02 Definitions of Code and Regulations “Code” means the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended through the applicable date of reference. “Regulations” mean the provisions of C.F.R. §1.170A-14 as amended through the applicable date of reference. 4.03 Public Benefit This easement is given for public outdoor recreation and education and is for the substantial and regular use of the general public or the community. This Agreement provides significant public benefit as defined in §1.170A-14(d)(2)(i) of the Regulations. Public policies and programs that illustrate and support the significant public benefit of this Agreement include: (i) The Open Space Plan of ______Township, adopted in 200_, which ____. (ii) The ____County Greenways Plan, adopted in 200_, which _____. (iii) The ___ Township Zoning Ordinance, adopted in 200_, which ____. 4.04 Mineral Interests No Person has retained a qualified mineral interest in the Trail Area of a nature that would disqualify the Agreement for purposes of §1.170A-14(g)(4) of the Regulations. 4.05 Notice Required under Regulations To the extent required for compliance with §1.170A-13(g)(4)(ii) of the Regulations, Owners agree to notify Holder before exercising any reserved right that may have an adverse impact on the conservation interests or public

recreational purposes associated with the Trail Area. 4.06 Baseline Documentation The undersigned Owner or Owners and Holder have signed for identification purposes the report (the “Baseline Documentation”), to be kept on file at the principal office of Holder, that contains an original, fullsize version of the Trail Plan together with other pertinent information regarding the conservation and public recreational interests served by the Agreement, including photographs depicting existing conditions of the Trail Area as of the Agreement Date. 4.07 Trail Area Right In accordance with §1.170A-14(g)(6) of the Regulations, the undersigned Owner or Owners agree that the easement granted under this Agreement gives rise to a property right, immediately vested in the Holder, that entitles the Holder to compensation upon extinguishment of the easement. The fair market value of the property right is to be determined in accordance with the Regulations; i.e., it is at least equal to the proportionate value that this easement as of the Agreement Date bears to the value of the Property as a whole as of the Agreement Date. Holder must use any funds received by application of this provision in a manner consistent with the recreational and conservation purposes of this Agreement. 4.08 Qualification under §2031(c) of the Code To the extent required to qualify for exemption from Federal eState tax under

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Appendix F: Trail Easement Agreement §2031(c) of the Code, and only to the extent such activity is not otherwise prohibited or limited under this Agreement, Owners agree that commercial recreational uses are not permitted within the Trail Area. Article V. Miscellaneous 5.01 Indemnity Holder must indemnify and defend Owners against all Losses and Litigation Expenses resulting from property damage and/or personal injuries that occur or are alleged to occur as a result of Holder’s installation or maintenance of the Trail or Trail Area, except to the extent caused by the negligent or wrongful acts or omissions of Owners. The word “Losses” means any liability, loss, claim, settlement payment, cost and expense, interest, award, judgment, damages (including punitive damages), diminution in value, fines, fees, and penalties or other charge other than a Litigation Expense. The term “Litigation Expenses” means any court filing fee, court cost, arbitration fee or cost, witness fee, and each other fee and cost of investigating and defending or asserting any claim of violation or for indemnification under this Agreement including in each case, attorneys’ fees, other professionals’ fees, and disbursements. 5.02 Recreation Use of Land and Water Act This Agreement is intended to be interpreted so as to convey to Owners and Holder all of the protections from liability provided by the Pennsylvania Recreation Use of Land and Water Act, 68 P.S. §477-1 et seq., as amended through the applicable date of reference, or any other Applicable

Law that provides immunity or limitation of liability for owners or possessors who make property available to the public for recreational purposes. 5.03 Amendment Any amendment of this Agreement must be in writing, signed by Owners and Holder, and recorded in the Public Records. 5.04 Governing Law The internal laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania govern this Agreement. 5.05 Assignment and Transfer Neither Owners nor Holder may assign or otherwise transfer any of their respective rights or duties under this Agreement voluntarily or involuntarily, whether by merger, consolidation, dissolution, operation of law or any other manner except as permitted below. Any purported assignment or transfer in violation of this section is void. (a) By Holder Holder may assign its rights and duties under this Agreement, either in whole or in part, but only to a Qualified Organization that executes and records in the Public Records a written agreement assuming the obligations of Holder under this Agreement. Holder must notify Owners within 30 days prior to the assignment of the identity and address for notices of the Qualified Organization who has agreed to assume the obligations of the Holder under this Agreement. (b) By Owners This Agreement is a servitude running with the land binding upon the undersigned Owners and, upon recordation in the Public

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Records, all subsequent Owners of the Trail Area or any portion of the Trail Area are bound by its terms whether or not the Owners had actual notice of this Agreement and whether or not the deed of transfer specifically referred to the transfer being under and subject to this Agreement. This Agreement binds and benefits Owners and Holder and their respective personal representatives, successors and assigns. 5.06 Severability If any provision of this Agreement is determined to be invalid, illegal or unenforceable, the remaining provisions of this Agreement remain valid, binding, and enforceable. To the extent permitted by Applicable Law, the parties waive any provision of Applicable Law that renders any provision of this Agreement invalid, illegal, or unenforceable in any respect. 5.07 Entire Agreement This is the entire agreement of Owners, Holder and Beneficiaries (if any) pertaining to the subject matter of this Agreement. The terms of this Agreement supersede in full all Statements and writings between Owners, Holder, and others pertaining to the transaction set forth in this Agreement. 5.08 Definitions of Capitalized Terms This section contains definitions of capitalized terms used but not defined elsewhere in the Agreement. (i) “Applicable Law” means any Federal, State, or local laws, statutes, codes, ordinances, standards, and regulations applicable to the Trail, the Trail Area, or this Agreement, as amended through the applicable date of reference.

(ii) “Owners” means the undersigned Owner or Owners and all Persons after them who hold any interest in all or any part of the Trail Area. (iii) “Person” means an individual, organization, trust, or other entity. (iv) “Public Records” means the public records of the Office for the Recording of Deeds in and for the county in which the Trail Area is located. (v) “Qualified Organization” means a governmental or non-profit entity that (a) has a perpetual existence; (b) is established as a public charity for the purpose of preserving and conserving natural resources, natural habitats, environmentally sensitive areas and other charitable, scientific and educational purposes; (c) meets the criteria of a qualified organization under C.F.R. §1.170A-14(c)(1) as amended through the applicable date of reference; and (d) is duly authorized to acquire and hold trail easements under Applicable Law. 5.09 Incorporation by Reference The following items are incorporated into this Agreement by means of this reference: • The legal description of the Trail Area attached as Exhibit “A” • The Trail Plan attached as Exhibit “B” • The baseline documentation, if any • [The mortgage subordination agreement attached as Exhibit C”]

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Appendix F: Trail Easement Agreement INTENDING TO BE LEGALLY BOUND, the undersigned Owner or Owners and Holder, by their respective duly authorized representatives, have signed and delivered this Agreement as of the Agreement Date. Witness/Attest: _______________________________________

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COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA: COUNTY OF: _________________________ ON THIS DAY _____________, before me, the undersigned officer, personally appeared ___________________________, known to me (or satisfactorily proven) to be the person(s) whose name(s) is/are subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowledged that he/she/they executed the same for the purposes therein contained.

This document is based on the model Trail Easement Agreement (4/20/2006 ed.) provided by the Pennsylvania Land Trust Association. This document should not be construed or relied upon as legal advice or legal opinion on any specific facts or circumstances. It must be revised to reflect specific circumstances under the guidance of legal counsel.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I hereunto set my hand and official seal.

Owner’s Name:

_______________________________________ Owner’s Name:

_______________________________________

By: _______________________________________ Name of Holder: Name of signatory: Title of signatory: Acceptance by Beneficiary: [NAME OF BENEFICIARY] _______________________________________

By: _______________________________________ Name: Title:

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_________________________________________ Notary Public Print Name: COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA : COUNTY OF : ____________________________ ON THIS DAY _______________ before me, the undersigned officer, personally appeared _____________________________, who acknowledged him/herself to be the ___________________________________ of _________________________, a Pennsylvania non-profit corporation, and that he/she as such officer, being authorized to do so, executed the foregoing instrument for the purposes therein contained by signing the name of the corporation by her/himself as such officer. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I hereunto set my hand and official seal. ________________________________________ Notary Public Print Name:_____________________________

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix G: Water Quality Improvement Easement Appendix G: Water Quality Improvement Easement

Outlined below is a sample water quality improvement easement agreement. The sample agreement is based on a model agreement developed by the Pennsylvania Land Trust Association. THIS WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT EASEMENT (this “Easement”) dated as of _____________ (the “Easement Date”) is by and between ___________________ (the “undersigned Owners”) and __________________ (the “Holder”).

(“the Treatment Area”) within which Holder intends to undertake the Project. The Plan may also show one or more of the following areas: an area (the “Temporary Construction Area”) to be used as a staging area during construction of Facilities; an area (the “Access Corridor”) to provide ingress and egress to and from the Treatment Area and the public right of way; and an area (the “Utility Corridor”) to provide power or other utility services to service Facilities.

(b) Educational Purposes Holder is permitted to invite other Persons, accompanied by an authorized representative of Holder, to enter the Property via the Access Corridor and view the Treatment Area and Facilities within the Treatment Area for scientific and educational purposes related to the Project. Holder is permitted to install signage identifying the Project and/or the interest of Holder and Beneficiaries with respect to the Project within the Treatment Area and/or Access Corridor.

ARTICLE II. GRANT OF EASEMENTS ARTICLE I. BACKGROUND 1.01 Property The undersigned Owners are the sole owners in fee simple of the Property described in Exhibit “A” (the “Property”). The Property is also described as: Street Address: Municipality: County: Parcel Identifier: 1.02 Project The undersigned Owners desire Holder to undertake a project (the “Project”) to remediate effects of abandoned mine drainage to improve the quality of water passing through or discharging from the Property. The Project is more fully described in Exhibit “B”. The facilities to be installed by Holder in connection with the Project are also described in Exhibit “B” (the “Facilities”). 1.03 Plan Attached as Exhibit “C” is a survey or other graphic depiction of the Property (the “Plan”) showing the location of an area

2.01 Grant of Easement: Treatment Area The undersigned Owners grant to Holder an easement over the Treatment Area for the purpose of installation, construction and replacement (collectively, “Construction”) of the Facilities; maintenance and repair of the Facilities, monitoring water quality, and other activities in furtherance of the goals of the Project. This easement may be exercised at any time and from time to time by Holder. Except as otherwise provided in this Easement with respect to notice prior to commencement of the Construction of the Facilities, no notice to Owners is required prior to entry onto the Property pursuant to the rights granted under this Article. a) Access Corridor This grant of easement over the Treatment Area includes an easement for pedestrian (and, if reasonably necessary for Project activities, vehicular) access to and from the public rightof-way over the Access Corridor designated on the Plan (if any) or, if no Access Corridor is designated on the Plan, then over a path to be designated in a location reasonably satisfactory to Owners and Holder.

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2.02 Grant of Easement: Temporary Construction Area If a Temporary Construction Area is designated on the Plan, the undersigned Owners grant to Holder an easement over the Temporary Construction Area for the purpose of parking vehicles, storage of materials and equipment and other staging activities related to Construction of Facilities permitted under this Article. Upon termination of use of the Temporary Construction Area, Holder must restore and replant the Temporary Construction Area as nearly as possible to its condition prior to entry. 2.03 Grant of Easement: Utility Corridor If a Utility Corridor is designated on the Plan, the undersigned Owners grant to holder an easement over the Utility Corridor for the purpose of Construction of power lines or other utility facilities reasonably required in connection with the Project. 2.04 Term The term of the easements granted in this Article is perpetual provided, however, that Holder may terminate Holder’s rights to enter the Property under the grant of this Easement

at any time following notice to Owners. Upon notice of termination, Owners and Holder must sign and record in the Public Records a release of this Easement and, upon such recordation, neither Owners nor Holder have any further rights or obligations under this Easement. Unless otherwise agreed in writing by Owners and Holder, Holder has no obligation to remove Facilities at the end of the term of this Easement. 2.05 Beneficiaries Should Holder fail to complete the Project, the rights of Holder under this Easement may be exercised by Holder, any of the Persons identified below (collectively, the “Beneficiaries”) and the respective employees, agents, contractors, successors and assigns of each of them. • County in which the Property is located • County conservation district in the county in which the Property is located • Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection ARTICLE III. OBLIGATIONS 3.01 No Interference Owners must not interfere or allow any tenant or other person to interfere in any way with the Project or with the exercise of Holder’s rights with respect to the easements granted under Article II. The undersigned Owners grant to Holder a right of inspection over the entire Property to determine compliance with the provisions of this Section.

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Appendix G: Water Quality Improvement Easement (a) Prohibited Activities Without limiting the breadth of the prohibition under this Section, listed below are examples of activities prohibited to the Owners unless the prior written approval of Holder is first obtained: (i) Planting or removing vegetation within the Treatment Area. (ii) Construction of any kind within the Treatment Area, Access Corridor, Temporary Construction Area or Utility Corridor, if any. (iii) Any activity on or about the Property that changes or redirects water resources within or flowingthrough the Treatment Area such as channelization of a stream or installation or expansion of a well or pond. (b) Permitted Activities The Owners are permitted to engage in the following activities: (i) Walking, bird watching and hunting. (ii) Planting and harvesting crops and other agricultural activities outside the Treatment Area; provided, however, that Holder is not responsible for any damage to such crops by exercise of Holder’s rights under this Easement. 3.02 Construction Holder agrees that, prior to commencement of Construction of the Facilities: (a) Notice Holder must notify Owners not less than 30-days prior to commencement of Construction of the Facilities. (b) Waivers of Liens Holder must obtain legally binding waivers of mechanics liens from all Persons

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furnishing labor or materials in connection with Construction of the Facilities. (c) Insurance Holder must obtain certificates evidencing liability insurance coverage with respect to Holder and all Persons entering the Property for the purpose of Construction of the Facilities. (d) Permits Holder must obtain, at Holder’s cost and expense, all permits and approvals required for the Construction of the Facilities. (e) Costs Holder must promptly pay as and when due all costs and expenses incurred in connection with the Construction of the Facilities. 3.03 Indemnity (a) Scope of Indemnity Holder must indemnify and defend the Owners against all Losses and Litigation Expenses arising out of or relating to: (i) Any breach or violation of this Easement by Holder or other Beneficiary, as the case may be. (ii) Damage to property or personal injury (including death) occurring on or about the Property if and to the extent such damage results from the negligent or wrongful acts or omissions of Holder, any Beneficiary or any other Person entering the Property under the grant of easements set forth in Article II. (b) Defined Terms (i) The term “Losses” means any liability, loss, claim, settlement payment, cost and expense, interest, award, judgment, damages (including punitive damages), diminution in value, fines,

fees and penalties or other charge other than a Litigation Expense. (ii) The term “Litigation Expenses” means any court filing fee, court cost, arbitration fee or cost, witness fee and each other fee and cost of investigating and defending or asserting any claim of violation or for indemnification under this Easement including in each case, attorneys’ fees, other professionals’ fees and disbursements. 3.04 Title The undersigned Owners represent and warrant to Holder that they are the sole owners in fee simple of the Property and that the Property is unencumbered by any mortgage or other lien securing the payment of money or, if it is, Owners have obtained and delivered to Holder prior to the Easement Date the subordination of any such mortgage or other lien to this Easement. ARTICLE IV. MISCELLANEOUS 4.01 Notices (a) Requirements Each Person giving any notice pursuant to this Agreement must give the notice in writing and must use one of the following methods of delivery: (i) Personal delivery. (ii) Certified mail, return receipt requested and postage prepaid. (iii) Nationally recognized overnight courier, with all fees prepaid. (b) Address for Notices Each Person giving a notice must address the notice to the appropriate Person at the receiving party at the address listed below or

to another address designated by that Person by notice to the other Person: If to Owners: _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _________ If to Holder: _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _________ 4.02 Governing Law The internal laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania govern this Easement. 4.03 Successors and Assigns Holder may not assign its rights under this Easement except to a non-profit organization or governmental entity that assumes the liabilities and obligations of Holder under this Easement. The rights of any Beneficiary of this Easement are not assignable. Subject to the preceding restrictions, this Easement is binding upon Owners, Holder and their respective successors and assigns. 4.04 Severability If any provision of this Easement is determined to be invalid, illegal or unenforceable, the remaining provisions of this Easement remain valid, binding and enforceable. To the extent permitted by applicable law, the parties waive any provision of applicable law that renders

Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix G: Water Quality Improvement Easement any provision of this Easement invalid, illegal or unenforceable in any respect. 4.05 Counterparts This Easement may be signed in multiple counterparts, each of which constitutes an original, and all of which, collectively, constitute only one agreement. 4.06 Guides to Interpretation (a) Captions The descriptive headings of the articles, sections and subsections of this Easement are for convenience only and do not constitute a part of this Easement. (b) Other Terms (i) The word “including” means “including but not limited to”. (ii) The word “must” is obligatory; the word “may” is permissive and does not imply an obligation. (iii) The word “Owners” means the undersigned Owners and all Persons after them who hold any interest in all or any part of the Property. (iv) The word “Person” means individual, corporation, partnership, trust or other legally recognized entity. (v) The term “Public Records” means the office for the recording of deeds in and for the county in which the Property is located.

4.08 Incorporation by Reference The following items are incorporated into this Agreement by means of this reference: • The legal description of the Property attached as Exhibit “A” • The description of the Project attached as Exhibit “B” • The Plan attached as Exhibit “C”

INTENDING TO BE LEGALLY BOUND, the undersigned Owners and Holder have signed and delivered this Easement as of the Easement Date. Witness/Attest:

4.09 Public Records This Easement is intended to be recorded in the Public Records at the expense of Holder as a servitude running with the land identified as the Property. This Easement is binding upon Owners and their successors and assigns as owner of the Property whether or not such Owners had actual notice of the terms of this Easement based on model v.

By: ______________________________________ Name: Title:

This document is based on the model Water Quality Improvement Easement (7/15/05 edition) provided by the Pennsylvania Land Trust Association. This model should not be construed or relied upon as legal advice or legal opinion on any specific facts or circumstances. The document must be revised to reflect specific circumstances under the guidance of legal counsel.

__________________________________________ Print Name:

COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA: COUNTY OF:__________________________ ON THIS DAY _____________, before me, the undersigned officer, personally appeared ___________________________, known to me (or satisfactorily proven) to be the person(s) whose name(s) is/are subscribed to the within instrument, and acknowledged that he/she/they executed the same for the purposes therein contained.

COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA : COUNTY OF :_____________________________ ON THIS DAY _______________ before me, the undersigned officer, personally appeared _____________________________, who acknowledged him/herself to be the ______________________ of _________________________, a Pennsylvania non-profit corporation, and that he/she as such officer, being authorized to do so, executed the foregoing instrument for the purposes therein contained by signing the name of the corporation by her/himself as such officer. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I hereunto set my hand and official seal. ______________________________________ Notary Public Print Name:

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I hereunto set my hand and official seal. __________________________________________ Notary Public Print Name:

4.07 Entire Agreement This is the entire agreement of Owners and Holder pertaining to the subject matter of this Easement. The terms of this Easement supersede in full all Statements and writings between the Owners and Holder pertaining to the transaction set forth in this Agreement.

Southern Allegheny Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

May 2007

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Appendix G: Water Quality Improvement Easement

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Southern Alleghenies Planning & Development Commission

Appendix H: Natural Infrastructure Data Layers Needed Appendix H: Natural Infrastructure Data Layers Needed

Maps (NI use) 1 Groundwater Recharge 2 Stormwater Filtration 3 Ground Water Production 4 Surface Water Production 5 River-Water Based Service 6 Septic Systems 7 Landfills 8 Constructed Wetlands 9 Commercial Transportation 10 Large-Scale Agriculture 11 Forest Reserves 12 Oil and Natural Gas Areas 13 Coal Reserves 14 Aggregate Extraction Areas 15 Solar Energy 16 Hydro-electric Power 17 Wind Power 18 BDAs 19 Brook Trout Habitat 20 Warm Water Game Fish 21 Significant Bird Watching 22 Deer Hunting 23 Ski Slopes 24 Primitive Camping 25 Non-Primitive Camping 26 Aerial Sports 27 Cultural Resource Sites 28 ATV Areas 29 Land Suitable for Trails 30 White Water Rafting / Kayaking 31 Flatwater Kayaking / Canoeing 32 Power and Sail Boating

Obtained as Part of Greenway Project

Phase II Scope ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔

Notes/Comments Groundwater production data Derive use / create map Analyze well yield data Derive use / create map







✔ ✔

Southern Allegheny Greenways and Open Space Network Plan

✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔

Groundwater production data School locations / undermined areas Derive use / create map Add navigable rivers / river terminals Agricultural Equivalency Unit (AEU) density data Derive use / create map Derive use / create map Digitize upper Freeport coal seam extents Derive use / create map Derive use / create map Derive use / create map Derive use / create map Convert to integrated BDAs Derive use / create map Derive use / create map Derive use / create map Obtain / digitize co-op lands / deer population density Derive use / create map Derive use / create map Derive use / create map Derive use / create map Incorporate legend / list of sites Digitize mine sites / create map Use key greenway links Determine / digitize water classifications Determine / digitize water classifications Digitize locations / navigable rivers

May 2007

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Prime Consultant Environmental Planning & Design, LLC

Pennsylvania Environmental Council

Trans Associates Engineering Consultants, Inc.

100 Ross Street Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (412) 261-6000

22 Terminal Way Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (412) 481-9400

4955 Steubenville Pike, Ste 400 Pittsburgh, PA 15205 (412) 490-0630

Roles

Roles

Roles

• Project Manager • Landscape Architect • Regional Planner

• Public Involvement • Organizational / Management Strategist

• Transportation Planner • Funding Specialist