Generic Section - Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines - Ophea

Generic Section - Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines - Ophea

Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines Elementary – Curricular Generic Section September 2016 Generic Section Background This document is a ...

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Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines

Elementary – Curricular

Generic Section

September 2016

Generic Section Background This document is a revision of the 1999 version of the Physical Education Curricular Safety Guidelines. These 2016 Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines (Safety Guidelines) were developed with the support and encouragement of the Ontario Physical and Health Education Association (Ophea), the Ontario School Boards’ Insurance Exchange (OSBIE), the Ontario Association for the Support of Physical and Health Educators (OASPHE), the Ontario Federation of School Athletic Associations (OFSAA), and the Canadian Intramural Recreation Association – Ontario (CIRA). The Elementary Curricular module of the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines was developed to support The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 1-8: Health and Physical Education, 2015 (revised). Intent of the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines The primary responsibility for the care and safety of students rests with the school board and its employees. An important aspect in fulfilling this role is to recognize that there is an element of risk in all physical activity and to take action accordingly. To this end, the safety guidelines writing team and physical educators across Ontario have identified and analyzed reasonable foreseeable risks and have developed these guidelines to reflect a consensus among qualified persons about procedures that help minimize, to the greatest extent possible, the risk of a preventable accident or injury. A guideline alone does not eliminate risk regardless of how well it is written or how effectively it is implemented. Safety awareness, practised by the teacher, based on up-to-date information, common sense observation, action, and foresight, is the key to safe programming. The intent of the Curricular Safety Guidelines is to provide a reference document that will assist the teacher to focus on safe instructional practices for each class activity in order to minimize the inherent element of risk. By implementing safe instructional practices, such as use of logical teaching progressions, as well as inclusion of ageappropriate activities in program preparations, planning and daily teaching, the educator will guard against foreseeable risks. It is hoped that through this implementation process, this document will assist educators in fulfilling their obligation to provide the safest possible environment in which all students, regardless of physical, mental, emotional abilities/challenges or cultural background, can be physically active. Impact and Scope of this document The Safety Guidelines statements represent the minimum standards for risk management practice for school boards. An activity must not occur unless these statements have been addressed. This document delineates minimum guidelines that must be met by physical educators and administrators in addressing the safety component of the physical education core program. This module focuses on classroom instruction in physical education. Intramural and interschool activity guidelines can be found in their respective modules. Risk Management The following elements of risk must be taken into consideration by the teacher: • The activity is age-appropriate for the students’ physical/mental abilities and behavioural patterns. • The teacher has the knowledge and ability in accordance with the safety guideline pages to teach/supervise the activity safely. • When considering an activity which is not addressed in the physical education curriculum or the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines, the educational value vs. the entertainment value of the activity must be determined (e.g., Is going to a wave pool educational or entertainment?). Once the activity has been approved by a board official as having educational value, the inherent risks must be identified and minimized.

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Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines

Elementary – Curricular

Generic Section

September 2016

A. Generic Issues Please Note: • All statements in the Safety Guidelines are minimum standards. • The following statements in the Generic Section of the Safety Guidelines are not listed in any order of priority. • Lists of examples in the Safety Guidelines are not exclusive. There are many common guidelines for safety which apply to all physical education class activities. Some commonalities are: 1. Medical Conditions: At the beginning of the school year, teachers need to be aware of the medical background and physical limitations of their students. This includes knowledge of students with heart disorders, asthma, diabetes, severe allergies, anaphylaxis, previous concussion etc. Each school needs to develop a process by which medical information is made available to teachers at the beginning of the school year and throughout the year as needed (see Appendix A). To address a student’s medical condition (e.g., asthma, life threatening allergies, diabetes, epilepsy, heart disorders) teachers are to refer to their school board’s/school’s medical condition protocols and/or individualized student medical information form. To assist teachers with the management of a student with asthma when participating in physical activity Ophea has developed a Sample Management of Asthma Protocol (Appendix L). 2. Sudden Arrhythmia Death Syndrome (SADS) refers to a variety of cardiac disorders which are often genetic and undiagnosed that can be responsible for sudden death in young, apparently healthy people. For more information visit www.sads.ca. Because physical activity is a common trigger for many sudden cardiac deaths, it is important for teachers to recognize possible symptoms/warning signs. ● fainting or seizure during physical activity ● fainting or seizure resulting from emotional excitement, emotional distress or being startled (e.g. a sudden loud noise such as a school fire alarm system) School response: ● Immediately call 911. ● Inform parents and provide information about SADS – www.sads.ca ● The student is not to participate in physical activity until cleared by a medical assessment and documentation is provided to the school administrator/designate. Refer to Appendix M for school and parent information and responsibility and a sample form to be completed for return to activity after a fainting episode. 3. An emergency action plan to deal with accidents in physical education must be developed and applied in all schools. For details on an emergency action plan, see Appendix E. 4. A fully-stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible to the gymnasium. For a sample listing of first-aid items, see Appendix D. 5. Universal precautions (e.g., using impermeable gloves), must be followed when dealing with situations involving blood and other bodily fluids (see Appendix K). Teachers must refer to School Board protocols that address blood and bodily fluids procedures. 6. Concussion Protocol and Procedures Information The Ministry of Education expects all boards in Ontario to develop and maintain a policy on

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Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines

Elementary – Curricular

Generic Section

September 2016

concussion. In accordance with PPM 158 School Board Policies on Concussions, school board policy on concussion is expected to contain, at a minimum, the following: • Development of Awareness; • Prevention; • Identification; • Management Procedures for a Diagnosed Concussion; and • Training and a process to support ongoing implementation and compliance. The Ministry of Education considers the concussion protocol outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines to be the minimum standard. School boards may localize the components of the concussion protocol, to meet the specific needs of their school district, keeping in mind that they can raise the minimum standards but cannot lower the standards. Although it is important to be familiar with the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guideline Concussion Protocol, educators must ensure that they use their own board’s concussion protocol. To assist in the development of concussion safety protocols and procedures, administrators, teachers and coaches can reference the appropriate concussion information located in the Appendices section of this module. Refer to list below. ● ● ● ● ●

Appendix C-1 – Concussion Protocol: Prevention, Identification and Management Procedures Appendix C-2 – Sample Tool to Identify a Suspected Concussion Appendix C-3 – Sample Documentation of Medical Examination Appendix C-4 – Sample Documentation for a Diagnosed Concussion – Return to Learn/Return to Physical Activity Plan Appendix C-5 - Sample Concussion Prevention Strategies

7. If a student misses a physical education class due to an injury or illness requiring professional medical attention (e.g., medical doctor, chiropractor, physiotherapist), the principal must receive communication from the student’s parent/guardian, giving him/her permission to return to physical activity. For a sample form, see Appendix B. Parents/guardians must provide a return to physical activity plan for students returning to activities with injuries/illnesses such as spinal injuries, fractures, torn ligaments or mononucleosis etc. The best plans will involve a medical professional who is involved in the student’s treatment/recovery and who will communicate to the parents/guardians that their child is ready to move to the next level, and ultimately return to activity. 8. Teachers must ensure parents/guardians are aware of safety precautions related to environmental factors (e.g., temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects, frost bite, and dehydration) (see Appendix A). 9. Lightning is a significant weather hazard that may affect outdoor activities. Safety precautions and protocols must be developed and communicated to participants in response to potential lightning risk factors. At all times the Board’s lightning procedures are the mandatory minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., trip guides, facility/program coordinators) – the higher standard of care is to be followed. For lightning procedures, see Appendix F. 10. Many different situations may arise involving the transportation of students away from the school for activities. It is important that parents are made aware of the mode of transportation and student expectations. The means and frequency of communication required must be established with the school principal. A signed parent/guardian acknowledgement/permission form must be received from each participant. The form must contain details of the activity and its inherent risks including transportation risks. Consideration must also be given to informing parents of activities which take students off the immediate school property, where transportation is not

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Elementary – Curricular

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required (e.g., cross-country running). Refer to individual school board’s field trip procedures related to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission. 11. When activities are offered off campus, a working communication device must be readily accessible. 12. When taking students off-site for an activity organized by an outside provider (e.g., camp activities), the appropriate safety guidelines must be shared with the activity provider prior to trip confirmation. The outside provider must agree to abide by the mandates described in the Safety Guidelines. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, see Appendix O. 13. Students must be made aware of the locations of the fire alarms, the fire exits and alternate routes from the gymnasium or other large indoor room used for activity. 14. Prior to teaching the skills of the activity, the teacher must: • • • •

outline the possible risks of the activity; demonstrate how to minimize the risks; set procedures and rules for safe play; and provide instruction on concussion prevention and awareness, e.g.: - the definition and the seriousness of a concussion - the signs and symptoms - the importance of reporting the suspicious of a concussion to teacher/parents - prevention techniques for the activity (see Appendix C-5).

15. If students are involved in an activity or sport (e.g., a low organization game) which is not described in this guideline, refer to the guidelines of an activity that it most resembles. 16. Any modifications teachers make to guideline statements must raise the level of safety, not lower it. 17. Where an incident occurs that increases or could increase the risk of injury, corrective actions must take place to help prevent its reoccurrence. 18. At the beginning of the school year, teachers must instruct students in appropriate change room conduct as well as emphasize the need to change quickly and proceed to the gym. Reinforce this guideline as necessary during the school year. 19. Approval from the appropriate school board official must be received if a teacher wishes to include activities that are not in the guidelines and do not resemble guideline activities. As part of this process, the teacher must demonstrate that all appropriate precautions will be taken in the interest of student safety. 20. Individuals wishing to make additions and/or modifications to the curricular safety guidelines must fill out an Application for New or Revised Safety Guideline Activity Page form, available at http://safety.ophea.net/modify-safety-guidelines.

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B. Introduction to Sport / Activity Page Components Please note: ● All statements found on the sport/activity pages and supporting Appendices A-M are the minimum standards. An activity must not occur unless these guidelines have been addressed. ● The statements in the sport/activity pages of the Safety Guidelines are not listed in any order of priority. ● Lists of examples in the Safety Guidelines are not exclusive. 1. Sport/Activity Pages a) Guidelines for each class activity are outlined according to the following critical components: Equipment Clothing, Footwear and Jewellery Facilities

Special Rules/Instructions Supervision

b) With some exceptions, appropriate age divisions are not described on activity pages. It is the responsibility of each School Board to determine the age appropriateness of these activities. Where ages are determined in activity pages (e.g., Rowing: “Grades 6 to 8 only”), the standard has been determined by experts in the field. 2. Equipment a) To provide a safe environment for class activities, the teacher must make a pre-activity check of the equipment to be used. This could be done visually or recorded on a check list (see Appendix I-2). Hazards must be identified and removed or isolated as a factor in the activity. b) When using equipment that is not described in the document, care must be taken to determine that it is safe for use, (e.g., no sharp edges, cracks, or splinters) and that it is size, mass and strength appropriate. c) Protective equipment. Prior to participation teachers and supervisors are to check that the protective equipment, described under the Equipment section on the activity page, is being properly worn by the students (e.g., properly fitted (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) and properly worn cycling helmet with chin straps done up). Where appropriate, teachers and supervisors, when participating in the activity with the students are encouraged to wear the protective equipment not only for personal protection, but to act as a role model for students (e.g., CSA approved ice hockey helmets when ice skating). d) All balls must be properly inflated. e) No home-made equipment is to be used (e.g., personal ball hockey sticks, plastic bleach bottle scoops). Equipment can be made at school by Board employees, adult volunteers and by students who are under direct supervision. See School-Made Equipment activity pages in the Intramural module. f)

If students are permitted to bring their own equipment (e.g., badminton racquets, skis, in-line skates), students and parents/guardians must be informed of the importance of determining that the equipment is in good working order and suitable for personal use.

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g) Helmets. Helmet requirements, Safety Standards Associations and/or certification standards, can be found on the specific activity/sport pages under Equipment. Recognized Safety Standard Associations for Helmets: The Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines recognizes the following safety standard associations in its guidelines: ● Canadian Standards Association – CSA ● U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission – CPSC ● American Society of Testing and Materials – ASTM ● National Operating Committee on Standards in Athletic Equipment – NOCSAE ● Snell Memorial Foundation – Snell Standard ● British Standards Institute – BS ● Standards Association of Australia – AS ● Common European Norm – CEN ● Safety Equipment Institute – SEI Selection of helmets for activities where specific helmets have been developed: Helmets designed for the type of hazards encountered in the activity will provide the optimal required protection for the activity. Select a helmet that meets the protection standards (certification) for the specific activity/sport as determined by a recognized safety standards association. Selection of helmets for activities where specific helmets have not been developed (e.g. ice skating, tobogganing/sledding). The Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines lists on its activity pages the types of helmets that offer the best protection against ice skating/tobogganing injuries as recommended by the following safety organizations: Parachute, Canada Safety Council, and the Ontario School Board Insurance Exchange. Selection of Multi Purpose Helmets: Some helmets are marketed as ‘multi sport’ meaning they meet the safety standard for more than one activity (e.g. cycling, skateboarding and in-line skating). For a multi-purpose helmet to be used for an activity/sport, the helmet must have an identification of a safety standard certification (e.g. sticker/identification on the package or on the helmet) from a recognized safety standards association indicating that it meets the required safety standards for those activities the helmet will be used for. Select a suitable helmet for the activity: i) Reference the specific activity page in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines ii) Consult the sport governing body of the activity. iii) Consult a reputable provider (retailer) of the equipment for information on the most suitable helmet. iv) Consult Parachute at www.parachutecanada.org Certification sticker’s location: To be sure that the helmet meets the safety standard (certification) for your particular activity/sport: ● Most helmets that meet a particular standard will contain a special label that indicates compliance usually found on the liner inside of the helmet. CSA Standards: Where a Canadian Standard Association standard becomes available for an activity helmet, the CSA approved helmet is to be the choice for use. h) Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the teacher.

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i)

September 2016

When equipment (e.g. fitness equipment) is purchased second hand or donated to your school/school board, follow the guidelines for new/donated equipment in Appendix H.

3. Clothing, Footwear and Jewellery a) Appropriate athletic footwear must be a minimum uniform requirement. Appropriate athletic footwear is defined as a running shoe with a flat rubber treaded sole which are secured to the foot. Running shoes with higher heels, wheels, rubber, plastic or metal cleats, open toes, open heels are not appropriate. Students must also wear appropriate clothing for physical education classes. Shorts or sweat pants and T-shirts/sweat shirts are examples of appropriate clothing. Deviations from this minimum are listed on activity pages. Some ill-fitting clothing, hard-soled shoes, and socks without shoes can inhibit movement and possibly cause injury during active movement. Where religious requirements present a safety concern, modifications to the activity must be made. b) Jewellery. Exposed jewellery being worn during physical activity can pose a hazard to the wearer and/or other participants and be the cause of an injury. Jewellery can be caught up in equipment, on another person or their clothing, or be hit by a projectile. Sample types of jewellery: ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Hanging jewellery on neck, wrists, ears, torso Studs on ears, face, tongue, torso Loops/hoops/bars on ears, face, torso Rings on fingers, toes Watches/bracelets (hard material) on wrist/ankles Spacers on ears Hair pins, clips and barrettes

Medic alert identification and religious articles of faith that cannot be removed must be taped or securely covered. Finger rings are not permitted for any activity. Criteria for the removal and wearing of jewellery during physical activity: • During group/team activities where there is a possibility of (incidental) contact with other participants or equipment, exposed jewellery is to be removed. Exceptions are: • New piercings which present a safety concern can be accommodated during the required healing time period and must be securely covered during physical activity. • Spacers are permitted during physical activity. • Chains/necklaces, under an article of clothing that can become exposed during physical activity are to be removed. • During individual/group activities where there is little chance of (incidental) contact with other participants or equipment, exposed jewellery may be worn (e.g. skiing/snowboarding, curling, track events, water activities/boating). • For those activities where the wearing of jewellery is a safety concern, statements are located on the individual sport/activity pages (e.g. in Gymnastics – No exposed jewellery). For all activities the teacher is to be vigilant and to have the student remove any piece of jewellery they feel may pose a safety hazard to the wearer or other participants.

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Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines

Elementary – Curricular

Generic Section

September 2016

c) Parents/guardians must be made aware of safety precautions with eyeglasses for some activities, including an eyeglass strap and/or shatterproof lenses or removal of glasses if vision is adequate (see Appendix A). d) Long hair must be secured so as not to block vision. 4. Facilities a) To provide a safe environment for class activities the teacher must make a pre-activity check of the facilities and equipment to be used. This could be done visually or recorded on a check list (see Appendices I-1, I-2, I-3). The minimum requirement is a pre-use visual check. Hazards must be identified and removed as a factor in the activity. Potentially dangerous and immovable objects (e.g., goalposts, protruding stage) must be brought to the attention of students and administration. b) All equipment must be checked regularly to determine it is in good working order. Only equipment related to safety concerns is included in this document. Students must be encouraged to report equipment or facility problems to the teacher. For more information on the role of the student in safety, see Appendix J. c) In an emergency situation (e.g., lightning, severe weather, medical emergency) the supervisor in charge of the excursion must follow School Board protocol. If the excursion takes place at an outdoor education facility whose emergency protocol has a higher standard of care than the School Board protocol, then the outdoor education facility protocol must be followed. d) Facilities and major equipment must be inspected and a written report completed by a reputable third party on a regular basis. e) Any use of a facility must be supervised. f)

Moving portable goals • Teacher/staff member must supervise moving portable goals. • Teacher/staff member must inform students of procedures for moving portable goals and review periodically • If assisting the teacher/staff member in the moving of portable goals, only students who have been properly trained can be used. Constant visual supervision is required • Teacher/staff member is to designate an area a safe distance from the path of moving portable goal in which other students are to stay. Check that the path is clear (no obstructions and/or students in the way)

g) Equipment/furniture which is hazardous to the activity must not be stored around the perimeter of the gymnasium or any other large indoor room used for physical education. A reasonable number of benches as well as mats secured to the wall are exceptions to this statement. h) For all indoor activities, walls and stages must not be used as turning points or finish lines. A line or pylon could be designated in advance of the wall or stage. i)

Foreseeable risks must be identified and precautions taken to minimize risks. For safety precautions when using non-gym areas (e.g., concourses, hallways, classrooms, stages) for gym classes, see Appendices G and I-3.

j)

Playing areas must be free from hazards (e.g., holes, glass, and rocks). Severely uneven surfaces must be brought to the attention of the principal, students must be made aware of

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Elementary – Curricular

Generic Section

September 2016

them, and modifications made when necessary. Playing areas must allow for safe footing and traction. k) Regarding the opening or closing of gym divider door/curtains: ● Teachers must inform students of procedures for opening and closing doors/curtains and review periodically (e.g. posted signage if applicable). ● Constant visual supervision is required. ● Teachers/staff members only in charge of opening/closing. If assisting the teacher in the opening/closing of the door/curtain, students must be properly trained ● Designate an area a safe distance from the path of the door/curtain in which students must remain during the opening/closing of the door/curtain. Check that path is clear (no obstructions and /or students in the way).Remove key after door/curtain closes ● Inspect door/curtain on a regular basis for anything that would hinder effective operation. ● Should the door/curtain manufacturer require a higher standard of care/supervision than the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines for the opening/closing of gym dividers and doors, the manufacturer's standard must be followed (e.g., only adults (including trained students 18 and over) can operate doors/curtains). ● Noise can be a problem in gymnasiums where curtains divide teaching areas. Determine that students are able to hear and follow instructions/signals. Use strategies to enhance communication to students. ● A teacher/supervisor who is not familiar with the operations related to divider doors/curtains must seek assistance from appropriate support staff and/or refrain from opening/closing divider doors/curtains until instructional support is received. l)

Where running takes place off school site for a warm up or conditioning run and/or is an integral part of the activity: ● ● ●

Prior to initial use of route or course, teachers must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems. Before initial attempt, teachers must outline to students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution). If route is off school property, determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

m) Natural Ice Locations (Lakes, Ponds, Rivers): Only Board/school approved natural ice locations are to be used. An approved natural ice location is one that is: ●

Monitored and tested by a recognized organization (e.g., local municipality, police, and snowmobile clubs) and/or a recognized knowledgeable individual (e.g., winter camp supervisor) that measures ice thickness for activity safety.

Prior to activity on natural ice surface teacher/supervisor must check with recognized/knowledgeable source for thickness of ice for specific activity. Ice surface is to be measured in several places. For the following activities ice thickness must be a minimum of: ● Cross Country Skiing = 15 cm (6”) ● Walking = 15 cm (6”) ● Skating (group) games = 15 cm (6”) The use of natural ice involves some risk. Safety criteria to follow: ● For natural ice surfaces where conditions cannot be measured – stay off the ice.

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● ● ● ● ●

September 2016

Stay away from unfamiliar paths or unknown ice, avoid traveling on ice at night unless necessary Obey all ice warning signs. Teacher/supervisor must be in close proximity to students on the ice surface. Teachers/supervisors are to be knowledgeable of procedures to follow for rescuing an individual who has fallen through the ice. Students are to be informed of ice safety and ice rescue procedures prior to activity e.g. not to go on the ice surface alone.

5. Special Rules/Instructions a) Class activity must be modified according to the age, ability level, language and experience of students and the facility available. b) Teachers, instructors and supervisors must be aware of the possibility of peer pressure and make sure no student is coerced into participating. When a student displays hesitation verbally or non-verbally, the teacher must determine the reason(s) for doubt. If the teacher believes that a potential hesitancy during the skill could put the student at risk, the student must be directed toward a more basic skill, or be allowed to select a challenge at their comfort level, including the choice to not participate. c) Teachers must be encouraged to stay current with respect to safe exercise techniques. d) All class sessions must include appropriate warm-ups and cool-downs. e) Skills must be taught in a proper progression. Refer to skill progression resources (e.g., School Board’s core curriculum documents, commercial resources). f)

Games and activities must be based on skills that have been taught.

g) Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration: • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects, frost bite) • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity • previous training and fitness level • length of time and intensity of physical activity h) Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g., use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing) i)

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes) (see Appendix F).

j)

Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

k) Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity at all indoor and outdoor sites to prevent dehydration. l)

Modify activities which involve students with special needs to address safety issues for all students. Teachers need to refer to resources designed to maximize safe opportunities for

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Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines

Elementary – Curricular

Generic Section

September 2016

students with physical, intellectual, and behavioural exceptionalities (e.g., Ophea: Steps to Inclusion, Active Living Alliance for Canadians with a Disability: Resource Library). m) Many activities address the issue of body contact, stick-on-body and stick-on-stick contact. In an effort to promote common understanding of the term, this document views contact as an intentional contact with the purpose of gaining an advantage in the specific activity. n) Some activities refer to an “in charge person”. While the teacher is “in charge” and responsible for the overall safety and well-being of persons under his/her care, sometimes there are other personnel who must be identified as “in charge” related to specific situations (e.g., a pool lifeguard). In activities where an “in charge” person is designated, that person must make final decisions regarding the safety of the participants. o) While moving, students must not be required to close their eyes or be blind-folded. The activity of goalball is an exception to this statement p) Emphasize controlled movement when requiring students to walk or run backwards. Avoid backward-running races. q) Any student playing with a cast must provide a doctor’s note or parent/guardian signed permission indicating it is safe for him/her to participate. r)

Casts/orthopedic devices must not present a safety concern to students or other participants. Modifications might have to be made.

s)

An exposed orthopaedic apparatus must be soft or padded and must be approved by the person in charge prior to the commencement of the activity.

6. Supervision Definition of Supervision: Supervision is the vigilant overseeing of an activity for regulation or direction. All facilities, equipment and activities have inherent risks, but the more effectively they are supervised, the safer they become. a) A supervisor, as referred to below, is defined as a teacher, principal, or vice-principal employed by the school board. A volunteer (not necessarily a teacher) could assist in the supervision of physical education activities. Examples of volunteers are: instructional assistants, educational assistants, retired teachers, co-op students, parents/guardians and teacher candidates. Refer to your School Board policy regarding volunteers. These volunteers must not be the sole supervisors of any activity. b) Students must be aware that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without the appropriate type of supervision. In addition to written or verbal communication, at least one of the following deterrents must be in place: ● ●

locked doors signs on doors indicating that students are not to use the gym unless supervised staff scheduled and present in the area of the gym (e.g., an adjoining physical education office) in order to see students entering the gym without authorization.

c) All activities must be supervised. The Safety Guidelines designate three categories of supervision: “Constant visual”, “On-site”, and “In-the-area”. The categories are based on the principles of general and specific supervision which take into consideration the risk level of the activity, the participants’ skill level and the participants’ maturity. The three levels of

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supervision described below are not hierarchical but represent the type of supervision that an activity requires and the type of supervision that is inherently possible. ● ● ●

“Constant visual” supervision means that the teacher is physically present, watching the activity in question. Only one activity requiring constant visual supervision may take place while other activities are going on. “On-site” supervision entails teacher presence but not necessarily constantly viewing one specific activity. Momentary presence in adjoining rooms to the gym is considered part of “on-site supervision”. “In-the-area” supervision means the teacher must be readily accessible and at least one of the following criteria is in place: o teacher is circulating; o exact location of teacher is known and location is nearby; or o teacher is visible. “In the area” supervision is applied to activities that characteristically put students out of sight for periods of time (e.g., alpine skiing, cross country skiing, cross country running). “Constant visual” and “on-site” supervision would not be possible in these situations.

Example: During a track and field session, some students are involved in high jump, some are practising relay passing on the track while a third group is distance running around the school. • • •

“Constant visual” supervision – High Jump – Teacher is at high jump area and is observing activity. “On-site” supervision – Relay Passing – Students are practising on the track and can be seen by the teacher who is with the high jumpers. “In-the-area” supervision – Distance Running – Students are running around the school and at times may be out of sight.

d) Teachers must establish routines, rules of acceptable behaviour and appropriate duties of students at the beginning of the year and reinforce throughout the year. Teachers must sanction students for unsafe play or unacceptable behaviour and must exercise that responsibility at all times. Refer to Appendix J for more information on student behaviour. e) Students must be made aware of the rules of activities or games. Rules must be strictly enforced and modified to suit the age, physical, emotional, social, and intellectual abilities of the participants. f)

Co-op students or other secondary students must not be the sole supervisor of any activity.

g) Occasional Teacher Coverage: • • • •

The occasional teacher must have students participate in physical activities commensurate with his/her ability to safely teach that activity/sport. Include the Safety Guidelines sheet for the activity with the lesson plans. Inform the occasional teacher of the whereabouts of a contact teacher or administrator in case of an emergency. Specify restrictions/modifications for students with health or behavioural problems.

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Generic Section

September 2016

Introduction to the Appendices

Information in the appendices addresses the required elements previously described in the generic section. School Boards are to address all of the safety elements in the Appendices (e.g., parental permission, medical information).

Each appendix was developed as a sample for School Boards to localize as needed.

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Safety Guidelines - Daily Physical Activity (DPA) The responsibility for addressing a safe learning/activity environment rests with the school board and its staff. This responsibility applies to all aspects of the school day, including DPA. Daily physical activities may take place in a variety of locations, such as gymnasiums, the outdoors, classrooms, hallways, concourses, large stages and multipurpose areas. There are many common or generic guidelines for safety that apply to all of these locations, and they are outlined on the following pages.

Generic Safety Guidelines for DPA: Medical Information • A process must be in place by which staff is made aware of any limitations (e.g., physical, intellectual, emotional) that students may have that would prevent full participation in daily physical activities. • Be well prepared to respond to emergency situations that might arise from such conditions as asthma, diabetes, and life-threatening allergies. • Follow board policies regarding the collection and storage of student medical data. First Aid • Be aware of the school’s first-aid emergency action plan, the identity of the first-aid providers, and the location of the first-aid kit(s). • When conducting off-site activities, plan how to access emergency medical aid. • Follow board policies prescribed for Universal Precautions for Blood and Bodily Fluids. • A first-aid kit must be accessible to all areas used for DPA. Activity Risks Before • • •

engaging in physical activities, inform students of the following: possible risks associated with the activity ways of minimizing the risks procedures and guidelines for safe participation.

Emergency Situations Inform students of the locations of fire alarms, fire exits, assembly areas, and protocols for emergency situations for every location where daily physical activity takes place. Off-site Activities When activities are taking place off the school site, refer to school board policies, protocols, and forms. Change-Rooms and Traveling to DPA Activity Area At the beginning of the school year, and throughout the year, inform and remind students of appropriate change-room behaviour and safe procedures for going to and from the DPA area. Equipment • Equipment must be appropriate for the facility or location used (e.g., classroom, outdoors). • Equipment must be checked regularly to determine that it is in good working order. • Balls must be properly inflated. • Mats must be placed on all designated landing areas (e.g., under chin-up bar, peg board, climber rungs). • Encourage students to report equipment problems to the teacher. Clothing, Footwear and Jewellery (Ways to implement and communicate the following are included at the end of the DPA section) • Running shoes are a minimum requirement, regardless of where DPA takes place (see Outdoors activity page for exceptions when DPA is outdoors). Running shoes must have flat rubber soles

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• • • • •

September 2016

with a tread and be secured to the feet. Running shoes with higher heels, wheels, open toes, open heels, cleats and sandals are not appropriate. Remind students to tie shoelaces securely. When DPA takes place as part of a Physical Education class, shorts, sweat pants, T-shirts, and sweatshirts are examples of appropriate clothing. When DPA takes place in any setting other than as part of a physical education class, students must wear clothing that does not inhibit movement (e.g., not tight clothing) and is appropriate for bending, stretching, etc. When religious requirements present a safety concern, modifications must be made to the activity. For all activities the teacher is to be vigilant and to have the student remove any piece of jewellery they feel may pose a safety hazard to the wearer or other participants e.g. hanging jewellery. Criteria for the wearing and/or removal of jewellery during Daily Physical Activity: o Medic alert identification and religious articles of faith that cannot be removed must be taped or securely covered o Refer to Elementary Curricular individual activity pages related to the topic you are teaching in order to determine the wearing and/or removal of jewellery. o During individual/group/team activities where there is a possibility of (incidental) contact with other participants or equipment - NO exposed jewellery to be worn. o During individual/group activities where there is little chance of (incidental) contact with other participants’ jewellery may be worn.

Facilities • Visually check the activity area prior to the activity to determine that hazards are identified and removed. • Classrooms must provide enough space that is unobstructed by furniture and other equipment that will allow for free movement by students (i.e., enough space to move freely without touching others or furniture). • Remove excess equipment and furniture from the perimeter of the gymnasium, hall, concourse, stage (e.g., tables, chairs). • Bring potentially dangerous and immovable objects (e.g., goalposts, protruding stage) to the attention of students. Where there are immovable objects (e.g., trophy cases), create a “safety zone” of at least one metre around the perimeter of the activity area. Mark out these types of areas (e.g., with pylons, mats etc.). • The activity surface, whether indoors or outdoors, must provide good traction. • Make students aware of the boundaries of the activity area. • Encourage students to report safety concerns regarding the facility to the teacher. • Where school hallways or stairways are used for Daily Physical Activity (DPA), appropriate safety measures must be in place: o hallway protrusions must be clearly marked o inform school community of times and locations of DPA o hall double doors must be secured open o monitors must be positioned at corners o floor surface must be dry and provide good footing o stairways must have a railing o students must be instructed on safety procedures for running stairs (e.g. one step at a time, blind spots, spatial awareness, using railings for balance, maintaining body control, respect for personal space) Physical Activities: Special Rules and Instructions • Activities must be appropriate for the age and ability levels of the students and the facility where the activity is taking place. • The number of students participating in DPA in any location must not present a safety concern.

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• • • • • • • • •

September 2016

Establish routines, rules of acceptable behaviour, and appropriate duties for students at the beginning of the year, reinforce these throughout the year, and determine that students adhere to them. Games and activities must be based on skills that have been taught previously. Instruct students regarding the proper use of equipment before allowing them to use it. Students must be instructed to keep a safe distance from one another, from furniture/equipment and structures (e.g., walls, doors, windows). Clearly outline all rules to students. Rules must be strictly enforced. Modify rules to suit the age and ability of the participants. Make students aware that body-on-body contact and equipment-on-body contact are prohibited. Daily physical activities must include an appropriate warm-up, moderate to vigorous physical activity, and cool-down. Encourage each student to work at a level of intensity that is appropriate for him or her. Determine that the temperature and weather conditions are appropriate for participation in moderate to vigorous physical activity outdoors.

Supervision • Determine that supervision of DPA is in accordance with all board policies and protocols. • While students are physically active, be present at, in control of, and fully attentive to the activity area at all times. • Inform and periodically remind students that use of equipment and of the gymnasium and multipurpose rooms is prohibited without teacher supervision. Deterrents must be in place (e.g., announcements, signs on doors, locked doors). • Be vigilant to prevent one student from pressuring another into trying activities for which he or she is not ready. • When a student displays hesitation, verbally or non-verbally, during an activity, discuss the reason(s) for the hesitancy and, if appropriate, provide the student with a different activity. • Share DPA safety standards with occasional teachers. In the following charts, safety guidelines are provided for activities conducted in specified areas. In cases where sport-specific activities are being done (e.g., soccer), refer to the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines: Elementary Curricular Module. In this document there are activityspecific safety standards for a full range of activities.

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DPA Locations Classroom

September 2016

Equipment

Clothing, Footwear and Jewellery

● Equipment

● Running shoes must be

must be appropriate for age and ability of students and size of classroom. ● All equipment used in DPA must be in good repair. ● Location of nearest firstaid kit must be known and accessible. ● DPA equipment must be safely stored.

MultiPurpose Area Concourse Hallways Stage Library Stairs

• Equipment must be appropriate for age and ability of students and size of facility. • All equipment used in DPA must be in good repair. • First-aid kit

worn.

● Jewellery – refer to

Criteria for the Wearing and Removal of Jewellery. ● Clothing appropriate for freedom of movement.

Facilities

Special Rules & Instructions

Supervision

• Visually inspect and check for hazards specific to classrooms (e.g., floor surface must not be slippery and is free from all obstacles, such as books, backpacks, and extension cords).

• Include activities that have a controlled amount of movement (e.g., running on the spot, chair exercises).

• On-site supervision

• Students must be instructed in the proper use of equipment before using it.

• Carpets must be flat and secured to the floor and not present a tripping hazard. • There must be enough room between students and furniture and walls to allow for freedom of movement. • Running shoes must be worn. • Jewellery – refer to Criteria for the Wearing and Removal of Jewellery • Clothing appropriate for freedom of movement.

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• Visually inspect and check for hazards specific to the location (e.g., proximity of drinking fountains, glass doors and trophy cases to the activity). • Mark off areas where there are immovable objects (e.g., sinks, water fountains). • Floor surfaces must

• Include activities that have a controlled amount of movement, based on the size of the area (e.g., aerobics, mat work, fitness stations, skipping, dance). • Students must be instructed in the proper use of equipment before using it. • If the activity area is a common open area (e.g., an atrium, a forum, a library, hallway), students who are not involved in DPA must walk around the outside

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• On-site supervision

Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines

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Generic Section

DPA Locations

September 2016

Equipment

Clothing, Footwear and Jewellery

must be accessible.

Facilities



• DPA equipment must be safely stored.







Gymnasium

• Equipment must be checked regularly and repaired as needed.

• Running shoes must be worn. • Jewellery – refer to Criteria for the Wearing and Removal of Jewellery.

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provide good traction. Walls and doors must not be used for turning points or finish lines. A line or pylon must be used instead. Where a hall or stair activity involves passing through a doorway, the door(s) must be secured open. There must be enough room between students and equipment and walls to allow for freedom of movement. Large stages can be used, but the edge must be marked off and students kept back from the markers.

Special Rules & Instructions

Supervision

of the area or must be redirected to take another route. • Take precautions to guard against doors opening into the activity area (e.g., keep DPA participating students far enough away from a door that could swing open into the DPA area). • No racing or end-to-end activities. • When students are ascending or descending stairs, they must be in control and must have access to a hand rail.

• Locker doors must be closed when DPA occurs in hallways. • Visually inspect for • Students must be instructed in the • On-site hazards. proper use of equipment before supervision using it. • Walls and stages must not be used for • When involving students in circuits, turning points or there must be enough room finish lines. A line or between stations and between the

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DPA Locations

Outdoors

September 2016

Equipment

Clothing, Footwear and Jewellery • Clothing appropriate for freedom of movement. • Scarves, drawstrings, and belts must not present a safety concern.

• First-aid kit must be accessible. • Equipment must be appropriate for age and ability of students. • DPA equipment must be stored safely. • Equipment • Footwear must be must be appropriate for the appropriate requirements of the for age and activity (e.g., running ability of shoes, snowshoes, and students. boots). • Equipment • Clothing must be must be safely appropriate for the transported to activity and weather the outdoor conditions (e.g., hats, location. mitts). • First-aid kit • Jewellery – refer to must be Criteria for the Wearing accessible. and Removal of Jewellery. • When using creative playgrounds, follow board/school policies for their use.

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Facilities

Special Rules & Instructions

pylon must be used instead. • Floor plugs must be used to cover the holes in which poles for nets are usually placed.

station activity and the wall for safe movement.

• Visually inspect outdoor area for potential hazards (e.g., holes, glass, rocks). • Immovable obstacles, such as trees and goalposts, must be identified to students. • Severely uneven surfaces must not be used. There must be sufficient turf for proper traction. • Warn students to be careful on wet grass. • When engaging students in an activity in the school neighbourhood (e.g., a power walk), teachers must familiarize students

Supervision

• Take weather conditions into • On-site consideration (e.g., heat, cold, supervision smog, rain, lightning) when • In-the-Area planning activities. supervision • Attention must be given to for power temperature, length of time walks, students have been outside, and neighbourintensity of activity. hood run/walks • Inform parents and students of the importance of sun protection (e.g., • For activities sunscreen, hats) and insect in the school repellent. neighbourhood, one • Remind students of the importance supervisor of hydration. must be at • Inform school office whenever a the front of class will be held outdoors and the group determine that an appropriate and one at means of communication is the back of available (e.g., student runner, the group walkie-talkies). (primary). A • Determine that there is easy access responsible into the school building from the student must location. be at the • Students must stay in pairs or

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DPA Locations

Community Facilities (e.g., arenas, parks)

September 2016

Equipment

Clothing, Footwear and Jewellery

• Use • Clothing and footwear equipment must be appropriate for appropriate to the activity (e.g., the size and running shoes, skates). condition of • Jewellery – refer to the facility. Criteria for the Wearing and Removal of • Equipment must be safely Jewellery. transported to the community facility. • First-aid kit must be accessible. • When using off-site facilities, follow board policies.

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Facilities with the route before the initial attempt (e.g., note areas to approach with caution). Students must not cross intersections unless directly supervised. • Visually inspect community facility for hazardous conditions. • For outdoor community facilities, see Outdoors section above.

Special Rules & Instructions

Supervision

groups (the buddy system) if they are going to be out of the teacher’s sight for any reason. • For winter activities, discuss with students how to prevent, recognize, and treat frostbite and hypothermia.

front of the group and a teacher at the back of the group for junior and intermediate students. • On-site supervision

• Follow rules and etiquette as outlined by the facility. • Be familiar with the emergency safety procedures of the facility. • Determine that there is a suitable means of communication with the school in case of an emergency.

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September 2016

Sample Letter to Parents/Guardians (or Newsletter Item) (Name of school or letterhead) (Date) Dear Parents/Guardians, The Ministry of Education requires every elementary student across Ontario to participate in a minimum of 20 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity during each instructional day (Grades 1 to 8). The School Board and our school are committed to helping our students benefit from this requirement. Research shows that providing elementary students with opportunities to be physically active on a daily basis has a positive impact on their physical, mental and social well-being. In particular, recent studies have cited that physical activity has had a beneficial impact on students’ achievement, readiness to learn, behaviour, and self-esteem. Each 20 minute Daily Physical Activity (DPA) session includes a warm-up, sustained physical activity, and a cool-down. On days that students are participating in physical education, DPA may be planned as part of the lesson in the gym. On days that your child does not have a physical education class, it will occur in another manner (e.g., outdoors, in the classroom, at another location in the school or at a school-wide event such as an assembly). Students with limitations will be accommodated so that all students can participate as best they can. Therefore, a minimum safety requirement is that students must wear appropriate footwear and clothing on a daily basis. This means running shoes and comfortable, loose fitting clothing, which is already a requirement for physical education classes. The wearing and/or removal of jewellery during Daily Physical Activity is based on the type of activity and the hazards it may pose to the wearer and other participants. Teachers will determine when jewellery is to be removed on the basis of safety for all students. In general it is best not to have your child wearing exposed hanging jewellery e.g. necklaces, chains, dangling earrings.

Running shoes must have flat rubber soles with a tread and be secured to the feet. ● No running shoes with wheels ● No sandals ● No running shoes with a higher heel ● No slip-ons ● No cleats ● No open toe or open heels ● Shoelaces must be tied. This program is only one step to helping students attain a healthy active lifestyle. As parents/guardians, you can play an important role by encouraging your child’s participation in physical activity at school, by participating in physical activities with your child, and by talking to your child about Daily Physical Activity and about the importance and benefits of healthy, active living. Please look for details of activities related to DPA in upcoming communications throughout the school year. If you have any questions, please contact us through the school office. Yours truly, Principal

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September 2016

Sample DPA Communication Strategies A. The minimum student safety requirements for DPA are as follows: · running shoes · when DPA takes place in any setting other than as part of a physical education class, students must wear loose fitting clothing that does not inhibit movement (e.g., not tight clothing) and is appropriate for bending, stretching etc. · no exposed hanging jewellery · Medic alert identification and religious articles of faith that cannot be removed must be taped or securely covered. There are a variety of ways that this information can be communicated to parents: · in the school newsletter · on the school’s web site · in the student handbook · as an attachment to the June report card to prepare students and parents for the next school year (sample attached on previous page) · as part of the Physical Education Safety Guideline Appendix A which goes home to all parents/guardians in September (attached) · letter to parents These requirements could be included in the school’s dress code and shared as part of any of the above strategies. The following is a sample dress code description: B. Sample Dress Code School policy requires that students meet acceptable standards of dress and grooming. Student dress should promote a safe, respectful, learning environment. Please assist your child in making the appropriate dress choices each day. Students need to be prepared every day to be active, to sit on the floor and to move around the classroom. Participation in the DPA Program requires that: • Students wear running shoes o Running shoes must have flat rubber soles with a tread and be secured to the feet. o No:  running shoes with wheels  running shoes with a higher heel  open toes or open heels  cleats  sandals o Shoelaces must be tied • Students have no exposed hanging jewellery • Medic alert identification and religious articles of faith that cannot be removed must be taped or securely covered. • Students wear loose fitting clothing that does not inhibit movement (e.g., not tight clothing) and is appropriate for bending, stretching etc.

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