germantown forward 2030 - City of Germantown

germantown forward 2030 - City of Germantown

GERMANTOWN FORWARD 2030 OUR PLAN FOR SOCIAL, E N V I R O N M E N TA L A N D E C O N O M I C S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y. 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2 T...

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GERMANTOWN FORWARD 2030

OUR PLAN FOR SOCIAL, E N V I R O N M E N TA L A N D E C O N O M I C S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y.

1

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

2

TABLE of CONTENTS FOREWORD........................................................................ 4 LETTER FROM THE MAYOR............................................... 5 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY..................................................... 6 VISION STATEMENT....................................................... 10 KEY PERFORMANCE AREAS............................................11 CITY SERVICES & FINANCE........................................... 12 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT........................................... 18 EDUCATION.......................................................................22 LAND USE & TRANSPORTATION....................................26 NATURAL RESOURCES.................................................. 30 PUBLIC SAFETY................................................................36 QUALITY OF LIFE............................................................. 40 TECHNOLOGY...................................................................44 WELLNESS....................................................................... 48 STEERING COMMITTEE................................................. 53 TASK FORCES.................................................................. 54

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FOREWORD

I visited Germantown in February 2015, during the first days of the community-wide visioning process that rendered the document you’re now reading. I was struck by the City’s and the community’s willingness to lean into this process, to try to get it right — to create a plan that was inclusive of everyone and would honor the community’s heritage while also making Germantown a place that our kids and grandkids would want to call home. It’s tricky to try to plan for the next generation. As a professional futurist, even I am not sure of what the future will bring. We know that our kids will use more, not less, technology. We know that the importance of great education will only grow in importance. And we know that we’re living much, much longer. But we also know that we are going to have to throw a few things at the wall, and see how they stick. Especially if you’re committed to constant improvement, experimentation will be the norm. But one thing will never change. It’s timeless, and it’s wisely written repeatedly in these pages. Communities are about people. “All generations.” “Engaged residents.” “Creativity.” “Design.” “Culture.” “Kindness.” “Partnerships.” All of these words are in your Vision and Values, and none of them are possible without people. In his play Coriolanus, Shakespeare wrote, “What is a city but the people?” Indeed. Regardless of Germantown’s future, it will always be about the people.

REBECCA RYAN

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EXECUTIVE FROM THE SUMMARY MAYOR

Dear citizens, stakeholders and visitors: Throughout our City’s history, leaders have always kept an eye on the future while being mindful of our past. As mayor of such a wonderful community and strong municipal organization, I am honored to present this strategic plan for the City of Germantown. Supported by a clearly articulated set of key performance areas and strategic objectives, the Germantown Forward 2030 vision statement identifies the right choices to move Germantown toward a sustainable future. First, I must recognize and acknowledge the work of the 30-member strategic planning steering committee. Over a period of 12 months, they created the long-range vision and guiding principles under which this strategic plan has emerged. Next, nine task forces took the vision statement and over a very tight and rigorous time frame, developed meaningful and actionable strategic objectives and performance measures that breathe life into our plan. The result is a strategic vision and plan that is truly a product of the community. Creating a sustainable city requires a long-term view. The Germantown Forward 2030 plan captures this with a focus on quality of life issues, fiscal responsibility, strong public safety and community engagement. This strategic plan is intended to help guide Germantown in these areas by charting a course to navigate the economic, environmental and social arena in which the City operates. Your continued support to build a sustainable future makes our vision for Germantown possible. I look forward to the years ahead and am confident we can achieve the strategic objectives contained within this plan. Sincerely,

MAYOR MIKE PALAZZOLO

Creating a sustainable city requires a long-term view. The Germantown Forward 2030 vision statement captures this with a focus on quality of life issues, fiscal responsibility, strong public safety and community engagement.

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY — P  ATRICK J. LAWTON, ICMA-CM GERMANTOWN CITY ADMINISTRATOR

Germantown Forward 2030 Steering Committee

Introduction The complexity of the problems facing local governments and communities across the country requires active and ongoing citizen engagement in long-range planning to guide public policy and service delivery. It was against this backdrop that the strategic plan, now known as Germantown Forward 2030, emerged. The decision by the Board of Mayor and Aldermen to pursue the development of a strategic plan aimed at 2030, gave Germantown residents an opportunity to truly consider their future desires for the City and to plan proactive steps to move there. The year-long planning process engaged residents in a dialogue about challenges and opportunities, community values and ensuring a sustainable future for the City. The process also provided an opportunity for the wisdom and expertise of Germantown residents to devise innovative solutions to address the economic, environmental and social issues faced today and anticipated to emerge in the future.

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Strategic Planning Process In January 2015 the Germantown Board of Mayor and Aldermen approved a process for the development of a long-range strategic plan to guide the growth and development of the community for the next 15 years. The year-long planning process focused on understanding and influencing the future, rather than simply preparing for or adapting to it, by aligning resources to bridge the gap between our present condition and the desired future. The strategic planning process began with the appointment of a 30-member steering committee. These citizens led the development of the Germantown Forward 2030 vision statement. A larger group of citizens assigned to specific task forces worked to develop specific goals and action plans to translate the vision into reality.

In an effort to make the strategic planning process a truly grass roots effort, one of the first actions by the Board of Mayor and Aldermen was to hand over the keys to the 30-member steering committee, charging them with the development of the plan to ensure community ownership. Steering committee members represented all aspects of the community in regard to age, race, gender and neighborhood. The process was facilitated by City staff to provide support and guidance and ensure completion of the plan. Members of the steering committee plunged headfirst into an intensive situational analysis, including the systematic collection and evaluation of data and relevant material related to the City’s current environment and future trends. The group enjoyed unlimited

access to executives and materials. In other words, the committee spent several months learning what makes our City and the greater community “tick,” and understanding what’s around the corner that may impact us. This analysis included: • An environmental scan including analysis of key indicators • Workforce planning analysis • Legal, ethical and reputational risk assessment • Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats (SWOT) analysis • Review and discussion about the City’s competitive position, customer requirements and industry trends • Identification of key communities • Review of community survey results

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

“Knowing how to think empowers you far beyond those who know only what to think.” — NEIL DEGRASSE TYSON

With a treasure trove of knowledge, the committee then spent a period of three months putting pen to paper and collectively developed the Germantown Forward 2030 vision statement. This statement is based on a comprehensive understanding of the current affairs of our community and the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead. The steering committee’s early writing efforts focused on the following questions: • What must happen to ensure Germantown’s sustainability in 2030? • What words do you want your children and grandchildren to use to describe Germantown? • What are the common values shared across the community? • What is unique about Germantown? The vision statement developed by the steering committee is an expression of possibility, the ideal state that the community hopes to achieve. The focus of the steering committee in writing the vision statement was to ensure the entire community embraces it. The vision provides the basis, defined by a series of value-based principles, from which the steering committee established the key performance areas.

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The key performance areas (KPAs) that emerged from the visioning process formed the foundation for the task forces’ strategy development work that followed. Nine task forces were comprised of steering committee members, appropriate City staff and residents tapped for their expertise or interest in one of the KPAs. Individual task forces used the following steps to develop the strategic objectives, actions plans and key performance indicators that guide the implementation of the strategic plan. • Each task force developed a Description of Success for the KPA. The Description of Success defines KPA success in reference to the vision statement. Task force members asked the question, “What should the performance area look like if the vision is achieved?” and “What community assets exist to help reach this description?” • Once the Description of Success was defined, the task force used this description to identify indicators and targets to monitor progress.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

GERMANTOWN 2030 STRATEGIC PLANNING PROCESS GERMANTOWN 2030 PROCESS OVERVIEW 02 01

FORM

ANALYZE

DETERMINE short-, medium-, and long-term action plans

the community

03 GERMANTOWN 2030 STRATEGIC DEVELOP PLANNING PROCESS

steering committee

Vision Statement

02

FUTURE

08

ANALYZE 04

Practice transparency, FORM the community exercise accountability,steering committee measure progress, and repeat DEFINE Key Performance DETERMINE Areas

01

GENERATE Strategic Objectives

06

07

short-, medium-, and long-term action plans

IDENTIFY

CREATE 08

FUTURE 05

03 DEVELOP Vision Statement

04

Practice transparency, Key Performance exercise accountability, Indicators

Description of Current Reality

measure progress, and repeat

GENERATE Strategic Objectives

DEFINE

Key Performance Areas

06

07

IDENTIFY

05

CREATE Keyaction Performance The strategic objectives and plans that • Each task force developed a Description Description of Indicators emergedCurrent effectively identify what must be of the Current Reality focusing Reality accomplished to achieve the vision set forth in on challenges that may threaten Germantown will repeat parts of this process using the Forward 2030. These objectives achievement of the description of Act methodologyGermantown Plan, Do, Study, for continuous improvement. will be deployed through the allocation of success. Identification of these intellectual and human capital and financial challenges provided a starting point for resources. Progress will be measured using a action plan development. performance management program designed PLAN Determine • Finally, each task force generated ideas objectives, to provide accountability and transparency. Germantown will repeat parts of this process using the define processes DO and initiatives, in the form of strategic Plan, Do, Study, Act methodology for continuous improvement. Execute objectives and action plans, designed the plan to move the community from current reality toward success. Action plans were PLAN sorted into short-, medium- and long-term Determine objectives, priorities and performance indicators define processes DO ACT were developed for each objective. Execute Refine the plan, adjust processes

Germantown will repeat this process using the Plan, Do, Study, Act methodology for continuous improvement.

the plan

STUDY Evaluate the results

ACT

Refine the plan, adjust processes

STUDY Evaluate the results

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

GERMANTOWN FORWARD 2030 VISION: Germantown is a vibrant, modern community, the community of choice, offering outstanding quality of life for all generations. The government is fiscally sound and provides top-quality public safety and services responsive to community requirements. Engaged residents honor the past, treasure the present and responsibly shape Germantown’s future.

THE COMMUNITY VALUES: Excellence in education Innovation, creativity and continuous improvement Lifestyle opportunities as part of the fabric of everyday life Natural and designed beauty and smart growth Community strength, health and sustainability A culture of excellence and kindness Local and regional partnerships

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KEY PERFORMANCE AREAS

KEY PERFORMANCE AREAS: CITY SERVICES & FINANCE — How to create a culture of continuous improvement and innovation, providing outstanding customer value and high product and service quality in a sound financial manner to our residents, businesses and visitors ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT — How to create a strong local economy by attracting new businesses and maintaining successful, resilient businesses that help move the community toward sustainability EDUCATION — How to provide an educational system that prepares students to be adults in a world that is rapidly changing and to continue to address the economic, infrastructure and technological issues confronting formal and informal lifelong learning LAND USE & TRANSPORTATION — How land use and transportation policy decisions are made regarding the modification and/or management of land and how people move within our community in a more sustainable manner NATURAL RESOURCES — How ecosystem integrity and biodiversity are protected, how to provide a dependable supply of high-quality water, reduce green house gas emissions and improve air quality and protect our rivers and streams from pollutants PUBLIC SAFETY — How to protect the community from natural and man-made events that could endanger lives or property QUALITY OF LIFE — How arts, culture, recreation and leisure activities for both residents and visitors remain relevant and are delivered in a manner that exceeds expectations TECHNOLOGY — How to manage technologies strategically and invest infrastructure dollars wisely to meet the expectations of our citizens and business community WELLNESS — How to meet the physical, nutritional, mental, spiritual and emotional needs of the community to improve health and wellness

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

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“Continuous improvement is better than delayed perfection.”

CITY SERVICES & FINANCE

— MARK TWAIN

CITY SERVICES & FINANCE City Services and Finance is one of the most important performance areas for the City of Germantown, directly affecting the success of each department and the eight other key performance areas. Focusing on strong, community-driven strategic planning built on a culture of “Excellence, Every Day” City staff deliver services in a fiscally-responsible, efficiency-driven manner focusing on continuous improvement to ensure customer expectations are met. Strong financial policies provide the framework for Germantown’s financial success and are imperative to the City’s future position. Leaders understand that containing costs and increasing operational efficiency, while maintaining adequate financial reserves, is crucial to sustaining City services and meeting customer expectations. As a result, Germantown is one of only 100 cities in the nation earning the AAA bond rating from both the Moody’s Investment Firm and Standard and Poor’s. Moody’s first awarded Germantown the AAA rating in 1986, followed by Standard and Poor’s in 1994. The City has been recertified by both organizations with each bond sale, most recently in 2016.

Careful planning and citizen engagement ensure that financial resources are allocated in a way that supports each of the nine key performance areas. Community survey results confirm that City efforts are impacting customers with 90% reporting satisfaction with City government’s overall job of providing highquality services. While the current reality for Germantown is exceptional, there is always room for improvement. Opportunities exist in the areas of operational efficiency, innovation and closing gaps in coordination of resources. The City of Germantown must strive to align elected officials, administration, staff, customers, the City budget, fiscal policies, departmental operations and City commissions with the Germantown Forward 2030 Strategic Plan. This will require a focus on identified strategic objectives to ensure action plans are executed and performance goals are met. Priorities for the Finance and City Services performance area include financial performance, asset renewal, meeting financial liabilities and providing quality, efficient services responsive to community requirements.

In order to ensure customer requirements are met, financial planning must take into consideration the delivery of City services.

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CITY SERVICES & FINANCE

Strategic Objective 1

Action Plans

Time Line

All funds are self-sustaining.

• Reduce dependency of Special Revenue Funds on the General Fund

1 to 2 years

The City of Germantown is diligent in maintaining adequate funding levels to support existing services and anticipated service requirements. Some of the City’s Special Revenue Funds and Enterprise Funds are dependent upon funds received from the City’s General Fund. This objective reduces the dependency of taxpayer dollars from the General Fund to support Special and Enterprise Funds. Over time, the General Fund will reduce funding to the Special Revenue Funds making these funds self-sufficient except for capital needs; however, the Enterprise Funds should be self-sufficient including capital needs. Both of these funds must generate revenues that exceed expenditures.

Action Plans

Time Line

Asset renewal is fully funded and takes place as scheduled.

• Update IRP policy, establish criteria for prioritization

1 to 2 years

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• Develop process for measuring variance between IRP and actual replacement of assets • Increase asset replacement to meet schedule

General Fund transfers to Special Revenue Funds General Fund transfers to Enterprise Funds

• Reduce dependency of Enterprise Funds on the General Fund

Strategic Objective 2

The City of Germantown is responsible for significant physical assets including a utility system, streets, drainage system, fire stations, parks and other assets. The City believes that stewardship of City assets is essential to deliver high-quality services to its customers consistently and effectively. The City will review the Infrastructure Replacement Program (IRP) schedule on an annual basis to ensure assets are being replaced when their useful life exceeds value. This objective will be obtained as the City maintains an adequate fund balance and revenues over expenditures. This strategy ensures that assets will be replaced as indicated by the City’s IRP schedule.

Key Performance Indicators

Key Performance Indicators Fully funded asset renewal

CITY SERVICES & FINANCE

Strategic Objective 3

Action Plans

Time Line

Net financial liabilities are fully funded.

• Reinforce adopted financial policies and monitor pension plan market performance and any amendments to the plan

1 to 10 years

Financial sustainability is a key objective of the City of Germantown. As a fiscally responsible city, sufficient assets are made available to meet current and future retirees’ demands on assets. The City maintains an adequate pension funding level where net pension liability and asset value will be 80% or greater. Pension liability is the difference between the total amount due to retirees and the actual amount of money the company has on hand to make those payments. Germantown is fully funded in all its pension liabilities, however, additional City funds will be required or asset investments will need to change in order to maintain this funding level if it falls below 80%.

Key Performance Indicators Fully funded annual pension liability

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CITY SERVICES & FINANCE

Strategic Objective 4

Action Plans

Time Line

The City provides high-quality services.

• Provide timely response to customer needs

1 to 2 years

The City’s highest objective is to provide superior customer service in the most timely and costeffective manner on a daily basis. By focusing on current needs and anticipating future customer needs, the City can deliver services consistently and efficiently. One tool that the City relies on to assess customer service is the feedback received from the City’s Community Survey. This feedback is used to make changes to existing services and/or anticipate future service requirements. The City takes pride in its technically competent workforce, and is dedicated to serving customers and adapting resources to requirements.

Key Performance Indicators Satisfaction with City services

• Understand customer requirements for all City operations and integrate within the performance management system

Strategic Objective 5

Action Plans

Time Line

Key Performance Indicators

The City provides community services that are responsive to customer needs.

• Align departmental business plans with strategic plan

1 to 2 years

Net Promoter Score

The alignment of departmental business plans with the City’s Strategic Plan is imperative for the sustainability of the City. City departments are tasked with aligning business plans with the strategic objectives included in the City’s 2030 Strategic Plan. Operational objectives, designed to support achievement of strategic objectives, are vital to the plan. The achievement of these objectives will lead the City to service excellence in the form of responsiveness to customer needs, as well as cost effectiveness in meeting those needs.

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• Develop and implement a process to update the plan

CITY SERVICES & FINANCE

Strategic Objective 6

Action Plans

Time Line

City Services are used effectively in high-priority areas.

• The percent of total City resources for lowvalued services should not exceed 20%

1 to 2 years

The City of Germantown strives to deliver services to customers in the most efficient manner possible, while pursuing efficiencies in operations to achieve the best value of public funds. The City relies on feedback that is plotted in the Value Quadrant, a tool used to evaluate and align resources with customer requirements. Low-valued services are evaluated using standardized practices to improve efficiency. Some services may also be eliminated to free up time and money for higher value services.

Key Performance Indicators Satisfaction with the City’s ability to focus on priorities Funding of low-valued services

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

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“Growth is never by mere chance; it is the result of forces working together.”

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

— JAMES CASH PENNEY, FOUNDER OF JCPENNEY

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Economic development pervades all aspects of City life, and as such, has become a significant key performance area in achieving sustainability for Germantown. The City’s triple bottom line, which refers to economic, environmental and social sustainability, is directly impacted by economic development efforts. The importance of this focus cannot be stressed enough as the competition for jobs, business and community have expanded beyond local to national and global interest. Germantown’s approach to current and future economic considerations can strategically position the City long-term as a quality place to live and conduct business — both crucial elements to its continued reputation as a community of choice. To be successful in economic development, the City must be a community with a thriving sustainable economy that provides innovative employment opportunities and authentic experiences for residents and visitors. Communities that have excelled demonstrate the ability to grow their economies through strong job creation emerging from innovative thinkers and companies that rapidly adapt to changing market needs. They recognize the unique identities of their communities and leverage them in residential and business attraction. They have the ability to reinvent themselves when needed. Economic planning

that incorporates land use and transportation supports infrastructure and connectivity, facilitating an environment for these vital assets to flourish. These considerations are critical for the future of Germantown due to limited land and resources. The resulting tax base, workforce, property values and quality of life will be a reflection of its success. A variety of assets and resources play a role in the City’s economic development efforts. Cultural and recreation amenities (including GPAC, the Germantown Athletic Club, Germantown Community Theater, Bobby Lanier Farm Park, the Germantown Greenway, the Great Hall, numerous parks and athletic fields and more) help to drive revenue from a tourism standpoint. Germantown’s reputation for quality shopping (including Saddle Creek, boutiques and multiple grocery offerings) assists with sales tax revenue. And the City’s dynamic medical industry, respected education system, relationships in economic development at the local, state and regional level and recent appeal to entrepreneurs through a small business incubator provide a pipeline for opportunities in business innovation and employment. These and other organizations and industries are invaluable in the City’s economic development efforts and will continue to provide a valuable contribution in the years to come.

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ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Strategic Objective 1

Action Plans

Time Line

Economic Development practices support economic sustainability.

• Develop Germantown as a regional destination

1 to 2 years

Germantown’s approach to economic development strategically positions the City as a local and regional destination for medical, office, retail and service business. Economic development efforts directly impact the City’s sustainability. This focus creates a sustainable economic base that provides opportunities for employment along with an affordable place to live. The City creates an enabling business climate through clear and transparent processes where businesses that align with community values thrive. City initiatives focus on retaining, expanding, growing and, lastly, attracting businesses. The City focuses on established targeted industry clusters including healthcare, medical devices, bioscience and technology, while also supporting those businesses that exemplify the overall character of the community.

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Key Performance Indicators Ratio of elastic tax revenue to total revenue Unemployment rate

• Grow and retain employment opportunities in the City by executing industry sector and cluster strategies aimed at growing the Life Sciences and Health Care industry sectors

Business growth rate Cost of living index

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Strategic Objective 2

Action Plans

Time Line

Economic development policies encourage investment in key commercial areas.

• Complete all identified small area plans and adopt related land use changes

1 to 2 years

• Redevelop municipal center into a mixed-use development and city center

2 to 5 years

The City recognizes the economic value of real placemaking and integrates programs along with strategic investments in infrastructure to encourage private development. The City’s economic development policies and planning initiatives incorporate land use, infrastructure and connectivity, which facilitate opportunities for these vital areas to flourish. These considerations are critical for the future of Germantown due to limited land and resources. The resulting tax base, workforce, property values and quality of life are a reflection of its success. By creating a vibrant city center and facilitating other strategic investments, the City gives people a reason to come to Germantown and to return for the Germantown experience.

Key Performance Indicators Commercial tax base revenue Value of new construction in key commercial areas Job growth Median residential property value Median home price

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

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“Intelligence plus character — that is the true goal of education.”

EDUCATION

— MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR.

EDUCATION Education in Germantown is multi-layered and abounds in choices. Germantown is home to schools in both the Germantown Municipal School District (GMSD) and Shelby County Schools, three primary-level private schools, five special needs schools, nine preschool programs, a healthy homeschool population, the Union University Germantown campus and a variety of children’s and adult continuing education offerings from many sponsors. The leaders of many of these schools have expressed a desire to hold regular meetings to coordinate plans and share opportunities. Education providers in Germantown can only benefit from this continued cooperation and diversity. The quality of education within a community has been shown to be of high importance to a relocation decision. Realtor.com’s survey of prospective homebuyers showed that 91% said school boundaries were important in their search. A Zillow analysis implies that the difference between an excellent school district and a good one can mean a 30 to 40% difference in home values for the same size and amenities.

The American philosopher, John Dewey, argued that “Democracy has to be born anew every generation, and education is its midwife.” Public education is for the common good and for ensuring that all Americans have equal opportunities to maximize their individual potential and positively impact our society and culture. Then supporting one’s public schools is to the mutual benefit of all, even those whose children have passed through the schools or those who have never had children attending. The City of Germantown strives to achieve performance excellence at all levels in order to attain our description of success; Germantown is known as a community of continuous education for lifelong learning. The City of Germantown facilitates opportunities for resident learners to enhance their quality of life through education. The 2015 Germantown community survey rated education as the single most important issue facing Germantown.

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EDUCATION

With the establishment of the Germantown Municipal School District in 2014, Germantown has the opportunity to directly influence the direction and performance of the largest education provider in the City. While Germantown can and will encourage and support all education providers in the City, the community has local control of GMSD, which serves the largest population of students and is critical to Germantown’s reputation of excellence.

GMSD must lead through innovation and wise application of resources in order to continue to be the top-performing school district in Shelby County and to become one of the top 100 school districts in the United States. From today’s resident student population of 5,700 (3,400 at GMSD), growth to 6,800 to 6,900 is anticipated by 2030. This will require additional capital and more instructional and support staff as the district grows.

Strategic Objective 1

Action Plans

Time Line

Germantown has a reputation for lifelong learning and continuous education that meets the needs of all residents.

• Conduct a survey of all offerings in Germantown, prepare a plan to fill identified gaps

1 to 2 years

The City of Germantown facilitates opportunities for resident learners to enhance their quality of life through education. This exists through schools in the Germantown Municipal School District and Shelby County Schools, three primary-level private schools, five special needs schools, nine preschool programs, a healthy homeschool population, the Union University Germantown campus and a variety of children’s and adult continuing education offerings from many sponsors.

• Improve the availability and awareness of adult and children’s education opportunities in Germantown from all sources, producing an exchange listing of offerings from City government and all education providers • Establish a forum for the leaders of the various education providers in Germantown to share ideas, coordinate activities and cooperate in achieving excellence in all education in Germantown • Police and Fire Departments promote safety on all school campuses and support the health and welfare of students and teachers

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Key Performance Indicators Participation in adult lifelong learning and continuing education Degree to which adult lifelong learning and continuing education needs are met Books from Birth enrollment

EDUCATION

Strategic Objective 2

Action Plans

Time Line

Germantown Municipal School District is the top-performing school district in Shelby County and ranks among the top five statewide.

• The City responsibly provides financial support for GMSD’s longrange facilities plan

1 to 2 years

The City of Germantown supports the success of the Germantown Municipal School District. In addition to financial support for operational and capital needs, City departments support district operations through collaborative partnerships, programs and services.

• GMSD benefits from the City’s borrowing and purchasing power

Key Performance Indicators Satisfaction with GMSD operations GMSD national ranking GMSD county ranking

• Police and Fire Departments support safety on GMSD campuses and the health and welfare of students and teachers • City departments collaborate with GMSD staff and schools to offer programs and classes to support student achievement

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

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“In choosing street types and traffic solutions, it is important to start with the human dimension.”

LAND USE & TRANSPORTATION

— JAN GEHL, CITIES FOR PEOPLE

LAND USE & TRANSPORTATION To be successful, Germantown must improve walkability, especially in the Central Business District. Residents crave a place where they can gather and enjoy food, friends and entertainment within a walkable distance. The City strives to be a leader in improved access and mobility for all forms of transportation with a focus on drivers, commuters, cyclists and pedestrians. These objectives, in addition to a focus on well-planned development and home maintenance, are important to improving property values in Germantown. The coordination of land use and transportation planning is commonly considered a primary element of smart growth. These disciplines share policies, principles and strategies intended to preserve, enhance and facilitate healthy, sustainable communities and neighborhoods. The integration of land use and transportation supports a balance of mixed uses envisioned in the smart growth plan (housing, employment, retail, recreation and service opportunities), which recognize the importance of spatial and geographic proximity, layout and design of these uses.

What happens in the street right-of-way has a direct impact on the overall character of adjacent land. Design of the public right-ofway can often be a catalyst for change in the vibrancy of a city and in people’s travel choices. Right-of-way design influences the first impression that shapes the community’s image, and impacts how people feel when they travel, whether by car, truck, foot, bike or bus. A system that promotes walking and biking can also contribute to a healthier town. Opportunities to improve connectivity and encourage alternative forms of transportation exist through improved sidewalks and crosswalks and updates to the Greenway and Master Bike Plans. Great communities also share another commonality: residents take pride in their homes and reinvest to maintain home values. Implementing programs to promote investment in aging neighborhoods is also a significant opportunity for the City.

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LAND USE & TRANSPORTATION

Strategic Objective 1

Action Plans

Time Line

Significantly improve walkability in Germantown’s Central Business District.

• Implement streetscape design standards in the Central Business District to enhance walkability

1 to 2 years

• Fully implement the City’s Greenway and Pedestrian/Bicycle Master Plans

2 to 5 years

Strategic Objective 2

Action Plans

Time Line

Germantown is regionally recognized as a leader for improved access and mobility for all forms of transportation.

• Develop a baseline for level of service performance on Germantown Road and Poplar Avenue

1 to 2 years

Germantown’s streets now have many other functions beyond the safe and efficient movement of cars; they form vital components of residential areas and greatly affect the overall quality of life for residents and visitors. City streets play a significant role in the vitality, livability and character of the City and its neighborhoods. Implementation of streetscape improvements within the Central Business District creates a place that is attractive to residents and visitors. New sidewalks and high-quality streetscapes are now important amenities that influence travel choices. Significant investment in the Germantown Greenway and other pedestrian pathways throughout the community creates additional opportunities for pedestrian activities.

Germantown is a model community for all modes of transportation due to its focus on safety and efficiency through the implementation of a “Complete Streets” policy and program. The program, developed with land use compatibility as the primary goal, successfully improves connectivity, access and service throughout the City. These transportation and land use policies enhance the City’s reputation by actively managing the network capacity around rapid growth and decreasing traffic congestion. A critical issue throughout the planning and development processes is balancing the level of development while considering the capacity of the road system.

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Central Business District Walk Score

Key Performance Indicators Ratio of proposed to actual bike routes and greenway Satisfaction with traffic flow

• Develop and adopt a Complete Streets policy

Level of Service for Germantown Road Level of Service for Poplar Avenue

• Update the major road plan and establish priorities for transportation efficiency • Improve the Level of Service on the City’s major corridors of Poplar Avenue and Germantown Road

Key Performance Indicators

2 to 5 years

LAND USE & TRANSPORTATION

Strategic Objective 3

Action Plans

Time Line

Assessed property value in designated smart growth areas increases annually.

• Proactively promote smart growth development opportunities in identified Economic Development strategic nodes

1 to 2 years

As the City grows and redevelops, leaders focus on policies and strategies that encourage efficient land use, support a mix of housing types integrated with activity centers and diverse businesses and increase the safety and efficiency of public utilities, streets, facilities and services. The opportunity for mixed-use smart growth development increases property values over conventional suburban development. By providing an alternative development choice, smart growth areas that more fully integrate uses and activities are important to the redevelopment within Germantown’s designated strategic nodes and districts.

Key Performance Indicators Property tax revenue from smart growth areas

Strategic Objective 4

Action Plans

Time Line

The City experiences positive trends in assessed value of residential areas.

• Initiate the Neighborhood Planning Initiative

1 to 2 years

Germantown’s neighborhoods significantly contribute to the City’s overall character and provide the foundation for the property tax base. The City encourages a broader range of housing options for Germantown residents while preserving the quality and desirability of Germantown’s existing neighborhoods. The City’s housing stock has predominantly been composed of single-family homes. As these homes age and housing demand changes with demographic shifts, it is paramount that the community ensures the continued success of older neighborhoods. At the same time, the development of more housing styles within the City helps to diversify market options for residents. The City continues to create opportunities for new residential properties and encourage improvement to existing homes. When this occurs, the result is higher home values, pride in ownership, new residents and an increased value to both neighborhoods and the City of Germantown.

• Establish a program to incentivize and support rehabilitation of existing single family homes and lots

Key Performance Indicators Assessed value of residential property Ratio of multifamily to singlefamily homes

• Promote alternative models of single family housing types in mixed use and SmartCode developments • Establish a support program for the maintenance of existing single-family homes in older sections of the City

2 to 5 years

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

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NATURAL RESOURCES

“In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks.” — JOHN MUIR

NATURAL RESOURCES Natural resources are defined as those elements found in nature and include land, vegetation, wildlife, water systems and air. People value these resources because they directly contribute to the physical, mental and economic health and well-being of the community. Management of these resources affects the quality of life in Germantown and the City’s commitment to sustainability and environmental stewardship. Natural resource management deals with managing the way people and the natural landscape interact, and specifically focuses on a scientific and technical understanding of resources and ecology and the life-supporting capacity of those resources. There are compelling reasons for placing natural resource management as a high priority in Germantown. (1) Germantown’s vision requires it; (2) the law mandates it; and (3) without it, natural systems and features that can be community assets become liabilities instead. There is a clear connection between today’s everyday activities that affect the environment and the quality of life that will be possible for future generations.

With an extensive parks system in place, many of the parks and amenities in Germantown are outdated and not designed to sustainable standards. An updated Parks and Open Space Master Plan should consider these deficiencies. Maintenance efforts need to be stronger to address the current condition of park lakes and lack of adequate informational, educational and wayfinding signage. The Greenway System Master Plan should be executed to make planned connections a reality. A current comprehensive assessment and GIS-based inventory of all natural resources does not exist and should be established. This action will allow for the development of updated natural resource management policies and will uncover critical needs and priorities. Germantown enjoys excellent potable water and must continue to maintain infrastructure to support such. Public lakes and rivers should be managed for better fish and wildlife habitat. Having stormwater management practices and an agreement with the City of Memphis for sewer treatment in place are both positive attributes. The use of reliable, energy-efficient vehicles in the City fleet is currently limited.

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NATURAL RESOURCES

Germantown’s success in terms of natural resources depends upon a fully implemented Natural Resources Management Plan that addresses all aspects of sustainable practices in natural resources management. A professional ecological team, with support from community stakeholders, is needed to undertake a comprehensive management process. This effort will result in an integrated systems approach to protect and conserve public land, vegetation, wildlife, water systems

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and air quality. All these natural resources are valued by citizens and provide access and a strong connection to nature. A wide range of nature-based education programs and public awareness about the importance of natural resources perpetuate the next generation of conservation stewards. These steps will help ensure that Germantown is known throughout the region as a leader in environmental stewardship and sustainable practices.

NATURAL RESOURCES

Strategic Objective 1

Action Plans

Time Line

Key Performance Indicators

Policies and practices advance sustainable practices in natural resource management.

• Create a Natural Resources Division

1 to 2 years

City’s carbon footprint

The City of Germantown’s continued vibrant quality of life depends on the ability to protect natural resources and implement a strong stewardship ethic, safeguarding the interests of future generations. There is a call for an integrated management system that ensures the health and integrity of the City’s natural resources and their underlying ecosystems. The intent of this strategic objective is to create a broad understanding and commitment for the advancement of sustainable practices through the adoption and full implementation of the Germantown Natural Resources Management Plan. Key performance indicators for plant and wildlife inventory provide data for the natural resources report assessment. In addition, the continual reduction of the City’s carbon footprint promotes energy conservation.

Air quality index

• Create a comprehensive database of all natural resources • Provide public awareness for understanding of the plan by communicating to residents and stakeholders • Improve access to nature and increase public awareness • Develop and implement a long-term funding strategy to progress the Natural Resources plan • Practice and promote innovative energy conservation measures

2 to 5 years

• Implement a long-term funding strategy to support sustained tree canopy

5 to 10 years

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NATURAL RESOURCES

Strategic Objective 2

Action Plans

Time Line

Ecosystem integrity and habitat biodiversity exist on public lands.

• Ensure well-stocked fishing lakes and ponds for recreational fishing

1 to 2 years

The ecosystem integrity and habitat biodiversity objective is focused on sustaining natural systems, their functions and values. The City’s approach to restore and sustain health, productivity and biological diversity of ecosystems is based on science, collaboration and strong management practices. Strategic actions protect the City’s streamside buffers along adjacent rivers and lakes to promote ecosystem integrity. Sustaining the natural functions of wetlands for habitat biodiversity is accomplished through compliance with state statutes and local ordinances. A comprehensive urban forestry program and a commitment to use native plants restores habitat integrity.

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Key Performance Indicators Tree canopy coverage ratio

• Develop and implement a streamside buffer ordinance

City’s non-invasive plant inventory

• Increase the use of drought-tolerant, low-maintenance native plants in the public landscape

Designated arboretum

• Eradicate invasive plants on all public property • Increase designated arboretums on public lands • Create designated, protected wildlife corridors • Increase tree planting programs • Increase planting of vegetation and habitat restoration to attract desired wildlife, pollinators, birds and butterflies

2 to 5 years

NATURAL RESOURCES

Strategic Objective 3

Action Plans

Time Line

Key Performance Indicators

Enhanced protection and conservation of our water resources are priorities.

• Monitor USGS and Groundwater Institute reports

1 to 2 years

Total coliforms

The strategic objective promotes continued investment and responsible management of Germantown’s aquifer. Water resources include potable water, sanitary sewer and stormwater. Potable water is the City’s greatest natural resource and protection of the aquifer in terms of quality and quantity is critical. Collecting, transporting and treating sanitary sewer discharges are musts for the health of the City. Stormwater discharge clarity is critical to maintaining clean lakes and rivers. The unpolluted discharge into drain laterals and further into adjacent rivers and lakes is an inherent and legislated necessity.

Turbidity • Invest in water availability redundancy

Total dissolved solids

• Protect wetlands and surface water

Water hardness

• Maintain a national pollutant discharge eliminations system

Rate of change in aquifer level

• Invest in physical infrastructure rehabilitation and maintenance through a comprehensive IRP plan • Implement eco-friendly irrigation systems and retrofits • Evaluate long-term non-ground water irrigation options

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

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“Safety and security don’t just happen: they are the result of collective consensus and public investment.”

PUBLIC SAFETY

— NELSON MANDELA

PUBLIC SAFETY Public Safety addresses the overall safety of the community, specifically in the areas of law enforcement, security, fire protection and emergency medical services. Community safety is affected by residents’ perception of safety and security, the overall crime rate, emergency services response times, fire prevention and suppression capabilities and the quality of emergency medical care and transport services. The community recognizes the importance of a partnership with public safety professionals. Germantown is recognized as a safe community and considers public safety as a core competency. The police and fire departments are recognized as some of the best in the region. The City consistently enjoys one of the lowest crime rates in the state, low property loss from fires and exceptional emergency medical services, giving citizens a true sense of safety and security. Rapid emergency response times ensure that incidents are handled in an efficient manner. Public safety providers receive high satisfaction ratings on customer surveys, a reflection of the professionalism and compassion shown by personnel. City-provided ambulance transport service has resulted in significant improvements in patient care and resulting in one of the highest cardiac arrest survival rates in the state. Citizens participate

in outreach programs, including Citizens Police Academy, CERT, CPR training, Neighborhood Watch programs and as reserve fire fighters and police officers. To ensure a safe community, it is imperative that the police department provide forwardthinking police services and the fire department provide exceptional fire and emergency medical services to meet the needs of the community. The departments strive to achieve the lowest crime rate in the state, excellent response times, a high solvability rate for crime, high customer satisfaction for public safety and high visibility. This is achieved through aggressive crime and fire prevention activities, including training of citizens in police operations, community emergency response team (CERT), fire safety and CPR. As an area that provides the most opportunity to affect the survivability of citizens, cardiac arrest and stroke survivability must be a priority. Finally, to be successful, the police and fire departments must continue to recruit and maintain a highly-trained and professional workforce sufficient to meet the community needs, along with sufficient infrastructure and innovative application of technology to enhance public safety. Public safety is best achieved using a community approach with citizens engaged in helping keep neighborhoods safe.

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PUBLIC SAFETY

Strategic Objective 1

Action Plans

Time Line

Germantown is the safest city in Tennessee.

• High-visibility patrols and proactive enforcement

1 to 2 years

Community engagement is vital to Germantown Police services in helping to determine customer requirements. The foremost of those is a rapid response to emergency situations. Quick response times ensure a high level of personal security and aid in the preservation of evidence. Highly visible, proactive neighborhood patrols provide a strong sense of security and deter criminal activity. These combined efforts are reflected by the City’s low crime index.

• Evaluate emergency response factors to ensure safe, efficient and effective officer arrival • Recruit, hire and retain quality employees • Maintain, improve and acquire innovative technology • Develop and strengthen community outreach programs • Assess infrastructure and capital needs and develop plans for potential CIP projects

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Key Performance Indicators State crime rate index Satisfaction with police services Satisfaction with safety while walking alone Satisfaction with safety in comparison to other cities Satisfaction with fire department services

PUBLIC SAFETY

Strategic Objective 2

Action Plans

Time Line

Fire protection services result in low property loss and no fire deaths.

• Assure response times meet National Fire Protection Association standards

1 to 2 years

Fire suppression and prevention activities result in low dollar loss in relation to affected properties, and low injuries and deaths from fire. This is achieved through fire code enforcement including review of development projects, inspection of new commercial buildings and annual maintenance inspections of all commercial occupancies. Fire prevention activities, featuring an aggressive public fire education program, reduce the risk of fires, injuries and deaths. Citizens are educated and take precautions to protect their families and property. Adequate fire fighter staffing, training, equipment, apparatus and strategic station locations help to control fire loss.

• Ensure adequate staffing levels to meet community needs

Ratio of total estimated value of fire loss to total appraised value of residential property Ratio of total estimated value of fire loss to total appraised value of commercial property

• Recruit, hire and retain quality employees • Assure safe commercial buildings through Fire Code enforcement • Assure adequate fire station placement and coverage • Assess infrastructure and capital needs and develop plans for potential projects

Strategic Objective 3

Action Plans

Time Line

Germantown has the highest survivability rate in Tennessee related to Emergency Medical Services.

• Increase community education and outreach

1 to 2 years

Emergency Medical Services include all ambulances and fire apparatus staffed with Paramedics and Advanced Emergency Medical Technicians trained to provide professional and compassionate care. Emergency medical personnel have the technology, tools and resources to provide excellent patient care. This results in high survivability from medical emergencies as well as high customer satisfaction. Cardiac arrest and stroke survivability are critical aspects of overall survivability, and remain a top priority. The community takes a proactive approach to health, wellness and medical care, including training in CPR and automatic external defibrillators, helping to improve survivability and overall quality of life.

Key Performance Indicators

Key Performance Indicators Cardiac arrest survival rate

• Ensure all personnel are fully qualified and trained • Assure ambulance response times meet or exceed national standards • Invest in equipment and lifesaving technology

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QUALITY OF LIFE

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“Whatever creates or increases happiness or some part of happiness, we ought to do; whatever destroys or hampers happiness… we ought not to do.”

QUALITY OF LIFE

— ARISTOTLE, RHETORIC

QUALITY of LIFE Quality of life in Germantown has a direct correlation to the community’s ability to engage residents, enhance public spaces and contribute to healthy, sustainable practices and opportunities. Placemaking or “creating places that inspire and connect people to maximize shared values” is key to retaining and advancing exceptional quality of life in Germantown and making/sustaining great spaces. The City of Germantown is positioned to develop and implement a process of creative placemaking in order to continue improving the quality of life, community well-being and prosperity while also fostering attention and distinction on a regional scale. Creative placemaking will include a focus on cultural districts, public art, public parks and gardens and connectivity to those places. The process and dynamic strategies of placemaking will be applied to the Central Business District and all appropriate public spaces. Germantown intentionally leverages the power of the arts, culture, creativity, recreation and life-long learning to serve all residents while driving a broader agenda for change, growth and transformation in a way that also builds character and quality of place. There is a strong collaboration between a diverse group of stakeholders — the City,

the private sector, non-profit organizations, artists and citizen groups. Partnerships and shared leadership harness the power to heighten the quality of life, revitalize spaces that need redesign and create new amenities. The placemaking process identifies tools to cultivate connections between people and place, including creating a cultural district(s), encouraging mixed-use development, attracting creative talent, displaying public art and planting public gardens. Effective branding, marketing and a vibrant central business district maximize great placemaking experiences for residents and visitors. For Germantown to flourish and maintain a competitive edge as the premier community, implementation of placemaking principles is key. More than just promoting better facility design, placemaking will facilitate creative patterns of use, and will require attention to the physical, cultural and social identities that define a place and support its ongoing evolution. Lack of connectivity to gathering spaces must also be addressed. It will be important to not simply borrow or copy what has been done elsewhere, but instead to look to Germantown’s current assets and needs, and develop a process for creating place-based strategies which will transform those tired and underused spaces into places which inspire positive investment and change.

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QUALITY OF LIFE

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QUALITY OF LIFE

Strategic Objective 1

Action Plans

Time Line

Exceptional gathering places encourage engagement among residents and visitors.

• Develop a branding and marketing campaign for the City

1 to 2 years

Placemaking inspires people to collectively reimagine and reinvent public spaces as the heart of the places they share. More than just promoting better urban design, placemaking facilitates creative patterns of use, paying particular attention to the physical, cultural and social identities that define a place and support its ongoing evolution. By studying the City’s spaces and researching national successes, coupled with a well-structured marketing communications plan, Germantown can be the home of unique and innovative spaces.

Satisfaction with Central Business District contribution to quality of life Satisfaction with top five City functions

• Design and implement a Central Business District streetscape plan • Create policies and guidelines to develop, manage and promote placemaking

Key Performance Indicators

Satisfaction with Germantown as a place to live 2 to 5 years

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TECHNOLOGY

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“Smart technology [is]… a historic opportunity to rethink and reinvent government on a more open, transparent, democratic, and responsive model.”

TECHNOLOGY

— ANTHONY M. TOWNSEND, SMART CITIES

TECHNOLOGY Technologies will play an increasingly prominent role in the quality of life for Germantown residents, and are essential for making City services more efficient and accessible. Residents demand a Citywide technological infrastructure that can support and sustain government, individual, educational and business demands. Effective and engaging communications also create a greater sense of community for residents. The real power and potential of technology is to improve how an organization conducts its business overall, including how it delivers external public services, operates and manages internal business processes and governs. The City has adopted and is making the effort to implement technology in this broader sense, that of changing the way the City operates, provides services and information to the public and engages citizens. To be successful, technology must be a pillar of the community’s infrastructure just as roads and water lines are today. Internet access and wireless communications

throughout the City must have the coverage and capacity to meet demand. It must be dependable, safe, secure, robust and state-of-the-art. Technology must also be acknowledged in every aspect of government. Stakeholders need to be capable of interacting with City Hall anytime, from anywhere, for any service. Finally, technology will enable more efficient government by creating more efficient internal operations. Germantown has a tech-savvy community. The current reality is that citizens are limited to one or two Internet providers. There are numerous choices for wireless connectivity, however coverage and capacity is lacking in some areas of the City. There are some City services available online (such as water billing, taxes and work orders), however significant opportunity exists to extend the online services offered by the City. Government operations can be made more efficient through the use of technology to help maintain a financially stable community.

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TECHNOLOGY

Strategic Objective 1

Action Plans

Time Line

A City-wide technological infrastructure supports and sustains individual, educational, government and business demands.

• Investigate means for enhancing the design and placement of wireless transmission facilities in residential areas

1 to 2 years

Germantown requires a dependable, state-ofthe-art and robust technology infrastructure throughout the City. This includes cellular service, wireless, Internet connectivity, radio, television and telephone service. City ordinances adapt to changing technology while keeping with the traditions citizens expect. The City creates an environment that attracts technology options for the community and explores strategic technological partnerships. Technology also supports and enhances public safety initiatives such as FirstNet, which will bring 21st century technology to first responders.

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Satisfaction with business internet service Satisfaction with business cellular service

• Develop Wireless Performance Index

• Explore and create strategic technological partnerships

Satisfaction with residential internet service Satisfaction with residential cellular service

• Establish baseline citizen and business satisfaction and demand requirements

• Review and implement changes to City ordinances to improve the technology environment in the community

Key Performance Indicators

2 to 5 years

Wireless performance index

TECHNOLOGY

Strategic Objective 2

Action Plans

Time Line

A technology-enabled community builds efficiency, safety and transparency by which all stakeholders can use and access relevant government information and services at any time from anywhere.

• Implement improvements to customer-facing online systems

1 to 2 years

The City of Germantown fosters an environment where technology is acknowledged in every aspect of government. City Hall is available any time, from anywhere, for any service and provides two-way communication between citizens, businesses and government. City government is made more efficient though the use of technology to enhance operations and provide the best value for the citizens. Germantown is known locally, regionally and nationally as a community that uses, encourages and fosters technology.

Key Performance Indicators Targeted City services available online Satisfaction with use and access of information and services

• Determine baseline satisfaction with the City’s online services

Satisfaction with the City website

• Increase satisfaction with City online services

2 to 5 years

• Be known locally, regionally and nationally as a community that uses, encourages and fosters technology

5 to 10 years

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

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WELLNESS

“The greatest wealth is health.” — VIRGIL

WELLNESS Germantown is a city that promotes a healthy environment, supporting a balanced notion of wellness for all ages. For the purposes of Germantown’s strategic plan, wellness refers to physical activity, healthy eating and stress management. Access to a diverse array of services and amenities, while available in 2015, are not well-used or measured in a meaningful way. Germantown has vast resources to encourage a healthy lifestyle, including parks, bike lanes, an Athletic Club and numerous other exercise options, a farmers market, greenway trails, traditional and specialty grocery options and a first-class healthcare network. From youth league ball fields to the performing arts, Germantown has been recognized for our potential to build a community culture of health and wellness. An inventory of the City’s wellness assets confirmed that the core elements are in place to support The Governor’s Foundation for Health & Wellness selection of Germantown as a Healthier Tennessee city. A group made up of civic, business and citizen

leaders, City staff and elected officials is currently working on a campaign designed to stimulate awareness and build momentum to encourage healthier living from the classrooms of Germantown’s K-12 schools to businesses, houses of worship, senior living communities and residential neighborhoods. Germantown will achieve long-term status as a city of choice, in part due to the sustained reputation as a leading-edge community with a common desire to encourage and support a fulfilling lifestyle in every conceivable way. In 2015, we are loosely connected with an expansive infrastructure of services for those self-motivated to work, live and play while meeting the nationally recognized indicators for excellent health. From infants to seniors, we are committed to a 2030 where the health of a community is measured in part by the holistic well-being of its residents. Wellness must live within the fabric of our families, schools, businesses, houses of worship and residential neighborhoods as a unifying feature of Germantown life.

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WELLNESS

Strategic Objective 1

Action Plans

Time Line

A majority of residents engage in healthy physical behavior.

• Determine baseline and set growth rate

1 to 2 years

A majority of the City’s population participates in meaningful physical activity at least three times a week that meets or exceeds national benchmarks for cardiovascular exercise. A vast inventory of public and private city-wide assets is continuously promoted through a coordinated communications network. The result is a vibrant, engaged and even competitive community. Team and individual fitness opportunities are available to all ages. As a result, Germantown is renowned regionally and beyond for higher-than-average life expectancy and lowered incidence of chronic illness.

• Inventory city-wide public and private assets and resources

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• Design and implement a community outreach plan for all ages • Collaborate to produce an annual Health and Wellness Expo

2 to 5 years

• Develop a branding and communication strategy for all objectives • Enact a smoke-free campus for all City facilities

5 to 10 years

Key Performance Indicators Participation in physical activity

WELLNESS

Strategic Objective 2

Action Plans

Time Line

A majority of residents are committed to a lifestyle that includes healthy eating habits.

• Determine baseline data and set growth rate

1 to 2 years

A majority of residents live a nutritionally healthy lifestyle featuring a self-disciplined balance of fruits, vegetables and other food choices, all in moderation centered on portion control. Public and private support groups are available options for individuals requiring counseling, education or support. Menu planning is commonplace, grocery store options are abundant and eating out means eating well with restaurants at each price point all serving healthy choices.

Key Performance Indicators Participation in healthy eating Participation in drinking water

• Inventory city-wide public and private assets and resources • Design and implement a community outreach plan for all ages • Hold a “Germantown’s Biggest Loser” community competition

2 to 5 years

• Implement the “Eat Real” or similar certification program in dining establishments • Collaborate to produce an annual Health and Wellness Expo • Develop a branding and communication strategy for all objectives

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WELLNESS

Strategic Objective 3

Action Plans

Time Line

A majority of residents report being involved in a supportive network and/or community at least once a week (behavioral, spiritual).

• Determine baseline and set growth rate

1 to 2 years

A majority of residents live a fulfilling life that is balanced between personal, academic, professional and volunteer pursuits. Residents may have divergent interests but their sense of community and self are securely connected. Physical and nutritional discipline and success find common ground in a genuine commitment to participate in community-wide activities that encourage self improvement. Local access to highly skilled medical professionals and other qualified life coaches is an added benefit of choosing Germantown.

• Inventory city-wide public and private assets and resources • Design and implement a community outreach plan for all ages • Develop programs to encourage multigenerational interaction • Develop a branding and communication strategy for all objectives • Develop and build on existing events, programming and training for residents of all ages

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2 to 5 years

Key Performance Indicators Participation in community events and programs

STEERING COMMITTEE

STEERING COMMITTEE Allyson Avera.................................... Vice President, Crye-Leike Real Estate Services Matt Bailey........................................ CFP, Pathway Financial Services, Inc. Joey Beckford................................... Community Volunteer Stephanie Brockway........................ Executive Director, Germantown Education Foundation

BOARD OF MAYOR & ALDERMEN Mike Palazzolo, Mayor

Janie Day........................................... Executive Director, Germantown Area Chamber of Commerce

John Barizza, Alderman

Stacey Ewell...................................... Assistant to the City Administrator, City of Germantown

Rocky Janda, Alderman

Jonathan Frase................................ Owner, Frase Protection, Inc.

Forrest Owens, Alderman

Audrey Grossman............................. Attorney, Harkavy Shainberg Kaplan & Dunstan PLC

Mary Anne Gibson, Alderman Dave Klevan, Alderman

Michelle R. Johns............................. Owner, Transforming Wellness, LLC Russell Johnson............................... Attorney, Russell Johnson Law Office Jenny Koltnow.................................. Director, Communications and Community Relations, AutoZone, Inc. Roberta Kustoff................................ Board Member, Tennessee Board of Parole Patrick J. Lawton.............................. Germantown City Administrator, ICMA-CM Lea Makhloufi .................................. International Baccalaureate Student, Germantown High School Greg Marcom.................................... The Reaves Firm, Inc. George Marinos................................ Strategic Accounts Manager, Landsberg Norris McGehee DVM, DABVP........ Owner, McGehee Clinic for Animals P.C. Dr. Lyle Muller, DDS, MSD................. Dentist Kristin New........................................ Community Volunteer Donna Chandler Newman................ Community Advocate; Retired Global Account Director, Lucent Technologies/Avaya Steve Priddy...................................... Community Advocate; Retired Vice President Human Resource Administration, FedEx Marjorie Reynolds............................ Community Volunteer Dan Roberts...................................... Director and Owner, Mathnasium and The Connection, LLC Antonio Scott.................................... 2016 Senior Class President, Houston High School Pat Scroggs...................................... Community Volunteer; Retired CEO & President, Germantown Area Chamber of Commerce Rick Towne........................................ Vice President, POP Solutions Group Dick Vosburg..................................... Community Advocate; Retired John Wagner..................................... Owner, Germantown Hardware and Germantown Carwash Gary Yenser....................................... President and Owner, Speedpro Imaging of Tennessee Kevin Young...................................... Community Advocate; Semi-retired

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TASK FORCES

TASK FORCES City Services & Finance Daniel Clark.....................................Vice President Clinical Informatics and Analytics, HealthChoice, LLC Ralph Gabb.....................................Finance Director, City of Germantown Janet Geyer.....................................Finance Manager, Crews Realty Clint Hardin.....................................Retired CFO, Folk Construction Co., Inc., Folks Folly, Inc., Folk Poperties, LLC, Folk Realty Partnership Russell Johnson.............................Attorney, Russell Johnson Law Office Matt Keathley.................................Investment Administrator, U.S. Dept. of the Navy - Commander Navy Installations Command Michael McLaughlin.......................Controller, Tower Ventures Christine Menzel.............................Teacher, Bolton High School Glen Perdue.....................................Planning Production and Control Manager, FedEx Lisa Piefer.......................................Procurement Director, City of Germantown Mitch Pleasant...............................Pharmacist Sherry Rowell..................................Sr. Budget & Performance Analyst, City of Germantown Adrienne Royals.............................Sr. Budget & Performance Analyst, City of Germantown Scott Wickliffe................................New Product Development Global Project Manager, FedEx Reza Ziai..........................................Chief Engineer, FedEx

Economic Development Bo Adams........................................Physician Christy Gilmour...............................Christy Gilmour Consulting, Strategy and Development Consultant Mike Harless...................................Retired Nick Kistenmacher.........................Senior Field Director, Office of US Senator Bob Corker Marie Lisco......................................Economic Development Manager, City of Germantown Scott Marcom.................................Operations Planning and Analysis Sr. Advisor, Sedgwick, Inc. Joseph McDonald..........................President/Owner, JMD Services Brian Pecon.....................................Retired Cameron Ross................................Economic and Community Development Director, City of Germantown Jessica Taveau...............................Director of Marketing and Communications, Memphis Bioworks Foundation Ric Wolbrecht .................................Raymond James, VP Investments Gary Yenser.....................................President and Owner, Speedpro Imaging of Tennessee

Education Stephanie Brockway......................Executive Director, Germantown Education Foundation Josh Clark.......................................Head of School, Bodine School Mindy Fischer.................................President, Germantown Municipal Council PTA Jo Gilbert.........................................Executive Director, Madonna Learning Center Dr. Manjit Kaur ...............................Owner and Director, Eye Level Learning Center Jason Manuel ................................Superintendent, Germantown Municipal School District Martha Mayers ..............................President, Germantown High School PTSA Mary McDonald..............................Founder and CEO, MCD Partners Education Consulting Daniel Page.....................................Director, Germantown Community Library Lisa Parker......................................Member and Past Chairman, Germantown Board of Education Dan Roberts....................................Director and Owner, Mathnasium and The Connection, LLC Renee Victory..................................Campus and MBA Director, Union University Dick Vosburg...................................Retired, Community Advocate

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TASK FORCES

Land Use & Transportation Allyson Avera..................................Vice President, Crye-Leike Real Estate Services Susan Burrow.................................Owner, Burrow Appraisal and Consulting Tim Gwaltney..................................City Engineer, City of Germantown James Jacobs................................Retired Donald McCrory..............................Executive Director, Memphis and Shelby County Port Commission Norris McGehee .............................Vetinarian/Owner, McGehee Clinic for Animals Sheila Pounder...............................Planner, City of Germantown Cindy Reaves..................................Partner, SR Consulting Cameron Ross................................Economic and Community Development Director, City of Germantown Chip Saliba......................................Land Use Controls Manager, Memphis/Shelby Co. Office of Planning and Development Jennifer Sisson...............................Lawyer, Sisson and Sisson John Wagner...................................Owner, Germantown Hardware

Natural Resources Matt Bailey......................................Financial Planner, Pathway Financial Services Pam Beasley...................................Director of Parks and Recreation, City of Germantown Jack Betchick.................................Reserve Park Ranger, City of Germantown Tim Bierdz.......................................Storm Water Engineer, City of Germantown Reynold Douglas............................General Services Director, City of Germantown Lori Anne Goetz..............................Engineer, Ensafe Inc. George Marinos..............................Strategic Accounts Manager, Landsberg Bo Mills............................................Public Works Director, City of Germantown Paul Mosteller.................................Agent/Owner, Insurance Solutions David Smith.....................................Sr. Civil Engineer - Manager, A2H, Inc. Lynda Spinolo.................................The Dabney Nursery Susan Threlkeld..............................Environmental Commission Member

Public Safety Jeff Beaman...................................Assistant Chief, Germantown Fire Department Rodney Bright.................................Deputy Chief, Germantown Police Department Donald R. Ester, Sr..........................Pastor, New Bethel Missionary Baptish Church Richard Hall.....................................Police Chief, Germantown Police Department Price Harris.....................................Attorney, The Law Office of R. Price Harris John Johnson.................................Deputy Chief (Retired), Memphis Police Department Alan Keller.......................................Captain, Germantown Police Department Jenny Lykins...................................Safety Awareness/Self Defense Instructor, Fogelman College of Business, University of Memphis Greg Marcom..................................The Reaves Firm, Inc. Keith Saunders, Jr..........................Administrative Chief, Germantown Fire Department Keith Saunders, Sr..........................Sr. Vice President, Division 10, Inc. John Selberg...................................Fire Chief, Germantown Fire Department Susan Sharp...................................Registered Nurse, Methodist Hospital Germantown David Townley ................................Lt. Col. Retired, United States Air Force Joanna Young.................................Office Manager, Center for Religious Expression - Founder, Cop Stop

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TASK FORCES

Quality of Life Frank Adams...................................Retired Airport Relations & Development, FedEx Pam Beasley...................................Director of Parks and Recreation, City of Germantown Joey Beckford.................................Arts Patron, Citizen of Germantown Paul Chandler.................................Executive Director, GPAC John Elkington................................Owner, Elkington Real Estate Group Justin Gee.......................................Attorney, Wagerman Katzman Law Firm Emily Hefley....................................Programming Manager, GPAC Angie Keathley................................Assistant to the Director, GPAC Kelly Lamberson.............................Stay-at-home Mom, Citizen of Germantown Yasmine Omari...............................Marketing and Education Outreach Coordinator, GPAC Phil Rogers......................................Director, Germantown Athletic Club Natalie Ruffin..................................Recreation Superintendent, City of Germantown Kathy Simonetti..............................Senior Vice President, Private Client Services, First Tennessee Bank Carlin Stuart....................................Manager, Business/Systems Analysis & Tax, Shelby County Kathy Torode...................................Project/Process Advisor, FedEx Services

Technology J.R. Anderson.................................Retired Engineer Michael J. Esposito........................Director IT, Food Nutrition Services, Shelby County Schools Tony Fischer...................................Director of Information Technology, City of Germantown Mark Furr.........................................Managing Partner, LAN Scape Solutions Stephanie Logan............................Technical Services Coordinator, City of Germantown William McMullen ..........................Lead Information System Architect, MITRE Corporation (Retired) Donna Chandler Newman..............Community Advocate; Retired Global Account Director, Lucent Technologies/Avaya Thomas O’Hara...............................Enterprise Client Partner-Connected Solutions Architect, Verizon Wireless Joe Plunk........................................Solutions Architect, Presidio

Wellness Hannah Altomar, ACNP................Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Amy Barringer...............................Clinical Director, Baptist Rehabilitation Germantown Janie Day......................................Executive Director, Germantown Area Chamber of Commerce Brian Janz.....................................Professor of MIS and George Johnson Teaching Fellow; Associate Director, FedEx Center for Supply Chain Management; Co-Founder, Memphis Innovation Bootcamp; Fogelman College of Business and Economics Michelle Johns.............................Owner, Transforming Wellness, LLC William Kenley..............................Chief Executive Officer, Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Steve Priddy...................................Community Advocate; Retired Vice President Human Resource Administration, FedEx Phil Rogers...................................Athletic Club Director, City of Germantown Steve Wilensky..............................Human Resources Director, City of Germantown

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

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WWW.GERMANTOWN-TN.GOV 1930 SOUTH GERMANTOWN ROAD GERMANTOWN, TN 38138 | (901) 757-7200 ©2016 THE CITY OF GERMANTOWN. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

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