GFS J-Term Catalog 2017 v5 10.25.2016.indd - Germantown Friends

GFS J-Term Catalog 2017 v5 10.25.2016.indd - Germantown Friends

germantown friends school JANUARY TERM Course Catalog 2017 GER M A N TOW N FR IEN DS .ORG 1 germantown friends school January Term C O U R S E C A...

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germantown friends school

JANUARY TERM Course Catalog 2017 GER M A N TOW N FR IEN DS .ORG

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germantown friends school January Term C O U R S E C ATA L O G 2017

TA B L E O F CO N T E N TS S TAT E M E N T O F P H I LO S O P H Y� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � 1 M A J O R C L AS S E S ( 6 H O U R S )  � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � 2 M A J O R C L AS S E S ( 3 H O U R S )  � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � 6 R E Q U I R E D M I N O R C L AS S E S � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � 1 7 E L E C T I V E M I N O R C L AS S E S� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � 1 8

S TAT E M E N T O F P H I LO S O P H Y J a n u a r y Te r m e n a b l e s o u r community to live the mission and values of our school and explore new passions, interests and interdisciplinary ways of learning about the world and ourselves. Through a modified schedule and course offerings outside of the re g u l a r c u r r i c u l u m , J a n u a r y Te r m provides teachers and students a space for experimentation, investigation and reflection.

GER M A N TOW N FR IEN DS .ORG

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MAJOR CLASSES EACH OF THE FOLLOWING MAJOR CLASSES MEET 6 HOURS PER WEEK Students will take 12 hours of major classes per week.

1

Astronomy

T race y Spinka

In Astronomy, students will use images and data from current and past space missions as well as terrestrial observations to explore scientists’ current understanding of our observable universe. Modern astronomy demonstrates the scientific process at work, where new observations are shaping the theories of tomorrow. Students will take a fascinating tour of celestial objects, whose scale, speed, energy and age are hard to comprehend, that are governed by the same physical principles that apply here on Earth. Students will be expected to do some reading and research outside of class and present their findings. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Four 90-minute classes per week

2

Current Supreme Court Term J e re my Ross

This course will examine cases pending before the US Supreme Court in the current 2016-2017 term. We will open with a look at the Court’s jurisdiction and organization, and students will select three of the cases on the Court’s docket for an up-close look, which will involve reading the briefs and the chief prior relevant opinions (much but not all of which can be done in the classroom). This exercise will culminate in three mock arguments by student counsel for both parties before a mock court of student justices, who must then decide the case and justify their opinions. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 10, 12 Four 90-minute classes per week

3

Documentary Film History & Production

S a r a h D e t w ile r & Kacki e St. C l ai r

Are you interested in watching and/or making documentary films? This course will explore the format by reviewing a variety of documentaries from

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different eras, and conclude with making your own short films on topics of local interest that inspire you. We will review the history of the documentary, how it has changed, and how best to use this medium to describe and reveal a subject. Students will participate in the planning, filming and editing of a 3-to-5-minute film. Topics will be local to Germantown: possibly a business or restaurant, a local hero, an historical event, or a topic of community concern. Students serve as camera operators, directors, writers, sound/ light specialists or editors in this collaborative process. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week and one 180-minute class per week

4

Elevator Pitch A a r on P r eeta m

All successful businesses began with a compelling idea. However, many brilliant ideas are never turned into reality due to a lack of funding or an inability to convey the potential of its goods/service. In this course, students will work in teams to develop a revolutionary product or service, then attempt to bring their idea to fruition by crafting a business plan. Business plans will include an executive summary (brief overview of the entire plan), market analysis (demographics of target market, market size, targeted market size, etc.) and projected financial highlights (financial projections, revenue, cost projections, funding and break-even point). In addition to the business plan, each team will develop an “elevator pitch” that clearly and concisely details why investors should back their idea. Students will be assessed based on their ability to work as a cohesive team, the feasibility and accuracy of their business plan, marketing of their product/service and success of their elevator pitch. Students are not required, but are strongly encouraged, to submit their pitch to one of the national contests for high school entrepreneurs. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Four 90-minute classes per week

GER M A N TOW N FR IEN DS .ORG

MAJOR CLASSES

5

Going to the Dogs

Intergroup Dialogue: Conversation about Race and Class in America 7

Robin Nouri e

Outside of a dog, a book is a man’s best friend. Inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read. –Groucho Marx Dogs and books! Books and dogs! What more could a student ask for? In this class, we will look at dogs from both a literary perspective—reading fiction and poetry about dogs, as well as writing about dogs—and from a working world perspective—learning about police dogs, rescue dogs, comfort dogs, service dogs, etc. We will also explore the latest thinking on dog cognition. Together we will experience the dog world in all its mystery and richness! Homework will include reading and perhaps some short writing assignments. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Four 90-minute classes per week

6

6 HOURS PER WEEK

Plutarch’s Lives of Illustrious Greeks and Romans

J i m Barron

Our knowledge of ancient Greece and Rome principally comes from the parallel biographies of famous Greeks and Romans found in Plutarch’s Lives, an enduring masterpiece of anecdote and insight. Moreover, Plutarch treats these lives as a topical field for both philosophical reflection and practical advice because they demonstrate how reason and judgment operate in the formation of human character. Plutarch’s Lives, then, are principally moral lessons for the present rather than historical accounts of the past. In this course, we will focus our reading and reflections on three pairs of Greek and Roman lives: Alcibiades and Coriolanus, Lysander and Sulla and Phocion and Cato the Younger. Our aim is to discover the essential philosophical convictions operating in Plutarch’s Lives, as well as evaluate the nature of the practical advice found there. Workload will consist of homework readings, in-class discussions and a final, in-class reflection essay. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Four 90-minute classes per week

Mir a n gela Bu ggs & A lys on S olom o n

This course will immerse students in deep discussion and community building around issues of social identity, power, inequality, justice, race and class. Intergroup dialogue offers opportunities for sustained and meaningful intergroup contact, and education to promote the creation of just, multicultural campus communities. The main objective of the intergroup dialogue process is to encourage self-reflective conversation and inquiry that break through the surface tension created by difference. This class will allow students to challenge misconceptions, biases and stereotypes; to ask difficult questions of one another; and to develop awareness of themselves as members of a social identity group. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week and one 180-minute class per week

8

Introduction to Meteorology Ma r k C r ox for d

Do you often find yourself alone, binge-watching the Weather Channel, obsessing over dew points and cloud-base heights? Do you fantasize about wind direction shifts and hurricane seasons that feature storms named after Greek letters? If so, this is the class for you. Students will use basic scientific principles to construct an understanding of the atmosphere, a crucial component of earth science that many do not understand well despite its obvious importance. You will learn basic atmospheric structure and cloud types, as well as how to read weather maps and local conditions to make basic forecasts. You will survey types of severe weather with special emphasis on thunderstorms, snowstorms and hurricanes. Finally, students will be introduced to important players in climate. During the month, the class will likely visit a local news station to see behind-the-scenes forecasting. Students will be graded on many lab activities (2-3 per week), including a culminating analysis of a major, historic tornado outbreak. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may NOT choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Four 90-minute classes per week

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MAJOR C LASSES

9

Language of Film

11 Playwriting Project

Gr e t a Ham

A n n e Ger b n er

This class will explore how film communicates in ways other than dialogue, e.g. editing, scene composition, lighting, etc. Students will learn how to critically analyze the messages sent in a nonverbal manner, and how they, as viewers, may be manipulated through such means. They will gain facility in looking at and analyzing film, and familiarity with different forms and techniques of filmmaking. They will also consider the impact of film on culture and society, and how issues of identity—especially the big eight social identifiers—are explored through cinema. Assessments will include the creation of a still-image story “scene,” critiques of individual scenes and film reviews. Material from R-rated movies (e.g. violence, brief zombie nudity) will be viewed, so parental permission is required. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may NOT choose it again. Prerequisite: Parental permission Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 | Two 90-minute classes per week and one 180-minute class per week

10

Orbital Mechanics

Be n Hamilt on & Davi d W i l l i ams o n

Ever heard the phrase, “It’s not rocket science!” before? Well, here is a course that is, quite literally, rocket science. It’s rumored to be a very complex topic, full of hard math, meant only for the supergeeks out there. But it really isn’t that hard to grasp. No, what makes rocket science hard is that it is physically challenging to get to space and beyond, despite our best understanding of how gravity works. There is a fundamental limit that Mother Nature has placed on us, a set of rules that constrain our capabilities. Yet in spite of this, humans have persevered in space flight. Here is an opportunity to learn how to use those rules to our advantage. This course will cover the counterintuitive laws that govern orbits, namely orbital mechanics, before switching to the design and limitations of rockets, known as rocket science. And yes, in rocket science, things do blow up. A lot. Majestic rocket failures and explosions included. Prerequisites: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Four 90-minute classes per week

4

6 HOURS PER WEEK

Historians, writers, musicians, actors, activists and curious students will enjoy this new playwriting partnership between GFS, the Germantown historic house Cliveden and Philadelphia Young Playwrights. Students will read some recently discovered papers belonging to the Chew family, who, for two centuries, lived at Cliveden, a mansion a few blocks down Germantown Avenue. Just as Lin-Manuel Miranda transformed American theatre when he wrote his Broadway musical based on the unlikely subject of Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton, students in the Playwriting Project will write monologues based on the fascinating documents of this Quaker slave-owning family. We’ll go to the house, read family letters and research their context, then write a monologue set in the house that brings a character to life for a modern audience. Students will also write a short play on any subject, inspired by history, current reality or fantasy. A feature of the course will be the artistic residency of director David O’Connor from Philadelphia Young Playwrights, who will guide students and provide feedback. Students should be prepared to write at home, as needed, for their project. No experience needed. Also planned: A field trip to the Lantern Theatre to see a new play. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 180-minute classes per week

12

Professional Set Construction Mic h a el K er n s & J a k e Miller

This class will lead students through the process of constructing and installing a professional theatrical set for the Cabaret performance of Pig Iron Theatre’s annual fundraiser. A project of this scale requires precise planning and execution to meet deadlines set by the theatre company’s production staff. This class will teach students how to bring a design to fruition, starting with the creation of a plan based on the set designer’s drawings that includes engineering, scheduling, budgeting, identifying and ordering materials. The primary focus of class time will be to implement this plan through the building and installation process. This will be an intense, hands-on experience for a limited number of students who

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MAJOR C LASSES

6 HOURS PER WEEK

are serious about learning how to manage, execute and install a small, professional theatrical set. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: Technical theatre experience (grade 8 or US) AND permission of instructor Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Four 90-minute classes per week

13

Shakespeare’s Hamlet and Modern Criticism

J o e McGe ar y

In this class, which is limited to seniors, we will read Hamlet and explore how Shakespeare’s most complexly psychological and deeply philosophical play has been understood (and misunderstood) by different audiences at different times in history. We will begin with a dramatic read-through of the play, and will view and compare several film adaptations of it. We will also explore various interpretations of Hamlet, from the time of the Romantic poets until the present, including criticism by Sigmund Freud and James Joyce, and by contemporary scholars such as Harold Bloom, Marjorie Garber and Stephen Greenblatt. The course will conclude with a reading of Tom Stoppard’s thought-provoking and hilarious existentialist drama, “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead,” which retells the story of Shakespeare’s melancholy Dane from the perspective of two minor characters. Consider this opportunity to learn about a great work of literature that is suspenseful, humorous, profoundly moving, intellectually ambitious—and always fascinating. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 12 Four 90-minute classes per week

GER M A N TOW N FR IEN DS .ORG

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MAJOR CLASSES EACH OF THE FOLLOWING MAJOR CLASSES MEET 3 HOURS PER WEEK Students will take 12 hours of major classes per week.

14 9/11 in a Global Context Me g Goldn er Rabi nowi tz

So I heard something and looked out my window—you know I’m on the East Side. It was too low. But it was steady and went by almost in slow motion. The owner set up a soup kitchen on the sidewalk. No, I haven’t been down there. The smoke. The dust. But the sky was so blue. (from Sweetbitter by Stephanie Danler) In this class, we will draw on fiction, non-fiction, prose, poems and drama to glean an understanding of the events of 9/11 and its repercussions. Students will use the course materials to explore the tragic circumstances of and surrounding that day, exploring causes, looking closely at the day itself—and considering its aftermath locally, nationally and around the world. We will examine the events through a variety of lenses, with each lens representing a different way to view the attacks, their outcomes and their global impact. Students will travel to New York to visit Memorial Plaza, One World Trade Center and the 9/11 Museum. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

15 Abnormal Psychology Aly son Solomon

Abnormal psychology is a branch of psychology that deals with psychological disease and abnormal behavior that causes distress or impairment in some aspect of an individual’s life. The term “abnormal psychology” covers a broad range of disorders, including disorders of adjustment, mood, anxiety, development and cognition. We will approach these disorders from multiple angles, including the psychoanalytical approach, the behavioral approach, the medical approach and the cognitive approach. By better understanding abnormal psychology, researchers and therapists can help people live healthier and more fulfilling lives. Information will be presented using a variety of methods, and students should expect to learn through teacher-led lectures and reading assignments, as well as through studentled research, presentations and projects. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-classes per week

6

16 Advanced Physical Education C a itlin S tu etz

This course is designed for students interested in achieving their highest level of health-related fitness. Class activities will emphasize improving fitness through weight training, plyometric exercises and cross-fit training, with the focus on the five components of fitness: cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility and body composition. Students will participate in a wide range of rigorous group and individual fitness routines/activities, as well as have the opportunity to develop a personal fitness plan. If you thrive on intensity in your workouts and want to move to the next level, this class is for you. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-classes per week

17 All the King’s Men C on n ie Th om p s on

All the King’s Men by Robert Penn Warren, published in 1946, is one of the greatest novels of the 20th century. Considered by many to be the best American political novel, the story traces the life of the populist Southerner Willie Stark, a charismatic character based on Governor Huey Long of Louisiana. Narrated by Jack Burden, a journalist, the novel is enhanced by Burden’s captivating voice and dramatic story. Students enrolled in this course will be invited to attentively read the novel, to watch the 1949 film based on the novel, and to explore the complexities of the novel’s characters and themes through class discussions. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Four 45-minute classes per week

18

Altering Space & Time with Animated Video Projections

Mega n C u lp & S a r a h Z w er lin g

Building on historical forms of installation art, students will collaborate and design a site-specific projection of moving or still images to create an

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MAJOR C LASSES

installation. Many modes of image making will be encouraged, including animations made in Adobe Photoshop, drawing, video and still photography. Other materials may be used as well, such as fabric, string, wood and paint, to enhance the space. Students will explore how light projection and digital images can transform space and form new experiences and thought for the viewer. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

19

An Introduction to Islam Ah me d Muhamed

This course is an introduction to the fundamental aspects of the Islamic religious system, as well as the many sects, theologies, religiously-based movements and parties that have developed within the religion. Commonly heard concepts that are central to Islam, such as Sharia, Islamic State, Hadith, Sunna, Jihad, Sufism, Shiism and Sunnism, will be discussed, along with how each of them shapes how Muslims understand Islam. Apart from being information-based, this course will critically examine questions about Islam and Modernity, gender roles, Islamophobia, the portrayal of Islam by media, Quranic prescription and rulings, and the relationship of Islam to Christianity and Judaism. Prerequisite: None| Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

20 Athletic Artists: The Connection Between Physical Education and Making Art M i c h ae l Koe h le r

Our work in this course will be based on Dr. John Ratey’s Spark, a book providing evidence that exercise increases brainpower, problem-solving skills and focus. We will combine different forms of physical movement with art-making and critique. Each class will begin with a workout, such as running, boot camp, dance or yoga, after which the students will focus on independent, artistic projects; each class will end with a critique of the day’s work and a plan for moving forward. Homework will include reading, selfconstructed assignments and weekly questionnaires. The class is open to all artists (writers, photographers, filmmakers, sculptors, painters, etc.) and athletes, who will participate in both the athletics and art

3 HOURS PER WEEK

assignments to the best of their abilities. Students must come to class with an artistic project in mind. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

21 Biology of the Senses Bob Lyn a m

This course will investigate how sensory input is received from the environment and how this information is processed and organized by the brain, and will involve both classroom lecture and lab activities in support of these concepts. Short readings related to class discussions will also be assigned. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

22

Black Power Movement J oh n W. K in g

The Black Power Movement (BPM), which began in 1966, is often lumped into the Civil Rights movement, or simply left out of our historical memory as a separate and distinct movement. But the BPM serves as the shift from the traditional action, tactics and rhetoric that defined the Civil Rights movement. It was generationally different, and had a larger number of women in leadership. In this course, students will read some selected articles from the Black Panther era, and discuss the pros and cons of actions taken and tactics used by the various groups involved. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

23

Bon Appétit: la Gastronomie Française

A m y C elen ta n o

This course will explore French culture through its food. The history of food preparation and selection, and the influential chefs who shaped French food habits will help to create a context within which to view contemporary French culture. Each student will research a specific region, culminating in a overview of its festivals, foods and beverages. Basic cooking skills will be taught and practiced, and students will produce reflection papers and oral presentations. The class will be taught in English. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

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MAJOR C LASSES

24 Cooking—Inspired by

Children’s Picture Books

D e vr a Ramse y

Whether you think you like them or not, you will make and eat green eggs and ham. In this course, we will familiarize ourselves with several picture books that have food as a central “character”—and then prepare that food together. Gathering to read aloud, we will eat the products of our culinary labor. When considering this course, keep in mind that some food preferences, sensitivities and allergies can be easily accommodated while others are harder to work around. Please contact the teacher with questions or concerns around this before signing up. Note: Students who took Cooking in the past may NOT sign up for this class. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

25

Current Events: Decoding History

A dam Hot e k & Andrew Lee This current events class is a safe space for students to explore news events by critically reading, discussing and evaluating newspaper and magazine articles. The subject material will depend on world events occurring on a daily basis, and will include foreign policy, politics and the arts. In order to contextualize our review of daily events, we will briefly explore the history of newspapers and other periodicals in the United States, as well as take up the political (and ultimately philosophical) question of what makes news “news.” Students will develop a deeper and clearer understanding of news events, strengthen research and presentation skills, and learn to empathize with a variety of different viewpoints. They will be assessed through class participation and the construction and presentation of an original Oped piece on a specific area of interest. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Four 45-minute classes per week

26 Design a Skylight Ge n Ne lson

Students in this course will work with architect Scott Ritchie to design a light-catching mobile to be installed in the skylight of the Wade Science Center.

8

3 HOURS PER WEEK

Small groups will design and test prototypes in the first two weeks, then, as a class, we will construct a final piece and install it during the last two weeks. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

27 Design Thinking

Mega n C u lp & Meg C oh en R a g a s

This course will introduce students to the concept of Design Thinking, a human-centered approach to solving problems and creating new, innovative concepts. As the website at Stanford’s d.school describes it, Design Thinking is “a methodology for innovation that combines creative and analytical approaches, and requires collaboration across disciplines,” and Design Thinking classes “create innovators rather than any particular innovation.” By employing Design Thinking’s five basic actions— empathize, define, ideate, prototype and test—the class will tackle two or three projects during the month of January, such as the Wallet Project, the Ramen Project, Designing Your Way Forward, the Gift Giving Project or the Compost Challenge. This class will not only expose you to a new approach to asking questions to find creative solutions to a problem, it will make you reexamine the questions you’re asking—and reconsider if you’re even solving the right problem. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 One 180-minute class per week

Diverse Representation Through the Lens of Nerd Culture 28

Tom a s K etch a m

Can you think of a movie, TV show, book, comic or cartoon protagonist that looks like you? That has similar beliefs and orientations? That comes from a similar background? Representation in the media matters, and not all students or children can answer yes to these questions. In this course, we will examine how “Nerd Culture” media (comics, cartoons and film) has attempted to become more inclusive and representative, including where they have been successful and where they have fallen into stereotypes or short of the goal. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

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29 Do (or Hack) it Yourself

K ay la A sh cro ft & Sam Su l l i van

Tired of endlessly scrolling through Pinterest, YouTube and Facebook, looking at the things people did all by themselves? Tired of watching other people hack their lives, instead of hacking your own? Feel like if you had just a little chunk of time—say, the month of January—you could actualize all of your make-yourown-shampoo and Xerox-transfer-print-thank-youcard potential? Then search no more! This course will give you the time, supplies and instructions to make those Facebook videos and Pinterest pins come to life! Each week/class, students will choose a project/ projects for the following week. These will be carried out during class time in the spirit of camaraderie, and participants can expect to complete roughly two DIY projects a week. This class is a great fit for the practical and the creative alike—come join us as we stop looking and start doing! Prerequisite: None| Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

30 Double Trouble: US Intervention

in Iran and Guatemala

K ate Han sse n

From the last years of the 19th century, with the Annexation of Hawaii, to the 21st century Invasion of Iraq, the United States has overthrown more than a dozen foreign governments for a variety of political and economic reasons. This course will examine two covert interventions: Operation Ajax and Operation Success, which overthrew the governments of Iran and Guatemala, respectively. Both interventions occurred within the same two years (1953 and 1954), were orchestrated by the same two men, and resulted in coups that ousted the countries’ respective leaders. Students will examine, discuss and debate the US motivations, the role of ideology and economics, and the legacies of these operations in the modern day. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

31

Embracing the City Through Fitness

3 HOURS PER WEEK

climbing, yoga, spinning class, biking, bowling, hiking the Wissahickon trails or learning self defense. This is a physically challenging class. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 One 180-minute class per week

32 Exploring the World Famous

Mural Arts Program

Mic h a el K oeh ler & Meg Gold n er R a b i no wi t z In this class, students will explore Philadelphia’s world-famous murals. Each week we will visit a different collection of murals and neighborhoods and discern how the murals reflect their surroundings. We will also visit the Mural Arts headquarters in Fairmount and meet mural artists. Students will learn about the history of the program, its role in the city, the process of designing and creating a mural, and the components of a successful mural. Students will research individual murals for a culminating studentled tour. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 One 180-minute class per week

33 Food for Thought: Eating,

Reading & Blogging About Food

Meg C oh en R a ga s

In this course, students will learn to write creatively and eloquently about their favorite fare. We will read some of the premier food writers, including Mark Bittman, Jeffrey Steingarten, Calvin Trillin and Ruth Reichel, as well as Lucy Kinsley’s graphic novel/ memoir Relish: My Life in the Kitchen. We will also create and collaborate on a food blog, where we will post reviews, trend stories, favorite recipes, odes and other celebrations of the culinary arts. Guest speakers, a class cooking project (which we’ll film for the blog, of course) and a food-centered field trip will complete the experience. A great choice for food lovers and aspiring writers alike! Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may NOT choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

To m Myran

Students will participate in various fitness experiences that the City of Philadelphia has to offer. Weekly off-campus trips may include ice skating, rock

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34 Forensics Ge n Ne lson

This class will explore the basic forensic techniques involved in crime scene investigations, including blood spatter patterns, fingerprinting and DNA profiling. Guest speakers and a crime scene simulation will be included. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

From Bessie to Beyoncé: African American Women in Poetry and Song 35

A dam Hot e k & Al ex Levi n

“Power’s not given to you. You have to take it. —Beyoncé This course will focus on the work of four exceptionally talented and influential poet/musicians: Bessie Smith, Nina Simone, Tracy Chapman and Beyoncé Knowles. Through close analysis of their recordings, archival video performances, and selected readings of lyrics, biographies and autobiographies (when available), we will simultaneously (re)discover their musical sophistication and consider the contexts that framed their careers. We will spend a week on each of the four women, and together draw connections and distinctions between their catalogues. Our conversations will include reflections on race, gender and the presentation of selves in front of audiences. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

36 Game Design

An dr e w Wes terhau s

In the words of Johan Huizinga, “It is through playing that society expresses its interpretation of life and the world” (Homo Ludens, 46). This course explores the multitude of ways in which games are played in our culture. Students will play and critically evaluate several games, both traditional (such as Ultimate Werewolf and Love Letter) and digital (such as Passage and Portal). Students will write brief weekly assignments that reflect on discussions and readings, making analytical comparisons to games that they play or have played. For their final project, students will develop a game of their own. The purpose of this

10

3 HOURS PER WEEK

course is to bring together thoughtful scholarship with hands-on revelry to explore the playful aspects of culture. No special background is required. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may NOT choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

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Hamilton: Biography and Broadway

Lis a Bu r n s

This course will begin to explore Ron Chernow’s biography, Alexander Hamilton, along with LinManuel Miranda’s score and lyrics for the hit Broadway show, Hamilton. As Chernow points out, Hamilton was the boy wonder of early American politics. Miranda’s musical draws from “the breadth of America’s culture and shows its audience [that] what we share doesn’t just dramatize Hamilton’s Revolution. It continues it.” Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

38 Hija de la Fortuna:

The Immersion Adventure of Reading a Novel in Spanish Ma r jor ie S p a eth

This course will allow Spanish students to be guided in the intense experience of reading a historical novel in Spanish. Hija de la Fortuna, by Isabel Allende, is the fascinating adventure of Eliza Sommers, an orphan raised in the Brittanic colony of Valparaíso, Chile, by a proper British expatriate family and an indigenous cook. Chileans are infected by the California Gold Rush passion, and Eliza, now a young woman, follows her lover, who has disappeared to the Golden State, leading to an amazing adventure of self-discovery and transformation guided by her new friend, the Chinese doctor Tao Chi’en. As we read, we will discuss the many aspects of the issues of migration during the Gold Rush—the racism, false dreams and the unexpected real treasures that Eliza discovers. This course is most appropriate for intermediate and advanced level Spanish students, but highly motivated Spanish II students are welcome as well. Prerequisite: Spanish 1 | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

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39 Hip Hop Pedagogy: Power,

Identity and Social Change

M i k a e l Y israe l

In this debate-format course, students will use hip hop to examine inequality and identity in American society, including race, gender, sexuality, social class, mass incarceration, the drug economy and education. Using scholarly and popular texts, film and rap lyrics, students will be challenged to consider how popular identity and culture might facilitate or hinder social change. Combining ideas from theories of social movements, students will explore how hip hop can be used to resist and challenge inequality, “speak truth to power” and affect social change. Throughout the course, students will keep a “Rhyme Book” to be used as a reflective journal. Ultimately, students will develop critical thinking, writing and reading comprehension skills through hip hop. This class is only open to seniors. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

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History of Fashion Through an African-American Lens

Nata sh a L abbe

For decades, the fashion industry has drawn inspiration from several African-American or black historic and cultural movements, often without giving proper credit where it is due. In this course, we will examine how black people and their cultural traditions have influenced the fashion industry of the 21st century (i.e. how Michael Jackson and the design of Balmain jackets are related). In addition, we will deconstruct the meaning of cultural appropriation and investigate the role it has played in our society through fashion and style. Students will be asked to critically analyze media, including advertisements and articles, both inside and outside of the classroom, as well as complete a final project by the end of the course. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may NOT choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Four 45-minute classes per week

41 Humor in English: Origins Car ol Raw ling s Mi l l er

3 HOURS PER WEEK

next look at humor in the mystery plays, reading The Second Shepherd’s Play and Noah’s Flood. We will undertake that sly ironist Chaucer and his Miller’s Tale, and consider such later fascinating works as A Modest Proposal. Time permitting, we will look at American humor as well. As we go along, we will consider the uses of humor, not all of which may be light-hearted, and ponder the unsteady rhythms and often impolite nature of what makes us laugh. We will consider form, as well as the difference between written and oral humor. Throughout the course, we will turn regularly to what freshets of humor run through our lives now. In short, students will constantly be encouraged to share things that make them laugh. This course involves a good bit of reading and writing, and a culminating event: The creation of a humor project that students will share with the group during our final week of class. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may NOT choose it again. Prerequisites: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

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Immigrant Philadelphia

R ob in Fr ied m a n & S a m S u lliv a n

Many Philadelphians are immigrants or descendants of immigrants. In fact, Philadelphia has a large and fast-growing immigrant population, now over 500,000 (9% of the total population). The varied immigrant groups help make our city great as they contribute economically, socially and culturally. In this class, we will study the recent history of immigration to Philadelphia, asking questions such as, How is the city responding to the new immigrant groups? In what ways are individuals and groups organizing to make change? How have Philadelphia art and culture been affected? Additionally, we will meet with immigrants and refugees, leaders of immigrant groups, activists and artists, and will immerse ourselves in the issues impacting our city’s immigrants. We will pay special attention to the organizing efforts of young people, specifically around the Pennsylvania Dream Act and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. Students will study traditional arts and share traditional foods, and will go on at least one field trip to learn, firsthand, about immigrant life in Philadelphia. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

This lighthearted survey of humor in English opens in the Middle Ages with bawdy riddle poems. We will

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MAJOR CLASSES 43 Introduction to

International Relations

A n d re w L e e

International Relations is the study of relationships between countries, international organizations and non-governmental organizations. This course will examine both the theory and practice of international relations, with a focus on the 20th century and current events. We will look at different theories of international relations, including realism and liberalism, and will use them to analyze several case studies, including tensions throughout the Middle East, geopolitics in East Asia and the development of the European Union. Based on student interest and feedback, we will also examine current events as they occur. During the course, each student will specialize in a particular issue or geographic area of interest and present his or her findings to the seminar group. This class is only open to seniors. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 12 Four 45-minute classes per week

44 Introduction to Number Theory E le n a Quant

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7… Do you recognize these numbers? Well, that’s number theory! What about the numbers 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 10…? Or maybe you know why the numbers 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21… are special? If you want to know more about why these numbers and sequences have captivated mathematicians for millennia, then this is the course for you. We will dive into the basics of number theory, learning some of the notation and key theorems along the way. Come willing to participate and expect light homework for every class. Assessment will be a combination of classroom participation and effort on assignments. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may NOT choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Four 45-minute classes per week

45 It’s Not Rocket Science!...

Oh, Wait, It Is!

L a r r y Ot t man

In this introduction to model and sport rocketry, students will learn the basics of rocket terminology, assembly, flight and, most importantly, safety! We will read and discuss the memoir of Homer Hickam, the

12

3 HOURS PER WEEK

inspiration for the movie “October Sky.” The majority of class time will be hands-on, giving students the time and guidance to properly construct and prep two models that will (hopefully!) be successfully flown and recovered. Please note: We will be using epoxy for construction in this course. While proper safety precautions will be taken, students with a known allergy should consult the teacher before signing up. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

46 Life Drawing

D eb H of fm a n or Mic h a el Willi a m s o n

Students will learn the fundamentals of figure drawing through intensive work with the model. Issues of form, structure, volume, movement, composition, proportion and expression will be investigated through work on short poses and continue into extended poses. Students will have the opportunity to experience a range of approaches and techniques with dry and wet media. Assessments will be based on students’ level of engagement, their willingness to take risks and their investment in the overall integrity of the studio experience. There will be 1-3 short, practical homework assignments. Previous experience is not required. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 10, 12 One 180-minute class per week

47 Math Tutoring at a Local

Public Elementary School

Ma r k A n d er s on & D a v id Mr a z

We will travel to a local public elementary school to provide math instruction to individual students or small groups of students. In our two weekly sessions, we will work with a classroom teacher to provide students with more individualized help with math skills and concepts. Participants will receive guidance with math ideas, as well instruction for working with children. No experience necessary; any level of math expertise is most welcome. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

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MAJOR CLASSES 48 Mindfulness Matters:

Yoga and Meditation

S a r a Primo

Students of all levels are invited to participate in a yoga class that combines vinyasa (flow style), yin yoga (longer holds) and meditation. This course will offer students a way to clear their heads and connect with their bodies. They will identify weekly intentions and learn relaxation tools they can then carry with them for the rest of the year. Each week will have a different theme around topics identified as particularly relevant to the group. Students will have light homework: brief readings about the practice of yoga and home practice recommendations. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

49 Musique et Paroles Sam McI lv ai n

This course is offered for musicians, vocalists and/ or French speakers interested in composing, writing and recording French grammar and vocabulary songs that will be used in the French curriculum. (For potential lyricists, French 2 or above is a prerequisite.) Musicians and vocalists do not need to have a background in French, but they do need to play an instrument (guitar/bass/keyboard) at an intermediate level, or be able to program MIDI instruments—or be familiar with recording platforms such as GarageBand and ProTools. This class is limited to 4-6 lyricists and 4-6 musicians/vocalists/engineers. Prerequisite: Lyricists must have completed French 2; musicians must be intermediate level or above Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

50

Organic Chemistry Brian Riggs

Organic chemistry is a highly creative science in which chemists create new molecules and explore the properties of existing compounds. Organic compounds are central to the rubber, plastics, fuel and petrochemical, pharmaceutical, cosmetics, detergent, explosives, coatings, dyestuff and agrochemical industries. Organic chemistry is the study of the structure, properties, composition, reactions and preparation of carbon-containing compounds. We will begin with organic nomenclature and functional

3 HOURS PER WEEK

groups, study isomerism and move on to a study of organic reactions. Lab activities will include the synthesis and analysis of aspirin, the synthesis of nylon and esterification synthesis reactions. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may NOT choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Four 45-minute classes per week

51 Philadelphia Architectural

History

E len a Q u a n t & Mich a el Willia m s on We live in a city that has an extremely rich history, but what do we know about the buildings around us and who built them? In this course, we will explore historical architecture right here in our own backyard. Very little of this class will be in a classroom, as we explore the city by foot—snow or shine! By the end of the month, students will have examined Philadelphia’s major architectural time periods and styles, and will hopefully recognize works by a few influential architects, as well as be able to point out characteristics from different eras. There will be minimal homework; student assessments will be based on participation. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 One 180-minute class per week

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Power Vinyasa Yoga R a c h el Br a d b u r d

Come join a powerful, athletic and fun yoga class focused on breath and alignment. This class will be fast-paced and challenging; if you want a chance to move around, clear your head and connect with your body, sign up! No experience necessary, just bring a water bottle, athletic clothing and a willingness to engage. We will travel to Hotbox Yoga studio in Manayunk to practice. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

53 Programming for the iPhone Ma tt Z ip in

Ever wanted to create an app? Of course you have! This course is an introduction to developing apps for the iPhone using the Swift programming language.

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MAJOR C LASSES

No previous programming background necessary, although the more you know, the more you will be able to produce. There will be assigned projects, and because Xcode, the editor for developing iPhone apps, is only available for OSX, it’s useful to have a Mac at home. (If you don’t, you can use the Macs in the computer lab to complete your projects.) We’ll start at the very beginning and, by the end, you will be ready to make your mark on Silicon Valley! Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

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L isa B ur n s

Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

Reading Buddies: Tutoring at John B. Kelly Elementary School

P age Fah r ig- P e nds e & Sarah Yanu k

The John B. Kelly School is a public elementary school in Germantown, just a few blocks from GFS, and this course is part of a partnership between the two schools. GFS students will participate in a one-onone “reading buddies” program with first and second graders at Kelly, and will work with the same students each visit, allowing them to build relationships and track the Kelly students’ progress over the course of the month. GFS students will learn about the reading process as well as techniques for teaching reading and supporting their buddies. They will also experience some of the difficulties facing Philadelphia public schools today, and witness the creative work being done by teachers and students within that context. A few short readings and videos on reading tutoring and on the School District of Philadelphia will be assigned; students may be asked to keep brief notes on their reading buddies’ progress. These notes will be passed on to the Kelly teachers at the end of the program. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

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56 Rugs & Rants S a r a Gor d on

Design and create a unique wool wall hanging using the absurdly easy loop method. Students will transfer their original designs onto burlap backing and use rug hooks (crochet-type hooks mounted on a handle) to pull wool strips through gaps in the burlap. While hooking. we’ll listen to music, chat, perhaps even rant—no headphones, please. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

Quilt Making

Students will learn the process of designing, cutting and sewing a quilt of their own original design.

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3 HOURS PER WEEK

57

Storytelling Through Dungeons and Dragons

Tom a s K etch a m

Many of the greatest and most epic tales of the 20th century found their roots in tabletop fantasy games, including Dungeons and Dragons. From HBO’s Game of Thrones to Fallout 3 to H.G. Wells, the fantasy world has been popularized and inspired by Gary Gygax’s simplistic but limitless game. Fallible heroes, unstoppable villains, mesmerizing landscapes and worlds, twists and turns, and hilarious predicaments were all hatched in a basement full of kids before being brought to life in books or on the big screen. How many friends can say that together they have stormed dungeons, slain dragons and been brought to the brink of death and back countless times? Though these experiences are imaginary, they are derived from a part of each gamer’s personality, a part that most people would never let anyone see—the dreamer inside. These unabashed and unashamed group imagination exercises no doubt form the basis for deep and long-lasting, real-life relationships. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

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Sociology of Gender J en n a E m er s on

This course examines gender identity and expression through a sociological lens. It will use sociological theories, such as social constructivism and critical theory, to analyze how gender is shaped by, and shapes, surrounding cultural and social structures. Students will take a deeper look at how history, culture, race, class and sexuality all intersect with and influence gender as a social identity. To do this, students will engage in class discussions, interactive

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projects and short readings to gain a deeper understanding of gender and its implications in today’s social context. Sociology provides a framework to better understand gender relations on a systemic level and, with this understanding, to fight against injustice for people of all genders. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

Sweetness, Beauty, Intoxication, Control: The Botany of Desire 59

D an a We e ks

Join me as we read together Michael Pollan’s seminal work, Botany of Desire, on how the botanical world has, unlikely as it may appear (and is only knowable) to intelligences like ours, manipulated our humankind to encourage and propagate its unique species. Our class time will focus on reading, discussion and elaboration of evolutionary and biological phenomena to understand how four plants (apples, tulips, cannabis and potatoes) evolved to meet the needs of a single species. Reading, exposition and dialogue will form the framework of our time together. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

60

Teens and Tweens K ay la A sh cro ft

Social expansion, risk-taking, experimentation, breaking away and testing limits. Anxiety, peer pressure, competition, parental pressure, work and school, drugs and alcohol. These are some of the challenges that make adolescence one of the most intriguing and troubling stages of life. Students in this class will take a close look at one of the most confusing, exciting and critical phases of development: the pre-teen and teen years. Using literature, TV and film, students will write responses and reflection pieces, and engage in group discussions around this stage of development as the course explores how children grow into teenagers, how they navigate the challenges of adolescence, and how they become productive adults. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may NOT choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Four 45-minute classes per week

3 HOURS PER WEEK

61 The Buried Mirror: Reflections

on the History of Spain and the New World

R os a r io Ma n ion

This course is designed to learn about the history of Spain and the cultural connections between Spain and the Hispanic New World. We will start 20,000 years ago, move through the Colonial period and finish with the Spain and Latin America of today. The course is a reflection of the roots of Spanish culture, and will include readings from The Buried Mirror by Carlos Fuentes. We will watch YouTube videos, listen to music and dance. Students will research a topic of personal interest, write a paper and do a PowerPoint presentation during the last week of January. Prerequisites: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

62 The Internet of Things (IoT) N ic k R en n er

The Internet of Things (IoT) is the newest and fastest growing frontier in technology; it’s the heart of advancements like self-driving cars and smart cities. In this class, we will explore hardware options, such as sensors and actuators, using embedded platforms like Arduino and the Raspberry Pi. By connecting these boards to web applications, we will design our own IoT devices. Prerequisite: Advanced Programming, Advanced Physics, Arduino; instructor permission Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

63 The Light Within S tev e K u s h n er

The academic study of religion typically examines religion as a social and cultural phenomenon. This course takes a different approach: It looks at the religious experience itself as seen through the eyes of mystics from a variety of the world’s religious traditions. For example, GFS students are familiar with one of the central beliefs of the Quaker faith— the concept of the Inner Light—which holds that in every human soul there is implanted a certain element of God’s own Spirit and divine energy. But did you know that the experience and metaphor of Divine Inner Light can be found in many of the world’s religions? Tibetan Buddhism says that at the heart

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MAJOR C LASSES

of every single person and all creatures is an inner radiance that reflects our essential nature. One of the divine names of the Koran is an-Nur, the Light. Ohr is a central term in the Jewish mystical tradition. Through readings, conversation, possible meetings with clergy and religious scholars, and the experience of meditation practices from multiple traditions, students will explore the inner religious path from the perspective of multiple-faith traditions. Possible readings may include Theresa of Avila, Rumi, Thich Nhat Hanh, Ramakrishna and Mirabai. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

Trig Star 64

D e v r a Ramsey

Who will be the GFS Trig Star? The National Society of Professional Surveyors sponsors a high school trigonometry competition every year. This course will review the basics of trigonometric ratios and procedures needed to participate in the contest, and then focus on practicing for, and ultimately participating in, the competition at the end of the course. There is an opportunity for state and national level recognition for participants. Any student who has completed Geometry and is interested in solving problems is eligible to participate. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past need to get the permission of the instructor to take it again.

3 HOURS PER WEEK

66 Watercolor

E lis s a S u n s h in e

Color, experimentation and a range of different techniques will help students explore the properties of this medium. We’ll have fun learning to use watercolor in an expressive and colorful manner Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 One 180-minute class per week

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Winter Trail Hiking Tom a s K etch a m

During this course, students will be introduced to navigation and orienteering by analyzing trail and topographical maps. They will rely on connecting these maps to the landscape to navigate the Wissahickon Gorge. Challenges may include finding the shortest distance, the least elevation, the fastest route, or locating specific landmarks. Orienteers have to weigh various factors that will impact their travel, such as distance, elevation gain or loss, passability of terrain or vegetation, landmarks for navigation checkpoints, as well as their own fitness and skill level. Each class, students will use their skills to plan a route, then strap on their hiking boots, bundle up for the cold—and hit the trail. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 One 180-minute class per week

Prerequisite: Geometry | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

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War and Peace: A History of Nonviolent Resistance

J o h n Ce ccat t i

Nonviolent resistance to aggression is not being passive; it is an active strategy to confront oppression and gain dignity and rights. In this researchand-discussion-based class, students will study philosophies of war and peace throughout history. Readings will include Sun-Tzu, Machiavelli, George Fox, Mohandas Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Aung San Suu Kyi, among others. We will also analyze how non-violence has been represented in the media and in film. Finally, students will research a contemporary or historical episode of non-violence and present their findings to the group. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 90-minute classes per week

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REQUIRED MINOR CLASSES THE FOLLOWING CLASSES WILL CONTINUE DURING JANUARY TERM Choir

Jazz Ensemble 4

One 90-minute class per week

One 45-minute class per week

Chorus

Latin 1 (9)

One 90-minute class per week

Two 45-minute classes per week

Ensemble A

Mandarin 2

One 45-minute class per week

Two 45-minute classes per week

Ensemble C

Orchestra

One 45-minute class per week

One 90-minute class per week

French 2-1

Spanish 1

Two 45-minute classes per week

Two 45-minute classes per week

French 2-2

Spanish 2-1

Two 45-minute classes per week

Two 45-minute classes per week

Greek II

Spanish 2-2

Two 45-minute classes per week

Two 45-minute classes per week

Jazz Ensemble 1

Spanish 2-3

One 45-minute class per week

Two 45-minute classes per week

Steve Kushner

Jef f Torchon

Steve Kushner

Jim Barron & Natasha Labbe

Taia Harlos

Helen Song

Taia Harlos

Taia Harlos

Amy Celentano

Stephen Holt

Louisa Knowles

Rosario Manion

Greta Ham

Marjorie Spaeth

Brian Adamczyk

Marjorie Spaeth

Jazz Ensemble 2 Jef f Torchon

One 45-minute class per week

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ELECTIVE MINOR CLASSES STUDENTS WILL TAKE BETWEEN 6 AND 8 HOURS OF MINOR CLASSES PER WEEK ABCs in Japanese 68 Chihiro Williams This is an introductory course in written Japanese for students who have never learned Japanese. You will learn how to write your names, words and phrases in three Japanese writing systems (Hiragana, Katakana and Kanji) using a pen and calligraphy brush. You will also learn some spoken Japanese as we look at pop-culture and other topics, and make some simple Japanese food. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

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Access and Privilege in Modern Higher Education

Suzi Nam

This class will explore both the apparent and more ambiguous ways in which conceptual and circumstantial realities have affected access and privilege in college admissions over the past 20 years. Guided by journalistic research and scholarly articles and literature, we will seek to understand the current problems and potential solutions around systems/ structures that influence disparities within higher education. This class is only open to seniors. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 12 One 90-minute class per week

70 Advanced Knitting Gen Nelson

For this course, students need to be competent in the basics of knitting. We will cover knitting in the round and knitting socks using the Magic Loop technique. Prerequisite: Basic knitting skills Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

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Adventure Education, Leadership and Games

Taia Harlos

This course will allow all students to engage in hands-on, experiential learning in order to build their skills, identify strengths and discover new and

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different ways of interacting with peers. We will use group initiatives, games and activities that focus on communication, trust, problem-solving and teamwork. Challenge your assumptions, reflect on your patterns and discover your position as a leader (and as a follower) through fun and reflection. This is an active course that will occasionally take us outdoors—and often out of our comfort zones. Assessment is based on participation and group engagement. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 One 90-minute class per week

Adventures in Letterboxing 72 Kate Garrity & Kathr yn Murphy In this course, students will learn about and get started in letterboxing, a creative pastime dating back to the 1850s that involves both orienteering and treasure hunting. As part of their letterboxing kit, students will design and carve a personalized rubber stamp and create a simple, hand-bound journal to use while on our field trip to various sites in Philadelphia. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may NOT choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 One 90-minute class per week

Anno 73 Michael Koehler The Anno minor is open to Anno editors to develop layout to meet publication deadlines, and for any member of the senior class interested in creating their personal page for the yearbook. Editors will be available to support seniors with their page design, including taking photographs, designing layout and selecting font. The 90-minute block will give students time to get an in-depth view and learn the essential elements that go into making a great yearbook. Prerequisite: Open to current Anno editors and seniors only Grade Level: 12 | One 90-minute class per week

Architecture 74 Jonathan Plass & Sarah Zwerling This course will focus on design fundamentals, Google SketchUp and methods of representation, as well as

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ELECTIVE how design concepts can be translated into form. Students will create conceptual architecture based on ideas from their surrounding environment, for their surrounding environment. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 One 90-minute class per week

Awesome Alums and Others 75 Sara Gordon What does the journey look like between GFS graduation and establishing a rewarding career as chef, OBGYN, botanist, firefighter, author, illustrator, musician, teacher, professional athlete, landscaper, doctor, social worker, stage technician or actor? Twice a week, we’ll speak with GFS alumni, either in person or via Skype, and hear about their academic, professional and personal adventures post high-school graduation. The only requirement is that students come prepared to engage in dialogue with guests. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

Barbershop Quartet 76 Teri Gemberling-Johnson A barbershop quartet consists of four male vocalists—a tenor, a lead, a baritone and a bass—singing one on a part in close harmonies. In this class, the quartet will learn selections written specifically for this genre of music, rehearsing and preparing for performances throughout the year. Prerequisite: Must currently be enrolled in Barbershop Quartet DIS Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

Basketball 77 Mark Anderson During this minor, students will play fun, low-key, three-on-three basketball games. This minor is open to all students regardless of basketball abilities. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

MINOR CLASSES

Book Reading Fest 78 Connie Thompson You are invited to join a reading group that will gather twice a week to enjoy reading for pleasure. The group will agree on a contemporary novel or memoir to read and discuss, and we will split meeting time between reading and conversing about our chosen book. To complement our reading and energize our discussions, delicious beverages and treats will be available. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

Bowetrie: Bowie as Poetry 79 Sara Primo This course will look at David Bowie lyrics as poetry, enjoying them as literature and placing them within their cultural context. It is a class for curious newcomers as well as fans of his music. We will use the book Rebel Rebel by Chris O’Leary as our guide through Bowie’s “legacy (of ) roughly 600 songs, which range from psychedelia to glam rock to Philadelphia soul, from avant-garde instrumentals to global pop anthems.” Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

Bridges 80 Tracey Spinka & David Williamson There are more than half a million bridges in the United States, and you rely on them every day to cross obstacles like streams, valleys and railroad tracks. But do you know how they work? Or why some bridges are curved while others are straight? Engineers must consider many things—such as the distance to be spanned and the types of materials available—before determining the size, shape and overall look of a bridge. In this class, students will study the theory behind bridge building. They will look at real bridges and bridge failures—and build bridges of their own from balsa wood. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

Bridging the Generation Gap 81 Kate Hanssen & Deb Hof fman This course will consist of group visits with the residents of the Maplewood Manor long-term care facility (located across from PSD). We will work

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ELECTIVE together to lead art projects, interviews and other interactive activities that will socially engage the residents. Students should be prepared to be outgoing, compassionate, inquisitive and patient. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 One 90-minute class per week

Captains’ Leadership 82 Katie Bergstrom Mark

businesses, converse with business owners, hang out in a thrift store, a supermarket, a coffee shop or local restaurants, and volunteer at a charitable organization. The goal is to get to know our immediate surroundings more deeply. Participants are expected to be open to exploring the neighborhood of Germantown. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 One 90-minute class per week

We will explore leadership and followership themes that can be carried out in real life, such as leadership styles, group dynamics, motivation and energy, “First Follower” theory, effective strategies for difficult conversations, failure and goal-setting, cooperation and personalities, and mistake rituals. Prerequisite: Either a current team captain or a “rising” team captain (a captain elected by teammates to serve as a captain in an upcoming season) Grade Level: 10, 12 | Two 45-minute classes per week

Caribbean Cooking 83 Aaron Preetam Cilantro vs. culantro? We will discuss, cook and eat traditional West Indian and Hispanic foods. The following is a list of the recipes that we will prepare and taste: roti (naan), fry bake, curried chicken, stew chicken/chunks (texturized vegetable protein), tostones (fried green plantains with garlic), platanos maduros (fried ripe plantains), arroz con pollo y habichuelas (chicken with rice and beans) and pernil (garlic infused roast pork shoulder). Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 One 90-minute class per week

Chess 84 Rob Fetell & Brian Riggs This course is intended for anyone who wants to learn to play chess, get better at chess or just have fun playing chess. No previous experience necessary. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

85 Connect with Germantown

Dave Mraz The purpose of this minor is to become more aware of those around us. We will visit local

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MINOR CLASSES

Cryptography 86 Ben Hamilton & Matt Zipin Our history is laced with tales of hidden information in plain sight. Hiding information from our adversaries is a common goal we’ve shared dating back further than the Roman Empire. The basic principle is the same: How do two people share information with each other without the third person knowing, even though this third person will have complete access to their communications? This class will cover some of the common historical ciphers and the techniques used to break them. Students will design their own ciphers and attempt to break those created by other students to gain knowledge of the issues and complexity involved. Finally, the class will examine how it overcame the problems associated with these ciphers and introduce some of the more advanced concepts that drive modern encryption. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

D.E.A .R .: Drop Everything and Read 87 Various Faculty This minor will give students unstructured, quiet time to read for class or read for pleasure. Students can also use this time to complete homework. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 One 45-minute class per week

88 Earthquake Writing and Production

Lucy Cur tis, Sarah Detwiler, Ann e Gerbner & Meg Cohen Ragas

This is a workshop-oriented class for anyone interested in joining Earthquake’s writing or production staff, and highly encouraged for current Earthquake staff. We will use class time to work on a variety of editorial activities, including reporting

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ELECTIVE and writing, editing and revising articles, layout and production, photography, and discussing journalism and the news. Learn more about how to do newswriting, features, editorials, profiles, reviews, photo essays, and more. Open to all students. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 One 90-minute class per week

Etymology: An Exploration of the Latin and Greek Origins of English Words 89

Julie Marren

If you have always wanted to know the Latin and Greek roots of English words and like to think about how different languages are connected, this class is for you. We will approach etymology as we would approach learning a new language, memorizing the meanings of word elements and applying those meanings to understanding English vocabulary. We will also examine how those roots find their way from Latin and Greek through different languages into English. Your English vocabulary will inevitably expand as we explore language in a fun and upbeat environment. (All are welcome whether or not you have studied Greek or Latin before.) Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

Fencing 90 Deb Brackett Fencing has been described as a “physical chess game.” In this introductory class, we will start at the beginning—with footwork and games to understand time, space and tempo. We will progress to entry-level challenges of “right of way” and the basics of handling the weapon (foil). Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 One 45-minute class per week

MINOR CLASSES

Film Noir 92 John King Film Noir refers to a genre in American Cinema that focuses on pessimism, fatalism and menace as a narrative plot. Many contemporary films have borrowed from the narrative (Body Heat [1981], Fatal Attraction [1987], etc.). Students will view films and discuss narrative plots and acting styles. Prerequisite: Parental Permission Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 | One 90-minute class per week

Free Writing 93 Sam Sullivan or Robin Friedman Students will have time for independent writing, and can use this time to work on an independent project, work closely with a writing teacher, or share their writing with other writers. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

Fun with Scratch 94 Kate Jones For the curious computer programming novice, this minor will give you a chance to play around with SCRATCH, a simple programming language developed to make it easy to create animation, art, simulations and games. This self-paced, exploratory class offers the opportunity to unleash your creativity with this fun and playful tool. Absolutely no programming skills required. Prerequisite: None Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

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Game of Cards: Rules, Strategies and a Bit of History

John Ceccatti

Films of Stanley Kubrick 91 Joe McGear y During this minor class, we will watch and discuss Dr. Strangelove and 2001: A Space Odyssey. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 One 90-minute class per week

For centuries, card games, such as whist, bridge, canasta and pinochle, have provided personal enjoyment, social engagement and friendly competition. In this course, students will be able to hone their card-playing skills, learn new card games, and delve into the history of cards and card games. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

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ELECTIVE

96

Global Current Affairs

Caroline Caraballo, Margaret Maguire, Jake Schwar tz & Andrew Lee This class aims to exercise your analytical skills while also opening you up to an entirely new world of global current affairs. We will learn together about events outside of the US and compare and contrast the reporting of these events by American and international media outlets. Our ultimate goal will be to hypothesize why these events are reported by the US in the manner in which they are, and connect them to the greater political interests of the US. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

97 History of Disney

Michael Buckmire, Evan O’Lear y-Lee & Kayla Ashcroft In this class, students will learn about the fascinating history of this American cultural icon, from its most popular character before Mickey Mouse to its acquisition of Pixar. Disney’s illustrious history as a company provides for a wealth of discussion. We will watch movies and assorted clips. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 One 90-minute class per week

98 History of Fashion Lisa Bur ns

We will begin with the Etruscans and the Greeks, and, after a quick overview of the subsequent periods, each student may choose to focus on their favorite period and style. We hope to add a design component to the class as well. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

History of Rock & Roll 99 Nick Renner Get ready to Rock! We’ll listen to and discuss rock music from its roots in jazz and blues to the Modern Era. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

MINOR CLASSES

100

Introduction to Knitting Gen Nelson

This class is suitable for beginner and novice knitters. We will cover basic techniques—cast on, knit and purl stitches—and focus on making 8-inch squares for the knit-a-square project. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

Japanese Masters of Cinema

101 Adam Hotek

Students will watch and discuss films by two Japanese masters of cinema: Akira Kurosawa and Yasujiro Ozu. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 One 90-minute class per week

102 Just Mercy: Keep Banging the

Drum for Justice

Meg Goldner Rabinowitz & Alyson Solomon In this class, we will read and discuss Bryan Stevenson’s breakthrough work Just Mercy, about the criminal justice system, particularly its impact on youth. We will partner this text with Stevenson’s talk about his work founding and overseeing the Equal Justice Initiative in Montgomery, Alabama, and excerpts from Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

103

Kind of Blue

Mark Croxford

During this class, we’ll listen to Miles Davis’s masterpiece, read excerpts from Kind of Blue: The Making of the Miles Davis Masterpiece, a book that discusses its recording, and listen to other recordings by the influential players on the record. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

104

Latin 2

Natasha Labbe

This class is optional for students who are currently enrolled in Latin 2, giving them a chance to review

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ELECTIVE Level 1 content while reinforcing new content they have learned so far in Level 2. Prerequisite: Must currently be enrolled in Latin 2 Grade Level: 9, 10 Two 45-minute classes per week

105

Living Buddhism Tracey Spinka

In “Living Buddhism,” students will be introduced to some of the fundamental principles of Buddhist practice. We will also explore how these principles apply to our daily lives (i.e., how one lives Buddhism). Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may NOT choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

“Mixing Memory and Desire”: J.D. Salinger ’s Nine Stories and the Writer ’s Imagination 106

Alex Levin

In this course, we will work simultaneously on two worthy projects. We will read Nine Stories by Salinger, a book that moves suddenly between moments of tragedy and humor and is captivating, inspiring and, at times, befuddling, but in the most wonderful of ways. In this collection, children are full of many keen insights, while adults have startlingly few. At the same time, students will work on developing a single short story of their own. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

107

Mock Trial Jeremy Ross

Mock Trial is an interscholastic way to explore interest in the legal world and the justice system as well as hone verbal speech and delivery skills through competitions coordinated by the Pennsylvania Bar Association. Students will use this time to prepare and practice for the Mock Trial competition. Prerequisite: Students must be current Mock Trial participants Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

MINOR CLASSES

108

Model United Nations

Claire Kang, Jake Schwar tz & John Ceccatti

In this class, students will learn about the United Nations (U.N.) and talk about some modern issues that the U.N. is facing today. Students will also be introduced to Model U.N. and do some simulation Model U.N. mini-conferences, and will be able to participate both as delegates and as chairs. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

109

Modern Dance Lab Jake Miller

We will explore movement and ranges of motion in an open, experimental and playful space. Technically speaking, this course is an introductory Modern Dance class using the theory and practices of Laban Movement Analysis as the entry point for both structured and freeform improvisation. Practically speaking, it’s a chance to play, move your body and challenge your ideas about what ‘dance’ can be. ALL students are welcome, regardless of previous experience. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 One 90-minute class per week

110

Music Production

Thomas Primosch, Daniel Stassen & Jef f Torchon In this class, we will work as a group to make a mixtape consisting of whatever musical genres/styles the students want. Everyone will contribute in some way, whether in production, writing, recording, mixing or mastering. We will begin by quickly covering what goes into making a song or an album (and what each step of the process entails). After that, the rest of the course will be spent collaborating and actually working on the mixtape. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 One 90-minute class per week

111

Musical Theatre

Moriya Dichter & Lisa Bur ns

This course will take a look at the history of musical theatre. We will make our way through the decades of the 20th century, and focus on the musicals that changed the canon of musical theatre forever. Some of

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ELECTIVE the musicals we will focus on include A Chorus Line, Company, Rent and Next to Normal. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

112

Not your Childhood Coloring Book Devra Ramsey

This minor is about spending some quiet time with colored pencils, elaborate designs, good music and your peers. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

Open Community Action: Planning MLK Day, Our Biggest Day of the Year 113

Kathy Paulmier

Plan and lead GFS’s biggest volunteer day of the year, Martin Luther King Day of Service and Sharing. We’ll brainstorm project ideas, create instruction packets, organize supplies, and (this is optional) serve as hosts on the big day. We will read student-selected passages of Martin Luther King’s letters and speeches, and students will study the history of the Federal holiday and the scope of observances throughout the country. Students will learn the logistics of hosting a volunteer day of this size (500 visitors expected). Attendance at the MLK Day of Service on Monday, January 16, is voluntary, but even if you cannot attend, we want and need your input! Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 One 90-minute class per week

115

Outdoors Adventure

Zoe Loomis, Lila Ster nberg-Sher & Taia Harlos Come, Adventurers! In this class, students will learn basic outdoor skills (how to put on hiking boots, set up a tent, cook a meal) as well as read and discuss essays and articles on environmental ethics. Students will also learn how to lead and organize a multi-day camping trip, which we will (hopefully) go on in May. To celebrate the centennial of the National Parks, we will learn about their history and what and where each one is, as well as discuss their importance. Students should be prepared to spend some time outside during this course, either learning how to use a stove or having a snowball fight. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

116 Performing Musicians

Claire Kang, Marion Standefer & Andrew Westerhaus This class is open to musicians of all skill levels. We will gather to discuss music of all types and to play music together. During classes, ensembles can be formed, pieces can be practiced, short performances can be given, constructive critique can be exchanged, and concerts can be planned. Come out of the practice room and share your music! Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

117 Perspectives du Monde Francophone Sam McIlvain

This course will examine current world political, social and cultural developments through a French and French-speaking African media/journalistic lens.

114 Open Fitness Room

Tom Myran & Caitlin Stuetz

Sign up for this minor to create space in your day for fitness. The fitness room will be staffed by a physical education teacher, who can help you plan a new fitness routine or modify your existing fitness routine. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

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MINOR CLASSES

Prerequisite: French 3 or above | Grade Level: 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

118 Plutarch’s Moralia Jim Barron

In this reading and discussion course, students will become familiar with Plutarch’s life and career, his Platonic life philosophy and his education aims—with a specific focus on his role as a “moral” essayist. This towering thinker of the Greco-Roman world was the author of that great masterpiece of ancient

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ELECTIVE literature, Parallel Lives of Illustrious Greeks and Romans. We will devote a week apiece to reading and discussing three of Plutarch’s essays: “The Malice of Herodotus,” “On Listening” and “On Being Aware of Moral Progress.” The hope is that this brief exposure to Plutarch’s incomparable humanity and wisdom will inspire students “…to hunger and thirst, and so to stay in contact with the genuine cause of progress. For the greater the gain from philosophy… the greater the displeasure at separation [from it].” Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

119 Polyphony

Adam Hotek

Students in this class will review submissions to Polyphony, the Germantown Friends School literary arts magazine, including prose, poetry and visual art. Students can also use this time to create pieces for the publication, and do not need to be official members of Polyphony to take this class. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

Practicing Mindfulness

120 Meg Goldner Rabinowitz

In this course, students will study and practice mindfulness meditation, and engage in the calming creative arts of sewing, stitching, knitting and coloring. The course is an introduction to contemporary interfaith mindfulness practices and their connections to Western and Eastern Buddhism. Students will read short passages on mindfulness authored by world-renowned teachers and practice meditation together. Overlaps between mindfulness and Quaker Faith and Practice will be explored, along with the intersection of mindfulness and students’ own faith traditions. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

MINOR CLASSES

121

Strategy Games Matt Zipin

We will spend time learning some novel and interesting games. First we will play them, and then we will look carefully at the strategies inherent in each game. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

Surfing in American Pop Culture

122 Mark Croxford

Like many things, American’s opinions and knowledge of surfing are shaped by its appearance in popular culture. During this class, we will consider how it has been portrayed in both the written and cinematic realms. The results are sometimes accurate, many times hysterical. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

123

Tech Theater Michael Ker ns

Students in this class will work on varied technical theater projects, and will assist with the set being designed and constructed by members of the Professional Set Design class. No tech theater experience necessary. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 One 90-minute class per week

124 Teen Personal Finance Aaron Preetam

This course is designed to establish a useful and working knowledge of the financial world that will become a reality once you turn 18. We will evaluate the myriad options for checking and saving accounts, budgeting, the cryptic and often confusing world of credit cards, rental agreements, and college loans, as well as issues that the group deems relevant. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

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ELECTIVE

125

The Best Trivia Quiz You’ll Ever Make Andrew Lee

Students will take numerous trivia quizzes across multiple categories, based on student interest. We will identify elements of good trivia quizzes and create our own trivia quizzes before the end of the term. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

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the more complicated and aesthetically-interesting models. Students do not need any expertise or background in origami to be successful in this class. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 One 90-minute class per week

129

Try a Group Voice Class! Teri Gemberling-Johnson

This singing class will teach you about vocal technique and vocal production through the use of warm-up exercises and vocal experimentation of sound. Exercises that train your ear and note-reading practice will also develop your musical skills. As a group, you will learn several songs and support each other through class performance. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 One 45-minute class per week

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MINOR CLASSES

Anne Gerbner

Dr. Seuss typed The Cat in the Hat on a Smith-Corona Portable, Maya Angelou wrote her poetry on an Adler, Hemingway loved his Royal Quiet Deluxe, and Hunter S. Thompson preferred his IBM Selectric. Now you, too, can type your poetry, stories and ideas on a real typewriter! The English Department has a variety of typewriters just waiting for you to start typing during this course. Discover how typing changes the writing process and slows it down—without the distraction of email—and without a delete key. We will spend our time typing stories, poems, plays, children’s books, whatever you want. You can type up your own project, or try one of the writing ideas that will be suggested.

Tara Oanh Kohli & Joe McGear y

This course will explore the beauty and history of Viet Nam through the voices of its people. We will focus on both the war and its lasting effects, and the unique culture of contemporary Vietnamese society. Our course material will encompass a wide range of resources, potentially including memoirs, poems, films, photographs, and possibly even food! Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

130

Typewriting

Voices of Viet Nam

Zines

Michael Williamson

In this class, students will learn a short history of bookbinding. We will explore a range of crafted book forms, such as sewn binding and folded books, and will populate the pages of a zine with our own texts and images. This course is best for a person who loves writing and drawing, words and images, and who will come to class with stories, either already written or in idea form. Note: Students who have taken this class in the past may choose it again. Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

Prerequisite: None | Grade Level: 9, 10, 12 Two 45-minute classes per week

128 Unit Origami Larr y Ottman

Unit, or “modular,” origami is a particular branch of origami in which you repeatedly fold a basic shape, or “unit,” then assemble those units into larger, increasingly complex and interesting two- and threedimensional geometric models. Students will learn several basic unit folds and then have some flexibility to explore those that interest them most to create

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GFS GERMANTOWN FRIENDS SCHOOL

Visit

www.germantownfriends.org

215.951.2300 | 31 West Coulter Street, Philadelphia, PA 19144