handbook - Geelong Grammar School

handbook - Geelong Grammar School

TOORAK CAMPUS HANDBOOK Geelong Grammar School Toorak Campus Garry Pierson Head of Toorak Campus 14 Douglas Street, Toorak, Victoria, Australia 3142...

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TOORAK CAMPUS

HANDBOOK

Geelong Grammar School Toorak Campus Garry Pierson Head of Toorak Campus 14 Douglas Street, Toorak, Victoria, Australia 3142 T +61 3 9829 1444 F +61 3 9826 2829 E [email protected]

www.ggs.vic.edu.au

CRICOS 00143G 103

104

CONTENTS 01

02

OUR PHILOSOPHY

ACADEMIC PROGRAMME

Our Purpose Our Community A Positive Future Our Campus A Proud Heritage A Creative Approach

1

6 9 11 11 15 17

What is Curriculum? 21 Early Learning Centre 21 Primary Years Programme 22 Making Learning Visible 24 Forms of Reporting 25 Learning Environments 26 A Global Learning Perspective 27 IB Mission Statement 28 IB Learner Profile 28 Programme of Inquiry 29 Language 33 Mathematics 37 Lote­–Japanese 39 Library and Resource Centre 41 Science and Technology 42 E-Learning 43 Visual Art 44 Drama 46 Music 48 Physical Education and Sport 52 Outdoor Education 54 Positive Education 55 Pastoral Care and Leadership 56 Religious and Values Education 57 Learning Support Programme 57 Home Learning 58

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04

LIFE AT TOORAK CAMPUS

EARLY LEARNING CENTRE

Learning to Flourish 63 A–Z of Toorak Campus 65 Absentees 65 Allergies, Anaphylaxis and Asthma 65 Behaviour Management 66 Bicycles and Scooters 66 Camps/Outdoor Education 66 Church 67 Communication–Parent/Teacher 67 Community Portal 67 Contact Lists 68 Diary 68 Excursions 68 Extended Absence 68 Fees 68 Hats 68 Home Learning 69 House System 69 Library 70 Lost Property 70 Medical Care 70 Music Tuition 71 Newsletter 72 Out of School Hours Care Programme 72 Parent/Teacher Nights 74 Parents’ Association 74 Playground Supervision 74 Reports 74 School Hours 74 Security 76 Smartphone Application 76 Stationery for Students 76 Tuck Shop 76 Uniform 76 Uniform Shop 77

Our Guardian Angel 81 The Pottery 83 ELC Programme 83 Getting Started 85 ELC Guidelines 87 Communication–Parents/ELC 87 Contact Information 87 Daily Routine 88 Emergency Medical Care 89 Fees 89 Illness 89 Interactions with Children 90 Lunch 90 Medication 90 Special Experiences 90 Staff 90 Uniform 91 References 92 The Journey 93

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OUR PHILOSOPHY

01

The philosophy that underpins the School’s understanding of Exceptional Education is manifest in our purpose, spirit, focus, character and beliefs

OUR PURPOSE is to inspire our students and community to flourish and make a positive difference through our unique and transformational education adventures

OUR FOCUS is learning to flourish

OUR SPIRIT

- our rigorous a

- Positive E - our excep - partnerships betw

is making a positive difference

- in

OUR CHARACTER is to be authentic, courageous, dedicated, forgiving, inquiring, loving, optimistic, passionate, resilient and trusting

OUR CHALLENGE is to demonstrate that Positive Education enhances student wellbeing and to lead in establishing wellbeing as an essential component of a thriving educational system

WE BELIEVE

academic programmes create wonder, curiosity and a desire to learn -boarding and co-education provide valuable life skills Education enhances wellbeing and enables individuals to flourish ptional staff bring character and richness to the life of the School ween our parents, staff and students provide the best learning outcomes - in nurturing strong relationships fostering spirituality and celebrating our Anglican tradition - in serving others and building social responsibility - in growing our heritage through innovation

↓ SECTION 01 — OUR PHILOSOPHY

OUR COMMUNITY I am delighted to welcome you to our community. The Toorak Campus is a happy, safe and exciting community. It embraces many people and many ideas on a daily basis. It supports the notion that everyone is valued, that everyone is worth listening to and that everyone can make a difference. The campus undertakes great initiatives to bond us together; person to person, class to class and year level to year level. Community activities are many and varied, and include events hosted by our Toorak Parents’ Association. Each event provides an opportunity for our community to interact with each other, support each other and forge deep, meaningful and enduring relationships. The outcome is a wonderful sense of belonging.

Our Toorak Campus provides an environment that encourages our children to grow and flourish. Our innovative, open-plan classrooms are carefully designed and connected spaces where our students explore, learn and play. Our curriculum produces excellent academic results. Our Early Learning Centre (ELC) and Primary School programme is underpinned by the teaching of the world-renowned Reggio Emilia philosophy and the Primary Years Programme (PYP) of the International Baccalaureate which combine intellectual rigour and high academic standards with a strong emphasis on creativity and inquiry-based learning. It nurtures collaboration and fosters leadership through action. I welcome you to our community and look forward to sharing the School journey with you. Garry Pierson Head of Toorak Campus

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↓ SECTION 01 —OUR PHILOSOPHY

A POSITIVE FUTURE An independent Anglican co-educational boarding and day school spread across five specialist campuses, Geelong Grammar School boasts an international reputation as a pioneer of modern education. From its origins in 1855, the School has a proud heritage of innovation; reinforced through the establishment of its remote Timbertop campus in 1953, becoming co-educational in the early 1970s, and the recent introduction of Positive Education in 2009. The School developed Positive Education from the science of Positive Psychology in collaboration with Professor Martin Seligman and his team from the University of Pennsylvania. Positive Education focuses on cultivating positive emotions and character traits, encouraging students to find purpose and lead engaged and meaningful lives. Positive Education is taught at each year level, at every campus and across all aspects of school life. Studies over the past 20 years suggest that explicit Positive Psychology programmes lead students to have increased levels of creativity, better critical thinking skills and increased levels of positive emotion. Positive Education improves wellbeing while equipping students with the skills to manage failure and to build from those life experiences found to be challenging – teaching confidence, resilience and optimism. Under the umbrella of ‘wellbeing’ our Toorak Campus students learn about other significant life skills and concepts, including mindful meditation, the connection between emotional and physical wellbeing, nutrition and fitness. “Geelong Grammar School is the pioneer in the world in taking steps to introduce this type of learning through all aspects of an educational curriculum,” Professor Seligman said. “In doing so, I believe that Geelong Grammar students who go through the programme will be less likely to suffer from depression – which is increasing in epidemic proportions in many western countries, including Australia – and will lead more positive and fulfilling lives.” OUR CAMPUS Our Toorak Campus caters for children from 3 years of age in our Early Learning Centre (ELC) and Prep to Year 6 children in our Primary School. Our ELC programme reflects the philosophy of the Reggio Emilia approach, which focuses on the natural development of each child as well as the close relationship that they share with their environment. We have an innovative campus that features open-plan learning environments and state-ofthe-art facilities. Our Campus was the first school in Victoria to introduce the Primary Years Programme (PYP) of the International Baccalaureate which provides the framework of our curriculum from Prep to Year 6, and guides students to deeper investigation and encourages critical and creative thinking. Numeracy and Literacy skills underpin everything we do in the classroom. Specialist subjects – Music, Art, Drama, Physical Education, Japanese and Library – support this important foundation work. Japanese is taught from Prep to Year 6. Music is enhanced by our Instrumental Tuition Programme as well as Choral and Instrumental Ensembles. Visual and Dramatic Arts programmes culminate in our Art Exhibition, Year 6 Mask Performance and yearly Drama Performances. Excursions and camps are integral to an extensive Outdoor Education programme. Year 5 and 6 students compete in the Association of Public Schools (APS) Interschool Sports Competition. 11

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TOORAK CAMPUS HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

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↓ SECTION 01 — OUR PHILOSOPHY

A PROUD HERITAGE The history of our Toorak Campus stretches back 125 years to the establishment of the Toorak Preparatory Grammar School in a rented house in Wallace Avenue in 1887. The house was rented from “an old Welshman... he made it a proviso that the name Glamorgan be kept”, and soon the School was known simply as such. It was established by Miss Annie McComas, who had been a governess to Sir William Stawell, assisted by her younger sister Isabel, who succeeded Annie as Principal in 1895. Glamorgan had morning, day and boarding students – one of its earliest boarders was a “little gentleman” called Stanley Melbourne Bruce, who attended the School from 1891-1895, was Prime Minister of Australia from 1923-29, and elevated to the peerage in 1947 as first Viscount Bruce of Melbourne.

Isabel McComas purchased 14 Douglas Street, which had been vacated by the all girls Toorak College, in 1919. Glamorgan almost doubled its numbers in the next five years, with 121 boys enrolled by 1923. Geelong Grammar School purchased Glamorgan in 1947, allowing Miss McComas to retire after 60 years of service. In 1973 Glamorgan became co-educational and the modern Toorak Campus, as it is today, began.

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“There was something special about the place; something intangible. It may have been the teachers who gave every child individual attention. They really cared about you. You felt very special. I certainly had an advantage in life by attending Glamorgan.” Robert Cole, student at Glamorgan 1946-49

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↓ SECTION 01 — OUR PHILOSOPHY

A CREATIVE APPROACH Our Toorak Campus has a reputation for educational innovation and academic excellence. We were the first school in Victoria to introduce the Primary Years Programme (PYP) of the International Baccalaureate, which focuses on the development of the whole child as an inquirer, both in the classroom and in the world outside. The most significant and distinctive feature of the PYP is the six transdisciplinary themes. The six themes create a framework that allows students to ‘step up’ beyond the confines of learning within subject areas. These themes help teachers to develop a programme of in-depth inquiries into important ideas, identified by the teachers, and requiring a high level of involvement on the part of the students.

The programme offers a balance between learning about, or through, the subject areas, and learning beyond them. The Units of Inquiry are substantial and usually last for several weeks and are centred on the following six recurrent themes:-

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- Who we are - Where we are in place and time - How we express ourselves - How the world works - How we organize ourselves - Sharing the planet A key focus of our curriculum design at the Toorak Campus is to create a love of learning through varied and stimulating learning experiences. These experiences should interest and engage students, helping them to relate new content to previous knowledge and make connections between school experience and the real world. The PYP provides the framework to enable our teachers to plan, implement and assess learning experiences that encourage critical and creative thinking.

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ACADEMIC PROGRAMME

02

↓ SECTION 02 — ACADEMIC PROGRAMME

WHAT IS CURRICULUM? Curriculum is defined as a coherent plan for instruction and learning, integrating content, action and the affective domain. Curriculum serves as the basis for teachers and students active involvement in the co-construction of knowledge. In the past, curriculum largely focused on content. Today, educators realise the need to focus on creating enduring understandings through the exploration of concepts, skills and the processes involved in learning. Current best practice curriculum models take curriculum beyond the memorisation of facts to deeper levels of understanding and knowledge. This approach to learning has led educators to favour inquiry learning. Teachers and students embrace provocations in learning, establish prior knowledge about selected topics and negotiate research paths for further investigation. Students, in helping to determine the research questions and pathways for study, then take shared responsibility for their own learning. EARLY LEARNING CENTRE (ELC) We acknowledge the vital importance of a strong beginning in learning and have created a specific and specialised programme for our youngest learners at the Toorak Campus. We cater for the specific needs and requirements of the young brain and create stimulating and engaging learning experiences for all children at this level. The educational philosophy underpinning this section of the school incorporates aspects of the Reggio Emilia Educational Project of Northern Italy and the Primary Years Programme (PYP) of the International Baccalaureate. Our Early Learning Programme is carefully constructed to encompass all learning areas. Teachers plan the curriculum in teams and focus on the current interests of the group. Fortnightly programmes are designed around the emergent needs and interests of individual children and the class as a whole. Unit Planners embrace learning agendas that are played out over considerable lengths of time. All programme planners are displayed on the wall of each classroom to inform parents and visitors. Investigations are part of Units of Inquiry and are led with groups of children as they indicate interest and curiosity. These projects are documented in various forms for parents and friends to read and enjoy. Learning is hands-on, interactive, interest-based, play-centred, and investigative and develops the inquiring mind. Children are encouraged to explore and engage, to observe and wonder, to challenge and question their world. Learning is a never ending process and we celebrate the new and interesting paths the children take. The curriculum in the Early Learning Centre (ELC) is planned and implemented with the aim of fostering competence in children in all areas of the self (i.e. developing the whole child). The programme provides open ended, hands-on experiences that allow the children to progress and develop at their own pace. This is a play-based approach to learning. The curriculum is designed around the PYP Units of Inquiry and each unit encompasses the developmental areas of cognitive, social, emotional, language and physical skills. The

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VICTORIAN EARLY YEARS LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK (VEYLF) Teachers at the Toorak Campus also follow the Government of Victoria framework for children from birth to eight years, which is called the Victorian Early Years Learning and Development Framework (VEYLF). This document provides a common language to describe children’s learning and common principles to guide practice for all professionals who work in early childhood settings across Victoria. The document complements and works in conjunction with the Primary Years Programme (PYP), the principles of Reggio Emilia, as well as the philosophies and practices of Positive Education. The VEYLF identifies five outcomes for all children from birth to eight years: - children have a strong sense of identity - children are connected with and contribute to their world - children have a strong sense of wellbeing - children are confident and involved learners - children are effective communicators The framework recognises that children learn at different rates, in different ways and at different times. Our ELC teachers provide the support necessary for every child to learn and develop.

PRIMARY YEARS PROGRAMME (PYP) The Primary Years Programme (PYP) of the International Baccalaureate is a framework that enables teachers to plan, implement and assess teaching and learning experiences which are conceptually based, significant in their content, engaging to the learner, and challenging and relevant to the lives of today’s students. This framework leads students and teachers to deeper investigation, develops pertinent conceptual comprehension, encourages critical and creative thinking and builds enduring understanding. Teachers at the Toorak Campus provide opportunities to build the necessary skills that students will require as they travel forward in their lives. The effects of rapid social change and the implications of new advances in teaching and technology for the school’s curriculum are considered, as well as current research into how students best learn. Teachers are aware of the effects of changing family patterns, the shift from an agricultural/industrial to an information/service society, and the interdependence of Australian society and other societies around the world. These factors, among others, guide decision-making when structuring the curriculum. Teachers strive to ensure the process of education at the Toorak Campus serves the future needs of our students. All curriculum at the Toorak Campus are planned and negotiated in collaboration with teaching teams, the Head of Teaching and Learning and the PYP Co-ordinator.

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inclusion of children’s interests brings a unique and individual focus to the planning. The programme promotes independent learning and strongly values the inquiry based approach.

↓ SECTION 02 — ACADEMIC PROGRAMME

- A balanced core of common learning ensures that all students are challenged with learning experiences judged most appropriate to their future lives. Key elements of the core of common learning are organised around fundamental themes, addressing societal concerns such as civic competence, peace, the environment and the development of a global perspective. Balance is a key element. Curriculum content is carefully selected and appropriate learning provocations in learning are presented to students to challenge the learning process, in order to help students reach their full potential. Technology facilitates learning and is integrated into the teaching and learning processes in every instructional area. - Authentic assessment of performance allows a common emphasis of assessment to shift, from short-term recall of facts to recognising and encouraging student originality, insight and problem-solving, along with mastery of important information and skills. Learning how to learn and reflect on experiences equips students with the skills they need to understand and deal with changes and advances in our society. Assessment is embedded in the learning process and always has a contextual basis. - The curriculum is organised on a trans-disciplinary basis to ensure deep understanding. This approach builds opportunities for students to make connections between prior experience and new knowledge and also to see learning as an holistic experience rather than one that is carved up into traditional subject domains. This is the result of a collaborative process between teachers and students; working in teams, teams working with other teams and information gathered through constructive research. Each year the total body of knowledge increases and is built upon. As issues and understandings become more complex, the agendas for student learning become increasingly sophisticated and students’ involvement becomes more detailed and intricate. - A key element of curriculum design is to provoke the intrinsic desire within students to learn through varied and stimulating learning experiences. These should interest and engage students, helping them relate new content to previous knowledge and make connections between school experience and real-world issues. Rather than viewing students as passive recipients of information, today’s most effective learning experiences require students to become actively engaged in questioning, discussing, relating and reformulating information into systems and concepts they can understand and use. - Classroom strategies have a strong focus on developing thinking skills in an authentic fashion. This reinforces the importance of critical thinking, problem solving, reasoning and creative thinking over less complex traditional intellectual tasks, such as recall of factual information. - A good curriculum is the result of a collaborative process. Collaboration is the heart of the teaching and learning experience at the Toorak Campus. Traditional Classrooms have been replaced with state of the art, innovative Teaching and Learning spaces which have been designed and constructed with an understanding of the value of genuine collaboration in a socio-constructivist learning context. To support this process, the planning of curriculum is a collaborative and ongoing process, it is considered to be a

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- We guide children to strive for excellence in all that they do, while being considerate of themselves, others and the world in which they live. - Reflection is valued as a vital part of the learning process. Students are encouraged to make accurate and positive self-judgements about their learning which in turn promotes self-confidence and influences future learning. Implementation of these principles is evidenced in the outline of our curriculum as follows. MAKING LEARNING VISIBLE As children learn, it is important to share the learning process not only to mark achievements and audit skills and performance, but to illustrate the many skills and processes that are developed during the learning journey. Assessment is much more than the summative reflection of skills or a test of knowledge; it is an ongoing process and is integral to all teaching and learning at the Toorak Campus. Assessment is the process of gathering and analysing information about student performance. It identifies what students know, can understand, can do and may feel at different stages in the learning process. It gives students the opportunity to identify achievements and set targets needed for improvement in relation to curriculum and personal goals. Both the children and teachers are actively engaged in the assessment of student progress as part of the development of the children’s wider critical thinking and self-evaluation skills. It is an important process to provide both teachers and children the opportunity to reflect on teaching and learning. The documentation of learning is an important tool used in the assessment of learning at the Toorak Campus. Wall Panels, Displays, student work and notes as well as teacher observations and analysis of learning, are on display in classroom environments. Our youngest children (ELC) have daily class reflection journals that celebrate the learning journey of the class each day; they are constructed and published by teachers and students in collaboration. This practice continues throughout the Lower Primary School on a weekly basis. The intention of this documentation is to explain and interpret the learning process, not merely to display the product of learning experiences. All students at the Toorak Campus collate a portfolio of personal learning evidence each year. These wonderful documents hold many examples and memories of the shared learning experience. They celebrate the achievements of each child’s journey within the school year and track the learning of the individual as well as that of the group. Portfolios are maintained through collaboration between teachers and students, as they select work to include. Student Portfolios are the focus of the Student Led Conferences in Term 3 and are taken home at the conclusion of the academic year. Student portfolios are the celebration of an active mind at work. Assessment is central to the Primary Years Programme (PYP) goal of thoughtfully and effectively guiding children through the five essential elements of learning: the understanding of concepts, the acquisition of knowledge, the mastering of skills, the development of attitudes and the decision to take responsible action. TOORAK CAMPUS HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

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‘working document’, open to evaluation and change.

↓ SECTION 02 — ACADEMIC PROGRAMME

Regular assessment is part of the educational practice at the Toorak Campus. This helps us to identify additional needs and offer extension to students where appropriate. Some of our Assessment Practices are measured against standardised criteria which are useful in monitoring student progress and can provide normed statistics that are useful in goal setting. The teaching staff is supported by the Learning Support staff in this process. Specific diagnostic testing may be initiated by the Learning Support Co-ordinator, in consultation with families, to identify specific strengths or an area where extra support is necessary for the student’s learning. Opportunities for teachers and students to formally report on student progress are scheduled throughout the year. Regular parent/teacher and/or parent/student/teacher conferences are scheduled at the beginning of first term.

FORMS OF REPORTING Term 1 - ‘You Tell Us Interviews’ This interview is conducted early in the first term of the academic year. It is a vital tool for gathering a shared understanding of the child and mapping the personal learning and curriculum agenda for the year. The interview gives parents the opportunity to inform the teacher about their child as a whole person with specific needs and interests, talents, vulnerabilities and preferred learning styles. Teachers have the opportunity to select learning goals for students with parents. Term 2 - Mid-Year Report The mid-year report is a written reflection of the child’s learning journey throughout Semester 1. Teachers reflect on the child’s accomplishments and personal and social development. Reports are accessible on-line and parents are encouraged to read and reflect on this written summative assessment. Semester 2 - Teacher/Parent and Student Led Conferences A teacher-parent conference follows in Semester 2 in order for parents to formally discuss the report and what action can be taken to support the child’s learning. The student-led conferences enable children to discuss their work and progress with their parents from their own perspective. Students collate and prepare their portfolio for the conferences so that many examples of learning can be shared with parents. Students manage and host the conference with their parents, taking strong ownership of their learning and achievements thus far in the year. Term 4 - Written Reports For students in the Early Learning Centre, written reports are replaced by ‘transition statements and reflections of learning’. These reflections are provided as the final page of the child’s portfolio at the conclusion of the academic year. There are final written reports for Prep to Year 6 children, which reflect the child’s work during Semester 2 in all areas 25

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LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS Since 2007 the Toorak Campus has engaged on a remarkable journey of renewal and regeneration, changing not only the buildings and facilities that are provided for learning, but also the daily operation of the learning environments. We have been very fortunate to be able to partner the transformation of our facilities with the rejuvenation of our teaching and learning to provide innovative, engaging, contemporary and relevant learning facilities and teaching practices. The Toorak Campus has been widely regarded as a leader in the field of the Primary Years Programme (PYP) of the International Baccalaureate since 1999. We are also well known for the innovative educational practices in our Early Learning Centre (ELC) where our programmes are inspired by the philosophy of Reggio Emilia. The recent restoration and redevelopment of the Campus has, for the first time, allowed our staff to celebrate the collaborative learning models, which begin in the ELC, and continue this philosophy and practice with students between Prep and Year 6. As our students progress through their schooling and beyond, it is important that they are able to think and learn productively in collaborative and individual settings. The physical environments of the Sutherland, McWilliam and Glamorgan centres have been specifically designed and constructed to promote independent learning and collaboration amongst learners with a model of team teaching to draw upon the many skills and talents of our teaching staff. Our endeavour to strive for improved learning and teaching environments has led us to create spaces that allow children to direct their own learning, take responsibility, and work collaboratively with classmates to conduct research and refine understandings. Our learning environment designs allow the children’s work to shine, bringing vibrant life to the space. The intention is to celebrate the thinking that happens within the learning space; to focus on the experience of learning rather than the physical structures of the building. The impact of the learning environment has traditionally been considered less important than the teacher and the teaching. Traditional education settings would consider teachers as the provider or conveyor of knowledge and the children as ‘empty vessels’ to fill with knowledge. Radically and importantly, education is changing. We are stepping forward to make this change, to bring the very best learning opportunities and facilities to our students, underpinned by relevant and significant research in learning. Inside our shared learning environments there are spaces for small group discussion, for general study, for Information and Communication Technology (ICT) research, for targeted teaching, for team teaching, for workshop style learning, for seminar style learning and for students to come together and meet for pastoral care. Our spaces are comfortable,

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of the curriculum, including commentary on student progress in the context of the PYP Learner Profile. The written report includes classroom and specialist programmes, music and individual programmes and student reflection and self-evaluation. It is the culmination of assessment for the semester and provides a summative statement for each student at the end of the academic year.

↓ SECTION 02 — ACADEMIC PROGRAMME

welcoming and mirror adult learning and working spaces found in the community, rather than a traditional classroom. In this way, the learning spaces are designed to be convivial and productive, to showcase the students’ process in, and products of, learning. Each level of the Glamorgan Centre is considered to be a collaborative learning zone. The ground floor houses Years 3 and 4 and the first floor houses Years 5 and 6. By grouping these year levels in shared spaces we are allowing for greater extension and differentiation in specific skills areas such as language and mathematics, and allowing for a diverse range of experiences and facilities with specialised areas for expression through the arts and other creative media. Each year level continues to follow the PYP Units of Inquiry within specific year groups, but also benefits from access to an environment that supports independent and collaborative inquiry across groups and year levels on specific topics of study. The role of the teacher is crucial in our new learning spaces. Our teaching staff are able to collaborate with more authenticity and use a variety of team teaching models. In addition to this, teachers are responsible for supervising general study areas, conferencing with individual students, facilitating discussion, monitoring and supporting students during learning. Our innovative learning spaces not only stimulate and support our internationally recognised best teaching practice of the PYP, they enable our teachers to adopt innovative ways of delivering our curriculum and give our students the opportunity to learn in many different and exciting ways, that will mean that they are well prepared for the learning journey that lies ahead, within Geelong Grammar School and beyond.

A GLOBAL LEARNING PERSPECTIVE The child inhabits a complex world where learning and development arise not only from the school environment but also from the family and home and from the surrounding community. Teachers have come to understand that in all these contexts the child engages with the world in a direct and interactive manner. In this way the child learns and grows. Consequently the school needs to capture and encourage an active learning engagement through its curriculum. The Toorak Campus has gained a strong reputation for educational innovation and academic excellence by becoming the first school in Victoria to introduce the Primary Years Programme (PYP) of the International Baccalaureate throughout the School. The PYP is recognised by the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, and provides an excellent vehicle for delivery of the Australian National Curriculum, whilst at the same time providing students with a unique global outlook. The students follow a balanced curriculum that is globally significant and provides them with the opportunity to take an active role in their own learning. Through the PYP we strive to educate and develop whole students’ individual, intellectual, physical, emotional and creative identity. Art, Music, Drama, Science, Physical Education and a second language (Japanese) are integral parts of the programme. Specialist teachers work closely with classroom teachers to both plan and implement the curriculum. 27

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The PYP incorporates curriculum research from a range of national and international sources. The PYP focuses on key concepts, such as connection, perspective and responsibility; it explores trans-disciplinary themes, selected on the basis of their relevance and importance within a body of knowledge. Essential skills and attitudes, such as those listed in the Learner Profile that follows, along with skills specific to various disciplines, are developed. This curriculum provides opportunities for meaningful action and social service. The taught curriculum is based on the key concepts of form, function, causation, change, connection, perspective, responsibility and reflection. Each of the key concepts is considered to be a driving force for different lines of inquiry and provides the structure for subsequent research. A grid of the trans-disciplinary themes, which provide the organisational and educational framework for study and assist the teacher in identifying subject matter to be pursued, is displayed in this curriculum guide. In selecting individual units of work, the school seeks to find knowledge that is significant, relevant, engaging and challenging. The subsequent subject outlines will provide you with a sense of the ways in which the Toorak Campus has used the principles of the PYP to articulate its curriculum. The International Baccalaureate (IB) follows the PYP Programme with the Middle Years Programme and the Diploma Programme in secondary schooling. Being an IB World School is an honour we are proud to have; we embrace and believe in the IB mission as stated that follows.

IB MISSION STATEMENT The International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO) aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect. To this end the IBO works with schools, governments and international organizations to develop challenging programmes of international education and rigorous assessment. These programmes encourage students across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences, can also be right.

IB LEARNER PROFILE All students and teachers engaging in learning through the three programmes of the IB are encouraged to be: Inquirers: They develop their natural curiosity. They acquire the skills necessary to conduct inquiry and research and show independence in learning. They actively enjoy learning and this love of learning will be sustained throughout their lives. Knowledgeable: They explore concepts, ideas and issues that have local and global significance. In so doing, they acquire in-depth knowledge and develop understanding across a broad and balanced range of disciplines.

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The Toorak Campus values the support and involvement from the wider school community. Parents provide an essential support for student learning and are very much part of the PYP.

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Thinkers: They exercise initiative in applying thinking skills critically and creatively to recognize and approach complex problems, and make reasoned, ethical decisions. Communicators: They understand and express ideas and information confidently and creatively in more than one language and in a variety of modes of communication. They work effectively and willingly in collaboration with others. Principled: They act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness, justice and respect for the dignity of the individual, groups and communities. They take responsibility for their own actions and the consequences that accompany them. Open-minded: They understand and appreciate their own cultures and personal histories, and are open to the perspectives, values and traditions of other individuals and communities. They are accustomed to seeking and evaluating a range of points of view, and are willing to grow from the experience. Caring: They show empathy, compassion and respect towards the needs and feelings of others. They have a personal commitment to service, and act to make a positive difference to the lives of others and to the environment. Risk-takers: They approach unfamiliar situations and uncertainty with courage and forethought, and have the independence of spirit to explore new roles, ideas and strategies. They are brave and articulate in defending their beliefs. Balanced: They understand the importance of intellectual, physical and emotional balance to achieve personal well- being for themselves and others. Reflective: They give thoughtful consideration to their own learning and experience. They are able to assess and understand their strengths and limitations in order to support their learning and personal development.

PROGRAMME OF INQUIRY The Primary Years Programme (PYP) is a comprehensive approach to teaching and learning, with an international curriculum model that provides guidelines for what students should learn; a teaching methodology and assessment strategies. The Programme of Inquiry for ELC to Year 6 incorporates the five essential elements of concepts, knowledge, skills, attitudes and action, which are developed and applied in a context defined by the six trans-disciplinary themes. These themes cross traditional subject boundaries and embrace all learning opportunities that arise at school. A sample Programme of Inquiry follows on page 31-32.

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Who we are: An inquiry into the nature of the self; beliefs and values; personal, physical, mental, social and spiritual health; human relationships including families, friends, communities, and cultures; rights and responsibilities; what it means to be human. Where we are in place and time: An inquiry into orientation in place and time; personal histories; homes and journeys; the discoveries, explorations and migrations of humankind; the relationships between and the interconnectedness of individuals and civilizations, from local and global perspectives. How we express ourselves: An inquiry into the ways in which we discover and express ideas, feelings, nature, culture, beliefs and values; the ways in which we reflect on, extend and enjoy our creativity; our appreciation of the aesthetic. How the world works: An inquiry into the natural world and its laws; the interaction between the natural world (physical and biological) and human societies; how humans use their understanding of scientific principles; the impact of scientific and technological advances on society and on the environment. How we organize ourselves: An inquiry into the interconnectedness of human-made systems and communities; the structure and function of organizations; societal decisionmaking; economic activities and their impact on humankind and the environment. Sharing the planet: An inquiry into rights and responsibilities in the struggle to share finite resources with other people and with other living things, communities and the relationships within and between them, access to equal opportunities and peace and conflict resolution.

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The six trans-disciplinary themes are:

31 Fantasy provides a chance to explore and challenge our imagination.

Journeys and Moves

Migration is a constant process that changes people and places.

Time Detectives

Artefacts support our understanding of past and present living.

Our Bodies

The human body is a combination of interdependent systems requiring ongoing maintenance.

YEAR 6

The Things We Believe

YEAR 5

YEAR 4

Traces of History

Give and take

YEAR 3 The voice is a powerful tool for expressing your creativity.

Sound Expression

Artists use materials and techniques to express feelings, ideas and perspectives.

The Power of Paint

Explorations have helped us to better understand how the natural world works.

Space

Natural forces contribute to our changing environment.

Natural Disasters

The things we wear come from many different sources.

Global Rags

Organisations can shape and develop an event through effective collaboration.

The Show Must Go On

Extinction impacts ecosystems in our world.

The Living Planet

Our actions can determine the conservation of the world’s oceanic resources.

Fishing the Seas

Life in Global communities is shaped by many variables.

Global Perspectives

Responsible management and innovations could resolve issues created by our finite resources.

Resources for Life

YEAR 3

The place we live in today is a reflection of our past.

Cities require infrastructure to establish a functioning community.

Effective production evolves through collaboration.

The Production Line

Trade facilitates economic purpose, progress and prosperity.

Let’s Trade

YEAR 4

Tolerating and understanding each other’s perspectives helps us to co-exist.

Great Cities

Unique learning styles can strengthen our understanding and development.

Energy is a dynamic force which contributes to life.

The Power of Energy

Changes to climate and environment have an impact on the planet.

The Changing Environment

Traditional ownership of land and resources has implications for indigenous and nonindigenous societies.

One Land, Many Users

SHARING THE PLANET

YEAR 5

All Kinds of Minds

Cultures pass on their beliefs and values through language and The Arts.

Learning and Dreaming

Societies create systems for social, political and scientific organisation.

All Systems Go!

HOW WE ORGANISE OURSELVES

YEAR 6

Religion plays a significant role in the societies of the world.

Elements of Fantasy

Historical evidence can be subjective, impacting on our understandings of the past, present and future.

Chemicals are the building blocks of life and manipulating them can transform their properties and use.

We can experience change at various times during our lives.

Ka Boom!

Generalisations can influence our assumptions and understandings about culture and identity.

HOW THE WORLD WORKS

Stereotypical?

Looking Back To Go Forward

Learn, Change and Grow

HOW WE EXPRESS OURSELVES

WHERE WE ARE IN PLACE AND TIME

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WHO WE ARE



YEAR 2

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YEAR 1

YEAR 1

Home Is Where the Heart Is

Homes are a reflection of our environment and our culture.

Connecting with myself and others

Mindfulness allows us to understand ourselves and others.

Habitats have different characteristics to support the life within them.

Habitats

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Express Yourself 2 Our ideas, knowledge and feelings can be expressed in many different ways.

Express Yourself 1 There are many ways we can express ourselves.

I am an individual and I am part of many communities.

Me, Myself and I

Who we are is expressed in our identity.

ELC 4

People move from place to place as part of life.

Going Places

ELC 4

We can explore the many changes in our world.

Let’s Explore Change

Recycling and re-use of materials contributes to sustainable living.

Lost and Found

Plants are a life sustaining resource.

How Does Your Garden Grow?

Living together peacefully requires effective ways of solving conflict.

Peace Begins With Me

Living together peacefully requires effective ways of solving conflict.

Peace Begins With Me

PREP

The natural world offers opportunities to discover and investigate living things, the world around us and ourselves.

Just Investigate

The decisions we make impact others around us.

Learning Together

their communities to function effectively.

People can help organise

Systems

People can help organise their communities to function effectively.

Systems

YEAR 1

Me and the Community

The scientific world offers opportunities to discover and investigate how things work.

It is through the telling and sharing of stories that people people make sense of their world and their place within it.

Technology has affected our lives over time.

The food we eat reflects where we come from and our families’ ideas about nutrition.

Making Connections

Communication

Change

Food & Family

Habitats have different characteristics to support the life within them.

Habitats

Stories carry messages and reflect the imagination of the author.

It is through the telling and sharing of stories that people people make sense of their world and their place within it.

Technology has affected our lives over time.

Story Telling

Communication

Change

The food we eat reflects where we come from and our families’ ideas about nutrition.

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Food & Family



ELC 3

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LANGUAGE Language is our major means of thinking and communicating and is fundamental to learning, underpinning and permeating the whole curriculum. The development of fundamental skills in literacy means not only learning language, but also learning about language and through language. We nurture an appreciation of the richness of language, including a love of literature. While the three communication strands of – listening and speaking; reading and writing; viewing and presenting – can be observed separately, they are interrelated and interactive, with learning in one element supporting learning in another. Specific attention to the conventions of language such as grammatical structures and spelling is embedded in the programme. The emphasis within specific Units of Inquiry in language focuses on the four practices of a literate person as developed by Luke and Freebody (1999). These four areas consider the development of literacy skills through a balanced range of language learning and participation. They are: Code Breakers (How do I crack this code?), Text Participant (What does this mean to me?), Text User (What do I do with this text?) and Text Analyst (What does this text do to me?) EARLY LEARNING CENTRE (ELC) Children are immersed in literature through conversations, play and stories, games, activities, role play and more. The ability to process and understand language is encouraged as children engage in meaningful learning experiences. The joy of reading and storytelling is celebrated each day. Unpressured play experiences which foster pre-literacy skills build confidence for future learning. Opportunities for early reading and writing skills are included in our programmes. The emphasis on speaking and listening features strongly in the ELC. Children participate in small and large group experiences involving discussions that are documented. Teachers encourage children to reflect on their conversations and to actively expand ideas and rework central concepts and ideas in the process of understanding them. Teachers document children’s ideas as they dictate stories and describe their creative work. The concept of drafting and revisiting texts is modelled by teachers. Children are encouraged to explore manipulative skills and pre-writing experiences to build fine motor strength which is necessary to begin the formal stages of writing letters, names and small words. The ELC environment is rich in examples of print and writing. Children begin to recognise symbols, pictures, numbers, letters and small words as they engage in pre-reading experiences. They listen to stories, poetry, sing songs, read books and create stories as a part of the everyday programme. Opportunities to practise listening skills and play auditory games are also provided. OVERVIEW (PREP, YEAR 1 AND 2) Children in the early years of Primary School are carefully assessed, taught and monitored as they develop the foundations of their fundamental Language skills. These sessions build early language concepts and skills that are used in all learning.

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These skills are monitored individually using widely accepted assessment strategies tailored to these vital stages of development such as observation surveys, running records and the assessment of language building and decoding skills through sight recognition and writing of high frequency words. Children progress at their own rate and are supported by teaching that highlights concepts as well as modelling skills and strategies. This support changes over time as children begin to apply these skills independently. Carefully designed classroom programmes, together with the provision of Reading Recovery for some children, ensure that all children have a strong base of language learning ability by the end of Year 2. READING RECOVERY Reading Recovery is an early intervention programme for selected children who have not developed effective and efficient processes for reading and writing. Reading Recovery teachers work with individual students, building on their strengths and developing the skills and strategies to read and write independently. Reading Recovery students attend daily sessions of thirty-minutes for 12-20 weeks. This intense instruction accelerates children’s learning and develops their confidence. The classroom teachers and the Reading Recovery teachers work collaboratively to ensure success in all programmes. Prep The emphasis in Prep is on building a love of language and developing specific skills. Authentic contexts for reading and writing are provided with meaningful reasons to engage in decoding and creating written text. A wide variety of texts are explored throughout the programme in group and individual reading situations. Texts explored are: narrative, poetry, scientific, factual reports and recounts. Children develop conceptual understandings of language and particularly the role of print through role-modelling and practise, they engage in a range of strategies and cues when learning to read. Take-home books at an appropriate level are borrowed each day. Phonemic awareness activities support students to develop understanding of letter names, sounds and blends. Children develop their recognition of words for reading and writing and develop the skills to attack unfamiliar words. Teachers’ model writing and students write simple sentences, stories and reports. Handwriting formation and correct grip are encouraged and practised using the Victorian Modern Cursive Script. Speaking and listening skills are developed through formal and informal discussions and conversations which are central to the Units of Inquiry and shared learning of the group. These discussions are documented to show the process of learning and track the changing thinking of the group. Children are given many opportunities to speak to a group and develop their verbal presentation skills.

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Language teaching and learning occurs through the integration of language skills through the Units of Inquiry and through explicit teaching sessions. The weekly timetable provides for flexible extended periods to allow for immersion and focussed teaching of language skills.

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Year 1 In Year 1 children continue to develop their reading strategies and comprehension of many texts through the four practices of a literate person. Teachers model reading strategies and support small group and individual practice of reading. Take-home books are borrowed each day. Children read and write a wide variety of genre and text types. They develop skills to plan, draft, conference and publish their writing. Spelling, punctuation and grammar are taught and children explore common visual and sound patterns in words. Dictionary skills are developed. Students are encouraged to think their way through spelling using a variety of resources and experiences. Increased emphasis is placed on decoding and recognising sight words and visual patterns in spelling. Handwriting is practised and developed using Victorian Modern Cursive Script. Speaking and listening skills are developed through whole class and small group discussions. Children further develop their viewing and presenting skills as well as speaking in front of an audience. Year 2 In Year 2 children continue to develop their reading and comprehension of many different text types. They investigate the structure of texts in order to develop their literal and inferential comprehension. The Units of Inquiry help to drive a range of reading and writing skills. Wide reading for pleasure and information is encouraged. Children develop comprehension strategies and learn skills to self-correct reading errors. A wide range of books provide interesting and varied material for children to take home. Children plan, draft, conference, edit and publish in a variety of writing styles. Punctuation, spelling and grammar are taught within the context of writing. Students continue to refine their Victorian Modern Cursive Script and handwriting is practised as part of the publishing process. A range of resources are used to develop and consolidate spelling strategies. Opportunities for viewing and presenting, speaking and listening and developing reporting skills are provided throughout the language programme. Year 3 In Year 3 students build on the reading and writing strategies learnt in previous years. The emphasis on decoding unfamiliar text using strategies such as phonics and visual patterns in spelling is continued. Spelling generalisations, prefixes and suffixes are introduced. A range of appropriate resources are used which encourage students to think their way through spelling. In Year 3 students are becoming more independent readers. A variety of texts are explored and students are encouraged to read widely for pleasure. They are provided with many opportunities to develop their research skills including summarising texts into their own words. The students continue to develop their fluency and letter formation, progressing towards joined cursive handwriting using Victorian Modern Cursive Script. Students plan, review and edit their own writing and that of other students, identifying basic punctuation, grammar and spelling errors. Viewing and presenting as well as speaking and listening skills continue to be developed.

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In Year 4 spelling skills and strategies are consolidated, revised and extended through the language programme. Students and teachers continue to use a variety of appropriate resources to consolidate and further develop understandings of the grammatical constructs of language. Emphasis is placed upon the acquisition and synthesis of different spelling strategies. Students are introduced to new text types and work with increasing independence and fluency on those learned in previous years. The language programme provides opportunities to explore and create texts for a variety of purposes and audiences. Students are able to identify symbolic meaning and stereotypes in texts. They are developing their independent reading skills and are becoming writers who are able to research topics using a range of research skills. Editing skills continue to develop where students proofread and assess their own work and that of their peers. (Joined cursive handwriting is developed using the Victorian Modern Cursive Script). Children have opportunities to use and extend their viewing and presenting skills as well as their speaking and listening skills throughout the classroom programme and within Units of Inquiry Year 5 In Year 5 more complex texts, both fiction and non-fiction, are introduced and students analyse and explore events, characters and information in them. They are expected to justify their own ideas in discussion. Research skills are developed using a variety of resources from books to the Internet. Students are expected to develop an idea, describe events and present information when writing. A variety of genres and forms are developed using both handwriting and word processing when publishing work. Grammar, punctuation and sentence structure are examined and students are expected to proof read their work. Editing skills are a focus. Spelling strategies are revised and skills such as the use of base words, contractions, homophones and spelling generalisations for plurals are revised. Independent viewing and presenting skills are fundamental to the learning experience. Speaking and listening skills are also an integral part of the programme. Year 6 In Year 6 wide reading is encouraged and students reflect on their own reading and viewing strategies. Comprehension is a major focus. Students respond to unfamiliar concepts and topics in texts and give reasons for their interpretations of a text. Students are encouraged to expand their vocabulary through use of the dictionary and thesaurus. Grammar, punctuation, sentence and paragraph structure are a focus of the programme. Spelling strategies are further revised and extended to meet the needs of individual students. Writing strategies are practised, refined and extended to encompass a thorough understanding of the writing process from planning through to reviewing and final editing. Writing skills include using both fiction and non-fiction for a variety of purposes and audiences and in a variety of genres and forms. Word processing skills, technological literacy, viewing and presenting are all vital components of the programme in Year 6. They continue to be developed through the use of relevant programmes and ICT resources. Speaking and listening skills are integrated

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Year 4

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into the programme and students are encouraged to develop these skills for a range of audiences and purposes.

MATHEMATICS Mathematics is an integral part of daily life and consequently all students endeavour to master basic skills, understand relevant concepts and develop the ability to transfer these into practical situations at home, school and throughout their lives. We want students to become fluent users of the languages of mathematics and look on mathematics as a way of thinking, analysing and solving problems. Mathematical understanding of number, measurement, data handling, space and shape, pattern and function are developed through exploration and activities that are concrete and realistic. Development of abstract thinking and logic is introduced as students’ progress through the school. Early Learning Centre (ELC) Numeracy learning is an interactive and enjoyable experience in the ELC. Children engage in mathematical processes through play. We encourage children to solve problems, estimate, reason, count, analyse, order, categorise, hypothesize and predict in their everyday activities. This learning is play-based, hands-on and is an integral part of the programme. It builds on familiarity of the mathematical domains; space, measurement, number, pattern and data. Children have opportunities to explore numeracy through play, games, song, stories, rhymes, hypothesizing, estimating and experimenting. Overview (Prep, Year 1 and 2) Children in the early years participate in individual Numeracy assessments with their teacher throughout the year. This enables teachers to observe and document skills, strategies and methods of reasoning that children use to count, calculate, estimate and solve problems. Children progress at their own rate supported by the classroom programme which extends their development of strategies and skills. Ongoing observation and assessment ensure that children have a strong base of mathematical skills by the end of Year 2. Prep In Prep children learn to recognise numbers to 100 and write numbers to 30. Some children require extension or support depending on their abilities. Problem solving and the investigation of pattern is an important part of the programme with students sorting and ordering objects to copy, continue and create patterns. The use of a calculator is introduced. Addition, subtraction, ‘groups of’ and ‘share between’ are examined through concrete materials and formalised with simple algorithms. Awareness of length, mass, capacity and time is developed. Children learn to represent data pictorially. Shape, symmetry and direction are explored.

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In Year 1 children learn to recognise and write numbers to 100 and extend their knowledge of number facts. Some students need extension or support depending on their abilities. They explore place value to a minimum of 2 digits (ones, tens), and are introduced to the language and concept of fractions through concrete materials (parts of). Children make, create and explore the concept of pattern through exploration and manipulation of concrete materials. Measurement concepts of length, area, mass, capacity, shape and time are extended through concrete experiences. The language, skills and integrated use of mathematical concepts for problem solving are explored and children are encouraged to estimate mathematical solutions. The calculator is explored further as a mathematical tool and the operations of addition and subtraction are explored through concrete activities. Pictorial representation of data is further extended. Year 2 In Year 2 children continue to work on number facts and place value. An understanding of pattern is an important part of the programme. Children look for patterns in counting and ordering numbers. They learn to count by groups (twos, fives, and tens). Basic operations of multiplication, addition, subtraction, division and the concept of sharing are consolidated. Data is collected and represented pictorially. Concepts of shape, size, length, mass, capacity and time are studied. Counting strategies are developed to enable students to solve mental equations quickly and in a variety of ways. Year 3 In Year 3 number sense is further developed concentrating on the basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. Students learn to recognise and extend a variety of patterns including times tables. They consolidate their use and understanding of basic place value up to thousands. Simple fractions are explored. An understanding of estimations and rounding off is further developed and the students undertake problem solving activities. Measurement is explored using formal and informal units of measure when studying length, area, mass, volume and temperature. Time is studied through both digital and analogue clocks, calendars and timetables. Students also develop their understanding of Two Dimensional and Three Dimensional shapes and objects and look for their use in the local environment. The concepts of symmetry, congruence and curved and straight lines are explored. Students learn to read and follow simple maps and directions. Tables and graphs are used to represent data that the students have collected. Year 4 In Year 4 students engage in a variety of mathematical experiences appropriate to the needs of each individual. Students continue to explore the basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. These numerical functions together with multiplication table facts are a focus throughout the year. Speed and accuracy of number facts is built upon and the function of brackets is introduced. Number sense is consolidated and enhanced with a focus on developing fluency in rounding, estimation and problem

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Year 1

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solving. Students participate in activities that develop their mental and written skills to work with number, measurement, space and chance and data. Year 5 In Year 5 students extend their knowledge of number skills and tables and develop an understanding of place value for whole numbers and decimals. They apply the basic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division to whole numbers, fractions and decimals. They make and generalise number patterns and extend their estimating skills. Measurement covers the choice of appropriate units, measuring and comparing length, capacity, volume, mass, area, time, temperature and angles. Students study location via grids and networks and the symmetry of objects is considered. The concept of chance and random samples are discussed and students represent, report and interpret data. Students analyse Two Dimensional and Three Dimensional objects. Year 6 In Year 6 number skills and tables are consolidated. Place value is extended to a range covering thousandths to millions and equivalence of fractions, decimals, percentages and ratios are studied. Rounding-off and estimation skills are considered in relation to number and measurement. The concepts of volume and scale are introduced and students revise the measurement of length, area, capacity, volume, mass, temperature, time and angles. Students study space by considering plane figures, nets and scales. Chance and data is extended to random samples and data is represented and analysed so that conclusions can be drawn. Students represent, report and interpret data using spread sheets and data bases using computers.

LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH (LOTE) – JAPANESE At the Toorak Campus students study Japanese from Prep to Year 6. This is a fundamental part of our curriculum and forms part of the overall language learning programme. Units of inquiry that lend themselves to a Japanese perspective are taught at relevant year levels throughout the school. The Japanese curriculum is constructed with two main intentions; to develop a love of a second language though understanding and developing skills to decode and interpret the language, and to build cultural understandings associated with the study of Japan’s culture and lifestyle. Prep The Prep programme emphasises aural and oral communication as well as cultural understanding. Listening and speaking are central to learning, with children imitating Japanese language. They play with sounds, repeat single words and simple phrases related to pictures, objects, actions, singing songs, miming, and respond to language in context. Topics are often integrated with current classroom units. Children respond to simple greetings, classroom instructions, numbers, colours and body parts. Fine motor skills are developed through Japanese Origami folding and tracing Japanese writing symbols

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Year 1 The Year 1 programme builds upon previous learning and broadens children’s speaking and listening skills, extending understanding of language and culture. Children are introduced to language with repetitive patterns, and develop strategies for memorisation and comprehension. As much as possible, children are immersed in hearing the language with clear meaning of the words by singing, viewing videos, role-playing and various activities. Children develop new understandings of traditional and modern images of Japanese people and places through the topics of Japanese folk stories, family and Japanese children’s play. Year 2 The Year 2 programme continues to focus on speaking and listening skills. Writing and reading skills are gradually taught throughout the year. Through topics of classroom instructions; farm animals, months and seasons and what I like; children start to communicate with their friends by expressing their food likes and dislikes, rehearsed language patterns and revisiting common phrases. Children learn about seasons and months and investigate the concept of northern hemisphere seasons and identify geographic features of Japan. Students also cook Japanese children’s favourite dishes in class. They notice and discuss the three different writing systems, and practise copying selected letters. Year 3 Year 3 students have developed cultural understandings and are building confidence with their oral and aural skills. Students recognise more Japanese writing by tracing and copying simple words to label pictures. They recognise Kanji characters associated with specific items and can recognise the associated sounds and meanings of Kanji. They learn about the weather through role-play experiences such as being a weather forecaster. Students also participate in Japanese cooking; preparing a popular Japanese dinner dish. Year 4 Year 4 students consolidate previously learnt language and extend their personal vocabulary and knowledge of language structures. They are given opportunities to observe differences in the way the language sounds when used by different speakers, or in different contexts. They also identify features of communication and cultural differences in dress, eating, greeting routines, ways of being polite and cultural practices. Year 5 The Year 5 Programme enables students to increase their confidence and ability to comprehend and respond to questions and instructions, expanding their knowledge of vocabulary. Students recognise many Hiragana symbols and begin writing them. Students generate simple original sentences by introducing themselves and simple daily interactions. TOORAK CAMPUS HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

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and numbers. Through various cultural activities, children understand differences and similarities between Japanese culture and that of other countries, especially Australia.

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They also recognise the similarities and differences between languages in sentence structures. Laptops are incorporated into the Japanese programme to enhance reading and writing skills. Year 6 The Year 6 Programme is designed to reinforce previous learning by reading all appropriate Hiragana symbols. The focus in Semester 1 is on reading and writing Hiragana through various Japanese cultural activities. In Semester 2, the programme aims to develop understanding of the similarities and differences between Japanese and Australian cultures. Students investigate and summarise their knowledge of Japan and the Japanese culture in this final year of Primary Japanese study. Students have the (optional) opportunity to apply their knowledge and ability in Japanese through the Year 6 school trip to Japan. Through the study of a trip to Japan they learn more about culture and lifestyle through collecting information about foods, houses, schools, technology, religions in Japanese society. Students practise common phrases for using at airports, shops, restaurants, schools and at host families’ houses in various role plays. They start to recognise and name some individual Japanese writing symbols of Hiragana.

LIBRARY AND RESOURCE CENTRE Children develop information skills, strategies and language appreciation that will assist them to become informed decision makers and lifelong learners. Therefore the library programme is a central component of the School’s learning programme. The Toorak Campus Library and Resource Collection is located in the Sir Robert Southey Centre. The Resource Centre comprises: - Picture-fiction and fiction book collections - Curriculum based non-fiction and reference materials - Rooms for the teaching of literature and information research - Multi-Media Centre - Facilities for information retrieval The Library and Resource Centre provides a warm, welcoming, user-friendly environment and fosters the love and use of literature for a variety of purposes. In a commitment to provide best learning for our children, the teacher-librarian and the classroom teachers, from the Early Learning Centre (ELC) to Year 6, co-operatively plan, teach and evaluate a variety of programmes. The library environment creates suitable conditions and resources for research and reading, supporting the ongoing implementation of the Primary Years Programme (PYP). Children are involved in many special reading programmes. These include; author, illustrator, genre studies, ‘Browse and Borrow’ sessions and Literature Circles. Literature Circles for Years 1-6 advocates a student-centred approach to learning and is committed to catering

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The Library and Resource Centre enhances learning throughout the year by providing children with access to visiting writers, illustrators and performers from the world of literature. It provides resources that enrich and support the curriculum and personal interests, abilities and learning styles. The Library and Resource Centre promotes the development of information literate students and has a bank of computers for information retrieval. The library catalogue system OPAC (Online Public Access Catalogue) is accessed through the web. Children are encouraged to search for and use information in a meaningful and purposeful way to assist learning. The library is a busy place, children visit before and after school and at lunchtime, to read, borrow books, relax, play games, watch films and participate in activities. The Multi-Media Centre is situated in the Resource Centre and provides children with opportunities to develop their research and information technology skills. Children from Prep to Year 6 are provided with a consistent framework and support throughout their research projects. They develop the skills necessary to locate, evaluate, organise and present information from a variety of sources. The aim is for children to be independent and effective users of ideas and information throughout their lives.

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY All Science and Technology learning at the Toorak Campus is linked to and embedded in PYP Units of Inquiry. Through this process, science education helps students to make informed decisions about their lifestyle, their environment and the kind of society in which they wish to live. They begin to see how science affects people, and how science and technology has impacted on past, current and future development. Learning about science and relevant scientific methods of investigation encourages students to develop curiosity and a spirit of inquiry that helps them to be open-minded and value objectivity. Students are encouraged to adopt critical perspectives, to recognize the limitations of science and to respect and share responsibility for the local and global environment in which we live. At the Toorak Campus, children learn about Science and Technology in their classroom and in our Science Laboratory. The children engage as active young scientists. The Laboratory provides an important environment where children can explore, discover, observe, test and experiment with their ideas in Science. The specialised equipment and resources help provide an exciting and relevant learning environment. Learning in the Science Laboratory is facilitated by the classroom teachers and supported by the assistance of a Science Technician. Science is integrated in various units of the Primary Years Programme (PYP). For example: - Prep to Year 2 children focus on describing, scientific exploration, using language about the chemical, physical and natural world and identifying patterns in observations of phenomena.

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for individual differences.

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- Years 3 to 6 students explore key concepts in the strands of Biological, Chemical, Physical and Earth and Space Sciences are developed through Units of Inquiry that develop science knowledge and understanding. The students work as young scientists in investigations and experiments to further develop their understanding of scientific processes.

E-LEARNING Our technology rich world now demands that we are able to adapt, collaborate and work using a variety of Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Students at the Toorak Campus learn about technology as well as learn through technology. Flexibility and adaptability are critical to the School’s philosophy and approach to eLearning and educational technology tools. Wikis, blogs, collaborative online tools and educational apps are some of the new teaching strategies that teachers use in our classrooms of the 21st Century. Our approach to eLearning is not just to skill students in electronic resources but to also give them the opportunity to develop life-long skills of substantive decision-making, collaboration, and creative and critical thinking. Students have access to our Multi-Media Centre, PC computers, digital cameras, scanners, data projectors, iPads, video cameras and Promethean Interactive Whiteboards. In collaboration with Library research skills, retrieval, analysis and synthesis of information skills are promoted. All individuals using and accessing Information and Communication Technology (ICT) at the Toorak Campus are expected to adhere to the usage agreements outlined by the School. A copy of this agreement is available to each family of the School. Early Learning Centre (ELC) Children in the ELC develop familiarity with the tools of eLearning, such as digital cameras, scanners and computers. They practise manipulating the mouse to operate age-appropriate programmes. Teachers and children use the digital camera, scanner and ICT equipment to develop their ideas and record their projects and learning. They become familiar with hardware and software, as they use the tools of ICT to research and document their ideas and learn together. Prep, Years 1 and 2 Throughout these years, children learn skills that will enable them to use the tools of eLearning more effectively. Children learn strategies to manipulate text and images to create, change and record information for specific purposes and audiences. They learn to retrieve and save files, compose and send simple electronic messages, locate and retrieve relevant information from a variety of sources. They are able to try things out and explore what happens in real and imaginary situations. Years 3 and 4 The focus of eLearning in Years 3 and 4 is on skill acquisition using a wide variety of media and tools. Touch- typing, word-processing and desktop publishing are skills that are explicitly taught at this level. Students also learn to access and use multi-media and spread

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Years 5 and 6 Students in Years 5 and 6 use a wide variety of media and tools, including laptop computers, to aid and enrich their learning. They learn to file and sort information and work more efficiently by using the computer. Keyboarding, word-processing, PowerPoint presentations and websites are integrated with learning experiences. The internet is used as a research tool to download data associated with classroom curriculum. Students safely and independently use a range of eLearning skills, equipment and software to produce accurate and suitable formatted products to suit different purposes and audiences. Students will email, use websites, and access frequently asked question facilities to acquire and share information with peers and known experts. COMPUTERS All classrooms, from ELC to Year 4, are provided with desktop computers and printers. Software, suitable to the age group is loaded onto the computers. In addition a bank of desktop computers, a scanner, printer, CD ROM stacker, digital camera and video editing equipment is available for the use of all classes in the Multi-Media Centre located on the first floor of the Southey Centre. Students from Year 5 and 6 are required to lease or purchase a laptop computer for use at school. GGS organises this through Computelec. These computers are loaded with software for which the School has a site licence. Students must not load any other software on their laptops without first gaining permission to do so from their class teacher. Stickers must not be attached to computers. The security of laptop computers is the responsibility of the student. Students and their parents will therefore be asked to sign a contract in regard to the responsible use of their laptops. This is to avoid such situations as the accessing of inappropriate materials or of cost bearing material from the internet. The School takes matters of inappropriate use of computers very seriously.

VISUAL ART The Visual Art Programme at the Toorak Campus encompasses Arts practice, incorporating an appreciation of the Arts and responding to the Arts using appropriate terminology. Children develop knowledge and skills in a broad range of art forms including: drawing, painting, printmaking, ceramics, three-dimensional construction, digital art and textiles. The Art curriculum is integrated with the PYP classroom Units of Inquiry. Students learn to analyse their own works and appreciate other artists from past and present contexts.

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sheet software. Students create and edit their own text and graphics, and work with a variety of programmes to extend their learning. Students explore a range of software from Microsoft Office, including PowerPoint, Publisher and Word. Interactive and collaborative online learning tools are used to support language and mathematics learning in the classroom.

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Throughout the programme, consideration is given to Aboriginal Art as a lens through which Aboriginal culture and history can be explored. Selected two dimensional and three dimensional artworks of all students are displayed in the Biennial Art Exhibition. Students have the opportunity to participate in art and technology clubs, class and community projects, murals, art excursions and incursions, artist-in-residence programmes and displays of PYP Unit of Inquiry celebrations. Early Learning Centre (ELC) Art is a valued component of the ELC programme. Creative studio areas are provided in each classroom. Children design, explore, create, manipulate, build, experiment, construct and translate their ideas through creative media which provide useful and necessary vehicles for self-expression. Art works are celebrated and exhibited in a meaningful way in the ELC. Each child collates a portfolio which is taken home at the end of their ELC year. Prep Children draw upon their own observations, feelings and imagination to create twodimensional and three-dimensional artworks using a variety of media. They experiment with line, texture, colour, pattern and shape. Students explore techniques and processes to develop their visual artworks. They also learn to manipulate a variety of media and tools. Children enjoy viewing and discussing their own and others’ artworks and study art forms in order to identify differences and similarities between them. At this level children explore colour mixing, experiment with imaginary and observational drawing, painting, relief printing, ceramics, and textile techniques such as felting, sewing and weaving. Years 1 and 2 Children draw upon their experiences and imagination to create two-dimensional works about their feelings, ideas and observations. They explore, select and use art elements such as line, shape, colour, texture, form and tone in expressive ways. Children explore art principles such as pattern, contrast, repetition and symmetry. They experiment and learn to manipulate materials and tools used in a range of art forms such as ceramics, collage, drawing, painting, mono printing, three-dimensional construction, puppet making and textile techniques such as felting, sewing and weaving. Children are introduced to a range of art forms and they identify similarities, differences, emotions and meaning. They also describe the use of visual art elements when discussing their own and others’ works. Years 3 and 4 During Years 3 and 4 students further develop their artistic skills and experience art forms including drawing, watercolour and acrylic painting, printmaking, ceramics, sculpture, collage, mixed media, textiles and digital animation. Students continue to explore the art elements and also learn to understand a range of art principles such as contrast, scale, repetition, symmetry and balance. They experiment with art concepts such as movement, proportion and basic perspective. 45

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Years 5 and 6 Students develop and apply their skills and knowledge to visually communicate their feelings and their understanding of themselves and other people. They explore and use a variety of sources for inspiration and ideas in a broad range of art forms, drawing upon experiences, direct observation and imagination. Students make two-dimensional and three-dimensional artworks combining and manipulating art elements, such as drawing, printmaking, three-dimensional constructions, ceramics, textiles and digital art. They are introduced to art works in both contemporary and historical contexts through class discussions and excursions to galleries. Students begin to analyse, reflect upon and evaluate their own art and the artwork of others. In conjunction with Drama and the Unit of Inquiry, the Year 6 students design and construct an imaginative mixed media mask for the annual Year 6 Mask Performance. They explore art concepts such as movement, perspective and proportion and experiment with collage techniques and three-dimensional construction. During Year 6 the students complete an art project individually selecting a theme and art medium to develop a series of artworks.

DRAMA The Drama Programme develops children’s artistic and creative abilities through dramatic interpretation of real-life, fantasy and fictitious experiences. Relationships, negotiation and co-operation are all necessary parts of Drama lessons and performances. Children participate in a range of games and activities that develop the skills of negotiation and cooperation. Children’s Drama skills carry over to other areas of the curriculum as their confidence, motivation, social interaction and self-awareness develop through Drama games and performance opportunities. All the Toorak Campus children take part in one of our regular productions: ELC Celebration, Prep-Year 2 Production, Years 3-6 Production and Year 6 Mask Performance. Early Learning Centre (ELC) Dramatic play, dance and movement are important aspects of the ELC programme. Children are encouraged to explore different modes of expression, including dress up, role play, dancing, movement and dramatic games. Prep Children participate in a range of activities using familiar situations and experiences. Co-operation and decision making are encouraged through imaginary play, movement

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When students observe and discuss art works they use art terminology to name and describe key features such as subject matter, art elements, symbols and meaning.

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experiences, role-play and mime. Children observe the work of their peers and begin to critically analyse the work. Children are encouraged to share their ideas and observations and through discussion, identify and discuss Drama in their lives and as part of the community. Integration with the Units of Inquiry studied in the classroom allows the children to make connections between the real world and Drama. Year 1 Children participate in a range of activities using familiar situations and experiences. Roleplay, mime, movement, voice and gesture are all used in dramatic situations. Children are encouraged to share their work with their peers and begin to make constructive comments about their own work and the work of their peers. Children explore and identify forms of Drama they have seen and discuss specific aspects such as character and setting. Integration with the Units of Inquiry studied in the classroom allows the children to make connections and to learn by doing. Year 2 Children at this level participate in dramatic actions based on real and imagined characters and situations. Children contribute ideas and participate in decision-making when working as part of a group. They use role-play, voice, mime, gesture, movement and improvisation in all drama work. They work with others when preparing and presenting work and can observe or comment on the work of their peers. Integration with Units of Inquiry studied in the classroom provides opportunities to develop their understandings through role-play. Year 3 Students participate in a range of dramatic activities that draw on an understanding of fantasy and reality, as well as exploring ideas, feelings and issues. The students continue to experiment with the use of voice, movement, gesture, improvisation and role-play as well as play- building to develop characters and situations. Students are encouraged to work co-operatively in group activities and to make constructive suggestions about the work of their peers. In performance, students share opinions and interpretations of dramatic pieces. Recognition of cultures using different forms of drama is also explored and reflected upon. Students also begin to develop and use appropriate terminology to describe and compare drama from different cultures. Integration with the Units of Inquiry studied in the classroom provides opportunities to develop concepts through performance. Year 4 Students continue to participate in a range of dramatic activities that draw on an understanding of fantasy and reality, as well as exploring and developing feelings and issues. Vocal development, movement, gesture, play building, role-play and improvisation are all used in dramatic activities and are used to develop characters and situations. Students are expected to work co-operatively as part of a group and are continually assessing their own work and the work of their peers using appropriate drama terminology. They continue to recognise a variety of cultures using different forms of drama. Integration with the Units of

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Year 5 Using a variety of Drama skills such as, mime, improvisation, role-play, play-building, movement and the use of the voice, students are able to investigate situations, feelings and attitudes. Students use a variety of themes to develop these skills and use performance as a medium to showcase their skill development. They are involved in discussions about drama they have seen, and use terminology appropriately. Students are able to assess their own work as well as the work of their peers and this allows them to develop critical thinking skills. Integration with the Units of Inquiry that take place in the classroom allows the students to make realistic connections between life-skills and drama. Year 6 Students continue to use the drama skills they have acquired to enhance all of their dramatic work. Students are involved in a ‘Masked Performance’. This is an integrated unit of work, incorporating Art, Language and Drama. They create a mask and develop the performance skills necessary. Students continue to develop their improvisation and play building skills using a variety of themes. They critique their own work and the work of their peers and are able to use drama terminology confidently. Integration with the Units of Inquiry that take place in the classroom, allows the students to make learning connections and transfer their learning.

MUSIC Music is a language of the emotions and a unique symbol system. It develops people’s spiritual, social and cultural dimensions, musical skills, co-ordination and fine motor skills. The development of both the practical and creative areas of the brain is fundamental to music making. The benefit of this is seen not just in a person’s musical endeavours but in a host of other areas. Consequently, musical studies contribute to the development of the whole person and of personal wellbeing. Early Learning Centre (ELC) Music is an important component of the weekly programme. Experiences are planned to encourage children to create, listen, compose, sing, dance and share music. In addition to these experiences, the children attend specialist Music sessions every week which incorporate the Zoltan Kodály Method. Children learn through movement and dance, singing, listening, creating and playing percussion instruments in order to develop initial rhythmic, aural and vocal skills. Prep and Year 1 The Music Programme continues to follow the teachings of Zoltan Kodály and also integrates with aspects of the Classroom Programme. Students are encouraged to TOORAK CAMPUS HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

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Inquiry that takes place in the classroom allows the students to make realistic connections between life skills and drama.

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express themselves through creating, singing, playing and movement. Specific skills are nurtured including vocal development, aural development, internalising rhythm and finally, reading and writing skills. Children are exposed to many different types of music and the instruments of the orchestra. Children have the opportunity to perform at assemblies and Informal Concerts. Year 2 The Music Programme continues to follow the teachings of Zoltan Kodály and also integrates with aspects of the Classroom Programme. Children learn through creating, listening, movement, singing, playing and are increasingly given the opportunity to perform. They build on their knowledge of the rhythmic, melodic and harmonic elements of Music and can display these through singing, clapping, playing and reading and writing. Children are exposed to a variety of styles of music and are encouraged to express themselves creatively. Their knowledge of the instruments of the orchestra is expanded, particularly through the Year 2 String Programme. Year 3 With the development of music skills, children are now extended through the Class Instrumental Programme which features a semester of brass instruments, string ensemble and tuned percussion. They explore ideas and feelings through creating and making music. Children use several aspects of sound and develop specific skills, techniques and processes in creating and making Music through the Orff and Kodály approaches. They prepare and present musical works, respond to key features and discuss music from several cultures. Year 4 Year 4 Music consolidates previous music experience and knowledge through composing, improvising and analysis of music. Students participate in a variety of tuned and un-tuned class ensembles and activities that extend their experience and appreciation of Music. Students undertake studies in either clarinet or flute in the Year 4 Class Instrumental Programme. Years 5 and 6 Students develop further musicianship skills and ideas through the Orff and Kodály approaches. Students explore musical styles from a range of cultures and the classes are linked closely to the PYP. Through the Year 5 Class Instrumental Programme, students undertake studies in saxophone. Students in Year 6 are encouraged to pursue private studies on an instrument learned in prior years of the Instrumental Programme. TECHNOLOGY IN MUSIC Computers and a variety of music software are used to enhance elements of composition and theory of music from Year 3 to Year 6. This fosters development at all levels and offers a child-centred approached to learning.

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INSTRUMENTAL TUITION PROGRAMME The School provides instruction in a variety of musical instruments. Specialist Instrumental Teachers take these lessons, which are an optional extra, usually for 30 minutes per week. All children who have instrumental lessons are expected to complement their programme by being a member of an instrumental group or choir. CHORAL ENSEMBLES Junior Choir: This is an extension activity for students in Years 1 and 2 who enjoy singing and who are ready for the challenge of singing in a choral group. Senior Choir: This non-auditioned choir is for all students in Years 3-6. Rehearsals are once a week. INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLES Stringlets: All beginner students learning violin and cello rehearse weekly. Super Strings: All intermediate violin/viola and cello students rehearse weekly. Senior Strings: All advanced string student rehearse weekly. Concert Band: All brass and woodwind students rehearse weekly. OTHER ENSEMBLES Each year, other ensembles are organised to suit the individual skills and interests of the student population (e.g. flute trio, brass ensemble, guitar ensemble). Guitar Ensemble: For invited players. Percussion Ensemble: For invited percussion students. Chamber Strings: For invited percussion students. CONCERT PROGRAMME The Toorak Campus has a regular programme of student concerts as well as visiting performers and workshops. Our regular informal Concerts provide a popular platform for beginners through to more advanced students. Details are published during the year. Enquiries and bookings (where appropriate) should be directed to the Head of Music. You are encouraged to attend any performance.

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CLASS INSTRUMENTAL PROGRAMME Students from Year 2 to Year 5 participate in weekly group instrumental lessons. Instruments include violin, viola, cello, recorder, flute, clarinet, and saxophone, tuned and un-tuned percussion.

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The Toorak Campus Performance Programme plays an essential role within the development of the Music Programme. All students are encouraged to perform both solo and ensemble music at: Assemblies: Prep-Year 2 and Years 3-6 assemblies are held most weeks. Class Performance: Students may perform to their class or any year level with whom they are comfortable. Children also perform to one another in private and group lessons. Informal Concerts: Informal Concerts are held twice each term at 3.45 pm. These are extremely popular with students and parents and offer an opportunity for students at all levels to perform. Annual Concert: The Annual Concert offers a performance experience in a professional context. Carol Service: Student ensembles provide the music on this occasion. IPSHA Biennial Music Festival: The Toorak Campus often participates in this festival. Productions: These form an integral part of the Music and Drama Programme enabling all students to participate in various productions throughout their time at the Toorak Campus. ELC Celebration: Students plan, design, rehearse and perform in the annual ELC celebration. This experience incorporates teacher supported event planning and making. All aspects of this event are planned and negotiated by the children and facilitated with the support of the ELC staff. Cross Campus Activities: May include CD recording, sharing concerts, sharing Church Services, sharing music workshops. Church Services: Are held twice a term and provide the opportunity for Ensembles and Choirs to perform on an on-going basis. Excursions/Incursions: Various opportunities are provided each year for all students to experience professional music performances from groups such as Musica Viva and the MSO. INDIVIDUAL MUSIC TUITION A great number of students at the Toorak Campus learn instruments or singing. In addition, students are involved in group tuition as part of the curriculum from ELC to Year 6. Every student has the opportunity to learn a musical instrument and advice can be sought from Music staff. We recommend that students focus on learning one instrument. These lessons take place during class time and are normally run on a rotational basis. If students want to learn more than one instrument, a lesson time out of school hours will be organised wherever possible. Parents are advised to discuss this matter with the Head of Music before making a final decision. 51

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AUSTRALIAN MUSIC EXAMINATION BOARD (AMEB) AND INTERNAL EXAMS Students are encouraged to consider entering for AMEB Practical exams on their instrument as well as Theory exams. Advice may be sought from the Head of Music or your student’s Instrumental Teacher.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORT In Physical Education, students work to increase their knowledge and skills, and to develop positive beliefs, attitudes and values about physical activity. Opportunities to learn and practise skills and behaviours that support healthy, active living are provided. Early Learning Centre (ELC) Children engage in a variety of activities that enhance their gross motor skills, body awareness and control of movement. They also learn about co-operation and participation. In addition to daily outdoor play and weekly Physical Education sessions the children in the 4 year- old programme participate in the Perceptual Motor Programme. In Term 4, all ELC children experience an athletics unit and sports day. FUNDAMENTAL MOTOR SKILLS PROGRAMME All children from Prep through to Year 6 take part in the Fundamental Motor Skills Programme. Fundamental Motor Skills include overhand throwing, catching, kicking, striking, bouncing, running, leaping and jumping. All children from Prep to Year 6 participate in skill sessions and activities on a weekly basis where students are taught specific skill components. The Skills and Activities used are supplied by the Australian Sports Commission “Sport It” manual. Mastery of these skills by children is necessary if optimum development of higher level skills is to occur. PREP TO YEAR 2 PERCEPTUAL MOTOR PROGRAMME All children participate in one thirty minute sessions of PMP per week. Using the Movement for Learning Programme, students develop their strength, hand/eye coordination, balance and whole body movement. The Programme benefits academic, social and emotional skills as students develop control, confidence and a positive self-image. Prep The children learn to move safely in their environment with and without equipment. They learn about and demonstrate understanding of directional concepts and develop basic

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A compulsory component of Individual Music Tuition is ensemble participation. This provides students with the opportunity to develop their musical skills through social interaction. Each Instrumental Teacher will inform parents when their child is ready to participate in an appropriate ensemble, sending home a letter with details pertaining to rehearsal times and venue as well as an explanation of ensemble expectations.

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hand/eye co-ordination skills through using simple equipment. Children also develop Fundamental Motor Skills through a variety of fun activities and games. Children continue to develop their understanding about co-operation, sharing equipment and the role of rules in games to maximise participation and enjoyment. Children have several Physical Education lessons each week and one thirty minute session of the Perceptual Motor Programme. The children are also involved in House activities such as tabloids, cross country and athletics. Year 1 Children are increasingly exposed to a number of creative play situations and games in order to perform and demonstrate their motor skills. They learn to link a series of basic movement patterns to perform a basic movement sequence. They continue to develop their co-operative ability to enhance their enjoyment of game and play situations. The Royal Lifesaving Swim and Survive Programme is introduced in Term 1. The children are also involved in House activities such as tabloids, cross country, athletics and a swimming carnival. Year 2 Children are given opportunity for further development of basic movements, control of speed, shape and movement sequences, including take-offs and weight support in the Gymnastics programme. Early ball handling skills continue to be developed and are gradually incorporated into simple games that require hand/eye or foot/eye co-ordination. The benefit of co-operation, sharing and adherence to simple rules continues to be a focus. The Royal Lifesaving Swim and Survive Programme remains a focus for Term 1. Year 2 students are also involved in House activities such as tabloids, cross country, athletics and swimming. Years 3 and 4 Children practice and demonstrate control in performing sequences of simple movement patterns and show an awareness of space and timing in Gymnastics. This awareness of space and timing, which allows controlled movement, is increasingly applied to motor skills using equipment in minor games and activities. The Royal Lifesaving Swim and Survive Programme continue to be a focus for Term 1. There remains an emphasis on co-operation and consideration of others in games and play as well as adherence to rules of games and situations. The following modified sports will prepare students for the Associated Public Sports Competition, in which all students compete in Years 5 and 6. The sports offered are Netta Ball, Volleystars, Flipper Ball, Soccer, Aussie Football, T-Ball, Kanga Cricket, Minkey Hockey, Ace Tennis, Mini Basketball and Table Tennis. Students in Years 3 and 4 participate in House athletics, cross country, tabloids and swimming.

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Students have opportunities to apply motor skills that demonstrate control of movement patterns in a consistent manner over a range of activities and situations. They begin to play major games in competitive and non-competitive situations, which allow them to practise the ball handling skills they have learnt over time and to continue their development. There is a greater emphasis on the learning of rules to minimise injury and maximise participation and enjoyment. Students continue to experience gymnastics, athletics, skills sessions, swimming, and water safety and survival skills. Year 5 students also participate in House athletics, cross country, tabloids and swimming. Year 6 Students apply motor skills in basic gymnastic movements, dance and are conditioned to major game situations. They perform the movements with more consistency and control but are still exposed to skills lessons to further develop their expertise, understanding and proficiency. Water safety and swimming remain a focus during Term 1. Year 6 students also participate in House athletics, cross country, tabloids and swimming. ASSOCIATED PUBLIC SCHOOLS (APS) INTERSCHOOL SPORTS COMPETITION In Years 5 and 6 all students compete in Associated Public Schools (APS) Interschool Sports Competition each Wednesday from 12.30pm until 3.15pm. The students also train for this competition one hour per week on Monday from 3.00pm until 4.00pm. The emphasis of this competition is to participate and have fun, as well as provide an introduction to competitive sport. Students may also have the opportunity to represent their school at a Zone, Regional, State and National Level in their chosen sport.

OUTDOOR EDUCATION The Toorak Campus sees the role of Outdoor Education as an important factor in the development of students’ emotional, physical and spiritual being. Through our programme students will have the opportunity to test themselves, their beliefs, understandings and attitudes whilst developing a regard for the environment. Through Outdoor Education, the children are given the chance to see themselves as an integral part of their environment. The programme has been developed to nurture the development of personal qualities and resiliency via classroom and practical experiences. We provide opportunities for immersion in high energy activities as well as the chance to reflect on the importance of our dynamic and fragile environment. Students are encouraged to seek solace from contemplative time before and after outdoor activities and to reflect on the changes brought about by their actions and the actions of others. The Outdoor Education Programme strives to develop students’ self-efficacy and selfworth, and to give them opportunities to succeed and the ability to co-operate in groups; exploring, discovering and grasping these understandings. Our students, through shared and individual experiences and reflection, can develop empathy and understanding for one another, their community and global environment. It is of utmost importance to present an TOORAK CAMPUS HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

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Year 5

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enjoyable, challenging and positive learning experience so that a positive attitude towards Outdoor Education can be fostered in all students. The Outdoor Education Programme provides a sequential approach to developing confidence and skills through a range of experiences. Early Learning Centre (ELC): Outdoor experiences are a daily component of the ELC programme. This is planned to provide engaging activities which support children’s progress through all areas of development. Children are encouraged to observe and engage in the outdoor environment participating in environmental and sustainability focused experiences. Prep: Excursion/s that relate to the Units of Inquiry that contain a Sustainability/ Environmental Focus Year 1: One day camp Year 2: Two day camp with an overnight stay in bunk-style accommodation. Year 3: Three day camp with two nights in bunk-style accommodation. Year 4: Three day camp with two nights in cabins. Year 5: Four day camp with three nights in cabins. Students focus on environmental issues and team building activities. Year 6: Five day camp with four nights in tents or cabins with a focus on camping and team skills.

POSITIVE EDUCATION Social, emotional and physical development is a significant aspect of children’s lives and consequently underpins many programmes and activities throughout the School. Students are involved in educational programmes such as Nutrition, Pedestrian and Road Safety, Sun Smart Behaviour, Sex Education, Drug Education, Protective Behaviours, Social Skills and Values Education. These programmes together with Health, studied through the PYP Units of Inquiry, build student development of knowledge, skills and attitudes. The Physical Education Programme teaches many aspects of Health, including attitudes and skills for fitness and self- image now and in the future. Students learn through many strategies including discussion, role-play, observation, games, guest speakers and teachers as role models. Students are involved in learning experiences that affect the way they think, feel and act in regard to their wellbeing and that of others. With the increasing recognition of the importance of living an active, healthy life and of the need to make informed, responsible decisions, learning in Health gives students the knowledge and practical skills to meet these needs and help develop a better quality life for all. Learning focuses on the development of the whole person, contributing to the individual’s emotional, mental, physical and social wellbeing. The development of social skills is encouraged at all year levels through the House programme, the PYP Units of Inquiry and as a part of Religious and Values Education. These skills are also taught as part of classroom pastoral care. Social skills are ways of behaving

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Learning through discussion, role-play, brainstorming and positive reinforcement builds student skills and strategies and positive self-esteem. Classroom teachers work closely together with families and all staff in the school to support students in developing effective social skills.

PASTORAL CARE AND LEADERSHIP Pastoral Care is centred in the hands of the classroom teacher who is the first contact point for students and families. Pastoral care is the shared responsibility of all classroom teachers, specialist teachers, Area Co-ordinators, the Deputy Head and Head of Campus, who work together to ensure that every student and family is cared for, supported and encouraged to benefit from every aspect of school life. Pastoral care is integral to the Student Leadership and House programmes at the School. At all year levels students are encouraged to strive to the best of their ability, to recognise their strengths, reflect on their abilities and set goals for themselves. Students become aware of their preferred ways of learning and develop an understanding of the different abilities of others. Leadership experiences start in the Early Learning Centre (ELC), when students are given opportunities and responsibilities within their group to assume roles of leadership. Daily routines as Prep Leaders include collecting the roll and lunch orders and welcoming parents to the classroom at the conclusion of the day. These roles build confidence in our Preps. Roles of leadership are extended and developed throughout the School. All year levels provide opportunities for students to develop leadership skills, independence and confidence in a wide range of activities. In preparation for Leadership, Year 5 students attend a significant Leadership Conference in November of the preceding year. The School Captains are elected at the conclusion of the preceding year. Leadership Roles give students the chance to develop skills in public speaking, organising meetings, setting up teams, engaging in mediation and co-ordinating sporting and musical events. All students in Year 6 are considered to be School Leaders and are encouraged to model appropriate behaviours for younger students.

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which help students get on with each other and establish friendships. They are related to all aspects of school behaviour in the classroom and at play and are essential for healthy and happy interactions with others. Students learn social skills for playing games, being positive, taking risks, co-operating and being confident. The formation and maintenance of effective personal relationships is the focus of our restorative approach to behaviour guidance. This work supports the school belief in Positive Psychology and promotes wellbeing as well as the importance of taking responsibility for one’s own actions. Restorative practices further support the development of core social and self-management skills.

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RELIGIOUS AND VALUES EDUCATION Geelong Grammar School is an Anglican school and is proud of its heritage and tradition. Religious and Values Education forms a fundamental part of learning and curriculum at the School, the aim of which is to foster and develop depth of thinking and engagement by young students in key areas of religion and values. The philosophy underlying Religious and Values Education is that it is regarded as an important area of learning which aims to foster open minded debate, critical thinking and the skills of philosophic inquiry. It does not seek to impose any single view of truth but rather to help students to engage with issues of critical importance to their lives at a deep level. The approach to Religious and Values Education that has been adopted is called “The Five Strands” approach. The curriculum includes (1) An appreciation of The Bible and Christian traditions, (2) Values education within a broad religious framework, (3) Philosophy of Religion, (4) World Religions, and (5) The value of stillness (affective and experiential education and reflection). All children in Prep to Year 6 also attend services at St. John’s Anglican Church in Toorak each term.

LEARNING SUPPORT PROGRAMME The Toorak Campus recognises the different learning styles of students and values individuality. We are committed to providing multiple provisions for all our children. Learning Support staff play a major role in whole school assessment, monitoring students’ progress and individual testing. Learning Support staff assist the class teachers in differentiating the curriculum. This work is carried out with individuals and also in small groups. We aim to enhance the learning of our children and ensure they reach their potential by providing a range of programmes based on needs. The Extension Programme provides specifically for students who are working at an advanced level within various areas of the curriculum. Teachers are supported in the development of differentiated programmes by a specialist teacher who works with teachers at a planning level, and with selected groups of students. Extension students are encouraged to participate in various extension activities such as philosophy, extension language and mathematics groups. The Early Intervention Programme identifies students who may need extension or who require support in their learning. Individual Education Plans are devised in consultation with class teachers to provide an appropriate learning programme for students. Visiting Therapists and Speech Pathologists are able to assist with speech and language therapy or occupational therapy, they work with teachers to support and differentiate student learning where necessary. The Reading Recovery teacher supports Year 1 students who require individual assistance 57

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The Learning Support Co-ordinator, in consultation with families, may refer a child to the School Psychologist if a child experiences social, emotional and learning issues at school. A psychologist is employed part-time by the School. The Learning Support Co-ordinator, in consultation with families, may refer a child to the School Psychologist if a child experiences social, emotional and learning issues at school. The School Psychologist may work with individuals and groups to provide advice and resources.

HOME LEARNING Our Toorak Campus is committed to providing relevant Home Learning (homework) tasks for its students. Home Learning is assigned to serve various educational needs. It establishes study habits, assists in consolidating and supplementing work done in class, and encourages students to develop intellectual discipline and effective time management skills. Home Learning plays an important role in developing responsibility and life-long work habits. Home Learning also provides opportunities for students to share their inquiry and work positively with parents at home. Our guidelines and practices regarding Home Learning were developed in response to a school-wide review of homework after Professional Development with international education consultant Dr Ian Lillico in 2005. As part of the general Home Learning programme there is an expectation that children will spend a designated amount of time appropriate to the year level and to their individual need. In some cases the Home Learning programme may be modified according to the child’s needs and commitments. Home Learning can involve: - Reading - Spelling - Language study - Mathematics - Physical activity - Inquiry research - Class projects - Music practice - Personal goals/Positive Education Early Learning Centre (ELC) Home Learning in the Early Learning Centre is sent home as necessary to the children’s experience at the ELC. It reflects the Unit of Inquiry research and projects that are currently happening in the classroom. Home Learning also encompasses important moments of spontaneous learning and follows children’s interests to support strong connections between the ELC and the home environment, community and culture.

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in reading and writing.

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Prep to Year 2 In Prep to Year 2 we recognise that after a busy day at school children need unstructured time at home, where they can independently develop a stronger sense of self and engage in relationships and develop responsibilities with family and friends. Important recent research suggests that by allowing this time for children, we enable them to consolidate their school learning experiences more effectively. Whilst we strongly advocate that daily reading practice is essential at this age, we do not set other tasks on weekly home learning grids for children to complete. Instead, our children are encouraged to complete home learning tasks at times appropriate to a Unit of Inquiry or a personal learning agenda, which is negotiated between the classroom teachers and respective families as necessary. Years 3 to 6 Home Learning in Years 3 to 6 takes a more structured and systematic approach. It is gradually introduced and increased with students over time. Appropriate tasks are set by teachers and communicated to students on a weekly basis. Students submit their Home Learning to teachers in line with agreed time frames. SPECIALIST TEACHERS Specialist Teachers set Home Learning tasks with students as appropriate to the content of their lessons. These tasks are communicated to students verbally and via email to Class Teachers a week in advance (by Friday of the preceding week). TIME ALLOCATION Home Learning suggestions are sent home in the form of Unit Brochures for children in Prep to Year 2 at the commencement of each new Unit of Inquiry (every 6-10 weeks). Home Learning Grids are sent home at the commencement of each school week for students in Years 3 to 6. The time required for Home Learning tasks is difficult to predict, however, times should average: Prep to Year 2: 15 minutes shared reading and relevant Unit based tasks when required Year 3: up to ½ hour per day Year 4: up to ¾ hour per day Year 5: up to 1 hour per day Year 6: up to 1 hour per day The amount of time and tasks may vary according to the learning area and the student’s ability. PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT Parents provide essential support for student learning and where appropriate should be involved in the sharing and assisting of Home Learning tasks. Parents are encouraged to: - Provide a suitable study area for their child to complete Home Learning

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- Limit after-school activities to allow time for both Home Learning and leisure - Assist in planning a Home Learning schedule with their child - Provide positive reinforcement for their child’s efforts - Act as role models and work through questions with their child rather than providing answers - Share concerns regarding Home Learning with their child’s teacher - Be involved in reading at home by listening to, reading with and reading to their children (please remember that teaching of reading is done at school and reading at home needs to be an enjoyable and positive experience) - Convey any Home Learning problems to the teacher by a note in the diary as soon as they appear - Discuss and guide the children but avoid doing the work for them - If there is a difficulty, leave the activity and the parent or student can make a note in the diary

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LEARNING TO FLOURISH “Through the innovative teaching and learning strategies of Positive Education at the Toorak Campus, our children are developing the tools to cope with the demands of a busy life. On a daily basis, through implicit teaching, our children are given guidance and support on how best to learn, grow and develop a more confident and resilient attitude. We are fortunate to have Janet Etty-Leal, author of Meditation Capsules: A Mindfulness Programme for Children, regularly spend time with all of our children, from ELC to Year 6, to let them experience the benefits of mindful meditation. This will, in turn, further enhance core ingredients for learning, such as concentration and creativity.

I have been impressed by the responses we have seen in these areas, together with the resulting advancement of individual understanding of the benefits of Positive Education at all levels in all year groups. As a community we will continue to support each other through the highs and lows of every day as we work towards making our campus a happy and positive environment within which we live and learn together.”

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Garry Pierson Head of Toorak Campus

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A – Z OF TOORAK CAMPUS Our Toorak Campus is a busy and vibrant community. This section is compiled to give you more detailed information about the day-to-day life of Toorak Campus. Please refer to it often and seek further guidance when necessary, either by telephone: +61 3 9829 1444, email: [email protected] or our Community Portal via the School’s website at www.ggs.vic.edu.au. Information in this section may be updated from time to time, so parents are encouraged to stay up to date through our Toorak Campus Newsletter and the Community Portal. ABSENTEES Parents are asked to notify the Office on 9829 1444 before 9.00am if students are absent. The campus requires notification if your child is absent from School, for any reason, on any given day. We ask parents to make careful note of the term dates and organise their holidays accordingly. Please also see Extended Absence. ALLERGIES, ANAPHYLAXIS AND ASTHMA Severe Allergies, Anaphylaxis and Asthma are serious and sometimes life threating responses triggered by particular allergens including (but not limited to) nuts, eggs, some medications and some insects. Children with known allergies for whom an Epipen® or Epipen Jr® has been prescribed MUST provide the prescribed medication to the School in an insulated bag, labelled with the child’s name and class. Each child’s Epipen® will be stored in the First Aid Office and will be registered with EpiClub®. Parents will be reminded one month prior to the expiry date to allow adequate time for a replacement pen to be prescribed. An Action Plan must be completed annually by the student’s medical practitioner, as specified on the Anaphylaxis website www.allergry.org.au. An individual internal GGS Management Plan will also be completed at the commencement of each school year by the First Aid Officer in consultation with the student’s parents. For students with medically diagnosed severe allergies for whom no adrenaline auto injector has been prescribed, an ASCIA Action Plan for Allergic Reactions must be completed annually by the student’s medical practitioner as specified on the ASCIA website www. allergy.org.au In line with The Asthma Foundation Victoria Guidelines for Schools and Early Learning Centres, GGS has adopted single-person use spacers. This applies to all users of spacer devices in community settings, including Asthma Emergency Kits, training courses and clinical settings. The Toorak Campus has adopted the best practice for infection control; being the use of all spacers by one person only, and that spacer should not be re-used by another person, even if washed. Disposable spacers are now in use throughout the campus. Spacers should always be used when administering reliever ‘puffer’ medication as they deliver medication more efficiently and are an essential part of the Asthma First Aid procedure that Victorian schools and preschools are instructed to follow. 65

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For all Parents Parents are requested to refrain from including foods known to contain allergens in all snacks and lunches brought to school. If unsure, please consult with your child’s class teacher or the First Aid Officer. BEHAVIOUR MANAGEMENT One child’s behaviour should not impinge on another child’s ability to learn. Teachers have a clear understanding of strategies to use when managing student behaviour and follow a Behaviour Management Education Plan. Teachers at the Toorak Campus use kindness, forgiveness and understanding as the basis for resolving all issues that arise with students and believe that every mistake made is an opportunity for a learning experience to take place. Positive Education provides staff with the skills to support students to make sound decisions and to repair relationships with others if the need arises. Classroom teachers communicate regularly with Specialist Teachers about student behaviour and parents will be notified if there are any concerns about the behaviour of their child. BICYCLES AND SCOOTERS Students with parents’ permission may ride bicycles and scooters to school. Scooters and bikes are to be stored in the areas provided. For reasons of safety, bicycles and scooters may not be ridden in the school grounds. By law, it is compulsory that students wear a safety helmet to and from school. Students below Year 4 may ride to school if accompanied by a parent or guardian. CAMPS/OUTDOOR EDUCATION Toorak Campus offers an outdoor education programme for students in Years 2 to 6. These camp experiences give students an opportunity to develop a variety of skills through involvement in a range of outdoor experiences. Year 2: Camp Gundiwindi (1 night) - Hiking, ropes course, archery and damper making Year 3: Waratah Bay (2 nights) - Aquatic activities and hiking Year 4: Camp Maldon (2 nights) - Bike Education and hiking Year 5: (3 nights) - Bike Education and hiking Year 6: (4 nights) - Aquatic activities and hiking

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Parents/carers are responsible to ensure their child’s medication and spacer (or compatible face mask if under 5 years of age) is always available to staff. A School Asthma Action Plan must be completed annually by the student’s medical practitioner, as specified on the Asthma Foundation Victoria website www.asthma.org.au. An individual internal GGS Management Plan will also be completed at the commencement of each school year by the First Aid Officer in consultation with the student’s parents.

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CHURCH The Toorak Campus has a close and historic association with St John’s Anglican Church, Toorak. Students in Prep to Year 6 attend services twice a term. Children in Prep attend Church services from Term 2. The annual Easter Service and Carol Service, to which all members of the community are invited, are also held at St John’s. Church services commence at 9:30am. COMMUNICATION BETWEEN PARENTS AND SCHOOL Communication between parents and the School is of vital importance. In the case of a matter of urgency, the Toorak Campus office can relay a message to the appropriate class teacher/s. Teachers are happy to talk with parents and are the first point of contact should you have any concerns or queries. If you would like to discuss a matter in more detail please make an appointment with the teacher concerned. If the matter remains unresolved, please contact the Area Co-ordinator, who will be known to you. If further attention is necessary, please telephone the Deputy Head of Campus on 9826 1463. The Head of Campus is always available and welcomes communication by either telephone on 9829 1444, email or in person. The Deputy Head can also be contacted should the Head of Campus not be available. Contact Details It is important to keep all your contact details updated to ensure that you receive all relevant correspondence and most importantly in case of emergency. Therefore please use the Community Portal or contact School Office to update your address, contact telephone numbers or email address. Change of Family Circumstances We would appreciate being informed of any changes to home situations (e.g. illness in the family, parents going interstate, change in living arrangements, etc.) Staff are not always aware of family relationships and therefore we ask that where parents have separate addresses, these are made available to School Office. We are happy to send correspondence to more than one address as long as we are notified in writing. Therefore please use the Community Portal or contact School Office to update your address, contact telephone numbers or email address. If we are aware of any changes we are able to offer support to your child and ensure that any administrative details are appropriately addressed. COMMUNITY PORTAL The Community Portal is a dedicated section of the School’s website designed to provide parents and all members of the Geelong Grammar School community with timely, convenient and secure access to a wide range of information about the School, including online reports, upcoming events, fee payments and contact lists. Each parent or guardian

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is allocated a unique username and password to access the Community Portal. If you encounter any errors while trying to access the Portal, or while using it, please contact [email protected] CONTACT LISTS Contact Lists for other parents in your child’s class are available through the School’s Community Portal. All parents are encouraged to join the appropriate Contact Lists (accessed via the My Child icon) to enable class groups to be connected. DIARY Each student in the School from Prep to Year 6 will be issued with a diary which must be taken to and from school each day. The diary is an important means of communication between the School and home. We ask parents to check their child’s diary each night, and sign off at the end of each week. The diary is used to record Home Learning tasks and times, to note Absences and to hold any extra notices which may be sent home. Please assist your child to manage their diary by checking it each evening with them. This helps ensure fluid communication between the School and home. EXCURSIONS From time to time teachers plan for educational experiences outside of school. Parents will be notified of this beforehand. Permission for excursions is given by parents at the beginning of each year. Children are not taken on excursions without this permission. EXTENDED ABSENCE The campus requires written notification if your child will be absent for an extended period of time. We ask parents to make careful note of the term dates and organise their holidays accordingly. FEES Fees are payable one term in advance to the School. Payment should be forwarded to: Fees Department, Geelong Grammar School, 50 Biddlecombe Avenue, Corio VIC 3214 or to the Business Manager at the Toorak Campus. A current Fee Schedule is available from the School Office. HATS As part of our SunSmart Policy, clearly named broad-brimmed hats must be worn at recess and lunchtime, during sport and PE in Terms 1 and 4. As it is essential for students to wear hats if the UV index is above 3, we ask that students have their hats at school all year. Hats can be stored in student lockers so that they are available if required. The ‘No Hat, No Play’ policy will be applied if students do not have a hat.

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HOME LEARNING Please refer to the Academic Programme for information about Home Learning. The time required for Home Learning tasks is difficult to predict, however, times should average: Prep to Year 2: 15 minutes shared reading and relevant Unit based tasks when required Year 3: up to ½ hour per day Year 4: up to ¾ hour per day Year 5: up to 1 hour per day Year 6: up to 1 hour per day The amount of time and tasks may vary according to the learning area and the student’s ability. HOUSE SYSTEM A House system operates throughout Geelong Grammar School. At Toorak Campus, the House Programme is an inclusive experience for all Prep to Year 6 students and staff. House provides a framework for developing self-confidence, respect for others, caring and understanding, co-operative skills, leadership, responsibility, empathy and a sense of community. Students participate in cross-age learning through the House Programme. Activities are held during each term and involve social skills, values, performance in music, sports, problem solving and team building. Older students are responsible for younger students, building friendships that transfer to the school playground. House is built around a key structure of students at each Year level, ‘the buddy system’, where the focus is on developing and maintaining cross-age links and friendships. There are four Houses: Alexander (Green), Bruce (Red), Mann (Yellow) and McComas (Blue). Elected Year 6 Student House Leaders work closely with the Staff House Leaders to design and implement activities. These activities raise awareness within each House of the importance of social relations and to build an appreciation and joy in the connectedness of community. House sessions usually run for one hour fortnightly. Major House events include House Swimming, House Music and House Athletics. Alexander (Green) For over 40 years the names of Glamorgan and Miss Katherine L. Alexander were inseparably linked. ‘Miss Allie’ joined the staff at Glamorgan in 1909, having received a Master of Arts from the University of Melbourne. A loyal and long serving staff member, she instilled a sense of duty and high standards in her boys. Miss Alexander died on 4 October 1974. She was 91. Bruce (Red) Stanley Bruce entered Glamorgan in 1891 as a boarder and was described by the then Principal, Isabel McComas, as “a very fine small boy”. He attended Cambridge University, practiced law in London and was severely wounded in World War I, winning the Military Cross. He entered politics in 1918, elected as Federal MP for Flinders. He became Finance Minister in 1921 and was elected Prime Minister of Australia in 1923 at just 39 years of age. 69

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Mann (Yellow) James Gilbert Mann came to Glamorgan as a student in 1925. He won a junior scholarship and passed into Cuthbertson House at Geelong Grammar School in 1927. He was awarded a Rhodes Scholarship in 1937, gaining First Class Honours in Law at Oxford University. Mann joined the AIF and was on board the HMAS Hereward when it was bombed and sunk in Crete. He did what he could for the wounded and rescued exhausted men from the water by placing them into the rafts. He was last seen giving up his place on board a raft to another young man before swimming off into the distance. McComas (Blue) Miss Isabel McComas was the Founding Principal of Glamorgan. She led the school from 1887 until 1946 when it became part of Geelong Grammar School. Miss McComas believed that each student was an individual requiring encouragement and support according to individual needs. She designed the Glamorgan badge. Her portrait hangs in the Reception area at Toorak Campus. Glamorgan (White) The Toorak Campus operates as one House within the Geelong Grammar School structure. Our Campus House colour is white and we compete in the GGS House Swimming in Term 1 and House Athletics in Term 3. LIBRARY The Coulter Library, located in the Southey Centre, is open from 8.00am until 4.00pm and at lunch time. Parents may borrow a number of books for their child. The Library contains a small collection of adult fiction/non-fiction and books pertaining to children and parenting that parents are welcome to borrow. LOST PROPERTY The School asks that parents label all items of clothing and equipment carefully. Lost property is located outside the First Aid room. If property is labelled it can be quickly returned. MEDICAL CARE All parents of students entering Geelong Grammar School must complete a Medical History form for their child at the time of entry. The School must be advised subsequently of any variation to the information recorded on it. Each year parents will be requested to update medical records, immunisation and emergency contact details. It is vital that parents inform the school of any changes to contact details in case they need to be contacted in the event of an emergency. In order to support the staff, the School’s First Aid Officer compiles a daily history of children’s visits to First Aid. No medicines will be administered without written consent on the day. Specific medical forms may need to be completed prior to TOORAK CAMPUS HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

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He was made a Viscount in 1947, becoming Viscount Bruce of Melbourne, and was the first Australian to take his seat in the House of Lords.

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children going on Camp. For further information please contact the School’s First Aid Officer on 9829 1432. Parents are requested to inform the Head of Campus or the appropriate teacher, in writing, of important aspects of their child’s medical record, particularly if drugs or other medication have been prescribed. This information must be kept up to date. Some conditions will require management plans. The School First Aid Officer will communicate directly with parents with regard to management plans. If any child has been suffering from an infectious illness, the Health Department regulations must be observed, and the School notified. Particularly in the early years, if your child is suffering from infectious cold symptoms, vomiting and/or diarrhoea, we ask that you observe a 24 hour symptom free period before your child returns to school. As a general rule, if a child requires medication they should be kept at home. However, in unusual circumstances where a child needs to be given medication during the day, please make special arrangements in writing with the First Aid Officer. Medical Appointments In the interest of your child’s learning, dental or medical appointments should be made out of school hours where possible. If an appointment is necessary during school hours please advise the class teacher via the student’s diary. Students must be collected from their classroom; they are not permitted to wait at the gate. School Office must be notified when they depart the School and also when they return. MUSIC TUITION A great number of students at the Toorak Campus learn instruments or singing. In addition, students are involved in group tuition as part of the curriculum from ELC to Year 6. Every student has the opportunity to learn a musical instrument and advice can be sought from Music staff. We recommend that students focus on learning one instrument. Music lessons take place during class time and are normally run on a rotational basis. If students want to learn more than one instrument, a lesson time out of school hours will be organised wherever possible. Parents are advised to discuss this matter with the Head of Music before making a final decision. A compulsory component of Individual Music Tuition is ensemble participation. This provides students with the opportunity to develop their musical skills through social interaction. Each Instrumental Teacher will inform parents when their child is ready to participate in an appropriate ensemble, sending home a letter with details pertaining to rehearsal times and venue as well as an explanation of ensemble expectations. The adage ‘practice makes perfect’ is a guiding principle of our Music Programme. Our Music staff create self-motivating programmes with their students by setting weekly practice goals. Young students should set a goal of 5 -15 minutes of playing each day. 71

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Tuition offered: - Piano - Violin, Viola, Cello, Double Bass - Flute, Recorder, Clarinet, Saxophone, Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone - Guitar, Electric Bass - Drums, Percussion - Music Discovery - Singing Lessons run for 30 minutes and fees are advised at the start of each year. Fees are charged to the family school account retrospectively. Parents should be aware that one half term’s notice in writing to the Head of Music is required if a student is to discontinue music lessons. One half term’s fee will be payable in lieu of insufficient notice. Orchestral instruments (Strings, Brass, Woodwind) are available for hire. Students are encouraged to buy their own instruments after initial tuition. Guitarists and recorder players must have their own instruments. Students choosing to learn piano should have access to a piano or keyboard at home. Students are encouraged to complete Australian Music Examination Board (AMEB) exams as well as internal theory exams. Advice may be sought from the Head of Music or your student’s Instrumental Teacher. NEWSLETTER A Toorak Campus Newsletter is emailed weekly to each family. The Newsletter contains information about forthcoming events, details about the Toorak Parents’ Association, class activities, reflections and achievements. The Newsletter is also available online on the Community Portal. OUT OF SCHOOL HOURS CARE PROGRAMME (OSHC) Our Out of School Hours Care Programme (OSHC) Programme is run by Camp Australia. Families must be registered users of the programme before making a booking. Registrations should be made directly with Camp Australia at www.campaustralia.com.au or 1300 105 343. The OSHC Programme is a registered programme under the Commonwealth Child Care Cash Rebate Scheme. Rebates may be claimed by mail or through Medicare by parents who are employed, studying, training or looking for work. A receipt is available from the OSHC Co-ordinator. TOORAK CAMPUS HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

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More advanced students are encouraged to allocate enough practice time, preferably at the same time each day, to cover their graded repertoire, technical work and school ensemble pieces. Parents are strongly encouraged to support their children in their musical endeavours.

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3 & 4 Year Old Kindergarten (Located in the Early Learning Centre) Available from 3.15pm - 6.00pm Monday to Thursday and 12.45pm - 6.00pm Friday Prep (Located in the Early Learning Centre in Terms 1 and 2) Children should be booked in at 3.30pm. Available until 6.00pm Tel: +61 3 9829 1410 Prep (Terms 3 and 4) to Year 6 (Located in the Butler Centre) Children should be booked in at 3.30pm. Available until 6.00pm Tel: +61 3 9829 1420 Suitable refreshments will be provided. Activities include arts and crafts, games, cooking, sports and supervision of homework. The activities will be varied and will offer a different programme from that of the School. Children who attend the programme regularly are encouraged to make a permanent booking. These bookings will automatically carry over each new week until written notification of the change is received by the Co-ordinator. Children who do not attend the programme regularly can be booked into the programme on a casual basis. Casual bookings need to be made by closing time on the day prior to care. This is to ensure the appropriate staffing ratios are met and staff have the necessary information for each child. On the Day Bookings: Emergency places may be available on the day but a position in the programme cannot be guaranteed at this late stage. To ensure the safety of all children, the co-ordinator needs to be advised of all cancellations. Notification of the cancellation needs to be authorised by the parent or guardian either in writing or verbally, not by the child. Cancellations need to be made by close of day, on the day prior to care (Friday for a Monday cancellation). Without this notice the normal fee will be charged. Children must be collected by parents or their nominated replacement. The supervisor must be advised by telephone of any likely delay or revised arrangements. On departure from After School Care, children must be signed out on the register and a booking-out time recorded. After School Care ends at 6.00pm sharp. Arrangements for late collection may be made at the discretion of the After Hours Co-ordinator. Late Collection Fees are charged. Fees are charged per session: - After School Care (3.15pm - 6.00pm) - Casual Aftercare - Curriculum Day - Sports Club short fee - Late Collection Please see the Camp Australia website for current fee and rebate information. All OSHC enquiries should be directed to the Programme Co-ordinator on 0402 047 543.

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PARENT/TEACHER NIGHTS The following interviews are held each year: -‘You Tell Us’ Interviews - Parent/Teacher Conferences - Student-Led Conferences PARENTS’ ASSOCIATION The Toorak Campus Parents’ Association (known as the Glamorgan Association) was formed more than twenty years ago to enhance and engage the School Community. Membership is automatic for all parents of current students. The Association is steered by a committee, including parent representatives, the Head of Campus and a staff representative. The Association organises functions and fundraising events throughout the school year. Its main events include the Welcome Cocktail Party at the beginning of the year, the Family Camp weekend, Mothers’ Day Luncheon and the biennial Fundraising Dinner. Class Representatives are appointed by the Association to foster and support inclusiveness in each year level. The Class Representatives arrange Cocktail Parties and Coffee Mornings to facilitate this. Funds raised go towards supporting selected campus projects and programmes. The Association always welcomes support and involvement from parents. PLAYGROUND SUPERVISION Members of staff are on duty in the grounds at recess and lunchtime. One staff member is on duty before school from 8.15am until 8.30am and after school from 3.15pm until 3.45pm. Parents or guardians must actively supervise children on the campus outside these hours. REPORTS Geelong Grammar School uses an online reporting system and parents will receive a report about their child’s progress at the end of Semester 1 and 2. Parents will need to ensure that all contact information (particularly email address) is up to date prior to receiving student reports. SCHOOL HOURS Parents and children may arrive on Campus for 8.15am when classroom doors open. Arrival before this time is only applicable for authorised before school activities. It is the responsibility of parents to ensure that their children are at school on time to settle in before lessons begin. The time from 8.15am to 8.30am allows parents and children a golden opportunity to spend quality time together before the start of the school day. Please see below for start of day times. Parents should note that teaching staff will be using this time to prepare for their day. Parents should also note that the Library is open before and after school for similar reasons.

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Lesson times are: ELC: 9.00am - 3.00pm (Mon – Thurs) and 9.00am - 12.30pm (Friday) Prep to Year 2: 8.30am - 3.15pm Year 3 to 6: 8.30am - 3.30pm Children become anxious if they are not picked up on time so please try to be punctual. If unforeseen circumstances mean you are going to be late, a phone call to the School will quickly allay any fears. Children not collected by 3.30pm (Prep to Year 2) or 3.45pm (Year 3 to 6), will be taken to After School Care. All children remaining at this time MUST go to After School Care. Charges will apply for children placed in After School Care. The School cannot be responsible for unsupervised children. Parents are responsible to supervise children enrolled in after school activities if these activities start after 3.45pm. Arrival at School Children in the Early Learning Centre (ELC) should enter via the Wallace Avenue gate. Parents must sign children into and out of the ELC under Department of Education and Early Childhood Development (DEECD) regulations. Parents of children in Prep and Year 1 enter via Wallace Avenue and children in Years 2 to 6 can enter via the Jackson Street or Douglas Street gates. Progressively, we encourage children in Years 3 to 6 to enter the School independently and to carry their own bag. Parents and students may enter the School grounds from 8.15am. Earlier arrival is only permitted for organised before school activities. All School gates are closed from 9am and entry after that time is via the Douglas Street gate only. After School Collection Parents are asked to enter the School grounds to collect their children. In the interest of safety, children must not be asked to cross the street to find their parents’ car. Children may not wait for their parents unsupervised. For their own safety, children are asked to wait for parents in the School grounds where they will be supervised. Parents, please note that double parking in busy streets is a danger to our students. Students from Prep to 2 who have not been collected by 3.30pm will be taken to After School Care and Year 3 to 6 students not collected by 3.45pm will also be taken to After School Care. Parents are responsible to actively supervise their children when in the School grounds after 3.30pm. Before and After School Activities The campus offers a range of before and after school activities. These vary from term to term. A list of these activities can be obtained from School Office. Some of the activities offered include, Running Club, Swimming, Art Club, Chess Club, Tennis, Creative Dance, Hip Hop, Chinese and Fencing.

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Office hours: 8.15am - 4.15pm. Tel: +61 3 9829 1444, Fax: +61 3 9826 2829, email: [email protected] Head of Campus: Garry Pierson Deputy Head: Kylie Griffiths Admissions Officer: Marita Hogan Campus Business Manager: Diane Dunn School Office Assistant: Sarah Treyvaud Receptionist: Loretta Lane SECURITY Access to the School is between 8.15am and 4.15pm. Between 9.00am and 2.30pm access is available via the Douglas Street gate only. All other gates are locked between these hours. When authorised before are after school activities are scheduled the gates will be open to accommodate these activities. SMARTPHONE APPLICATION Geelong Grammar School’s free Smartphone Application, GGS Mobile, is designed to keep our community connected with all of the latest news and events from the School via their mobile phones. GGS Mobile can be downloaded from both the iTunes Store and Android Market. STATIONERY FOR STUDENTS A bulk order for classroom stationery needs is placed at the beginning of each school year for students from ELC to Year 6. The cost is debited to student accounts in Term 1. TUCK SHOP Ourtuckshop is available for lunch orders on a daily basis for all children from the ELC to Year 6. UNIFORM ELC students do not wear uniforms, but will need a library book bag, a broad-brimmed school sunhat, and a sports bag which will be used as a linen bag for bedding. All these items are available from the Uniform Shop. All Prep to Year 6 students must wear clearly named and correct school uniform at all times. Jewellery is to be restricted to a watch and plain ear studs. Sleeper-earrings are not suitable for wearing to school, particularly when playing sport. Hair should be well groomed, clean and combed. Extremes in hairstyle, colour or length are not acceptable. Makeup and nail polish are not to be worn. Hair below shoulder length should be tied back with a hair-coloured or school coloured tie.

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SCHOOL OFFICE The School Office is centrally situated in the School Office Building, 14 Douglas Street, Toorak.

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Black shoes should be kept clean and polished. A full uniform list, with photographs, is available under the Admissions tab on the website. All items and expert advice are available from the Uniform Shop. Students in Prep to Year 6 are able to wear their Sports Uniform to school on the days that they have Physical Education or Sport. This information will be discussed with parents in greater detail at the Information Evening at the start of each year. When in public, students are often judged by their appearance in School Uniform. It is the responsibility of all students and their parents that students are well groomed when in public. UNIFORM SHOP The Uniform Shop is for the use of all parents for the purchasing and ordering of the School Uniform and for recycling articles of clothing which have been outgrown or are no longer required. The Uniform Shop is located on the ground floor (veranda) of the School Office Building. The Manager may be contacted on Tel: 9829 1437. Voicemails may be left on this number when the shop is closed. Opening Hours Monday: 8.00am – 10.30am Tuesday: 1.00pm – 4.30pm Thursday: 1.00pm – 4.30pm The Uniform Shop is also open during School Holiday periods for full uniform fittings. Appointments are required for full uniform fittings. Opening times are advertised in the Toorak Campus Newsletter. Second-hand uniform sales/purchases are also available in the Uniform Shop. 75% of the sale price goes to parents and the remaining 25% goes to the School. Please bring items of School clothing (which must be clean and in good order, with name tags removed) to the Uniform Shop. A form must be completed with a contact name, number and details of the items left for sale.

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OUR GUARDIAN ANGEL The Angel Room in our ELC is watched over by the gentle presence of a significant painting by renowned graffiti artist Keith Haring (1958-1990), which he painted on a visit to Melbourne in 1984. Haring made his name painting the subways and laneways of Manhattan. He went on to hold major exhibitions at the Paris Museum of Modern Art, the Bordeaux Contemporary Art Museum and the Stedelijk Museum in the Netherlands. He painted public murals in Paris, Amsterdam and Berlin, drew album covers for David Bowie and Malcolm McLaren, created advertising campaigns for Absolut vodka and Swatch watches, and artwork for Madonna and Sesame Street. His art had a child-like quality and Haring held workshops for children around the world.

“What I like about children is their imagination. It’s a combination of honesty and freedom they seem to have in expressing whatever is on their minds.”

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The ‘Angel’ painting was originally painted on an external wall of The Pottery during Haring’s three-week visit to Australia in 1984 (when he also painted a large mural at the Collingwood Technical College). Redevelopment of the site enclosed the mural in what is now known as ‘The Angel Room’. “The artwork has assumed a new life and relevance to the people who live with it every day,” art writer Meaghan Wilson-Anastasios explained. “It will endure in the minds of hundreds of little people, who grow into bigger people – many of who most probably don’t even know who painted the angel, or why it’s there.”

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THE POTTERY The Toorak Campus Early Learning Centre (ELC) is housed in a building known as The Pottery, which takes its name from the Potts family, who lived there before the house was acquired by the School. The building and outdoor spaces were transformed in a significant renovation process in 2002. We are lucky to be housed in such a beautiful building and we recognise the warmth it gives to our learning environment. Situated on Wallace Avenue, The Pottery is adjacent to the Sutherland Centre, where our Prep and Year 1 classes are located. This co-location facilitates a smooth transition to formal schooling when our young learners emerge from their early childhood years.

ELC PROGRAMME “If I can Ask my own questions, Try out my ideas, Explore what’s around me, Share what I find: If I have Plenty of time for My special pace A nurturing space, Things to transform: If you’ll be My patient friend, Trusted guide, Fellow investigator, Partner in learning: Then I will Explore the world, Discover my voice, And tell you what I know In a hundred languages” Pam Houk (USA) We believe learning is a natural and ongoing process. Children start to develop views from an early age based on their knowledge and interpretations of events and experiences. The enjoyment of learning, of creating and expressing themselves is central to young children’s growth and development as they seek to construct their understanding of their world. Children can be powerful communicators if given the opportunity to explore and share their understandings with others. The impact of others on a child’s personal

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Environment is significant to learning. We recognise that while we shape our environment, it also shapes us. The learning environment has the potential for facilitating social interaction and physical expression and for provoking thought and inquiry. Children have the right to feel familiar, safe and secure, to freely engage with the environment that surrounds them as they continue to wonder, observe, create and question. Our role is to trust, extend and challenge children, to support and facilitate their growth. We realise the importance of authentic experience, the benefit of the inquiry approach and the power of shared learning. Our task, as educators, is not to fill the heads, but to ignite the fires within. We encourage children to seek, respect, explore, investigate and share their experiences as they grow in our changing world. WHAT DO WE WANT THE CHILDREN TO LEARN? Our Primary Years Programme (PYP) curriculum is constructed with the children’s learning as the central focus. We combine the PYP framework with the values that underpin the Educational Project of Reggio Emilia. These elements are infused with our own values, our international perspective and our Australian culture and context. We seek to develop attitudes and concepts within the child’s interests, with the knowledge that skills development will naturally follow. We build an environment which allows children to build relationships with people in the school community. They learn in a social, supportive, collaborative context. Children build on their prior knowledge and construct meaning in response to their experiences. They are given opportunities to speak and to be listened to in many languages of expression (e.g. drama, music, the arts, drawing, physical activity and discussion). Teachers and children are partners in learning. They are encouraged to be inquirers, thinkers, communicators, risk takers, knowledgeable, principled, caring, open minded and reflective. HOW BEST WILL CHILDREN LEARN? Young children learn through inquiry, which is demonstrated by wondering, investigating, exploring, synthesising and theorising. We respect the child’s developing ideas and understandings as they make sense of the social and natural world. Their developing ideas are expressed in a variety of media through play and reflection, as they gradually refine their understanding of how the world works.

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learning is paramount. Offering the opportunity to investigate and discover together brings a broadened perspective and understanding through collaboration and free expression of ideas. Children are seen as having immense potential as well as developmental skills. They have rights as well as needs. They are rich and capable individuals who bring a unique perspective and experience to the group. Children have an innate need to express themselves in a myriad of individual ways. We encourage children to celebrate their own style, promoting self understanding and self esteem. Children seek to identify and belong, in their environment, and with their peers.

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HOW DO WE KNOW WHAT YOUNG CHILDREN HAVE LEARNED? We value the importance of documentation. Our written records and visual images detail children’s learning, development and experiences in the Centre. This documentation provides a vehicle for reflection and communication with children, families and the School community. Children make connections and expand their learning through this process. Families share and celebrate the learning journey of their child. A significant collection of this documentation is collated in each child’s portfolio. A portfolio is a meaningful collection of pieces documenting each child’s interests and participation in learning and special experiences and events throughout the year. It is a selection of significant moments representing growth and development and provides a snapshot of each child’s experience at the ELC. Teachers and children actively select pieces to include in the portfolio. The Student Led Conference allows children to reflect on their own learning and experience by sharing their portfolio with their family.

GETTING STARTED Children are eligible to attend our Early Learning Centre (ELC) once they have turned three years old – children in ELC 3 must be three years of age on or before December 31 in the year prior to commencement. Where places are not available in our classes, children’s names and details can be left with the Admissions Officer to be placed on our waiting list. It is important that children are toilet trained before they commence at The Pottery as we do not have appropriate facilities for nappy changing (this includes ‘pull-up’ style nappies). Prior to commencing at The Pottery, please read the literature that has been sent home from the ELC. It will give you useful information, such as procedures, hours of attendance, etc. Check times carefully and plan your day to enable you to collect your child on time. Ensure all enrolment documents, including health forms, have been fully completed and returned. Establish a routine before the first day as an important step to promoting an easy start. Early nights are an advantage. Prior to the beginning of the school year introduce your child to lunch in a lunchbox by practising together at home. Name all articles of clothing including jackets, hats, lunch boxes, drink bottles and children’s bags. ORIENTATION MORNING Orientation Morning is held at the beginning of Term 1 each year. A detailed letter with visiting times will be sent to families. This is a time for children and parents to further connect with the class teacher, familiarise themselves with the environment and for the children to meet and play with new friends. FIRST DAY AT THE ELC Dress your child in appropriate clothing that they can manage, including comfortable shoes. Please apply sunscreen prior to leaving home. Ensure your child has his/her bag packed with spare clothes and a broad-brimmed sun hat. At the Toorak Campus it is compulsory during Terms 1 and 4 for all children to wear a broad brimmed sun hat during outdoor play.

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Be aware that children will be tired in the first few weeks, especially in the hot weather. Plenty of early nights and quiet afternoons are a good idea. The first few weeks of the year will be a period of adjustment and settling in – don’t expect too much from your child. Children need time to adapt to new routines – to develop confidence and to build up trust with teachers and the children around them. TERM 1 PROGRAMME After Hours Care is available if required during the first three weeks, however, we strongly recommend an early pick-up as children become very tired during these first weeks. Please speak with your class teacher on Orientation morning if you have any questions about these arrangements. The ELC Programme for the first three weeks of the year will be: 3 YEAR OLD GROUPS

4 YEAR OLD GROUPS

Week 1

Week 1, 2 and 3

Hours: 9.00am - 11.00am Children will need a bag packed with: - Some spare clothes - A broad-brimmed hat - No lunch required

Hours: 9.00am - 12.30pm Children will need a bag packed with: - Some spare clothes - A broad-brimmed hat - Sunscreen - Lunch required

Weeks 2 and 3 Hours: 9.00am – 12.30pm Children will need a bag packed with: - Some spare clothes - A broad-brimmed hat - Sunscreen - Lunch required

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When you arrive at The Pottery, you must sign your child in and leave a contact phone number together with an estimated pick up time. All parents or guardians must sign their child in noting the time of arrival, and sign them out when leaving every day. Discuss with your child who will pick him/her up after the ELC session. Ensure that he/she is aware of how and when he/she will be going home (e.g. after story time). Try not to bombard your child with questions when you arrive home. Children find it hard to answer questions when they are tired. Your child will tell you about what happened when he/she is ready. Read your child’s class reflection journal to find information about the day from the teaching staff.

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ELC GUIDELINES Our Early Learning Centre (ELC) abides by the School Guidelines (as outlined in Life at Toorak Campus) on Interactions with Children, Asthma, Anaphylaxis, SunSmart, Peanuts, Nuts and Nut Products, Bullying and Early Intervention. We also observe and incorporate Policies and Procedures outlined in the Education and Care Services National Regulations. A copy of the Policies and Procedures can be located within the ELC and on the School website. COMMUNICATION BETWEEN PARENTS AND THE ELC Open and honest communication between staff and parents in the ELC is important in maintaining positive relationships. Both staff and parents have an obligation to deal with issues in a positive, constructive and professional manner. Issues of concern should be raised with the class teacher. Making an appointment to do this before or after programme hours gives importance to discussing issues. Concerns should be directed to the ELC Director via telephone, in writing or in person (by appointment). The ELC Director will discreetly respond as soon as is practicable after an issue has been raised, and determine action to be taken. The ELC Director must notify the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development (DEECD) if a complaint or grievance alleges that the health, safety or wellbeing of any child within the ELC may have been compromised, or if there has been a contravention of the Education and Care Services National Law Act 2010 and Education and Care Services National Regulations. CONTACT INFORMATION Garry Pierson Head of Toorak Campus Tel: +61 3 9829 1444 Simone Carter Director of Early Learning Centre Tel: +61 3 9829 1410 School Office: +61 3 9829 1444 ELC Office: +61 3 9829 1410 ELC 3: +61 3 9829 1451 ELC 3: +61 3 9829 1450 ELC 4: +61 3 9829 1452 ELC 4: +61 3 9829 1453 During teaching sessions you can leave a message on the ELC Office voicemail. Please leave your details and calls received will be returned as soon as possible.

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OR YOU MAY CONTACT: Children’s Services Advisers Department of Education and Early Childhood Development 280 Thomas St (PO Box 5, Dandenong) Victoria 3175 Tel: +61 3 8765 5787 www.education.vic.gov.au DAILY ROUTINE The hours of operation for the ELC are: Monday – Thursday: 9.00am* – 3.00pm (After Hours Care: 3.15pm - 6.00 pm) Friday: 9.00am* – 12.30pm (After Hours Care: 12.45pm – 6.00 pm) *Children may be dropped off from 8.30am each morning. Children not collected by 3.15pm Monday – Thursday and 12.45pm Fridays will be enrolled in After Hours Care (see OSHC, in Life at Toorak Campus section for more information). DAILY ROUTINE: 3 YEAR OLD GROUPS 8.30am: Parent and child time (indoors) 9.00am: Daily programme begins with indoor/outdoor experiences 10.15am: Group Time followed by project work and indoor developmental experiences (During this time there is an informal morning tea) 11.30am: Story 11.40am: Prepare for lunch 11.50am: Lunch 12.30pm: Relaxation time 1.45pm: Wake & pack away linen 2.00pm: Outdoor experiences, small group experiences or Specialist classes (which may include Library, Music and Physical Education) 2.50pm: Story 3.00pm: Programme concludes, pick up time 3.15pm: After Hours Care begins (12.45pm on Fridays) DAILY ROUTINE: 4 YEAR OLD GROUPS 8.30am: Parent and child time (outdoors) 9.00am: Daily programme begins with a morning meeting discussion followed by project work and indoor developmental experiences (During this time there is an informal morning tea) 10.30am: Class Assembly/story 11.00am: Outdoor experiences 11.50am: Prepare for lunch 12.00pm: Lunch 12.30pm: Relaxation time

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1.30pm: Wake & pack away linen 1.45pm: Outdoor experiences, small group experiences or Specialist classes (which will include Library, Music and Physical Education) 2.50pm: Story 3.00pm: Programme concludes, pick up time 3.15pm: After Hours Care begins (12.45pm on Fridays) EMERGENCY MEDICAL CARE In an emergency when a parent, guardian or an authorised contact is unavailable, Geelong Grammar School staff are authorised to seek medical treatment for children by a medical practitioner, dental, hospital or ambulance service. Where a staff member considers it advisable to obtain immediate ambulance, medical, dental or hospital attention, staff are authorised to arrange such attention. In the event that an x-ray, anaesthetic or minor surgery is prescribed and it has not been possible to contact the parent, guardian or authorised person, the parent/guardian will be responsible for the cost of any such ambulance, medical, dental or hospital attention or expense. Information regarding authorisations in the event of emergency care being required forms part of the ELC enrolment record which must be completed and signed by the parent/guardian prior to any child commencing. FEES Fees are payable one term in advance to the School. Payment should be forwarded to: Fees Department, Geelong Grammar School, 50 Biddlecombe Avenue, Corio VIC 3214 or to the Business Manager at the Toorak Campus. A current Fee Schedule is available in the ELC Foyer or from the School Office. ILLNESS If any child has been suffering from an infectious illness, the Health Department regulations must be observed, and the School notified for cross contamination purposes. Children suffering from infectious cold symptoms should be kept at home. We urge all parents to be aware of the many viruses, coughs, colds and flu that are common amongst young children. For the wellbeing of other children in their class and staff we ask that if any of the following symptoms are evident, children are to be kept at home for 24 hours after symptoms cease: - Persistent coughing - High temperature - Vomiting - Diarrhoea - Fatigue - Runny nose - Conjunctivitis - Head lice

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INTERACTIONS WITH CHILDREN It is important for teachers and parents to communicate behavioural concerns with one another. Communication between teachers and families can take place via the telephone or in person at the start or end of each day. Early Learning Centre (ELC) staff are trained and experienced in positively redirecting behaviour in young children. In the instance of a child’s behaviour injuring another child at the ELC, this behaviour will be documented and parents of both parties will be informed. LUNCH ELC children bring a lunchbox from home each day. We encourage healthy eating and ask parents to support this by providing a healthy selection of food. ELC children are not permitted to bring any foods containing known allergens, including all nut products (e.g. peanut butter, Nutella, nut bars, satay sauces, etc.). Ourtuckshop is available for lunch orders on a daily basis. MEDICATION Parents are requested to inform the Class Teacher of important aspects of their child’s medical record, particularly if drugs or other medication have been prescribed. Should a child need to be given medication, it probably means that he/she should be kept home. However, there are unusual circumstances (e.g. if a child suffers from eczema, an allergy or asthma, which may need attention from the Class Teacher). In this case, please make special arrangements with the teacher. If parents wish a teacher to administer medicine they must fill in the required form. SPECIAL EXPERIENCES Throughout the course of the year we incorporate a variety of incursions and excursions which are designed to support the children’s learning experience. The ELC children attend weekly specialist lessons in Music, Physical Education, Perceptual Motor Programme and Library. Other special events during the year include Mothers’ Day, Fathers’ Day and Annual ELC Celebration of Learning. STAFF Geelong Grammar School has a commitment to employ well-qualified and experienced staff. All ELC staff hold relevant Early Childhood Teaching qualifications, as determined by the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development (DEECD), and have completed comprehensive First Aid training, which includes the management of Anaphylaxis. Our commitment to quality of staff and teaching ensures the provision of highly personalised attention, care and a comprehensive programme that provides an excellent foundation for all areas of learning. Geelong Grammar School also has a TOORAK CAMPUS HANDBOOK - GEELONG GRAMMAR SCHOOL

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The school employs a First Aid Officer. Should a child become ill during the day, the First Aid Officer may be consulted to assist with the management of health issues. Parents will be notified to collect sick children.

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commitment to provide adult to child ratios much higher than those required by State regulations. This arrangement ensures the quality of communication, relationships, and above all, the most effective activation of the children’s resources and potentialities. UNIFORM ELC children do not wear uniform; however parents will need to purchase: - library book bag - broad-brimmed school sunhat, and - sports bag (which will be used as a linen bag for bedding) All these items are available from the Uniform Shop. The Uniform Shop is located on the veranda near the School Office and is open: Monday: 8.00am – 10.30am Tuesday and Thursday: 1.30pm – 4.30pm

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REFERENCES Toorak Campus Curriculum Guideline Documents Toorak Campus 2008 Scope and Sequence IB PYP Subject Specific Scope and Sequence Making the PYP Happen International Baccalauréat Organisation Route des Morillons 15 1218 Grand - Saconnex Geneva, Switzerland. 2000 The Australian National Curriculum Documentation ACARA Level 10, 255 Pitt Street, Sydney, New South Wales AUSTRALIA, 2000

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Spread across five specialist campuses, Geelong Grammar School offers a unique educational journey to meet the diverse needs of our students. We believe that learning is life’s greatest adventure and every single step matters.

MIDDLE SCHOOL (YRS 5-8) CORIO Embedded in our 245-hectare site on the edge of Corio Bay, Middle School is a unique learning and living environment that allows students on the edge of adolescence to grow and flourish.

BOSTOCK HOUSE (ELC-YR 4) GEELONG Our heritage-listed campus located in the leafy Geelong suburb of Newtown, Bostock House provides the perfect environment for our students to explore, learn and play.

SENIOR SCHOOL (YRS 10-12) CORIO Australia’s largest co-educational boarding school campus, our Senior School offers the choice of the Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE) or the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma for entry into tertiary study.

TIMBERTOP (YR 9) MANSFIELD Our remote Year 9 campus located in the foothills of the Victorian Alps, Timbertop provides students with a transformational year of challenge and adventure.

TOORAK CAMPUS (ELC-YR 6) TOORAK A modern campus in the heart of Melbourne’s inner east, our Toorak Campus provides a positive environment where learning is celebrated and children are encouraged to reach their potential.