History Council of New South Wales Inc - History Council of NSW

History Council of New South Wales Inc - History Council of NSW

History Council of New South Wales Inc Annual Report 2016 “The History Council of NSW fills a great need, which is to honour the past and learn from ...

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History Council of New South Wales Inc Annual Report 2016

“The History Council of NSW fills a great need, which is to honour the past and learn from it.

- History Council of NSW anonymous feedback survey, May 2016

The History Council of New South Wales is supported by the NSW Government through Arts NSW

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Contents FROM THE PRESIDENT ..................................................................................................... 3 ABOUT US .......................................................................................................................... 4 Vision ............................................................................................................................................ 4 Objectives..................................................................................................................................... 4 Our Team ...................................................................................................................................... 4

OUR WORK ......................................................................................................................... 5 History Week ................................................................................................................................ 5 History Week 2016: Neighbours ................................................................................................. 5 Speaker Connect ....................................................................................................................... 6 Annual History Lecture ............................................................................................................... 8 Awards and Prizes ..................................................................................................................... 8 Feedback ................................................................................................................................... 9 Other Events and Programs ..................................................................................................... 11 Newcastle Writers Festival 2016 .............................................................................................. 11 Sydney Writers’ Festival 2016 ................................................................................................. 11 PACE Internships ..................................................................................................................... 11

MEDIA AND COMMUNICATIONS .................................................................................... 12 FINANCIAL MATTERS ..................................................................................................... 13 Matters in detail ......................................................................................................................... 13

OUR SUPPORTERS ......................................................................................................... 14

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FROM THE PRESIDENT 2016 was a fantastically successful year for the History Council of NSW (HCNSW). This success is a testament to the power of teamwork and collaboration. The continued goodwill demonstrated by our members and supporters communicates the power of history and its importance to communities across New South Wales. History contributes to the economy; it connects people and communities through story, shapes identity and citizenship and enhances community wellbeing. Our theme for History Week this year was ‘Neighbours’. This was perfect for an organisation committed to community engagement in the production and consumption of history. Thanks must go to all our corporate and individual members who have supported this work. The HCNSW is grateful for the support of the NSW Government through Arts NSW, without which it could not host its wonderful array of history programs. We would like to thank De Bortoli Wines for their continued generous support, sponsoring the Deen De Bortoli Award for Applied History. Our sincerest thanks go to Geoffrey Jones for his generous donation of the prize money for the 2016 Max Kelly Medal. We would also like to acknowledge the invaluable and continued support of our long-term cultural partners - Sydney Living Museums, State Library of NSW, Department of Modern History at Macquarie University, City of Sydney, Royal Australian Historical Society, Dictionary of Sydney and Inside History Magazine.

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ABOUT US Vision The HCNSW aims to ensure that history, in all its diverse forms, is an important part of the cultural life of the people and communities of New South Wales.

Objectives History is often an under-represented part of the cultural industry. The HCNSW provides services and programs, which aim to build capacity within the history sector and showcase the importance of history. We focus on five key areas: awareness, diversity, excellence, advocacy and outreach. Our objectives are to: •

Develop a relevant, vibrant and accessible professional development program for our members and audiences across New South Wales;



Promote communication within the history sector and provide opportunities for collaboration;



Provide a forum for identifying and responding to issues of relevance to the practice of history;



Celebrate the diversity of and foster excellence in historical practice.

Our Team EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Tanya Evans, President Stephen Gapps, Vice President Andrea Fernandes, Secretary Richard Neville, Treasurer David Carment, Executive Member Heidi Norman, Executive Member Nancy Cushing, Executive Member Lisa Ford, Executive Member GENERAL COUNCIL

Megan Martin, Sydney Living Museums Dave Earl, University of Sydney Cassie Mercer, Inside History Magazine Mari Metzke, Individual Representative Martyn Killion*, State Records NSW Louise Trott, Australian Society of Archivists Richard Waterhouse, University of Sydney Christine Wright, Royal Australian Historical Society *Martyn Killion is serving the remainder of Jenni Stapleton’s term (from November 2016 to the elections in February 2017). The HCNSW would like to acknowledge Jenni Stapleton for her service on the General Council.

Matthew Allen, University of New England STAFF Jeannine Baker, Macquarie University Lisa Murray, City of Sydney Nicole Cama, Executive Officer Michelle Cavanagh, Individual Representative Amy Way, Administrative Assistant Mirjana Djukic, St Lazarus Serbian Orthodox Church 4

OUR WORK 92 History Week events 11 Speaker Connect talks 240 members $6,500 in awards and prizes

History Week The HCNSW initiated History Week in 1997 to showcase the rich and diverse history being produced across New South Wales. During History Week, HCNSW members including community groups, local councils, libraries, archives, museums, universities, cultural institutions and history professionals celebrate the best in community and professional history and highlight its important role in our cultural life. The objectives of History Week are to: • • • •

Showcase history in an innovative and exciting format; Provide educational experiences that reach students and the general public, and promote lifelong learning opportunities; Present audiences with rich and diverse histories relevant to all aspects of our community; Attract new audiences to history, demonstrating that history is exciting, relevant and all around us.

History Week provides a united and focussed umbrella within which participating organisations and individuals can promote their work and reach a broad audience. The HCNSW has played an integral role in planning and organising History Week and it will continue to do so in 2017.

History Week 2016: Neighbours The theme for History Week 2016, ‘Neighbours’, included stories of individuals, families and communities living near one another and links between adjoining suburbs, regions and countries.



Neighbours

knew well but saw things only a true historian would show you.

of both conflict and friendship.

We were lead through an area we thought we

has

shaped

imagination

and

memories, created identities and been a source

On 2 September 2016 the State Library of NSW and HCNSW continued their longstanding, successful partnership to launch History Week at the NSW Premier’s History Awards. The HCNSW played a support role in the running and promotion 5

of the awards, providing advice on suitable judges and promoting the call for nominations, shortlist and results. A total of 92 events (compared with 86 in 2015) were registered in 2016, which included exhibitions, a comedy night, talks, tours and an open day at a primary school. The Department of Modern History, Macquarie University once again collaborated with HCNSW in organising a symposium. The event took place on 6 September 2016 at the State Library of NSW and attracted an audience of 54 people, with many survey respondents reporting they found it very interesting and intellectually stimulating. Sixty-four of the events were held in Sydney, 12 in Greater and Western Sydney, and 16 in regional NSW. Feedback surveys were circulated to audience members, host organisations and speakers. Representatives from 14 host organisations responded and noted attendance varied from 8 to 75 people, with an average of 41 attendees based on the responses.

Speaker Connect In 2016 HCNSW continued its Speaker Connect program. History professionals were invited to travel to organisations in Sydney and regional NSW to deliver exciting and thought provoking talks on the topic of



The program was great to be a part of

and I think the regional engagement that the Speaker Connect program promotes is really worthwhile and important.

neighbours. The program aims to: •

Connect history professionals with organisations across NSW and provide regional audiences with cultural enrichment opportunities;



Promote the work of history professionals to wider audiences and raise the profile of history;



Provide professional development and paid opportunities to history professionals.

HCNSW received 19 applications from potential hosts and 20 presentation proposals from speakers. Eleven talks by 12 speakers were hosted by a



There were high quality speakers with

variety of organisations across Sydney and NSW.

interesting and relevant topics - we would find it difficult to source these speakers ourselves.

Speakers were offered a $300 honorarium for their

Hohepa Ruhe

6

efforts and the talks were held free of charge and were open to the general public.

More than just neighbours: Maori in NSW since 1793 4 September 2016, Addison Road Community Centre, Marrickville

Lisa Murray

Deathly Neighbours: the evolution of Sydney’s cemeteries 7 September 2016, Fairfield City Museum and Gallery 9 September 2016, Ashfield Library

Jo Henwood

Macarthur and Harris, and the Kings who came between 9 September 2016, Katoomba Library and Cultural Centre

Kate Bagnall

From Canton to the Colonies: Chinese women in nineteenth-century NSW 7 September 2016, Corrimal District Library

Benjamin Thorn

Everyone has at least one really good story 6 September 2016, Grafton Library

Jeannine Baker

Women radio broadcasters and their listeners 10 September 2016, Moruya and District Historical Society

Rohan Howitt

Australia’s Southern Empire: How Antarctica was made Australian 11 September 2016, Port of Yamba Historical Society Inc

Liz Giuffre and Sarah Attfield

Finding the ‘Perfect Blend’ in an Undervalued Genre: Neighbours as a significant piece of popular television history 7 September 2016, Randwick City Library

Mark Dunn

On the neighbour’s circuit: good and bad neighbours in the colonial Hunter Valley 6 September 2016, Singleton Public Library

Louise Prowse

Territorial Myths: The construction of legend and historical ownership in country town communities in the twentieth century 8 September 2016, Tamworth Library

Lisa Murray at Ashfield Civic Centre, image courtesy Mark Dunn

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Rohan Howitt at Yamba, image courtesy Port of Yamba Historical Society Inc

Annual History Lecture The Annual History Lecture was presented by the HCNSW on 7 September 2016 at The Mint, Macquarie Street, Sydney and was delivered by Professor Heather Goodall.

Professor Heather Goodall, Annual History Lecture 2016, photo by tee eightch PHOTOGRAPHY

Professor Goodall presented her lecture ‘Neighbours – and heroes’. Goodall spoke about a selection of fascinating Australian activists, who had the courage to cross national boundaries and cultural and ethnic borders to build friendships and stand up for equality. These included Isabel Flick, Clarrie Campbell, Phyllis Johnson, Danny Singh and Lucy Woodcock. ABC Radio National’s Big Ideas recorded the lecture and broadcasted it on 19 October 2016.

Awards and Prizes The Annual History Citation 2016 was awarded to Associate Professor Carol Liston in recognition of her contributions to researching and teaching history and heritage, and her service to community and local history organisations.

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The Max Kelly Medal 2016 and prize of $500 was awarded to Daniel McKay for his essay ‘Loyal Children: The Australian Factor in the Birth of the Imperial Federation Movement’. The HCNSW is grateful to Geoffrey Jones for his generous donation of the prize money for the 2016 Max Kelly Medal. The 2016 Deen De Bortoli Award for Applied History was awarded to Dr Hannah Forsyth for her essay ‘Dreaming of Higher Education’. The Deen De Bortoli Award is generously funded by the De Bortoli family and named in memory of Deen De Bortoli (1936-2003). The inaugural Aboriginal History Prize was awarded to



As a fledgling historian, it is a great

honour and encouragement to have my research recognised…The History Council of NSW in supporting this award, are demonstrating a real commitment to new generations of historians. The more voices we have telling the stories of the past, the more vibrant and alive our shared history becomes.

Rachael Simons for her essay ‘“We Will Protect Ourselves”: William Ferguson’s Critique of the Policy of Aboriginal Protection in NSW, 1937-1938.’

Feedback The HCNSW offered survey participants the chance to enter to win a six-month digital subscription to Inside History magazine, courtesy of the HCNSW’s media partner, Inside History. This was an effective incentive as the survey received 58 responses compared with 38 in 2015.

History Week audience survey data* Which category below includes your age? 2015 Under 25 10.5% 26-35 2.6% 36-50 23.7% Over 50 63.2% Is this the first time you have Yes = 36.8% participated in History Week? No = 63.2% How many History Week events did you 1 = 47.2% attend? 2 = 38.9% 3 = 8.3% 4 = 2.8% 5 = 2.8% Would you recommend History Week to Yes = 100% a friend? No = 0%

2016 6.9% 5.2% 31% 56.9% Yes = 55.2% No = 44.8% 1 = 53.4% 2 = 19% 3 = 20.7% 4 = 6.9% 5 = 0% Yes = 100% No = 0%

* A full report of the survey results can be provided upon request to [email protected]

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What did you appreciate or enjoy most about History Week 2016? Word bubble of responses to this survey question created using Voyant https://voyant-tools.org/

“…

that there are some fabulous people

out there researching and protecting our history.

“…

appreciating what we have from

history and realising how important it is to treasure it.

History Week 2016 is supported by the NSW Government through Arts NSW

For a more comprehensive History Week 2016 report click here: bit.ly/HW16report

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Other Events and Programs Newcastle Writers Festival 2016 The HCNSW presented a panel, ‘Bringing Family History to Life’, to about 60 audience members at the Newcastle Writers Festival on 1 April 2016. Historians Nancy Cushing (University of Newcastle), Tanya Evans (Macquarie University), Catharine Coleborne (University of Newcastle) and Melanie Nolan (Australian National University) spoke about the family history boom and how it has impacted their research and writing. The panel noted that while emotive aspects of family history can sometimes diminish the practice in the eyes of academic historians, it is also what gives the discipline its power.

Sydney Writers’ Festival 2016 On 19 May 2016, the HCNSW presented a panel session, ‘Historical Obsessions’, at the Sydney Writers’ Festival. The session featured Sydney Living Museums’ Caroline Butler-Bowdon as chair of the panel, which comprised the winners of the 2015 NSW Premier’s History Awards – Alan Atkinson, Carolyn Holbrook and Babette Smith. To a full house, the panellists explored how and why they fell in love with their subjects. Atkinson revealed his fascination with the ‘continuing unsolvable mystery’ and ‘enigma of other people’s lives’; Smith noted how her rich and varied career has helped shape her understanding of human nature; and Holbrook spoke of how she tries to balance her historical works with the emotive elements that can arise through story and the analytical components of academic enquiry.

PACE Internships In 2016 Tanya Evans continued to recruit her modern history Professional and Community Engagement (PACE) Students to work with the HCNSW making connections organisations

with

local

across

and NSW

community including

history

“…

PACE allowed me to understand the

importance of history outside of academia and the role it can play in shaping and strengthening communities.

Mudgee,

Orange, Bourke and Albury-Wodonga. She is keen to set her students on a path towards employability but also wants them to value the significance of voluntary work, the importance of being able to work well with others and to become active citizens. It is vital for young people to engage with local and regional history when most local historical societies are suffering from an ageing membership. Knowledge of local history can have a powerful transformative impact on all learners, young as well as old. 11

MEDIA AND COMMUNICATIONS 2015

2016

Website page views

47,145

92,176

Twitter impressions*

31,500

328,200

Twitter followers

969

1,527

Facebook reach**

132,217

319,249

Facebook likes

1,590

2,248

Subscribers

1,409

1,500

* Times a user is served a Tweet in timeline or search results. Statistics provided by Twitter Analytics. ** The number of unique people who saw HCNSW content according to Facebook statistics.

The HCNSW communicates with its member organisations and individuals, sharing information about their activities, and offering advice on how best to engage audiences online. The website was re-designed and relaunched to improve the user experience and increase access to the HCNSW's services, simplifying navigation and abolishing the problematic member login function. A new strategy for social media was adopted in 2016, changing all channels to reflect the HCNSW as an organisation and not just its History Week activities. A clear, consistent and strategic approach to social media posting has meant the HCNSW has almost tripled its Facebook reach and significantly increased its Twitter impressions. The HCNSW e-newsletter, which was previously mainly focussed on History Week, was changed to include content on topical historical issues, engaging stories, events and announcements from members and partners as well as the HCNSW's programs. History Week received extensive publicity, which was generated organically through social media and word of mouth, despite the HCNSW not engaging a communications agency. Organisations piggybacked off History Week, taking the opportunity to tap into new audiences by relating their own content to the theme, for example, the Sydney Opera House and Biennale of Sydney, who have more than 78,000 followers between them. Articles and postings were published in newspapers and websites including ABC News, The Daily Telegraph, The Conversation, Bega District News, Camden Haven Courier, City of Sydney What’s On, and Central Sydney Magazine. Nicole Cama, Executive Officer of the HCNSW publicised History Week on 2SER Breakfast Radio and it was also featured on ABC’s The Gruen Transfer.

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FINANCIAL MATTERS The Auditor’s Report for 2016 can be made available on request. In 2016 the HCNSW generated an income of $112,490 ($173,475 in 2015) and had a surplus of $10,493 ($38,961 in 2015).

Matters in detail •

The major source of income received was government grants with $60,000 from Arts NSW.



Other income sources were sponsorship ($5,000), membership subscriptions ($29,209), and donations ($3,770). Though membership income increased, reduced staff resources made the pursuit of additional sources of income impossible.



Total expenses were $101,997 in 2016, reduced from $134,514 in 2015. Cost savings were made mainly in marketing/publicity expenses $127 ($11,912 in 2015), event costs $13,843 ($33,323), IT expenses $1,621 ($4,999), travel expenses $1,823 ($3,839) and administration costs $5,772 ($7,466). In addition, vital support was provided by HCNSW’s partners - De Bortoli Wines, State Library of NSW, Sydney Living Museums, City of Sydney, Royal Australian Historical Society.



The Arts NSW grant was used for salaries and History Week 2016 expenses, including the Annual History Lecture, Speaker Connect and promotional material.



Through careful financial management the HCNSW ended the year with a $10,493 surplus, however, a portion of this is from a Macquarie University PACE grant which will be spent in early 2017.



The HCNSW carefully monitored spending in 2016 due to a reduction in Arts NSW funding, however, it has received an increase in funding for 2017. Additional staff resources will be allocated to deliver the HCNSW’s comprehensive program of activities in 2017.



Despite funding challenges, the HCNSW remains in a secure position to continue its key activities and develop some new programs in 2017.

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OUR SUPPORTERS MAJOR SUPPORTER Arts NSW PARTNERS Macquarie University

Support us and our renewed 2017 vision to build capacity and strengthen the history sector.

State Library of NSW Sydney Living Museums

Become a member bit.ly/HCNSWSupport OR

City of Sydney Dictionary of Sydney

Donate via GiveNow at givenow.com.au/historycouncil

Royal Australian Historical Society Inside History Magazine SPONSORS De Bortoli Wines Geoffrey Jones

The History Council of NSW is grateful to its many corporate and individual members for their continued support.

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