History-to-Go - Tampa Bay History Center

History-to-Go - Tampa Bay History Center

Tampa Bay History Center History-to-Go Outreach Kit Unconquered People: Florida’s Seminole Indians Grades 3-5 Tampa Bay History Center Informao...

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Tampa Bay History Center

History-to-Go Outreach Kit

Unconquered People: Florida’s Seminole Indians

Grades 3-5

Tampa Bay History Center

Informaon for the Teacher

Welcome! The acvies and resources in this kit are intended to introduce students to Florida’s unique and diverse cultural heritage. Students discover the history of the Seminoles, their culture and tradions, and how their communies changed over me. Students also learn about the Seminole Wars and tribal resistance. The acvies in this kit are designed to help students explore and learn using hands-on objects. For example, students use a map to learn about the Seminole Wars; explore Seminole legends; and try their hand at running a trading post.

Seminole turban

Aligned with Florida’s Next Generaon Sunshine State Standards, the acvies are mul-disciplinary, integrang social studies, language arts, math and science. Most of all, they are meant to be engaging and fun. We wish you and your students happy exploring!

Seminole & Miccosukee Gallery, Tampa Bay History Center

Seminole sckball racquet

Overview of Acvies

Tampa Bay History Center

Acvity 1 Who, What, When and Where? Students use a 12-foot meline and historical postcards to sequence significant events in the history of the Seminole Tribe. Acvity 2 The Seminole Wars: 1812 - 1858 Students will learn about the causes and effects of the Seminole Wars as they examine the 1839 Florida Seat of War map. Acvity 3 Never Surrender: Seminole Resistance and Removal Students can visualize the impact of forced land forfeiture on the Seminoles as the tribe clashed with the American government from 1820 to today. Acvity 4 How Does Seminole Patchwork Tell a Story? Students idenfy patchwork as a significant cultural expression of the Seminole people. Acvity 5 Story Time: Seminole Legends Students idenfy Seminole legends and patchwork passed down through the generaons as a significant cultural expression of the Seminole people. Acvity 6 Design a Patchwork Students design and draw a Seminole-like patchwork that reflects the meaning of a Seminole legend. This acvity will be most successful if completed a8er students have learned to idenfy Seminole patchwork (Acvity 4) and Seminole Legends (Acvity 5). Acvity 7 Think Like a Seminole Students write a Seminole-like expository statement to explain a Seminole patchwork sample. Acvity 8 She Sang Promise: The Life of Be5y Mae Jumper Students become familiar with Be>y Mae Jumper, a modern Seminole tribal chief, and to idenfy ways that modern Seminoles contribute to their own cultural welfare. Acvity 9 Lost in a Canoe in the Everglades: A Read Along Acvity Students learn about the Everglades from the Seminole perspecve, and discuss the importance of the Everglades for Florida today. Acvity 10 John Horse Students learn about John Horse, an African-American Seminole Indian and the impact he had on Colonial Florida. Acvity 11 A Day at the Trading Post Students demonstrate their knowledge of the Seminole Indians by seBng up a trading post and inving others to visit the post.

Tampa Bay History Center

Checklist: What’s in the Kit? Books and CDs 













Alderson, Doug Great Florida Seminole Trail. Sarasota: Pineapple Press, 2013.

Annino, J.G. and Lisa Desimini She Sang Promise: The Story of Bey Mae Jumper, Seminole Tribal Leader. Naonal Geographic, 2010.

Benoit, Peter. The Trail of Tears. Scholasc: The Cornerstones of Freedom Series, 2012.

Buckley, Susan and Barbara Burt, eds. The Seminoles. Appleseeds Magazine, 2000.









Jumper, Be>y M. and Guy LaBree Legends of the Seminoles. Sarasota: Pineapple Press, 1994.

Naylor, Phyllis Reynolds. To Walk the Sky Path. Yearling, 1992.

Raffa, Edwina and Annelle Rigsby Escape to the Everglades (and teacher handbook). Sarasota: Pineapple Press, 2013.

Smith, Patrick. A Land Remembered (and workbook). Sarasota: Pineapple Press, 2001.

Downs, Dorothy Patchwork: Seminole and Miccosukee Art and Ac&vi&es. Sarasota: Pineapple Press, 2005. 

Sneve, Virginia Driving Hawk and R. Himler. The Seminoles. Holiday House: First American Books Series, 1994.



Wynne, Nick. Florida Tales: Historical Adventures for Young Floridians. Florida Historical Society Press, 1997.

Field, Ron and Richard Hook The Seminole Wars: 1818-58. Osprey Publishing, 2009.

George, Jean Craighead. The Talking Earth. HarperCollins, 1987. 

Four CDs of music and stories

Checklist: What’s in the Kit?

Tampa Bay History Center

Posters

 Seminole women making dolls and baskets

 Patchwork designs

 Osceola

 Billy Bowlegs

 John Horse

 Andrew Jackson

Tampa Bay History Center

Checklist: What’s in the Kit? Objects  Alligator head

 Can ra>le

 Dugout canoe (miniature replica)

 Patchwork strips

 Timeline and set of 26 postcards

 Seminole Wars card game (6 decks)

 Beads

 Foam shapes

 Doll

 Coone plant (branch, seed pod and seeds) Note: plant is toxic if consumed.

 Sckball racquet

 Turban

 Florida Seat of War map  Treaes and Reservaons (map icons)  Wooden Forts and Canoes (map icons)

 Seminole Tribe of Florida flag

 Seminole Tribune newspaper

Tampa Bay History Center

Acvity 2 The Seminole Wars: 1812 - 1858 TIME

40 minutes

OBJECTIVE

Students will learn about the causes and effects of the Seminole Wars as they examine the 1839 Florida Seat of War map.

MATERIALS

 Teacher background materials “Florida Seat of War”  1839 Florida Seat of War map  Seminole Wars 1818-58 by Ron Field  Card games (6 decks) – 4 students per deck, all of the decks are the same  Seminole Wars card game instrucons  Fort and canoe magnets

BACKGROUND: GAME METHOD Students play an easy-to-learn card game, much like Go Fish, to gather informaon about the Seminole Wars. Each matching set of cards in the deck includes informaon about one incident: the locaon, U.S. military a>ached to the fort, Seminole involvement and an explanaon of significant events. Students use the cards to locate events on the map, and to teach each other about the wars.

TEACHER INSTRUCTIONS 1.

Introduce this acvity by displaying the map on a white board or on a table. Point out the map creators included in the descripons on the map. Help students locate Tampa Bay, Lake Oh-Kee-Cho-Bee and Hai-O-Kee. The U.S. Army built 80 forts used to support the Seminole Wars. We believe they are all included on the map.

2.

Divide students into groups of 4 or less and pass out the card games. The game is played like Go Fish. Students need to collect four-of-a-kind (for instance, all of the number 2s = 4 cards) to complete a set of informaon.

3.

Walk through the instrucons with your students, helping them establish a dealer and the order of play. In our trials we discovered that many students have not ever played with a poker deck of cards before. They were unfamiliar with the Jacks, Queens, Kings and Aces and the suits.

4.

Allow play for 10-15 minutes. If all students have not completed the game they will be close to finished.

5.

Invite students, one at a me, to come to the map with a set of cards. Begin with the 2s and follow in sequence. Students will share the posion of their fort or event by comparing their map of Florida card to the big map, and place a fort or canoe magnet on the site. Ask them to tell their classmates about the people and events that are significant to the site. Encourage them to share the informaon and not just read off of the cards. You may want to fill in or answer quesons. The teacher background materials include many specifics about the incidents.

Tampa Bay History Center

Acvity 3 Never Surrender: Seminole Resistance and Removal TIME

15—25 minutes

OBJECTIVE

Students can visualize the impact of forced land forfeiture on the Seminoles as the tribe clashed with the American government from 1820 to today.

MATERIALS

 Seat of War map  Treaes and Reservaons map icons  Seat of War map Seminole Naon Land Key—Teacher Guide  Indian Removal by the Great White Father—Teacher Resource  The Seminole website www.semtribe.com, if me allows

BACKGROUND Creek Indians, runaway slaves and others looking for land to occupy arrived in Florida in the 1700s. As these groups of people banded together, they soon came to be known as Seminoles. The Seminoles lived off the land and sea in Florida: fishing, hunng, and growing crops. They learned to live with the mosquitos and the damp, wet cold and the hot, humid heat. For a me, the land of Florida was their land. Two treaes, the Treaty of Moultrie Creek and the Treaty of Payne’s Landing, and the 1830 federal Indian Removal Act restricted the movement of Seminoles within Florida. The treaes forced the Seminoles to move to areas of Florida that were set aside for them by the United States government. The Indian Removal Act a>empted to banish them from Florida forever. The Seminoles fought 3 wars against the United States government over their desire to remain in Florida. Over me the Seminoles, some by agreement and some by force, were gathered up at Fort Brooke in Tampa, and taken by boat to New Orleans where they joined other Nave Americans on the Trail of Tears. One hundred or so Seminoles hid from the government at the end of the Third Seminole War. Since 1950, the descendants of the 100 Seminoles have asked the US government for a return of their lands. Today the tribe holds 6 reservaons covering almost 90,000 acres of Federal Land holdings.

INSTRUCTIONS 1.

Begin this acvity by placing the red treaty icon on the map. This icon represents land deeded in both treaes. Discuss with your students the land restricons that began with the treaes.

2.

Remove the treaty icon and explain the Indian Removal Act and the subsequent removal of Seminoles to Oklahoma.

3.

Explain that 100 or so Seminoles remained in hiding – over me the Seminoles came out of hiding and were allowed land on reservaons. Add the icons that pinpoint the locaon of the current reservaons (land key—teacher guide).

4.

Discuss the impact of loss of land. Why is land so important to people? What might be the consequences of less land for the Seminoles?

5.

Display the words for the “Indian Removal by the Great White Father,” and discuss.

6.

If me allows, visit the Seminole website. Click on the culture link and allow your students to read more about the current Seminole culture.

Tampa Bay History Center

Acvity 4 How Does Seminole Patchwork Tell a Story? TIME

10—15 minutes

OBJECTIVE

Students idenfy patchwork as a significant cultural expression of the Seminole people.

MATERIALS

 Teacher background material - Patchwork: An Eye Dazzling Art by Dorothy Downs  2 Posters: Patchwork Designs and Seminole Women Working on Dolls and Baskets  Patchwork Seminole and Miccousukee Art and Ac$vi$es by Dorothy Downs  Seminole doll  Patchwork strips  Modern Seminole photographs—PowerPoint on flash drive

INSTRUCTIONS 1.

Begin this discussion by sharing the patchwork samples (poster, doll and samples). Allow students to pass around the cloth samples. Discuss with students the history of patchwork so that they understand the evoluon of the cra8 from hand-sewn patches to sewing machine creaons with patchwork and rickrack.

2.

Use the poster to explain about “look-like” names. Use Patchwork by Dorothy Downs, page 23, to explain the “lookalike” names associated with the Patchwork Designs poster.

3.

Using the fabric samples, ask the students what they think the designs look like. There are no specific “look-like” names associated with most of the fabric samples. It is up to the children to suggest names.

4.

Close this acvity by showing the photos of Seminoles taken between 1990 and today. Engage students in a conversaon about patchwork clothing as a cultural statement that connues today.

Tampa Bay History Center

Acvity 5 Story Time: Seminole Legends TIME

15—20 minutes

OBJECTIVE

Students idenfy Seminole legends and patchwork passed down through the generaons as a significant cultural expression of the Seminole people.

MATERIALS

 Legends of the Seminoles—excerpt from the introducon—Teacher Background Material  “Li>le Frog” from Legends of the Seminoles, page 59  Blue and White Storm patchwork strip  Patchwork by Dorothy Downs, page 40  Patchwork Designs poster

INSTRUCTIONS 1.

Begin this acvity by explaining legends are passed from generaon to generaon. Discuss Be>y Mae Jumper, the first Seminole to write down and publish some of the legends so they would be preserved as part of the Seminole cultural tradion.

2.

Read “Li5le Frog” to your students.

3.

Show your students the blue and white storm patchwork sample and use the Dorothy Downs book to explain about the “look-alike” naming of this sample as a storm.

4.

If me allows, there are other legends in the book that e patchwork to a legend. At the end of many of the stories you will find the patchwork that es to the poster.

Tampa Bay History Center

Acvity 6 Design a Patchwork TIME

30—40 minutes

OBJECTIVE

Students design and draw a Seminole-like patchwork that reflects the meaning of a Seminole legend. This acvity will be most successful if completed a8er students have learned to idenfy Seminole patchwork (Acvity 4) and Seminole Legends (Acvity 5).

MATERIALS

 “The Rabbit and the Snake” The Seminoles Appleseeds, page 16 (if you will read aloud to your students)  Legends of the Seminoles (Copies of different legends from the book if your students will read to themselves. Use the ones that do not include patchwork at the end of the story.)  Patchwork Design poster  Rubber shapes, one bag per student  Patchwork Design student sheet, 1 per student  A ruler and colored markers or crayons

INSTRUCTIONS 1.

Begin with the legend. Read The Rabbit and the Snake to your students, or ask them to read a legend to themselves.

2.

Help them to idenfy the central characters or theme in the legend(s). Many of the legends are similar to pour-quoi tales or creaon stories. Most of them have animals and elements of nature.

3.

Use the poster to discuss pa>erns and the repeon of the design.

4.

Hand out the Patchwork Design sheets (one per student)

5.

Hand out the shapes.

6.

Ask students to use the shapes to design a pa>ern to complement the story they heard or read. Remind them to design a pa>ern to represent an element in the story. Ask them to repeat the pa>ern. Students may want to trade shapes to come up with their repeon. If you do not mind the trading, TBHC does not mind if different shapes are returned in the bags.

7.

Ask students to use a ruler and the coloring implements to recreate their design in the space provided below their original work.

8.

Return the rubber shapes to the plasc bags.

9.

Ask students to give their patchwork a name and write it in the space le8 vacant by the removal of the rubber shapes.

10. Finish by making a class poster using all of the student designs.

Tampa Bay History Center

Acvity 7 Think Like a Seminole TIME

20—30 minutes

OBJECTIVE

Students write a Seminole-like expository statement to explain a Seminole patchwork sample.

MATERIALS

 Seminole Patchwork Poster  Patchwork by Dorothy Downs, page 23  Seminole patchwork fabric samples

BACKGROUND Seminoles legends are similar to pour-quoi tales. They explain the universe from the point of view of the Seminoles. The legends usually include animals and other elements of nature. This acvity is best accomplished a8er students have learned to idenfy Seminole patchwork (acvity 4) and Seminole legends (acvity 5).

INSTRUCTIONS 1.

Introduce this acvity by sharing the patchwork poster and the patchwork sample look-alike names found on page 23 in Patchwork by Dorothy Downs.

2.

Share the fabric samples with your students and brainstorm potenal names for the designs.

3.

Ask students to choose a patchwork sample, give it a name, and write an expository statement that explains the Seminole-like legend behind the patchwork.

4.

If me allows, students will share their expository statements or write the legend imagined in their expository statement.

Tampa Bay History Center

Acvity 8 She Sang Promise: The Life of Be5y Mae Jumper TIME

20—30 minutes

OBJECTIVE

Students become familiar with Be>y Mae Jumper--the first and only female Seminole Tribe Chief-and idenfy ways that modern Seminoles contribute to their own cultural welfare.

MATERIALS

 She Sang Promise by J. G. Annino  Photos of Be>y Mae Jumper (found on website Semtribe.com)

INSTRUCTIONS 1.

Share with students photos of Be>y Mae Jumper from the Seminole Tribe website.

2.

Read She Sang Promise to students.

3.

Ask students to help you make a list of ways in which the Seminoles preserve their cultural identy.

4.

5.

a.

Schools

b.

Tourism

c.

Seminole Indian News

Ask students to list the services that Seminoles offer within their tribe that contributes to a be>er way of life. a.

Medical help

b.

Tribal government

c.

Schools

d.

All of the above

Discuss with students: What is Be>y Mae Jumper’s most important contribuon to her people? How does she help non-Seminoles be>er understand about the Seminole culture?

⇒ “She is a voice for her people.” ⇒ What does it mean to be a voice for your people?

Tampa Bay History Center

Acvity 9 Lost in a Canoe in the Everglades: A Read Along Acvity TIME

20 minutes

OBJECTIVE

Students learn about the Everglades from the Seminole perspecve, and discuss the importance of the Everglades for Florida today.

MATERIALS

 Florida Tales, Historical Adventures for Young Floridians by Nick Wynne  Dugout Canoe (miniature replica)  CD: Voices of the Everglades (Florida Humanies Council, 2009)  Website: The Journey to Restore America’s Everglades, created for 4th grade curriculum, The Journey of Wayne Drop to the Everglades h>p://www.evergladesplan.org/educaon/ lesson_plans_waynedrop.aspx

INSTRUCTIONS 1.

Begin this acvity by showing students the wooden canoe and talking about traveling throughout Florida in this kind of boat.

2.

Connue this acvity by reading aloud the adventure “Lost in the Everglades,” found in Florida Tales, pages 71-78.

3.

Discuss: a.

What words does the author use to describe the Everglades?

b.

How does the reader know the Everglades are important to the Seminoles?

c.

What did Billy Jumper mean when he said that Richard had a Seminole heart? What is a Seminole heart and what did Richard do to acquire one?

4.

Close with an excerpt from the CD Voices of the Everglades: “Voice of the River” (3:38), “Mi Amigo Mosquito” (3:52) or “Please Don’t Feed the Alligators” (:36).

5.

If me allows, share the Everglades website with your students. This website is best used with Flash.

Tampa Bay History Center

Acvity 10 John Horse TIME

20-30 minutes

OBJECTIVE

Students learn about John Horse, an African-American Seminole Indian and the impact he had on Colonial Florida.

MATERIALS

 Background on John Horse included in Teacher Background materials or found at h>p://www.johnhorse.com/black-seminoles/synopsis.htm  Poster of John Horse  Rebellion website h>p://www.johnhorse.com/index.html

INSTRUCTIONS 1.

Hang the poster of John Horse and explain that students will learn about the struggles of John Horse and African American Seminoles in their pursuit of freedom from slavery.

2.

In a computer lab, ask students to access the Rebellion website. As a group, or on their own, view the Picture Tour to get an overview of John Horse and the role of African Americans in the formaon of the Seminole Naon. (The Picture Tour link can be found in the Overview or in the Images secon.) The vocabulary may be difficult for 4th grade students to read by themselves.

3.

Discuss.

Tampa Bay History Center

Acvity 11 A Day at the Trading Post

45- 60 minutes (including me for students to make a Seminole bead object and set up the trading post)

TIME

30+ minutes for the post to be open OBJECTIVE

Students demonstrate their knowledge of the Seminole Indians by seBng up a trading post and inving others to visit the post.

MATERIALS

 Video clip - Florida Memory, “Seminoles at work and play at the Silver Springs Trading Post in 1960” (14minutes) h>p://www.floridamemory.com/items/show/232386  Postcard invite to the trading post  Postcards  Sewing machine and trading post poster  Arfacts  48 Bead cra8 making kits  Seminole flag  48 Pennies, distributed to the vising tourists as they arrive at the trading post

INSTRUCTIONS 1.

Begin this acvity by explaining how the Seminoles emerged from the Everglades. They established trading post businesses along the highways to a>ract the a>enon of tourists vising Florida. Show the Florida Memory video.

2.

Explain that students will set up their own trading post and decide who to invite to visit the post.

3.

Ask students to construct 2 Seminole bracelets or other bead cra8s. The kit includes 2 sets of beads for each student and string. There are enough beads in each bag for a bracelet. Students may keep one of the bracelets for themselves, but they should not take it home unl a8er the trading day. The other bead object is to be sold in their trading post. ⇒ While they are working, explain that the Seminoles operated their trading posts for the benefit of the whole tribe. Funds collected were given to the tribe treasury and the tribe used the money to care for all members of the tribe. The funds they collect for their beads will be returned to their chief, their teacher.

4.

Send out the invitaons.

5.

Students might name their post. They can also make a sign with the name of the post and signs for the arfacts they are selling.

On the day of the event: 6.

Decide on a display area and set up a table to display the arfacts.

7.

Hang the posters and Seminole flag.

8.

If students have made patchwork designs (Acvity 5) display them as well.

9.

As the vising tourists arrive, give each of them 2 pennies so that they may make a purchase at the trading post. ONLY the student-made bead objects are for sale.

10. Students may share informaon about the arfacts and posters and demonstrate Seminole acvies. They can sell their bead cra8s.