IS THIS THE YEAR?

IS THIS THE YEAR?

VOL. 17 | ISSUE 161 SEPT. 3-16, 2014 IS THIS THE YEAR? FAN PREDICTIONS & WEEKEND ALTERNATIVES FOR THE FAINT OF FOOTBALL | PAGE 6 BRANSTAD VS. HATCH ...

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VOL. 17 | ISSUE 161 SEPT. 3-16, 2014

IS THIS THE YEAR? FAN PREDICTIONS & WEEKEND ALTERNATIVES FOR THE FAINT OF FOOTBALL | PAGE 6

BRANSTAD VS. HATCH SEE HOW THE CANDIDATES MATCH UP ON STUDENT DEBT | PAGE 4

GROUND CONTROL ASTRONAUT CHRIS HADFIELD

TELLS HIS TRUE STORY OF SINGING IN A TIN CAN. | PAGE 14

A L W A Y S

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VOL. 17 | ISSUE 161 SEPT. 3-16, 2014

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NEWS

IOWA'S HIGHER ED PROBLEM As Gov. Terry Branstad and Democratic challenger Jack Hatch square off, debt-burdened students are left scratching their heads. BY ADAM B SULLIVAN

W

hen Gov. Terry Branstad enrolled in the University of Iowa in the 1960s, tuition was just $340. Today, in-state students and their families shell a bare minimum of about $8,000 for tuition and fees over the course of a year, despite a tuition freeze that Branstad pushed legislators to fund this past session. And even though Iowa students are racking up more debt than almost anywhere else in the country, college affordability has so far not floated to the top of this year’s gubernatorial contest between

THE RACE IS ON | The complacent and corpulent versus the nameless and penniless. Illustration by Mark Vollenweider

Branstad and Democrat challenger Jack Hatch. This fall’s elections come amid local concern over the University of Iowa’s funding from the state. The school now receives more funding from the state government than either of the other two state universities—some $230 million in this year’s budget, compared to less than $200 million at Iowa State, and less than $100 million at Northern Iowa. A

new funding model, though, could straighten out that imbalance. The plan approved by the Iowa Board of Regents earlier this year would put a heavier emphasis on educating in-state students, potentially tightening UI’s funding stream since it educates a higher portion of out-of-state students than ISU and UNI. To cope, UI leaders are planning heavier recruitment of Iowa high schoolers. And they’ve also set out to prove the university’s worth to constituents across Iowa, launching the “University for IOWA” campaign this summer, meant to “illustrate the ways that UI serves our state.” The university also appears to be refocusing on economic development, with leaders announcing in August they were beefing up the school’s economic development office with a few staff changes: “It is clear that Iowa’s public universities must work not only to educate the future workforce, but do all they can to ensure there are good jobs at thriving companies waiting when they graduate, and that faculty and student innovators have adequate support to translate great ideas into products and businesses,” UI President Sally Mason said in a press release. Even if Iowa colleges remain a bargain compared to other big universities—in-state tuition at UI ranks the second-lowest among schools in the Big Ten, for instance—students here are still managing to accrue plenty of debt: About three-fourths of graduates from Iowa colleges and universities have debt, an average of about $30,000 each, according to U.S. Department of Education data. That’s one

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NEWS of the highest marks of any state in the country and a few thousand above the national average. Iowa students’ increasing debt totals are fueled by public college tuition rates that inched up each year until recently; four-year graduation rates below 50 percent at most Iowa colleges; and periods of below-average income growth in the state. Those debt loads are also a product of a national student borrowing frenzy in recent years: In 2001, the federal government doled out almost $50 billion in higher education loans, compared to over $100 billion a decade later in 2011, according to a 2012 report by the College Board. Branstad has acknowledged the issue and pushed for tuition freezes the last two years, while Hatch calls student debt a “drag on the economy” and also supported the tuition freezes. But long-term plans for keeping tuition and debt in check seem sparse on the campaign trail, aside from vague ideas about curricular flexibility and collaborating between secondary schools and colleges. “[Community colleges] are working with local school districts in offering courses, higher level math and science and vocational courses and they’re doing it in conjunction.

… We have something where you can dual enroll and get college credit in high school,” Branstad said at the first debate.

About three-fourths of graduates from Iowa colleges and universities have debt, an average of about $30,000 each, according to U.S. Department of Education data.

But even if Iowa grads are strapped with debt, at least they enter a state economy that even challenger Hatch admits is “going well.” Unemployment in July was just 4.5 percent, below the national rate of 6.2 percent and Iowa’s metro areas consistently earn high marks for their job markets. Just a couple weeks ago, Forbes called Des Moines the best American city for young professionals. Branstad says he can sustain the favorable economy through his economic development

strategy, characterized by a series of tax relief packages that have drawn ire from critics. Hatch, a real estate developer, is no enemy of economic development incentives, but he also says the state’s economy needs a boost from a minimum wage hike—potentially a boon for working students and other low-wage young people. “By bringing it up to $10.10, you create thousands of new opportunities for people, and they no longer have to depend on public assistance,” Hatch said during the August debate. A handful of polls over the summer gave Branstad a double-digit lead over Hatch. Branstad has a very comfortable fundraising lead as well, reporting more than $4 million on hand in mid-July, compared to some $180,000 for Hatch. A win in November would make Branstad one of the winningest politicians in American history—undefeated over six gubernatorial contests. “We have only just begun. We have a lot more to accomplish,” Branstad said at the debate last month. Adam B Sullivan is an activist and freelance journalist in Iowa City.

FAULCONER GALLERY

THROUGH SEPTEMBER 28

EDWARD BURTYNSKY WATER Organized by the New Orleans Museum of Art.

ONE NIGHT ONLY: WATERMARK an award-winning film by Jennifer Baichwal and Edward Burtynsky September 12, 7:30 p.m. Sebring-Lewis Hall Bucksbaum Center for the Arts Grinnell College Open daily 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. grinnell.edu/faulconergallery

GRINNELL COLLEGE

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV161 | Sept. 3 - 16, 2014 | 5

SPORTING LIFE

HOPE FOR THE HAWKEYES? Last year the Hawks defied expectations and fought their way to a January bowl game that they almost won. This year, a favorable schedule places the team in early contention for a Big Ten title. BY CASEY WAGNER

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he Iowa Hawkeyes' football team recovered from a disappointing 2012 campaign with eight wins in 2013 and a trip to a January bowl game. The 2014 Hawkeyes have the experience and talent to not only win more than eight games, but to also compete for the Big Ten title.

NORTHERN IOWA—Aug. 29, 11 a.m. This issue will be at the printers while the Hawkeyes take on the Panthers, so by now we've all likely seen the game's results. While our neighbors to the north do tend to put up a good fight, we're going to summon our Hawkeye pride and go ahead and call this one a... WIN.

STRENGTH OF SCHEDULE: Iowa has a very favorable schedule that includes three teams from the Hoosier State (Ball State, Indiana and Purdue) and none of the top four teams in the Big Ten East division (Michigan, Michigan State, Ohio State and Penn State). With this relatively light schedule, a trip to Indianapolis for the Big Ten Championship Game is not out of the question.

BALL STATE—Sept. 6, 2:30 p.m. The Cardinals are not your usual sacrificial lamb from the MAC. Among the 10 teams Ball State beat last year was Northern Illinois, a team that beat Iowa. However, the Cardinals are a different team heaving lost their star quarterback and three top receivers. WIN.

ON OFFENSE: Balance is the key. Stocked with experience and versatility all around, Iowa will be able to pound the ground with a diverse and talented set of running backs and a massive offensive line that can plow gaping holes in defenses. A veteran quarterback and a trusty, experienced corps of wide receivers and tight ends will produce an efficient passing attack. ON DEFENSE: Five starters return from a team that last year gave up the sixth fewest yards per game in the country. “Bend but don’t break” is the philosophy of the Iowa defense, and despite having a number of holes to fill—a lot of experience and talent graduated in May—the Hawkeyes will be bending a lot more than they break this season. BOTTOM LINE: To get to the Big Ten Championship Game, the Hawkeyes will need to play to their potential. In the past, Iowa has matched topranked opponents toe-to-toe, but then inexplicably stooped to the level of their mediocre competition, not only frustrating fans but also damaging the team’s conference title hopes and confidence. The Hawks need to bring their A-game this fall to earn a shot at winning the Big Ten crown.

6 | Sept. 3 - 16, 2014 | LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV161

F O O T B A L L F R E E Z O N E S If you are looking to get sporty on Saturdays, but lack a taste for the Hawkey-flavored lifestyle, let's just say that you are not alone. These nearby destinations are easy to access, but far enough away from Kinnick Stadium that you (most likely) won't slip on any vomit on the way to your workout:

IOWA STATE—Sept. 13, 2:30 p.m. Despite a late game-scoring flurry from Iowa State, the Hawkeyes beat up the Cyclones last year. The same will hopefully happen again this season, with Iowa ramming the ball down the throat of the Iowa State defense like it did in 2013. WIN. @ PITTSBURGH—Sept. 20, Time TBD Pitt head coach Paul Chryst was Wisconsin’s offensive coordinator from 2005–2011, so he’s familiar with the Hawkeyes and Big Ten football. Iowa can beat Pitt, but the Hawkeyes don’t have a stellar record in their last 10 true road openers (4-6) and always seem to lay an egg on the road at least once per season. LOSS. @ PURDUE—Sept. 27, 11 a.m. The Boilermakers are not good. This is definitely a rebuilding era in West Lafayette. However, this is one of those games where, in the past, the Hawkeyes have failed to rise above their opponent’s weaknesses. If the Hawks do not pound the Boilermakers into the ground early and keep them buried, Purdue could hang around and gain some confidence. That is when a program-building upset could happen. WIN. INDIANA—Oct. 11, 11 a.m. Indiana rounds out the Hoosier State triumvirate on Iowa’s schedule. The Hoosiers racked up a lot of yardage on offense last year (508.5 per game), but their defense could not stop a three-year-old on a tricycle (527.9 yards

Disc Golf & Camping at Sugar Bottom Follow signs south off Mehaffey Bridge Road NE | N. Liberty

With 18 holes conveniently located right near the campgrounds, you can dodge Saturday traffic by starting your escape on Friday and making a weekend of it. DISTANCE FROM KINNICK: 12 MILES

Bike to Terry Trueblood Recreation Area 4213 SE Sand RD. | Iowa City

An in-town waterfront oasis, the Terry Trueblood Recreation Area offers kayak rentals, paddle boards, bike trails and hiking. DISTANCE FROM KINNICK: 3.5 MILES

Paddleboarding at Lake MacBride 3525 Highway 382 NE | Solon

Take in the last drops of summer with a hike, a swim and a trip out on Lake Macbride. Afterwards, quench your thirst at Big Grove Brewery in downtown Solon. DISTANCE FROM KINNICK: 20 MILES

SPORTING LIFE allowed per game). Indiana may put up a number of points on the scoreboard at Kinnick, but the Hawkeyes should score more to celebrate homecoming with a win. WIN. @ MARYLAND—Oct. 18, 11 a.m. The Terrapins and Hawkeyes will play each other for the first time ever. Although decimated by injuries last year, if Maryland can stay healthy, they could have an explosive offensive—for a bunch of turtles. This has the potential to be a close game, which is bad news for the Hawks. Since 2010, Iowa has been 4-10 in games decided by three points or less. LOSS.

NORTHWESTERN—Nov. 1, Time TBD The Wildcats give the Hawkeyes fits when they have a mobile quarterback, which they don’t this year. Northwestern still has a solid running game and Trevor Siemian is an efficient passer. Seven starters return to a defense that was among the worst in the Big Ten last year, so chances are the Wildcats have improved. Iowa should be able to handle the Wildcats this year, but you never know … WIN. @ MINNESOTA—Nov. 8, Time TBD The Gophers are on the rise with a lot of experienced players returning, including a strong defense. One big change, though, is the quarterback: Mitch Leidner will replace Philip Nelson, who left the team. The Hawkeyes ran roughshod at TCF Bank Stadium last year, picking up 246 yards, so the Gophers will want redemption and Floyd of Rosedale. Minnesota’s defense may be a stiff test, but their offense is essentially one-dimensional. WIN. @ ILLINOIS—Nov. 15, Time TBD Iowa plays the hated pumpkin heads of Illinois for the first time since 2008. In two years as head coach, Illinois’ Tim Beckman has only won a single conference game. Illinois may double or even triple Beckman’s Big Ten wins

MAN ENOUGH | Senior Wide Receiver Kevonte Martin-Manley is among the NCAA's most dangerous punt returners. Photo by Chris Mortenson

2014 HAWKS TO WATCH

JAKE “SPEEDY” RUDOCK

POSITION: Quaterback HOMETOWN/YEAR: Weston, Fla./Junior SUPERPOWERS: In 2013, Rudock completed 59 precent of his passes for 2,383 yards and 18 TDs. His game is agile, versatile and mobile which lends a much-needed factor of improvisation to keep opposing defenses on their toes. ACHILLES HEEL: Rudock will need to cut down his turnover contribution (he threw 13 interceptions last year) and protect his knees after injuries took him out of three games.

MARK “THE RUMBLER” WEISMAN

POSITION: Running Back HOMETOWN/YEAR: Buffalo Grove, Ill./Senior SUPERPOWERS: Weighing in at 240 pounds, Weisman is a prototypical bruiser who has

amassed 1,790 yards and 16 TDs over the last two seasons. He will power the ball between the tackles and keep local icemakers busy filling orders for opposing linebackers and safeties. ACHILLES HEEL: Weisman has received his fair share of bruises the last couple years, leaving games early due to foot, elbow and pectoral injuries. His body needs to be able to take the pounding Iowa needs from him.

KEVONTE “KMART” MARTIN-MANLEY

POSITION: Wide Receiver, Punt Returner HOMETOWN/YEAR: Pontiac, Mich/Senior. SUPERPOWERS: The sure-handed and dangerous Martin-Manley ranks second in the Big Ten and eighth in the nation for punts returns. Last year, he lead the team in punt return yardage (314) and famously returned two punts for touchdowns in less than one minute last year against Western Michigan. ACHILLES HEEL: Infallible.

records this season, but one of those victories will probably not be against Iowa. WIN. WISCONSIN—Nov. 22, Time TBD This game will likely decide who has the upper hand for the Big Ten West title. Wisconsin lost a lot of good players and will basically have new faces on defense. But four starters return to an offensive line that weighs nearly 1,600 pounds, and running back Melvin Gordon will look to improve on the 1,609 yards he rushed for last season. With home field advantage, though, the Hawkeyes should be able to reclaim the Heartland Trophy. WIN. NEBRASKA—Nov. 28, Time TBD The Cornhuskers have a lot of experienced players returning on offense, but there will be a lot of new faces on defense. Among the offensive players returning this season are leading passer Tommy Armstrong, Jr., the team’s three leading rushers and three of the top four receivers from 2013, including defensive end Randy Gregory, who lead the Big Ten last year with 10.5 sacks. Still, the Hawkeyes should be able to handle the Huskers. WIN. —Casey Wagner

BRANDON “THE FREAK” SCHERFF

POSITION: Offensive Lineman (Left Guard) HOMETOWN/YEAR: Denison, Iowa/Senior. Superpowers: The left side of the offensive line is anchored by tackle Scherff (6 feet 5 inches, 320 pounds), a potential NFL firstround pick who literally will have Rudock’s back protecting the blindside. ACHILLES HEEL: In 2012, Scherff missed the final five games of the season after suffering a broken right fibula and dislocated ankle, but he returned strong and started at left tackle in all 13 games in 2013.

CARL “THE MOUNTAIN” DAVIS

POSITION: Defensive Tackle HOMETOWN/YEAR: Detroit, Mich./Senior SUPERPOWERS: Three starters return to the defensive line, including Davis. A 315-pound run stopper who recorded 42 total tackles last season, Davis is a mountain that opposing offensive linemen will need to move. ACHILLES HEEL: Davis missed the final six games of the 2011 season after his right kneecap popped in and out of place, but has bounced back nicely after surgery in 2012. LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV161 | Sept. 3 - 16, 2014 | 7

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ON THE TABLE

I SCREAM,YOU SCREAM Here’s a recipe for delicious homemade ice cream. BY FRANKIE SCHNECKLOTH

A

sweet friend recently shipped me some Jeni’s Splendid Ice Cream all the way from Ohio as a belated birthday gift and end of summer treat. Three pints of different flavors showed up on my doorstep on top a slab of dry ice and made me one happy gal. Since its arrival, I’ve been hiding my ice cream in the back of the freezer, trying to ignore its siren calls. Inevitably, I give in and tell myself, ‘just a spoonful’ will do the trick. For a person with a reasonable amount of willpower one spoonful is enough—but that person is not me. I can’t stop at just one, and I don’t stop until all my spoons lie dirty in the sink.

Photos by Frankie Schneckloth

Ingredients 2 cups whole milk 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon cornstarch 3 tablespoons cream cheese, softened 1/8 teaspoon fine sea salt 1 1/4 cups heavy cream 2/3 cup sugar 2 tablespoons light corn syrup a large handful of fresh mint, torn into pieces

1 gallon Ice

ziplock bag

I don’t, by any means, relegate ice cream consumption to warmer months, but there is something so summery about a bowl of ice cream, eaten outside among a chorus of cicadas. The seasons will soon shift, but there’s still plenty of time to make homemade ice cream and savor the last days of summer. NOTE: You will need an electric ice cream maker for this recipe. The ice cream canister should be solidly frozen before you attempt this recipe or your ice cream will never actually become ice cream, which would be very sad. If you freeze all the components of the ice cream maker, minus the actual electric base—the canister, the paddle, even the lid—it helps the freezing process along. The ingredients listed, minus the mint, create a go-to recipe for experimenting with different flavors. If you don’t like mint, you could try infusing your base with lavender or swirling in a berry purée as you pour your ice cream into a storage container.

12 OZ. CURLS BREW OF THE MONTH: SEPTEMBER

Step One: PREP |

Mix two tablespoons of milk with cornstarch in a small bowl to make a smooth slurry. Whisk the cream cheese and salt in a medium bowl until smooth. Fill a large bowl with ice and water for an ice bath.

Step Two: COOK | Combine the remain-

ing milk, cream, sugar and corn syrup in a four-quart saucepan, and bring to a rolling boil over medium-high heat for four minutes. Remove from heat and gradually whisk in the cornstarch slurry. Bring the mixture back to a boil over medium-high heat and cook about one minute or until slightly thickened, stirring with a heatproof spatula. Remove from heat.

Step 3: CHILL | Gradually whisk the hot milk mixture into the cream cheese until smooth. Add mint, then pour the mixture into a 1-gallon ziplock freezer bag, seal it and submerge in the ice bath for 30 minutes until cold, adding more ice as necessary. Refrigerate to steep the mint flavor for four to 12 hours. Step 4: FREEZE |

Strain out the mint. Pour the ice cream base into the ice cream maker’s frozen canister and use the machine to spin until thick and creamy. Pack the ice cream into a storage container, press a sheet or parchment directly against the surface of the ice cream and seal with an airtight lid. Freeze in the coldest part of your freezer until firm for at least 4 hours. Enjoy! Recipe adapted from Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams at Home by Jeni Britton Bauer.

Frankie Schneckloth lives, works and eats ice cream in Iowa City.

BARLEY AND ME PUPPY PALE ALE Confluence Brewing Company | Des Moines, Iowa

B

arley and Me Puppy Pale Ale, Little Village's beer of the month, is for the dogs. And cats, rabbits, ferrets, pigs and the many other animals sheltered and cared for by the Animal Rescue League of Iowa (ARL). A portion of every sale of Barley and Me goes to the ARL, Iowa’s largest nonprofit animal shelter. The ARL was founded in 1926 and serves people and pets from across Iowa through programs that include pet adoption, humane education, pet behavior training, spay and neutering and animal cruelty intervention. Serve Barley and Me in a favorite pint glass. The beer pours a hazy, medium-amber color, and a finger and a half of dense, buttery, eggshell-colored foam dissipates slowly, leaving lacing along the side of the glass. The aroma is bursting with fresh and invigorating tropical fruit and citrus. Scents of mango, pineapple, kiwi, a little tangerine, cara cara orange, lemon zest and grapefruit stand out. Sweet caramel malt provides a very enticing balance. The Nelson Sauvin hops used in the brewing process also impart aromas reminiscent of gooseberry. The beer’s mouthfeel is full and bready and the taste is a delicious mirror image of the aroma. Flavors of mango, tangerine, kiwi, a touch of pineapple, lemon zest and grapefruit are most prominent. A nice, hoppy bite provides backing and lingers on the taste buds after each sip. Sweet caramel malt is also noticeable and balances the hop bitterness. SERVING TEMPERATURE: 45ºF. ALCOHOL CONTENT: 5.5 percent ABV. FOOD PAIRING: Eric Selander, Confluence’s sales and distribution manager, recommends

“something along the lines of an aged cheddar and smoked sausage for an appetizer and fish and chips or a pork chop with a pineapple demi-glaze for an entree. The New Zealand Motueka and Nelson Sauvin hops are hearty on the front end but finish softly and linger on the palate.” WHERE TO BUY: Barley and Me is available in 32-ounce mini-growlers at John’s Grocery, New Pioneer Food Co-op and the Coralville Hy-Vee Wine and Spirits. It is on tap at Blackstone, Short’s Burger and Shine downtown, Old Capitol Brew Works, Stella and will soon be at both Quinton’s locations. PRICE: $9 per mini-growler.

Casey Wagner lives and works in Iowa City.

PRAIRIE POP

OF SPACE AND COPYRIGHT ODDITIES Even though he had escaped the bonds of earth, astronaut Chris Hadfield was still bound by copyright laws when recording his extraterrestrial Bowie cover. • BY KEMBREW MCLEOD

L

ast year, Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield and his son Evan cooked up an out-of-this-world family project: a cover of David Bowie’s 1969 hit “Space Oddity,” complete with a zero gravity music video filmed on the International Space Station. Uploaded right before he touched down on Earth, it rapidly racked up millions of hits from around the world. His “Space Oddity” video was in the news again recently after it was pulled from YouTube, sparking conjecture that Bowie’s lawyers believed that it was an interplanetary copyright infringement. The reality is a bit more mundane—though before getting into the minutiae of copyright licensing, let’s start from the beginning. “When I first got to the space station,” Commander Chris Hadfield explained, “I recorded a Christmas song my brother and I wrote called ‘Jewel in the Night.’ Then my son put it out on SoundCloud, and when people found out there was a musician in space, there was a continuous clamor for me to record 12 | Sept. 3 - 16, 2014 | LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV161

FLOATING IN A MOST PECULIAR WAY | Hadfield strums to his son from a little closer to the sun. Illustration by Jared Jewell

‘Space Oddity.’” “It surprised me because, why would you want to do that? The astronaut dies in that song,” he said, laughing. “But my son was persistent and kept telling me, ‘You’ve got to do it.’ So I made a deal with him that if he rewrote the song so that the astronaut lived, I would make a recording of it.” “It’s not a song I normally play,” he added. “I’ve played a lot of music, but that wasn’t in my repertoire.” During his 21-year tenure as a Houston-based astronaut, Hadfield fronted and played in several local groups—including Max Q, an all-astronaut band. It turns out that many astronauts are musicians, including about half of his crewmates on the space station—which had an acoustic guitar, harmonica, keyboard and ukulele. “There’s a connection between music and mathematics,” Hadfield pointed out. How does space change the way you play

music? “The big difference is that the guitar is not held in place by anything,” Hadfield says. “It doesn’t suspend itself on a strap, and it doesn’t sit on your lap because it’s weightless.” He compares it to playing an acoustic guitar that is floating in a pool, and also notes that weightlessness alters the way you strum and fret—because gravity isn’t pulling your arm down. “But the nice thing is, if you drop the pick, it doesn’t go anywhere.” Space also affects your voice. “You have no weight on your diaphragm,” Hadfield says, “your head is constantly congested because there’s no way for your sinuses to drain, your tongue is a little thicker … and so your voice has a different quality in space than it does on Earth.” After Hadfield demoed the track, musicians on Earth (including former Bowie band member Emm Gryner) added other instruments. He shot the music video while in orbit and sent it down to the Canadian Space Agency, which handed it over to his son, Evan Hadfield, who edited the footage with a friend. “They released it just in a nick of time,” Hadfield says, “got it all done and released it the day before I came back from orbit.” But before they could legally upload it to YouTube, his team had to deal with a variety of copyright issues. The Commander’s cover of “Space Oddity” raised many legal questions. Could one infringe on David Bowie’s earthly copyright in space? Is a sound recording even copyrightable if it has been taped in space? And if so, in what country would it be copyrighted? It appears that the answers are yes, yes, and … well, it’s complicated. According to The Economist, the various sections of the International Space Station are governed by different intellectual property laws—depending on which country built them. Hadfield recorded the performance in the Canadian part of the space station, which means that the sound recording was copyrighted in Canada. Fortunately, the earthbound musicians he collaborated with were all located in Canada, which avoided additional transnational copyright headaches. To get permission from Bowie’s song

publishing company, Hadfield pulled the old Astronaut Mind Trick. “I just called them from the space station on the phone,” he tells me. “Time was getting a little short, and so I called them and asked them, and they talked to the people at the Canadian Space Agency and it worked out.” “It turns out that even Bowie himself gave the go-ahead, “Hadfield said. “The licensing people liked it, and they just charged a nomiWhen

people

found

out

there

was

a

musician in space, there was a continuous clamor for me to record

"Space Oddity." —Chris Hadfield

nal fee—just a few Euros, I think … and gave it to everybody in the world for free for a year.” When Hadfield’s team realized last May that the copyright license would expire soon, they temporarily took the video down until all the administrative details were ironed out. “The legal folks have been very nice and accommodating,” he said, “and they’re looking forward to getting it back out there to share with everyone.” In fact, the official video should be available on YouTube soon. “Everywhere I go in the world, people have seen it,” Hadfield says, “which is amazing, because it was just a father-son project.” Kembrew McLeod plans to do a father-son project with his three-year-old son Alasdair, also involving music and outer space.

BUSINESS AS USUAL

THE STRANGER Taxi driver, Vic Pasternak, is back with this episode of "Business as Usual," an excerpt from All the Help You Need, coming soon from Slow Collision Press. • BY VIC PASTERNAK creeping around the door, smoking and scratching at his 15-day beard. This was the same guy I’d seen hanging around the dumpsters upon pulling into the lot. Next, he disappears from the window, and I hear him bang through the service door into the garage. Then the door from the garage swings into the office. The creeper breezes in like he’s a regular of the club. He’s broadshouldered but too tall to be anything but lanky, with long arms, hands, fingers. Greasy jeans hang off his butt under an outsized t-shirt, and he wears a cap twisted to the side. He looks like the kind of hitchhiker that would eat your brains. Meanwhile, a flurry of phone calls. The old man dispatches Leon to K-Mart and Quiet Chuck to pick up the Vine. The hobo snoops about the room and rubs two quarters for everybody to look at. “Anybody got a cigarette, preferably an American Spirit?” “I smoke menthols,” Leon says on his way out the door. “I got USA Golds, if’n you want,” says Jerry. I say, “Lucky bitch gets a preference?” Illustration by Josh Carroll But Quiet Chuck offers his cigarettes as does the rookie. The aptain Jerry Nicodemus leans on the creeper peels a square out of Chuck’s pack and helm looking at the slow clock, and Chuck won’t take the 50 cents. I hang around the taxi shack look- “Make that son-bitch pay,” I growl at ing to cherry-pick calls, just like the Chuck, and at the stranger: “Hobos keep it rest of us—Leon Bath, Quiet Chuck and the outside.” skinny greenhorn staring from the chair pulled I glare at the creeper and the creeper looks back at me a little dumbfounded. beside the dispatch desk. Fat Leon digs a fat elbow in my ribs and Hobos and junkies make camp behind our asks about my summer vacation. “So what yard in the high grass on the river’s edge. I can only assume this dude is one of them. happened to Colorado?” “I says the hobo camp’s out back, down on “It didn’t flood, if that’s what you mean.” He tips his chins at me. “Bring back any the river. Now scram.” I clap at him twice, chop-chop. weed?” Nothing’s changed around here but the calen- The stranger pats Quiet Chuck on the shouldar and a few fresh faces. I look through the ve- der. “Thanks for the cigarette, bubba.” netians out into the parking yard and see a dude Then Quiet Chuck leaves for his call and

C

14 | Sept. 3 - 16, 2014 | LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV161

the creeper goes back into the garage as the old man bursts laughing until he’s whooping with a hand over his mouth. “Vic Pasternak, that ain’t no hobo. Haw haw, that’s Billy!” “That guy’s a cab driver? He’s one of our drivers?” Captain Jerry whoops and whoops until he fires up a fresh smoke. The stranger meanwhile returns from the garage brandishing a bottle of Windex and looking at me with flat, cold, crazy eyes. He moves into the room lifting the Windex bottle like he’s going to spray me, and I whiff a peculiar funk from his clothes, like he’s been playing out in floodwater. Or shitting his pants. He points the nozzle at a newspaper folded beside me on the couch. “You using that?” “It ain’t mine.” “I’ma use it for my windows then,” he says, talking like a southern boy but I can’t place where from. His drawl is spiked with brass notes, like N’awlins by way of Buffalo, NY. “Washing windows with newspapers makes’m shine like they wasn’t there, bubba.” He grins sideways like the ShamWow Man, then sallies out to sparkle his windows with yesterday’s news. I get off the couch and over to the schedule. “What’s that creep’s name?” “Billy Kinross,” replies Jerry. “You remember Frank Boulot? Drunk Frank? It’s his nephew.” This town has more than one Drunk Frank, but there’s only one Billy K. on our schedule. Finding where my name is penciled in, I see we’re set to work the same shifts all week. The old man throws the rookie out of the office and waves me into the chair beside his desk. I ignore his offer and return to the window instead. I split the venetians and peer into the parking yard, watching the creeper wipe down the glass of his taxi with newspaper, stretching across the dash to get the whole of it. Taxi drivers are scorned everywhere, unfairly and fairly. This business draws survivor types and other outcasts, the thrill-seekers among us, the authority doubters and haunted souls, the dopes that think they’re making real money, street rats that don’t give a fuck, musicians, alien hunters, drug addicts, single dads,

the chronically mentally ill and felons. Drivers don’t always stick around, good and bad. Our work cooks up a strange gumbo and those of us remaining grind and grow on each other to become something like comrades-in-arms. Or lifers among a proud and highly dysfunctional family. When the new rookie quits, some fool This

business draws survivor types and

other outcasts, the thrill-seekers among us, the authority doubters and haunted souls

...

will volunteer to replace him. Newbies always find their way here. As do the d-bags that’ve been previously shit-canned and the dopes that can’t get work anywhere else, or won’t. But this window washer doesn’t look like one of our tribe. Jerry shifts to a low voice: “Billy’s working to get back to the righter side of the pasture. He’s been out for a bit.”

“Out of where? Prison? This’s who we’re hiring these days?” “We always hired jailbirds,” Jerry says like he’s letting me in on a secret. “And don’t be smart. I got him the job and he’s doing fine. The Christ has personally asked that I shepherd Billy toward the righter ways.” We might call him Jerry Nicodemus, our Captain, but townfolk call him Preacher, especially behind his back. “I think Jesus is asking you to have a little heart, Vic Pasternak. Be nice to Billy as some kind of favor to me. You’d see he’s the salt of the earth if you’d just have a little heart.” Billy waves at us from outside the venetians. Then he moseyes into to his cab and makes a big circle driving out of the lot. I watch the whole show from the window and he stares back at me as he goes. “I got a little heart all right,” I tell the old man. “And I don’t like that guy.” Vic Pasternak has been driving a taxi in Illinois City, Ohio, for over a decade, ruining his chances for a solid career and shortening his lifespan. He enjoys fishing, preying, chainsawing and long walks alone.

LIFE AFTER BETH

9/5

FRANK

9/12

LAND HO!

9/12

ALLOY ORCHESTRA AT THE ENGLERT 10/1

THE TUBE

THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UNWATCHABLE From the terrific to the terrible to the soon-to-be terminated, here's an overview of Fall's new TV shows. • BY MELISSA ZIMDARS

T

his summer I watched every iteration of The Real Housewives, so needless to say a fresh crop of TV shows this fall is exciting. A few trends seem to be emerging, which include weird police mysteries where children die, comic book adaptations and sitcoms that attempt to bring more racial and ethnic diversity to the airwaves. Some of the shows seem promising, others seem downright ridiculous and most of them will be cancelled within a few episodes regardless. Some seem

of the shows seem promising, others downright

ridiculous

and

most

of them will be cancelled within a few episodes regardless.

To start, CBS has two new, interest-piquing dramas. Stalkers features Maggie Q and Dylan McDermott as police officers in the Threat Assessment Unit of the LAPD. If you didn’t guess from the title, the unit deals with catching stalkers and addressing issues of cyber crime, voyeurism and romantic fixations that go too far. There has been a good amount of industry gossip about the opening scene of this pilot being particularly gruesome and scary, so hopefully the show doesn’t veer off into the 16 | Sept. 3 - 16, 2014 | LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV161

SURVIVING UTOPIA | Reality TV goes after the niche communalist demographic in this FOX series.

territory of gratuitous violence. The second show, Madame Secretary, which seems like a new version of Geena Davis’ short-lived Commander in Chief, features Tea Leoni as the new, free-thinking U.S. Secretary of State who, according to the trailer, doesn’t just think outside of the box, she “doesn’t even know there is a box.” There are a handful of other programs to check out, too. The creator of Happy Endings has a new—and potentially hilarious—romantic comedy on NBC entitled Marry Me, featuring Ken Marino and Casey Wilson. M. Night Shyamalan (I know, I know) is the executive producer of a new FOX mystery drama that seems like a combination of The Truman Show and The Dome: Wayward Pines. It’s basically a crazy town where citizens are not only under constant surveillance, they also have no way of escaping. Also of note is Rainn Wilson’s new FOX show, Backstrom, where he plays a “selfdestructive, overweight, offensive and irascible” police detective (so, basically, he sounds like any of my ex-boyfriends, if they suddenly started working as police detectives). Other shows will be worth watching out of morbid curiosity. ABC, in a clear attempt to showcase its commitment to diversity and multiculturalism, is launching three new family sitcoms: Fresh Off the Boat, Cristela and

Black-Ish. Each sitcom features, respectively, an Asian family, a Latino family and a Black family. The trailers make the shows seem like they will all be post-racial trainwrecks that treat race like it no longer matters, and say, “Hey, look at how funny these racial stereotypes are!” For instance, the pilot of Black-Ish focuses on a father’s anxiety over his son not being “Black enough.” When the son asks to have a Bar Mitzvah, the father instead throws him a Bro-Mitzvah that looks like a generic rap video. Oy vey. Additionally, FOX is launching a new reality program called Utopia, which they are marketing as the “purest form of reality.” Basically 15 people dedicate a year of their lives to building a dream society together on three (only three?) acres of land. They create their own government, build their own houses, and of course, ideologically disagree over absolutely everything. Finally, there are a bunch of shows to skip entirely: ABC’s Forever features a medical examiner in New York City who cannot die, so, obviously, as he solves the deaths of others. The long story arc in this show will be him figuring out why he keeps coming back to life (and, for some reason, keeps coming back to life naked in a river). Pass. NBC’s State of Affairs marks Katherine Heigl's return to TV, and promises to be an even bigger waste of time. Heigl plays a renegade CIA analyst trying to take down different terror groups, not unlike Homeland, Person of Interest or Covert Affairs. I’m bored already. But the show I predict will be the biggest waste of time is ABC’s Galavant. The fairytale-themed show is a comedy and a musical! It might be interesting to lovers of Once Upon a Time and Once Upon a Time in Wonderland, or if you were a fan of the infamously corny style of the 1990 police musical Cop Rock. But, if we’re being real, nothing will ever live up to the glorious awkwardness of Cop Rock. Melissa Zimdars wanted to write an entire column about how bad FOX’s Hieroglyph (a period drama set in Egypt, duh) would be, but the network came to its senses and pulled the pilot.

An electrifying play about American abstract expressionist painter Mark Rothko.

BY

JOHN LOGAN

Directed by Sam Osheroff

September 5 - 28, 2014

213 N. Gilbert Street, Iowa City 319-338-7672

riversidetheatre.org SPONSORED BY

AND

JOYCE & DICK SUMMERWILL

TALKING MOVIES

TOO IRONIC TO BE FRANK Larry Abrahamson's Frank is one heady indie rock film. • BY PAT BROWN course just another kind of mask, an interioras-disguise. This dichotomy is played at various points in the film either for laughs or tears, or sometimes for both. While

the film's ironic play with masks

and interiority makes it both interesting and funny for stretches, it ultimately can't quite sell its more earnest resolution.

I

t's difficult to tell whether director Larry Abrahamson's comedy-drama Frank benefits from or is hindered by its central conceit: Star Michael Fassbender, despite his renowned beauty and acting chops, spends the film with his head inside an over-sized, cartoonish, paper-maché mask. Fassbender plays the title character, an eccentric musical genius who heads an indie-rock band full of unstable personalities, and who, for reasons unknown to anyone in the band, never removes his mask. The enigma of his appearance is the center of much of the dramatic development of the film, but there is little doubt that many of the people who watch this film will not already know what Fassbender looks like. So for many, already knowing the 'answer' to this mystery may beomce either a major, drama-stifling flaw or one more reflexive irony in a film full of them. At the beginning of the film, the keyboard player in Frank’s band—and latest in an apparently long line of depressive keyboard players—throws himself into the Atlantic Ocean and, as a replacement, they pick up passerby Jon Burroughs (Domhnall Gleeson). Jon happens to be a keyboardist and aspiring songwriter and eagerly joins them for their next gig and subsequent recording sessions. The recording of the album, done in an isolated Irish cabin, ends up lasting for almost a year. During this time, Jon's abilities as a songwriter continue to stagnate, even while his closeness with Frank grows, along with his enmity with

18 | Sept. 3 - 16, 2014 | LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV161

YOU'VE SEEN THE FILM WHERE MICHAEL FASSBENDER SHOWS HIS PENIS. NOW SEE THE FILM WHERE HE DOESN'T SHOW HIS FACE.

violence-prone theremin player Clara (Maggie Gyllenhaal). Jon is the viewer's cypher, our point of identification as we are introduced to the wild world of Frank's band, but he is also depicted with a healthy dose of ironic distance. He is, as we learn early on, a rather banal keyboard player and a downright dreadful songwriter. The film's opening scene gives us his thoroughly uninspired song lyrics in the form of voiceover narration: "Lady in the red coat, where are you going?" sings a flat voice over a shot of Jon passing a woman in a red coat. Unhappy with his inability to write a song, Jon posts to Twitter about his long day writing songs, his public declaration of his songwriting success perhaps giving him some substitute rush of accomplishment. The film's satiric treatment of Twitter— Jon's misleading posts are displayed onscreen throughout the film, a sort of secondary, unreliable narrator—is akin to the ironies deployed around Frank's mask: an overt contradiction between exterior and interior, located right around the intersection of tragic and comic. Frank's goofily cheery mask, we almost automatically assume, belies a much less cheery inside; Jon's use of Twitter is ostensibly for the public narration of private thoughts, but it is of

Just as Frank wavers between the tragic and comic effects of contradiction between inside and outside, it also dryly mocks the tropes we might expect to find in a comedy-drama about tortured musical genius while fully participating in them. Is there a secret that Frank's mask is hiding (other than the 'secret' that he looks like Michael Fassbender)? The film seems both to ask this question and to mock Jon for asking it, the latter proving a bit more interesting. Perhaps we shouldn't push so hard to know these things, the film initially admonishes us, before building much of its third act around answering the more conventionally dramatic question about Frank’s identity. (Actually, more fascinating and compelling than any final reveal regarding Frank are the somewhat dark implications regarding Jon's own motives for joining the band and befriending the weirdo with the paper-maché head.) In the end, it (frankly) feels like Frank spends too much time working up ironic distance from its characters to really pack the emotional punch that the movie seems to be striving for in its final scenes. While the film's ironic play with masks and interiority makes it both interesting and funny for stretches, it ultimately can't quite sell its more earnest resolution. We might see in the character Frank a contradictory metaphor for the troubled status of authenticity in a world abounding in types of masks, but this neat thought doesn't ultimately guide the film Frank toward a satisfactory conclusion. Pat Brown is a graduate student in the Department of Cinematic Arts at the University of Iowa.

THE

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Go to beatdeeryjeep.com and make your picks today! NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. THIS CONTEST IS INTENDED FOR PLAY IN THE STATE OF IOWA ONLY AND WILL BE GOVERNED BY IOWA LAW. DO NOT PARTICIPATE IF YOU ARE NOT ELIGIBLE AND LOCATED IN THE STATE OF IOWA AT THE TIME OF ENTRY. IN ORDER TO BE ELIGIBLE FOR VEHICLE, ENTRANT MUST BE OVER AGE 25 AND A LICENSED DRIVER WITH VALID FULL-COVERAGELITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV161 INSURANCE. | Sept. 3 - 16, 2014 | 19

I O W A C I T Y: T H E A P P

AREA EVENTS Music ONGOING

Photo by DONZOR

Single Mothers | Blue Moose—Sept. 4, 8 p.m. ($10, +19) London, Ontario’s Single Mothers play nihilistic, middle-finger waving punk, and they play it so well their upcoming al-

Tuesdays: Blues Jam Parlor City Pub and Eatery, Free, 8 pm

bum, Negative Qualities, might be the most anticipated de-

Thursdays: Daddy-O Parlor City Pub and Eatery, Free, 7 pm

but of the year. Case in point: Their latest single, “Marbles,”

Open Mic Uptown Bill's, Free, 7 pm

boasts one of the best lyrics of the year, “She’s all like, ‘Blah,

Live Music Mendoza Wine Bar, $3, 7 pm

blah, blah, blah, something about McSweeney’s.’” —MJ

Battle of the Bands VII Yacht Club, $5, 8 pm Friday: Live Music Mendoza Wine Bar, $3, 7 pm Saturday: Live Music Mendoza Wine Bar, $3, 7 pm

Bonne Finken Signals Blue Moose Tap House, $10-$12, 9 pm

Saturday Night Music Uptown Bill's, Free, 7 pm

Accelerate Two Night Dance Party Gabe's, $6-$10, 10 pm

Live Band Penguin's Comedy Club, TBD, 8 pm

77 Jefferson Ro Hempel Band Yacht Club, $5-$7, 10 pm

WED. SEPTEMBER 3

SAT. SEPTEMBER 6

Spiritual Drum Circle Journey Church, Donation, 5 pm

Irish Sessions Uptown Bill's, Free, 4 pm

Paradise Fears Blue Moose Tap House, $12-$14, 6 pm Motherfolk Gabe's, Free, 9 pm

THURS. SEPTEMBER 4

Find it all. All the time. Download Best of IC Little Village's free mobile calendar app, available now on iOS & Android.

SAT. SEPTEMBER 6 Crown The Empire Blue Moose Tap House, $16-$18, 5 pm ConeTrauma, Savage Hacks Genovia Forever, The Statistix

Loretta Lynn Paramount Theatre Cedar Rapids, $42-$59,

Public Space ONE, See Website for Pricing, 7 pm

7 pm

Hoosier Highway Wildwood Smokehouse & Saloon,

Moonshine Sorrow The Mill, $5, 9 pm

Cover, 8 pm

Single Mothers Blue Moose Tap House, $10, 9 pm

OSG Jelly Bread Yacht Club, $7, 10 pm

Cornmeal Henhouse Prowlers Gabe's, $12-$15, 9 pm

Accelerate: Two Night Dance Party Gabe's, $6-$10, 10 pm

PBR Public Space ONE, See Website for Pricing, 9 pm

FRI. SEPTEMBER 5

SUN. SEPTEMBER 7 Piano Club Iowa City Public Library, Free, 1 pm

Bonne Finken Java Blend Exclusive Hour Java House,

Unplugged Music Series Fireside Winery, TBD, 2 pm

Free, 2 pm

Brucemorchestra Brucemore, $20-$35, 7 pm

Friday Night Concert Series PedMall, Free, 6 pm

Canter Gabe's, Free, 9 pm

The Recliners The Mill, $6, 7 pm Live Band Penguin's Comedy Club, TBD, 8 pm

TUES. SEPTEMBER 9

Free Live Music Soul Phlegm High Ground Cafe, Free, 8 pm

Windhand All Them Witches, In the Mouth of Radness

Live Music Mendoza Wine Bar, $3, 8 pm

Gabe's, $10, 9 pm

ABOUT THE CALENDAR THE LITTLE VILLAGE CALENDAR serves hundreds of area venues and reaches 150,000 readers per month. Listings are published free of charge at littlevillagemag.com/calendar, on the free calendar app Best of I.C. (iOS, Android) and in Little Village Magazine (on a space-available basis). To add or edit events, visit littlevillagemag.com/calendar. Download the Little Village Best of I.C. app to find thousands of additional listings, bookmark your favorite events, and invite friends via SMS text. DETAILS: littlevillagemag.com/bestofic | QUESTIONS: [email protected]

20 | Sept. 3 - 16, 2014 | LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV161

Adam Burke

Brooks Wheelan | The Mill—Sept. 13, 9 p.m. ($10-$12, +19) Brooks Wheelan began his comedy career in Los Angeles, taking classes at the famed Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre, after earning his degree at the University of Iowa. With a season-long stint on Saturday Night Live under his belt, Wheelan’s return to Iowa is a homecoming every comedy fan should check out. —MJ

WED. SEPTEMBER 10 Burlington Street Bluegrass Band The Mill, $5, 7 pm Golden Donna and Cuticle Gabe's, Free, 9 pm

THURS. SEPTEMBER 11 Lucero Blue Moose Tap House, $17-$20, 9 pm

FRI. SEPTEMBER 12 Friday Night Concert Series PedMall, Free, 6 pm Brother Ali Gabe's, $15-$17, 7 pm The 100s The Mill, $8, 8 pm Josh Thompson First Avenue Club, $15+, 8 pm Soul Phlegm High Ground Cafe, Free, 8 pm Zeta June Yacht Club, $5, 10 pm

SAT. SEPTEMBER 13 Community Folk Sing Uptown Bill's, Free, 3 pm Jake McVey Wildwood Smokehouse & Saloon, Cover, 8 pm Lowland Human Public Space ONE, TBD, 8 pm Diplomats of Solid Sound, The Uniphonics Yacht Club, $7+, 10 pm Cosby Sweater Gabe's, $5, 10 pm

SUN. SEPTEMBER 14 Cherub Blue Moose Tap House, $15-$17, 9 pm Arc & Stones Cold Stares Gabe's, Free, 9 pm

MON. SEPTEMBER 15 After the Burial Texas In July, I Declare War, REFLECTIONS, Come The Dawn Blue Moose Tap House, $15-$17, 4 pm Kickin Krotch Gabe's, Free, 9 pm

TUES. SEPTEMBER 16 Blues Jam Parlor City Pub and Eatery, Free, 8 pm Mary Gauthier and Sam Baker Englert Theatre, $22-$25, 8 pm First Fleet Concerts Presents: Black Lips Blue Moose Tap House, $15+, 9 pm EGI Gabe's, Free, 9 pm

Photo by Zach Wolfe

Black Lips w. The King Khan and BBQ Show | Blue Moose—Sept. 16, 8 p.m. ($15, +19) Garage rock fans have no excuse to not catch this show. Black Lips and The King Khan & BBQ Show are arguably the two most vital garage rock acts playing today, bringing the genre to new, thrilling heights while still respecting the style’s roots in blues and doo-wop. But it’s their respective live shows that set them apart from the current swath of garage rock bands: Both bring an unhinged theatricality to the stage that allows for anything to happen, from unexpected noise freakouts to out-and-out lewd debauchery. Atlanta’s Black Lips have been playing sloppy, ragged rock and roll since 2000, but it wasn’t until their 2007 live album

Photo by Greg Billman

Los Valientes Del Mundo Nuevo that they became a fixture in the garage rock landscape. Since then, the four-piece has

Children of Eden | Revival Theatre Company | Sept.

released four albums of impossibly catchy tracks. Songs like “Bad Kids” and “O Katrina!” are just about guaranteed to

4-6—Brucemore

start some serious sing-alongs, even if you’re listening to the song for the first time.

com

But there’s one other reason this is a can’t-miss show: Back in 2009, Black Lips and The King Khan and BBQ Show

Seduction, murder and an apocalyptic flood—can you

joined forces and formed an “evil gospel” supergroup called The Almighty Defenders, recording an incredible and

get more epic than the Old Testament? Revival Theatre

bizarre full-length album in just eight days. Who knows? Maybe Iowa City will get to witness a reunion of The Almighty

Company opens its inaugural season with a musical

Defenders. —Max Johnson

based on the first half of the Book of Genesis. —JS

Mansion,

revivaltheatrecompany.

VENUE GUIDE IOWA CITY

Steven Vail Fine Arts 118 E College St, (319) 248-9443

legionarts.org

Blue Moose Tap House 211 Iowa Ave, (319) 358-9206,

stevenvail.com

Little Bohemia 1317 3rd St SE, (319) 366-6262

bluemooseic.com

The Mill 120 E Burlington St, (319) 351-9529, icmill.com

Mahoney's 1602 E Ave NE, (319) 364-5754

Chait Galleries Downtown 218 E Washington St,

Trumpet Blossom Cafe 310 E Prentiss St, (319) 248-0077,

McGrath Amphitheatre 475 1st St SW, (319) 286-5760,

(319) 338-4442, thegalleriesdowntown.com

trumpetblossom.com

mcgrathamphitheatre.com

Englert Theatre 221 E Washington St, (319) 688-2653,

University of Iowa Museum of Art 1375 Iowa 1,

National Czech and Slovak Museum 1400 Inspiration Place

englert.org

(319) 335-1727, uima.uiowa.edu

SW, ncsml.org

FilmScene 118 E College St, (319) 358-2555,

University of Iowa Museum of Natural History 17 N Clinton

Opus Concert Cafe 119 Third Ave SE, (319) 366-8203,

icfilmscene.org

St, (319) 335-0480, uiowa.edu/mnh

orchestraiowa.org

First Avenue Club, 1550 S 1st Ave, (319) 337-5527,

Uptown Bill’s 730 S Dubuque St, (319) 339-0804,

Paramount Theatre 123 3rd Ave SE, (319) 398-5211,

firstavenueclub.com

uptownbills.org

paramounttheatrecr.com

Gabe’s 330 E Washington St, (319) 351-9175, icgabes.com

Wildwood Smokehouse & Saloon 4919 Dolphin Dr SE,

Parlor City Pub & Eatery 1125 3rd St SE, (319) 247-0000,

Iowa Artisans’ Gallery 207 E. Washington St,

(319) 338-2211, wildwoodsalloon.com

parlorcitypub.com

(319) 351-8686, iowa-artisans-gallery.com

Yacht Club 13 S Linn St, (319) 337-6464,

Penguin’s Comedy Club 208 2nd Ave SE, (319) 362-8133,

Iowa City Community Theatre 4261 Oak Crest Hill Rd SE,

iowacityyachtclub.com

penguinscomedyclub.com

(319) 338-0443, iowacitycommunitytheatre.com

CEDAR RAPIDS

Shores Event Center 700 16th St NE, (319) 775-5367,

African American Museum of Iowa, 55 12th Ave SE,

shoreseventcenter.com

imu.uiowa.edu

(319) 862-2101, blackiowa.org

Sip N Stir 1119 1st Ave SE, Cedar Rapids.,

Lasansky Corporation Gallery 216 E Washington St,

Brucemore Mansion 2160 Linden Dr SE, (319) 362-7375,

(319) 364-3163, sipnstircr.com

(319) 337-9336, lasanskyart.com

brucemore.org

Tailgators 3969 Center Point Rd NE, (319) 393-6621,

M.C. Ginsberg Objects of Art 110 E Washington St,

Cedar Rapids Museum of Art, 410 Third Avenue SE,

tailgatorslive.com

(319) 351-1700, mcginsberg.com

(319) 366-7503, crma.org

US Cellular Center 370 1st Avenue NE | (319) 398-5211,

Old Capitol Museum 21 N Clinton St, (319) 335-0548,

Daniel Arthur's 821 3rd Ave SE, (319) 362-9340,

uscellularcenter.com

uiowa.edu/oldcap

danielarthurs.net

Veterans Memorial Stadium 950 Rockford Rd SW,

Prairie Lights Bookstore 15 S Dubuque St,

Hawkeye Downs Speedway and Fairgrounds 4400 6th St SW,

(319) 363-3887

(319) 337-2681, prairielights.com

(319) 365-8656, hawkeyedownsspeedway.com

Theatre Cedar Rapids 102 3rd St SE, (319) 366-8591,

Public Space One 120 N Dubuque St, (319) 331-8893,

JM O'Malley's 1502 H Ave NE, (319) 369-9433

theatrecr.org

publicspaceone.com

Legion Arts CSPS Hall 1103 3rd St SE, (319) 364-1580,

Iowa Memorial Union 125 N Madison St, (319) 335-3041,

22 | Sept. 3 - 16, 2014 | LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV161

Closing Sept 7: Carl Van Vechten: Photographer to the Stars Cedar Rapids Museum Of Art, Free-$5, 12 pm Closing Sept 21: Grant Wood Cedar Rapids Museum Of Art, Free - $5, All Day Ending Sept 24: Reframing the City Exhibition Public Space ONE, Free, All Day Closing Sept 26: Works by Heather Baker Morrissey Gallery,

Art / Exhibition ONGOING

Free, All Day

SUN. SEPTEMBER 14

Ending Sept 28: Legacy: Ceramics by Gerald Eskin Iowa

Community Worktime Public Space ONE, Free, 1 pm

Artisans Gallery, Free, All Day BJ Grimmer: Paintings Iowa Artisans Gallery, Free, All Day

Theatre / Performance

Celebration! Rituals and Revelry of Life National Czech &

Angela Waseskuk Legion Arts CSPS Hall, Free, All Day

Slovak Museum and Library, $3-$10, All Day

Nathan Biehl Legion Arts CSPS Hall, Free, All Day

ONGOING

Images Gone With Time National Czech & Slovak Museum

Nicholas Economos Legion Arts CSPS Hall, Free, All Day

Mondays: Catacombs of Comedy Iowa City Yacht Club, $3, 10 pm

and Library, $3-$10, All Day

Closing Oct 26: America's First Ladies Herbert Hoover

Wednesdays: Spoken Word Uptown Bill's, Free, 7 pm

Faces of Freedom: The Czech and Slovak Journey National

National Historic Site, Free, All Day

Open Mic Penguin's Comedy Club, Free, 8 pm

Czech & Slovak Museum and Library, $3-$10, All Day Berlin: Divided Past/ United Future German American

FRI. SEPTEMBER 5

Heritage Center, $3-$5, All Day

First Friday Iowa Artisans Gallery, Free, 5 pm

Berlin: Made in America German American Heritage Center, $3-$5, All Day

SUN. SEPTEMBER 7

Closing Sept 3: Marvin Cone on My Mind Cedar Rapids

Community Worktime Public Space ONE, Free, 1 pm

Museum Of Art, Free - $5, 12 pm

Fridays & Saturdays: Weekend Comedy Showcase Penguin's Comedy Club, Free, 7 pm Sept 5 - 6: Children of Eden Brucemore, $18 - $25, 7 pm Sept 12 - 14: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe Coralville Center for the Performing Arts, $14 - $22, 7 pm Sept 12 - 20: Lost Boy Found Iowa Theatre Artists Company, $10 - $15, 7 pm

Closing Sept 5: Home 10th Annual Catich Exhibition Saint

SAT. SEPTEMBER 13

Ambrose University, Free, All Day

Go With the Flow - Watercolor Workshop Urbanity, $45 in-

City, Free, 7 pm

Mauricio Lasansky and the First Generation Arts Iowa, Free, 9 am

cludes materials, 1 pm

Cash on Delivery Old Creamery Theatre, $18.50-$28, 7 pm

CORALVILLE

grinnellconcerts.com

Eronel 285 Main St, eroneldbq.com

Cafe Crema 411 2nd St, (319) 338-0700, facebook.com/

The Faulconer Gallery 1108 Park St, (641) 269-4660,

Five Flags Center 405 Main St, (563) 589-4254,

caffecrema.us

grinnell.edu/faulconergallery

fiveflagscenter.com

Coralville Center for the Performing Arts, 1900 Country Club

QUAD CITIES

The Lift 180 Main St, 563-582-2689, theliftdubuque.com

Adler Theatre 136 E 3rd St, Davenport, (563) 326-8500,

Matter Creative Center 140 E 9th St, (563) 556-0017,

Coralville Recreation Center 1506 8th St ,

adlertheatre.com

mattercreative.org

(319) 248-1750, coralville.org

Circa 21 Dinner Playhouse 1828 3rd Ave, Rock Island,

Monks 373 Bluff St, (563) 585-0919,

Iowa Children’s Museum 1451 Coral Ridge Ave,

(309) 786-7733, circa21.com

facebook.com/MonksKaffeePub

(319) 625-6255, theicm.org

Figge Art Museum 225 W 2nd St, Davenport,

Mystique Casino 1855 Greyhound Park Rd,

Mendoza Wine Bar 1301 5th St, (319) 333-1291,

(563) 326-7804, figgeartmuseum.org

(563) 582-3647, mystiquedbq.com

mendozawinebar.com

Isle of Capri Casino 1777 Isle Parkway, Bettendorf,

NORTH LIBERTY

(563) 359-7280, isleofcapricasinos.com

CLINTON

Bobber's Grill 1850 Scales Bend Rd NE, (319) 665-3474,

River Music Experience 129 Main St, Davenport,

wildroseresorts.com/clinton

bobbersgrill.com

(563) 326-1333, rivermusicexperience.com

Showboat Theater 303 Riverside Rd, (563) 242-6760,

MT. VERNON / LISBON

iWireless Center 1201 River Dr, Moline, (309) 764-2001,

clintonshowboat.org

Lincoln Winebar 125 First St NW, Mt Vernon,

iwirelesscenter.com

(319) 895 9463, foodisimportant.com

ANAMOSA / STONE CITY

CASCADE

Dr, (319) 248-9370, coralvillearts.org

Sutliff Cider 382 Sutliff Road, Lisbon, (319) 455-4093,

Closing Sept 28: RED by John Logan Riverside Theatre Iowa

Wild Rose Casino 777 Wild Rose Dr, (563) 243-9000,

Ellen Kennedy Fine Arts Center 505 Johnson St. NW,

General Store Pub 12612 Stone City Rd, (319) 462-4399,

(563) 852-3432

sutliffcider.com

generalstorepub.com

RIVERSIDE

MAQUOKETA

DES MOINES

Ohnward Fine Arts Center 1215 E Platt St,

desmoinesperformingarts.org

(319) 648-1234, riversidecasinoandresort.com

(563) 652-9815, ohnwardfineartscenter.com

El Bait Shop 200 SW 2nd St (515) 284-1970 elbaitshop.com

FAIRFIELD

Codfish Hollow Barnstormers 5013 288th Ave,

Gas Lamp 1501 Grand Ave (515) 280-3778,

Cafe Paradiso 101 N Main St, (641) 472-0856,

codfishhollowbarnstormers.com

gaslampdsm.com

cafeparadiso.net

DUBUQUE

House of Bricks 525 E Grand Ave (515) 727-437

The Bell Tower Theater 2728 Asbury Rd Ste 242,

Vaudeville Mews 212 4th St, (515) 243-3270,

(641) 209-5008, orpheumtheatrefairfield.com

(563) 588-3377, belltowertheater.net

[email protected]

GRINNELL

Diamond Jo Casino 301 Bell St, (563) 690-4800,

Woolys 504 East Locust (515) 244-0550 woolysdm.com

diamondjodubuque.com

Whiskey Dixx 215 4th St (515) 288-8678

Riverside Casino & Golf Resort 3184 Highway 22,

Orpheum Theater Fairfield, 121 W Broadway Ave

The Gardener Lounge 1221 6th Ave, (641) 269-3317,

Civic Center 221 Walnut St (515) 246-2300,

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV156 | JUNE 4 - 17 | 23

b

Legion Arts

70 musicians. 12 countries. infinite beats ...

Landfall FESTIVAL OF WORLD MUSIC

9.16.14 ► 9.20.14 CSPS and other Cedar Rapids locations www.legionarts.org

City Revealed

MAGAZINE.

little village

kimschillig.com 319-248-3316 Licensed realtor in the state of Iowa

Residential and Commercial

Great Artists. Great Audiences. Hancher Performances. Al Jarreau / Iowa Soul Festival September 19 | UI Pentacrest | FREE Hoba Hoba Spirit September 26 | CSPS Hall, Cedar Rapids

studentst ticke $10

Susan Werner, The Hayseed Project October 9 | Club Hancher at The Mill Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center October 16 | Riverside Recital Hall Three Acts, Two Dancers, One Radio Host October 18 | Englert Theatre Photo: Daniel Chauvet

SpokFrevo Orquestra October 30 | Englert Theatre Roberta Flack November 8 | Riverside Casino & Golf Resort® Event Center Liz Lerman, Healing Wars November 13–15 | Space Place Theater Danú, A Christmas Gathering: Féile Na Nollag December 10 | Englert Theatre Kronos Quartet, Beyond Zero: 1914-1918 February 7 | Englert Theatre Terell Stafford Quintet February 13 | Club Hancher at The Mill Roseneath Theatre, La Maleta February 27 | Englert Theatre Pacifica Quartet March 6 | Riverside Recital Hall The Joffrey Ballet March 7–8 | Space Place Theater The Nile Project March 11 | Englert Theatre

Photo: David Bazemore

Howard Fishman, The Basement Tapes Project April 10 | Club Hancher at The Mill Working Group Theatre, All Recipes Are Home April 17–18 | Johnson County Fairgrounds, Barn 2 Cantus, Anthems April 30 | St. Mary’s Catholic Church Inti-Illimani May 15 | IC Ped Mall, Fountain Stage | FREE

Order online at hancher.uiowa.edu Call (319) 335-1160 or 800-HANCHER TDD and access services: (319) 335-1158

Photo: John D. Kelly

Photo: Helen Shariatmadari

AREA EVENTS

FRI. SEPTEMBER 5

Ramp, Free, 7 am

Cinema

IWP Reading: Natasha Tiniacos and Enrique Serrano

Sunday: GLBTQ Community Pot Luck and Bingo Studio 13,

Shambaugh House, Free, 5 pm

Free, 6 pm

WED. SEPTEMBER 3

Kazim Ali Prairie Lights Books & Cafe, Free, 7 pm

SAT. SEPTEMBER 6

Boyhood FilmScene, $6.50-$7.50, 10:30 am

SUN. SEPTEMBER 7

Mood Indigo FilmScene, $6.50-$8.50, 4 pm

Joe Michaud German American Heritage Center, Free, 2 pm

Free, 7 am

TUES. SEPTEMBER 9

SUN. SEPTEMBER 7

John Scalzi Prairie Lights Books & Cafe, Free, 7 pm

FHP Canning and Preserving 101 Workshop Public Space

Boyhood FilmScene, $6.50-$8.50, 6:30 pm Hollywood Chainsaw Hookers FilmScene, $4, 10 pm

THURS. SEPTEMBER 4

Cedar Rapids Farmers Market Downtown Cedar Rapids,

ONE, Free, 1 pm

Boyhood FilmScene, $6.50-$7.50, 2:30 p,

THURS. SEPTEMBER 11

Mood Indigo FilmScene, $6.50-$8.50, 7 pm

Andrew Shaffer Reading and Book Signing New Bo

Young Frankenstein Backpocket Brewery, Free, 8 pm

Books, Free, 7 pm

SAT. SEPTEMBER 6 Hook FilmScene, Free-$5, 11 pm

TUES. SEPTEMBER 9

Benefit for "Families Helping Families of Iowa" Devotay,

Hope Edelman Prairie Lights Books & Cafe, Free, 8 pm

J. Elke Ertle German American Heritage Center, Free, 2 pm

Price TBD, 4:30 pm

Chelsea Cain Prairie Lights Books & Cafe, Free, 7 pm

SAT. SEPTEMBER 13

Foodie

ONGOING

THURS. SEPTEMBER 11 Contemporary Japanese Dinner with Satomi Kawai New

MON. SEPTEMBER 15

Literature

MON. SEPTEMBER 8 Pinot Noir Wine Tasting Devotay, $30, 6 pm

SUN. SEPTEMBER 14

Just Like Us Screening and Director Q&A FilmScene,

Pink Floyd The Wall FilmScene, Free-$5, 11 pm

TBD, 4 pm

Pioneer Food Co-op Coralville, $20, 6 pm

SUN. SEPTEMBER 14 Winter Farmers Market Johnson County Fairgrounds, Free, 11 am

ONGOING Mondays: Coralville Farmers Market S.T. Morrison Park,

North Liberty Famers Market Pacha Parkway, Free, 12 pm

Free, 5 pm

Benefit for Alzheimer's Association Devotay, TBD, 4 pm

Tuesdays:

Iowa

City

Farmers

Market

Iowa

City

GLBTQ Community Pot Luck and Bingo Studio 13, Free, 6 pm

Fridays: Kirkwood English Conversation Club Iowa City

Marketplace, Free, 3 pm

Public Library, Free, 10 am

Wednesdays: Iowa City Farmers Market Chauncey Swan

TUES. SEPTEMBER 16

Ramp, Free, 5 pm

Beer & Wine Devotay, $30, 6 pm

WED. SEPTEMBER 3 Chris Leslie-Hynan Prairie Lights Books & Cafe, Free, 7 pm

Thursdays: Coralville Farmers Market S.T. Morrison Park, Free, 5 pm Saturday: Iowa City Farmers Market Chauncey Swan

SCOPE PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS

DUSTIN LYNCH

JOIN SCOPE. apps due sept. 12

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all University of Iowa-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact SCOPE Productions in advance at (319)335-3395.

get more info at scope.u iowa.edu

ON SALE NOW

2014 FIELD TO FAMILY FESTIVAL EVENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

C W

Thurs., Sept. , :-: Stroll through downtown Iowa City and enjoy delicious dishes made from local ingredients from: , Atlas, Basta, Bluebird, Devotay, Motley Cow, and Share Restaurant. Ticket info at fieldtofamily.org; Early Bird: /person,  with current student ID; AFTER September : /person. Tickets for sale at New Pi stores.

K’ D   M  F  S Sat., Sept. , :-Noon Iowa City Farmer’s Market, Chauncey Swan Parking Ramp

Enjoy fun educational agriculture activities, local foods, and more. Purchase produce at the ICCSD Market Booth, featuring the harvest from  school gardens! Join hands-on activities with Field to Family, Iowa Children’s Museum, and New Pi Soilmates.

F  F’ S  H D Sun., Sept. , :-: Share Restaurant, Sheraton Hotel, Downtown Iowa City

Enjoy small plates from  local chefs and drinks from Share Restaurant’s mixologist., with ingredients from the following local farms: Adelyn’s Garden, Friendly Farm, Echollective Farm & CSA, Grimm Family Farm, Muddy Miss Farms, Organic Greens, Pavelka’s Point Meats, and Wind Shadow Farm. Proceeds support Field to Family’s Local Food Finder and Farm to School programs. /person. Tickets and info at www.fieldtofamily.org Tickets for sale at New Pi stores.

 A C R

Sun., Sept. , : A Local Bicycle Tour of Farms, Food, & Fermentation Pedal your way through northeast Iowa City and Solon. Along the way, enjoy local food and handcrafted beverages from local chefs and brewers. /person. Register at: www.culinaryride.com

EAT LOCAL WEEK!

O L D

C A P I T O L

M A L L

September 15-21

VISIT WWW.FIELDTOFAMILY.ORG FOR TICKET INFORMATION AND FOLLOW FIELD TO FAMILY ON FACEBOOK. Thank you to the sponsors of the 2014 Field to Family Festival; New Pioneer Food Co-op, Edible Iowa River Valley Magazine, Little Village Magazine, Share Restaurant, Hy-Vee, UICCU, Blank & McCune, Hill Bank & Trust, Iowa Valley RC&D, & Practical Farmers of Iowa

Always something new!

Jewelry and accessories!

Fun gifts, toys, clothes!

OLD CAPITOL MALL & MOUNT VERNON

www.silverspiderweb.com

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28 • 7:30pm PARAMOUNT THEATRE CEDAR RAPIDS (319) 366-8203 www.paramounttheatrecr.com WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29 • 7:30pm STEPHENS AUDITORIUM • AMES Stephens Auditorium Ticket Office 1-800-745-3000 www.ticketmaster.com A Food Drive Event – All Ages Show www.widespreadpanic.com

AREA EVENTS Educational Tuesdays: Line Dancing Lessons Robert A. Lee Recreation Incarcerated in Iowa Symposium | University Capitol Centre—Sept. 6, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. (Free, register at incarceratediniowa.com) | Prison Terminal: The Last Days of Private Jack Hall Screening and Q&A | Becker

Center, Free, 1 pm

Communication Studies Building, Room 101—Sept. 5, 7 p.m. (Free)

WED. SEPTEMBER 3

The University of Iowa Prison Projects Coalition will host the first annual Incarcerated in Iowa Symposium, bringing

Sewing: Alder Shirtdress (Class 2 of 2) Home Ec.

into focus Iowa’s nine prisons and over 8,000 inmates, with a mission to “highlight, create and foster connections

Workshop, $68, 5 pm

between Iowa prisons and surrounding communities, especially the University of Iowa community.”

Yoga/PiYo workshops Soul Centric Healing, $75 for pre-

Lectures and discussion sessions will focus on nine projects that engage with Iowa’s prison population and that cover topics from education and public health, to art and history. Featured speakers include John Baldwin, Director

registration, $85 day of, 6 pm

of the Iowa Department of Corrections; Linda Snetselaar, UI Associate Provost of Outreach and Engagement; and

SAT. SEPTEMBER 13

Carolyn Colvin, Associate Professor in the UI College of Education.

Knitting: Knitted Bag with Sewn Lining (Class 2 of 3)

Preceding the symposium will be a screening of the Academy Award-nominated documentary, Prison Terminal: The Last Days of Private Jack Hall, which captures the final days of a terminally ill inmate, Jack Hall, and the hospice

Home Ec. Workshop, $50, 1 pm

care he receives from fellow prisoners at the Iowa State Penitentiary. Following the screening will be a Q&A with the

MON. SEPTEMBER 15

director, Edgar Barens. —Erica Blair

Keyboard Class for Adult Beginners West Music Coralville, $89, 6 pm

THE STRAIGHT DOPE

CAN A GIRL LOSE HER VIRGINITY RIDING A ROLLER COASTER? Recently I wanted to take my 12-year-old daughter to an amusement park, but a friend told me that since she just hit puberty she shouldn't ride roller coasters or anything bumpy because she could lose her virginity. Is this true? —Suckerpunchit I have to tell you, this isn’t a question you expect to hear in 2014, and honestly it would have struck me as a little retro in 1973. But never mind. Let’s talk about nature’s virginity test. To start with the obvious: Virginity is the state of never having had sexual intercourse. It’s not possible, therefore, to lose your virginity riding a roller coaster unless you have sex while en route. Your friend is referring to the risk of damaging the hymen, the traditional marker of virginity. The hymen is a thin membrane that partly covers the vagina, leaving an opening permitting menstrual discharge to escape. Commonly though not always, the hymen ruptures during a woman’s first penetrative intercourse, producing some pain and blood flow. 28 | Sept. 3 - 16, 2014 | LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV161

Female humans are said to be unique among primates in having a hymen, although similar structures have been reported in other mammals, including elephants and llamas. How evolution came to gift them with a freshness seal of sorts is unclear. Possibly it served to protect the vagina from contaminants. Historically it’s been used to enforce chastity, and one may argue that by promoting longterm bonding and thus a secure child-rearing environment it confers reproductive advantage. To the latter contention some will say: not likely—other primates such as chimps raise offspring just fine without pairing off. The riposte, and I don’t suggest this facetiously, is that for a long time—and in some cultures even now—a bride who flunked the virginity

test was shunned or even killed. Conceivably women over the course of evolutionary time who weren’t naturally endowed with hymens and thus couldn’t produce the requisite bloody sheets, bearskins, or whatever on their wedding nights suffered the same fate and were removed from the gene pool. But I’m getting ahead of myself. The hymen is far from infallible as an indicator of sexual activity. Sometimes it survives penetration intact, and in rare cases grows back during pregnancy, which may be the

WED. SEPTEMBER 10 Theology Brewed Journey Church, Free, 7 pm

THURS. SEPTEMBER 11 Local Government Affairs Iowa City Area Chamber of

Community ONGOING Wednesdays: SLAA meeting Studio 13, Free, 6 pm Theology Brewed Journey Church, Free, 7 pm Thursdays: Karaoke Penguin's Comedy Club, Free, 8 pm

WED. SEPTEMBER 3

Commerce, Free, 7 am

FRI. SEPTEMBER 12

Library, Free, 10 am Thursdays: Preschool Storytime Iowa City Public Library,

New Bo Open Coffee Club Brewed Cafe, Free, 8 am

Free, 10 am

No Foot Too Small Benefit University Club, $50, 7 pm

Fridays: Play & Learn Cedar Rapids Downtown Library,

SAT. SEPTEMBER 13 Game Geeks Retro Championship 2014 Game Geeks, $5 per tournament, 12 pm

Free, 10 am Saturdays: Family Storytime Iowa City Public Library, Free, 10 am

Iowa City Open Coffee Iowa City Area Development

Iowa State v Iowa Hawkeyes Kinnick Stadium at UI,

THURS. SEPTEMBER 4

Group, Free, 8 am

$49.50, 2 pm

Doodlebugs at the CRMA: Shapes are Flat Cedar Rapids

SAT. SEPTEMBER 6

Kids

Ball State v. Iowa Hawkeyes Kinnick StadiumI, $49.50, 2 pm

SUN. SEPTEMBER 7

ONGOING Mondays: Play & Learn Cedar Rapids Ladd Library, Free, 10 am

Museum Of Art, Free, 10 am

FRI. SEPTEMBER 5 Playtime with Mimi Iowa Children's Museum, Free, 10 am

Cars & Coffee NewBo City Market, Free, 8 am

Toddler Storytime Iowa City Public Library, Free, 10 am

SAT. SEPTEMBER 6

180 for Haiti 5K Run/Walk Terry Trueblood Recreation

Tuesdays: Toddler Storytime Iowa City Public Library,

Sensory Storytime Iowa City Public Library, Free, 1 pm

Area, At Will, 9 am

Free, 10 am

MON. SEPTEMBER 8

Tweens on Tuesday Iowa City Public Library, Free, 2 pm

SUN. SEPTEMBER 7

Play & Learn Cedar Rapids Downtown Library, Free, 6 pm

Playtime with Mimi Iowa Children's Museum, Free, 10 am

Group Meditation Iowa City Public Library, Free, 3 pm

Wednesdays: Preschool Storytime Iowa City Public

basis of some “virgin birth” stories. More commonly the hymen tears prematurely, often as a result of physical activity. This has been known for centuries: an 1825 medical textbook warns against using the hymen as a proxy for virginity, as it can be ruptured by jumping, horseback riding, bicycling, accidents, various medical conditions, “artificial manipulation” (masturbation, presumably), or “lesbian delights or Sapphic pleasure.” Reported causes of early tearing in more recent times include inserting tampons, stretching and participating in vigorous sports. Falls onto bicycle crossbars, playground equipment, or fence rails have caused broken hymens, as has doing particularly energetic splits. A careless physician can tear a patient’s hymen during a routine gynecological examination. While premature tearing of the hymen is in most of the developed world an annoyance at worst, there are plenty of places where it’s a disaster. In many Muslim societies in the Middle East and South Asia, virginity is mandatory for an unmarried woman and must be demonstrated by bleeding when the hymen is torn on the wedding night. To determine the

hymen’s status beforehand, young women may be browbeaten into undergoing “virginity testing” via manual exploration of the vagina. Even where it’s no longer common to publicly display a stained sheet after the wedding night, as in Israeli-Palestinian communities, many women still place a cloth on the bed beforehand and keep it afterward for the husband’s viewing. Elsewhere mothers, mothers-in-law, or aunts may demand to see the bloodied sheets. Unfortunately, after puberty the hymen has few blood vessels and is often flexible or very thin, so even if the bride has been chaste, there may be no perceptible blood. One source claims only one in four virgins bleed on first intercourse. And so medical science has provided a solution: hymenoplasty, or hymen reconstruction surgery. Performed on brides who face embarrassment, shunning, violence, or even murder if they can’t produce the expected blood, hymenoplasty is typically done on the eve of the wedding and involves stitching the torn ends of the hymen together. If the available fragments are insufficient, vaginal skin is used instead. Since bleeding can’t be guaranteed, some doctors insert breakable packets of

a bloodlike substance behind the hymen that split open upon penetration. Now to your question. We scoured the medical journals for reports of hymens ruptured by roller coasters but found no definitive accounts. Anecdotes abound online but don’t constitute proof. It’s not obvious how a roller coaster would stress the hymen—while high g-forces are involved, premature hymen rupture due to external causes typically involves some kind of impact or the legs being pushed in different directions, neither of which normally happens on roller coaster rides. I won’t say it’s impossible for your daughter to damage her hymen at an amusement park. But assuming she won’t be considered a ruined woman if she does, why should anyone care? —CECIL ADAMS Send questions to Cecil via straightdope. com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV161 | Sept. 3 - 16, 2014 | 29

C.R.A.M. FILES

NEWS & NOTES FROM THE CEDAR RAPIDS ARTS & MUSIC SCENE

GREAT PERFORMANCES IN SEPTEMBER There’s an abundance of remarkable, late-summer live music happening in Cedar Rapids this month. • BY SARA DRISCOLL

DJ Matt Rissi

residentadvisor.net/dj/mattrissi A pioneer of the Cedar Rapids electronic music scene who has been producing all-night dance parties in and outside of Iowa for over 20 years, Matt Rissi is one of the most respected and hardworking DJs in the area. The fanfare of his events are not to be missed! Here’s a rundown of what he’s up to this month:

SEPT. 12: The Pornstar’s Ball at Woody’s Show Club. If you’re inclined to skip this just because of the sleazy title and location, you should know that you’re missing one of the wildest electronic dance music spectacles around. The stripclub is converted into one huge dance space for a raging party that routinely sells out and doesn’t stop until 5 a.m. This installment of the ball, the 24th in the series, features Rissi alongside a showcase of DJs from Denver, Colo.

SEPT. 20: Downtown Farmers Market. Rissi

comes out of the dark to explore the deeper sounds of house music for a special 8 a.m. sunrise set.

SEPT. 26 - 27: Therapeutic Chemistry at

Mahoney’s Pub in the Irish District. Joined by Kevin Bassett and Dylan Lazarus, these back-to-back parties have the intimacy of a small space while still keeping an explosive crowd going on the dance floor all night long. The DJ booth is the center of attention, the spot where you can get an up-close look at the magic behind the mixer.

acts coming in from as far away as Argentina, Tunisia, Vietnam and South Africa, this unique concert series brings in artists from all across the globe right here to our own backyard. The Saturday show in Green Square Park is free and features Kinobe and the Wamu Spirit, a critically acclaimed group a of guitar players and percussionists hailing from Uganda. Tickets and info available at CSPS.

Loretta Lynn

| Paramount Theatre— Sept. 4, 7:30 p.m. ($42-$59)

Landfall Festival of World Music

America’s sassy sweetheart of classic country has been inspiring fans for over 50 years. Lynn’s early songs confronted social and domestic issues that many women struggled with. Today, her rags to riches story of hard work and perseverance eventually paying off continues to resonate. This tour is remarkable as Lynn has recently suffered health problems, a house fire and the loss of a child.

The Landfall Festival of World Music returns to Cedar Rapids for its seventh year. With

Sarah Driscoll lives in Cedar Rapids with her husband and dog. Sarah put out CRAM (Cedar Rapids Art & Music) magazine from 20022006.

Various Cedar Rapids venues—Sept. 16-20, legionarts.org

D ow n tow n I owa Cit y

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the Paper Nest 220 E Washington St. Iowa City 319.455.6378

Specializing in high quality printing & bookbinding papers, handmade bookbinding tools & custom letterpress printing.

ON SALE SEPTEMBER 5 AT 10 AM Special Guest: JENNY SCHEINMAN

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Coworking spaces for you and your laptop, your off-site development team, or maybe your start-up company.

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34 | Sept. 3 - 16, 2014 | LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV161

SAVAGE LOVE

WORKING OUT THE KINKS In this week's column, readers write in about getting pissy over sex and going balls out for love. • BY DAN SAVAGE My boyfriend of two years cannot climax or maintain an erection unless his testicles are handled, squeezed, pulled or pressed on (preferably with my stockinged foot or knee). Needless to say, intercourse does not work very well, and our sexual repertoire is rather limited, which is frustrating for both of us. His doctor says his ED is not physiological. I’ve read your advice on “death grip” masturbation and suspect it’s a variation of that. I would love to try to “rewire” him; we have started trying to conceive, so we need him to ejaculate successfully at least a few times per cycle (to increase our chances but also for sperm health). We are in our mid-30s, so I don’t want to wait months for him to increase his sensitivity. What would you suggest? Almost Resigned To A Turkey Baster My first suggestion, ARTATB, is that you drop the stigmatizing and unhelpful talk about ED (“erectile dysfunction”). Your boyfriend’s dick works—he can obtain and sustain an erection, he can blow loads—he just requires a very specific and inconvenient form of stimulus to obtain and sustain that erection. My second suggestion is to accessorize. He needs to have his balls handled, squeezed, pulled and pressed on? There are toys for that! At Mr. S Leather (mr-s-leather.com), for instance, you’ll find all sorts of metal and silicone ball stretchers; some of them lock, some are electrified, and some snap on with magnets. This is a little complicated to explain—it would be easier to show you, but I don’t make house calls anymore—but try to picture this: You roll up one of your stockings, put his balls in the toe, bolt a ball stretcher around his now-stocking-wrapped sack, and then unroll the stocking. Then yank on one end of the stocking either with your toes (pulling his balls down) or with your hand after pulling the stocking up through his crack and over his shoulder (pulling his balls back and up). Voilà! Your boyfriend’s balls are being handled, squeezed, and pulled on during PIV intercourse, you’re doing the pulling, and your stockings are in play! Work with his kink and there’s no need to waste time retraining him—and, hey, who knows? A few dozen successful PIV/ballstretcher sessions could help your boyfriend

make the leap to plain ol’ PIV. Quality metal ball stretchers aren’t cheap; a good one will set you back $150. But they’re a whole lot cheaper than fertility treatments and a fuck of a lot sexier than turkey basters. I am a 31-year-old gay man in a new relationship. My boyfriend is amazing, and our sex life is hot. We’re very open with each other, so he was comfortable telling me that he’s into piss. I can tell the thought of me pissing in his mouth or vice versa is a major turn-on for him. I’ve never done anything like that before, so he said that it was not a requirement, just a bonus, and we moved on. Now I’m thinking about it a lot because seeing him satisfied is a major turn-on for me, and the thought of not giving him everything he wants bothers me. I’ve always considered myself GGG when it comes to sex, so I think I’m open to trying this. But rather than just doing it, I’d like to enjoy it. Do you have any suggestions for helping me sexualize it in my mind? Piss Is Sorta Sexy Nothing will sexualize piss for you quite as rapidly and effectively as seeing the effect it has on your boyfriend, PISS. Just do it, as they say, and even if piss play never becomes your thing—even if it doesn’t become something you would ever pursue on your own—your boyfriend’s enjoyment of it (his excitement, his gratitude) should provide you with all sorts of bank-shot thrills. (Please note: Don’t do it first thing in the morning.) And to kinky readers dating vanillas: Do you see what PISS’s boyfriend did there? He disclosed his kink (“into piss”), downplayed it (“not a requirement”), and dropped it (“moved on”). Now PISS, having grown more attached to his boyfriend, is coming around all on his own. Disclose, downplay, and drop isn’t a foolproof strategy—there’s no guarantee that a partner will come around if you go the DDD route—but it’s more likely to be successful than, say, the “present, pressure, and pout” strategy that too many kinksters employ. I’m a 53-year-old woman. From 1971 until my daddy died in 2001, he and I played cribbage nearly every week. It’s a card game where the players score points off each other,

and the points are recorded with a series of pegs that fit into tiny holes in a wooden “cribbage board.” I now often play cribbage with my grandnephews. When you score points and mark them with the pegs, that process is called “pegging.” Well, thanks to you and your ingenious readers, I can’t use that term anymore without snickering like an 11-year-old. What term do you suggest I substitute for “pegging” the next time I play cribbage with someone? Perplexed Expert Player I’m a cribbage player, too, PEP, and while we refer to the thingies we move around our cribbage board as pegs, we don’t call the process of moving them “pegging.” Maybe that’s a regional thing? But rest assured, words can have more than one meaning. Pegging can mean “a woman fucking a man in the ass with a strap-on dildo” and also mean “moving your pegs around a cribbage board,” just as pussy can mean “domesticated cat” and “lady parts,” or santorum can mean “the frothy mix of lube and fecal matter that is sometimes the byproduct of anal sex” and… actually, I’m not aware of an alternate meaning for santorum. Maybe someone should come up with one? On the Lovecast, Dan and the awesome Mary Martone argue about fat shaming: savagelovecast.com. Contact Dan Savage: [email protected] net, @fakedansavage on Twitter.

READ THE FULL SAVAGE LOVE COLUMN EVERY WEDNESDAY AT LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV161 | Sept. 3 - 16, 2014 | 35

F R O M G R AY T O B L A C K

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1. Military slang 6. Egypt’s “_____ Spring” 10. This number told eight he liked his belt 14. The Little Mermaid 15. Medicinal pot 16. First ladies of the bible and the Ruff Ryders 17. Jolt used to prove obedience? 19. Sailed with the Pinta and the Santa Maria 20. Can be copped 21. “Battle of _____ Jima” 22. Lazy beetle 23. Not Tony or Toni, but 26. '90s rap duo “_____ n Pepa” 27. Stimuli used to proved obedience? 32. Rap video staple 34. Honolulu greeting present 35. To practice boxing 36. Exponent and Impart suffix 37. Relaxing style of music 41. Text message to a BF or BFF 42. Pastry dough 43. Unit of energy 44. Ming Dynasty emperor with the longest reign 47. Aircraft used to prove electricity? 51. MBA Class 52. Hillary Clinton type suit 53. Gulf where a phony incident brought the U.S. into Vietnam 56. Gay madman? 57. Billions of years 61. Indian spiced tea 62. Produce used to prove inheritance? 65. They need to be competitive to be considered 66. First night of vacation need, usually 67. “Put some _____ on it!” 68. New Jersey’s version of ya’ll, with guys 69. There's a 7-to-1 ratio of these to Iowans 70. Candy, Kiss, Smart or Lazy (plural)

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1. Pro Football Hall of Famer Warren 2. Shrinking Asian sea 3. Violently tear apart 4. Animal byproduct in jello 5. Mr. Blue Sky band, to fans 6. Ask and you shall receive this? 7. Do over 8. _____ Z. 9. A Redwoods State Park 36 | Sept. 3 - 16, 2014 | LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV161

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10. Tube televisions, most likely 11. Simon and Hecubus declaration 12. Kevin, Mel or Dustin’s costar 13. First words of our anthem 18. Portrayer of gangster boss Marsellus 23. Jazeera and Weird 25. Ukrainian actress Kuylenko 27. Resident Evil star, Jovovich 28. Straighten out 29. Say what you think 30. _____ of Duty 31. Iowa City’s Sound Alternative 32. Goon who asked,“Why don’t you make like a tree and get outta here?” 33. Cub’s home 38. Detailed directions to cantaloupe and honeydew farms? 40. Can be identical or evil 43. A gentleman’s after date request 46. Provides evidence of, with to 48. Airport for the Chiefs, on the monitors 49. Euchre-like card game 50. The new spinach 53. The OG of yogurt shops 54. “Oh, how I hate _____ State.” 55. South Indian state, with Tamil

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56. Make out, to a limey 58. Exclamations made while igniting cheese 59. Atlanta housewife turned actress 60. _____ Fifth Avenue 63. “The Book of _____” 64. Undergrad college for English, biology and theater

AUGUST ANSWERS a b b a

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): "I have a hypothesis that everyone is born with the same amount of luck," says cartoonist Scott Adams. "But luck doesn't appear to be spread evenly across a person's life. Some people use up all of their luck early in life. Others start out in bad circumstances and finish strong." How would you assess your own distribution of luck, Virgo? According to my projections, you are in a phase when luck is flowing stronger and deeper than usual. And I bet it will intensify in the coming weeks. I suggest you use it wisely—which is to say, with flair and aplomb and generosity. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): When my daughter Zoe was seven years old, she took horse-back riding lessons with a group of other young aspirants. On the third lesson, their instructor assigned them the task of carrying an egg in a spoon that they clasped in their mouths as they sat facing backwards on a trotting horse. That seemingly improbable task reminds me of what you're working on right now, Libra. Your balancing act isn't quite as demanding, but it is testing you in ways you're not accustomed to. My prognosis: You will master what's required of you faster than the kids at Zoe's horse camp. Every one of them broke at least eight eggs before succeeding. I suspect that three or four attempts will be enough for you. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Peter the Great was the Tsar of Russia from 1682 until 1725. Under his rule, his nation became a major empire. He also led a cultural revolution that brought modern European-style ideas and influences to Russia. But for our purposes right now, I want to call attention to one of his other accomplishments: The All-Joking, All-Drunken Council of Fools and Jesters. It was a club he organized with his allies to ensure there would always be an abundance of parties for him to enjoy. I don't think you need alcohol as an essential part of your own efforts to sustain maximum revelry in the coming weeks, Scorpio. But I do suggest you convene a similar brain trust. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In Roald Dahl's kids' story James and the Giant Peach, 501 seagulls are needed to carry the giant peach from a spot near the Azores all the way across the Atlantic Ocean to New York City. But physics students at the U.K.'s University of Leicester have determined that such a modest contingent wouldn't be nearly enough to achieve a successful airlift. By their calculations, there'd have to be a minimum of 2,425,907 seagulls involved. I urge you to consider the possibility that you, too, will require more power than you have estimated to accomplish your own magic feat. Certainly not almost 5,000 times more, as in the case

of the seagulls. Fifteen percent more should be enough. (P.S. I'm almost positive you can rustle up that extra 15 percent.) CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): So far, 53 toys have been inducted into the Toy Hall of Fame. They include crayons, the jump rope, Mr. Potato Head, the yo-yo, the rubber duckie, and dominoes. My favorite inductee—and the toy that is most symbolically useful to you right now—is the plain old cardboard box. Of all the world's playthings, it is perhaps the one that requires and activates the most imagination. It can become a fort, a spaceship, a washing machine, a cave, a submarine, and many other exotic things. I think you need to be around influences akin to the cardboard box because they are likely to unleash your dormant creativity. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I'm not opposed to you fighting a good fight. It's quite possible you would become smarter and stronger by wrangling with a worthy adversary or struggling against a bad influence. The passion you summon to outwit an obstacle could bestow blessings not only on you but on other people, as well. But here's a big caveat: I hope you will not get embroiled in a showdown with an imaginary foe. I pray that you will refrain from a futile combat with a slippery delusion. Choose your battles carefully, Aquarius. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): During the next six weeks, I suggest you regard symbiosis as one of your key themes. Be alert for ways you can cultivate more interesting and intense forms of intimacy. Magnetize yourself to the joys of teamwork and collaboration. Which of your skills and talents are most useful to other people? Which are most likely to inspire your allies to offer you their best skills and talents? I suggest you highlight everything about yourself that is most likely to win you love, appreciation, and help. ARIES (March 21-April 19): I don't usually do this kind of thing, but I'm going to suggest that you monitor the number six. My hypothesis is that six has been trying to grab your attention, perhaps even in askew or inconvenient ways. Its purpose? To nudge you to tune in to beneficial influences that you have been ignoring. I furthermore suspect that six is angling to show you clues about what is both the cause of your unscratchable itch and the cure for that itch. So lighten up and have fun with this absurd mystery, Aries. Without taking it too seriously, allow six to be your weird little teacher. Let it prick your intuition with quirky notions and outlandish speculations. If nothing comes of it, there will be no harm done. If it leads you to helpful discoveries, hallelujah.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In English, the rare word "trouvaille" means a lucky find or an unexpected windfall. In French, "trouvaille" can refer to the same thing and even more: something interesting or exceptional that is discovered fortuitously; a fun or enlightening blessing that's generated through the efforts of a vigorous imagination. Of course I can't guarantee that you will experience a trouvaille or two (or even three) in the coming days, Taurus. But the conditions are as ripe as they can be for such a possibility. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The Dutch word *epibreren* means that even though you are goofing off, you are trying to create the impression that you are hard at work. I wouldn't be totally opposed to you indulging in some major epibreren in the coming days. More importantly, the cosmos won't exact any karmic repercussions for it. I suspect, in fact, that the cosmos is secretly conspiring for you to enjoy more slack and spaciousness that usual. You're overdue to recharge your spiritual and emotional batteries, and that will require extra repose and quietude. If you have to engage in a bit of masquerade to get the ease you need, so be it. CANCER (June 21-July 22): When James Franco began to learn his craft as an actor, he was young and poor. A gig at McDonald's paid for his acting lessons and allowed him to earn a living. He also used his time on the job as an opportunity to build his skills as a performer. While serving customers burgers and fries, he practiced speaking to them in a variety of different accents. Now would be an excellent time for you to adopt a similar strategy, Cancerian. Even if you are not doing what you love to do full-time, you can and should take stronger measures to prepare yourself for that day when you will be doing more of what you love to do. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Here are a few of the major companies that got their starts in home garages: Apple, Google, Microsoft, Mattel, Amazon and Disney. Even if you're not in full support of their business practices, you've got to admit that their humble origins didn't limit their ability to become rich and powerful. As I meditate on the longterm astrological omens, I surmise you are now in a position to launch a project that could follow a similar arc. It would be more modest, of course. I don't foresee you ultimately becoming an international corporation worth billions of dollars. But the success would be bigger than I think you can imagine.

––Rob Brezsny LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV161 | Sept. 3 - 16, 2014 | 37

LOCAL ALBUMS

JACK LION JAC EP

jacklion.bandcamp.com

I

t seemed that after Slip Silo vocalist and guitarist Matt Logan split the Midwest and his band to take an opportunity on the West Coast, the remainder of the band was rudderless. In a March 2013 interview with Little Village he said that he hoped they’d be able to continue on the mission of connecting and tapping into a “transcendent and universal creativity source” without him. In that same interview Logan said that he hoped the remaining trio would keep the band

name, and, for a while, they did. After meeting a cab driver with a big personality and joie de vivre, the band decided to rename themselves in tribute to him. A particularly transcendent performance at the Trumpet Blossom helped the trio gain their bearings. “This is it,” said trumpeter and producer Brian Lewis Smith in an official statement. “This is our passion.” On their latest release JAC EP, the trio creates music that has roots in Slip Silo, but is distilled and refined to an ambient electronic sound with some live instrumentation—notably the trumpet work of Smith which carries the melody line in most of the songs. This fusion of live jazz instrumentation and electronic samples and keyboards reminds me a lot of Kieran Hebden of Four Tet’s side project with jazz drummer Steve Reid. I found myself initially trying to figure out what was actually played and what was samples, but my attention was soon drawn away and I was left to enjoy the album's mixture of the subtle textures. “So It Goes” carries a looped tick-tock beat with bits of percussion flowing in and out which make it difficult to tell what is played

by drummer Justin Leduc and what is sampled. The muted trumpet darts like a fish in a bubbling brook of keyboards at times echoing the melody of the keyboards and other times taking its own line. The trio creates music that has roots in Slip Silo, but is distilled and refined to an ambient electronic sound ...

“Bowlingsmith” opens with a trumpet playing a taps-like melody while the beat and synths march along. The counterpoint of the keyboard pacing soon picks up, forcing the listener to focus on the widening vistas of the deliberately extended notes of the trumpet. The band says they are developing the improvisational aspects of their music—“the universal creativity source,” if you will—but, it isn’t the atonal squonking that free jazz is sometimes known for. There are distinct song structures and melody that the listener can follow which result in a very satisfying soundtrack. —Mike Roeder

The OLD TRAIN DEPOT District

LITTLEVILLAGEMAG.COM/LV156 | JUNE 4 - 17 | 39