Journey to a Customer Experience Map - Catalyst

Journey to a Customer Experience Map - Catalyst

WHITE PAPER Journey to a Customer Experience Map BY JILL H E WIT T, CUS TOM E R E XPE RIE NCE DE SIG N E R Journey to a Customer Experience Map Ex...

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WHITE PAPER

Journey to a Customer Experience Map BY JILL H E WIT T, CUS TOM E R E XPE RIE NCE DE SIG N E R

Journey to a Customer Experience Map

Executive summary

B

usinesses are constantly seeking ways to more accurately predict customer behavior and attitudes. Data models and traditional market research often overlook a research methodology that can tell you what customers are thinking, feeling and doing at each stage of their relationship with you. This methodology, titled “customer experience mapping,” uncovers customer emotions and attitudes through the entire customer life cycle, resulting in opportunities for more relevant communications, better customer relations, higher retention rates, and increased lifetime value.

60% of shoppers who excluded an institution from consideration did so because they had a bad experience or heard negative things.

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By cataloging key customer touch points and talking to customers about their experiences during those key touch points, it’s possible to create a customer experience map that provides a concise picture of what customers are thinking, feeling and doing. The map not only identifies gaps in customers’ experiences, it also delivers an actionable framework to improve them. IN THIS WHITE PAPER WE WILL EXPLORE:

• What is a customer experience map and how to create one • H  ow to use a customer experience map to pinpoint gaps in your customers’ experiences • How to apply your findings to create a competitive advantage

©2015 Catalyst. All rights reserved.

Journey to a Customer Experience Map

Why does customer experience matter?

C

ustomers interact with your brand across multiple channels. They expect a holistic, integrated experience in and across all of them.

RECENT STUDIES HAVE SHOWN THAT:

45%

68%

54%

of customers prefer an omnichannel shopping experience

of consumers use two or more screens at the same time to access unrelated content

of marketers cite not having a consolidated customer view across channels as the biggest roadblock to a successful cross-channel experience

While marketers recognize the need to adopt an omnichannel strategy, many are struggling to successfully connect consistently with consumers across all available outlets. Most organizations are structured to focus on individual channels, touchpoints, technologies or features rather than the overall brand. A customer experience map bridges this gap and examines how customers interact with your brand during each stage of the customer life cycle.

Sources: eMarketer “US Time Spent on Mobile to Overtake Desktop” August, 2013 Retail Systems Research (RSR) “Retailing: Omni-Channel Approach Central to Strategies in 2013” August, 2013

Bad customer experiences are shared … and shared … and shared Years ago, a bad customer experience took a lot longer to permeate the public than it does today. But with social media and ratings and review websites, word gets around a lot quicker. Here’s an actual example from the banking industry:

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Journey to a Customer Experience Map

Good customer experiences make a brand stand out

When your customers aren’t happy, they vote with their feet.

Good reviews are also shared. These two banks had the confidence to allow reviews directly on their website—good, bad or indifferent.

Your customers’ experiences impact the bottom line When your customers aren’t happy, they vote with their feet. When they’re happy, they’re more likely to recommend you to others and stay loyal—even become advocates. Either way, it affects your bottom line.

The importance of a positive customer experience Positive business impact

1%

of customers feel that their customer experience expectations are always met1

86%

of customers are willing to pay up to 25% more for a better experience1

Enterprise companies who raise their customer experience score by

10%

89%

Realize additional revenue of

$1

billion

5

of customers stop doing business with a company after a bad experience1

One 12

negative experience takes good experiences to make up for it2

The high cost of churn The average company loses up to

30%

of their customers each year3

7x

It costs up to more to acquire new customers than retain current ones4

Companies who lower their customer attrition rates

5%

95%

Companies who raise their customer retention rate

Increase their value

10%

Sources: 1 slideshare.net/RightNow/2011-customer-experience-impact-report 2parature.com/infographic-financialcustserv 3McKinsey 4 White House Office of Consumer Affairs 5Forrester, The Business Impact of Customer Experience 6Bain & Company

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Raise company profits by up to

6

30%

6

Journey to a Customer Experience Map

What is a customer experience map?

A

customer experience map is a strategic tool for presenting your customer’s point of view. It includes four key components:

u

v

Guiding principles

Customer journey

HELP ME UNDERSTAND WHAT I GET.

I DESERVE VIP TREATMENT.

I WANT TO GET MY MONEY’S WORTH.

GIVE ME MORE.

MAKE IT ABOUT ME.

Program features awareness = benefits satisfaction

Loyalty programs = special treatment

Showing rewards = enhanced perceived value

Added features & benefits = greater value

Personalization = relevant messaging

Journey Stages

I LOVE THE PROGRAM; I’LL TELL MY FRIENDS.

Brand ambassadors = program referrals

Learning and Signing Up Find out about program sign up

Planning and Attending Movies Receive card renewal

Receiving and Redeeming Rewards Approach reward reward expiration

Renewing Membership 90 days before renewal

Learn about program and benefits

Receive membership card

Learn that a reward is close

Learn about renewal

Decide not to renew

Assess program value

Attend movies to begin earning rewards

Earn reward

Consider renewal

Attend as lapsed member

Use reward OR reward expires

Renew membership

Sign up

Learn —Consider—Sign up

Doing

Letting Membership Lapse Immediately after lapse

renewal

Attend Learn

Learn

Use

Learn

Consider

Renew

Decide not to renew

Attend as a lapsed member

REWARDS

$

Ongoing non linear

REWARDS

Non linear, but timebased Linear Process

Thinking

Feeling

$

Earn

• Will this program benefit me?

• What’s playing this week?

• How will I use my reward?

• Did I earn rewards this year?

• Should I have renewed?

• How do I sign up?

• Which theatre is closest?

• Should I use the reward now or save it for a special occasion?

• It’s time to renew already?

• Wouldn’t it be nice if I could still get the concession upgrades?

• Will joining take long?

• Which has the best amenities and concessions?

• Why did it take so long to earn?

• I have to pay again?

• Why didn’t I get more for being a loyal member?

• What? An annual fee?

• What are my friends doing tonight?

• Why aren’t there more rewards?

• Will I lose out by renewing early?

• Is this just another sales pitch?

• How close am I to a reward?

• Is it going to be a pain to redeem?

• What are my other expenses?

• Can’t I just get to my movie?

• Where are the offers and special events?

• Rewards expire? Why?

• Do I have time to renew right now?

• Hmm. Why not?

• I have to pay a fee to purchase tickets online? Why?

• Jazzed about earning free items.

• • • •

• Thrilled. This saved me some money and now I’m hooked.

• Grateful for the notice because I don’t want to miss out.

• Happy that it was fast and easy to redeem my reward.

• Happy to renew; it was easy.

• Glad because I earned the reward quickly.

• Pleased that I can use rewards toward renewal cost.

• Discouraged. I wish I got more of a reward.

• A little irritated because I just don’t have time now but will renew at my next visit.

• Comfortable with my research; I’ll sign up next time. • Interested because I think it could save me money. • Skeptical; I’ll research the program more. • Annoyed. I just want the crew member to leave me alone.

• Appalled that you are asking me to pay for a loyalty program.

Excited because I want to see new movies. Intrigued when I get promotions about movies that I want to see. Glad that the crew members are so friendly. Enjoy the modern amenities of the theatre.

• Uninterested in promotions that don’t fit my movie tastes.

• Upset that it’s taking so long to earn a reward.

• Angry that rewards expire. I earned them; they should never expire.

• Unhappy with the high cost of movie-going.

• Disappointed that I have to pay again.

• Miss the rewards now that my membership has lapsed.

• Unappreciated.

• Let down because the company didn’t recognize my loyalty.

• Mad because I never received a reward.

• Dissatisfied because there’s a renewal cost.

Opportunities • Make it easy for movie-goers to understand member benefits at a glance • Let movie-goers see what they are missing out on through in-theatre experience • Encourage members to promote the program

w

Qualitative research

• Make it even easier for crew members to sell & promote the program • Partner with Fandango (and others) to promote the program • Leverage segmentation and personalization to deliver relevant messages to members

• Introduce surprise and delight approach for members based on their value • Optimize life cycle communications to reinforce value of program and drive retention • Identify program modifications

x

Opportunities

u  Guiding principles—these emerge as you begin to understand the journey v T he customer journey—shows what customers have actually done wQ ualitative online and offline research—conversations with customers to gain insights about what they are thinking and feeling x  Opportunities—gaps in the customer experience that can be closed by improved marketing and customer service

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Journey to a Customer Experience Map

How to develop a customer experience map

H

ere are five specific steps to guide you on your way.

1. Inventory all triggers, touchpoints and channels Begin by listing all of your current customer touchpoints by channel under each customer life cycle stage. This important exercise will show the gaps in your touchpoint inventory, and you’ll immediately be able to see where the opportunities are.

TRIGGERS, TOUCHPOINTS AND CHANNELS INVENTORY STAGE

Sign Up

Earn Rewards

Redeem

Renewal

Lapsed

CHANNELS

In Store

• This is the first listing

• This is the first listing

• This is the first listing

• This is the first listing

• This is the first listing

• Second listing is here

• Second listing is here

• Second listing is here

• Second listing is here

• Second listing is here

• Listing number three comes next

• Listing number three comes next

• Listing number three comes next

• Listing number three comes next

• Listing number three comes next

• A fourth listing goes here

• A fourth listing goes here

• Number five is another listing • This is the first listing

• This is the first listing

• This is the first listing

• This is the first listing

• Second listing is here

• Second listing is here

• Second listing is here

• Second listing is here

• Listing number three comes next

• Listing number three comes next

Email

• A fourth listing goes here • This is the first listing

• This is the first listing

• This is the first listing

• This is the first listing

• Second listing is here

• Second listing is here

• Second listing is here

• Second listing is here

• Listing number three comes next

• Listing number three comes next • A fourth listing goes here

GAPS

Web • This is the first listing • Second listing is here

• This is the first listing

Look at• the gaps This is the first listing • Second listing is here in your touchpoint inventory—are they opportunities?

• Listing number three comes next

Social Media

• This is the first listing

• This is the first listing

• This is the first listing

• Second listing is here

• Second listing is here

• Second listing is here

• Listing number three comes next

Mobile • This is the first listing

• This is the first listing

• Second listing is here

• Second listing is here

• This is the first listing

• This is the first listing

• This is the first listing

• Second listing is here

• Second listing is here • Listing number three comes next • A fourth listing goes here

Mail • This is the first listing

• This is the first listing

• This is the first listing

• Second listing is here

• Second listing is here

• Second listing is here

• Listing number three comes next

Out of Home

• A fourth listing goes here

Ongoing nonlinear

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Time-based nonlinear

Linear

Journey to a Customer Experience Map

2. Research Once you’ve completed your inventory, you are ready to start doing some qualitative research. Of course you can pull comments from social media or ongoing research, but it is also very important to set up direct qualitative research to create your customer experience map. A S YOU PL AN YOUR RESEARCH, YOU’LL NEED TO:

• Identify customer segments to recruit • Develop a discussion guide that will encourage people to tell a story about what they are doing, thinking and feeling • Decide what to pay participants • Prepare questions that will help you probe for clarification and examples There are a variety of ways to gather qualitative research from customers. You can observe and interview customers on site, conduct online surveys, run traditional focus groups or use online focus groups. We recommend using online bulletin boards. Essentially, these are online focus groups. They have several advantages over traditional focus groups:

CUSTOMER FEEDBACK:

“I wish I could have earned more rewards but when I’m just buying for myself the rewards didn’t add up fast enough.” —Jessica F. (lapsed member)

• Large geographical reach • Easier for customers to participate • Participants can remain anonymous • Moderator can probe for clarification • Eliminates “group think” and biasing • Results are immediately available

3. Hold workshops Customer experience workshops are conducted with your internal stakeholders—the people who can impact the final customer experience. When stakeholders read customers’ comments and feelings firsthand, they develop empathy and are more likely to act on and resolve customer experience problems.

“Make us feel special for choosing your store. We pay your paychecks, so we make you feel special.” —Bill M. (longtime member)

“… if I knew that I was close to another reward, I’d be more likely to go to the store sooner than I might have otherwise.” —Linda C. (newbie) —Linda C. (newbie)

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Journey to a Customer Experience Map

DURING THE WORKSHOPS, WE:

• Read all the comments customers made on the online bulletin boards • Create a sticky note for each comment—each color indicates a specific research segment

Customer experience workshops are conducted with your internal stakeholders.

• Group similar comments into themes: disappointment, frustration, surprise, communications timing, etc. • Look for emerging patterns

4. Develop an initial model of customer feelings We focus on feelings to identify highs and lows in the customer experience throughout the life cycle. The three lines in the model below represent optimal, average and poor customer experiences.

5. Do a complete analysis of your customer research This analysis pulls all your research together to show you what your customers are thinking, feeling and doing at each stage of their journey with you. The consolidated research is used to build your customer experience map.

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Journey to a Customer Experience Map

Customer experience map in action Since every business model is unique, we chose an example that anyone can relate to—opening a personal bank account. The typical banking customer life cycle looks like this: Consideration

Account Opening

Onboarding

Day-to-Day Account Management

Expanding Relationship

Ending Relationship

Now, lets take a closer look at what customers are doing, thinking and feeling at the very beginning of the journey—the consideration stage.

Banking Customer Experience

When considering opening a personal banking account, the customer is influenced by many touch points, including visiting a branch, advertising and direct mail solicitations. Below is a visual representation of the customer journey at this stage:

Account Opening This analysis pulls

• Identify the need for a new financial account



• Assess financial institutions and account types available

• •

View advertisements

Doing

CUSTOMER JOURNEY

Steps

Consideration

Call a representative

all your research Choose a financial institution and together toaccount showtype(s) Open account(s)you what your Receive confirmation and account numbers customers are thinking, feeling and doing at each stage of their journey with you.

Visit website

Apply online

Visit branch

Speak with a representative

Fill out application

Call representative

Receive paperwork to sign

Fax/email signed paperwork to bank

View mail promotion Check rates online

Visit branch

KING

Talk with friends

• Who do my friends and family bank with?

• Will it be difficult to open a new account?

• How do I choose the best account for my needs?

• Will I qualify for the account(s) that I want?

• Does the bank offer the services and technology I need?

• What does the fine print mean?

• How close are the nearest branches and ATMs?

• Will I be able to talk to a real person? Page 9

• How do fees and rates compare to other banks?

• Will the branch representatives take care of all the pap

anking Customer Experience Map Journey to a Customer Experience Map

Visit branch

Talk with friends

Consideration THINKING

Steps

• Identify the need for a new financial account

• Assess financial institutions and account types available

THINKING

What are customers thinking about when they are considering View advertisements switching banks?

Call representative

O • Will it be difficult

• How do I choose the best account for my needs?

• Will I qualify for t

• Does the bank offer the services and technology I need? • Choose a financial institution and account type(s) • How close are the nearest branches and ATMs? • Open account(s) • How do fees and rates compare to other banks? • Receive confirmation and account numbers • How big is the bank’s presence (local, national, international)?

• What does the fin • S • Will I be able to t • S • Will the branch re • O Acquisition • R

• Does this bank take an interest in my community?

• What should I ex

• What will happen

Receive account Happy — opening documents

Positive

Apply online Comfortable —Visit I’vewebsite done my research

Doing

• Will I be able to c

• Will the bank help me grow and progress financially?

Check rates online

R p

Account • Who do my friends and family Opening bank with?

• How helpful and knowledgeable are the bank employees? Call a representative

View mail promotion

r

the reps

Happy — the bank does a lot of great things for the local community

Thankful — the ba

Confident — my friends/family have recommended the bank

Special — as if my

Excited to open my first account

Acquisition Respected — branch representatives sat down with me and explained options Welcomed during Speak with a Receive account Fill out Visit branch Rec representative opening documents application mat and services Comfortable —inthth Convinced — switching will deliver a better experience than my current bank

Visit branch Talk with friends

FEELING

• •

• Will the bank help me grow and progress financially?

Indifferent

Pleased — I wasn’

Glad to have it do Acquisition

• Will I qualify for the account(s) that I want?

Indifferent — I did • W

• What does the fine print mean?

Concerned — will • W o

• W

• W Impatient — waite

Insecure — branch

Acquisition • Will I be able to continue working with my advisor from my old bank? Burdened — I had • What will happen to the employees at my local branch? Unappreciated —

Frustrated and an

Comfortable — I’vepinpoint done my research Gaps can

Happy — the reps are here to help me open an account

Em

Happyopportunities — the bank does afor lot of great things for the local community

Thankful — the bank was willing to lend me money

Confident — my friends/family have recommended the bank improvement in each

Special — as if my transaction were the only thing happening in the branch

Inf tha

Co Acquisition • Create personal connections with prospective customers • Create flexibletim an life cycle: Respected — branch representatives sat down with me and explained options Welcomed during the takeover Ple • Make it easy to understand and differentiate between account options • Make account op and services • Which customer Comfortable — the bank knows what is going on and I can ask for help off • Share stories from advocates • Provide custome Convincedsegments? — switching will deliver a better experience than my current bank Lu • Welcome and gu Excited to open firstcustomer account stage ofmy the

• W  hich channel or touchpoint?

Indifferent

will it b

• Will it be difficult to open a new account?

• What should I expect when my account is taken over by the bank?

Confused — how do offers differ from bank to bank?

OPPORTUNITIES

Positive

OPPORTUNITIES

Receive account Worried — opening documents

• Will the branch representatives take care of all the paperwork? Distrustful of large banks that are sneaky and rude Acquisition

• How big is the bank’s presence (local, national, international)? • How helpful and knowledgeable are the bank employees?

Fax/email signed paperwork to bank

• Will I be able to talk to a real person?

• How do fees and rates compare to other banks?

• Does this bank take an interest in my community?

Receive

Concerned — will I be taking a step backwards, since the bank doesn’t have a global presence?

Dissatisfied

THINKING



How does a customer feel when interacting with your brand? Are you Who do my friends and family bank with? exceeding, fulfilling or How do I choose the best account for my needs? falling short of customers’ Does the bank offer the services and technology I need? expectations? Gaps will Howbe close are the branches and ATMs? easy to nearest see here.

FEELING



Call representative

Confused — how do offers differ from bank to to sign bank? paperwork

Concerned — will I be taking a step backwards, since the bank doesn’t have a global presence? Page 10

Worried — will it be difficult? It’s been a long time since I changed accounts

Sa

Pleased — I wasn’t rushed and that the process was not stalled

An

Glad to have it done — one more thing crossed off my to-do list

CONS

Acquisition ALUATE ND EV— I didn’t actually choose the bank Indifferent IDER A

Concerned — will I lose access to my money?

Ac

PURCHASECo

Ign tra

Journey to a Customer Experience Map

SAMPLE FINANCIAL SERVICES CUSTOMER EXPERIENC MAP

The path to purchase and beyond

Consideration

Account Opening

Onboarding

Day-to-Day Account Management

Expanding Relationship

Ending Relationship

• Identify the need for a new financial account

• Choose a financial institution and account type(s)

• Set up online or mobile banking services

• Deposit money

• Monitor financial health

• Identify the steps necessary to move financial assets

• Assess financial institutions and account types available

• Open account(s)

• Set up direct deposit

• Withdraw money

• Identify the need for new financial services

• Close account with financial institution

• Receive confirmation and account numbers

• Order checks

• Check balances

• Learn about products or services available

• Receive ATM/debit/credit card

• Pay bills

• Add or change account products/services

View advertisements

Call a representative

Evaluate financial situation

Visit website

Doing

CUSTOMER JOURNEY

Steps

Banking Customer Experience Map

Receive account opening documents

Apply online

Pay bills

Deposit money Download mobile app

View mail promotion Add account

Check rates online Visit branch

Speak with a representative

Fill out application

Receive account opening documents

Receive materials in the mail

Send direct deposit info

Sign up for online banking

Learn about new services View cross-sell promotions

Log in

Initiate account closing

Receive account closing paperwork

Withdraw money

Visit branch Talk with friends

Call representative

Receive paperwork to sign

Fax/email signed paperwork to bank

Research products/services

Receive account opening documents

Call a rep

Visit branch

Receive statements and alerts

Positive

THINKING

Transfer money and check balances

• Who do my friends and family bank with?

• Will it be difficult to open a new account?

• What services and features are offered with my new account(s)?

• Will I qualify for the account(s) that I want?

• Will I be able to understand how to use my account?

• Will I be able to reach someone at the bank easily if I have a question or a problem?

• What are these new features all about (e.g., mobile banking)? Are they useful?

• Can I trust my current bank?

• How do I choose the best account for my needs? • Does the bank offer the services and technology I need?

• What does the fine print mean?

• Will it be easy to add a new account?

• Can I find a bank that doesn’t charge as many fees?

• Will I be able to talk to a real person?

• Will I have problems logging in to my account online or on my mobile device?

• Is my bank looking out for my best interests?

• How close are the nearest branches and ATMs?

• Are my banking activities and identity secure?

• Will other banks move faster (e.g., refinancing)?

• How do fees and rates compare to other banks?

• Will the branch representatives take care of all the paperwork?

• Will all of my bank accounts transition smoothly?

• Can I easily access my accounts wherever and whenever I need to?

• Is there a branch nearby where I can talk to someone about adding an account?

• How big is the bank’s presence (local, national, international)?

Acquisition

• Are there any benefits to switching the account(s) that I have with the bank?

• How difficult and painful will it be to switch banks?

• Does this bank take an interest in my community?

• What should I expect when my account is taken over by the bank?

• How helpful and knowledgeable are the bank employees?

• Will I be able to continue working with my advisor from my old bank?

• Will the bank help me grow and progress financially?

• What will happen to the employees at my local branch?

Comfortable — I’ve done my research

Happy — the reps are here to help me open an account

Empowered to build our home knowing that the bank was backing us

Valued — when I am recognized in the branch

Happy — the bank does a lot of great things for the local community

Thankful — the bank was willing to lend me money Special — as if my transaction were the only thing happening in the branch

Informed — the site is very comprehensive and explained all of the benefits that come with the account

Secure — I am alerted when changes are made to my online account

Confident — my friends/family have recommended the bank Excited to open my first account

Acquisition

Respected — branch representatives sat down with me and explained options and services

Welcomed during the takeover

Indifferent

FEELING

Convinced — switching will deliver a better experience than my current bank

Comfortable — the bank knows what is going on and I can ask for help

• Are there banks with better interest rates?

• Is another bank’s promotion worth switching for?

• Will the bank monitor my account(s) and let me know when I should consider a change?

• Can I find a knowledgeable financial team to work for me?

Valued — when a teller or other employee suggests an option that will earn more interest or have lower fees

Intrigued by higher interest rates for checking accounts at other banks

• Are there any loyalty benefits for sticking with the bank? • Can I live with the frustrations that I have with my bank’s technology?

Comfortable — bank employees don’t make me feel stupid or behind the times when I ask questions about new technology Pleased — I have met all of the requirements to receive my promotional offer for opening an account Lucky — I had a smooth transition to the bank. Others did not

Comfortable — I can reach someone at the branch or by phone if I have a problem with my account

Interested in cash offers to open an account elsewhere

Fortunate — the bank is looking out for my best interests Respected — the bank doesn’t push accounts/services that I don’t want

Relieved and happy — it isn’t a fight to get a problem solved Confident — my questions will be answered by friendly bank personnel Pleased — my bank supports my community

Lazy — I don’t feel like jumping through all the hoops to switch my account(s)

Confused — how do offers differ from bank to bank?

Worried — will it be difficult? It’s been a long time since I changed accounts

Satisfied — my online issues have been dealt with quickly by phone reps

Easy to keep my money in the same place it has been since I was a kid

Concerned — will I be taking a step backwards, since the bank doesn’t have a global presence?

Pleased — I wasn’t rushed and that the process was not stalled

Anonymous — I’m just a number after all the papers are signed

OK — as long as everything is handled correctly

Unsure about some services like mobile banking and overdraft protection and whether they will benefit me

Glad to have it done — one more thing crossed off my to-do list

Acquisition

Indifferent — my bank is just a place to make payments; I’m a number

Anonymous — the promotions I receive are generic

Unappreciated — no one has contacted me or helped me learn how to maximize my banking relationship

Acquisition

Confused — I didn’t feel like everything was as clear as it could be

Indifferent — I don’t really feel like I have a relationship with the bank

Impatient — our mortgage refinancing is taking forever

Indifferent — I didn’t actually choose the bank

Ignored — no communication from the bank since my accounts were transitioned

Unimportant — they haven’t taken the opportunity or time to approach me and find out what they can do for me

Dissatisfied — I feel disconnected; I’d like a better relationship

Disappointed — the bank has not analyzed my patterns and reviewed changes that could benefit me. I’m left to do this work on my own

Angry — my bank made a mistake with my bank account

Uninformed — I don’t receive information about promotions or products Annoyed by the constant promotional mailings that I receive from the bank

Embarrassed — a customer service representative made me feel dumb, instead of trying to help

Impatient — tellers at the bank try to upsell me when I’m in a hurry — I’m there for a specific reason

Deceived — the bank’s financial practices don’t seem straightforward, and extra fees keep getting added to my account(s)

Concerned — will I lose access to my money?

Dissatisfied

Distrustful of large banks that are sneaky and rude

Impatient — waited a long time in a crowded, smelly waiting area Insecure — branch personnel were not super knowledgeable

Upset — I can’t transfer funds to a friend immediately, even though he has a the bank account

Acquisition

Acquisition

Burdened — I had to figure out how to switch some things on my own

Unsettled — I didn’t have the tools to access my account

Unappreciated — the bank is cold, impersonal and untrustworthy

Unimportant — ATM/debit cards and new checks were not reissued when promised

Frustrated and annoyed — many missteps and fees along the way

Foolish — I was told that my banking service would be the same and it has not turned out that way

Frustrated — I keep getting locked out of my online banking account — especially when the Customer Contact Center is closed! Irritated — I’ve requested that my email address be changed multiple times and it still hasn’t been done Annoyed — my online account history displays only 90 days of transactions

Unfulfilled — I need a bank with an international presence

Vulnerable — I felt like my accounts had been compromised

Exasperated — when I can’t log in to my online account and the Customer Contact Center is closed

Unappreciated — I am not rewarded for my loyalty. Why do new customers get all the perks?

OPPORTUNITIES

Irked — it’s hard to get in touch with my advisor

• Create personal connections with prospective customers

• Create flexible and customizable account options

• Follow up on all new customers with personalized communications

• Form a relationship with each customer

• Work for each customer’s financial well-being

• Provide prompt, expeditious responses to customer concerns

• Make it easy to understand and differentiate between account options

• Make account opening simple and straightforward

• Identify and honor customer communication preferences

• Be available to customers

• Make it easy to grow the relationship

• Follow up personally on all account errors

• Share stories from advocates

• Provide customer support at each step of the process

• Provide educational tools

• Encourage and reward loyalty

• Provide customized messaging and promotions online

• Match competitor offers

• Welcome and guide acquired customers through conversion

• Assign acquired customers to a bank counselor

UATE

D EVAL

IDER AN

CONS

PURCHASE

ADVOCATE

Guiding principles

G

uiding principles will emerge as you begin to understand the customer journey as a whole. Use your guiding principles as a litmus test for the success of organizational initiatives now and in the future. Here are a few guiding principles: “Know me”—get better connected with your customers, personalize the experience “Remember me”—stay connected to customers with more relevant touches through direct mail and email “Make me feel special”—proactively optimize customer account and suggest products tailored to them “Help me succeed”—continue to improve online tools and technology “Always be there for me”—be available to customers 24/7, whenever/ wherever/however

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Journey to a Customer Experience Map

Process summary

1.

Triggers, touchpoints and channels inventory

2.

Customer research (online focus groups)

3.

Stakeholder workshops

4.

Develop initial model of customer feelings

5.

Build your customer experience map

Key takeaways 1. A customer experience map tells you what your customers are doing,

Developing a customer experience map is an excellent first step toward improving your customers’ overall experiences and satisfaction.

thinking and feeling at each stage of the customer life cycle

2. The process pinpoints where the opportunities are by channel and touch point within the life cycle 3. Create guiding principles and a road map to improve the overall customer experience Developing a customer experience map is an excellent first step toward improving your customers’ overall experiences and satisfaction. The research and analysis can be completed fairly quickly, providing you with a road map for the coming year and beyond.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

For more than 15 years, Jill Hewitt has designed, researched and evaluated user interfaces across a variety of platforms, including Web, mobile, public kiosks and hardware devices. Her approach is deeply rooted in user-centered design principles. Jill has extensive knowledge in usability and user needs research methods, all geared toward understanding customer needs and improving customer experiences. She has improved customer experiences for major Fortune 500 brands, including UPS, NPR, Turner Broadcasting, Dell and Paychex. She is currently a customer experience designer at Catalyst, a marketing agency headquartered in Rochester, New York.

800.836.7720 | www.catalystinc.com |

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