Lesson 5 Act 1 pg 1

Lesson 5 Act 1 pg 1

Manzanar National Historic Site How Does My Identity Shape My Experience in America? Objective: Activity 1: The Power of Words How can perspectives...

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Manzanar National Historic Site

How Does My Identity Shape My Experience in America?

Objective:

Activity 1: The Power of Words How can perspectives dictate the treatment of a race or community?

Students utilize primary source documents focusing on Japanese Americans to explore aspects of the racial atmosphere of America in the 1940s.

Procedure: Have the class define connotation and denotation. Pair up students to read the Comparison/Contrast worksheet (located in the Lesson 5 Activity 1 Resources section) and a copy of the Life magazine article “How to Tell Japs from the Chinese” dated December 22, 1941 (located in the Lesson 5 Activity 1 Resources section). The students will complete the worksheet together. Have the class discuss the worksheet answers and the offensive and inappropriate use of the term “Japs.” Distribute the Propaganda Worksheet (located in the Lesson 5 Activity 1 Resources section) and have students work in pairs to analyze the text of the article. Regroup the class for discussion and have students share worksheet questions and answers. Ask your class how language and propaganda are used today. Have students provide examples from sources such as television, the internet, newspapers, billboards, etc. (this can also be a homework assignment). Assign individuals or groups a 3-5 minute presentation on their propaganda example of choice. Students then present their propaganda selection.

Assessment:

eets. 1. Student answers on the worksh 2. Group reports. ns. 3. Evaluation of oral presentatio

Extension:

sement for 1. Have students write an adverti ine, gaz ma a television, internet, radio or ’ ates ssm cla using propaganda to sway to ain pert ent sem opinions. Have the adverti e vid Pro . a current event or movement newspapers, students with examples such as ents and/or sem magazines, political adverti internet access. r Friends 2. Read the article “How to Tell You ber 22, em Dec , ine From the Japs” (Life magaz e. 1941) found on www.time.com/tim Guide, ce our Res r 3. Access Densho’s Teache nese Japa A y: ntr In the Shadow of My Cou 1 n sso -Le American Artist Remembers ge, Facts Analyzing Information: Langua and Opinions, Part B on densho.org/learning/shadow/ shadow-TRG-en.pdf

Grade Level: 10 & 11 Time: 60-90 minutes (class) 60 minutes (ho me) Materials:

Comparison/Con trast worksheet Life magazine article, “How to Tell the Japs fro m the Chinese” Propaganda w orksheet

Concepts Covered:

Explore the use of propaganda. Analyze purpose for a newspaper article. Identify tone. Analyze the use of “loaded words”. Identify use of denotation and connotation of words to draw incorrect conclusions.

CDE Standards: 10th Grade

English/Language Arts

Reading 1.1 2.4 2.8 3.8 Writing 1.5 2.3 Listening & Speaking 1.1 2.2

History/Social Science 10.8.6

11th Grade

English/Language Arts Reading 1.3 2.6 Writing 2.4

History/Social Science 11.7.5

www.nps.gov/manz

Manzanar National Historic Site

Reprinted from Life magazine, December 22, 1941, pgs. 81-82

Activity 1:

The Power of Words

Manzanar National Historic Site Activity 1:

The Power of Words

Reprinted from Life magazine, December 22, 1941, pgs. 81-82

HOW TO TELL JAPS FROM THE CHINESE ANGRY CITIZENS VICTIMIZE ALLIES WITH EMOTIONAL OUTBURST AT ENEMY In the first discharge of emotions touched off by the Japanese assaults on their nation, U.S. citizens have been demonstrating a distressing ignorance on the delicate question of how to tell a Chinese from a Jap. Innocent victims in cities all over the country are many of the 75,000 U.S. Chinese, whose homeland is our stanch ally. So serious were the consequences threatened, that the Chinese consulates last week prepared to tag their nationals with identification buttons. To dispel some of this confusion, LIFE here adduces a rule-of-thumb from the anthropometric conformations that distinguish friendly Chinese from enemy alien Japs. To physical anthropologists, devoted debunkers of race myths, the difference between Chinese and Japs is measurable in millimeters. Both are related to the Eskimo and North American Indian. The modern Jap is the descendant of Mongoloids who invaded the Japanese archipelago back in the mists of prehistory, and of the native aborigines who possessed the islands before them. Physical anthropology, in consequence, finds Japs and Chinese as closely related as Germans and English. It can, however, set apart the special types of each national group. The typical Northern Chinese, represented by Ong Wenhao, Chungking’s Minister of Economic Affairs (left above) [previous page] is relatively tall and slenderly built. His complexion is parchment yellow, his face long and delicately boned, his nose more finely bridged. Representative of the Japanese people as a whole is Premier and General Hideki Tojo (Left, below) [previous page] who betrays aboriginal antecedents in a squat, long-torsoed build, a broader, more massively boned head and face, flat, often pug, nose, yellow-ocher skin and heavier beard. From this average type, aristocratic Japs, who claim kinship to the Imperial Household, diverge sharply. They are proud to approximate the patrician lines of the Northern Chinese.

Manzanar National Historic Site Activity 1:

The Power of Words

Comparison/Contrast Worksheet Directions: With a partner, read the December 22, 1941 Life magazine article, “How to Tell Japs from the Chinese.” Then, look through the article and write down words and phrases that describe each group. Use the ideas you generate with this worksheet to answer the questions on the Propaganda Worksheet (located in Lesson 5 Activity 1 Resources section). Be prepared to discuss your answers with the class.

Words and phrases describing the Japanese

Words and phrases describing the Chinese

Manzanar National Historic Site Activity 1:

The Power of Words

Propaganda Worksheet The December 22, 1941 Life magazine article “How to Tell Japs from the Chinese” is an example of propaganda. Propaganda is the systematic manipulation of information designed to influence thinking and behavior. Think about the purpose of this article and answer the following questions: 1. Why was this article published? What is the significance about the date it was published?

2. What is the tone of the article? How does the tone influence the interpretation of the text?

3. After reading this article, what conclusions do you think someone would draw about Japanese people?

4. After reading the article, what conclusions do you think the average American during World War II would draw about Chinese people?

5. What conclusions did you and your partner draw about the attitudes of the American press during World War II?

6. In light of what happened on September 11, 2001, do you think an article like this focusing on Arab Americans or Muslim Americans would appear in Life magazine today? Why or why not?

7. Do you think that it was appropriate for this article to appear in December of 1941? Why or why not?

8. Do you think attitudes have changed about this type of racial profiling since Pearl Harbor? How?