Logan Square - New Communities Program

Logan Square - New Communities Program

Logan Square Neighborhood Association | LISC/Chicago’s New Communities Program QUALITY-OF-LIFE PLAN MAY 2005 LOGAN SQUARE: A Place to Stay, a Place ...

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Logan Square Neighborhood Association | LISC/Chicago’s New Communities Program

QUALITY-OF-LIFE PLAN MAY 2005

LOGAN SQUARE: A Place to Stay, a Place to Grow

PLANNING TASK FORCE

Logan Square

Bruce Anderson 35th Ward Zoning Committee

Mark Kruse Hispanic Housing Development Corporation

Participants at community meeting

Noemi Avelar Humboldt Park Social Services

Teresa Lamberry Spanish Coalition for Housing

Martina Aguirre

Elena Miramontes

Leticia Barrera Logan Square Neighborhood Association

David Leeney First American Bank

Jane Ashley

Silbia Moctezuma

Joanna Brown Logan Square Neighborhood Association

Paul Levin 35th Ward Office

Rosa Brito

Angelena Montenegro

Larry Bulak Liberty Bank for Savings

Miguel Luna Mozart Elementary School

Marta Bruno Mendoza

Juanita Munoz

Michael Burton Bickerdike Redevelopment Corporation

Rev. Charles Lyons Armitage Baptist Church

Angelita Burgo

Tasha Murdock

Mario Caballero Ames Middle School

Maribel Mata-Benedict FLAK Block Club

Lissette Castaneda St. Sylvester’s Church

Deborah McCoy Logan Square Cooperative

Araceli Carrillo

Raul Ortiz

Ald. Rey Colon 35th Ward Alderman

John McDermott Logan Square Neighborhood Association

Ana Cepeda

Aurelio Perez

Lorraine Cruz Ames Middle School

Lucrecia Mejia St. Sylvester’s Church

Reynalda Covarrubias

Lourdes Perez

Ashley Dearborn Armitage Baptist Church

Maricela Melecio Child Care Providers Association

Deloise Davis

Tasha Peterson

Catherine Delgado Monroe Elementary School

James Menconi Monroe Elementary School

Yesenia DeJesus

Virginia Presa

Jennifer DeLeon Zion Cristo Rey Lutheran Church

Michael Mendoza Logan Square Youth Council

Norma Delgado

Shirley Reyes

Cece Drazek Economic Development Commission of Greater Logan Square

Joel Monarch Unity Park Advisory Council

Magali Diodonete

Jennifer Richter

Margarita Espino Funston Elementary School

Lissette Moreno-Kuri Logan Square Neighborhood Association

Kisha Edwards

McKinzie Robinson

Dr. Liliana Evers Funston Elementary School

Maria Moyer Fifth Third Bank

Cristina Escalera

Martha Rodriguez

Jeannette Feliciano McCormick Tribune Logan Square YMCA

Maribel Navarrette Bundle of Joy Home Day Care

Vanessa Evans

Rosemarie Rodriguez

Joyce Fernandes archi-treasures

Ofelia Navarro Spanish Coalition for Housing

Irma Fuentes

Maria Romellaco

Mark Fick Chicago Mutual Housing Network

Ald. Billy Ocasio 26th Ward Alderman

Gabriela Galvan

Elsa Ruiz

Omar Figueroa Humboldt Park Social Services

Tom Osgood Chicago Hope

Blanca Garcia

Cristina Salgado

Ald. Manuel Flores 1st Ward Alderman

Idida Perez Episcopal Church of the Advent

Carmen Garcia

Elisa Salgado

Dawn-Marie Galtieri aurorARTS alliance

Rod Port Armitage Baptist Church

Lidia Garcia

Julia Salinas

Blanca Giron Brentano Math and Science Academy

Delia Ramirez Humboldt Park Social Services

Olga Garcia

Gipsie Santiago

Rev. Leo Gomez Our Lady of Grace Church

Lowell Rice Greater North Pulaski Development Corporation

Rosa Garcia

Maria Sotomayor

Lucy Gomez-Feliciano Logan Square Neighborhood Association

Rosita de la Rosa Logan Square Neighborhood Association

Brigida Godinez

Adela Torres

Dr. Elizabeth Gonzalez Chase Middle School

Ricarda Ruiz Ames Middle School

Imelda Gondono

Marisol Torres

Lilian Gonzalez Ames Middle School

Jesse Senechal Kelvyn Park High School

Imelda Gutierrez

Gloria Uruchima

Maria Gonzalez St. Sylvester’s Church

Joan Sheforgen PrimeCare Community Health Center

Jeanet Henning

Sandra Valle

Miguel Sotomayor Monroe Elementary School

Marisol Lugo

Marisol Ventura

Rev. John Graham Episcopal Church of the Advent

Kathy Tholin FLAK Block Club

Maria Marquez

Patricia Villafane

Mike Gregory Armitage Baptist Church

Judith Torres Hispanic Housing Development Corporation

Antonia Martinez

Rev. Michael Herman St. Sylvester’s Church (Task Force Chairman)

Sandra Vargas Logan Square Neighborhood Association

Romelia Martinez

Tony Hernandez LaSalle Bank

Elsa Vazquez MidAmerica Bank

This list was compiled from sign-in sheets for planning meetings and

Valdemar Hernandez St. Sylvester’s Church

Dr. Georgette Watson Brentano Math and Science Academy

Rev. Anna Kari Johnson Zion Cristo Rey Lutheran Church

Rev. Pedro Windsor La Capilla del Barrio

Martha Juarez Monroe Elementary School

Sandra Zarinana Logan Square Youth Council

Silvia Gonzalez Monroe Elementary School

© 2005 LISC/Chicago

related activities and may not include all participants. Our apologies for any misspellings or omissions.

QUALITY-OF-LIFE PLAN : LOGAN SQUARE

CONTENTS SUMMARY Residents Seek Path to a Diverse Future 2

OUR COMMUNITY Neighborhood Faces Rapid Economic Change Lead Agency: Logan Square Neighborhood Association Planning Process: Building a Consensus for Action 6

VISION A Place to Stay, a Place to Grow 13

STRATEGIES Eight Steps to Achieve Our Vision 15

WORK PROGRAM Schedule and Lead Organizations 34

SUMMARY

Residents Seek Path to a Diverse Future

Working families pursuing the American Dream are the focus of our plan.

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Logan Square is on the move. But for many working families of this historic North Side neighborhood, the nagging question is whether they, too, must inevitably move. Or might it be possible to harness the mighty-but-mindless market forces moving west from the lakefront’s condo belt, and use those forces to weave a new type of community? If so, what kind of community? This quality-of-life plan envisions one that Chicago has produced all too rarely. It would be both stable and diverse, neither Gold Coast nor barrio—a place where families of all kinds, colors and classes would not simply coexist, but support one another as they pursue their own versions of the American dream.

Such a community would not be that different from

property tax reassessment, in 2003, imposed an average

historic Logan Square. This is a neighborhood born in the

increase of 76 percent. This in a neighborhood where, as of

scramble for affordable housing that followed the Great

Census 2000, fully one-third of renters devoted too much

Fire of 1871. Located beyond the city’s brick-only fireproof

of their income to rent.

zone, early Logan Square’s wooden two- and three-flats

The scale of the consequent displacement, if not the

were an affordable godsend to displaced German and

pain, is apparent in census tract 2216, which covers the

Scandinavian mill workers. After the city annexed the

20 blocks east of Western Avenue between Armitage and

neighborhood and enhanced it with broad boulevards and

Fullerton. During the 1990s, rents there doubled, home

public squares, merchants, managers and professionals

values tripled and 44 new units were added. Yet the tract’s

built dignified greystones and Queen Annes along Kedzie,

population fell by 15 percent, and the number of Latinos

Logan and Humboldt boulevards. This legacy of diversity,

and children dropped by half. As gentrification rolls west,

this mix of rich and not-so-rich, of English-speakers and

the implications are clear.

those who speak another tongue, has endured for more

No plan can stop this tide. Then again, no thoughtful

than a century. The accents heard along Milwaukee Avenue

planner would try. Fresh investment can be life’s blood to a

Elaborate mansions were built along the boulevards starting in the

were first Yiddish, then Polish, and most recently, Spanish.

healthy neighborhood. But there are ways to meld the old

late 1800s.

All the while, a diverse yet stable Logan Square has

and the new, to make the tapestry more interesting rather

remained one of Chicago’s best examples of what an urban

than tear it apart, or worse, bleach it to monochrome.

neighborhood can be and do. The next wave may not be so benign. The gentrification

This is a plan to preserve diversity in Logan Square. More than 200 community representatives, work-

of Lincoln Park has jumped the Kennedy Expressway, first

ing through a task force led by the Logan Square

colonizing Bucktown, now bidding up real estate and rents

Neighborhood Association, were involved in its prepara-

as far west as Kedzie Avenue and beyond. The median

tion. Our vision for Logan Square is that it be a place to

price of all homes sold last year in Logan Square was

stay, and a place to grow.

more than $300,000, though Chicago magazine notes that single-family detached homes averaged $442,766. The last

3

STRATEGIES AND PROJECTS STRATEGY 1 Preserve and expand affordable housing. We will help organize tenants so that subsidized buildings stay subsidized after federal contracts expire. We will continue to organize for a citywide set-aside ordinance and expansion of Chicago’s Affordable Housing Trust Fund. Working with experienced community development corporations, we will create affordable housing for those ready to own, including limited-equity co-ops, and supportive housing for those with mental or physical impairments. Rental units will be affordable for area residents and large enough to accommodate families. We will establish a housing center to help families rent or buy, and a Legacy Project through which longtime owners can sell their property with the assurance that working families can continue to live there.

STRATEGY 2 Expand and improve parks and recreational programs, and create new community spaces. We will work with the Chicago Park District, park advisory councils and the Trust for Public Land to make expansion of Haas Park on Fullerton Avenue a replicable model for park expansion and improvement. Kosciuszko Park, our neighborhood’s largest, needs redesign and reinvestment to become an active recreational asset rather than a hangout. We will advocate for these and other elements of the city’s 2004 Open Space Plan for Logan Square. We will pursue opportunities such as new campus parks near schools, and development of a plaza and farmers’ market on CTA property at Logan Boulevard and Milwaukee Avenue. Also promising is a proposed linear park and bikeway atop the dormant Bloomingdale rail embankment, which forms the border between Logan Square and our sister community, Humboldt Park. STRATEGY 3 Improve and expand model community school programs, and foster educational opportunities for residents of all ages. Building on a 12-year track record of school-community partnerships, we will bring new cohorts into Nueva Generación, a model program that trains parent mentors as bi-lingual teachers. We will push to increase the community’s pre-school capacity. At the high school level, we will strengthen school-community relationships by involving students in local service projects and strengthening college preparatory curricula and college counseling services. To combat a very high student turnover rate at all our schools, we will support research, policies and programs to break the links among housing displacement, student mobility and poor academic performance.

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STRATEGY 4 Revitalize key commercial corridors by working with elected officials, businesses and property owners. Although our three major commercial avenues have different problems and possibilities, all need coordinated planning and redevelopment. We propose a model redevelopment for portions of the Armitage corridor between Mozart Street and Hamlin Avenue, featuring new family-sized affordable rental housing above lively storefronts. To create thriving commercial corridors, while maintaining the scale and flavor of the community, we will study potential zoning changes, recruit new businesses and support streetscape and façade improvements along Fullerton, Armitage and Milwaukee avenues. STRATEGY 5 Support industrial retention and business development, and provide coordinated job training, job placement and financial education to community residents. We support efforts by local industrial groups to protect nearby factory and distribution jobs from displacement by residential lofts and other non-business uses. We will work with private and non-profit partners to create new jobs in burgeoning service industries such as health care, childcare and information services. We will collaborate with partners to create job training and placement services and develop entrepreneurial skills and opportunities. Equally important is the need for coordinated job placement services that link working families with income-support programs and financial education.

STRATEGY 6 Improve the health, safety and well being of Logan Square residents and families. Healthier lifestyles will be pursued in several ways with several partners, including Parent Mentor teams in the schools, Ayuda Mutua (Mutual Help) activities among block clubs, a swimming pool for the McCormick-Tribune YMCA, health-promotion efforts by employer groups and partnerships with the Chicago Park District. We will build on the work of the Logan Square Neighborhood Association Health Outreach Team to connect people to health insurance and services, improve access to local health care providers, and monitor patient billings as part of the region-wide Hospital Accountability Project. To reduce violence and high homicide rates in Chicago Police Districts 14 and 25, we will work with those districts on crime prevention and promote initiatives such as Safe Passage, in which residents and business owners watch out for children on their way to and from school.

STRATEGY 8 Build community leadership and enable all residents, young and old, citizen and non-citizen, to participate effectively in decisions affecting their lives. We will continue to cultivate and expand our circle of leadership, reaching out to young and old alike. On housing issues and projects, resident-led steering committees will set policy so that people, not profits, drive development. Immigrants, especially, will be asked to lead. No human being shall be considered “illegal,” and no resident of Logan Square shall be persecuted or denied basic human rights for lack of citizenship papers. We will organize the undocumented and pursue their access to education and employment, shelter and health care, and will work with the Consulate of Mexico to obtain passports and matriculas.

STRATEGY 7 Support local arts organizations, promote art activities and expand arts programming and cultural events. An expanded Logan Square Arts Coalition will help artists—both performing and visual—obtain more training, adequate workspaces and venues to reach the public. Other projects will include an on-line arts calendar and periodic art fairs at the new CTA plaza at Milwaukee and Kedzie avenues.

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OUR COMMUNITY

Neighborhood Faces Rapid Economic Change

Summary totals from Census 2000 barely hint at the

often doubling up with relatives, almost always stretching

powerful changes taking place in Logan Square, a densely

their paychecks. As of 2000, more than 12,000 of Logan

populated neighborhood at the inland heart of Chicago’s

Square’s 28,855 households were considered low-income,

thriving North Side. The community’s reported popula-

earning less than 80 percent of the city median, $38,625.

tion—82,715—grew hardly at all during the 1990s. Nor

Our community is home to more limited-income households

did its racial and ethnic makeup change much: roughly

than either Pilsen or Little Village, two neighborhoods

two-thirds Hispanic, one-quarter non-Hispanic white, and

often associated with the working poor.

just over 5 percent African-American. Behind these numbers is a dynamic story of change—of a community challenged to preserve a rich legacy of toler-

preceded them. They want job opportunities at living

ance and diversity or be overtaken by a market-driven

wages, a solid education for their children, and decent

monoculture that is open only to the affluent. Parents who

and affordable places to live.

were forced out of Lincoln Park as children now fear that

While church and community groups, especially the

Balanced housing development means ensuring that working families

their own children will feel that same pain as the market,

Logan Square Neighborhood Association, have worked

are not priced out of Logan Square.

once again, drives them out of their community.

wonders with schools, block clubs and daycare networks,

Viewed as a whole, Logan Square is still very diverse.

housing displacement continues to undermine community

Internally, however, an uneasy, east-to-west stratification

aspirations. How are teachers, even teachers reinforced

has evolved. During the 1980s and ‘90s, developers who

by parent mentors and home literacy visits, supposed to

were priced out of Lincoln Park first turned to Bucktown—

raise achievement levels when half their students move

the easternmost wedge of Logan Square, between the

every year? How should resources be allocated effectively

Kennedy Expressway and Western Avenue—and converted

between, say, Darwin School on the east side of the neigh-

the old German working-class neighborhood into an

borhood, where enrollment is plummeting as Latinos are

upscale colony.

priced out, and Monroe School in west Logan Square,

At the other end, in the forest of densely packed brick two-flats and walk-ups west of Kedzie Avenue, large Latino families, many newly arrived in the U.S. or newly displaced from neighborhoods like Bucktown, are moving in,

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Logan Square’s Spanish-speakers have aspirations not so different from those of the European immigrants who

where displaced families are crowding in and enrollments are soaring? Answers will not be found easily, but a place to start looking is Logan Square’s unique past.

OUR COMMUNITY

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The land above North Avenue west of the Chicago River was farm country before the Civil War, though the plank

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road that would become Milwaukee Avenue anticipated

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building code that required all-brick construction. Lower

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Logan Square lay just beyond the reach of a safety-first

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The Great Fire of 1871 sparked the area’s trajectory



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the 1850s.

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Railway, which laid tracks along the west bank during

communities. Back then, most of what would become

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good supply of manufacturing jobs was assured by the

as one of Chicago’s most intensively developed bedroom

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the area’s potential as a close-in residential location. A hard-working river and by the Chicago and Northwestern

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A history of diversity

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home prices and rents for its new wooden buildings, along with the new Milwaukee Avenue streetcars, and later, elevated train, were magnets for working families, many

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newly arrived from central Europe and Scandinavia. Full annexation in 1889 was followed by installation of a grandiose park and boulevard system across Chicago’s

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North and West Sides. This section of the city’s famed “emerald necklace” was designed by architect William Le Baron Jenney, better known for inventing the steel framing system that holds up skyscrapers. Jenney did not bless the neighborhood with a major

Figure 1 Northwest location near transportation

park, but he did create a set of magnificent boulevards that

Logan Square’s Northwest Side location is well served by transportation resources including the I-94 Kennedy

connect to Lincoln and Humboldt Parks. Each is 250 feet

Expressway and the CTA Blue Line train serving the Loop and O’Hare International Airport. Metra stations are located on the eastern and western borders of Logan Square.

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An early step in the planning process was an analysis of neighborhood issues.

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Figure 2 Neighborhood issues

Schools

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OUR COMMUNITY

wide, with space enough for three roadways (two service

There was never any mass abandonment of housing

lanes and a generous center carriage drive), each separated

in Logan Square, no widespread epidemic of fires or

by grassy medians and framed by stately elms and catalpas.

foreclosures. To the contrary, flower gardens and

The boulevards meet at a ceremonial square at Milwaukee

wrought-iron fences are far more evident than graffiti

and Kedzie—a Parisian-style traffic circle dominated by a

or broken glass, even on the poorest blocks. The absence

towering monument to Civil War General John A. Logan.

of blight is remarkable, given the age of the housing

The boulevards spurred another wave of develop-

stock, the persistent overcrowding, the large numbers

ment, this time by well-off immigrants, including flush

of low-income renters, and the fact that renters still

Milwaukee Avenue storekeepers, who ordered up elegant

outnumber owners by 2 to 1.

greystone mansions and brick two- and three-flats styled

Strong church, block and community groups, working

to look like single-family homes. In this interweaving of

with Logan Square Neighborhood Association (LSNA),

economic and ethnic backgrounds, a local tradition was born.

have made a difference. From 1962, when residents and business owners formed LSNA to stop the Kennedy

New immigrants, new challenges

Expressway from cutting through the heart of Logan

Logan Square kept growing following World War I and

Square, through the 1970s, when LSNA fought redlining

by 1925 was built up border-to-border. Poles and Russian

and slum-lording, the neighborhood stuck together. In the

Jews moved in as many Germans and Scandinavians moved

last two decades, victories have ranged from the creation

up and out. By 1930 the population reached a teeming

of the Unity play lot to two new middle schools and four

114,174, with many Depression-era families doubling up

elementary-school annex buildings.

or moving into makeshift basement and attic apartments. Cramped conditions set the stage for the next great

Well maintained housing is one of Logan Square’s major assets.

But the larger story remains the enduring commitment of immigrants—then and now—to hard work, family,

migration, after World War II, when young families

religion and the American Dream. Can they continue

throughout the city bolted for the burgeoning suburbs.

to pursue that dream in Logan Square? The goal of this

Their places were taken, at first, by Puerto Rican fami-

plan—and of Logan Square Neighborhood Association—is

lies who moved into south Logan Square; and later, by

to ensure that the answer is yes.

immigrants from Mexico, Cuba and Central America who spread throughout the community. By 1980 Logan Square was half Hispanic; by 1990, two-thirds.

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LEAD AGENCY LEAD AGENCY

Logan Square Neighborhood Association

“The New Communities Program is a

One of Chicago’s oldest and most successful community organizations, Logan Square Neighborhood Association

opportunity for hundreds of immigrant mothers, helping

(LSNA) has been at the center of community life since the

many develop the confidence and leadership skills needed

struggle to build a thriving, ethnically

organization began, in 1962. In at least one respect the

to launch careers outside the home. This multi-purpose

and economically diverse community.”

association provides a model for the New Communities

approach is typical of LSNA’s initiatives, from job training

Program (NCP): LSNA’s day-to-day work is guided by a

and retention to child care, from engaging youth to

Nancy Aardema, LSNA Executive Director

holistic plan, not unlike an NCP quality-of-life plan, which

organizing seniors, from promoting local artists to securing

is updated annually. The eleventh, most recent, holistic plan

more affordable housing.

natural fit. The partnership broadens our

aims to build and protect “an excellent place to live, work, play, raise children, run a business and worship.” At the center of LSNA’s work are programs that build a stronger community through stronger schools: The Parent Mentor program each year trains more than 100 parents as tutors in seven public schools.

The housing effort is especially crucial, because residential displacement undermines progress elsewhere. LSNA has partnered with Hispanic Housing Development Corporation and Bickerdike Redevelopment Corporation to produce hundreds of affordable units for Logan Square. With the help of supportive aldermen, several for-profit developers have been persuaded to set aside affordable

Community Learning Centers at five schools provide

units in upscale developments. LSNA is a leader in the

English as a Second Language and GED instruction

citywide Balanced Development Coalition, which seeks to

for adults, along with childcare, tutoring and recreation

make affordable set-asides a matter of law.

for children. Literacy Ambassadors sends teams of teachers and parents on home visits to counsel parents on reading strategies and to build home-to-school bridges. Nueva Generación, in partnership with Chicago State University, trains parent mentors to become professional bi-lingual teachers and has become the model for a new statewide initiative.

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These programs have opened new worlds of

The association succeeds by pitching a big tent for all stakeholders—a tent in which Spanish is spoken along with English. Its 50-person Members Action Council draws from schools, churches, block clubs, community agencies and businesses. Hundreds attend its annual membership Congress, at which issues are debated and voted upon.

OUR COMMUNITY

PLANNING PROCESS

Building a Consensus for Action

From the outset in early 2003, leadership at both LISC/

showing places they avoid because of gangs or traffic

Chicago and the Logan Square Neighborhood Association

hazards, and positive places—the schools, parks, churches

(LSNA) agreed that the New Communities Program (NCP)

and stores—that enrich our lives. Citizen-planners also

in Logan Square would reflect the spirit, mission and

listed their priorities on index cards. Like all planning

methods contained in LSNA’s holistic plan. NCP offered an

sessions, the meeting was conducted in both Spanish

opportunity to broaden both the scope of the holistic plan

and English.

and the coalition behind it. An NCP orientation meeting was held November 18,

The following month the core committee met again, and planning consultants from Camiros Ltd. summarized

2003, at Funston School. Nearly all the 30 community

the results of the earlier work. The committee then divided

representatives who attended the meeting committed to

into five focus areas: affordable housing; commercial

serving on the core committee of the Planning Task Force.

corridors; community facilities and open space; education

They also heard Rev. Michael Herman of St. Sylvester

and job training; and family services. In March 2004, these

Catholic Church, chair of the task force, explain how the

subcommittees, meeting at Armitage Baptist Church, discussed

Citizen-planners identified existing conditions and pinpointed problems

quality-of-life plan and LSNA’S holistic plan “would work

and developed a vision for their respective issue areas.

and opportunities to begin the planning process.

together in a complementary way.” On a cold Saturday in January 2004, more than 35

During the spring and summer of 2004, the subcommittees finalized their vision and began listing strategies and

leaders embarked on a bus tour and mapping exercise to

programs necessary to achieve it. Meanwhile, two Early

assess neighborhood conditions and pinpoint problems

Action Projects were begun. Taking advantage of a one-

and opportunities. The core committee split into teams.

time opportunity to expand Haas Park, LISC provided a

Each marked the neighborhood map with colored dots

pair of grants worth $55,000 to help the Trust for Public

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Land fund a purchase option on a warehouse adjacent to

planning charrette on November 4, 2004, at Ames School.

the park. The Haas Park Advisory Council, LSNA and

At meeting’s end, 40 attendees were given 21 sticky dots

other local groups helped raise matching funds. Residents

and asked to “invest” them among scores of proposals

contributed amounts ranging from five dollars to $500.

listed on oversized flip charts. Low- and no-scoring

Liberty Bank for Savings gave $5,000, and the 1st Ward

proposals were eliminated, and heavily dotted proposals

Alderman’s Office contributed $10,000.

were highlighted.

LSNA also obtained $20,000 from LISC to work with Greater North-Pulaski Development Corporation on

participated in the same investment process at a

a health and health insurance awareness campaign,

December meeting.

promoting programs such as KidCare and FamilyCare to employees in that industrial corridor. The core committee held a workshop on strategies and programs at Funston School in September, drafting what would become eight strategies and related programs, projects and organizing efforts. These were fine-tuned at a

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About 100 parents from Logan Square schools

After eighteen months of thoughtful, collaborative work, our task force is proud to present this vision for a new Logan Square, along with strategies, programs and projects for achieving our vision. Task force members worked as a large group and on five sub-committees.

VISION

VISION

A Place to Stay, a Place to Grow

Our community has strong programs to involve parents in school improvement.

Logan Square is a place to stay and to grow. It is, above all, a place to grow healthy families—families secure that their homes are, and will continue to be, decent and affordable; families confident that their children are both physically safe and intellectually challenged in quality schools and pre-schools; families sustained by access to meaningful work at livable wages; families proud of their ethnic and cultural heritage, yet welcoming of the energy and diversity that newcomers bring to the mix. While Logan Square is a place to grow, ours will be a balanced and holistic growth that fosters true, rooted community for young and old, new immigrants and long-time residents alike.

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Preserve Section 8 housing

Cooper Lamp building reuse

Area-wide initiatives Community school network Develop mentor programming

Create public market area

Partnership with the police and safe passage to school

Reuse of former library

Expand and redesign Haas Park

Preserve and develop affordable housing

Redevelop underutilized space along Armitage as commercial/residential mixed use Rethink Ames school athletic field

14

STRATEGIES

STRATEGIES

Eight Steps to Achieve Our Vision

Figure 3 Key projects of the plan The plan includes social, economic and physical projects to achieve the community’s vision.

The task force developed eight ambitious but achievable strategies. They will preserve our legacy of diversity, expand our opportunities for personal growth and advance Logan Square as a community where all can pursue their version of the American Dream. We pledge that the energy and thoughtfulness that went into envisioning these strategies will carry forward to the more challenging work of making them a reality. Our Strategies: 1. Preserve and expand affordable housing. 2. Expand and improve parks and recreational programs, and create new community spaces.

3. Improve and expand model community school programs, and foster educational opportunities for residents of all ages.

4. Revitalize key commercial corridors by working with elected officials, businesses and property owners.

5. Support industrial retention and business development, and provide coordinated job training, job placement and financial education to community residents.

6. Improve the health, safety and well being of Logan Square residents and families.

7. Support local arts organizations, promote art activities and expand arts programming and cultural events.

8. Build community leadership and enable all residents, young and old, citizen and non-citizen, to participate effectively in decisions affecting their lives.

15

STRATEGY 1

Preserve and expand affordable housing.

No amount of neighborhood improvement will benefit people who can no longer afford to live in Logan Square.

the last five years alone, home prices in Logan Square have

Our success at turning neighborhood schools into centers

increased by 75 percent.

of community life, for instance, will be greatly undermined

A recent analysis of home-loan data by the Woodstock

if families who currently use and support those schools are

Institute shows dramatic change in both the volume of loans

forced by rising rents to move elsewhere.

and the profile of families buying homes in Logan Square.

The shortage of affordable and decent housing is a crisis

In 1990 there were 848 home loans reported. By 2002

throughout Chicago, but nowhere is the situation more

the number had risen to 3,706. As loan activity increased,

acute than in Logan Square. Census 2000 found that 30

the typical buyer profile shifted from moderate-income to

percent of renters here are cost-burdened, paying more than

upper-income families. In 1990, two-thirds of borrowers

35 percent of income in rent. Seventeen percent were cat-

ranked in the lowest or second-lowest income categories. By

egorized as extremely burdened, paying more than half their

2002, moderate-income buyers represented only 31 percent

income for housing.

of loan recipients. Buyers in the highest income category

Across the entire community area, rents increased by 38 percent during the 1990s, and median home values by 81

jumped from less than 13 percent to more than 42 percent. In a related study, “Who’s Buying Where,” dated

percent (see Figure 4, Median home value/median monthly

February 2002, the Woodstock Institute found that 19 of

rent). East of Milwaukee Avenue, along the knife’s edge of

Logan Square’s 29 census tracts were in rapid transition

displacement, demand for new condominiums and fancy

from a diverse mix of homebuyers to essentially upscale

rehabs is driving real estate prices out of sight. On these

white owners.

blocks, the median value of single-family homes more

While we welcome the new residents who have been

than tripled between 1993 and 2002, and soaring real

drawn to our beautiful homes and diverse community,

estate taxes are forcing long-time homeowners to move.

we will dedicate ourselves to making sure our low- and

Rents more than doubled, forcing thousands of working

moderate-income families can continue to call Logan Square

families to move west, some to still-affordable rentals in

their home. This will require policies and programs that are

west Logan Square, others to more distant neighborhoods,

strong and multi-faceted.

such as Belmont-Cragin, or to Des Plaines and other inner-ring suburbs.

16

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17

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institutional relationships with the Lathrop community the CHA Plan for Transformation, Lathrop will undergo dramatic changes. We will work with residents and the

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1.2 Establish a Logan Square housing center.

expire, threatening to displace low- and moderate-income residents.

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18

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1.5 Start limited-equity housing cooperative projects.

and help to market new rental units that have been set

In partnership with a community development

aside by private developers for working families.

corporation (see Project 1.3), we will develop new housing

STRATEGIES

them about borrowing scams that can lead to foreclosure;

co-ops through the purchase of a large rental building or

1.3 Partner with community development corporations

buildings. We will perform moderate rehab, then sell

to build housing.

ownership shares to working families. Co-op residents

LSNA has not, by itself, built housing. But the associa-

will preserve equity and receive tax advantages; their shares

tion has decades of experience with the low- and moder-

would appreciate over time at a controlled rate, as opposed

ate-income families who constitute the potential market

to a market rate, to maintain affordability at resale.

for affordable housing. LSNA has a track record of successful collaboration with not-for profit developers

1.6 Develop supportive housing in Logan Square.

such as Hispanic Housing Development Corporation,

Logan Square has a limited number of shelter facilities

Neighborhood Housing Services and Bickerdike

for the homeless, and almost none with supportive services

Redevelopment Corporation. The worsening crisis requires

that can deal with such problems as addiction, AIDS

LSNA to take a more active role, such as partnering with

and mental illness. In partnership with experienced

Bickerdike on redevelopment of the run-down sections of

providers, such as Humboldt Park Social Services

Armitage Avenue around Funston School (see Strategy 4).

and Lakefront Supportive Housing, we will explore

Maintaining affordability of the area’s housing stock is a priority.

development of supportive housing, where residents can

1.4 Advocate for affordable set-aside units in new and substantially rehabbed market-rate housing developments.

receive appropriate services and prepare for employment and independent living.

As active participants in the citywide Balanced Development Coalition, we will continue to mobilize support for the

1.7 Establish the Logan Square Legacy Project.

Affordable Housing Set-Aside Ordinance. This mandates

Knowledge is power. Yet we often don’t know that

that 15 percent of units be set aside for affordable

an apartment building has been sold until a condo

homeownership in all new or substantially renovated

converter announces he or she has a contract to

buildings of more than 10 units, or that a compensating

purchase. A Legacy Project would canvass building

fee of $100,000 for every required affordable unit be paid

owners in advance, giving them the option to sell or lease

into the city’s Low-Income Housing Trust Fund. Until

to a not-for-profit that would, in turn, rent to working

mandatory set-asides are enacted, we will urge our aldermen

families. Several recent sellers have said they would have

to seek voluntary set-asides from private developers.

viewed such an offer favorably. A periodic canvass would

We will advocate for new policies, such as a condominium conversion policy, which could require a fee for conversion

also alert advocates to impending sales so they can track zoning changes and displacement issues.

of rental units and possibly cap the number of conversions in a particular year in a particular neighborhood.

19

STRATEGY 2

Expand and improve parks and

With slightly more than 0.6 acres of public parks for

recreational programs, and create new

every thousand residents, Logan Square ranks among city

and Greenway.

community spaces.

communities with the least open space. According to the

The city’s proposed linear park and bikeway atop the

1998 CitySpace report, some 99 new acres of parks would

dormant freight rail embankment at Bloomingdale

be needed just to reach the recommended minimum of two

Avenue (1800 North) offers an opportunity to enhance the

acres per thousand residents. These numbers prompted the

aesthetics and exercise opportunities along south Logan

city and the Chicago Park District to produce an ambitious

Square. Crucial will be the look and location of on- and

Logan Square Open Space Plan in July 2004. It proposes

off-ramps for bikers and hikers, and the placement of

several improvements that LSNA and its allies have long

pocket parks. This is a chance, also, to work with our

supported, such as expansion of Haas Park, and some new

sister community, Humboldt Park, which supports the trail

ideas, such as development of public spaces alongside and

in its own quality-of-life plan.

2.2 Support construction of the Bloomingdale Bike Trail

under the Kennedy Expressway. In general, we support the city’s plan and urge its timely implementation. Physical park improvements, however, won’t be

2.3 Work with park advisory councils to improve park facilities and programming.

enough to keep young people away from the call of gangs

Beginning with Kosciuszko Park, our largest, we will

and drug use. Nor will new trees and field houses, by

undertake a systematic review of park conditions and

themselves, end the isolation of seniors who are too afraid

programming, comparing what’s available with our

or infirm to use the parks. That will require thoughtful

community’s recreational needs. We will help advisory

programming, aggressive outreach and better coordination

councils recruit additional members and develop fresh ideas

among the parks, police and schools.

for each of our 13 parks—from tiny Neighbor’s Garden Park to Mozart Park to nine-acre Kosciuszko—so that all

2.1 Expand and improve Haas Park.

are monitored by a group of citizens steeped in park issues

We will continue to work with the Chicago Park District,

and governance.

park advisory councils, the 1st Ward alderman and the Trust for Public Land to make expansion of Haas Park,

2.4 Construct small playgrounds and gardens on

at Fullerton and California avenues, a replicable model

vacant parcels.

for park expansion and improvement across the city.

Logan Square has but a handful of vacant city-owned lots,

The trust’s recent purchase of an adjacent warehouse

but here and there are opportunities to chip away at our

makes it imperative that the Chicago Park District

open-space deficit by developing gardens and play lots.

follow through with funding for additional land, closure

One possibility is an underutilized lot at St. Sylvester’s

of Fairfield Avenue and construction of a new field house

School, across from Palmer Square, where parish leaders

and other improvements.

are working with the national KaBOOM! organization to raise funds and recruit volunteers for a day-long park-raising.

20

STRATEGIES

2.5 Support creation of a multi-use plaza on Chicago Transit Authority property off Logan Square. Just south of the Logan Square monument, alongside Milwaukee Avenue where the Blue Line descends into a subway tunnel, the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) owns a half-acre that could be much, much more than the existing parking lot and open railway cut. We will work with the city, CTA and groups such as Logan Square Walks, Logan Square Preservation and the aurorARTS alliance to obtain funding for a landscaped, half-acre public plaza that in summertime could double as a farmers’ market and Latino-themed art fair, or feria.

2.6 Rethink and reconfigure the Ames School athletic field. One of the public open spaces in southwest Logan Square is the expansive athletic field in front of Ames Middle School, at Armitage and Hamlin Avenues. Despite the best efforts of Ames School leadership, this space is underutilized due to a lack of maintenance funding. We will engage school, park and police leadership in rethinking, and possibly reprogramming, this space. The Chicago Park District’s Campus Park program will be reviewed as a funding alternative.

2.7 Support renovation of the West Park Commission Comfort Station on Logan Square.

Figure 6 Bloomingdale bike trail Conversion of the abandoned Bloomindale rail line would create a major greenway and recreational facility for residents of Logan Square and Humboldt Park. The trail would also help address the neighborhood’s documented need for more open space.

With 600 square feet of interior space, this building on the east side of the square at Milwaukee and Logan can be converted from equipment storage to an information center, historical display and small meeting space for neighborhood groups. Logan Square Preservation is leading the effort to return this historic gem to more constructive public use.

21

STRATEGY 3

Improve and expand model community

The Logan Square Neighborhood Association (LSNA) is

jobs. We will expand beyond the eight current programs

school programs, and foster educational

a national leader in the sophisticated work of building

to at least two more Logan Square schools, and

opportunities for residents of all ages.

community schools—schools that are intimately tied to

recommend expansion statewide—wherever low-income

their communities and are centers of community. LSNA’s

schools and their communities could benefit from

pioneering initiatives—including the Parent Mentor and

greater parent involvement.

Literacy Ambassadors programs and the school-based student achievement levels but also opened new worlds of

3.2 Build upon school-based Community Learning Centers.

opportunity for immigrant and other low-income mothers,

Starting in 1996, Community Learning Centers (CLC)

helping them develop the confidence and leadership skills

have proven their worth in five of our schools—Funston,

to pursue their dreams of education and work. Parents are

Monroe, Mozart, Schneider and Ames. For adults, the

everywhere in LSNA schools, sharing their language and

centers offer evening GED classes and English as a

culture, their social and tutoring skills and, of course, their

Second Language instruction; childcare, tutoring and

love for children. We will work to educate others, locally

activities for children are also available. More than 1,000

and nationally, about the value of the LSNA community-

adults attend in an average week, 600 of them for

school model for student achievement, community

English-language classes. LSNA partners with institutions

development and family success.

within Logan Square, such as the aurorARTS alliance, and

Community Learning Centers—have not only raised

Much remains to be done. While our grade-school

outside the community, such as Malcolm X College, the

achievement scores are steadily improving, in 2004 fewer

Chicago Children’s Museum and the Family Institute at

than one-third of seventh graders at Ames Middle School

Northwestern University. In this way, families can attend

met state achievement standards on the ISAT test. At

programs that would not otherwise be easily accessible.

Kelvyn Park High School just west of our community,

The Community Learning Centers will be expanded to

where a majority of Logan Square students attend high

provide advanced instruction for literacy tutors and parent

school, one in five students drops out every year. Only 15

mentors, comprehensive summer programming, new arts

percent of juniors meet state standards for reading, and less

activities and citizenship classes. We will also expand the

than 5 percent for math.

centers’ scope to include job training and financial literacy

Most immediately, we must better understand the problem of student turnover, or mobility, in the K-12 years, and develop

programs to increase the economic resiliency of our families (see Strategy 5).

a plan to attack it. If high student turnover is not addressed, it will undermine progress on other educational issues.

3.3 Enhance the Literacy Ambassadors program. Beginning in 2003, some 35 teams of teachers and parents

22

3.1 Expand the Parent Mentor program.

in five schools have been holding house meetings on literacy.

Since 1995 this program has hired and trained more than

They help parents devise reading strategies and build

1,000 parents, mostly immigrant mothers, to tutor students

bridges from school to home. We hope to expand Literacy

for two hours a day in several Logan Square public grade

Ambassadors to two more schools and strengthen the

schools. Most tutors go on to further schooling or full-time

program’s innovative lending libraries for parents.

Meanwhile, our Community Learning Centers will

LSNA’s newest parent initiative, a federally funded

continue to train childcare workers to offer age-appropriate

Americorps pilot program, places experienced parent men-

activities in a literacy-rich environment. These centers

tors in schools to tutor children intensively. Now in three

currently offer the only pre-school opportunities available

schools, this program will expand to five in 2005-06. The

to many children.

impact of these skilled and trained parents is being tracked, in hopes that their success will inspire a national program.

STRATEGIES

3.4 Develop the Parents as Tutors program.

With our partners, we also will research the need for, and feasibility of, a new pre-school program, perhaps located at the old library branch building on Altgeld Street.

3.5 Expand high school service learning opportunities. LSNA will expand its partnership with Kelvyn Park

3.8 Improve access to computers at local schools,

High School, whose students do their service learning as

the new public library and other public spaces.

tutors in our Community Learning Centers, and where

Digital literacy is a key to future employability. Yet our

we are collaborating on an innovative freshman social

schools are under-equipped, and many of our families

justice curriculum. We will also seek funding to re-start a

cannot afford the latest computers, much less broadband

Pre-school programs are crucial to future academic success, but more

successful attendance program in which parents work

technology, in their homes. We will survey needs and create

are needed to meet the demand in Logan Square.

with truant students.

a plan to ensure adequate computer equipment and space

3.6 Continue the Grow Our Own Teachers program.

at our schools, at the new public library at Sacramento and

the students leave or arrive during any given school year.

Fullerton avenues and at other locations.

Mobility affects everyone, from teachers who have to spend

We will start a second cohort of students in our Nueva

valuable time helping newly arrived students catch up, to

Generación (New Generation) program, which has 30

3.9 Improve opportunities for high school students

students who must adjust to a new school environment. It

parents in the fifth year of studying to be bilingual

to advance to college.

affects school-improvement efforts—teachers cannot build

teachers. As part of the Chicago Learning Campaign,

Too few of our high school graduates are prepared for,

upon each others’ work because so few students remain

we will continue to advocate for a statewide Grow Our

aware of or motivated to pursue college opportunities.

from year to year. The community suffers when active

Own program based on this highly successful collaboration

In a world where education increasingly predicts success,

families move away and no longer participate in creating

with Chicago State University.

this must change. We will work with local high schools to

safe, family-friendly and culturally sensitive schools.

strengthen college preparatory curricula and to improve

Housing displacement may be the root cause, yet

3.7 Expand pre-kindergarten and Head Start programs,

college counseling. We also will utilize the new state law

we know too little about the phenomenon to propose

and develop a new pre-school.

that allows undocumented students to pay lower in-state

strategies and programs to address it. A broad but detailed

Pre-school programs are crucial to academic success, yet

tuition at Illinois colleges.

survey is needed to provide comparative data on the causes

there are too few slots at our pre-school centers—waiting

and effects of student mobility. Armed with accurate data,

lists of 80 to 100 families are common—and providers

3.10 Commission research on school mobility in

we will advocate for solutions, which may include the

are poorly coordinated. We will work with our schools,

Logan Square.

liberalization of school attendance boundaries.

Christopher House, the YMCA and YWCA, along with

The debilitating problem of student mobility, or high

allies such as State Senator Miguel del Valle, to improve

student turnover rates, threatens to undermine all the

the adequacy and efficiency of these vital programs.

projects outlined above. At several schools, more than half

23

STRATEGY 4

Revitalize and redevelop key commercial

Our three major commercial avenues have different problems

corridors by working with elected

and possibilities, yet all need coordinated planning and

of the community’s $868 million total retail spending,

officials, businesses and property owners.

redevelopment, plus a more thoughtful and proactive use

according to the market research firm MetroEdge. But we

of tax increment financing. Also, each of these streets could

must be prepared to compete with big-box discounters,

take fuller advantage of the pedestrian traffic generated by

such as the Wal-Mart recently proposed for a neighborhood

the nearby Blue Line el stations.

to the west.

Logan Square stores capture a lion’s share (90 percent)

Milwaukee Avenue is Logan Square’s bustling downtown, with an eclectic mix of stores, professional offices and

4.1 Pursue school-to-school housing and retail

entertainment venues. Future investments in this commercial

redevelopment on Armitage Avenue.

district should reflect its current streetwall of two- to four-

In cooperation with local aldermen, we will partner with

story buildings with active retail and other nonresidential

Bickerdike Redevelopment Corporation to revitalize one or

uses on the ground floor and residential uses above.

more blocks in the Armitage Avenue corridor, from Ames

Fullerton, with its generous street and sidewalk widths,

Middle School at Hamlin Avenue on the west, past Funston

continues to have retail opportunity, but it is not a

School to Mozart Street on the east. Envisioned for Phase

continuous retail pedestrian street. Areas of pedestrian-type

One are 70 units of affordable family rental housing above

commercial use are interspersed with drive-through banking

a lively ensemble of stores and restaurants. The commercial

and purely institutional buildings. New development should

tenants would include, but not be limited to, smaller,

concentrate retail uses at major intersections. Armitage, with its narrow width and hodgepodge of uses – from used car lots to liquor and tobacco stores – is a tougher case. There, an ambitious redevelopment plan is warranted. Over time, the street’s underutilized land and

Figure 7 Armitage Avenue “school to school” housing initiative

buildings could recycle into housing that is in scale with

Armitage Avenue offers a number of opportunities

other neighborhood residential uses.

to develop new housing. Depending on the size of the site and adjacent land-use mix, new residential developments could be configured in �several ways. Exact locations will depend ��� �� availability of sites and public policy. �� �� �� �

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24

on the

STRATEGIES

locally owned businesses. Special assistance will be available for any owner who would otherwise be displaced.

4.2 Study potential zoning changes to encourage mixed-use projects. Developers chasing the booming market for luxury condos are taking advantage of permissive zoning along commercial streets, installing enormous condo buildings that are out of scale with the neighborhood and are changing the character of our shopping districts. We will work with our aldermen, and the committee now redrawing zoning throughout the city, to protect commercial zoning along key streets and intersections. Everywhere our efforts should encourage small, locally owned stores and inviting, pedestrian-friendly streetscapes.

4.3 Recruit badly needed businesses and services. Our commercial districts are long on cell-phone stores and resale shops, but short on other products and services needed by a revitalizing community. We will work with the Economic Development Commission to conduct surveys and focus groups with residents to learn what other businesses they would like to see in Logan Square and then recruit these businesses. Some early favorites: a business-service store, such as Fed Ex Kinko’s, and a

Figure 8 Armitage Avenue infill development

full-service bank in western Logan Square. We could also

Infill development along Armitage could improve the look and pedestrian quality of the street and provide

use more quality daycare and pre-school providers.

opportunities for new affordable housing. This drawing is for illustrative purposes only. No specific plans for

4.4 Support streetscape and façade improvements

this corner have been discussed.

along Fullerton, Armitage and Milwaukee avenues. If our commercial corridors are going to better serve our community and attract new investment, they must look attractive. Public investment in streetscape and building façade improvements can spur commercial investment and draw more residents and visitors. We will work with local aldermen, chambers of commerce and business owners to encourage such improvements. 25

STRATEGY 5

Support industrial retention and

Logan Square is predominantly residential, yet it is

business development, and provide

and warehouse districts. Centered on Elston and Pulaski

flanked east and west by two extensive manufacturing

coordinated job training, job

avenues, these provide thousands of living-wage jobs to

placement and financial education

breadwinners across the North Side. Both the North Branch

for community residents.

encroaching residential development and the conversion of

(Elston) and Pulaski industrial corridors are threatened by viable industrial buildings to loft-style condos. Even as we move to protect what industry remains, it is evident that most new job opportunities will be in services, from foodservice and hospitality to media services and information management. Data collected by the Illinois Department of Employment Security show that our largest job category is administration and support, accounting for one-fifth of the 15,034 jobs reported in 2003 within ZIP code 60647. It is imperative to help our workforce develop the skills to compete in a global, twenty-first century economy. Equally important is the need for coordinated job

The Cooper Lamp building has the potential to anchor the business and industrial corridor on the community’s east end.

5.1 Expand Community Learning Centers to provide coordinated employment services and financial education. LSNA’s five Community Learning Centers serve hundreds

placement services that link working families with

of adults each day. We will build on this success by

income-support programs and financial education. LSNA’s

coordinating new partnerships to provide job training,

Parent Mentor program and its Community Learning

job placement and financial literacy services. We will

Centers are already providing job preparation and

look to the Centers for Working Families model developed

placement services, from ESL classes to job fairs. LEED

by LISC/Chicago and the Annie E. Casey Foundation as

Council and Greater North-Pulaski Development

a framework for building the financial strength and

Corporation also provide job training and placement

resiliency of our working residents. Potential partners

services. We will combine and redouble our efforts to

include the Chicago Interfaith Committee on Workers

prepare our workforce.

Issues, Greater North-Pulaski Development Corporation (GNPDC), and the Local Economic and Employment Development (LEED) Council.

26

STRATEGIES

5.2 Assist local entrepreneurs with training and business development. Small businesses produce the vast majority of new jobs,

Institute for Entrepreneurship Education and Park National Bank, we will connect entrepreneurs to training, technical

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protect manufacturing jobs. Along with GNPDC, LEED Council, the Island Block Club and workers themselves, we will organize and advocate for industrial retention. To the west, we will support a Planned Manufacturing District (PMD) along the Pulaski Corridor to prevent other uses from encroaching on local industrial companies. To the east, where residential loft conversions are hottest, we will urge that business tenants be recruited for anchor buildings such as Cooper Lamp at 2533 W. Diversey Avenue. We will seek out manufacturers isolated in newly residential areas and help them relocate, if desired, to industrial corridors on Elston Avenue or Pulaski Road.

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assistance and loan programs.

5.3 Work with local industrial councils and others to

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Figure 9 TIF districts and commercial corridors Logan Square is served by active commercial and industrial corridors that provide jobs and retail goods and services. Tax increment financing districts that are already in place or proposed can provide funding to support economic development and job training initiatives.

27

STRATEGY 6

Improve the health, safety and well being

Our community ranks in the middle range of Chicago

6.1 Initiate a Healthier People/Healthier Workforce program.

of Logan Square residents and families.

neighborhoods on most health indicators, but death rates

With the Greater North-Pulaski Development Corporation,

from heart disease, cirrhosis, respiratory diseases and HIV

we have launched a Healthier People/Healthier Workforce

are well above citywide averages. We need more exercise,

program as an Early Action Project to educate employers

smarter diets and fewer bad habits.

and employees on health issues, including how to obtain

Beyond personal health strategies, Logan Square needs

KidCare, FamilyCare and other public benefits.

better access to quality health services. Since 2001, LSNA’s Health Outreach Team has connected more than 2,500

6.2 Continue to expand health and nutrition programs.

people per year to health insurance and services, yet large

With partners such as the North Central District Health

numbers of uninsured mothers still have difficulty

Council, the Gilead Project and the Illinois Coalition for

obtaining the pre-natal, obstetric and pediatric care needed

Immigrants and Refugee Rights, we will continue and

to raise healthy children. Ours ranks among the bottom

expand health and nutrition programs such as Health

third of Chicago’s 77 communities for high rates of teenage

Promoters; cooking and nutrition classes at LSNA’s

births and insufficient prenatal care.

Community Learning Centers; and Ayuda Mutua

Access to quality health care requires that hospitals treat patients with respect and fairness. We will help

(Mutual Help), which works with block clubs to promote gardening, walking, biking and dancing.

monitor patient billings as part of the region-wide Hospital Accountability Project initiated in 2003 by the Service

6.3 Expand PrimeCare, a full-service health clinic in

Employees International Union (SEIU.) If hospitals are

Logan Square.

discovered to be gouging our uninsured and under-insured

PrimeCare Community Health Center provides quality

residents, we will join efforts to improve billing practices or

medical services on a sliding-fee scale to the working

eliminate hospitals’ non-profit tax status.

families of Logan Square. More could be offered, and

Violence is also a health issue in Logan Square. We are

could be expanded or replaced with a larger one at another

occurred during 2004 in Chicago Police Districts 14 and

location. We will work with PrimeCare and other allies to

25. When in February 2004 the Chicago Tribune labeled

make this happen.

one of our patrol areas, 1413, the city’s deadliest police beat, we became determined to do something about it.

28

more served, if its building at 3924 W. Fullerton Avenue

outraged by the 46 homicides—most gang-related—that

6.7 Make Logan Square a safe place to bike and walk.

schools, facilities and parks.

Young people, especially, need to get off their couches,

Needed most are after-school programs and leagues to

put down their video games and start walking and

engage adolescents and teenagers, especially those with

biking. Yet Logan Square is a dense, traffic-intensive

working parents and time on their hands after 3 P.M. We

community. Several initiatives to improve this situation

will work with our school and park networks to increase

are in the works, including more dedicated bike lanes near

and promote healthful activities. We will also work with

parks and schools; a Walk-to-School campaign; and a

the McCormick Tribune YMCA in Logan Square to add

traffic-calming initiative around the Logan Square monu-

a badly needed indoor swimming pool at the Y at 1834

ment, led by Logan Square Walks. With the Chicagoland

N. Lawndale Avenue. There is potential there, too, for an

Bicycle Federation and Afterschool Matters, Logan Square

outdoor amenity, perhaps in conjunction with the proposed

Neighborhood Association (LSNA) has helped start a

Bloomingdale bikeway.

bicycle repair and safety program at Ames Middle School.

STRATEGIES

6.4 Expand physical fitness and sports programs at

Some 25 young people will learn how to repair, and safely

6.5 Improve access to mental health services, addiction

ride, bicycles through this 16-week program. Graduates

Logan Square can be a safer place to walk and bike with the addition

counseling and dental care.

will get their own bikes and a chance to work as Junior

of more dedicated bike lanes near parks and schools.

Our residents, especially Spanish-speaking immigrants,

Bike Ambassadors during the summer months.

have limited access to mental health services and to counseling for addiction to alcohol, tobacco and other

6.8 Form new block clubs to take on health and safety

drugs. Working with Humboldt Park Social Services and

issues.

other partners, we will foster creation of an addiction

LSNA’s experience has proved that strong block clubs

recovery center and a family counseling service capable

increase the safety and cohesiveness of a neighborhood—

of dealing with domestic abuse.

and even of a single apartment building. Block clubs could

Working with PrimeCare and the Infant Welfare Society of Chicago, we will seek funding for, and work to establish,

also promote healthier lifestyles—for example, with help from the Active Living by Design (Ayuda Mutua) program.

a low-cost, community-based dental clinic or referral service.

6.9 Increase participation in crime prevention strategies. 6.6 Help young people make healthy lifestyle choices

The rash of gang violence over the past two years under-

through a community-wide effort.

scores the need to redouble efforts to make Logan Square

The area around Ames, Funston and Mozart schools offers

a safer community. We will partner with Chicago Police

many temptations that lead young people to drugs and

Districts 14 and 25 on crime prevention, participating

alcohol. It is the goal of the community to stop drug

actively in the Chicago Alternative Policing Strategy (CAPS)

dealing and gang recruiting in the area around the schools,

community policing initiative, and supporting the Safe

especially at dismissal time. Parents want to ensure that

Passage initiative, in which residents and business owners

local businesses do not sell tobacco or alcohol to minors.

watch out for children on their way to and from school. To

We will also provide training in alcohol, tobacco and other

check progress and rally public support, we will co-sponsor

drug prevention to students at Ames Middle School.

an annual School Safety Summit.

29

STRATEGY 7

Support local arts organizations,

Art helps define a community. It expresses our collective

promote art activities and expand arts

identity and can be a powerful tool for community build-

programming and cultural events.

Square and at the same time provide the psychological

ing. Art can draw attention to the diversity of Logan benefits of self-expression and self-esteem. Throughout the New Communities Program planning process, Logan Square residents consistently conveyed their love of the arts and their desire for more arts activities and experiences. While Logan Square has a strong history of support for community art, from Redmoon Theater to graffiti artists, local arts organizations face several challenges. There is a need for greater coordination and promotion of art activities. Finding space has been a challenge. Though some organizations thrive through partnerships with under-utilized

Art helps the community express our collective identity and is a

facilities such as churches, planning is needed to integrate

powerful tool for community building.

the arts into our public spaces and provide permanent homes for arts groups. The community has expressed a

7.2 Expand arts programming in our Community

desire for more arts education for all ages, and support for

Learning Centers.

a vision: to transform urban landscapes with public art.

The arts allow people of all ages to tell their individual and community stories. By partnering with Redmoon

7.1 Identify suitable workspace and buildings for lease

Theater and other organizations to offer more arts

or purchase by artists and arts organizations.

education in our Community Learning Centers, we will

With partners such as aurorARTS alliance and Logan

strengthen educational opportunities and generate art that

Square Preservation, we will identify under-used spaces

mirrors our neighborhood.

throughout the community—in churches or other facilities—and connect them with artists and arts

7.3 Strengthen the Logan Square Arts Council.

organizations that need space. To attract larger arts

The council will step up as our primary arts networking

organizations and to keep growing arts organizations

and advertising mechanism, developing an arts calendar and

in the community, we will identify buildings that can be

possibly a web site to promote cultural events and venues

leased or bought by mid- to large-sized arts organizations.

in Logan Square, and creating internal communication channels to promote current and new arts initiatives.

30

STRATEGIES

7.4 Undertake public art projects. The proposed half-acre plaza southeast of the Logan monument at Milwaukee and Logan (see Project 2.5) will have space for periodic art fairs, or ferias, that will celebrate the arts in Logan Square. On the northwestern side of the square at Milwaukee and Kedzie, a mural project led by archi-treasures will celebrate the diverse Logan Square community and our vision for the future. Other public art projects will occur throughout the community, with help from the organization Public Allies.

7.5 Establish a cultural center to serve as the hub of arts activities. Many members of the community expressed the desire for a cultural arts center in Logan Square. It would provide a hub for arts activities and experiences, supporting smaller arts activities while also offering a high-profile exhibition and performance venue. Logan Square Preservation, aurorARTS alliance and other arts organizations will examine potential sites and take the lead on creating this new center.

Figure 10 Plaza for farmers market, art festivals A festival plaza along Milwaukee Avenue near Logan Boulevard, next to the CTA tunnel entrance, could be used by vendors selling produce, art, ethnic goods and other products.

31

STRATEGY 8

Build community leadership and enable

The best of plans will have little impact unless we build

all residents, young and old, citizen and

the power to implement them. New leaders must step up

non-citizen, to participate effectively in

(financial and political) to make change happen. We will

decisions affecting their lives.

to mobilize community support and forge the partnerships continue to cultivate and expand our circle of leadership, reaching out to the young and the old, whose energy and wisdom are so vital to our plan’s success. In a community where nearly 30 percent are foreign born, we will continue to guard and advance the rights of immigrants.

8.1 Strengthen institutional ties, and build new relationships to advance the plan. We will reach out to institutions and leaders who have not yet been involved in this planning effort, engaging

English as a Second Language and citizenship classes in our

the unaware, the disinterested and the disaffected. We

Community Learning Centers can help immigrants better understand

will encourage all to add their perspective—their colorful

the rights and duties of citizenship.

stitches—to our tapestry.

8.3 Help immigrants obtain services and certifications 8.2 Organize to protect and advance the rights of

needed for citizenship.

immigrants.

The continued presence and success of immigrants is

Immigrants, especially, will be summoned to lead. No

essential to preserving the legacy of diversity in Logan

human being shall be considered “illegal,” and no resident

Square. We will work with the Consulate of Mexico

of Logan Square shall be persecuted or denied basic human

and others to obtain passports and matriculas needed

rights for lack of citizenship papers. In partnership with the

by immigrants to establish credit and participate fully in

Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights, we

the economy. In the long term, we will continue English as

will organize the undocumented and pursue their access to

a Second Language instruction in the Community Learning

employment, decent and affordable housing and the same

Centers and help immigrants come to a fuller understanding

human rights afforded all by the U.S. Constitution.

of the rights and duties of citizenship and to navigate the naturalization process. We will hold citizenship classes at Community Learning Centers and other locations to educate residents on the importance of becoming active citizens.

32

8.6 Expand voter registration efforts.

The Logan Square Youth Council develops young leaders

We registered more than 600 new voters in the Logan

and steers teens away from drugs, alcohol and tobacco.

Square area and helped turn out more than 4,000 “unlikely”

These efforts will be strengthened, as will youth leadership

voters in the November 2004 presidential election. Still,

on other issues that affect the community—from affordable

our 26th and 35th wards cast fewer than 15,000 votes

housing to the preponderance of military recruiters over

each, compared to 25,000 or more cast by better-organized

college recruiters in our high schools. Our youth will be

city wards. We need to do more. Non-participation in the

enabled to see a positive future for themselves and to reject

political process will deprive our neighborhood of badly

the way of street gangs—a way that leads, for too many, to

needed government resources, from city jobs to pothole

prison or the morgue.

repairs. We will help get out the vote. !Registrese y vote!

STRATEGIES

8.4 Organize young people to have a voice in their future.

8.5 Connect young and old, organize seniors and help them get needed services. We will ensure that seniors have the support and services

Our youth will be enabled to see a positive future for themselves and

they need to live full, safe and healthy lives. We will involve

encouraged to become community leaders.

seniors in the leadership programs of LSNA; advocate for a pedestrian-friendly community through Logan Square Walks; and foster intergenerational activities, including oral histories, arts, block clubs, safety efforts and civic projects such as the mural at Milwaukee and Kedzie (see Strategy 7.5).

33

WORK PROGRAM

Key to Participating Organizations

34

Many organizations have pledged to implement the projects in our

Church of the Good News CGN

Logan Square Preservation LSP

quality-of-life plan. They include but are not limited to:

College Summit CS

Logan Square Walks LSW

Community Learning Centers CLC

Logan Square Youth Council LSYC

1st Ward Aldermanic Office

Darwin School

Malcolm X College MXC

ACORN

Economic Development Commission of Greater Logan Square EDC

McAuliffe School

Advancement Via Individual Determination AVID

Episcopal Church of the Advent ECA

Monroe Elementary School

Americorps

Erie Neighborhood House ENH

Mozart School

Ames Middle School Ames

Family Institute at Northwestern University FINU

New Communities Covenant Church NCCC

Ames Middle School GEAR-UP program Ames GEAR-UP

Friends of the Bloomingdale Trail FBT

Nixon School

archi-treasures

Fullerton Avenue Chamber of Commerce FACC

North Central District Health Council NCDHC

Armitage Avenue Chamber of Commerce AACC

Funston Annex

North Grand High School

aurorARTS alliance AAA

Greater North-Pulaski Development Corporation GNPDC

Nuestra Señora de las Americas Church NSAC

Bickerdike Redevelopment Corporation BRC

Haas Park Advisory Council HPAC

Old Town School of Folk Music OTS

Brentano Math and Science Academy

Health Alternative Systems HAS

One Economy Corporation OEC

Casa Ruth CR

Hispanic Housing Development Corporation HHDC

Park National Bank PNB

Centro San Bonifacio CSB

Humboldt Park Social Services HPSS

Political advisory committees

Chicago Children’s Museum CCM

Humboldt Park Vocational Center HPVC

PrimeCare

Chicago Community Development Corporation CCDC

Illinois Coalition for Immigrant & Refugee Rights ICIRR

Public Allies PA

Chicago Interfaith Committee on Workers’ Issues CICWI

Illinois Institute for Entrepreneur Education IIEE

redmoon theater

Chicago Mutual Housing Network CMHN

Island Block Club IBC

Schneider School

Chicago Park District CPD

Kelvyn Park High School

St. Sylvester Church and School SSCS

Chicago Park District Advisory Councils CPD councils

Lathrop Homes Local Advisory Council Lathrop LAC

Target Community Organization TCO

Chicago Police Department District 14 Dist. 14

Local Economic and Employment Development Council LEED Council

Trust for Public Land TPL

Chicago Police Department District 25 Dist. 25

Logan-Sacramento-Richmond-Altgeld Block Club LSRA

University of Illinois at Chicago UIC

Chicago Public Schools CPS

Logan Square Arts Council LSAC

Westtown Concerned Citizens WCC

Chicago Public Schools Office of Postsecondary Options CPS-OPO

Logan Square Branch Library LSBL

YMCA

Chicago State University CSU

Logan Square Neighborhood Association LSNA

YWCA

Chicagoland Bicycle Federation CBF

Logan Square Neighborhood Association Reinvestment Coalition LSNARC

Zoning advisory committees

Christopher House CH

Logan Square Parks Alliance LSPA

WORK PROGRAM

WORK PROGRAM

Schedule and Priorities STRATEGY

TIMEFRAME (YEARS) 1

2-3

4-5

ORGANIZATIONS LEAD ORGANIZATION

1. PRESERVE AND EXPAND AFFORDABLE HOUSING. 1.1

Work to preserve affordable rental housing.

LSNA, HHDC, BRC, CCDC, CMHN,

1.2

Establish a Logan Square housing center.

LSNA

1.3

Partner with community development organizations to build housing.

LSNA, BRC, HHDC

1.4

Advocate for affordable set-aside units in new and substantially rehabbed market-rate housing developments.

LSNA, BRC

1.5

Start limited-equity housing cooperative projects.

LSNA, BRC, CMHN

1.6

Develop supportive housing in Logan Square.

HPSS

1.7

Establish the Logan Square Legacy Project.

LSNA

CGN, Lathrop LAC, Schneider

2. EXPAND AND IMPROVE PARKS AND RECREATION PROGRAMS, AND CREATE NEW COMMUNITY SPACES. 2.1

Expand and improve Haas Park.

TPL, CPD, HPAC, LSRA, 1st Ward, AAA, FACC, LSNA

2.2

Support construction of the Bloomingdale Bike Trail and Greenway.

CPD, FBT, LSNA, BRC

2.3

Work with park advisory councils to improve park facilities and programming.

CPD, CPD advisory councils, LSPA, SNA

2.4

Construct small playgrounds and gardens on vacant parcels.

SSCS, LSNA, CSB, Ames GEAR-UP

2.5

Support creation of a multi-use plaza on Chicago Transit Authority property off Logan Square.

LSNA, archi-treasures, LSP, LSW, AAA

2.6

Rethink and reconfigure the Ames School athletic field.

Ames, CPS, CPD

2.7

Support renovation of the West Park Commission Comfort Station on Logan Square.

LSP, LSW

35

STRATEGY

TIMEFRAME (YEARS) 1

2-3

4-5

ORGANIZATIONS LEAD ORGANIZATION

3. IMPROVE AND EXPAND MODEL COMMUNITY SCHOOL PROGRAMS, AND FOSTER EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR RESIDENTS OF ALL AGES. 3.1

Expand the Parent Mentor program.

LSNA, Funston, Brentano, Mozart, Monroe,

3.2

Build upon school-based Community Learning Centers.

3.3

Enhance the Literacy Ambassadors program.

3.4

Develop the Parents as Tutors program.

LSNA, Americorps, Funston, Monroe, Mozart

3.5

Expand high school service learning opportunities.

LSNA, Kelvyn Park HS

3.6

Grow Our Own Teachers program.

LSNA, CSU, ACORN, TCO

3.7

Expand pre-kindergarten and Head Start programs, and develop a new pre-school.

LSNA, YWCA, CH, YMCA, Brentano, Monroe,

3.8

Improve access to computers at local schools, the new public library and other public spaces.

OEC, LSNA, LSBL, Ames, CPS

3.9

Improve opportunities for high school students to advance to college.

LSNA, Kelvyn Park HS, CS, AVID, CPS-OPO,

Schneider, Ames, Darwin, McAuliffe LSNA, Funston, Monroe, Mozart, Schneider, Ames, AAA, MXC, CCM, FINU, Kelvyn Park HS LSNA, Funston, Brentano, Mozart, Monroe, Schneider, Ames, Darwin, McAuliffe

Mozart, Funston, Darwin

LSYC, ICIRR 3.10 Commission research on school mobility in Logan Square.

LSNA

4. REVITALIZE AND REDEVELOP KEY COMMERCIAL CORRIDORS BY WORKING WITH ELECTED OFFICIALS, BUSINESSES AND PROPERTY OWNERS. 4.1

Pursue school-to-school housing and retail redevelopment on Armitage Avenue.

LSNA, BRC, WCC

4.2

Study potential zoning changes to encourage mixed-use projects.

EDC

4.3

Recruit badly needed businesses and services.

EDC

4.4

Support streetscape and building façade improvements along Fullerton, Armitage and Milwaukee avenues.

City of Chicago, EDC, FACC, AACC

5. SUPPORT INDUSTRIAL RETENTION AND BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, AND PROVIDE COORDINATED JOB TRAINING, JOB PLACEMENT AND FINANCIAL EDUCATION TO COMMUNITY RESIDENTS. 5.1

Expand Community Learning Centers to provide coordinated employment services and financial education.

LSNA, LEED Council, GNPDC, HPSS, CICWI, CLC

5.2

Assist local entrepreneurs with training and business development.

IIEE, LSNARC, PNB, LEED Council, GNPDC, HPVC

5.3

Work with local industrial councils and others to protect manufacturing jobs.

GNPDC, LEED Council, LSNA, IBC, workers, SSCS, ECA, NSAC, NCCC

36

WORK PROGRAM

STRATEGY

TIMEFRAME (YEARS) 1

2-3

4-5

ORGANIZATIONS LEAD ORGANIZATION

6. IMPROVE THE HEALTH, SAFETY AND WELL BEING OF LOGAN SQUARE RESIDENTS AND FAMILIES. 6.1

Initiate a Healthier People/Healthier Workforce program.

LSNA, GNPDC

6.2

Continue to expand health and nutrition programs.

LSNA, CSB, NCDHC, PrimeCare, ICIRR

6.3

Expand PrimeCare, a full-service health clinic in Logan Square.

PrimeCare

6.4

Expand physical fitness and sports programs at schools, facilities and parks.

CPD, YMCA, CLC

6.5

Improve access to mental health services, addiction counseling and dental care.

HPSS, HAS, CR

6.6

Help young people make healthy lifestyle choices through a community-wide effort.

LSNA, CPD, Dist. 14, Dist. 25, CBF, Mozart,

6.7

Make Logan Square a safe place to bike and walk.

McAuliffe, Nixon, Funston, Ames LSNA, CPS, Dist. 14, Dist. 25, CBF, Mozart, McAuliffe, Nixon, Funston, Ames, Kelvyn Park HS, North Grand HS, YMCA, LSW, LSP 6.8

Form new block clubs to take on health and safety issues.

LSNA, UIC

6.9

Increase participation in crime prevention strategies.

LSNA, CPS, Dist. 14, Dist. 25, CBF, Mozart, McAuliffe, Nixon, Funston, Ames, Kelvyn Park HS, North Grand HS, YMCA, LSW

7. SUPPORT LOCAL ARTS ORGANIZATIONS, PROMOTE ART ACTIVITIES AND EXPAND ARTS PROGRAMMING AND CULTURAL EVENTS. 7.1

Identify suitable workspace and buildings for lease or purchase by artists and arts organizations.

AAA, LSP

7.2

Expand arts programming in our Community Learning Centers.

LSNA, Redmoon, AAA, OTS, CCM

7.3

Strengthen the Logan Square Arts Council.

LSAC

7.4

Undertake public arts projects.

archi-treasures, AAA, PA

7.5

Establish a cultural center to serve as the hub of arts activities.

LSP, AAA

37

STRATEGY

TIMEFRAME (YEARS) 1

2-3

4-5

ORGANIZATIONS LEAD ORGANIZATION

8. BUILD COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP AND ENABLE ALL RESIDENTS, YOUNG AND OLD, CITIZEN AND NON-CITIZEN, TO PARTICIPATE EFFECTIVELY IN DECISIONS AFFECTING THEIR LIVES.

38

8.1

Strengthen institutional ties, and build new relationships to advance the plan.

LSNA

8.2

Organize to protect and advance the rights of immigrants.

LSNA, ICIRR, LSYC

8.3

Help immigrants obtain services and certifications needed for citizenship.

LSNA, ICIRR, ENH

8.4

Organize young people to have a voice in their future.

LSYC, LSNA

8.5

Connect young and old, organize seniors and help them get needed services.

LSNA, HHDC, LSW

8.6

Expand voter registration efforts.

LSNA, ICIRR

39

40

New Communities Program

For more information

Staff and Consultants

NCP is a long-term initiative of Local Initiatives Support

Nancy Aardema Executive Director

LISC/Chicago

Corporation/Chicago to support comprehensive community

Susan Yanun New Communities Program Director

Andrew Mooney Senior Program Director

development in Chicago neighborhoods. It seeks to rejuvenate

Logan Square Neighborhood Association

Amanda Carney Director, New Communities Program

challenged communities, bolster those in danger of losing

2840 N. Milwaukee Avenue

Susana Vasquez Deputy Director,

ground and preserve the diversity of areas in the path of

Chicago, IL 60618

New Communities Program

gentrification. Each effort is led by a neighborhood-based

(773) 384-4370 phone

Patrick Barry Scribe Coordinator and Editor

lead agency that coordinates programs among other local

(773) 384-0624 fax

John McCarron Scribe

organizations and citywide support groups.

[email protected]

The program gives each of the lead agencies several

www.lsna.net

Camiros Ltd. Leslie S. Pollock Principal Planner

resources: two full-time staff positions (an NCP director and organizer), technical support for planning and documenting the

Susana Vasquez Deputy Director,

Barry Gore Project Planner

planning process, a pool of loan and grant funds distributed on

New Communities Program

Jing Cui Urban Designer

a competitive basis for project seed money, and opportunities

LISC/Chicago

Dena Hicks Landscape Architect

for learning from both peers and subject-area experts.

1 N. LaSalle St., 12th Floor

Denise Lea Planner

All NCP neighborhoods spend their first year undertaking

Chicago, IL 60602 Kym Abrams Design, Inc.

a structured community planning process that leads to the

312-697-6102

quality-of-life plan, then move on to implementation. They

[email protected]

Kym Abrams Creative Director

are encouraged to be “doing while planning,” undertaking

www.newcommunities.org

Kelly Komp Design Manager

short-term “Early Action Projects” such as launching a youth

www.lisc-chicago.org

Andy Eltzroth Designer

program, opening an employment center, creating public art or sponsoring local health fairs. NCP is designed to strengthen communities from within

Illustration and Photo Credits Steven Mach Illustration, page 14

– through planning, organizing and human development.

Barry Gore, Camiros, Ltd., page 26

The comprehensive approach is designed to help broaden

Juan Francisco Hernandez, pages 3, 11

opportunities for local residents through better education,

Rob Hill, pages 2, 29

broader housing choices, safer streets, stronger personal

Logan Square Neighborhood Association, cover (far left,

finances and new economic opportunities. The strengthened community is better equipped to take advantage of larger

middle right), pages 6, 12, 13, 19, 23, 32, 33 Michael Stanek, cover (middle left, far right), pages 9, 30

market forces, attract new investment and enhance the overall quality of life.

41

The New Communities Program (NCP) is supported by a major grant from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Additional funding has been provided by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, Joyce Foundation, Lloyd A. Fry Foundation, Living Cities, Mayor’s Office of Workforce Development, Nationwide Insurance, Partnership for New Communities, Polk Bros. Foundation and Surdna Foundation. www.lisc-chicago.org www.newcommunities.org