Los Angeles City Planning Commission - City Clerk Internet Site

Los Angeles City Planning Commission - City Clerk Internet Site

PLANNING DEPARTMENT TRANSMITTAL TO THE CITY CLERK’S OFFICE CITY PLANNING CASE: ENVIRONMENTAL DOCUMENT: COUNCIL DISTRICT: CPC-2011 -2459-GPA-ZC-SP-...

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PLANNING DEPARTMENT TRANSMITTAL TO THE CITY CLERK’S OFFICE

CITY PLANNING CASE:

ENVIRONMENTAL DOCUMENT:

COUNCIL DISTRICT:

CPC-2011 -2459-GPA-ZC-SP-SN-CA

ENV-2011-2460-EIR

CD-13, CD-4

APPLICANT/REPRESENTATIVE:

TELEPHONE NUMBER:

EMAIL ADDRESS:

Paramount Pictures Corp., Sharon Keyser (Applicant) George Mihlsten, Latham & Watkins, LLC (Representative)

(213) 485-1234

[email protected]

TELEPHONE NUMBER:

EMAIL ADDRESS:

PLANNER CONTACT INFORMATION:

TELEPHONE NUMBER:

EMAIL ADDRESS:

Elva Nuno-O’Donnell

(818) 374-5066

[email protected]

PROJECT ADDRESS: 5555 Melrose Avenue

r New/Changed APPELLANT/REPRESENTATIVE:

None

APPROVED PROJECT DESCRIPTION:

The proposed Paramount Pictures Master Plan (the “Project”), consists of improvements to Paramount Studios comprising the main studio property of approximately 56 acres (the Main Lot) and six surrounding properties of approximately 6 acres (the Ancillary Lots). The Main Lot and Ancillary Lots are referred together as the Project Site. The Project includes the redevelopment of portions of the Project Site with new studio-related uses, circulation improvements, parking facilities, and pedestrian-oriented landscaped areas. These improvements would be implemented through the proposed Paramount Pictures Specific Plan (including a Historic Resources Preservation Plan), incorporating Sign Regulations in lieu of a proposed Sign Supplemental Use District, which would guide development within the Project Site. The proposed Specific Plan would allow for the construction of up to approximately 1,922,300 square feet of new stage, production office, support, office, and retail uses and the proposed demolition of approximately 536,600 square feet of stage, production office, support, office, and retail uses, resulting in a net increase of approximately 1,385,700 square feet of floor area within the Project Site upon completion of the proposed Project. No “Protected Trees,” pursuant to Ordinance 177,404, have been identified on the Project Site. A haul route approval for 420,000 cubic yards of export, throughout Project buildout to 2038, is also requested.

C:\Users\51983\Downloads\CPC-2011-2459-GPA-ZC-SP-SN-CA PLANNING TRANSMITTAL Form.docx

l

COMMISSION ACTION(S) / ZONING ADMINISTRATOR ACTION(S): (CEA’s PLEASE CONFIRM) 1.

2.

3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

9.

Certified that it has reviewed and considered the information contained in the Draft and Final Environmental Impact Report (EIR), and Errata, Environmental Clearance No. ENV-2011-2460-EIR (SCH. No. 2011101035), including accompanying mitigation measures, the Mitigation Monitoring Program, Adopt the related environmental Findings, the Statement of Overriding Considerations, and the Mitigation Monitoring Program as the environmental clearance for the proposed project and find that: a. EIR for Paramount Pictures, which includes the Draft EIR, Final EIR and Errata, has been completed in compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), Public Resources Code Section 2100 et seq., and the State and City of Los Angeles CEQA Guidelines. b. The Project’s EIR is presented to the City Planning Commission (CPC) as a recommending and decision­ making body of the lead agency; and the CPC reviewed and considered the information contained in the EIR prior to certification of the EIR and recommending the project for approval, as well as all other information in the record of proceedings on this matter. c. The Project’s EIR represents the independent judgment and analysis of the lead agency. Recommended that the City Council Approve a General Plan Amendment (Hollywood Community Plan and Wilshire Community Plan) from Commercial Manufacturing; Neighborhood Office Commercial; Low Medium II Residential; and Medium Residential to General Commercial (Main Lot to remain Industrial Limited Manufacturing). Recommended that the City Council Approve a Zone Change from RD1.5-1XL; R3-1XL, R3-1; C2-1; [Q]C2-1; [Q]C2-1VL; [Q]M1-1; and [QJM1-2D to Paramount Pictures Specific Plan (PPSP). Recommended that the Mayor Approve, and the City Council Adopt, the attached Paramount Pictures Specific Plan. Denied the establishment of a Sign District without prejudice, as the sign regulations have been incorporated within the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan Approved and Recommended that the City Council Adopt a Code Amendment establishing the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan (PPSP). Adopted the attached Findings. Advised the applicant that, pursuant to California State Public Resources Code Section 21081.6, the City shall monitor or require evidence that mitigation conditions are implemented and maintained throughout the life of the project and City may require any necessary fees to cover the cost of such monitoring. Advised the applicant that, pursuant to the State Fish and Game Code Section 711.4, a Fish and Game and/or Certificate of Game Exemption is now required to be submitted to the County Clerk prior to, or concurrent with, the Environmental Notices and Determination (NOD) filing.

ENTITLEMENTS FOR CITY COUNCIL CONSIDERATION: Certified that it has reviewed and considered the information contained in the Draft and Final Environmental 1. Impact Report (EIR), and Errata, Environmental Clearance No. ENV-2011-2460-EIR (SCH. No. 2011101035), including accompanying mitigation measures, the Mitigation Monitoring Program, Adopt the related environmental Findings, the Statement of Overriding Considerations, and the Mitigation Monitoring Program as the environmental clearance for the proposed project and find that: EIR for Paramount Pictures, which includes the Draft EIR, Final EIR and Errata, has been completed in a. compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), Public Resources Code Section 2100 et seq., and the State and City of Los Angeles CEQA Guidelines. The Project’s EIR is presented to the City Planning Commission (CPC) as a recommending and decision­ b. making body of the lead agency; and the CPC reviewed and considered the information contained in the EIR prior to certification of the EIR and recommending the project for approval, as well as all other information in the record of proceedings on this matter. The Project’s EIR represents the independent judgment and analysis of the lead agency. c. Approval of a General Plan Amendment (Hollywood Community Plan and Wilshire Community Plan) from 2. Commercial Manufacturing; Neighborhood Office Commercial; Low Medium II Residential; and Medium Residential to General Commercial (Main Lot to remain Industrial Limited Manufacturing). Approval of a Zone Change from RD1.5-1XL; R3-1XL, R3-1; C2-1; [Q]C2-1; [QJC2-1VL; [QJM1-1; and [QJM1-2D 3. to Paramount Pictures Specific Plan (PPSP). Recommend that the Mayor Approve, and the City Council Adopt, the attached Paramount Pictures Specific Plan. 4. Dismiss the establishment of a Sign District without prejudice, as the sign regulations have been incorporated 5. within the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan Adopt a Code Amendment establishing the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan (PPSP). 6. Adopt the attached Findings. 7. Advise the applicant that, pursuant to California State Public Resources Code Section 21081.6, the City shall 8. monitor or require evidence that mitigation conditions are implemented and maintained throughout the life of the project and City may require any necessary fees to cover the cost of such monitoring. Advise the applicant that, pursuant to the State Fish and Game Code Section 711.4, a Fish and Game and/or 9. Certificate of Game Exemption is now required to be submitted to the County Clerk prior to, or concurrent with, the Environmental Notices and Determination (NOD) filing.__________________^^________________________________ C:\Users\51983\Downloads\CPC-2011-2459-GPA-ZC-SP-SN-CA PLANNING TRANSMITTAL Form.docx

2

FINAL ENTITLEMENTS NOT ADVANCING:

Sign District

ITEMS APPEALED:

N/A

ATTACHMENTS:

REVISED:

P? Letter of Determination I* Findings of Fact F Staff Recommendation Report r Conditions of Approval lv Ordinance S' Zone Change Map fv GPA Resolution S' Land Use Map Exhibit A-Site Plan F Mailing List r Land Use lv Other

_______

ENVIRONMENTAL CLEARANCE:

r Categorical Exemption

r r r r r r r r r r r

REVISED:

r

r Negative Declaration r Mitigated Negative Declaration F/ Environmental Impact Report r Mitigation Monitoring Program r Other___________________

r r r

NOTES / INSTRUCTION(S):

ENV-2011-2460-EIR may be found at http://planning.lacity.org/eir/Paramount/ParamountCoverPg.htm .

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3

FISCAL IMPACT STATEMENT:

r Yes

F? No *lf determination states administrative costs are recovered through fees, indicate “Yes”.

PLANNING COMMISSION:

I* City Planning Commission (CPC)

r North Valley Area Planning Commission

r Cultural Heritage Commission (CHC)

r South LA Area Planning Commission

r Central Area Planning Commission

r South Valley Area Planning Commission

r East LA Area Planning Commission

F West LA Area Planning Commission

r Harbor Area Planning Commission PLANNING COMMISSION HEARING DATE:

COMMISSION VOTE:

July 14, 2016

5-0

LAST DAY TO APPEAL:

APPEALED:

TRANSMITTED BY:

TRANSMITTAL DATE:

Adam Villani, City Planner

August 23, 2016

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Los Angeles City Planning Commission 200 N. Spring Street, Room 532, Los Angeles, California, 90012-4801, (213) 978-1300 www.lacity.org/PLN/index.htm LETTER OF DETERMINATION Mailing Date:

AUG 0 9 2016

CASE NO.: CPC-2011-2459-GPA-ZC-SP-SN-CA CEQA: ENV-2011-2460-EIR, SCH: 2011101035 Related Cases: TT-71751-1A, CPC-2011-2462-DA

Location: 5555 W. Melrose Avenue Council Districts: 13 - O’Farrell, 4-Ryu Plan Areas: Hollywood and Wilshire Request: General Plan Amendment; Zone Change; Specific Plan; Sign District; Code Amendment

Applicant: Sharon Keyser, Paramount Pictures Corporation Representative: George Mihlsten, Latham & Watkins, LLP At its meeting of July 14, 2016, the Los Angeles City Planning Commission took the

following action: 1. Certified that it has reviewed and considered the information contained in the Draft and Final Environmental Impact Report (EIR), and Errata, Environmental Clearance No. ENV2011-2460-EIR (SCH. No. 2011101035), including accompanying mitigation measures, the Mitigation Monitoring Program, adopted the related environmental Findings, the Statement of Overriding Considerations, and the Mitigation Monitoring Program as the environmental clearance for the proposed project and Find that: a. EIR for Paramount Pictures, which includes the Draft EIR, Final EIR and Errata, has been completed in compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), Public Resources Code Section 2100 et seq., and the State and City of Los Angeles CEQA Guidelines. b. The Project’s EIR is presented to the City Planning Commission (CPC) as a recommending and decision-making body of the lead agency; and the CPC reviewed and considered the information contained in the EIR prior to certification of the EIR and recommending the project for approval, as well as all other information in the record of proceedings on this matter. c. The Project’s EIR represents the independent judgment and analysis of the lead agency. 2. Approved a General Plan Amendment (Hollywood Community Plan and Wilshire Community Plan) from Commercial Manufacturing; Neighborhood Office Commercial; Low Medium II Residential; and Medium Residential to General Commercial (Main Lot to remain Industrial Limited Manufacturing). 3. Approved a Zone Change from RD1.5-1XL; R3-1XL, R3-1; C2-1; [QJC2-1; [QJC2-1VL; [QJM1-1; and [QJM1-2D to Paramount Pictures Specific Plan (PPSP). 4. Dismissed the establishment of a Sign District without prejudice, as the sign regulations have been incorporated within the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan.

5. Approved a Code Amendment establishing the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan (PPSP). 6. Adopted the attached Findings. 7. Advised the applicant that, pursuant to California State Public Resources Code Section 21081.6, the City shall monitor or require evidence that mitigation conditions are implemented and maintained throughout the life of the project and City may require any necessary fees to cover the cost of such monitoring. 8. Advised the applicant that, pursuant to the State Fish and Game Code Section 711.4, a Fish and Game and/or Certificate of Game Exemption is now required to be submitted to the County Clerk prior to, or concurrent with, the Environmental Notices and Determination (NOD) filing.

CPC-2011-2459-GPA-ZC-SP-SN-CA

Page 2

RECOMMENDATION TO THE CITY COUNCIL: 1. Recommend that the City Council certify that it has reviewed and considered the information contained in the Draft and Final Environmental Impact Report (EIR), and Errata, Environmental Clearance No. ENV-2011-2460-EIR (SCH. No. 2011101035), including accompanying mitigation measures, the Mitigation Monitoring Program, adopt the related environmental Findings, the Statement of Overriding Considerations, and the Mitigation Monitoring Program as the environmental clearance for the proposed project and find that: a. EIR for Paramount Pictures, which includes the Draft EIR, Final EIR and Errata, has been completed in compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), Public Resources Code Section 2100 et seq., and the State and City of Los Angeles CEQA Guidelines. b. The Project’s EIR is presented to the City Planning Commission (CPC) as a recommending and decision-making body of the lead agency; and the CPC reviewed and considered the information contained in the EIR prior to certification of the EIR and recommending the project for approval, as well as all other information in the record of proceedings on this matter. c. The Project’s EIR represents the independent judgment and analysis of the lead agency. 2. Recommend that the City Council approve a General Plan Amendment (Hollywood Community Plan and Wilshire Community Plan) from Commercial Manufacturing; Neighborhood Office Commercial; Low Medium II Residential; and Medium Residential to General Commercial (Main Lot to remain Industrial Limited Manufacturing). 3. Recommend that the City Council approve a Zone Change from RD1.5-1XL; R3-1XL, R31; C2-1; [Q]C2-1; [Q]C2-1VL; [Q]M1-1; and [Q]M1-2D to Paramount Pictures Specific Plan (PPSP). 4. Recommend that City Council adopt, the attached Paramount Pictures Specific Plan. 5. Recommend that the City Council adopt a Code Amendment establishing the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan (PPSP). 6. Recommend that the City Council adopt the attached Findings. Fiscal Impact Statement: There is no General Fund impact as administrative costs are recovered through fees. The action was taken by the following vote: Moved: Seconded: Ayes: Absent:

Ahn, Mack, Katz, Padilla-Campos

Vote:

5-0

Ambroz Millman

Choe, Perlman, Dake-Wilson

James K. Williams, Commission Executive Assistant II Los Angeles City Planning Commission Effective DklBfflppeals: The Los Angeles City Planning Commission’s decision is appealable to the Los Angeles City Council within 20 days after the mailing date of this determination letter. Any appeal not filed within the 20-day period shall not be considered by the Council. All appeals shall be filed on forms provided at the Planning Department’s Public Counters at 201 N. Figueroa Street, Fourth Floor, Los Angeles, or at 6262 Van Nuys Boulevard, Suite 251, Van Nuys. Final Appeal Date:

AUG 2 9 2016

CPC-2011 -2459-GPA-ZC-SP-SN-CA

Page 3

If you seek judicial review of any decision of the City pursuant to California Code of Civil Procedure Section 1094.5, the petition for writ of mandate pursuant to that section must be filed no later than the 90th day following the date on which the City's decision became final pursuant to California Code of Civil Procedure Section 1094.6. There may be other time limits which also affect your ability to seek judicial review. Attachment: Ordinance, Maps, Findings, Resolution, Specific Plan Associate Zoning Administrator: Charles J. Rausch Senior City Planner: Luciralia Ibarra City Planner: Elva Nuno-O’Donnell City Planner: Adam Villani

ORDINANCE NO. An ordinance amending Section 12.04 of the Los Angeles Municipal Code by amending the zoning map. THE PEOPLE OF THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES DO ORDAIN AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Section 12.04 of the Los Angles Municipal Code is hereby amended by changing the zone classifications of properties shown upon a portion of the Zoning Map incorporated therein and made a part of Article 2, Chapter 1 of the LAMC, so that such portion of the Zoning Map shall conform to the zoning on the map attached hereto and incorporated herein by this reference.

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CPC 2011-2459-GPA-ZC-SP-SN-CA 5555 Melrose Avenue

F-1

FINDINGS GENERAL PLAN AMENDMENT FINDINGS REQUEST The Department of City Planning initiated a General Plan Amendment that would designate portions of the Project Site (the Ancillary Lots) as General Commercial. The types of land uses that could be developed on the Project Site would be governed by the proposed Paramount Pictures Specific Plan. Under the proposed General Plan Amendment, the Project would maintain and enhance the existing mix of on-site industrial and commercial uses associated with, and typical of, motion picture and television production studios. FINDINGS

1. The proposed General Plan Amendment complies with Los Angeles City Charter Section 555 in that it complies with the procedures pertaining to the preparation, consideration, adoption and amendment of the General Plan, or any of its elements or parts, as prescribed by ordinance and subject to the requirements of Section 555. a.

Amendment in Whole or in Part. The General Plan Amendment before the City Planning Commission represents an Amendment in Part of both the Hollywood Community Plan and the Wilshire Community Plan, representing a change to the physical identity of portions of the Project site which are currently designated as Industrial-Commercial Manufacturing, Medium Residential, and Low Medium II Residential in the Hollywood Community Plan, and as Neighborhood Office Commercial and Medium Residential in the Wilshire Community Plan. The portion designated Industrial-Commercial Manufacturing has the corresponding zone of [G]C2-1 VL. The portions designated Medium Residential have the corresponding zones of R3-1XL and R3-1. The portion designated Low Medium II Residential has the corresponding zone of RD1.5-1XL. The portions designated Neighborhood Office Commercial have the corresponding zone of C2-1. The proposed zoning for all of the General Plan Amendment areas, as well as the rest of the Project site, is PPSP (Paramount Pictures Specific Plan zone), corresponding with the proposed Paramount Pictures Specific Plan, and created through a proposed Code Amendment. The Project Site comprises the approximately 56-acre Main Lot and six Ancillary Lots totaling approximately 6 acres, but the General Plan Amendment only applies to the Ancillary Lots and excludes Parcels C and D of the Lemon Grove Lot. The Project site has a significant economic and physical identity in that it represents the Paramount Studios, the largest movie, television, and entertainment studio physically located within Hollywood. The majority of the Project Site has been used for motion picture and television production for nearly 100 years, and Paramount Studios is an integral and historic entity in the entertainment industry. Under the regulations of the proposed Paramount Pictures Specific Plan, which would govern the existing studio/campus, the proposed Project would rehabilitate and preserve historic resources, introduce modernized facilities, and enhance landscaping and pedestrian gathering spaces on the Project Site, which has played a foundational role in Hollywood’s entertainment industry.

CPC 2011-2459-GPA-ZC-SP-SN-CA 5555 Melrose Avenue

F-2

The Ancillary Lots themselves serve an important support function for the Paramount Studios, providing parking not just for passenger vehicles, but also for base camps, which are the trucks and trailers used to haul equipment and provide temporary work space, such as dressing rooms, during film and television production. All of the Ancillary Lots subject to the General Plan Amendment are currently developed with either surface parking lots, multi-level parking structures, or, on the Gregory Lot, a childcare facility. These uses are all appropriate for the General Commercial land use designation, which the Framework Element of the General Plan defines as “a diversity of retail sales and services, office, and auto-oriented uses.” For the Applicant’s flexibility, a variety of uses, including internal-serving retail, are proposed in the Specific Plan for the Ancillary Lot areas subject to the General Plan Amendment, but they are all appropriate to the General Commercial land use designation and would continue to act in a support capacity for the production facilities of the Paramount Studios. Parcels C and D of the Lemon Grove Lot were initially proposed to be included in the General Plan Amendment, but they were excluded because they are currently undeveloped and would be small parcels of General Commercial land use designation nearly surrounded by a residential neighborhood designated Low Medium II Residential, representing an initial intrusion of a high-intensity use into a stable medium-density residential area. Redesignating the land use of the Ancillary Lots (other than Parcels C and D of the Lemon Grove Lot) reinforces an area that has its own economic and physical identity in the form of (1) strengthening the General Plan Amendment area’s identity as a functional part of the Paramount Studios with a General Commercial designation appropriate to the existing and proposed uses on the site while maintaining compatibility with its residential neighbors, (2) furthering the General Plan Framework Element’s Objective 3.14 of accommodating land and supporting services for the retention of existing and attraction of new industries, (3) furthering the General Plan Framework Element’s Objective 3.12 of maintaining the uses, density, and character of existing low-intensity commercial districts whose functions serve surrounding neighborhoods and/or are precluded from intensification due to their physical characteristics, and (4) balancing the needs of Paramount Studios to thrive as an employer and economic engine for the area with the needs of the surrounding residential areas and a respect for the historic nature of the Project site. b.

Initiation of Amendments. In compliance with this sub-section, the Director of Planning proposed the amendment to the Hollywood Community Plan and Wilshire Community Plan (both part of the General Plan-Land Use Element). The request was initiated, via signature by the Director’s designee on August 30, 2015.

c.

Commission and Mayoral Recommendations. The noticing and hearing requirements of the General Plan Amendment were satisfied, pursuant to LAMC Section 12.32-C.3. The hearing was scheduled, duly noticed, and held at First Presbyterian Church of Hollywood, Mears Center, 1760 North Gower Street, Hollywood, CA 90028 on May 16, 2016. The City Planning Commission shall make its recommendation to the Mayor upon a recommendation of approval, or to the City Council and the Mayor upon a recommendation of disapproval.

The action is further subject to the following sections of Charter Section 555: d.

Council Action. The Council shall conduct a public hearing before taking action on a proposed amendment to the General Plan. If the Council proposes any modification to

'

CPC 2011-2459-GPA-ZC-SP-SN-CA 5555 Melrose Avenue

F-3

the amendment approved by the City Planning Commission, that proposed modification shall be referred to the City Planning Commission and the Mayor for their recommendations. The City Planning Commission and the Mayor shall review any modification made by the Council and shall make their recommendation on the modification to the Council in accordance with subsection (c) above. If no modifications are proposed by the Council, or after receipt of the Mayor’s and City Planning Commission’s recommendations on any proposed modification, or the expiration of their time to act, the Council shall adopt or reject the proposed amendment by resolution within the time specified by ordinance. e.

Votes Necessary for Adoption. If both the City Planning Commission and the Mayor recommend approval of a proposed amendment, the Council may adopt the amendment by a majority vote. If either the City Planning Commission or the Mayor recommends the disapproval of a proposed amendment, the Council may adopt the amendment only by a two-thirds vote. If both the City Planning Commission and the Mayor recommend the disapproval of a proposed amendment, the Council may adopt the amendment only by a three-fourths vote. If the Council proposes a modification of an amendment, the recommendations of the Commission and the Mayor on the modification shall affect only that modification.

2.

The proposed General Plan Amendment complies with Los Angeles City Charter Section 556 in that it is in substantial conformance with the purposes, intent, and provisions of the General Plan and all of its elements.

Paramount Studios is the largest motion picture studio within Hollywood, and is a major factor in maintaining Hollywood as a center of the entertainment industry, particularly in movie and television production. Paramount Studios produces and distributes films and television shows of its own and also opens its production facilities for use by other studios as well as independent productions. The proposed Project will enhance Paramount Studios’ role in this regard by enabling it to expand and update its facilities to meet the technological and business needs of the entertainment industry in the 21st century while respecting the historical resources on its property.

Framework Element The Framework Element for the General Plan was adopted by the City of Los Angeles in December 1996 and re-adopted in August 2001. The Framework Element provides guidance regarding policy issues for the entire City of Los Angeles, including the Project site. The Framework Element also sets forth a Citywide comprehensive long-range growth strategy and defines Citywide policies regarding such issues land use, housing, urban form, neighborhood design, open space, economic development, transportation, infrastructure, and public services. The Land Use chapter of the Framework Element identifies objectives and supporting policies relevant to the Project site. Those objectives and policies seek, in part, to accommodate a diversity of uses that support the needs of the City’s existing and future residents, businesses, and visitors.

Goal 3J: Industrial Growth that provides job opportunities for the City’s residents and maintains the City’s fiscal viability.

CPC 2011-2459-GPA-ZC-SP-SN-CA 5555 Melrose Avenue

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Objective 3.14: Provide Land and supporting services for the retention of existing and attraction of new industries.

Policy 3.14.1: Accommodate the development of industrial uses in areas designated as “Industrial-Light,” “Industrial-Heavy,” and “Industrial-Transit” in accordance with Tables 3-1 and 3-9. The range and intensities of uses permitted in any area shall be determined by the community plans. Table 3-9 Land Use Designation Industrial-Light Industrial-Heavy Industrial-Transit

Corresponding Zones CM, MR1, MR2, M1, M2

M3 CM, M1, M2, C2

Policy 3.14.2: Provide flexible zoning to facilitate the clustering of industries and supporting uses, thereby establishing viable “themed” sectors (e.g., movie/television/media production, set design, reproductions, etc.). Policy 3.14.9: Initiate programs for lot consolidation and implement improvements to assist in the retention/expansion of existing and attraction of new industrial uses, where feasible. The proposed Project would promote the retention, expansion, and upgrading of Paramount Studios’ existing light-industrial operations on the Main Lot by retaining the Industrial-Limited Manufacturing land use designation on the Main Lot, establishing the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan, creating the PPSP (Paramount Pictures Specific Plan) zone through a Code Amendment, and applying the zone to the Main Lot through a Zone Change. The Specific Plan would provide for the development of 1,385,700 net new square feet (after interim projects are built) of stage, production office, support, office, and retail buildings on the Project site, as well as 3,970 net new parking spaces. The Specific Plan would provide for regulations regarding height, signage, design, and uses, as well as the establishment of a Historic Resources Preservation Plan. This would allow Paramount Studios to modernize and expand its motion picture and entertainment production facilities under a regulated, unified plan. Development and construction of the Project will generate more than 7,200 part-time and full­ time jobs for the local economy, of which over 4,400 are directly related to construction of the Project. Operation of the Project at full buildout will generate more than 12,600 jobs locally, of which more than 5,400 would be from on-site operations. In addition to employment on site, Paramount acts as an economic engine for the area, providing business not only for directly entertainment-related services, but also for general businesses like restaurants, retail, catering, logistics, security, etc. Overall, the Project will create nearly 20,000 jobs during construction and operations. Goal 3H: Lower-intensity highway-oriented and local commercial nodes that accommodate commercial needs outside centers and districts.

Objective 3.12: Generally, maintain the uses, density, and character of existing low-intensity commercial districts whose functions serve surrounding neighborhoods and/or are precluded from intensification due to their physical characteristics.

CPC 2011-2459-GPA-ZC-SP-SN-CA 5555 Melrose Avenue

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Policy 3.12,1: Accommodate the development of uses in areas designated as “General Commercial” in the community plans in accordance with Tables 3-1 and 3-7. The range and densities/intensities of uses permitted in any area shall be identified in the community plans. Table 3-7 Land Use Designation General Commercial

Corresponding Zones C2, [Q]C2

The proposed Project would maintain and accommodate the development of the uses, density, and character of the existing low-intensity commercial uses in the Ancillary Lots (except Lemon Grove Lot Parcels C and D), whose functions support the adjacent entertainment production facilities on the Main Lot but are precluded from intensification by their close proximity to residential uses. This would be accomplished by changing these lots’ land use designations to General Commercial, establishing the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan, creating the PPSP (Paramount Pictures Specific Plan) zone through a Code Amendment, and applying the zone to the Ancillary Lots through a Zone Change. The Ancillary Lots would allow a variety of uses but would primarily be used for parking (including production base camps) and retail purposes. Some of the heavier industrial uses permitted on the Main Lot such as paint shops and mills would be forbidden on the ancillary lots, and since only the Main Lot is a Certified Sound Stage under Film L.A.’s definition (under the LAPD’s authority), any filming on the Ancillary Lots would be infrequent, and audience shows would not be allowed. Thus the Ancillary Lots would be used to support the production activity on the Main Lot but would not be used as intensely as the Main Lot.

Goal 3C: Multi-family neighborhoods that enhance the quality of life for the City’s existing and future residents.

Objective 3.7:

Provide for the stability and enhancement of multi-family residential neighborhoods and allow for growth in areas where there is sufficient public infrastructure and services and the residents’ quality of life can be maintained or improved.

Policy 3.7.1: Accommodate the development of multi-family residential units in areas designated in the community plans in accordance with Table 3-1 and Zoning Ordinance densities indicated in Table 3-3, with the density permitted for each parcel to be identified in the community plans. Table 3-3 Land Use Designation Low Medium I Low Medium II Medium High Medium High

Corresponding Zones RD3, RD4, RZ2.5, RZ3, RZ4, RU, R2 RW1, RD1.5, RD2 R3 R4, [Q]R4 R5, [Q]R5

Density Per Net Acre 10-17 18-29 30-55 56 -109 110-218

The Lemon Grove Lot, one of the Ancillary Lots, is further divided into four parcels, as shown in the following figure. Parcel A is an existing parking structure, and Parcel B is an adjoining surface parking lot proposed to be built into a parking structure to match Parcel A. Parcels C and D, however, are small vacant lots surrounded by residences. They are overgrown with weeds, have been vandalized with graffiti, and are fronted by cracked sidewalks. Current zoning for these lots is RD1.5-1VL and their land use designation is Low Medium II Residential.

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The proposed Project, with the modifications recommended by Department of City Planning Staff, would provide for the stability and enhancement of the multi-family residential neighborhood surrounding Parcels C and D of the Lemon Grove Lot and maintain the nearby residents’ quality of life by keeping the Low Medium II Residential land use designation of these parcels. These parcels would nevertheless be included in the Specific Plan and be subject to the proposed Code Amendment and Zone Change. Redesignation of these lots as General Commercial would create a situation where individual lots designated for high-intensity commercial uses would be surrounded or mostly surrounded by medium-density residential property. Furthermore, Parcel D measures only covers 1,920 square feet of land, making development of any kind very difficult. Keeping these lots within the Specific Plan area maintains unified control under a single document, where uses are limited to those that would create minimal conflicts with the adjacent residential properties and maintenance of the lots is required. Thus compatibility with the surrounding neighborhood is maintained by including these lots within the Specific Plan while excluding them from the General Plan Amendment. Goal 7B: A City with land appropriately and sufficiently designated to sustain a robust commercial and industrial base. Objective 7.2: Establish a balance of land uses that provides for commercial and industrial

development which meets the needs of local residents, sustains economic growth, and assures maximum feasible environmental quality.

Policy 7,2.8: retain the current manufacturing and industrial land use designations, consistent with other Framework Element policies, to provide adequate quantities of land for emerging industrial sectors. Policy 7.2.10: Ensure that the City’s industrial sites are regionally competitive to maintain and enhance a core manufacturing base. Goal 7C: A city with thriving and expanding businesses. Objective 7.3: Maintain and enhance the existing businesses in the City.

Policy 7.3.7: Prioritize the retention and renewal of existing industrial businesses. The Project would be consistent with these Goals, Objectives, and Policies by retaining the Industrial-Limited Manufacturing designation on the Main Lot, allowing the preservation and enhancement of the production facilities of Paramount Studios. Development and construction of the Project will generate more than 7,200 part-time and full­ time jobs for the local economy, of which over 4,400 are directly related to construction of the Project. Operation of the Project at full buildout will generate more than 12,600 jobs locally, of which more than 5,400 would be from on-site operations. In addition to employment on site, Paramount acts as an economic engine for the area, providing business not only for directly entertainment-related services, but also for general businesses like restaurants, retail, catering, logistics, security, etc. Overall, the Project will create nearly 20,000 jobs during construction and operations.

Land Use Element

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The Land Use Element of the General Plan of the City of Los Angeles is composed of 35 Community Plans. The majority of the subject property, north of Melrose Avenue, is located within the Hollywood Community Plan area (effective April 2, 2014), and a small portion of the subject property, located south of Melrose Avenue, is located within the Wilshire Community Plan area (adopted September 19, 2001). Within the Hollywood Community Plan, the Main Lot is designated Industrial-Limited Manufacturing. The Camerford Lot, Waring Lot, and Parcel A of the Gregory Lot are designated Medium Residential. Parcel B of the Gregory Lot is designated Industrial-Commercial Manufacturing. Parcel A of the Lemon Grove Lot is designated Medium Residential while Parcels B, C, and D are designated Low Medium II Residential. Within the Wilshire Community Plan, the Windsor Lot and the majority of the South Bronson Lot are designated Neighborhood Office Commercial, while two lots on the south side of the South Bronson Lot are designated Medium Residential. While the Applicant proposed to change the land use designation of the Ancillary Lots to either General Commercial or Regional Commercial the Department of City Planning has instead proposed General Commercial for all the Ancillary Lots, except for the Lemon Lot Parcels C and D which are proposed to remain at Low Medium II Residential. The land uses, development intensity, design, and certain operational regulations and approval processes would be governed by the proposed Paramount Pictures Specific Plan. A new PPSP (Paramount Pictures Specific Plan) zone is to be created through a Code Amendment and applied to the Project Site through a Zone Change. The Specific Plan would provide for the development of 1,385,700 net new square feet (after interim projects are built) of stage, production office, support, office, and retail buildings on the Project site, as well as 3,970 net new parking spaces. The Specific Plan would provide for regulations regarding height, signage, design, and uses, as well as the establishment of a Historic Resources Preservation Plan. This would allow Paramount Studios to modernize and expand its motion picture and entertainment production facilities under a regulated, unified plan. The Framework Element of the General Plan defines General Commercial areas as “a diversity of retail sales and services, office, and auto-oriented uses comparable to those currently allowed in the ‘C2’ zone (including residential)” and notes that “[tjhey are located outside of districts, centers, and mixed-use boulevards and occur at the intersections of major and secondary streets, or as low rise, low-density linear “strip” development along major and secondary streets.” The Main Lot is where the actual production of motion pictures and other forms of entertainment generally occurs, and the Ancillary Lots contain ancillary support uses, specifically surface parking lots, multi-story parking structures, and, on the Gregory Lot, a childcare center. Thus it is appropriate for the Main Lot to remain within the Industrial-Limited Manufacturing designation, as the Hollywood Community Plan says that industrially designated areas “should be encouraged to be occupied by the types of industry which are indigenous to Hollywood— motion picture and television production, radio studios, sound and recording studios, film processing studios, and motion picture equipment manufacturing and distribution.” The nearest other site designated for Industrial-Limited Manufacturing is the Raleigh Studios, another movie studio located across Melrose Avenue from the Main Lot, in the Wilshire Community Plan area. Within the Hollywood Community Plan, the nearest other parcels designated Industrial-Limited Manufacturing are on the west side of Vine Street, 0.26 mile west of the Main Lot. Two other television production studios, Sunset Gower Studios and Sunset

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Bronson Studios, located 0.5 mile and 0.6 mile, respectively, north of the Main Lot, are also designated Limited Manufacturing in the Hollywood Community Plan. The Hollywood Community Plan defines the Hollywood Center as the focal point of the community, located on both sides of Hollywood and Sunset Boulevards between La Brea Avenue and Gower Street, 0.75 miles from the Project site at its nearest point. The Project site thus fits the definition of General Commercial in terms of location (outside a center), and the parking and retail uses proposed for the Ancillary Lots also fit the role defined for General Commercial properties in the Framework Element. The nearest other properties designated for General Commercial uses are along the south side of Melrose Avenue in the Wilshire Community Plan, approximately 0.2 miles west of the Project site. Within the Hollywood Community Plan, the nearest properties designated for General Commercial uses are on Lillian Way north of Santa Monica Boulevard, approximately 0.4 miles northwest of the Project site. The Lemon Grove Lot is divided into four parcels. Parcel A is an existing parking structure, designated Medium Residential, and Parcel B is an adjoining surface parking lot designated Low Medium II Residential and proposed to be built into a parking structure to match Parcel A. Parcels C and D, however, are small vacant lots surrounded by residences. They are overgrown with weeds, have been vandalized with graffiti, and are fronted by cracked sidewalks. Current land use designation for these lots is Low Medium II Residential. Redesignation of these lots as General Commercial would create a situation where individual lots designated for high-intensity commercial uses would be immediately surrounded by, or mostly surrounded by medium-density residential property. Furthermore, Parcel D measures only covers 1,920 square feet of land, making development of a General Commercial nature very difficult. Keeping these lots within the Specific Plan area, however, would maintain unified control under a single document, keeping uses on these parcels limited to those that would create minimal conflicts with the adjacent residential properties. Keeping long-term land use designation as Low Medium II Residential would maintain compatibility with the surrounding neighborhood and prevent an incongruity between small adjacent parcels, and therefore the Department of City Planning staff recommendation is to exclude Parcels C and D of the Lemon Grove Lot from the General Plan Amendment.

Mobility Plan 2035 Mobility Plan 2035 serves as the Circulation Element of the General Plan. It was adopted by the City Council on January 20, 2016, and provides the policy foundation for achieving a transportation system that incorporates “Complete Streets” principles to balance the needs of all road users.

Policy 4.8: Transportation Demand Management Strategies: Encourage greater utilization of Transportation Demand Management (TDM) strategies to reduce dependence on single­ occupancy vehicles. The proposed Project promotes this policy by including an extensive Transportation Demand Management (TDM) program to reduce vehicle trips by promoting alternatives to individual vehicle travel and the use of public transportation. The TDM program includes implementation of several TDM strategies, which may include, but are not limited to the following: • Flexible work schedules and telecommuting programs; • Bicycle amenities (bicycle racks, lockers, etc.); • Guaranteed Ride Home program;

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Rideshare/carpool/vanpool promotion and support; Transportation Information Center;

Discounted transit passes; Mobility hub support; and Funding for bikeway improvements.

Policy 4.9: Transportation Management Organizations: Partner with the private sector to foster the success of Transportation Management Organizations (TMOs) in the City’s commercial districts. The Project promotes this policy by requiring the Project Applicant to initiate, fund, and market a Hollywood-area Transportation Management Organization (TMO) to promote alternative modes of transportation including walking and bicycling, carpooling and vanpooling, use of public transit, short-term automobile rentals, etc. This TMO would be available to anyone within the Hollywood community, not only employees and guests of the proposed Project, and would be accessible through a website and a mobile application providing users with information access to services. ■

Policy 2.17: Street Widenings: Carefully consider the overall implications (costs, character, safety, travel, infrastructure, environment) of widening a street before requiring the widening, even when the existing right of way does not include a curb and gutter or when the resulting roadway would be less than the standard dimension. The Environmental Impact Report’s analysis indicated that without any Mitigation Measures, Project-related operational traffic would cause significant impacts at 19 signalized intersections under the Future with Project scenario. To mitigate these impacts, however, the Project addressed demand-side approaches that would generate less vehicular traffic or manage it in such a way so as to cause fewer delays at intersections. A Transportation Demand Management program was included as a Project Design Feature, and as Mitigation Measures, the Applicant was required to initiate a Transportation Management Organization for the Hollywood area and also fund improvements to LADOT’s Transportation Systems Management program, including signal controller upgrades, CCTV cameras, and system loops. With the aforementioned Project Design Features and Mitigation Measures, only two modifications of specific intersections were deemed necessary. The first is a restriping of the lanes on northbound Gower Street at Santa Monica Boulevard to convert a shared through/right-turn lane to separate through and right-turn lanes. This would require the conversion of two on-street parking spaces but no other changes to the roadway width. The other modification deemed necessary would be the addition of a right-turn-only lane for westbound traffic on Melrose Avenue turning north onto Gower Street. This would require the dedication of some right-of-way at this corner, which would be feasible after Paramount demolishes the Stage 21 building, which includes the former RKO Radio Pictures logo globe feature built into the parapet of the building. Demolition of this feature was not deemed a significant impact to historic resources in the EIR because the feature was significantly altered in 1967 by the removal of the radio tower and “RKO” call letters, which causes the globe logo to lack integrity as a historic resource. Nevertheless, a number of public commenters expressed concern over the removal of this feature; in response the Applicant added a Project Design Feature to, if feasible, remove the globe and place it on display.

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Thus the Project prioritized other design features and mitigation measures before concluding that two reconfigurations of intersections would be necessary. With mitigation, the number of significantly impacted intersections under the Future with Project scenario has been reduced from 19 to 4.

Housing Element The Housing Element of the General Plan serves as a blueprint for meeting the City’s housing and growth challenges. The Housing Element identifies the City’s housing conditions and needs, reiterates goals, objectives, and policies that are the foundation of the City’s housing and growth strategy, and provides the array of programs the City has committed to implement to create sustainable, mixed-income neighborhoods across the City.

Goal 2: Safe, Livable, and Sustainable Neighborhoods Objective 2.4: Promote livable neighborhoods with a mix of housing types, quality design and a scale and character that respects unique residential neighborhoods in the City.

Policy 2.4,1: Promote preservation of neighborhood character in balance with facilitating new development. The Project promotes the preservation of neighborhood character in balance with facilitating new development by concentrating the most intensive uses on the Main Lot, which is not adjacent to any residential properties, and creating a transition between studio uses and residential uses by redesignating the Ancillary Lots (other than Parcels C and D of the Lemon Grove Lot) as General Commercial, which allows a variety of commercial uses but is intended to be compatible with adjacent residential uses. Furthermore, Parcels C and D of the Lemon Grove Lot would retain their Low Medium II Residential land use designations to ensure future compatibility with the character of the surrounding residential neighborhood.

1. The proposed General Plan Amendment complies with Los Angeles City Charter Section 558 in that it is in substantial conformance with public necessity, convenience, general welfare and good zoning practice. The proposed General Plan Amendment is in substantial conformance with public necessity, convenience, general welfare and good zoning practice, as described below. Public Necessity, Convenience and General Welfare A key purpose of the Project is to encourage job growth and economic opportunities that support and enhance entertainment industry and related uses on the Project Site, and to balance support Hollywood’s core industry with the needs of the community and a respect for the historic nature of the Project site. The Project would create job opportunities during construction, and would make possible the creation of a wide range of permanent jobs serving the movie, television, and entertainment industry. Specifically, development and construction of the Project will generate more than 7,200 part-time and full-time jobs for the local economy, of which over 4,400 are directly related to construction of the Project. Operation of the Project at full buildout will generate more than 12,600 jobs locally, of which more than 5,400 would be from on-site operations. In addition to employment on site, Paramount acts as an economic engine for the area, providing business not only for directly entertainment-related services, but

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also for general businesses like restaurants, retail, catering, logistics, security, etc. Overall, the Project will create nearly 20,000 jobs during construction and operations. The Project would allow modernization of the Project Site and development of state-of-the-art sound stages, production offices, and post-production areas, enabling the site to meet anticipated future needs and demands of the entertainment industry. The Project would also facilitate improvements to circulation in and around the Project Site while allowing development of sufficient and' conveniently located parking. The Project will help ensure development designed to be compatible with the surrounding residential neighborhoods and commercial corridors. The Project is necessary because the current land use designations and restrictions would not permit the development and uses envisioned in the Master Plan. The Project would allow development of various types of office uses and would facilitate the development of much needed production-related facilities, production office, studio support uses, and parking that would strengthen the existing media and entertainment center on the Project Site. Accordingly, the Project will facilitate the expansion of the media and entertainment industries on the Project site by permitting the proposed development. The Project would contribute to the public necessity, convenience and general welfare by permitting the continued operation and expansion of the Project Site for media and entertainment purposes, thereby strengthening one of the City’s core industries. Good Zoning Practice The Project is necessary to encourage retention of existing media and entertainment uses, and to accommodate additional new stage, production office, production support, office, and retail uses within the existing Project Site. The Project is also necessary to establish the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan and PPSP (Paramount Pictures Specific Plan) zone, which will contain development standards and design guidelines for the proposed development. Approval of the proposed Paramount Pictures Specific Plan would more closely align the Project Site with its existing function as a major film and television production facility and allow for more cohesive development between the Main Lot and Ancillary Lots. Accordingly, the Project is consistent with good zoning practice. The Project is appropriate and proper because it will encourage the development of new facilities, including office and retail uses, within underdeveloped portions of the existing Project Site. The Project will allow expanded use of the Project Site, which will include improved access to public transportation and major traffic arteries, permitting mobility in and around the area. The Project would allow the development described above, consistent with good zoning practice. The General Plan Amendment is consistent with the requirements for a General Plan Amendment set forth in Section 555(a) of the Los Angeles City Charter and Section 11.5.6 of the Los Angeles Municipal Code in that the area involved has “significant social, economic or physical identity.” The Project Site comprises the Main Lot and Ancillary Lots, which together form the Paramount Pictures campus and support Paramount Studios, the largest working film and television studio still located in Hollywood, and a geographic area with significant social, economic, and physical identity. The majority of the Project Site has been used for motion picture and television production for nearly 100 years, and Paramount Studios is an integral and historic entity in the entertainment industry. Under the regulations of the proposed Paramount Pictures Specific Plan, which would govern the existing studio/campus, the proposed Project would rehabilitate and preserve historic resources, introduce modernized facilities, and enhance

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landscaping and pedestrian gathering spaces on the Project Site, which has played a foundational role in Hollywood’s entertainment industry. As the Project is consistent with the City’s goals and policies as set forth in the General Plan and its Elements as described above, the Project is consistent with good zoning practice. Accordingly, the request complies with Los Angeles City Charter Section 558 in that it is in substantial compliance with public necessity, convenience, general welfare, and good zoning practice. ZONE CHANGE FINDINGS

1.

The proposed Zone Change complies with Los Angeles City Charter Section 556 and LAMC Section 12.32.C.7 in that it is in substantial conformance with the purposes, intent, and provisions of the General Plan and all of its elements.

Pursuant to LAMC Section 12.36.D, when acting on multiple applications for a project, when appropriate, findings may be made by reference to findings made for another application involving the same project. This finding is substantially identical to the finding found earlier in this document as Finding No. 2 in the General Plan Amendment Findings in Accordance with Section 556 of the Los Angeles City Charter and is hereby incorporated by reference. 2.

The proposed Zone Change complies with Los Angeles City Charter Section 558 and LAMC Section 12.32.C.7 in that it is in substantial conformance with public necessity, convenience, general welfare and good zoning practice.

Pursuant to LAMC Section 12.36.D, when acting on multiple applications for a project, when appropriate, findings may be made by reference to findings made for another application involving the same project. This finding is substantially identical to the finding found earlier in this document as Finding No. 3 in the General Plan Amendment Findings in Accordance with Section 558 of the Los Angeles City Charter and is hereby incorporated by reference.

SPECIFIC PLAN FINDINGS FINDINGS

1.

The proposed Specific Plan complies with Los Angeles City Charter Section 555 in that it complies with the procedures pertaining to the preparation, consideration, adoption and amendment of the General Plan, or any of its elements or parts, as prescribed by ordinance and subject to the requirements of Section 555.

Pursuant to LAMC Section 12.36.D, when acting on multiple applications for a project, when appropriate, findings may be made by reference to findings made for another application involving the same project. This finding is substantially identical to the finding found earlier in this document as Finding No. 1 in the General Plan Amendment Findings in Accordance with Section 555 of the Los Angeles City Charter and is hereby incorporated by reference. Pursuant to Los Angeles Municipal Code (“LAMC”) Section 12.32.C.7, a Specific Plan shall be approved only after making findings that the action is consistent with the General Plan and is in conformity with public necessity, convenience, general welfare and good zoning practice.

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The proposed Specific Plan complies with Los Angeles City Charter Section 556 and LAMC Section 12.32.C.7 in that it is in substantial conformance with the

purposes, intent, and provisions of the General Plan and all of its elements. Pursuant to LAMC Section 12.36.D, when acting on multiple applications for a project, when appropriate, findings may be made by reference to findings made for another application involving the same project. This finding is substantially identical to the finding found earlier in this document as Finding No. 2 in the General Plan Amendment Findings in Accordance with Section 556 of the Los Angeles City Charter and is hereby incorporated by reference. 3.

The proposed Specific Plan complies with Los Angeles City Charter Section 558 and LAMC Section 12.32.C.7 in that it is in substantial conformance with public necessity, convenience, general welfare and good zoning practice.

Pursuant to LAMC Section 12.36.D, when acting on multiple applications for a project, when appropriate, findings may be made by reference to findings made for another application involving the same project. This finding is substantially identical to the finding found earlier in this document as Finding No. 3 in the General Plan Amendment Findings in Accordance with Section 558 of the Los Angeles City Charter and is hereby incorporated by reference.

CODE AMENDMENT FINDINGS

Pursuant to Los Angeles Municipal Code (“LAMC”) Section 12.32.C.7, a Code Amendment related to land use shall be approved only after making findings that the action is consistent with the General Plan and is in conformity with public necessity, convenience, general welfare and good zoning practice.

1.

The proposed Code Amendment complies with Los Angeles City Charter Section 556 and LAMC Section 12.32.C.7 in that it is in substantial conformance with the purposes, intent, and provisions of the General Plan and all of its elements.

Pursuant to LAMC Section 12.36.D, when acting on multiple applications for a project, when appropriate, findings may be made by reference to findings made for another application involving the same project. This finding is substantially identical to the finding found earlier in this document as Finding No. 2 in the General Plan Amendment Findings in Accordance with Section 556 of the Los Angeles City Charter and is hereby incorporated by reference. 2. The proposed Code Amendment complies with Los Angeles City Charter Section

558 and LAMC Section 12.32.C.7 in that it is in substantial conformance with public necessity, convenience, general welfare and good zoning practice. Pursuant to LAMC Section 12.36.D, when acting on multiple applications for a project, when appropriate, findings may be made by reference to findings made for another application involving the same project. This finding is substantially identical to the finding found earlier in this document as Finding No. 3 in the General Plan Amendment Findings in Accordance with Section 558 of the Los Angeles City Charter and is hereby incorporated by reference.

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Delegation of City Planning Commission Authority In accordance with Charter Sections Charter 559, and in order to insure the timely processing of this ordinance, the City Planning Commission authorizes the Director of Planning to approve or disapprove for the Commission any modification to the subject ordinance as deemed necessary by the Department of Building and Safety and/or the City Attorney's Office. In exercising that authority, the Director must make the same findings as would have been required for the City Planning Commission to act on the same matter. The Director’s action under this authority shall be subject to the same time limits and shall have the same effect as if the City Planning Commission had acted directly.

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CEQA FINDINGS OF FACT

f.

INTRODUCTION

Paramount Pictures Corporation, the “Applicant,” proposes the Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project which sets forth the framework to guide the development of the approximately 62-acre Paramount Studios site located within the Hollywood Community of the City of Los Angeles (the “Project Site").1 The Project Site is comprised of the main studio property of approximately 56 acres (the “Main Lot”) and six surrounding properties of approximately 6 acres (the “Ancillary Lots”). The Main Lot is generally bounded by Van Ness Avenue to the east, Melrose Avenue to the south, Gower Street to the west, and a cemetery to the north. The Ancillary Lots and their locations are as follows: the “Gregory Lot” located on the west side of Gower Street at Gregory Avenue; the “Waring Lot" located on the west side of Gower Street at Waring Avenue; the “Camerford Lot" located on the west side of Gower Street at Camerford Avenue; the “Windsor Lot” located on the south side of Melrose Avenue at Windsor Boulevard; the “South Bronson Lot” located on the south side of Melrose Avenue at Bronson Avenue; and the “Lemon Grove Lot” located on the east side of Van Ness Avenue, north of Lemon Grove Avenue. The Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project (the “proposed Project”) involves the redevelopment of portions of the Project Site with new studio-related uses, circulation improvements, parking facilities, and pedestrian-oriented landscaped areas. These improvements would be implemented through the proposed Paramount Pictures Specific Plan (the “proposed Specific Plan”), which would guide development within the Project Site through the year 2038. The proposed Specific Plan would allow for the construction of up to approximately 1,922,300 square feet of new stage, production office, support, office, and retail uses, and the removal of up to approximately 536,600 square feet of existing stage, production office, support, office, and retail uses, for a net increase of up to approximately 1,385,700 square feet of floor area within the Project Site upon completion of the proposed Project.

ENVIRONMENTAL DOCUMENTATION BACKGROUND The project proposal was reviewed by the Los Angeles Department of City Planning (serving as lead agency) in accordance with the requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act (“CEQA”) (Public Resources Code § 21000 et seq.: 14 Cal. Code Regs. § 15000 et seq.). An initial study was prepared for the project in October 2011 and is attached to the Draft EIR in Appendix A. In compliance with CEQA Section 21080.4, a Notice of Preparation (“NOP”) was prepared by the City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning and distributed to the State Clearinghouse, Office of Planning and Research, responsible agencies and other interested parties. The NOP identified specific areas where the proposed project could have adverse environmental effects and determined that an EIR would need to be prepared to document these effects. The Department of City Planning issued the NOP on October 13, 2011, A public scoping meeting was held on October 27, 2011, at the First Presbyterian Church of Hollywood, 6054 Yucca Street, Hollywood, California, 90028, to receive community input on the proposed project and the scope of the EIR. Comments from identified responsible and trustee agencies, as well as interested parties on the scope of the Draft EIR, were solicited through the NOP process. Refer to Appendix A of the Draft EIR for a copy of the NOP and written comments submitted to the Department of City Planning in response to the NOP and scoping meeting. 1 The majority of the Project Site is located within the Hollywood Community Plan Area, while the Ancillary Lots south of Melrose Avenue are located within the Wilshire Community Plan Area.

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The Draft EIR was submitted to the State Clearinghouse, Office of Planning and Research, and was circulated for public review and comment for a 45-day review period commencing on September 10, 2015 and ending October 26, 2015. Pursuant to Section 15088 of the CEQA Guidelines, the City of Los Angeles, as lead agency, reviewed all comments received during the review period for the Draft EIR and responded to each comment in Section III of the Final EIR. The Department of City Planning prepared a Final EIR for the project, which was completed on April 14, 2016, and is hereby incorporated by reference in full. The Final EIR was made available for review on the City’s website [http://planning.lacity.org/eir/Paramount/FEIR/index.html]. The Final EIR was also made available at libraries and the Department of City Planning. The Final EIR is intended to serve as an informational document for public agency decision-makers and the general public regarding the objectives and components of the proposed Project. The Final EIR addresses the environmental effects associated with implementation of the proposed Project, identifies feasible mitigation measures and alternatives that may be adopted to reduce or eliminate these impacts, and includes written responses to all comments received on the Draft EIR. Responses were sent to all public agencies that made comments on the Draft EIR at least 10 days prior to certification of the Final EIR pursuant to CEQA Guidelines Section 15088(b). Notices regarding availability of the Final EIR were sent to those within a 500-foot radius of the Project Site as well as individuals who attended the scoping meeting and provided comments during the NOP and Draft EIR comment periods.

A.

RECORD OF PROCEEDINGS

The City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning Deputy Advisory Agency and Rearing Officer conducted a duly noticed concurrent public hearing on May 16, 2016 to receive public testimony on the proposed entitlements and environmental documents. The Deputy Advisory Agency issued its letter of determination on June 7, 2016, approving Tentative Tract 71751 for the merger and phased resubdivision of the Main Lot and one Ancillary Lot to ten ground lots (8 lots on the Main Lot and 2 lots on the Ancillary Lot), certifying the EIR and adopting the Mitigation Monitoring Program (MMP), these Findings, and a Statement of Overriding Considerations. The Advisory Agency's determination was subsequently appealed on June 17, 2Q16.and4s-sehedt4ed-befofe-On July 14, 2016. the City Planning Commission denied the appeal in part and granted in part to allow technical corrections to Tentative Tract No. 71751.The City Planning Commission further recommended approval of the for recommendation on-the remaining entitlements, including a General Plan Amendment, Zone Change, Specific Plan including sign regulations and a historic preservation plan sion-distfiet. and Code amendment, certification of the EIR and Errata, adoption of the Mitigation Monitoring Program (MMP), including project design features and mitigation measures, these Findings, and a Statement of Overriding Considerations^-on-July 14, 2-646. The recommendation of the City Planning Commission will be subsequently presented to the City Council for action. The documents and other materials that constitute the record of proceedings on which the City of Los Angeles’ CEQA findings are based are located at the Department of City Planning, 6262 Van Nuys Boulevard, Room 351, Van Nuys, California 91401. This information is provided in compliance with CEQA Section 21081.6(a)(2).

III.

FINDINGS REQUIRED TO BE MADE BY LEAD AGENCY UNDER CEQA

Section 21081 of the California Public Resources Code and Section 15091 of the CEQA Guidelines require a public agency, prior to approving a project, to identify significant impacts of the project and make one or more of three possible findings for each of the significant impacts. The possible findings are:

F-3 “Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the project which avoid or substantially lessen the significant environmental effect as identified in the final EIR.” (State CEQA Guidelines, § 15091, subd, (a)(1)) “Such changes or alterations are within the responsibility and jurisdiction of another public agency and not the agency making the finding. Such changes have been adopted by such other agency or can and should be adopted by such other agency. (State CEGA Guidelines, § 15091, subd. (a)(2)) “Specific economic, legal, social, technological, or other considerations, including provision of employment opportunities for highly trained workers, make infeasible the mitigation measures or project alternatives identified in the final EIR.” (State CEGA Guidelines, § 15091, subd. (a)(3)) The findings reported in the following pages incorporate the facts and discussions of the environmental impacts that are found to be significant in the Final EIR for the proposed Project as fully set forth therein. Although Section 15091 of the CEGA Guidelines does not require findings to address environmental impacts that an EIR identifies as merely “potentially significant,” these findings nevertheless fully account for all such effects identified in the Final EIR. For each of the significant impacts associated with the proposed Project, either before or after mitigation, the following sections are provided: a) Description of Significant Effects - A specific description of the environmental effects identified in the EIR, including a judgment regarding the significance of the impact. b)

Project Design Features - Identified project design features or actions that are included as part of the proposed Project and set forth in the Mitigation Monitoring Program.

c)

Mitigation Measures - Identified mitigation measures or actions that are required as part of the proposed Project and set forth in the Mitigation Monitoring Program.

d) Finding - One or more of three specific findings in direct response to CEGA Section 21081 and CEGA Guidelines Section 15091. e)

Rationale for Finding - A summary of the reasons for the finding(s).

IV.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSED PROJECT

A.

PROJECT DESCRIPTION The proposed Project consists of a Tract Map, General Plan Amendment, Zone Change, and

adoption of the proposed Specific Plan (including a Historic Resources Preservation Plan) to guide development within the Project Site through the year 2038, as well as a related Code Amendment; a Sign Supplemental Use District; Development Agreement; demolition, grading, excavation, and building permits; and any additional actions as may be deemed necessary or desirable. Under the proposed Specific Plan, portions of the Project Site would be redeveloped with new studio-related uses, circulation improvements, parking facilities, and pedestrian-oriented landscaped areas.

F-4 The proposed Specific Plan would establish development guidelines and standards that would be used to regulate basic planning and development concepts for future development within the Project Site. These development guidelines and standards would provide a measure against which specific future development proposals can be evaluated. As such, the proposed Specific Plan would create a regulatory framework that accounts for the unique needs of the Project Site and the surrounding community and allows flexibility for adapting to future changes that could occur in the entertainment industry. The primary development regulations set forth in the proposed Specific Plan would address land use, historic preservation, design, alcohol sales, child care facilities, and parking, as well as associated implementation procedures. The proposed Specific Plan would allow for the construction of up to approximately 1,922,300 square feet of new stage, production office, support, office, and retail uses. With the proposed removal of approximately 536,600 square feet of stage, production office, support, office, and retail uses, this would result in a net increase of approximately 1,385,700 square feet of floor area within the Project Site upon completion of the proposed Project, with adjustments permitted, subject to the Land Use Exchange provisions of the proposed Specific Plan. The Conceptual Site Plan is an illustration of how development within the Project Site may occur in conformance with the proposed Specific Plan. It should be noted, however, that actual development would be governed by the requirements of the proposed Specific Plan and not the Conceptual Site Plan. That is, the Conceptual Site Plan represents just one possible development scenario. As part of ongoing operations at the Project Site, additions and changes to the Project Site occur on a continuous basis, including interior and exterior improvements. During the review process for the proposed Project, it is anticipated that approximately 50,000 square feet of new floor area consisting of new office, stage, production office, and/or support uses would be constructed as part of ongoing business activities. These additional facilities are referred to as “interim projects” and were considered in the Project Impacts section for each of the environmental issue analyses in the EIR.

B.

PROJECT OBJECTIVES

The proposed Project’s specific objectives are as follows: 1.

Substantially enhance the role of the Project Site in the movie, television, and entertainment industry, and in so doing, contribute to the preservation of Hollywood as the international focus for the movie, television and entertainment industry;

2.

Modernize and upgrade the facilities at the Project Site to meet the increased competition for movie, television, and entertainment production and post­ production facilities from other worldwide locations, including competition from other studios in the Los Angeles region;

3.

Provide new state-of-the-art and technologically advanced soundstages, production offices, and post-production areas within the Project Site to meet the anticipated future demand of the movie, television, and entertainment industry and allow flexibility to incorporate future technology advances;

4.

Establish a clear and consistent set of guidelines to provide a level of certainty for future development of the Project Site to meet the anticipated future demand of the movie, television, and entertainment industry and to remain competitive;

F-5

5,

Maximize opportunities for the local and regional economy by creating construction jobs and a wide range of jobs serving the movie, television and entertainment industry;

6

Improve the identity of the Project Site as a movie, television and entertainment industry area and enhance the visual appearance of the Project Site by providing architecturally distinct development and a creative signage program reflective of the movie, television and entertainment uses while preserving the historic character of the Project Site;

7.

Provide a campus environment and incorporate and integrate a mix of uses that maximizes synergies and efficiencies between people, uses and buildings

.

within the Project Site;

8

Establish clear guidelines for the preservation of the historic character of the Project Site while allowing for the development of state-of-the-art facilities for the movie, television and entertainment industry;

9.

Provide producers, writers, actors, and other creative personnel, and related administrative personnel, with offices, work spaces, and general offices to meet the demand for the movie, television, and entertainment industry and to remain competitive with other production facilities in the region and worldwide;

10.

Provide new production support facilities for storage and on-lot distribution of lighting, props, and other equipment/and expand employee amenities and increase gathering spaces for employees to meet increased demand for facilities;

11.

Provide for increased production “base camps” directly adjacent to production offices and filming facilities and areas on the Project Site to allow for the flexible and efficient staging of trucks and trailers needed for talent, lighting, grip, costume, and other production services; and

12.

Provide new parking on the Project Site that is sufficient and conveniently located, and enhance and improve internal circulation throughout the Project Site, including truck circulation within the Main Lot, to enhance efficiency and safety.

.

V.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS FOUND IN THE INITIAL STUDY NOT TO BE SIGNIFICANT

The City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning prepared an Initial Study dated October 13, 2011, which determined that the proposed Project would not have the potential to cause significant impacts in the following areas: agricultural and forest resources; biological resources; and mineral resources. Therefore, these issue areas were not examined in detail in the EIR. The rationale for the conclusion that no significant impact would occur in each of these issue areas is summarized below, and based on that rationale, and other evidence in the administrative record relating to the proposed Project, the City finds and determines that the following environmental impact categories will not result in any significant impacts and that no mitigation measures are needed.

A.

Agricultural and Forest Resources

F-6 The Project Site is not located on designated Prime Farmland, Unique Farmland, or Farmland of Statewide Importance, as shown on the maps prepared pursuant to the Farmland Mapping and Monitoring Program. No agricultural or other related activities currently occur on the Project Site or within the Project vicinity. In addition, no agricultural zoning, forest land or timberland zoning is present in the surrounding area, and no nearby lands are enrolled under the Williamson Act. As such, no impacts to agricultural and forest resources would occur and no mitigation measures are required. B.

Biological Resources

The Project Site is located in a highly urbanized area and is currently developed with buildings, surface parking areas, and limited landscaping. Given the urbanized nature of the Project area and the fact that the Project Site has already been disturbed, the likelihood of the presence of any endangered and/or threatened species is remote. Furthermore, no candidate, sensitive, or special statues species in local or regional plans, policies, or regulations by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) or U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) are known to be present or have been identified on-site. No riparian habitat or sensitive natural communities are located on-site, nor have they been identified in City or regional plans, policies, or regulations of the CDFW or USFWS as being within the Project Site. In addition, there are no federally protected waters or wetlands, as defined by Section 404 of the Clean Water Act, that exist on or in the vicinity of the Project Site. There are also no native resident, migratory fish, or wildlife species or established native resident or migratory wildlife corridors on-site or within the Project vicinity, nor would the Project impede any use of native wildlife nursery sites. Only wildlife commonly found in developed, urban areas are expected to be found within the Project Site. Finally, the Project Site is not located within an adopted Habitat Conservation Plan, Natural Community Conservation Plan, or other approved local, regional, or state habitat conservation plan. The Project Site includes approximately 800 trees, some of which may be removed for implementation of the Project, in addition to approximately 400 ficus trees maintained as a screen along the eastern and southern perimeter of the Main Lot in association with the security fencing. However, there are no protected trees as defined by the City of Los Angeles Protected Tree Ordinance (Ordinance No. 177404) located on the Project Site. The Project Site is not subject to any other local policies or ordinances protecting biological resources. Thus, the Project would not conflict with any local policies or ordinances protecting biological resources, such as a tree preservation policy or ordinance. Based on the above, no impacts to biological resources would occur, and no mitigation measures are required.

C.

Mineral Resources

No mineral extraction operations currently occur on the Project Site. The Project Site is located within a highly urbanized area of the City of Los Angeles and has been previously disturbed by development. As such, the potential for mineral resources to occur on-site is low. Furthermore, the Project Site is not located within a City-designated Mineral Resource Zone where significant mineral deposits are known to be present, or within a mineral producing area as classified by the California Geologic Survey. The Project Site is not located within a City-designated oil field or oil drilling area. Therefore, the Project would not result in the loss of availability of a mineral resource or a mineral resource recovery site. No impacts to mineral resources would occur and no mitigation measures are required.

F-7 Vi.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS POUND NOT TO BE SIGNIFICANT PRIOR TO MITIGATION

The Los Angeles Department of City Planning prepared an Initial Study for the Project in which it required analysis of the following environmental impact areas in an EIR: Aesthetics (including views, light/glare, and shading); Air Quality (including greenhouse gas emissions); Cultural Resources (including historic resources, and archaeological and paleontological resources); Geology and Soils; Hazards and Hazardous Materials; Hydrology and Surface Water Quality (including groundwater); Land Use and Planning; Noise; Employment, Housing and Population; Public Services (including police protection, fire protection, schools, parks and recreation, and libraries); Traffic, Access, and Parking; and Utilities and Service Systems (including water supply, wastewater, solid waste, and energy). The following impact areas were determined to be less than significant prior to mitigation, and based on that analysis and other evidence in the administrative record relating to the Project, the City finds and determines that the following environmental impact categories will not result in any significant impacts and that no mitigation measures are needed:

A.

Aesthetics/Visual Quality and Views 1.

AestheticsA/isual Quality

§1

Construction

Overall, while Project construction activities would affect the visual character of the area on a short-term basis, they would not substantially alter or degrade the existing visual character of the Project Site or introduce permanent elements that would substantially detract from the visual character of the surrounding area for the following reasons: (1) views of construction activities would be limited in duration and location; (2) the site appearance would be typical of construction sites in urban areas; (3) construction would occur within an urban setting with a high level of human activity and development; and (4) impacts would be reduced through standard best management practices implemented during the construction period, including the use of construction fencing to screen much of the construction activity from view at street level. Therefore, visual quality impacts associated with construction would be less than significant.

b)

Operations

Implementation of the proposed Project would result in the removal of some existing buildings, structures, paving, and landscaping and would involve the development of new buildings, structures, paving, and landscaping consistent with the proposed Specific Plan, including the Historic Resources Preservation Plan. The proposed Project would create an integrated site with a mix of entertainmentrelated uses, similar to and building upon those that currently exist on-site as well as in the surrounding area. Buildout of the proposed Project would increase the height, density, and mass of on-site structures as compared to existing conditions, but would incorporate variations in building planes to reduce the effect of massing and provide a pedestrian scale adjacent to the public streets. The areas surrounding the Project Site include clusters of industrial development housing entertainment-related uses, such as pre- and post-production facilities, similar to those located on­ site, and other commercial uses. The broader Hollywood area encompasses a variety of neighborhoods, including intensely developed commercial areas, mixed-use centers with high tourist traffic and active nightlife, a theater district, and areas with high-rise development, all of which are

F-8 interspersed with single-family and multi-family residential neighborhoods, in particular, commercial and residential towers punctuate the skyline along many streets in Hollywood, such as Rossmore Avenue to the southwest of the Project Site and Sunset Boulevard, Hollywood Boulevard, and Vine Street to the north. Overall, the proposed Project building heights would be similar to and/or compatible with those both on-site and in the surrounding area. The majority of the building heights across the Project Site would be substantially similar to other buildings in the Project vicinity, such as the four-story Raleigh Studios, and other existing mid-rise structures that would remain on-site. The proposed Project would also increase the density of development on the Project Site. The Project Site currently exhibits some contrast with the surrounding area in terms of building heights and density. Existing buildings, security walls, and gates currently extend along the Main Lot’s property lines. The increase in density that would occur under the proposed Project, particularly along the Melrose Avenue frontage, would not be out of character for the Project Site or its relationship to the surrounding area. Overall, the proposed Project’s density would be compatible with the existing developed nature of the Project Site and surrounding area. Much of the new construction within the Main Lot would be concentrated in the southern half of the Main Lot, increasing the intensity of development along the Melrose Avenue frontage. New buildings in a variety of building heights would replace surface parking lots, creating visual interest and strengthening the Studio’s identity along this major arterial street. Overall, the proposed development along Melrose Avenue would be compatible with the surrounding environment, where Melrose Avenue serves as a major commercial arterial and where the Main Lot’s Melrose frontage serves as the primary visual and physical gateway to the Project Site. At the Ancillary Lots, the proposed Project would infill what are primarily surface parking lots with uses that are compatible with the character of the area. Overall, the development proposed on the Ancillary Lots would be compatible with surrounding development in terms of building height, density, and overall design and would provide a more consistent commercial streetscape along Melrose Avenue. Under the proposed Project, it is anticipated that the primary building materials would continue to include stone, stucco, and glass, thus tying into the existing building context, campus color, and material palette. Further, implementation of the Historic Resources Preservation Plan would promote architectural compatibility between new construction and existing development on the Main Lot. Although precise building designs have not been prepared yet, through compliance with the Preservation Plan, new development would reference the architectural features of the existing buildings in order to further promote the visual identity of the Project Site. Landscape improvements would also be used as unifying visual elements. Additionally, visual screening would be implemented for uses such as loading docks, trash/recycling areas, rooftop equipment, and outdoor storage areas visible from public pedestrian locations within 500 feet of the perimeter of the Project Site so as not to detract from the visual character of the Project Site. Project signage would be coordinated and regulated by the proposed signage regulations. Similar to existing conditions, additional signage would be located within the site interior, the majority of which would not be visible from off-site. Where signage would be visible from off-site areas, consideration is given to the placement of specific types of signs within the context of the surrounding environment. The illumination of signs, including digital display signage, projected images, scrolling digital displays, and supergraphics, would be regulated to limit brightness. Accordingly, no substantial impact related to visual contrast would occur as a result of Project signage.

F-9 Project outdoor security and architectural lighting would provide security arid aesthetic enhancements while also being sensitive to nearby properties. Limitations on illumination levels would preclude overly bright lighting that could disrupt the visual quality of the Project area. Project lighting would comply with Los Angeles Municipal Code (LAMC) requirements as well as relevant City regulations with respect to new lighting within the public right-of-way. Some contributors to the potential historic districts within the Main Lot that are visible from limited areas off-site may be removed as part of the proposed Project. However, compliance with the Preservation Plan, along with Mitigation Measures C-1 through C-6 set forth in the MMP (which are specific to historic impacts), would ensure that Project development activities, including demolition, construction, rehabilitation, and preservation activities, do not diminish the historic integrity of the potential historic districts on the Project Site. Overall, the visual character of the Main Lot as viewed from off-site would continue to be predominantly defined by the perimeter wall formed by buildings on Gower Street and a portion of Melrose Avenue, with related entertainment signage at the corner; the KCAL Building; a fence covered by a thick hedge and landscaping along portions of Melrose Avenue; the arched entry gate at the Melrose Gate; and the landscaping and security wall along Van Ness Avenue that permits intermittent views of contributor buildings within the eastern portion of the Main Lot. Therefore, the proposed Project would not result in the removal or alteration of a substantial amount or proportion of existing features that contribute to the valued visual character or image of the Project Site. Moreover, the proposed Project would not cause any of the following: substantial degradation of the existing visual character or quality of the Project Site or the surrounding vicinity; removal or development of a substantial amount of existing open space; a substantial degree of contrast between proposed features and existing features that represent the Project Site’s aesthetic image; or the development of buildings that detract from the existing style or image of the Project Site or surrounding area due to density, height, bulk, setbacks, signage, or other physical elements. As such, the proposed Project would not substantially alter, degrade, or eliminate the existing visual character of the Project Site or surrounding area, including valued existing features or resources, or introduce elements that substantially detract from the visual character. Impacts related to aesthetics/visual quality would be less than significant. Further, it is noted that in 2013, the State of California enacted Senate Bill 743 (SB 743). Among other things, SB 743 adds Public Resources Code Section 21099, which provides that “aesthetic and parking impacts of a residential, mixed-use residential, or employment center project on an infill site within a transit priority area shall not be considered significant impacts on the environment.” Public Resources Code Section 21099 defines a “transit priority area” as an area within 0.5 mile of an existing or planned major transit stop, which Public Resources Code Section 21064.3 defines as “a site containing an existing rail transit station, a ferry terminal served by either a bus or rail transit service, or the intersection of two or more major bus routes with a frequency of service interval of 15 minutes or less during the morning and afternoon peak commute periods.” Pursuant to SB 743 and Public Resources Code 21099, an employment center project is a project located on property zoned for commercial uses with a floor area ratio of no less than 0.75 and that is located within a transit priority area. Public Resources Code Section 21099 defines an infill site as a lot located within an urban area that has been previously developed, or on a vacant site where at least 75 percent of the perimeter of the site adjoins, or is separated only by an improved public right-of-way from, parcels that are developed with qualified urban uses. The Project proposes a zone change to Specific

F-10

Plan that would include commercial uses, and the total Project development would result in a Project Site-wide FAR of approximately 1.2:1. The Project Site is an infill site within an area identified by the City as a transit priority area as defined in Public Resources Code Section 21099. As such, under SB 743, the Project’s aesthetic and parking impacts would not be considered significant impacts on the environment pursuant to Public Resources Code Section 21099. Nonetheless, the environmental analysis considered the potential impacts of the Project on aesthetics and parking.

2

.

Views

None of the roadways within the immediate Project vicinity are designated as scenic highways. Valued visual resources identified on-site include: the water tower and the original Bronson Gate; the Melrose Gate; the perimeter wall formed by office buildings and sound stages fronting Gower Street and Melrose Avenue, which are considered historic contributors; the KCAL Building; limited portions of other contributors to the potential Paramount Pictures Historic District visible from off-site (e.g., the Bluhdorn Building and the Set Lighting and Grip Building); and the northern fagades of some of the industrial buildings and sound stages along the northern property boundary. Valued visual resources in the surrounding area that are visible from the Project Site vicinity include the Hollywood Hills and the Hollywood Sign. Most views of and across the Project Site would experience little if any change as a result of Project implementation. The majority of the Project Site is not visible from vantage points greater than one to two blocks away from the Project Site. While Project development would be visible from off­ site locations within one or two blocks of the Project Site, view impacts would typically occur at limited vantage points, as opposed to along extensive roadway segments or from entire large geographic areas. Similarly, while individual on-site visual resources may be obstructed, the proposed Project would not result in the obstruction of a substantial amount or proportion of existing features that contribute to the valued view of the Project Site. Moreover, Project development may open up new opportunities for views of existing valued visual resources and would enhance certain views, such as views of the Bronson Gate from the Main Lot entrance at Melrose Avenue and Bronson Avenue. In addition, the proposed Project would not affect views from a designated scenic highway, corridor, or parkway. It is also specifically noted that based on the proposed Project’s characteristics, particularly building heights, and an evaluation of simulated composite photographs showing existing and future conditions based on the Conceptual Site Plan at representative locations, as viewed from a range of distances and variety of directions relative to the Project Site, Project development would not affect views of the Hollywood Hills or the Hollywood Sign to the north on an overall basis. As such, on an overall basis, the proposed Project would not obstruct an existing valued view, and view impacts would be less than significant. In addition, as discussed above, it is noted that the Project’s aesthetic impacts, including views, would not be considered significant impacts on the environment pursuant to Public Resources Code Section 21099.

3.

Project Design Features

The proposed Specific Plan included in Appendix B of the Draft EIR includes regulations related to screening and rooftop parking lighting and screening that would reduce impacts related to aesthetics/visual quality and views (see Section 5 of the Specific Plan):

F-11

Screening, New buildings that have rooftop equipment or outdoor storage that is visible from public pedestrian locations within 500 feet of the perimeter of the Project Site shall screen such rooftop equipment and outdoor storage areas to minimize its view from public pedestrian locations. Screening devices may include vegetated walls, fences, trellises, graphic treatments, other structures, or other measures approved by the Director of Planning. Rooftop Parking Lighting. New parking structures that have rooftop parking shall shield the tight sources on the rooftop level so as to direct the lighting on-site. Rooftop Parking Screening, The rooftop parking level of new parking structures shall include a parapet wall of at least 3,5 feet. Further, the following additional project design features are included in the MMP with regard to aesthetics/visual quality and views: Project Design Feature A.1-1: Where Project construction is visible from pedestrian locations adjacent to the Project Site and perimeter walls or fencing do not already exist, temporary construction fencing shall be placed along the periphery of the development sites to screen construction activity from view at the street level from off-site. Project Design Feature A.1-2: The Applicant shall ensure through appropriate postings and daily visual inspections that no unauthorized materials are posted on any temporary construction barriers or temporary pedestrian walkways that are accessible/visible to the public, and that such temporary barriers and walkways are maintained in a visually attractive manner throughout the construction period. Project Design Feature A.1-3: New on-site utilities that may be required to serve the proposed Project shall be installed underground. 4.

Cumulative Impacts a)

AestheticsA/isual Quality

Few of the related projects are located sufficiently close to the Project Site to enter the same field of view as the proposed Project. Regardless, future developments generally would be subject to applicable LAMC requirements, such as height limits and density and setback requirements, and many would be subject to review by the City to ensure consistency with adopted guidelines and standards that relate to aesthetics and visual quality. Therefore, it is not anticipated that future development inclusive of the proposed Project, interim projects, and related development would substantially alter, degrade, or eliminate the existing visual character of the Project area, including valued existing features or resources, or introduce elements that substantially detract from the visual character of the area. Cumulative impacts would be less than significant.

M

Views

F-12

In general, related projects have the potential to block views from local streets and other public vantages throughout a project area. With respect to the proposed Project, the views most likely to be affected on a cumulative basis are north-facing views of the Hollywood Hills and the Hollywood Sign. However, as previously indicated, the proposed Project would not affect views of the Hollywood Hills or Hollywood Sign, which, due to the densely developed nature of the area, are generally only available when looking north along adjacent north-south roadways, including Gower Street, rather than when looking north across the Project Site. Based on the proposed Project’s characteristics, particularly building heights, and an evaluation of simulated composite photographs showing existing and future conditions based on the Conceptual Site Plan at representative locations, as viewed from a range of distances and variety of directions relative to the Project Site, Project development would not affect views of the Hollywood Hills or the Hollywood sign to the north on an overall basis, and view impacts would be less than significant. Given the limited number and location of the related projects within any field of view that includes the Project Site, view impacts would occur at a distance where such changes are not discernible within the broad urban landscape. As such, cumulative view impacts would be less than significant.

B.

Light and Glare 1.

Construction

To the extent evening construction includes artificial light sources, such use would be temporary and would cease upon completion of Project construction. Construction lighting would be focused on the particular area undergoing work. Construction-related illumination would be used for safety and security purposes only, in compliance with LAMC light intensity requirements. Additionally, as a project design feature, construction lighting would be shielded and/or aimed so that no direct beam illumination would fall outside of the Project Site boundary. Thus, with adherence to existing LAMC regulations and the construction lighting project design feature, light resulting from construction activities would not substantially alter the character of off-site areas surrounding the Project Site, or interfere with the performance of an off-site activity. Therefore, light spill impacts associated with construction would be less than significant. As set forth in Project Design Feature A.1-1, where construction is visible from pedestrian locations adjacent to the Project Site and perimeter walls or fencing do not already exist, temporary construction fencing would be placed along the periphery of the development sites to screen construction activity from view at the street level from off-site locations. As such, glare from construction activities would not substantially alter the character of off-site areas surrounding the Project Site, or interfere with the performance of an off-site activity. Therefore, glare impacts associated with construction would be less than significant.

2

.

Operation

The proposed Project would include new lighting for safety, security, architectural features, signage and use of the facilities that would be developed as part of the proposed Project. The potential for light spill to occur with Project development would be reduced by existing LAMC requirements and the project design features. In addition, any new street and pedestrian lighting within the public rightof-way would comply with applicable City regulations and would be approved by the Bureau of Street Lighting in order to maintain appropriate and safe lighting levels on both sidewalks and roadways while minimizing light spill on adjacent properties. The proposed signage regulations would require the

F-13

preparation of a signage illumination plan that includes specifications for the illumination of digital display signs, projected image signs, scrolling digital display signs, and supergraphic signs, including maximum luminance levels, and provides for the review of the signs in order to ensure compliance with the regulations set forth in the proposed signage regulations. To further reduce potential light spill impacts, the proposed signage regulations require that light intensity levels for digital display signs, projected image signs, scrolling digital display signs and supergraphic signs be limited to 2 footcandles as measured at the property line of the nearest residentially zoned property outside the boundaries of the Project Site. As shown in the photometric analysis included with the Draft EIR, the levels of light spill from Project lighting would not exceed 2 foot-candles, and Project operations, including the proposed signage program, would result in light spill impacts that would be less than significant. Finally, lighting used for outdoor production, special effects and”special events would not increase lighting over existing conditions and would therefore not result in a significant impact. Daytime glare can result from sunlight reflecting from a shiny surface that would interfere with the performance of on-site activity, such as the operation of a motor vehicle. With the implementation of the project design features, daytime glare attributable to the proposed Project would be controlled. Thus, Project development would not incorporate substantial amounts of highly reflective building materials or signage that would be highly visible to off-site glare-sensitive uses, and would not substantially alter the character of the off-site areas surrounding the Project Site nor interfere with the performance of an off-site activity. As a result, Project daytime glare impacts would be less than significant. Nighttime glare can result from buildings, signs, or thematic elements that include reflective materials that are located within highly visible areas. With existing regulations and the proposed project design features, including shielding of rooftop parking lights, building, parking and security lighting levels would not result in a significant glare impact. Based on field observations and the proposed signage program, digital display signs, scrolling digital display signs, projected image signs and supergraphic signs have the potential to cause glare impacts. To address potential nighttime glare issues, the proposed signage regulations include limitations on the location, illuminance and luminance levels, and hours of illumination of digital display signs, projected image signs and scrolling digital displays signs, and the location and manner and hours of illumination of supergraphic signs. The Draft EIR evaluated the initially-proposed project design features which would limit Project nighttime lighting with regard to glare to 600 candelas per meter squared (cd/m2), which is below the significance threshold of 800 cd/m2, and would not substantially alter the character of the off-site areas surrounding the Project Site or interfere with the performance of an off-site activity. Therefore, Project impacts with regard to nighttime glare were found to be less than significant. Nevertheless, in response to public comments, the Applicant proposes to further restrict the maximum nighttime brightness level of digital display signs and the scrolling digital display sign, as well as projected image signs, so that such signs would not be permitted to exceed a nighttime brightness level of 300 cd/m2. This change in the proposed signage regulations would further reduce the Project’s less than significant impacts with regard to artificial light and glare.

3.

Project Design Features

F-14 As previously described, future development under the proposed Project would be subject to the proposed Specific Plan included as Appendix B of the Draft EIR, which includes regulation of rooftop parking lighting that would reduce impacts related to light spill (see Section 5 of the proposed Specific Plan). •

Rooftop Parking Lighting. New parking structures that have rooftop parking shall shield the light sources on the rooftop level so as to direct the lighting on-site.

In addition, the proposed Signage Regulations include the following regulations to reduce impacts from signage lighting and glare: •

Signage Illumination Plan. The applicant shall submit a signage illumination plan to the Director of Planning for digital display, projected image, scrolling digital display, and supergraphic signs. The signage illumination plan shall be prepared by a lighting design expert, and those portions of the plan setting forth the wattage draw must be certified and stamped by an electrical engineer certified by the State of California. The plan shall include specifications for all illumination of digital display, projected image, scrolling digital display, and supergraphic signs, including maximum luminance levels, and shall provide for the review of the displays in order to ensure compliance with the regulations set forth in the proposed Signage Regulations, including those listed below.



Lighting for Supergraphic Signs. Lighting for supergraphic signs shall be designed, located, or screened so as to minimize to the greatest reasonable extent possible direct light sources onto any exterior wall of a residential unit and into the window of any commercial building outside the Project Site. The source of the external illumination shall be shielded from public view.



Reflective Materials. Signage shall not use highly reflective materials such as mirrored glass.



Signage Glare Levels. Digital display signs, projected image signs, and scrolling digital display signs shall have a nighttime brightness no greater than 300 candelas per square meter and a daytime brightness of no greater than 7,500 candelas per square meter. The displays shall transition smoothly at a consistent rate from the permitted daytime brightness to the permitted nighttime brightness levels, beginning 45 minutes prior to sunset and concluding 45 minutes after sunset. The brightness of digital display signs and projected image signs shall be measured from ground level at the nearest residential property outside of the boundaries of the Project Site. The measured maximum brightness shall be based on the luminance levels of the white display portion of the sign, and the red, green, and blue outputs shall be turned to full on at the time of testing. A calibrated luminance meter shall be used to measure the luminance intensity of the sign in candela per meter squared (nits) in accordance with the luminance meter manufacture’s operation instructions. The luminance measurements should not be taken at oblique angles that exceed 60 degrees off-axis from the face of the sign.•



Signage Lighting Levels. Digital displays, projected image signs, scrolling digital displays, and supergraphic signs shall not generate light intensity levels of greater than 2 foot-candles as measured at the property line of the nearest residentially zoned property outside the boundaries of the Project Site. A calibrated illuminance meter shall be used to measure the maximum incident illuminance resultant from the sign in foot-candles in

F-15 accordance with the illuminance meter manufacture’s operation instructions. The meter shall be mounted to a tripod at eye level, and aimed at the sign. A measurement shall be taken with the sign turned on, and again with the sign turned off. The difference of the two measurement shall be considered the resultant illuminance generated by the sign. •

Hours of Operation or Illumination of Digital Displays, Projected Image Signs, Scrolling Digital Displays, and Supergraphics. Digital display and scrolling digital display signs may only operate between the hours of 6:00 a.m. to 2:00 a.m. Projected image signs and supergraphic signs may be illuminated between the hours of one hour before sunset to 2:00 a.m. .

Further, in addition to the requirements of the LAMC, the following additional project design features are included in the MMP with regard to light spill and contrast/glare: Project Design Feature A.2-1: Light sources associated with proposed Project construction shall be shielded and/or aimed so that no direct beam illumination is provided outside of the Project Site boundary. However, construction lighting shall not be so limited as to compromise the safety of construction workers. Project Design Feature A.2-2: Outdoor security and architectural lighting shall be shielded and/or directed toward the areas to be lit to limit spill-over onto adjacent uses where appropriate. Project Design Feature A.2-3: Glass used in building fagades shall minimize glare in a manner consistent with applicable energy and building code requirements. 4.

Cumulative Impacts

Development of the proposed Project, interim projects, and other related projects in the area would introduce new or expanded sources of artificial light. However, the additional artificial light sources introduced by these projects would not significantly alter the existing lighting environment that currently exists in the immediate Project area because the related projects include land use types that are typical for the area and are not known to generate excessive or otherwise unusual lighting levels, and because of existing ambient light levels in the vicinity. In addition, each of the related projects would be required to comply with existing regulatory requirements that address artificial light. It is not anticipated that the related projects would result in cumulative light spill impacts due to the types of uses proposed, their distances from the Project Site, and existing ambient light levels in the vicinity. As a result, cumulative light spill impacts would be less than significant. With regard to daytime glare, it is anticipated that the related projects within the vicinity of the Project Site would be subject to discretionary review to ensure that building materials to be used would not create significant glare impacts. In addition, the proposed Project’s contribution to a daytime glare impact would not be cumulatively considerable, and therefore cumulative daytime glare impacts would be less than significant. Cumulative nighttime glare impacts are also anticipated to be less than significant for the same reasons as those cited above with regard to the proposed Project’s less than significant cumulative light spill impacts. C.

Air Quality (Construction: Toxic Air Contaminants and Odors; Operations: Toxic Air Contaminants, Odors, and Consistency with Air Quality Plans)

F-16 t.

Construction a]

Toxic Air Contaminants

The greatest potential for TAC emissions during construction would be related to diesel particulate emissions associated with heavy equipment operations during grading and excavation activities. The results of the analysis for the construction of the proposed Project yield a maximum incremental increase in offsite individual cancer risk of 6.7 in a million over the duration of construction and an excess cancer burden of 0.05, where the maximum impact occurs at residential uses south of the Project Site. The chronic hazard index is approximately 0.01 and is less than the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) significance threshold of 1.0. As the proposed Project would not emit carcinogenic or toxic air contaminants that individually or collectively exceed the maximum individual cancer risk of 10 in one million or result in an excess cancer burden of 0.5 or more, Projectrelated toxic emission impacts from construction activities would be less than significant and no mitigation is required. b]

Odors

Compliance with the requirements in Sections 2480 and 2485 in Title 13 of the California Code of Regulations (CCR) and Section 93115 in Title 17 of the CCR would minimize potential diesel odors during construction to a less than significant level. Other potential sources that may emit odors during construction activities include the use of architectural coatings and solvents. SCAQMD Rule 1113 limits the amount of VOC from architectural coatings and solvents. As a result of the Applicant’s mandatory compliance with applicable SCAQMD rules and regulations, construction activities or materials would not cause a significant impact related to odors.

2

.

Operations a]

Toxic Air Contaminants

Based on the low incremental increase in the number and long-term (annual average) activity of the on-site toxic air contaminant sources and compliance with applicable California Air Resources Board (CARB) and SCAQMD rules and regulations, potential air toxic containment impacts associated with the proposed Project would be less than significant. Typical sources of acutely and chronically hazardous toxic air contaminants include industrial manufacturing processes (e.g., chrome plating, electrical manufacturing, petroleum refinery). The proposed Project would not include these types of potential industrial manufacturing process sources. It is expected that quantities of hazardous toxic air contaminants located on-site would be below thresholds warranting further study under the California Accidental Release Prevention Program. As such, the proposed Project would not release substantial amounts of toxic contaminants, and no significant impact on human health would occur.

b]

Odors

The proposed Project does not include any uses identified by the SCAQMD as being associated with odors, and ongoing facility operations have not received any notices of violation or notices to comply associated with odors over the last two decades. The proposed Project does include restaurant uses which have the potential to emit odors through cooking and charbroilers. However, the proposed Project would minimize the release of odors from restaurant uses with odor reducing

F-17 equipment as required by SCAQMD Rule 1138.- Garbage collection areas for the proposed Project would be covered and situated away from the property line and sensitive uses where feasible. Good housekeeping practices would be sufficient to prevent objectionable odors. Therefore, potential odor impacts would be less than significant.

cl

Consistency with Air Quality Plans (1)

SCAQMD CEQA Air Quality Handbook Policy Analysis

The determination of AQMP consistency is primarily concerned with the long-term influence of the proposed Project on air quality in the Air Basin. While development of the proposed Project would result in short-term regional impacts, Project development would not have a significant long-term impact on the region’s ability to meet State and federal air quality standards. The proposed Project would comply with SCAQMD Rule 403 and would implement all feasible mitigation measures for control of PM10, PM2,5, and NOx. Also, the proposed Project would be consistent with the goals and policies of the AQMP for control of fugitive dust. As described in Section IV.B.1, Air Quality of the Draft EIR, the proposed Project’s long-term influence would also be consistent with the goals and policies of the AQMP and is, therefore, considered consistent with the SCAQMD’s AQMP. (2)

City of Los Angeles Policies

The proposed Project is consistent with applicable policies of the City of Los Angeles Air Quality Element. Development of the proposed Project would implement project features that would reduce vehicular trips, reduce vehicle miles traveled, and encourage use of alternative modes of transportation. Overall, the central location of the proposed Project and its proximity to existing transportation infrastructure and mass transit options would result in a reduction of vehicle miles traveled and vehicle trips. As a result, the proposed Project is consistent with the City of Los Angeles Air Quality Element. 3.

Cumulative Impacts !)

Construction

Based on the use of standard risk-assessment methodology, construction activities at each related project would not result in a long-term (i.e., 70-year) substantial source of TAG emissions. Additionally, the SCAQMD CEQA guidance does not require a health risk assessment for short-term construction emissions. As such, cumulative toxic emission impacts during construction would be less than significant. Based on mandatory compliance with SCAQMD rules, odor impacts from the proposed Project are anticipated to be less than significant individually, as well as cumulatively.

b)

Operations

With respect to TAC emissions, the related projects (which primarily include retail/commercial, residential, office, and hotel uses) would not represent a substantial source of TAC emissions, which are typically associated with large-scale industrial, manufacturing, and transportation hub facilities. In

F-18 addition, the proposed Project would not result in any substantial sources of TACs that have been identified by the CARB’s Land Use Guidelines, and thus, would not contribute to a cumulative impact. Potential odor impacts from related projects are anticipated to be less than significant. The proposed Project would not result in odor impacts, and, thus, would not have a cumulative impact. D.

Air Quality—Greenhouse Gas Emissions 1

.

Construction Impacts

Construction of the proposed Project is estimated to generate a total of 41,631 metric tonnes of CC>2e. As recommended by the SCAQMD, the total GHG construction emissions were amortized over 30 years (i.e., total construction GHG emissions were divided by 30 to determine an annual construction emissions estimate that can be added to the proposed Project’s operational emissions) in order to determine the proposed Project’s annual GHG emissions inventory. 2

.

Operational Impacts

The proposed Project contains numerous project design features that would reduce the proposed Project’s GHG emissions profile and would represent improvements versus “business-asusual” (BAU). The proposed Project would provide a mix of compatible infill and higher density uses to reduce vehicle trips, promote alternatives to individual vehicle travel and promote efficient delivery of services and goods. The proposed Project would also concentrate new employment and retail uses near the Hollywood Freeway and the transportation corridors of Santa Monica Boulevard, Melrose Avenue, and Western Avenue, and in close proximity to public transit opportunities (e.g., light rail and bus routes), thereby minimizing vehicle trips and GHG emissions. Additionally, bicycle amenities such as racks and personal lockers would be expanded at various locations around the Project Site. The proposed Project’s GHG emissions reduction of 26 percent compared to the BAU scenario constitutes an equivalent or larger break from BAU than has been determined by CARB to be necessary to meet AB 32’s goals (i.e., 16 percent reduction). Therefore, the proposed Project would not have a significant impact on the environment due to its GHG emissions. In addition, the proposed Project would not conflict with any applicable plan, policy or regulation of an agency adopted for the purpose of reducing the emissions of GHGs. 3.

Project Design Features

In addition to the water conservation, waste reduction, and Transportation Demand Management (TDM) project design features set forth in the MMP, the following project design feature would further reduce GHG emissions from the proposed Project as would compliance with the regulatory measures described in Section IV.B.1, Air Quality, of the Draft EIR:

Project Design Feature B.2-1: Where Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) standards are applicable, the design of new buildings shall include features so as to be capable of achieving current LEED® Certified status. 4.

Cumulative Impacts

F-19

Although the proposed Project is expected to emit GHGs, the emission of GHGs by a single project into the atmosphere is not itself necessarily an adverse environmental effect. Rather, it is the increased accumulation of GHG from more than one project and many sources in the atmosphere that may result in global climate change. Overall, the proposed Project has incorporated sustainability design features to reduce vehicle miles traveled and to reduce the proposed Project’s potential impact with respect to GHG emissions. The proposed Project, by implementing the project design features, results in a net decrease in GHG emissions that represents a substantial reduction from BAU. The proposed Project’s features and GHG reduction measures make the proposed Project consistent with AB 32. Given the proposed Project’s consistency with State and City of Los Angeles GHG emission reduction goals and objectives, the proposed Project would not conflict with any applicable plan, policy or regulation of an agency adopted for the purpose of reducing the emissions of GHGs. In the absence of adopted standards and established significance thresholds, and given this consistency, the proposed Project’s impacts are concluded to be less than significant and not cumulatively considerable.

E.

Hydrology and Surface Water Quality 1

.

Surface Water Hydrology

Construction activities for the proposed Project would have the potential to temporarily alter existing drainage patterns and flows by exposing the underlying soils and making the Project Site temporarily more permeable. With preparation and implementation of a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP), compliance with applicable City grading regulations, and installation of new storm drain facilities, as applicable, construction of the proposed Project would not cause flooding, substantially increase or decrease the amount of surface water in a water body, or result in a permanent, adverse change to the movement of surface water. Therefore, construction of the proposed Project would result in a less than significant impact on surface water hydrology, and no mitigation measures are required. Given that the Project Site is currently predominantly impervious, the existing drainage areas and patterns on-site would generally be maintained under the proposed Project. While the development of new buildings would alter drainage areas somewhat, the majority of surface and street flows would remain unchanged. The existing drainage areas and patterns would be minimally impacted by the proposed Project due to the existing predominantly impervious nature of the Project Site. With implementation of Project Design Feature F.1-4, there would be no increase in the peak flow rate leaving the Project Site, and the limited increase in stormwater volumes within specific catchment areas would not create a substantial increase in the amount of stormwater in the City system, particularly since there would be an overall reduction in flow volumes sitewide. The proposed Project would not result in a permanent adverse change to the movement of surface water sufficient to produce a substantial change in the current or direction of water flow. As such, operation of the proposed Project would result in a less than significant impact on surface water hydrology.

2

.

Surface Water Quality

Construction activities such as earth moving, maintenance/operation of construction equipment, and handling/storage/disposal materials could contribute to pollutant loading in stormwater

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runoff.

With implementation of the construction-related Best Management Practices (BMPs) and

compliance with all applicable regulatory requirements, construction of the proposed Project is not anticipated to create pollution, contamination or nuisance as defined in Section 13050 of the California Water Code or cause a regulatory standard to be violated, as defined in the applicable NPDES stormwater permit or the Basin Plan for the receiving water body. Accordingly, construction of the proposed Project would result in a less than significant impact on surface water quality. As is typical of most major urban developments, stormwater runoff from the Project Site has the potential to introduce pollutants into the stormwater system. With respect to dry weather impacts, the existing program of discharging groundwater seepage (dewatering) flows from the catchments would continue following redevelopment of selected areas under the General NPDES Permit No. CAG994004. The proposed Project would implement measures to reduce or eliminate dry weather nuisance flow (e.g., over irrigation, wash water, etc.). Therefore, operation of the proposed Project would result in a less than significant dry weather impact on surface water quality, and no mitigation measures are required. With respect to wet weather impacts, following completion and operation of the proposed Project it is projected that pollutant loads and average concentrations for all constituents would be less than those under baseline conditions with the implementation of structural BMPs sized to address water quality control volume. The proposed Project is not anticipated to create “pollution,” “contamination” or “nuisance” as defined in Section 13050 of the California Water Code or cause a regulatory standard to be violated, as defined in the applicable NPDES stormwater permit or the Basin Plan for the receiving water body. Therefore, operation of the proposed Project would result in a less than significant wet weather impact on surface water quality, and no mitigation measures are required.

3.

Project Design Features

Project Design Feature F.1-1: Prior to the issuance of grading permits, the Applicant shall provide the City with evidence that a Notice of Intent has been filed with the State Water Resources Control Board to comply with the Construction General Permit. Such evidence shall consist of a copy of the Notice of Intent stamped by the State Water Resources Control Board or the Regional Water Resources Control Board, or a letter from either agency stating that the Notice of Intent has been filed.

Project Design Feature F.1-2: For all construction activities disturbing greater than 1 acre or more, prior to receiving a grading permit from the City of Los Angeles, the Applicant shall provide proof of a Waste Discharger Identification Number for filing a Notice of Intent for coverage under the Construction General Permit and a certification that a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan has been prepared. For individual construction activities that may occur over time that disturb less than 1 acre, the Applicant shall comply with the applicable City of Los Angeles local requirements.

Project Design Feature F.1-3: Prior to issuance of a building permit for a project that triggers the Standard Urban Stormwater Mitigation Plan requirements, the Applicant shall prepare and submit for review and approval a Standard Urban Stormwater Mitigation Plan that shall include Best Management Practices (e.g., infiltration systems, bio-filtration, structural treatment systems) to the City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works or Department of Building and Safety, as applicable.

Project Design Feature F.1-4: The proposed Project shall include up to three stormwater detention features on-site to reduce the peak flow rate to a level at or below

F-21

the existing peak flow rate leaving the Project Site and pipe runoff to the City storm drain system (Catchment Area D, G and J). The detention features shall be sized to reduce the peak flow rate from those catchment areas to a level at or below the existing peak flow rates (24.11 cubic feet per second in Catchment Area D, 163.47 cubic feet per second in Catchment Area G, and 11.02 cubic feet per second in Catchment Area J). The potential location of the proposed detention features is shown on Figure IV.F.1-6 of the Draft EIR. The proposed detention feature on the western portion of the Main Lot shall be installed when a new private on-site storm drain is connected to the 21inch City storm drain in Melrose Avenue, The proposed detention feature in the south central portion of the Main Lot shall be installed when a new private on-site storm drain is connected to the 33-inch City storm drain in Melrose Avenue. The proposed detention feature in the south-eastern portion of the Main Lot shall be installed when a new private on-site storm drain is connected to the 42-inch City storm drain in Melrose Avenue. The proposed detention features shall be located underground and shall consist of either a flow-through or flow-by detention system, or an approved facility that would provide an equivalent reduction in peak runoff flow rate. The exact size and location of the detention features shall be determined prior to construction as final building plans and detailed hydrology reports are completed.

Project Design Feature F.1-5: The Applicant shall continue to require the control of live animals used in production by an animal wrangler to minimize the potential for animal waste to remain on-site. 4.

Cumulative Impacts a)

Surface Water Hydrology

The identified related projects are generally located in a highly urbanized area, and future land use changes or development are not likely to cause substantial changes in regional surface water flows. In accordance with City requirements, each related project, including Related Project No. 61 (located immediately north of the Project Site on the cemetery property), would be required to implement BMPs to manage stormwater in accordance with Standard Urban Stormwater Mitigation Plan (SUSMP) and Low Impact Development (LID) guidelines, thereby minimizing post-development stormwater flows. Furthermore, the proposed Project would result in an overall reduction in surface water flow volumes sitewide. Therefore, the proposed Project’s contribution to cumulative impacts to surface water hydrology would not be cumulatively considerable and, as such, impacts would be less than significant.

b]

Surface Water Quality

Because the related projects are generally in an already highly urbanized area, future land use changes or development are not likely to cause substantial changes in regional surface water quality. It is anticipated that these related projects and other future development projects would also be subject to SWPPP and SUSMP requirements and implementation of measures to comply with total maximum daily loads. Therefore, with compliance with all applicable laws, rules and regulations, the proposed Project’s contribution to cumulative impacts to surface water quality would not be cumulatively considerable and, as such, impacts would be less than significant.

F.

Groundwater

F-22

1

.

Groundwater Hydrology

Groundwater under the Project Site is not currently pumped for beneficial uses (e.g., drinking water, industrial, or agricultural supply). In addition, no water supply wells are located at the Project Site that could be impacted by construction, nor would the proposed Project include the construction of water supply wells. During construction, shallow groundwater could be encountered as close to the surface as approximately 8 to 12 feet below ground surface. As the proposed Project would include below-grade parking facilities, construction activities could encounter groundwater within portions of the Project site and dewatering could be required. Potential dewatering inflows are not anticipated to draw water across any substantial distance and, therefore, would not adversely impact the rate or direction of flow of groundwater supply. In addition, due to the distance from the Project Site to the nearest water supply wells and the temporary nature of any groundwater extracted during construction, construction dewatering would not change potable water levels sufficiently to reduce the ability of water utilities to use the groundwater basin for public water supplies or to reduce yields of adjacent wells or well fields (public or private), and related impacts would be less than significant. Therefore, construction of the proposed Project would result in a less than significant impact on groundwater hydrology, and mitigation measures are not required. The proposed Project would have no impact on public water supplies, and no reduction in yields of adjacent wells or well fields (public or private) would occur. Project development is not expected to include activities that would require groundwater extraction related to groundwater remediation that could affect groundwater hydrology. Since no water supply wells would be affected and dewatering is not anticipated to adversely impact the rate or direction of flow of regional groundwater (other than localized groundwater flow changes), operation of the proposed Project would result in a less than significant impact on potable water levels. Based on the site-specific land uses and impervious percentage factors applied to the Conceptual Site Plan, the pervious percentage of the Project Site is expected to increase by 1 percent (to approximately 7 percent pervious or 93 percent impervious) as a result of the proposed Project. From a regional groundwater basin perspective, the potential increase in groundwater recharge resulting from this increase in pervious surface would be limited but beneficial and would result in a less than significant impact. Based on the above, operation of the proposed Project would result in a less than significant impact on groundwater hydrology, and mitigation measures are not required. 2.

Groundwater Quality

The primary concerns relating to groundwater associated with construction of the proposed Project are: (1) the spillage of hazardous materials from temporary construction equipment and operations; and (2) the effects upon groundwater quality resulting from short-term dewatering activities (i.e., movement of existing contamination). The proposed Project would comply with all applicable federal, state and local requirements concerning the handling, storage, and disposal of hazardous waste, that would reduce the potential for the construction of the proposed Project to release contaminants into groundwater that could affect existing contaminants, expand the area or increase the level of groundwater contamination, or cause a violation of regulatory water quality standards at an existing production well. Therefore, impacts would be less than significant. No significant areas of groundwater contamination have been identified beneath the Project Site. Furthermore, the estimated rate of groundwater dewatering during construction would not draw groundwater across any substantial distance. Therefore, impacts related to the rate or direction of movement of existing contaminants, the level of groundwater contamination, and regulatory water quality standards would

F-23 be less than significant. To the extent construction necessitates the removal or relocation of groundwater monitoring wells, with compliance with the well abandonment guidelines set forth in the Department of Water Resources, California Water Well Standards, Part III, Destruction of Monitoring Wells, and the California Department of Health Services guidelines, the proposed Project would result in a less than significant impact with respect to the abandonment of any on-site wells, if required. Based on the above, construction of the proposed Project would result in a less than significant impact on groundwater quality, and mitigation measures are not required. Activities associated with the storage of hazardous materials in underground storage tanks could have a potential impact on groundwater quality during operation of the proposed Project, Compliance with all applicable existing regulations (i.e,, the applicable NPDES permit or industrial user sewer discharge permit requirements) at the Project Site and underground storage tank regulatory programs would prevent the proposed Project from affecting or expanding any potential areas of contamination, increasing the level of contamination, or causing regulatory water quality standards at an existing production well to be violated, as defined in the California Code of Regulations, Title 22, Division 4, Chapter 15 and the Safe Drinking Water Act. Therefore, impacts would be less than significant. Permanent dewatering systems may be required for certain below­ ground structures (e.g., subterranean parking). Any dewatering system would be designed and operated in accordance with all applicable regulatory and permit requirements. In addition, no existing significant areas of groundwater contamination have been encountered beneath the Project Site. As such, no significant impact is anticipated to the rate or direction of movement of any existing contaminants beneath the Project Site or the area affected by or the level of groundwater contaminants. Therefore, operational impacts would be less than significant and are not anticipated to violate regulatory water quality standards at an existing production well. Given the estimated rate of groundwater extraction, the distance to the nearest water supply wells, existing groundwater conditions, and compliance with regulatory requirements, dewatering would not adversely affect existing contaminants, expand the area affected by contaminants, result in an increased level of groundwater contamination, or cause regulatory water quality standards at an existing production well to be violated. Therefore, potential impacts associated with dewatering would be less than significant. Based on the above, operation of the proposed Project would result in a less than significant impact on groundwater quality, and mitigation measures are not required. 3.

Project Design Features

Project Design Feature F.2-1:

Any discharge of groundwater during construction or operation of the proposed Project shall occur pursuant to, and comply with, the applicable National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit or industrial user sewer discharge permit requirements. If contaminated groundwater is found during the management of construction or long-term dewatering, treatment and discharge, as appropriate, shall be conducted in compliance with the applicable regulatory requirements (i.e., the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board General Permit conditions, or the City’s industrial user sewer discharge permit requirements).

Project Design Feature F.2-2:

In the event a groundwater monitoring well needs to be removed or relocated during construction, the abandonment of the well shall occur in accordance with the guidelines set forth in the Department of Water

Resources, California Water Well Standards, Part III, Destruction of Monitoring Wells, and the California Department of Health Services guidelines.

F-24 Also refer to the project design features set forth in the MMP related to the appropriate handling, storage, and disposal of hazardous materials, which would serve to minimize potential impacts to groundwater. ' 4.

Cumulative Impacts a]

Groundwater Hydrology

No water supply wells are located at the Project Site, and the nearest active water well fields are located approximately 4 miles away from the Project Site and approximately 2.5 miles away from the nearest related project. Like the proposed Project, all or most of the related projects would depend on public water supply systems. Given the location of the Project Site and related projects in the area and distance from the existing production wells, the proposed Project’s contribution to cumulative groundwater hydrology impacts would not be cumulatively considerable and, therefore, would be less than significant. In addition, the proposed Project would not require groundwater remediation; therefore, no cumulative groundwater impacts would occur. Finally, while the proposed Project's resulting potential increase in groundwater recharge could be considered beneficial, operation of the proposed Project would not result in a measurable increase in local groundwater levels nor would it result in a demonstrable and sustained reduction of groundwater recharge capacity. Therefore, the proposed Project’s contribution to groundwater recharge would not be cumulatively considerable and, as such, impacts would be less than significant.

M

Groundwater Quality

As with the proposed Project, with compliance with existing statutes and regulations, the related projects would be unlikely to cause or increase groundwater contamination. Therefore, the proposed Project’s contribution to cumulative impacts to groundwater quality would not be cumulatively considerable and, therefore, would be less than significant.

G.

Land Use 1.

Land Use Consistency

a)

Consistency with Local Plans and Applicable Policies

By providing new studio/media/entertainment-related development featuring a combination of rehabilitated historic resources, modernized facilities, and landscaping and pedestrian areas, the proposed Project would complement the area’s unique character and employment base and would help ensure the retention of studio-related uses within Hollywood. As such, the proposed Project also would be consistent with the general intent of the General Plan Framework, Hollywood Community Plan, and Wilshire Community Plan. With regard to zoning, the regulations of the proposed Specific Plan would supplement, and in some cases, supersede those set forth in the Planning and Zoning Code (Chapter 1) of the LAMC. For example, the proposed Specific Plan includes the Historic Resources Preservation Plan that provides guidelines for the rehabilitation (including alteration) and preservation of historic resources within the Main Lot, as well as the construction of new structures within the Main Lot. Project signage would be coordinated and regulated by the proposed signage regulations included in the proposed

F-25

Sign Supplemental Use District. Overall, the proposed zoning designation would set forth regulatory controls, via the proposed Specific Plan, that are comparable to existing zoning requirements. Approval of the proposed Specific Plan would more closely align the Project Site with its existing function as a major film and television production facility and allow for more cohesive development between the Main Lot and Ancillary Lots. With implementation of the requested approvals, including adoption of the proposed Specific Plan, zone change, and the proposed signage regulations, land use impacts related to LAMC consistency would be less than significant. In addition, because the proposed Project would allow for the development of industrial and ancillary commercial uses that are consistent with and would enhance the existing uses within the Project Site and the surrounding area, the proposed Project would be consistent with the City of Los Angeles’ Industrial Policy Initiatives and the Industrial Land Use Policy.

bl

Consistency with Regional Plans

As analyzed in Section IV.G, Land Use, of the Draft EIR, the proposed Project would be generally consistent with the Southern California Association of Governments’ (SCAG’s) 2008 Regional Transportation Plan (RTP), Growth Vision Report, 2012-2035 Regional Transportation Plan/ Sustainable Communities Strategy (2012-2035 RTP/SCS), and Regional Comprehensive Plan (RCP). Additionally, as discussed in Section IV.B.1, Air Quality, of the Draft EIR, the proposed Project would be consistent with the goals and policies of the SCAQMD’s Air Quality Management Plan (AQMP). Additionally, as discussed in Section IV.K, Traffic, Access, and Parking, of the Draft EIR, with implementation of all feasible mitigation measures, the proposed Project would not conflict with the Congestion Management Program (CMP) as it would not result in significant impacts to the nearby CMP intersections or freeway monitoring locations.

cl

Conclusion Regarding Impacts Relative to Land Use Consistency

With approval of the proposed Specific Plan, zone change, and either General Plan Amendment (redesignating the Ancillary Lots to General Commercial or resdesignating the entire Project Site to Regional Center or Regional Commercial), the proposed Project would not be in substantial conflict with the adopted Community Plans or with relevant environmental policies in other applicable plans. As such, the proposed Project’s impacts related to land use consistency would be less than significant.

2

.

Land Use Compatibility

The surrounding uses were developed over a span of several decades and feature a variety of building types and architectural styles. The eclectic nature of the surrounding uses and their associated architecture results in a non-cohesive visual character within the area. The infill of new studio-related uses that are substantially similar in terms of land use type to the existing studio-related uses within the Project Site would be compatible with the varied land uses that characterize the Project area. Overall, the proposed Project’s density would be compatible with the densely developed nature of the surrounding area. The majority of the building heights across the Project Site would be substantially similar to other buildings in the Project vicinity, such as the four-story Raleigh Studios and other existing structures that would remain on the Project Site. The proposed high-rise structures would be compatible with the overall character of the Hollywood area, where high-rise buildings are common along many streets, such as Hollywood Boulevard, Vine Street/Rossmore Avenue, and

F-26 Sunset Boulevard. By focusing density and activating the pedestrian realm along Melrose Avenue, the proposed Project would strengthen the Studio’s identity and create a greater sense of place along this important frontage. Overall, the land uses proposed on the Ancillary Lots, as detailed in the Conceptual Site Plan, would be compatible with surrounding development in terms of land use type, development density, building height, and overall design. Furthermore, the proposed Project design would improve and enhance the visual character of the Project Site as compared with existing conditions, promoting compatibility with surrounding uses. In general, the proposed signage regulations would regulate signage while providing sufficient flexibility to meet the unique needs of the proposed Project, with an overarching goal of ensuring that Project signage is integrated with and enhances the character of the Project Site as an important entertainment industry venue. The proposed Project is considered compatible with the surrounding area in terms of both land use type and design. As such, the proposed Project would not substantially and adversely change the existing land use relationships between the Project Site and existing off-site uses. Furthermore, the proposed Project would not disrupt, divide, or isolate any existing neighborhoods or communities. As such, the proposed Project’s impacts related to land use compatibility would be less than significant. 3.

Project Design Features

Other than the proposed Specific Plan regulations, no project design features relevant to land use are proposed.

4.

Cumulative Impacts

Future development projects would be subject to existing zoning and land use designations as well as environmental review by the City. Therefore, such future projects are not expected to fundamentally alter the existing land use relationships in the community. Rather, the concentration of development in the area would make use of infill opportunities within an area well served by transit, thus promoting a more cohesive and compatible urban environment. Two projects, Related Project No. 24 and Related Project No. 61, are in close enough proximity to the Project Site so as to contribute to cumulative land use impacts by potentially altering existing land use relationships. The balance of the related projects would not cause cumulative land use impacts due to either distance and/or existing intervening development. Related Project No. 24, located at 5663 Melrose Avenue, involves the construction of 96 multi-family residential dwelling units and 3,350 square feet of retail uses.2 This type of development would be substantially similar to other land uses in the Project vicinity. Related Project No. 61 proposes additional cemetery-related uses within the cemetery immediately north of the Project Site. These uses would be consistent with existing development on the cemetery property. Thus, these related projects would not combine with the proposed Project and the interim projects to create any inconsistency with land use plans or policies, nor any incompatibility with surrounding land uses. Additionally, given that the proposed Project would be compatible with existing surrounding land uses, the proposed Project would not

Construction of Related Project No, 24 has been completed.

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contribute to significant cumulative land use compatibility impacts. Cumulative impacts would be less than significant. H.

Noise (Operational) 1

.

On-Site Stationary Noise Sources

a1

Building Mechanical Equipment

Operation of the proposed Project would require building mechanical equipment to condition and ventilate the indoor air environment. Project building mechanical equipment would comply with the City’s Noise Regulation requirements, which would limit the noise from building mechanical equipment not to exceed 5 dBA above the ambient noise levels at the off-site noise sensitive receptors. As such, noise impacts from building mechanical equipment would be less than significant. b)

Parking Facilities

Noise associated with below-grade parking garages (e.g., car movements, horns and alarms) would be contained within the structures, and, thus, noise levels would be effectively shielded from the off-site noise sensitive receptor. Therefore, impacts associated with the below-grade parking garages would be less than significant. Noise sources associated with above-grade parking facilities include activation of car alarms, sounding of car horns, slamming of car doors and tire squeals. The estimated maximum noise level from parking-related operations at off-site sensitive receptor locations within 100 feet of a parking structure would exceed the proposed Project’s significance threshold for parking operations due to the potential for intermittent car alarms or horns. However, a project design feature would be implemented as part of the proposed Project that would integrate noise control features into the parking structure fagade within 100 feet of an off-site sensitive receptor. With implementation of the project design features, operational noise impacts due to the use of parking facilities would be less than significant.

c)

Loading Dock Areas

Based on measured noise levels from typical loading dock facilities, delivery trucks would generate noise levels of approximately 71 dBA (Leq) at a distance of 50 feet. However, a project design feature would be implemented as part of the proposed Project to locate and construct new buildings with loading docks such that the line of sight between the outdoor loading dock and any adjacent noise sensitive land use will be obstructed to the extent necessary to comply with the LAMC noise requirements. With implementation of the project design feature, noise levels related to typical loading and unloading activities would be contained or shielded and such impacts would be less than significant. d)

Studio-Related Operations

The proposed Project is not anticipated to include any new types of uses or activities beyond those occurring within the Project Site today. Outdoor production, including intermittent use of pyrotechnics and use of portable generators, already occurs within the Project Site. The proposed Project would include a net increase in stage and support uses. The stage shell structures are designed to provide sound insulation required to meet the intended functions (e.g., film production).

F-28 Sound generation within the interior of the stages would be contained within the sound insulated stages. As such, noise impacts associated with the operation of proposed stages and support uses would be less than significant. Currently, outdoor production occurs at various locations within the Main Lot and at the Ancillary Lots. Outdoor production within the Main Lot may potentially increase with Project build-out. As described in greater detail in Section IV.H, Noise, of the Draft E1R, noise levels were caicuiated with outdoor production occurring within the Main Lot locations closest to off-site sensitive receptors. The estimated noise levels from the future outdoor productions when compared with the current production noise levels would result in a maximum increase of 0.8 dBA (receptor R9). The future outdoor production noise levels when added to the existing ambient noise levels would result in a maximum increase of 0.7 dBA (receptor R13), which would be below the significance threshold of 3 dBA above ambient noise levels. Therefore, noise impacts associated with the projected increase in outdoor production activities would be less than significant.

el

Special Events

Special events would continue to occur on the Project Site consistent with existing conditions. The principal noise sources associated with special events include amplified sound equipment. Project Design Feature H-5 is' included to address the sound level outputs from amplified sound equipment associated with special events. As such, noise impacts associated with the special events would be less than significant. 2

.

Off-Site Traffic (Mobile Sources) a)

Future plus Project

Future roadway noise levels were calculated along 46 off-site roadway segments in the vicinity of the Project Site. Project traffic would result in a maximum of a 1.0 dBA (CNEL) increase in traffic noise along Van Ness Avenue between Santa Monica Boulevard and Lemon Grove Avenue. This maximum projected increase in noise levels is below the 3 dBA CNEL significance threshold. Therefore, off-site traffic noise impacts associated with the proposed Project would be less than significant. b)

Existing plus Project

When compared with the existing conditions, Project traffic would result in a maximum of a 1.0 dBA (CNEL) increase in traffic noise along Van Ness Avenue between Santa Monica Boulevard and Lemon Grove Avenue. Thus, the estimated increase in off-site traffic noise levels would be below the 3 dBA CNEL significance threshold. Therefore, off-site traffic noise impacts associated with the Existing plus Project condition would be less than significant.

3.

Composite Noise Level Impacts from Proposed Project Operations

An evaluation of noise from all the proposed Project’s operational noise sources (i.e., composite noise level) was conducted. Primary noise sources associated with the typical daily operation of the proposed Project would include additional on-site mechanical/electrical equipment; parking facilities, loading dock areas, and studio-related operations; and the anticipated increase in

F-29 the traffic volumes on nearby roadways. The proposed Project is estimated to increase the ambient sound level at the off-site noise-sensitive receptors from 0.1 dBA (receptors R8 and R9) to a maximum of 2.4 dBA (receptors R1 and R11), relative to the existing ambient noise environment. The estimated increases would be below the more stringent significance threshold of 3 dBA above ambient at all off­ site sensitive receptors. As such, the composite noise level impacts due to operations of the proposed Project would be less than significant. 4.

Project Design Features

Project Design Feature H-3: All Project outdoor loading dock and trash/recycling areas shall be located or constructed such that the line of sight between these noise sources and any adjacent noise sensitive land use shall be obstructed to the extent necessary to comply with Los Angeles Municipal Code noise requirements.

Project Design Feature H-4: Non-squeal paving finishes shall be used within the proposed Project’s new parking structure(s).

Project Design Feature H-5: Special events in the Main Lot that include an outdoor amplified sound system shall implement the following noise-management procedures: •

Prior to the special event, Paramount personnel shall test the sound level at the event speaker locations to confirm that the sound levels from the event’s amplified sound equipment are consistent with applicable Los Angeles Municipal Code requirements as directed by a qualified acoustical engineer.



Once the event has commenced, Paramount personnel shall test the sound levels from the event speakers to confirm that the sound levels from the amplified sound equipment are consistent with applicable Los Angeles Municipal Code requirements.



Paramount shall provide surrounding residents with a phone number to call during the special event with any concerns regarding the amplified sound levels

.

Project Design Feature H-6: Project mechanical equipment for new buildings located along the Main Lot northern property line shall be designed not to exceed 45 dBA (in terms of hourly Leq) as measured at the northern property line.

Project Design Feature H-7: If a new above ground parking structure is constructed within 100 feet of an off-site noise sensitive receptor, the fagade facing the receptor shall be designed with noise control features (e.g., acoustical louvers or solid parapet wall) so as to reduce noise to within 10 dBA above ambient.

5.

Cumulative Impacts

Due to provisions set forth in the LAMC that limit stationary source noise from items such as roof-top mechanical equipment, noise levels would be less than significant at the property line for each related project. Furthermore, mitigation measures (if required) for each related project would be implemented to ensure compliance with the LAMC. In addition, with implementation of the project design features, noise impacts associated with operations within the Project Site would be less than significant. Therefore, cumulative stationary source noise impacts associated with operation of the proposed Project and related projects would be less than significant.

F-30 Cumulative traffic volumes would result in a maximum increase of 1.3 dBA CNEL along Gower Street, north of Hollywood Boulevard. At all other analyzed roadway segments, the increase in cumulative traffic noise would be lower. Thus, all of the cumulative noise level increases would be less than the significance threshold of a 3-dBA difference in calculated traffic noise levels. As such, cumulative noise impacts due to off-site mobile noise sources would be less than significant. I.

Employment 1

.

Construction

It is estimated that approximately 4,480 part-time and full-time jobs would be directly associated with the construction of the proposed Project. These direct jobs would support another 2,784 indirect and induced jobs in a wide range of industries throughout the City resulting from purchases of construction-related supplies, goods and services, and household expenditures by direct and indirect employees. As such, the proposed Project would provide new direct and indirect employment opportunities during the construction period. Therefore, impacts related to construction employment would be less than significant. 2.

Operations

It is estimated that the proposed Project would add 5,493 new direct on-site jobs once all proposed improvements have been constructed and are in full operation. The additional 5,493 full and part-time jobs directly associated with annual operation of the completed proposed Project represents approximately 0.27 percent of projected 2038 employment in the City of Los Angeles Subregion, and 2.92 percent of employment growth between 2011 and 2038. The proposed Project is therefore consistent with SCAG’s forecast for the City of Los Angeles Subregion. Based on the above, the proposed Project would not cause growth (i.e., new employment) nor accelerate development in an undeveloped area that exceeds projected/planned levels for the year of Project buildout. Therefore, impacts related to employment consistency with SCAG’s forecast for the City of Los Angeles Subregion would be less than significant and no mitigation measures are required. 3.

Cumulative Impacts

The sum of direct, indirect, and induced proposed Project employment is projected to total an estimated 12,647 full-time and part-time jobs across a wide range of industry sectors. Although these jobs would be spread over the entire City, the proposed Project’s total employment impact would still fall within SCAG’s employment growth forecast for the City of Los Angeles Subregion in 2038 (i.e., 2,058,038 jobs), and forecasted employment growth over the period 2011-2038 (188,433 jobs). The cumulative employment , including direct, indirect, and induced Project employment, employment associated with interim project and employment associated with the specified related projects is projected total an estimated 18,467 full-time and part-time jobs. This cumulative employment represents approximately 0.9 percent of 2038 employment in the City of Los Angeles Subregion; and the cumulative employment impact accounts for 9.8 percent of the employment growth forecast in the Subregion through 2038. Therefore, the proposed Project’s incremental employment effect would not be cumulatively considerable within the meaning of CEQA, and, hence, its cumulative employment impact would be less than significant and no mitigation measures are required.

J.

Housing

F-31 1

.

Construction

Due to the employment patterns of construction workers in Southern California, and the operation of the market for construction labor, construction workers are not likely, to any notable degree, to relocate their households as a consequence of the construction job opportunities presented by the proposed Project. Thus, there would not be any significant housing impacts on household growth in the City of Los Angeles Subregion due to proposed Project construction. Therefore, construction-related impacts related to housing would be less than significant. 2

.

Operations

The proposed Project would not include any new residential development. The proposed Project also would not remove any existing housing because no housing is located on the Project Site. Therefore, there would be no direct housing impacts. The 5,189 net new office and studio production direct jobs (5,493 direct jobs minus 304 retail jobs) are estimated to result in an indirect housing/household demand associated with the proposed Project of approximately 2,589 housing units/households. The proposed Project’s estimated 2,589 indirect households/housing units represent about 0.16 percent of the households forecasted for 2038 in the City of Los Angeles Subregion, or about 1.0 percent of the extrapolated growth forecasted between 2011 and 2038. Therefore, the proposed Project would not induce substantial housing growth, because it would account for a limited portion of forecasted household growth rather than exceeding the housing growth forecast for the City of Los Angeles Subregion. The proposed Project is also compatible with relevant adopted local and regional housing and household growth policies, as discussed in Section IV.1.2, Housing, of the Draft EIR. Therefore, impacts related to housing would be less than significant. 3,

Cumulative Impacts

An indirect housing growth of 2,589 housing units/households would be associated with the direct new jobs generated by the proposed Project. As discussed in Section IV.I.3, Housing, of the Draft EIR, cumulative households (i.e., total proposed Project households plus interim projects households plus related projects households) represents approximately 0.27 percent of 2038 households in the City of Los Angeles Subregion; and the cumulative households impact accounts for approximately 1.72 percent of the household growth forecast in the City of Los Angeles Subregion through 2038. Therefore, the proposed Project’s incremental housing impact would not be cumulatively considerable within the meaning of CEQA, and, hence, its cumulative housing impact would be less than significant and no mitigation measures are required.

K.

Population 1

.

Construction

As discussed in Section IV.I.2, Housing, of the Draft EIR, due to the employment patterns of construction workers in Southern California, and the operation of the market for construction labor, construction workers are not likely, to any notable degree, to relocate their households as a consequence of the construction job opportunities presented by the proposed Project. Thus, there would not be any significant population impacts related to household growth in the City of Los Angeles

F-32 Subregion due to Project construction. Therefore, construction-related impacts related to population would be less than significant and no mitigation measures are required.

2

.

Operations

The proposed Project would not include any new residential development and therefore would have no direct population impacts. As discussed in Section IV.1.2, Housing, of the Draft EIR, jobs associated with the proposed Project’s commercial uses could create an indirect demand for approximately 2,589 housing units/households. It is estimated that the indirect Project housing demand could result in an indirect population increase of 7,092 persons. The 7,092 persons associated with indirect housing demand from the proposed Project’s office and studio production uses would represent approximately one-fifth of 1 percent of the population forecasted for 2038 in the City of Los Angeles Subregion, and 1.8 percent of population growth forecasted between 2011 and 2038. The proposed Project would be consistent with all City and regional population policies, including jobs/housing balance. Therefore, the proposed Project would not induce substantial population growth, nor would it exceed the population forecast for SCAG’s City of Los Angeles Subregion. Therefore, impacts related to population would be less than significant.

3.

Cumulative Impacts

The cumulative population associated with the proposed Project (i.e., total population associated with the proposed Project plus interim projects population plus related projects population) represents approximately 0.26 percent of 2038 population in the City of Los Angeles Subregion; and the cumulative indirect population growth accounts for approximately 2.97 percent of the population growth forecast in the City of Los Angeles Subregion through 2038. Therefore, the proposed Project’s associated incremental population impact would not be cumulatively considerable within the meaning of CEQA, and, hence, its cumulative population impact would be less than significant and no mitigation measures are required. L.

Public Services—Schools 1

.

Proposed Project Impacts

As no residential uses would be developed as part of the proposed Project, implementation of the proposed Project would not result in a direct increase in the number of students within the service area of the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). Based on application of the LAUSD, student generation rates to the land uses under the proposed Project, the proposed Project could indirectly generate approximately 992 elementary school students, approximately 248 middle school students, and approximately 496 high school students, for a total of approximately 1,736 students. For the purposes of providing a conservative analysis, it is assumed that these students would attend the LAUSD schools within the vicinity of the Project Site, rather than schools further away or private schools. Based on this conservative assumption, the elementary school students indirectly generated by employees at the Project Site would attend Van Ness Avenue Elementary School, Vine Street Elementary School, or Santa Monica Boulevard Community Charter School. The middle school students indirectly generated by employees at the Project Site would attend Joseph Le Conte Middle School or Bancroft Middle School. The high school students indirectly generated by employees at the Project Site would attend Fairfax High School or the Helen Bernstein High School Complex. Based on the future capacity and enrollment data provided by the LAUSD, and conservatively assuming that all students indirectly generated by employees at the Project Site would attend each of these schools,

F-33 with the exception of Vine Street Elementary School, each school is anticipated to have sufficient capacity to accommodate the students indirectly generated by Project Site employees. Pursuant to Senate Bill 50, the Applicant would be required to pay development fees for schools to the LAUSD prior to the issuance of building permits. Pursuant to Government Code Section 65995, the payment of these fees is considered mitigation of Project-related school impacts. Therefore, impacts on schools during operation of the proposed Project would be less than significant and mitigation measures are not required.

2

.

Cumulative Impacts

A number of the identified related projects and ambient growth projections fall within the attendance boundaries of the LAUSD. LAUSD has implemented the New School Construction Program which has delivered more than 170,000 seats. Furthermore, as with the proposed Project and the interim projects, future development, including the related projects, would be required to pay development fees for schools to the LAUSD prior to the issuance of building permits pursuant to Senate Bill 50. Pursuant to Government Code Section 65995, the payment of these fees would be considered mitigation of school impacts generated by the related projects. M.

Public Services—Parks and Recreation 1

.

Construction Impacts

Due to the employment patterns of construction workers in Southern California, and the operation of the market for construction labor, construction workers are not likely to relocate their households as a consequence of the construction job opportunities presented by the proposed Project. Further, it is anticipated that construction workers would use their breaks for lunch rather than for using parks and recreational facilities. Therefore, Project construction would not generate a demand for park or recreational facilities that cannot be adequately accommodated by existing or planned facilities and services, nor would Project construction interfere with existing park usage in a manner that would substantially reduce the service quality of the existing parks in the Project area. As such, impacts on parks and recreation facilities during Project construction would be less than significant, and mitigation measures are not required.

2.

Operations Impacts

The proposed Project would not develop residential uses that would directly generate the need for additional park and recreational facilities. In addition, the proposed Project would provide for expanded private on-site open space and recreational amenities to serve the recreation and leisure needs of Paramount employees and guests. Further, while the proposed Project’s employment opportunities would have the potential to indirectly increase the population of the Hollywood and Wilshire Community Plan areas, new demand for public parks and recreational facilities would be limited. Therefore, operation of the proposed Project would not generate a demand for park or recreational facilities that cannot be adequately accommodated by existing or planned facilities and services, or interfere with existing park usage in a manner that would substantially reduce the service quality of the existing parks in the Project area. Impacts on parks and recreation facilities during operation of the proposed Project would be less than significant, and mitigation measures are not required.

F-34 3.

Consistency with Regulations a)

Public Recreation Plan

The standards of the Public Recreation Plan are generally applied to projects that include a residential component, as residential uses generate the highest demand for public parks and recreational facilities. Commercial developments, such as the proposed Project, typically do not generate the need for additional public parks and recreational facilities, as the potential use of such facilities by commercial employees is generally minimal. Notwithstanding, the proposed Project would provide for expanded private on-site open space and recreational amenities to serve the recreation and leisure needs of employees and guests at Paramount Studios. Thus, the impacts of the proposed Project with regard to consistency with the Public Recreation Plan would be less than significant. b)

Los Angeles Municipal Code

As the proposed Project does not include the development of residential uses on-site, it would not be subject to the open space and park dedication requirements set forth in Section 12.21 and Section 17.12 of the LAMC. Therefore, the proposed Project would result in no impacts with regard to compliance with applicable sections of the LAMC.

cl

Hollywood and Wilshire Community Plans

The proposed Project would support the objectives and policies of the Community Plans through the provision of private open space and landscaping on-site, which would offset the demand for public parks and recreation space that could be generated by the proposed Project’s net new employees. In addition, Project development would not diminish the quality or accessibility or result in the removal of existing parks and recreational facilities within 2 miles of the Project Site. As such, impacts with respect to consistency with the Hollywood and Wilshire Community Plans would be less than significant. 4.

Cumulative Impacts

A number of the identified related projects and ambient growth projections fall within a 2-mile radius of the Project Site, the geographic area analyzed for purposes of assessing impacts to parks and recreational facilities. The City is currently providing, on average, 0.76 acre of neighborhood and community parks per 1,000 residents, which is below the Public Recreation Plan’s standards for neighborhood and community parks. As the population continues to grow in the Project area, increased demand would lower the existing parkland to population ratio if new facilities are not constructed. As with the proposed Project, the related projects would undergo discretionary review on a case-by-case basis and would be expected to coordinate with the Department of Recreation and Parks. Future development projects would also be required to comply with the park and recreation requirements of the Public Recreation Plan and Sections 12.21 and 17.12 of the LAMC, as applicable. In addition, as the proposed Project would not generate a direct increase in residential population, the demand for additional park and recreational facilities generated by Project employees and the potential indirect residential population growth would be minimal. Thus, the cumulative parks and recreation impacts of the proposed Project, interim projects, and related projects would be less than significant.

N.

Public Services—Libraries

F-35 1

Construction

Construction employment generated by the proposed Project would not result in a notable increase in resident population or a corresponding demand for library services in the vicinity of the Project Site. In addition, it is unlikely that construction workers would utilize Project area libraries on their way to/from work or during their lunch hours. Therefore, any increase in usage of the libraries by construction workers is anticipated to be negligible and impacts on library facilities during Project construction would be less than significant.

2

.

Operations

The 7,361-square-foot John C. Fremont Library does not meet the building size standard set forth in the 2007 Branch Facilities Plan Criteria for New Libraries, while the 19,000-square-foot Goldwyn-Hollywood Regional Library does meet the applicable size standard. Notwithstanding, the LAPL has indicated that both libraries meet the current demand for library services in their respective service areas. Additionally, five other LAPL branch libraries are located within 2 miles of the Project Site. To the extent that the proposed Project’s employees and/or indirect population generate an additional demand for library services, these libraries would assist in meeting that demand. Therefore, given that: (1) the two primary libraries that would serve the proposed Project are adequately meeting the demand for library services in the Project area, (2) the proposed Project does not include residential uses, which are the primary metric used by the LAPL for assessing the adequacy of library services and planning for future growth, and (3) Project employees and the potential indirect population generation that could be attributable to those employees would generate minimal demand for library services, the proposed Project would not exceed the capacity of local libraries to adequately serve the existing residential service population. As such, impacts on library facilities during operation of the proposed Project would be less than significant, and mitigation measures are not required.

3.

Cumulative Impacts

The John C. Fremont Library, constructed in 1927, is 7,361 square feet in size and, therefore, does not meet the building size standard set forth in the 2007 Branch Facilities Plan Criteria for New Libraries. As such, while the LAPL has indicated that the library meets the current demand for library services in its service area, it is conservatively assumed that the John C. Fremont library may not be adequate to serve the residential service area population upon proposed Project buildout in 2038, based on current LAPL size standards. The 2007 Branch Facilities Plan also provides a building size standard for Regional Libraries of up to 20,000 square feet. Thus, the 19,000-square-foot GoldwynHollywood Regional Library would remain adequate upon Project buildout in 2038 pursuant to the building size standard set forth in the 2007 Branch Facilities Plan Criteria for New Libraries. As with the proposed Project, future development, including the related projects, would undergo discretionary review on a case-by-case basis and would be expected to coordinate with the LAPL. Furthermore, the Goldwyn-Hollywood Regional Library as well as the several other branch libraries located within a 2-mile radius of the Project Site, including the Wilshire Library, Will & Ariel Durant Library, Cahuenga Library, Pio Pico-Koreatown Library, and Fairfax Library, would alleviate increased demand on the John C. Fremont Library. The proposed Project would not generate a direct increase in residential population, and the demand for library services generated by Project employees and potential indirect residential population growth would be minimal. Therefore, the proposed Project’s impacts on the John C. Fremont Library and the Goldwyn-Hollywood Regional Library would not be cumulatively

F-36 considerable, and the cumulative library impacts of the proposed Project, interim projects, and related projects would be less than significant. O.

Traffic (Congestion Management Plan, Transit System Capacity, Project Access, Parking) 1

.

Congestion Management Plan (CMP)

Only one arterial monitoring intersection, Western Avenue & Santa Monica Boulevard, is forecasted to have over 50 trips added by Project traffic during either peak hour. This intersection is expected to operate at LOS E during both the weekday morning and afternoon peak hours under Existing with Project conditions and under Future with Project conditions. As the intersection would not operate at LOS F during any peak hour, no significant traffic impact would occur according to CMP criteria and no mitigation is required. As the proposed Project would not add 150 trips in either direction during either peak hour, no CMP freeway segments impact would occur and no additional freeway analysis is required under CMP criteria for existing or future conditions.

2.

Transit System Capacity

With regard to transit system capacity, the proposed Project is forecasted to generate a total of 5,061 daily transit trips, including 521 morning peak-hour transit trips and 556 afternoon peak-hour transit trips. The anticipated transit demand from the proposed Project would be more than satisfied by the existing capacity surplus and the proposed Project is not expected to significantly impact the regional transit system under existing conditions. In addition, the anticipated future transit demand from the proposed Project would be more than satisfied by an estimated future capacity surplus, and the proposed Project is not expected to significantly impact the regional transit system under future conditions. 3.

Project Access

The proposed Project’s Conceptual Site Plan indicates that vehicular access to the Project Site would be modified and improved in a number of ways, as discussed in Section IV.K, Traffic, Access, and Parking, of the Draft EIR. Internal circulation within the Main Lot would be improved through widening and connecting of the existing avenues and alleys through the Project Site. With the removal of some buildings and the construction of new ones in strategic locations, the Main Lot’s configuration will enhance circulation for vehicles, pedestrians, and bicycles. Additionally, the construction of structured parking would help to reduce passenger vehicle traffic on the Main Lot, which will enhance safety and improve conditions for pedestrians and bicycles. Circulation within and among the Ancillary Lots would be largely unchanged with implementation of the proposed Project. All of the intersections nearest to the proposed driveways would operate at LOS D or better under both Existing with Project and Future with Project conditions. In addition, no access impacts related to bicycle, pedestrian, or vehicular safety are expected to result due to the design or placement of Project access points. Therefore, Project operational access impacts would be less than significant. 4.

Parking

F-37 During construction, an adequate number of on-site parking spaces for construction workers would be available at all times on the Project Site or the proposed Project would provide a shuttle to an off-site parking location for the construction workers. Thus, Project construction would result in a less than significant impact with regard to the availability of parking spaces. Operational parking requirements developed specifically for the Project Site are set forth in the proposed Specific Plan. Based on these requirements and the Conceptual Site Plan configuration of uses, the proposed Project would provide approximately 7,550 parking spaces, which exceeds the amount of parking required by the LAMC, as well as the forecasted peak parking demand for 7,547 spaces. Therefore, Project impacts with regard to parking would be less than significant. In addition, as discussed above, it is noted that the Project’s parking impacts would not be considered significant impacts on the environment pursuant to Public Resources Code Section 21099.

5.

Cumulative Impacts a]

CMP

The proposed Project’s contribution to cumulative traffic would result in less-than-significant LOS impacts at the CMP arterial monitoring station located at Western Avenue and Santa Monica Boulevard (Intersection No. 54). Further, as this intersection does not operate at LOS F during either peak hour under cumulative conditions, cumulative impacts would be less than significant. As the proposed Project would not add 150 trips in either direction during either peak hour, no CMP freeway segments impact would occur and as a result the proposed Project’s contribution to cumulative impacts would not be cumulatively considerable. Thus, cumulative impacts to CMP locations would be less than significant.

b)

Transit System Capacity

Implementation of the proposed Project in conjunction with cumulative conditions would increase the demand for transit in the Study Area. As discussed above, when accounting for the proposed Project and future growth through Project buildout, the anticipated future transit demand from the proposed Project would be more than satisfied by the capacity surplus. Thus, the proposed Project would not result in transit impacts that would be cumulatively considerable.

c]

Project Access

Implementation of the proposed Project in conjunction with interim projects, some of the related projects and regional growth (depending on proximity to the Project Site) would increase the amount of traffic in the Project area. The analysis of the Future-with-Project condition reflects both Project-specific and future cumulative traffic impacts related to intersection LOS in the Study Area, because the Future-with-Project condition considers a combination of existing traffic conditions, plus traffic from regional growth and related projects, and Project traffic. This analysis concluded that the proposed Project would result in less than significant impacts related to Project access, and bicycle, pedestrian, and vehicular safety. Therefore, the proposed Project’s cumulative impacts would not be cumulatively considerable, and are concluded to be less than significant.

d)

Parking

F-38 The parking demands associated with the proposed Project would not contribute to the cumulative demand for parking in the vicinity of the Project Site as a result of development of the proposed Project and related projects. The majority of the related projects are sufficiently separated from the Project Site such that they would not share parking supplies. Also, pedestrian access to the Project Site is controlled to select locations. Thus, visitors and employees associated with the proposed Project are not likely to park elsewhere due to geographic and access limitations. Additionally, the proposed Project’s demand for parking would be accommodated on-site. Therefore, cumulative parking impacts would be less than significant. P.

Utilities and Service Systems—Water Supply 1

.

Construction

The water demand generated by construction activities for the proposed Project would be substantially less than the net new water consumption of the proposed Project at buildout, and is not anticipated to have any adverse impact on available water supplies and infrastructure. In addition, such water demand would be temporary in nature. The proposed Project would implement Project Design Feature L. 1-1 related to water infrastructure, including the on-site construction of water facilities (related to domestic water and fire protection) along with off-site connections to the water distribution lines in Melrose Avenue, Gower Street and Ridgewood Place. The design and installation of new water lines would meet applicable City standards as set forth in the City Plumbing Code. Most construction impacts are expected to be confined to trenching for water lines and would be temporary in nature. With implementation of the construction traffic management plans pursuant to Project Design Feature K-2, construction-related impacts to water supply and infrastructure would be less than significant.

2.

Operation

Buildout of the proposed Project uses would result in a net increase of approximately 239,569 gallons per day or 268 acre-feet per year in potable water demand. As set forth in the Water Supply Assessment for the proposed Project provided in Appendix S of the Draft EIR, the LADWP Board found that the proposed Project falls within the projected water supplies for normal, single-dry, and multiple-dry years and that it will be able to meet the water demand for the proposed Project, as well as existing and planned water demands of its future service area. The estimated water demand for the proposed Project would not exceed the available supplies projected by LADWP. Thus, LADWP would be able to meet the water demand of the proposed Project, as well as the existing and planned future water demands of its service area. Therefore, operation-related impacts to water supply would be less than significant. Water service to the Project Site would continue to be supplied by the LADWP for domestic and fire protection uses. The proposed Project would increase the demand for domestic and fire water and would require the construction of additional domestic and fire water lines. With implementation of Project Design Feature L.1-1 and Project Design Feature J.2-4, the necessary on-site infrastructure and connections to the LADWP system would be constructed, and the proposed Project would not exceed the available capacity within the distribution infrastructure that would serve the Project Site. Therefore, operation-related impacts to water infrastructure would be less than significant.

3.

Project Design Features

F-39 Project Design Feature L.1-1: New on-site water mains and laterals would be installed in accordance with City Plumbing Code requirements, where necessary, to distribute water within the Project Site.

Project Design Feature L.1-2: The proposed Project would implement the following water conservation features: For proposed outdoor areas of the proposed Project: •

Expanded use of high-efficiency irrigation systems, including weatherbased irrigation controllers with rain shutoff technology or smart irrigation controllers for any area that is either landscaped or designated for future landscaping. Drip or subsurface irrigation shall be utilized.



Use of water efficient landscaping, such as proper hydro-zoning, turf minimization, zoned irrigation and use of native/drought-tolerant plant materials within the Project Site. At least 25 percent of new landscaping areas shall use drought-tolerant plants.



Use of landscaped contouring in areas other than production areas and visitor entry points.



Provide education on water conservation to employees.

For proposed indoor areas of the proposed Project:

4.



High-efficiency toilets with flush volume of 1.0 gallon of water per flush.



High-efficiency urinals that use 0.125 gallon per flush or less.



Indoor faucets that use 1.5 gallons per minute or less.



Pre-rinse spray valves that use 1.6 gallons per minute or less.



All installed dishwashers shall be Energy Star rated.



Shower stalls shall have no more than one showerhead per stall.



High-efficiency clothes washers with a water savings factor of 7.5 or less.



Tankless and on-demand water heaters.



Domestic water heating system.



Standardized bottleless water filters for drinking water.



Cooling tower conductivity controllers or cooling tower pH conductivity controllers. Cooling towers shall operate at a minimum of 5.5 cycles of concentration.

Cumulative Impacts

Based on LADWP’s 2010 Urban Water Management Plan (UWMP) water demand projections through 2035, and the service area reliability assessment conducted by the LADWP in its UWMP, LADWP determined that it will be able to reliably provide water to its customers through the year 2035. Furthermore, as indicated by the Water Supply Assessment, the LADWP Board found that that it will be able to meet the water demand for the proposed Project as well as existing and planned water demands of its future service area. Thus, it is anticipated that LADWP would be able to supply the demands of the proposed Project, the interim projects, the related projects, and future growth through 2035. Continued efforts by LADWP to secure the reliability of water supplies in the future, combined

F-40 with project-specific requirements to conduct analyses to ensure the availability of sufficient water supply to meet demand, are expected to continue through 2038 and beyond. Therefore, cumulative impacts on water supply would be less than significant. Similar to the proposed Project, new development projects would be subject to LADWP review to assure that the existing public utility facilities would be adequate to meet the domestic and fire water demands of each project, and individual projects would be subject to LADWP and City requirements regarding infrastructure improvements needed to meet respective water demands, flow and pressure requirements, etc. Therefore, cumulative impacts on the water infrastructure system would be less than significant.

Q.

Utilities and Service Systems—Wastewater 1.

Construction

Wastewater generation would occur incrementally throughout construction of the proposed Project (i.e., up to 2038). However, such use would be temporary and nominal when compared with the wastewater generated by an occupied permanent building. Thus, wastewater generation from proposed Project construction activities is not anticipated to cause a measurable increase in wastewater flows at a point where, and at a time when, a sewer’s capacity is already constrained or that would cause a sewer’s capacity to become constrained. For these same reasons, construction of the proposed Project is not anticipated to generate wastewater flows that would substantially or incrementally exceed the future scheduled capacity of any one treatment plant by generating flows greater than those anticipated in the Integrated Resources Plan. Construction impacts (including, but not limited to, street, traffic detouring and control, and impacts to other utilities) would be confined along Melrose Avenue and streets adjacent to the Ancillary Lots. With implementation of Project Design Feature K-2, which would require the implementation of construction traffic management plans, construction impacts to the wastewater system would be less than significant and no mitigation measures are required.

2

.

Operation

The proposed Project is estimated to generate an average net wastewater flow of 0.226 million gallons per day (0.350 cubic foot per second) and a peak wastewater flow of 0.660 million gallons per day (1.021 cubic feet per second). In terms of wastewater conveyance, there is sufficient capacity to accommodate the increased flows from the proposed Project, and the proposed Project would have a less than significant impact on the City’s main sewer lines serving the Project Site. The proposed Project would not cause a measurable increase in wastewater flows at a point where, and a time when, a sewer’s capacity is already constrained or that would cause a sewer’s capacity to become constrained. Impacts with respect to wastewater generation and infrastructure would be less than significant and mitigation measures are not required. The Hyperion Treatment Plant has the capacity to accommodate the additional wastewater flows from the proposed Project. The proposed Project’s net increase in average daily wastewater flow of 0.226 million gallons per day would equate to less than one percent of the current available capacity of the Hyperion Treatment Plant. Therefore, the proposed Project-generated wastewater would be accommodated by the existing capacity of the Hyperion Treatment Plant and a less than significant impact would occur. In addition, the proposed Project’s net increase in average daily

F-41 wastewater generation of 0.226 million gallons per day would represent approximately 0.04 percent of the Hyperion Service Area’s assumed future capacity of 550 million gallons per day and approximately 0.05 percent of the Hyperion Treatment Plant’s assumed future capacity of 450 million gallons per day. Therefore, the proposed Project’s additional wastewater flows would not substantially or incrementally exceed the future scheduled capacity of any treatment plant by generating flows greater than those anticipated in the Integrated Resources Plan. Impacts with respect to wastewater treatment capacity would be less than significant and mitigation measures are not required. 3.

Project Design Features

In addition to the water conservation features set forth in Project Design Feature L.1-2, the MMP also includes the following project design features with respect to wastewater:

Project Design Feature L.2-1: Prior to the development of a new building, the capacity of the on-site sanitary sewers that would serve the building shall be evaluated based on applicable Bureau of Sanitation and California Plumbing Code standards and replacement or new sanitary sewers shall be installed on-site as necessary to accommodate proposed flows.

Project Design Feature L.2-2: New Project sanitary sewers that may be necessary shall be designed and constructed to conform to the applicable Bureau of Sanitation and California Plumbing Code standards.

Project Design Feature L.2-3:

If it is determined, as part of the evaluation performed pursuant to Project Design Feature L.2-1, that existing on-site laterals cannot be utilized for future service for new Project development, the Applicant shall be responsible for the construction of all new service connections to off-site City sanitary sewers. New Project service connections and laterals shall be designed and constructed in accordance with Bureau of Sanitation and California Plumbing Code standards.

4.

Cumulative Impacts

Forecasted growth from known related projects in areas that are tributary to the City sewers serving the Project Site would generate approximately 0.191 million gallons per day of wastewater under average conditions and 0.565 million gallons per day under peak flows. Combined with the proposed Project’s 0.226-million-gailon-per-day average flow and 0.660-million-gallon-per-day peak flow, this equates to a cumulative increase in average daily wastewater flow of 0.417 million gallons per day and a cumulative increase in peak daily wastewater flow of 1.225 million gallons per day. Combined with the proposed Project’s 0.226-million-gallon-per-day average flow and the interim projects’ 7,500-gallon- per-day average flow, this equates to a cumulative increase in average daily wastewater flow of 0.425 million gallons per day. There is capacity within the main sewer lines serving the Project to accommodate the cumulative flows. New development projects occurring in the proposed Project vicinity would be subject to LAMC Sections 64.11 and 64.12, which require approval of a sewer permit prior to connection to the sewer system. Additionally, in order to connect to the sewer system, related projects in the City of Los Angeles would be subject to payment of the City’s Sewerage Facilities Charge. Payment of such fees would help to offset the costs associated with infrastructure improvements that would be needed to accommodate wastewater generated by ‘overall future growth. Furthermore,

F-42 similar to the proposed Project, each related project would be required to comply with water conservation programs of the local jurisdictions and the state. Therefore, cumulative impacts on wastewater conveyance systems would be less than significant. Without accounting for the proposed Project’s water conservation features, the proposed Project, interim projects, and, related projects would generate a net increase in average daily wastewater flows of approximately 0.425 million gallons per day. The forecasted 2038 average dry weather flow for the Hyperion Service Area is approximately 450 million gallons per day. Based the Hyperion Service Area’s assumed future capacity of approximately 550 million gallons per day, the Hyperion Service Area is expected to have adequate capacity to accommodate the cumulative wastewater flow of approximately 450.4 million gallons per day from the proposed Project, interim projects, related projects, and forecasted growth by 2038. Therefore, cumulative impacts on the wastewater treatment systems would be less than significant. R.

Utilities and Service Systems—Solid Waste (Construction) 1

.

Construction

Based on construction and debris rates established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, it is anticipated that construction of the proposed Project would generate a total of approximately 84,305 tons of demolition debris and 8,114 tons of construction debris, for a combined total of 92,419 tons of construction-related waste generation. With the proposed diversion of at least 50 percent of the non-hazardous construction and demolition waste based on Project Design Feature L.3-1, the proposed Project would dispose of approximately 46,209 tons of construction and demolition waste at the unclassified landfill throughout the construction timeframe for the proposed Project. This amount of construction and debris waste would represent approximately 0.07 percent of the remaining disposal capacity of 64.21 million tons for the unclassified landfill in Los Angeles County that has solid waste facility permits. Thus, the total amount of construction and demolition waste generated by the proposed Project would represent a fraction of the remaining capacity at the unclassified landfill in Los Angeles County. In addition, the daily construction and demolition waste generated by the proposed Project would also represent a fraction of the existing daily capacity at the unclassified landfill. Since the County’s unclassified landfill generally does not face capacity shortages, and the County’s unclassified landfill would be able to accommodate Project-generated waste, construction of the proposed Project would not result in the need for an additional disposal facility to adequately handle Project-generated waste. Therefore, construction impacts to solid waste facilities would be less than significant. 2

.

Project Design Features

Project Design Feature L.3-1: During new construction, a minimum of 50 percent of the nonhazardous demolition and construction debris by weight from construction of new Project buildings shall be recycled and/or salvaged for reuse in compliance with the requirements of City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety.

3.

Cumulative Impacts

It is anticipated that future cumulative development would implement measures similar to Project Design Feature L.3-1 to divert construction and demolition waste from landfill disposal.

F-43 Furthermore, the unclassified landfill does not face capacity issues and would be expected to have sufficient capacity to accommodate cumulative demand. Therefore, cumulative impacts on the unclassified landfill would be less than significant and no mitigation measures are required.

S.

Utilities and Service Systems—Energy

1.

Construction

During proposed Project construction, electricity would be consumed to convey water used for dust control and, on a limited basis, power lights, electronic equipment, and other construction activities necessitating electrical power. Construction activities, including the construction of new buildings and facilities, typically do not involve the consumption of natural gas. Proposed Project construction would also consume energy in the form of petroleum-based fuels associated with the use of off-road construction vehicles and equipment on the Project Site, construction worker travel to and from the Project Site, and delivery and haul truck trips (e.g., hauling of demolition material to off-site reuse and disposal facilities). Overall, a total of 200 megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity, 315,200 gallons of gasoline, and 1,594,200 gallons of diesel fuel is estimated to be consumed during proposed Project construction. The proposed Project would include measures to avoid unnecessary and wasteful consumption of energy (e.g., powering off equipment when not in use, recycling construction and demolition material). Further, construction of the proposed Project would not result in an increase in demand for electricity or natural gas that exceeds available supply or distribution infrastructure capabilities. Therefore, energy impacts during construction would be less than significant.

2

.

Operations

During operation of the proposed Project, energy would be consumed for multiple purposes including, but not limited to: heating/ventilating/air conditioning (HVAC), refrigeration, lighting, and the use of electronics,, equipment, and machinery. Energy would also be consumed during proposed Project operations related to water usage, solid waste disposal, and vehicle trips. The proposed Project’s net new energy demand would be approximately 35,800 MWh of electricity per year, 810,600 cubic feet of natural gas per month, 872,000 gallons of gasoline per year, and 151,500 gallons of diesel fuel per year. It is anticipated that LADWP’s existing and planned electricity capacity and electricity supplies would be sufficient to support the proposed Project’s electricity demand. LADWP has indicated that additional power to meet Project demand would be supplied to existing on-site substations through existing transmission lines and that the existing distribution facilities in the Project area have the capability to supply the increase in electrical demand generated by the proposed Project. Furthermore, it is anticipated that SoCalGas’ existing and planned natural gas supplies would be sufficient to support the proposed Project’s net increase in demand for natural gas. In addition, SoCalGas has indicated it has the gas supply to accommodate the proposed Project. Therefore, operation of the proposed Project would not result in an increase in demand for electricity or natural gas that exceeds available supply or distribution infrastructure capabilities. Further, the proposed Project would comply with applicable regulatory requirements regarding energy conservation (e.g., California Building Energy Efficiency Standards and CALGreen) and would implement project design features to further reduce energy use. As such, the proposed Project would not cause wasteful, inefficient, and unnecessary consumption of electricity or natural gas during operation. Impacts associated with operational electricity and natural gas consumption would be less than significant.

F-44 With regard to transportation energy use, pursuant to Project Design Feature K-1 in the MMP, the proposed Project would include vehicular trip reduction measures as part of a TDM Program. Additionally, bicycle amenities, such as racks and personal lockers, would be expanded at various locations around the Project Site pursuant to the TDM program. The Project Site is also located in a High-Quality Transit Area designated by SCAG, which indicates that the Project Site is an appropriate site for increased density and employment opportunities from a “smart growth,” regional planning perspective. As such, the proposed Project’s siting would minimize transportation fuel consumption through the reduction of vehicle miles traveled (VMT). Therefore, the proposed Project would not cause wasteful, inefficient, and unnecessary consumption of petroleum-based fuel during operation. Impacts associated with operational transportation-related energy use would be less than significant. 3.

Project Design Features

Project Design Feature L.4-1: The Applicant shall incorporate the following measures into the design of new buildings for the proposed Project:

4.



Efficient lighting and lighting control systems;



Light-colored or "cool" roofs;



Energy-efficient heating and cooling systems, appliances (e.g., Energy Star) and equipment and control systems;



Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for on-site street lighting; and



Education regarding energy efficiency, water conservation, waste diversion, and recycling services to the Applicant's employees.

Cumulative Impacts

The proposed Project would account for approximately 0.13 percent of LADWP’s projected energy sales for the proposed Project’s build-out year. Accordingly, the proposed Project’s contribution to cumulative impacts related to electricity consumption would not be cumulatively considerable and, thus, would be less than significant. Furthermore, like the proposed Project, during construction and operation, other future development projects would be expected to incorporate energy conservation features, comply with applicable regulations including CALGreen and state energy standards under Title 24, and incorporate mitigation measures, as necessary. The proposed Project would account for approximately 0.018 percent of the 2035 forecasted Accordingly, the proposed Project’s contribution to cumulative impacts related to natural gas consumption would not be cumulatively considerable and, thus, would be less than significant. Furthermore, future development projects would be expected to incorporate energy conservation features, comply with applicable regulations including CALGreen and state energy standards under Title 24, and incorporate mitigation measures, as necessary.

consumption in SoCalGas’s planning area.

The proposed Project would account for approximately 0.005 percent of existing transportation-related energy consumption in the State. The proposed Project is within an infill site that is adjacent to existing, approved, and planned infrastructure, urban services, transportation corridors, transit facilities, and major employment centers in furtherance of SB 375 policies. The proposed Project also would introduce new development and job opportunities within a High-Quality

F-45 Transit Area, which is consistent with numerous policies in the 2012-2035 RTP/SCS related to locating new jobs near transit. These features would serve to reduce VMT and associated transportation fuel consumption. Thus, while there would be an increase in the consumption of petroleum-based fuels, the proposed Project’s contribution to cumulative impacts related to transportation energy consumption would not be cumulatively considerable and, thus, would be less than significant. VII.

IMPACTS FOUND NOT TO BE SIGNIFICANT PRIOR TO MITIGATION, WHERE MITIGATION NONETHELESS PROVIDED TO FURTHER REDUCE IMPACTS

The following effects associated with the Project were analyzed in the EIR and found not to be significant prior to mitigation. Nonetheless, mitigation measures have been incorporated to further reduce these effects, as set forth in the MMP. A.

Public Services—Police Protection 1.

Description of Effects a]

Construction Impacts

Construction-related traffic on adjacent streets could potentially affect emergency access to and near the Project Site on a temporary basis. However, construction traffic management plans would be implemented pursuant to Project Design Feature K-2 to ensure that adequate and safe access and parking remains available at the Project Site during construction activities. Therefore, with implementation of Project Design Feature K-2, emergency access impacts from construction activities would be less than significant. Additionally, the potential for theft of construction equipment and building materials, which would be temporarily stored on-site, would be minimized through the implementation of Project Design Feature J.1-1, which includes the use of security fencing, lighting, locked entry, and security patrol of the Project Site. Thus, potential impacts associated with theft during construction activities would be less than significant.

b)

Operational Impacts

On-site security and safety measures would be continued as part of future operation of the Project Site to reduce the demand for the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) services, pursuant to Project Design Feature J. 1-2. The proposed Project would not generate a demand for additional police protection services that would substantially exceed the capability of the Hollywood or Olympic Community Police Stations to serve the Project Site. In addition, emergency access to the Project Site and surrounding uses would be maintained at all times and proposed Project development would not result in a significant impact on access. Therefore, impacts to police protection service would be less than significant. However, in accordance with City policies, Mitigation Measures J.1-1 and J.1-2 are included in the MMP to ensure that specific design features would be implemented that would further reduce potential impacts related to police protection services.

c]

Cumulative Impacts

A number of the identified related projects and ambient growth projections fall within the service areas of the Hollywood Community Police Station and Olympic Community Police Station,

F-46 which serve the Project Site and surrounding area. The cumulative increase in the police service population from the identified related projects and ambient growth projections would result in a cumulative increase in the demand for police protection services from both the Hollywood Community Police Station and Olympic Community Police Station. Similar to the proposed Project, the related projects would be reviewed by the LARD to ensure that sufficient security measures are implemented to reduce potential impacts to police protection services. In addition, each related project would be required to comply with regulatory requirements related to police protection. Furthermore, Projectrelated impacts on police protection services would be less than significant with implementation of project design features, which include the provision of on-site security. Therefore, the combined cumulative impacts on police protection associated with the proposed Project, the interim projects, and the related projects would be less than significant.

2.

Project Design Features

Project Design Feature J.1-1:

During Project construction, the Applicant shall implement security measures including security fencing, lighting, locked entry, and security patrols.

Project Design Feature J.1-2: The Applicant shall continue to provide private on-site security throughout the Project Site during Project operation.

3.

Mitigation Measures

Mitigation Measure J.1-1: Prior to the issuance of a building permit for a building that abuts a public street, the Applicant shall consult with the Los Angeles Police Department Crime Prevention Unit regarding the incorporation of crime prevention features appropriate for the design of the building, including applicable features in the Los Angeles Police Department’s Design Out Crime Guidelines.

Mitigation Measure J.1-2: The Applicant shall submit a diagram of the property to the Los Angeles Police Department- West Bureau Commanding Officer on an annual basis unless no new construction has occurred within the previous year. The diagram shall include access routes, and any additional information that might facilitate police response. 4.

Findings

Although operation of the proposed Project would not result in significant impacts on police services provided by the LARD, in accordance with City policies, Mitigation Measures J.1-1 and J.1-2 are included in the MMP to ensure that specific design features would be implemented that would further reduce potential impacts related to police protection services.

5.

Rationale for Findings

Implementation of Project Design Features J.1-1 and J.1-2 and Project Design Feature K-2 set forth in the MMP would ensure that Project-level and cumulative construction-related impacts on police services would be less than significant. During operation, Project-level and cumulative impacts on police protection services would be less than significant. Furthermore, implementation of Mitigation

F-47 Measures J.1-1 and J.1-2 set forth in the MMP would ensure that the proposed Project is designed in a manner that would further reduce potential impacts on police protection services. 6

.

Reference

For a complete discussion of environmental impacts with respect to police protection, please see Section IV.J.1, Public Services - Police Protection, of the Draft EIR. B.

Public Services—Fire Protection 1.

Description of Effects a1

Construction Impacts

Construction-related traffic on adjacent streets could potentially affect emergency access to and near the Project Site on a temporary basis. However, construction traffic management plans would be implemented pursuant to Project Design Feature K-2 to ensure that adequate and safe access and parking remains available at the Project Site during construction activities. Additionally, implementation of the project design features related to hazards and hazardous materials, as well as compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local requirements concerning the use, handling, and storage of hazardous materials (including flammable materials) would effectively reduce the potential for Project construction activities to expose people to the risk of fire or explosion related to hazardous materials. Therefore, with implementation of project design features and compliance with applicable regulations, construction-related impacts to fire protection services would be less than significant. b)

Operational Impacts d)

Facilities and Equipment

The proposed Project would not include the development of new residential units which would generate a new residential population in the service area of Fire Station No. 52. While the daytime population projected to be generated by the proposed Project would increase the demand for Los Angeles Fire Department (LAFD) fire protection and emergency medical services, the proposed Project would be located within close proximity (0.8 mile) of Fire Station No. 52. In addition, Fire Stations No. 27, No. 82, No. 29, and No. 61 would continue to be available to serve the Project Site in the event of an emergency. The proposed Project would also implement numerous project design features related to fire protection. These project design features would help reduce the proposed Project’s demand for fire protection services provided by the LAFD. In addition, potential fire hazards associated with high-rise structures would be reduced through compliance with, numerous construction and Fire Code standards affecting structural design, building materials, site access, fire flow, storage and management of hazardous materials, alarm and communications systems, building sprinkler systems, etc. Further, based on a preliminary review of the proposed Project’s plans, the LAFD did not conclude that the proposed Project would have a significant impact on LAFD services. Therefore, impacts related to the LAFD’s capability to provide adequate fire protection services would be less than significant. (2)

Response Distance and Access

F-48 Section 57.507.3.3 of the LAMC sets forth the response distance for commercial uses as 1 mile to a fire station with an engine company and 1.5 miles to a fire station with a truck company. Fire Station No. 52 is located 0.8 mile away and is equipped with two engines. Fire Station No. 27, located 1.2 miles away, is the closest fire station to the Project Site that is equipped with a truck. Therefore, the proposed Project would fall within the LAFD’s maximum prescribed response distances, and impacts with regard to fire response distance would be less than significant. Notwithstanding the proposed Project’s less than significant impact, Mitigation Measure J.2-1 is included in the MMP to ensure adequate emergency response to the Project Site. (3)

Fire Flow

According to the LAFD, a minimum fire flow ranging from up to 6,000 to up to 9,000 gallons per minute (gpm) from six hydrants flowing simultaneously with a residual pressure of 20 pounds per square inch would be required for the proposed Project. The existing fire protection system on-site is able to deliver a minimum of 5,000 gpm for an unlimited duration of time. Additional on-site fire water lines and hydrants would be constructed as necessary to comply with applicable City requirements regarding fire flows and to provide fire flow service to new buildings. Pursuant to Project Design Feature J.2-4, the proposed fire water system improvements would provide a minimum fire flow of up to 6,000 gpm to up to 9,000 gpm, with a residual pressure of 20 pounds per square inch. With construction of the proposed on-site fire water system improvements, the proposed Project would meet the fire flow requirement. Therefore, the proposed Project would result in a less than significant impact related to fire flows. .

c)

Cumulative Impacts

Similar to the proposed Project, related projects would be reviewed by the LAFD to ensure that sufficient fire safety and hazards measures are implemented to reduce potential impacts to fire services. In addition, each related project would be required to comply with regulatory requirements related to fire protection and emergency medical services, including fire flow requirements. Furthermore, Project-related impacts on fire protection services would be less than significant with implementation of regulatory requirements and the project design features. Therefore, cumulative impacts associated with the proposed Project, interim projects, and the related projects on the LAFD’s capability to provide adequate fire protection services would be less than significant. Each of the related projects identified in the area would be developed within urbanized locations that fall within an acceptable distance from one or more existing fire stations. Therefore, cumulative impacts associated with the proposed Project, interim projects, and the related projects on response distances would be less than significant. In addition, through the City of Los Angeles’ routine construction permitting process and coordination with the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP), cumulative impacts associated with the proposed Project, interim projects, and the related projects on fire flow water infrastructure would be less than significant.

2

.

Project Design Features

Project Design Feature J.2-1: The Applicant shall submit a plot plan for approval of access and fire hydrants by the Los Angeles Fire Department prior to the issuance of a building permit by the City. The plot plan may include the following design features, as determined by the LAFD:

F-49 No building or portion of a building shall be constructed mere than 150 feet from the edge of a roadway of an improved street, access road, or designated fire lane. Access for Los Angeles Fire Department apparatus and personnel to and into all structures shall be required. The width of private roadways for general access use and fire lanes shall not be less than 20 feet clear to the sky. Fire lanes, where required, and dead ending streets shall terminate in a cul-de-sac or other approved turning area. No dead ending street or fire lane shall be greater than 700 feet in length or secondary access would be required. All access roads, including fire lanes, shall be maintained in an unobstructed manner, and removal of obstructions shall be at the owner’s expense. The entrance to all required fire lanes or required private driveways shall be posted with a sign no less than three square feet in area. Fire lane width shall not be less than 20 feet. When a fire lane must accommodate the operation of Los Angeles Fire Department aerial ladder apparatus or where fire hydrants are installed, those portions shall not be less than 28 feet in width. Private roadways for general access use shall have a minimum width of 20 feet. Where access for a given development requires accommodation of Los Angeles Fire Department apparatus, overhead clearance shall not be less than 14 feet. All structures shall be fully sprinklered. Adequate public and private fire hydrants shall be required. The Los Angeles Fire Department may require additional vehicular access where buildings exceed 28 feet in height. Where fire apparatus shall be driven onto the road level surface of the subterranean parking structure, that structure shall be engineered to withstand a bearing pressure of 8,600 pounds per square foot. No building or portion of a building shall be constructed more than 300 feet from an approved fire hydrant. Distance shall be computed along path of travel. Any required fire hydrants to be installed shall be fully operational and accepted by the Los Angeles Fire Department prior to any building construction. No framing shall be allowed until the roadway is installed to the satisfaction of the Los Angeles Fire Department. Private streets shall be recorded as Private Streets and Fire Lanes. All private street plans shall show the words “Private Street and Fire Lane” within the private street easement.

F-50 •

All parking restrictions for fire lanes shall be posted and/or painted prior to any Temporary Certificate of Occupancy being issued.



Plans showing areas to be posted and/or painted “FIRE LANE NO PARKING” shall be submitted and approved by the Los Angeles Fire Department prior to building permit application sign-off.



Electric gates approved by the Los Angeles Fire Department shall be tested by the Los Angeles Fire Department prior to the Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety granting a Certificate of Occupancy.



Any required Fire Annunciator Panel or Fire Control Room shall be located within 50 feet of the visual line of sight of the main entrance stairwell or to the satisfaction of the Los Angeles Fire Department.

Project Design Feature J.2-2: The Applicant shall continue to provide on-site safety and fire prevention equipment for internal use by trained staff.

Project Design Feature J.2-3: The Applicant shall continue to coordinate with and provide advance notice to the Los Angeles Fire Department regarding large special events (i.e., 2,500 attendees or more) taking place on the Project Site. Project Design Feature J.2-4: The proposed Project shall comply with the fire flow requirements set forth in Section 57.507.3.1 of the Los Angeles Municipal Code. In doing so, the proposed Project shall provide a minimum fire flow ranging from up to 6,000 to up to 9,000 gallons per minute from six hydrants flowing simultaneously with a residual pressure of 20 pounds per square inch, as determined by the Los Angeles Fire Department based on its review of the proposed Project’s design plans. 3.

Mitigation Measures

Mitigation Measure J.2-1:

The Applicant shall submit an emergency response plan for approval by the Los Angeles Fire Department on an annual basis unless no new construction has occurred within the previous year. The emergency response plan shall include but not be limited to the following: mapping of emergency exits, evacuation routes for vehicles and pedestrians, and the location of the nearest hospitals and fire departments.

4.

Findings

Although operation of the proposed Project would not result in significant impacts on fire services provided by the LAFD, in addition to the project design features above and compliance with applicable state and City regulations, Mitigation Measure J.2-1 is included in the MMP to ensure adequate emergency response to the Project Site.

5.

Rationale for Findings

Implementation of Project Design Feature K-2 as set forth in the MMP would ensure that construction-related impacts on fire protection services would be less than significant. During operation, Project-level and cumulative impacts on fire protection services would be less than significant. Furthermore, implementation of Mitigation Measure J.2-1 as set forth in the MMP would ensure that the proposed Project is designed in a manner that would further reduce potential impacts on fire protection services.

F-51 6

.

Reference

For a complete discussion of environmental impacts with respect to fire protection, please see Section IV. J.2, Public Services - Fire Protection, of the Draft EIR.

VIII.

IMPACTS FOUND TO BE LESS THAN SIGNIFICANT AFTER MITIGATION

The following impact areas were concluded by the EIR to be less than significant with the implementation of mitigation measures described in the EIR and included in the MMP. Based on that analysis and other evidence in the administrative record relating to the project, the City finds and determines that mitigation measures described in the Final EIR and included in the MMP will reduce potentially significant impacts identified for the following environmental impact categories to below the level of significance: ' A.

Cultural Resources (Historic Resources) 1

.

Description of Effects a]

Potential Impacts to Paramount Pictures Historic District

With respect to demolition, with implementation of the Historic Resources Preservation Plan and the other mitigation measures set forth in the MMP, the potential Paramount Pictures Historic District would retain eligibility for historic designation. According to National Park Service guidelines, for a district to retain integrity as a whole, the majority of the components that make up the district's historic character must possess integrity even if they are individually undistinguished. In addition, the relationships among the district's components must be substantially unchanged since the period of significance. With implementation of Mitigation Measures C-1 through 07 set forth in the MMP, including the Preservation Plan, the overall integrity of the potential Paramount Pictures Historic District would be retained following Project implementation, and the individual components would collectively convey the historic significance of the historic motion picture studio lot. The district would retain significant aspects of integrity, and the complex as a whole would appear largely as it did historically. The central historic core, including some of the earliest remaining stages in Hollywood, important circulation patterns, a hierarchy of uses, and historic spatial relationships, would be retained. As such, the potential Paramount Pictures Historic District would continue to represent a rare remaining physical example of the Major Studio Era in Hollywood. Accordingly, the potential Paramount Pictures Historic District would remain eligible for listing in the National Register under Criterion A, the California Register under Criterion 1, and as a local Historic Cultural-Monument under Criterion 1 following implementation of the proposed Project. In addition, the City of Los Angeles CEQA Thresholds Guide criteria relative to historic impacts also would be met because the proposed Project would not result in the demolition of a significant resource, relocation activities that do not maintain the integrity and significance of a significant resource would not occur, or the introduction of new construction on the Main Lot would not reduce the integrity or significance of the potential historic district. Therefore, with implementation of the mitigation measures set forth in the MMP, including the Preservation Plan, potential impacts associated with the demolition of buildings within the potential Paramount Pictures Historic District would be less than significant. Regarding new construction, the Conceptual Site Plan carefully considers proposed locations for potential new building sites. There is no new construction proposed for the historic administrative core, and existing open space and primary circulation patterns would be maintained and enhanced. The potential building sites would primarily be located adjacent to existing recent construction on the

F-52 Main Lot or on the peripheral edges of the potential Paramount Pictures Historic District. Based on the Conceptual Site Plan, new construction would meet the National Park Service guidelines for evaluating the integrity of historic districts, as well as the City of Los Angeles CEQA Thresholds Guide related to new construction, as the introduction of new construction on the Main Lot would not reduce the integrity or significance of the potential historic district. Therefore, based on the proposed locations of the building sites, as identified in the Conceptual Site Plan, and implementation of the Historic Resources Preservation Plan and other mitigation measures set forth in the MMP, new construction within the potential Paramount Pictures Historic District would have a less than significant impact. All proposed rehabilitation or preservation would comply with the Historic Resources Preservation Plan and other mitigation measures set forth in the MMP, which include oversight by a qualified preservation professional. Therefore, with implementation of the Historic Resources Preservation Plan and other mitigation measures set forth in the MMP, the integrity of the remaining contributors would not be diminished, and a less than significant impact would result from any rehabilitation and preservation activities within the potential Paramount Pictures Historic District.

b)

Potential Impacts to RKO Studios Historic District

With respect to demolition, with implementation of the Historic Resources Preservation Plan and other mitigation measures set forth in the MMP, the overall integrity of the potential RKO Studios Historic District would be retained following Project implementation, and the individual components would collectively convey the historic significance of the historic motion picture and television studio lot. The district would retain significant aspects of integrity, and the complex as a whole would appear largely as it did historically. The central historic core, including the earliest stages in the district, important circulation patterns, the hierarchy of uses, and historic spatial relationships, would be retained. As such, the potential RKO Studios Historic District would continue to represent a rare remaining physical example of the Major Studio Era in Hollywood and would continue to convey its historic association with the development of the entertainment industry in Los Angeles. Accordingly, the potential RKO Studios Historic District would remain eligible for listing in the National Register under Criterion A, the California Register under Criterion 1, and as a local Historic Cultural-Monument under Criterion 1 following implementation of the proposed Project. In addition, the City of Los Angeles CEQA Thresholds Guide criteria relative to historic impacts also would be met because the proposed Project would not result in the demolition of a significant resource, relocation activities that do not maintain the integrity and significance of a significant resource would not occur, or the introduction of new construction on the Main Lot would not reduce the integrity or significance of the potential historic district. Therefore, with the implementation of the mitigation measures set forth in the MMP, including the Preservation Plan, potential impacts associated with the demolition of buildings within the potential RKO Studios Historic District would be less than significant. With regard to new construction, the Conceptual Site Plan carefully considers proposed locations for potential new building sites. There is no new construction proposed for the historic administrative core, and existing open space and primary circulation patterns would be maintained and enhanced. All new construction proposed within the potential RKO Studios Historic District would be concentrated in the southwest corner and at the eastern edge of the district boundary. These building sites would have adequate separation between proposed new construction and the potential historic district. Based on the Conceptual Site Plan, new construction would meet the National Park Service guidelines for evaluating the integrity of historic districts, as well as the City of Los Angeles CEQA Thresholds Guide related to new construction, as the introduction of new construction on the

F-53 Main Lot would not reduce the integrity or significance of the potential historic district. Therefore, based on the proposed locations of the building sites, as identified in the Conceptual Site Plan, and implementation of the Historic Resources Preservation Plan and other mitigation measures set forth in the MMP, new construction within the potential RKO Studios Historic District would have a less than significant impact. All proposed rehabilitation or preservation would comply with the Preservation Plan, would be subject to oversight by a qualified preservation professional, and would conform to the proposed mitigation measures set forth in the MMP. Therefore, with implementation of the Historic Resources Preservation Plan and other mitigation measures set forth in the MMP, the integrity of the remaining contributors would not be diminished and a less than significant impact would result from any rehabilitation and preservation activities within the potential RKO Studios Historic District.

cl

Potential Impacts to Historic Resources Located Outside of Historic District Boundaries .

The KCAL Building is the only potential historic resource located on the Project Site outside of the boundaries of the potential historic districts. The KCAL Building appears eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places under Criterion A and Criterion C, in the California Register of Historical Resources under Criterion 1 and 3, and as a local Historic-Cultural Monument under Criterion 1 and 3. Additionally, the only designated historic resource in the immediate Project vicinity is the Hollywood Forever Cemetery, which was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1999. ' Following implementation of the proposed Project, the KCAL Building would be retained and rehabilitated according to the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards, per the Preservation Plan. The KCAL Building would continue to appear as a stand-alone structure with adequate separation between the historic building and adjacent new construction. Moreover, the new construction would not obscure, damage, or destroy any character-defining features of the KCAL Building, and thus its historic character would not be diminished. With compliance with the Historic Resources Preservation Plan and other mitigation measures set forth in the MMP, new construction associated with the proposed Project would result in a less than significant impact to the KCAL Building. The proposed Project would not include new construction adjacent to the cemetery within the western portion of the Main Lot (i.e., within the potential RKO Studios Historic District). The Conceptual Site Plan for the proposed Project identifies two potential building sites for new development adjacent to the cemetery within the eastern portion of the Main Lot (i.e., within the potential Paramount Pictures Historic District). Both of the building sites would be separated from the cemetery by existing or new walls or buildings. The cemetery has shared a boundary with the motion picture studios on-site since the 1920s. Based on these factors, new construction would result in a less than significant impact to the Hollywood Forever Cemetery.

d)

Potential Impacts to Adjacent Historic Resources

The nearest designated Historic Preservation Overlay Zone (Hancock Park) is located approximately 0.5 mile from the Project Site, and all Historic Preservation Overlay Zones, including Hancock Park, Windsor Square, and Melrose Hill, are separated from the Project Site by major arterial

F-54 streets and existing development. No neighboring historic resources would be demolished as part of the proposed Project. Therefore, the proposed Project would have a less than significant impact on historic resources in the Project vicinity. e]

Cumulative Impacts

It is not expected that the related projects would impact historic resources of the same character (based on context, building type, evaluation, and designation) as those that are present within the Project Site. In addition, other than Related Project No. 61, due to the distance between the related projects and the Project Site, the related projects are not anticipated to impact the potential historic districts within the Project Site, the KCAL Building, or the Hollywood Forever Cemetery. Related Project No. 61 proposes additional cemetery-related uses within the Hollywood Forever Cemetery, and is subject to independent environmental review under CEQA. Should it be determined that Related Project No. 61 would result in potentially significant impacts to the cemetery’s historic designation, it would be required to implement feasible mitigation or alternatives to mitigate those impacts. Furthermore, as a cemetery use, the Hollywood Forever Cemetery does not include historic resources within the same or similar context as those on the Project Site (i.e., entertainment uses). Therefore, cumulative impacts on historic resources would be less than significant. 2,

Project Design Features

In addition to the proposed Specific Plan regulations, which include a Preservation Plan, Project Design Feature C-1 is included in the MMP with respect to the relocation of the globe feature at Stage 21:

Project Design Feature C-1:

When Stage 21 is demolished, the Applicant shall use commercially reasonable efforts to attempt to remove the globe from the structure. If the globe can be successfully removed, the Applicant shall work with an appropriate historic preservation or other group to relocate the globe to an off-site location, where it will be visible to the public, to the extent such a location is available.

3.

Mitigation Measures

Mitigation Measure C-1:

Project approval shall include a requirement to implement a preservation plan substantially in the form attached as Appendix L of the Paramount Pictures Historic Assessment Technical Report provided in Appendix F of the Draft EIR.

Mitigation Measure C-2: The Applicant shall ensure that archival documentation (Historic American Building Survey [HABS] Level I documentation) will be prepared for district contributors that will be demolished prior to commencement of demolition. HABS Level I documentation shall consist of the following: •

Architectural and historical narrative;



Adequate archival drawings as available;



Approximately six (6) to ten (10) large-format photographs documenting each visible fagade, context views, and interior views.

F-55

Mitigation Measure C-3: No contributing building shall be demolished until the Applicant is ready to proceed with a substitute use, including, for example, a building, landscape, open space, circulation, or production area, for its site. Mitigation Measure C-4: Production Park and Lucy Park within the Main Lot shall be retained as open space, and future rehabilitation shall conform to the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Cultural Landscapes and be based on historic photographs and other archival evidence. Mitigation Measure C-5: Existing avenues within the Main Lot shall be maintained to create a border between existing and new construction. Major historic circulation patterns shall be retained in north-south and east-west orientation. Mitigation Measure C-6: A qualified preservation professional shall be retained in order to act as the monitor for mitigation measures related to historic resources on the Project Site. The qualified preservation professional shall: •

Verify compliance with the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan Preservation Plan as set forth in the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan; and



Oversee the Historic American Building Survey documentation required in Mitigation Measure C-2.

Mitigation Measure C-7: The Applicant shall continue to include an interpretive program (e.g., informational signage) on the Main Lot. 4.

Findings

Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the proposed Project that avoid or substantially lessen potential significant environmental effects on Cultural Resources (Historic Resources), as identified in the EIR, to less than significant levels. 5.

Rationale for Findings

No adverse impacts associated with Cultural Resources (Historic Resources) would occur as a result of the development of the proposed Project with incorporation of Mitigation Measures C-1 through C-7 set forth in the MMP. 6.

Reference

For a complete discussion of environmental impacts with respect to Cultural Resources (Historic Resources), please see Section IV.C, Cultural Resources, of the Draft EIR and Section II of the Final EIR. B.

Cultural Resources (Archaeological and Paleontological Resources) 1

.

Description of Effects a)

Project Impacts

The results of the records search indicate there are no archaeological sites or isolates, which are artifacts not associated with an archaeological site, located within a 0.5-mile radius of the Project Site or within the Project Site. While this does not preclude the potential for an archaeological site to be identified during construction activities associated with the proposed Project, it is highly unlikely because substantial disturbance of the ground surface has previously occurred on-site. With

F-56 implementation of Mitigation Measures C-8 and C-9 set forth in the MMP, any potential impacts related to archaeological resources would be reduced to a less than significant level.

The paleontological records search indicates that grading or very shallow excavations in the uppermost layers of soils and Quaternary deposits in the Project Site are unlikely to discover significant vertebrate fossils. However, deeper excavations have the potential to encounter significant remains of fossil vertebrates. With implementation of Mitigation Measure C-10 set forth in the MMP, any potential impacts related to paleontological resources would be reduced to a less than significant level.

b)

Cumulative Impacts

With regard to potential cumulative impacts related to archaeological and paleontological resources, the Project vicinity is located within an urbanized area that has been substantially disturbed and developed over time. In the event that archaeological and paleontological resources are uncovered, each related project would be required to comply with applicable regulatory requirements. In addition, as part of the environmental review processes for the related projects, it is expected that mitigation measures would be established as necessary to address the potential for uncovering of paleontological resources and archaeological resources.

2

.

Project Design Features

No project design features are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue. 3.

Mitigation Measures

Mitigation Measure C-8: If a unique archaeological resource is discovered during Project construction activities, work in the area shall cease and deposits shall be treated in accordance with applicable federal, State, and local guidelines, including those set forth in California Public Resources Code Section 21083.2. A unique archaeological resource is defined as an archaeological artifact, object, or site about which it can be clearly demonstrated that, without merely adding to the current body of knowledge, there is a high probability that it meets any of the following criteria: •

Contains information needed to answer important scientific research questions and that there is a demonstrable public interest in that information;



Has a special and particular quality such as being the oldest of its type or the best available example of its type; or•



Is directly associated with a scientifically recognized important prehistoric or historic event or person [Public Resources Code Section 21083.2(g)],

In addition, if it is determined that an archaeological site is a historical resource, the provisions of Section 21084.1 of the Public Resources Code and CEQA Guidelines Section 15064.5 shall be implemented. A historical resource is defined as a resource listed in, or determined to be eligible for listing in, the California Register of Historical Resources [Public Resources

Code Section 21084.1], In the event an archaeological resource is encountered that the archaeologist determines is potentially a Native

F-57 American resource, the archaeologist shall retain a Native American representative to help determine the appropriate treatment for the resources. Mitigation Measure C-9: If human remains are encountered during construction, work in the affected area and the immediate vicinity shall be halted immediately. The construction manager at the Project Site shall be notified, and shall notify the archaeologist and Native American monitor, if they are not on-site at the time, as well as the responsible lead agency of the discovery, who in turn shall notify the Native American Heritage Commission and the County Coroner pursuant to procedures and requirements set forth in California Health and Safety Code Section 7050.5. Disposition of the human remains and any associated grave goods shall also be in accordance with this regulation and Public Resources Code 5097.91 and 5097.98, as amended.

The archaeologist and the Native American monitor, with the concurrence of the City, shall determine the area of potential impact and the timing when construction activities can resume.

Mitigation Measure C-10: If any paleontological materials are encountered during grounddisturbing activities for construction of the proposed Project, all further ground-disturbing activities in the area shall be temporarily diverted and the services of a qualified paleontologist shall then be secured. The paleontologist shall assess the discovered material(s) and prepare a survey, study or report evaluating the impact. The paleontologist’s survey, study or report shall contain a recommendation(s), if necessary, for the preservation, conservation, or relocation of the resource, as appropriate. The Applicant shall comply with the recommendations of the evaluating paleontologist, as contained in the survey, study or report, and a copy of the paleontological survey, study or report shall be submitted to the Los Angeles County Natural History Museum. Ground-disturbing activities may resume once the paleontologist’s recommendations have been implemented to the satisfaction of the paleontologist. 4.

Findings

Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project that avoid or substantially lessen potential significant environmental effects on Cultural Resources (Archaeological and Paleontological Resources), as identified in the EIR, to less than significant levels. 5.

Rationale for Findings

No adverse impacts associated with Cultural Resources (Archaeological and Paleontological Resources) would occur as a result of the development of the Project with incorporation of Mitigation Measures C-8, C-9, and C-10 set forth in the MMP.

6

.

Reference

For a complete discussion of environmental impacts with respect to Cultural Resources (Archaeological and Paleontoloqical Resources), please see Section IV.C, Cultural Resources, of the Draft EIR. C.

Geology and Soils

F-58 1.

Description of Effects a]

Geologic Hazards

d)

Seismic Hazards

No known active or potentially active faults underlie the Project Site. In addition, the Project Site is not located within an Alquist-Priolo Earthquake Fault Zone. Based on these considerations, the risk of fault rupture at the Project Site is considered negligible. Impacts related to fault rupture would be less than significant and no mitigation measures are required.

As with any new development in the State of California, building design and construction for the proposed Project would be required to conform to the current seismic design provisions of the California Building Code. With implementation of Mitigation Measure D-1 set forth in the MMP, which enforces this requirement, the proposed Project would not cause nor accelerate geologic hazards related to strong seismic ground shaking which would result in substantial damage to structures or infrastructure, or expose people to substantial risk of injury, and impacts associated with strong

seismic ground shaking would be less than significant. The potential for liquefaction, excessive differential settlement, or seismically induced

landslides occurring at the Project Site is considered remote. Therefore, the proposed Project would not cause or accelerate geologic hazards related to liquefaction, settlement, or landslides which would result in substantial damage to structures or infrastructure, or expose people to substantial risk of injury. Impacts related to liquefaction, settlement, and landslides would be less than significant and no mitigation measures are required. Given the distance of the Hollywood Reservoir to the Project Site, the oversight by the Division of Safety of Dams, including regular inspections, and the City’s emergency response program, the risk of inundation by a seiche or dam failure at the Project Site is low. Therefore, the proposed Project would not cause or accelerate geologic hazards related to seismically induced seiches, which would result in substantial damage to structures or infrastructure, or expose people to substantial risk of injury. Impacts related to seiches would be less than significant and no mitigation measures are required.

(2)

Soil Stability

It is anticipated that on-site fill includes non-engineered fill materials. Non-engineered fills are not suitable for support of new fills, foundations, concrete slabs, or paving. With implementation of Mitigation Measure D-2 set forth in the MMP, the proposed Project would not cause or accelerate geologic hazards related to unstable soils, which would result in substantial damage to structures or infrastructure, nor expose people to substantial risk of injury, and impacts associated with expansive soils would be less than significant. (3)

Expansive and Corrosive Soils

The earth materials underlying the Project Site have yielded test results from the very low to the very high expansion potential ranges. The test data indicate that the majority of the testing falls in the moderate expansion potential range. The majority of reported testing indicates that soils within

F-59

the Project Site are classified as corrosive to ferrous metals. With implementation of Mitigation Measure D-3 set forth in the MMP, the proposed Project would not cause or accelerate geologic hazards related to corrosive soils, which would result in substantial damage to structures or infrastructure, or expose people to substantial risk of injury, and impacts associated with corrosive soils would be less than significant.

(4)

Subsurface Oil and Gas

One abandoned oil welt may exist in the northeast corner of the Project Site. With implementation of Mitigation Measure E-2 set forth in the MMP, the proposed Project would not cause or accelerate geologic hazards related to subsurface oil, which would result in substantial damage to structures or infrastructure, nor expose people to substantial risk of injury, and impacts associated with oil would be less than significant. In addition, portions of the Project Site are located within a Citydesignated Methane Buffer Zone. With implementation of Mitigation Measure D-4 set forth in the MMP, the proposed Project would not cause nor accelerate geologic hazards related to subsurface methane, which would result in substantial damage to structures or infrastructure, nor expose people to substantial risk of injury, and impacts associated with methane would be less than significant.

(5)

Subsidence

Any potential settlement related to long-term dewatering for building operation would be less than, and already accounted for in, the construction dewatering settlement. Therefore, the proposed Project would not cause nor accelerate geologic hazards related to subsidence, which would result in substantial damage to structures or infrastructure, nor expose people to substantial risk of injury. Impacts related to subsidence would be less than significant and no mitigation measures are required.

M

Sedimentation and Erosion

Sedimentation and erosion could potentially occur from exposed soils during Project construction. With preparation and implementation of a SWPPP and compliance with applicable City grading regulations, Project construction would not constitute a geologic hazard to other properties by causing or accelerating instability from erosion, nor accelerate natural processes of wind and water erosion and sedimentation, resulting in sediment runoff or deposition which would not be contained or controlled on-site, and impacts related to sedimentation and erosion would be less than significant during construction.

c1

Landform Alteration

The proposed Project would not destroy, permanently cover, or materially and adversely modify any distinct and prominent geologic or topographic features. No impacts associated with landform alteration would occur, and no mitigation measures are required.

d)

Cumulative Impacts

Due to the site-specific nature of geological conditions (i.e., soils, geological features, subsurface features, seismic features, etc.), geology impacts are typically assessed on a project-by­ project basis rather than on a cumulative basis. Nonetheless, cumulative growth in the Project area through 2038, which includes specific known development projects as well as general ambient growth

F-60 projected to occur (as described in Section lil, Environmental Setting, of the Draft EIR) would expose a greater number of people to seismic hazards. However, as with the proposed Project, interim projects, related projects, and other future development projects would be subject to established guidelines and regulations pertaining to building design and seismic safety, including those set forth in the California Building Code and the Los Angeles Building Code. With adherence to such regulations, cumulative impacts with regard to geology and soils would be less than significant. Project Design Features

2.

No project design features are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue. 3.

Mitigation Measures

Mitigation Measure D-1: A final site-specific, design-level geotechnical, geologic, and seismic hazard investigation report that complies with all applicable state and local code requirements shall be prepared by a qualified geotechnical engineer and certified engineering geologist and submitted to the Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety for each individual building project, consistent with City of Los Angeles requirements (see 2008 Los Angeles Building Code Section 1802.1). The site-specific, design-level geotechnical reports shall address each of the potential geologic hazards addressed in the Geotechnical Engineering Evaluation for the Paramount

'

Pictures Master Plan, 5555 Melrose Avenue, Los Angeles, California, 90038 prepared by Geotechnologies, Inc., April 2015. The site-specific, designlevel geotechnical reports shall include recommendations for each specific building location and building design, including recommendations pertaining to site preparation, fills and compaction, and foundations, and shall include the applicable recommendations set forth in Mitigation Measures D-2 through D-4, below. Additionally, all such recommendations shall comply with applicable provisions and standards set forth in or established by: (a)

California Geological Survey’s “Guidelines for Evaluating and Mitigating Seismic Hazards in California, Special Publication No. 117” (Special Publication 117);

(b)

The version of the Uniform Building Code, as adopted and amended by the City of Los Angeles, in effect at the time of approval of each sitespecific, design-level geotechnical report;

(c)

Relevant State, County, and City laws, ordinances, and Code requirements; and

(d)

Current standards of practice designed to minimize potential geologic, geotechnical, and related impacts. -

The site-specific, design-level geotechnical reports shall be reviewed and approved by the City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety. Mitigation Measure D-2: During construction, encountered non-engineered fills shall be excavated and replaced as compacted fill properly bunched into suitable materials in accordance with City of Los Angeles requirements, or removed. The suitability of the excavated material for reuse in the compacted fills shall be confirmed during each final site-specific, design-level geotechnical investigation in accordance with the applicable provisions and standards detailed in Mitigation Measure D-1.

F-61 Mitigation Measure D-3:

As part of the site-specific geotechnical report provided for in

Mitigation Measure D-1, corrosion testing of Project Site soils, including pH levels, resistivity, sulfate content, chloride content, and other major anions and cations, shall be performed to the extent necessary. Where the evaluation indicates corrosive soil, specific types of pipe, insulation, coatings, and cathodic protection shall be selected in accordance with the applicable provisions and standards detailed in Mitigation Measure D-1 in order to reduce the risk of corrosion damage to underground utilities.

Mitigation Measure D-4: The design and construction of the proposed Project shall comply with the Los Angeles Methane Seepage Regulations (Los Angeles Municipal Code, Chapter IX, Article 1, Division 71), as applicable, including requirements for site testing. 4.

Findings

Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project that avoid or substantially lessen potential significant environmental effects with regard to Geology and Soils, as identified in the EIR, to less than significant levels. 5.

Rationale for Findings

No adverse impacts associated with Geology and Soils would occur as a result of the development of the Project with incorporation of Mitigation Measures D-1 through D-4 set forth in the MMP.

6

.

Reference

For a complete discussion of environmental impacts with respect to Geology and Soils, please see Section IV.D, Geology and Soils, of the Draft EIR.

D.

Hazards and Hazardous Materials 1.

Description of Effects a]

Construction Impacts

Compliance with the project design features as well as all applicable federal, state, and local requirements concerning the use, handling, and storage of hazardous materials would effectively reduce the potential for Project construction activities to expose people to a substantial risk resulting from the release or explosion of a hazardous material, or from exposure to a health hazard, in excess of regulatory standards. Therefore, impacts related to the use, storage, and management of hazardous materials during construction would be less than significant. With compliance with relevant regulations and requirements, as well as continued implementation of the comprehensive policies and programs specifically related to hazardous waste management on the Project Site, Project construction activities would not expose people to a substantial risk resulting from the release or explosion of a hazardous material, or from exposure to a health hazard, in excess of regulatory standards. Therefore, impacts associated with hazardous waste management during construction would be less than significant.

F-62 Hazardous substances have been and continue to be used on portions of the Project Site and within the surrounding vicinity. The activities conducted in the past at the Project Site may have resulted in the release of hazardous substances, potentially affecting the subsurface at the Project • Site. There is the potential to encounter residual contamination in the subsurface during construction at the Project Site, which would be a potentially significant impact without mitigation. With implementation of Mitigation Measure E-1 set forth in the MMP, impacts related to the potential to encounter residual contamination in the subsurface during construction at the Project Site would be less than significant. In addition, Project-related grading could uncover or disturb existing known and unknown underground storage tanks that could lead to soil and/or groundwater impacts and the potential exposure of people and the environment to hazardous materials, which would be a potentially significant impact without mitigation. With implementation of Mitigation Measure E-1 set forth in the MMP, impacts related to the potential disturbance of underground storage tanks during construction would be less than significant. Asbestos testing was conducted on the Main Lot and the results revealed asbestos and asbestos-containing materials in several buildings and structures. With implementation of Project Design Feature E-1 set forth in the MMP, impacts related to asbestos-containing materials during construction would be less than significant. Lead-based paint may also be present on-site, particularly in the Main Lot. With implementation of Project Design Feature E-2 set forth in the MMP, impacts related to lead-based paint during construction would be less than significant. Based on California State Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources maps, one abandoned oil well may exist in the northeast comer of the Main Lot. With implementation of Mitigation Measure E-2 set forth in the MMP, impacts related to construction in the area of abandoned oil wells would be less than significant. In addition, based on applicable safety provisions and appropriate monitoring, grading and construction activities associated with development within a Methane Buffer Zone are not expected to substantially expose construction workers to elevated levels of methane or other soil gases. Therefore, impacts associated with construction within a Methane Buffer Zone would be less than significant, and the proposed Project would not expose people or structures to substantial risk resulting from the release of a hazardous material, or from exposure to a health hazard, in excess of regulatory standards. Construction-related traffic on adjacent streets could potentially affect emergency access to and near the Project Site on a temporary basis. With implementation of Project Design Feature K-2, construction of the proposed Project is not anticipated to significantly impair implementation of or physically interfere with any adopted or on-site emergency response or evacuation plans, and impacts would be less than significant. b]

Operational Impacts

The expansion of operations on the Project Site has the potential to increase the acquisition, use, handling, and storage of hazardous materials on-site. Operation of the proposed Project could increase the opportunity for hazardous materials releases and, subsequently, the exposure of people and the environment to hazardous materials. Project staff on the Project Site would continue to be trained and designated to respond to accidental releases of hazardous materials associated with the

F-63 acquisition, use, storage, and handling of hazardous materials. In addition, professional hazardous materials response companies would continue to be on-call should a release occur at a time when appropriate staff are not available or the magnitude of the release is such that it cannot be handled internally. With continued implementation of hazardous materials management at the Project Site, in accordance with all applicable local, state, and federal laws and regulations relating to environmental protection and the management of hazardous materials, operation of the proposed Project is expected to be consistent with the goals, policies, and objectives of the City’s General Plan Safety Element. Through continued compliance with applicable laws, as well as implementation of the project design features, impacts associated with the use, storage, and management of hazardous materials during operation of the proposed Project would be less than significant. With implementation of the proposed Project, it is anticipated that hazardous waste-generating activities could increase. As is currently the Applicant’s practice, compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local requirements concerning the handling, storage, and disposal of hazardous waste would effectively reduce the potential for operation of the proposed Project to expose people to a substantial risk resulting from the release or explosion of a hazardous material, or from exposure to a health hazard, in excess of regulatory standards. Therefore, impacts associated with hazardous waste generation, handling, and disposal during operation of the proposed Project would be less than significant. While additional underground storage tanks are not anticipated as part of the proposed Project, expanded operations on the Project Site could require the installation and operation of additional underground storage tanks to accommodate increased hazardous materials similar to those used in existing operations on-site. An increase in the number of underground storage tanks could potentially increase the potential for accidental releases and subsequent impacts to soil, surface water, and groundwater, as well as the potential for environmental and human exposure to hazardous materials. Any new underground storage tanks installed at the Project Site would be required to be installed in accordance with federal, state, and local laws. Plans for any new underground storage tanks installations and for associated post-construction activities, monitoring, and response, would be submitted to the Los Angeles Fire Department (LAFD) for review and approval. The LAFD would oversee compliance with these construction standards and subsequent post-construction requirements. Therefore, impacts related to underground storage tanks during operation of the proposed Project would be less than significant. Expanded operations on the Project Site could require the installation and operation of additional aboveground storage tanks for storage of motor oil, vegetable oil, propane, and other substances. This increase in the number of aboveground storage tanks on-site could potentially increase the potential for accidental releases and subsequent impacts to soil and surface water, as well as the potential for environmental and human exposure to hazardous materials. Compliance with applicable laws would minimize impacts to human health and the environment associated with aboveground storage tanks by, for example, ensuring that new tanks include secondary containment, as required. Therefore, impacts related to aboveground storage tanks during operation would be less than significant. As the permitting process would ensure that new development would comply with the City’s Methane Seepage Regulations, impacts associated with development within portions of the Project Site within the Methane Buffer Zone would be less than significant, and the proposed Project would

F-64 not expose people or structures to substantial risk resulting from the release of a hazardous material, or from exposure to a health hazard, in excess of regulatory standards. Existing emergency response and evacuation plans would be updated and/or new plans created, as appropriate, to include operation of the proposed Project. Therefore, it is not anticipated that Project operations would significantly impair the implementation of or physically interfere with any adopted or on-site emergency response or evacuation plans or a local, state, or federal agency’s emergency evacuation plan. No adverse impacts to emergency response or emergency evacuation plans are anticipated. c]

Cumulative Impacts

While impacts associated with hazards and hazardous materials are typically site-specific and do not cumulatively affect off-site areas, conditions such as contaminated groundwater can affect down-gradient properties. In addition, operation of many of the related projects can reasonably be expected to involve the limited use of potentially hazardous materials typical of those used in residential and commercial developments, including cleaning agents, paints, pesticides, and other materials used for landscaping. However, all future development located within the vicinity of the Project Site would be subject to the same local, regional, state, and federal regulations pertaining to hazards and hazardous materials. It is expected that all potentially hazardous materials would be used, stored, and disposed of in accordance with manufacturers’ specifications and handled in compliance with applicable standards and regulations. Any risks associated with these materials would be adequately reduced to a less than significant level through compliance with these standards and regulations. In addition, through the extension of existing programs administered on the Project Site, Project impacts with regard to emergency response or evacuation plans would not be cumulatively considerable. As such, cumulative impacts with regard to hazards and hazardous materials from the combined proposed Project, interim projects, and related projects would be less than significant.

2

.

Project Design Features

Project Design Feature E-1: Prior to the issuance of any demolition permit or permit for remodeling of existing buildings, if applicable, the Applicant would provide a letter to the Department of Building and Safety indicating that the demolition/ renovation contract provides for a qualified asbestos abatement contractor/ specialist to remove or otherwise abate or manage asbestos during demolition or renovation activities in accordance with the South Coast Air Quality Management District’s Rule 1403. The Applicant shall comply with State and federal regulations to test for asbestos prior to issuance of any demolition permit. If asbestos-containing materials are found to be present, it shall be abated in compliance with the South Coast Air Quality Management District’s Rule 1403, as well as all other applicable state and federal rules and regulations.

Project Design Feature E-2: Prior to the issuance of any permit for demolition or alteration of an existing structure, if applicable, a lead-based paint survey would be performed in compliance with applicable State and federal regulations. Should lead-based paint materials be identified, the Applicant would provide evidence to the Department of Building and Safety demonstrating that the demolition/renovation contract provides that standard handling and disposal

F-65 practices would be implemented pursuant to Occupational Safety and Health Act regulations. The Applicant shall comply with State and federal regulations to test for lead-based paint prior to issuance of any demolition permit. Should lead-based paint materials be identified, standard handling and disposal practices shall be implemented pursuant to Occupational Safety and Health Act regulations.

3.

Mitigation Measures

Mitigation Measure E-1: If excavation or grading occurs in areas identified in Figure IV.E-1 in the Draft EIR (areas with potential for residual contamination in subsurface), then construction contracts shall include a provision that in the event that potential contamination is encountered during excavation or grading, work in the area of potential contamination shall be temporarily halted and the contamination evaluated by a qualified environmental professional using appropriate collection and sampling techniques as ' determined by the environmental professional based on the nature of the contamination. The nature and extent of contamination shall be determined and the appropriate handling, disposal and/or treatment shall be implemented (i.e., excavated/disposed of, treated in-situ [in-place], or otherwise managed) in accordance with applicable regulatory requirements, such as South Coast Air Quality Management District Rule 1166. " If soil contamination is not suspected, but is observed (i.e., by sight, smell, visual, etc.) during excavation and grading activities, excavation and grading within the area of the observed contamination shall be temporarily halted and redirected around the area until the appropriate evaluation and follow-up measures are implemented by a qualified environmental professional, as described above.

Mitigation Measure E-2: Prior to issuance of grading or building permits for construction in the area of the abandoned oil well that may exist in the northeast corner of the Main Lot, the Applicant shall comply with applicable regulations for California State Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources site plan review. If any oil wells are encountered during excavation and construction, the Applicant shall comply with all applicable requirements of California State Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources for the investigation and/or re-abandonment of the well. 4.

Findings

Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project that avoid or substantially lessen potential significant environmental effects with regard to Hazards and Hazardous Materials, as identified in the EIR, to less than significant levels. 5.

Rationale for Findings

No adverse impacts associated with Hazards and Hazardous Materials would occur as a result of the development of the Project with incorporation of Mitigation Measures E-1 and E-2 set forth in the MMP.

6.

Reference

F-66 For a complete discussion of environmental impacts with respect to Hazards and Hazardous Materials, please see Section IV.E, Hazards and Hazardous Materials, of the Draft EIR.

E.

Air Quality (Localized Construction and Localized Operations) 1

.

Description of Effects a]

Construction 0)

Localized Impacts from On-Site Construction Activities

Maximum localized construction emissions for off-site sensitive receptors would not exceed the localized screening thresholds for CQ and PM 10. However, localized NOX and PM2.5 emissions would exceed the applicable screening-level LSI for several construction phases and combined overlapping activities. Therefore, localized construction emissions resulting from the proposed Project would result in a significant short-term impact without mitigation. M

Operation (1)

Localized Operational Impacts

Operation of the proposed Project would not introduce any major new sources of air pollution within the Project Site. Notwithstanding, the screening level analysis shows that on-site operational emissions would not exceed the CO and NOx localized significance thresholds, but would exceed the localized PM 10 and PM25 significance thresholds. Therefore, the localized effects from the on-site operational emissions of PM10 and PM25 were analyzed using the AERMOD dispersion model. Based on the detail dispersion modeling, on-site operational emissions would not exceed any of the SCAQMD localized significance thresholds. An analysis of localized operational on-site emissions of existing conditions without the proposed Project versus with the proposed Project was also conducted. The net overall operational on-site emissions associated with the proposed Project would be greater in comparison to Project build-out emissions due to emission factors that assume air quality improves over time based Don regulations applicable to newer vehicles. As with the Project build-out analysis year, the screening level analysis shows that on-site operational emissions would not exceed the CQ and NOx localized significance thresholds, but would exceed the localized PM10 and PM2.5 significance thresholds. Therefore, the localized effects from the on-site operational emissions of PM10 and PM2.5 were analyzed using the AERMOD dispersion model. Based on the detailed dispersion modeling, on-site operational emissions would not exceed any of the SCAQMD localized significance thresholds. The localized CO hotspot screening analysis conducted for 15 intersections demonstrated that the proposed Project would not cause any new or exacerbate any existing CO hotspots. To further support this conclusion. CO concentration levels were forecasted at the three most potentially impacted intersections based on the highest projected concentration and using peak-hour traffic volumes and conservative meteorological assumptions. Project-generated traffic volumes under buildout in 2038 were forecasted to have a negligible effect on the projected t-hour and 8-hour CO concentrations at each of the three intersection locations analyzed. Similarly, the Project (2011)

F-67 analysis also resulted in a negligible effect on the projected 1-hour and 8-hour CO concentrations at the intersections. Thus, the proposed Project would not cause any new or exacerbate any existing CO hotspots, and, as a result, impacts related to localized mobile-source CQ emissions would be less than significant. Cumulative Impacts

cl

d)

Construction

Construction of the proposed Project would have a less than significant cumulative impact due to localized emissions with implementation of mitigation measures. (2)

Operation

An analysis pf potential localized operational impacts from on-site activities was conducted. Based on the analysis, localized CO, NQ2, PMtO. AND PM2.5 operational impacts would not exceed the SCAQMD’S thresholds. As such, the potential localized operational impacts from the proposed Project’s on-site activities would not be cumulatively considerable.

2.

Project Design Features

The following project design features are intended to implement requirements of SCAQMD Rule 403 (Fugitive Dust):

Project Design Feature B.1-1: The owner or contractor shall keep the construction area sufficiently dampened to control dust caused by construction and hauling, and at all times provide reasonable control of dust caused by wind. All unpaved demolition and construction areas shall be wetted at least twice daily during excavation and construction, and temporary dust covers shall be used for haul trucks to reduce dust emissions and meet South Coast Air Quality Management Rule 403.

Project Design Feature B.1-2: All materials transported off-site shall be either sufficiently watered or securely covered to prevent excessive amounts of spillage or dust.

Project Design Feature B.1-3: All clearing, earth-moving, or excavation activities shall be discontinued during periods of high winds (i.e., greater than 25 miles per hour), so as to prevent excessive amounts of dust. 3.

Mitigation Measures a.

Construction

The following mitigation measures set forth a program of air pollution control strategies designed to reduce the proposed Project’s air quality impacts to the extent feasible during construction. •

F-68 Mitigation Measure B.1-1: The Project representative shall make available to the lead agency and the South Coast Air Quality Management District a comprehensive inventory of all off-road construction equipment, equal to or greater than 50 horsepower, that will be used an aggregate of 40 or more hours during any , portion of construction activities for the proposed Project. The inventory shall include the horsepower rating, engine production year, and certification of the specified Tier standard. A copy of each unit’s certified tier specification. Best Available Control Technology documentation, and California Air Resources Board or Air Quality Management District operating permit shall be available onsite at the time of mobilization of each applicable unit of equipment. Off-road diesel-powered equipment within the construction inventory list described above shall meet the Tier 3 standards where commercially available. Mitigation Measure B.1-2: All construction equipment shall be properly tuned and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications.

Mitigation Measure B.1-3: Contractors shall maintain and operate construction equipment so as to minimize exhaust emissions. During construction, trucks and vehicles in loading and unloading queues shall have their engines turned off after five minutes when not in use, to reduce vehicle emissions. Mitigation Measure B.1-4: Construction activities shall be discontinued during seconq stage smog alerts.

Mitigation Measure B.1-5: To the extent possible, petroleum-powered construction activity shall utilize electricity from power poles rather than temporary diesel power generators and/or gasoline power generators. If stationary petroleumpowered construction equipment, such as generators, must be operated continuously, such equipment shall be located at least 100 feet from sensitive land uses, whenever possible. b.

Operation

In addition to the project design features designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (which would also serve to reduce criteria air pollutants), the following mitigation measures would further reduce operational emissions from the proposed Project:

Mitigation Measure B.1-6: The Applicant or its successor shall minimize delivery truck idling times to a maximum of five minutes, per the California Air Resources Board’s Airborne Toxic Control Measure.

Mitigation Measure B.1-7: The Applicant or its successor shall route delivery trucks via the most efficient available route on the Project Site.

4.

Findings

Changes or alterations have been required in, or incorporated into, the Project that avoid or substantially lessen potential significant environmental effects with regard to Air Quality (localized construction and operations), as identified in the EIR, to less than significant levels.

F-69 5.

Rationale for Findings

Implementation of the project design features would reduce localized construction. NOx, PM10, and PM2.5 emissions. With incorporation of mitigation measures set forth in the MMP. impacts from localized NOx, PM 10, and PM2.5 emissions would be reduced to a less than significant level. No significant impacts related to local CO concentrations would occur for the proposed Project or cumulatively. Concurrent construction and operational localized emissions would be less than significant for localized NOx, PM10. and PM2.5 impacts. As such, localized emissions that result from concurrent construction and operations would result in a less than significant impact. 6

Reference

.

For a complete discussions of environmental impacts with respect to air quality, please see Section IV.B.1. Air Quality, of the Draft EIR.

IX.

SIGNIFICANT IMPACTS WHICH REMAIN SIGNIFICANT AFTER MITIGATION MEASURES

The Project would result in the following impacts, which are found to be significant and unavoidable:

A.

Shading Description of Effects

1.

a]

Project Impacts

Under the proposed Specific Plan, new buildings would be developed in accordance with height zones that establish the maximum building heights for buildings throughout the Project Site. Setbacks would also be established within the proposed Specific Plan. Prior to mitigation, significant impacts are anticipated during the following seasons as a result of shadows cast by future development within the height zones proposed for the Project Site: •

Winter: Camerford Lot (impacts to north); Lemon Grove Lot (Parcels B, C, and D)

*

Spring: Lemon Grove Lot (Parcels B, C, and D)



Summer: Lemon Grove Lot (Parcels B, C, and D)



Fall: Lemon Grove Lot (Parcels B, C, and D)

Impacts associated with other Project Site locations/seasons and cumulative shading impacts would be less than significant.

b)

Cumulative Impacts

Based on the location of the related projects identified in the area, only two projects, Related Project No. 24 and Related Project No. 61, have the potential to cast shadows that may affect some of the same shade-sensitive uses as the proposed Project. Project shadows would extend to residential properties along Camerford Avenue in the morning during spring and fall. However, a

F-70 cumulative effect resulting from the shading of the same individual properties by the proposed Project and Related Project No. 24 would not be expected. Furthermore, shadows from Related Project No. 61 would not extend beyond the shadow that is already cast by the existing parking structure on Parcel A of the Lemon Grove Lot during the winter solstice afternoon hours prior to 3:00 p.m. Therefore, it can be assumed that cumulative shading impacts in the vicinity of the Lemon Grove Lot would be less than significant. Cumulative shading impacts would be less than significant. 2.

Project Design Features

As previously described, future development under the proposed Project would be subject to the proposed Specific Plan, which includes building height limitations based on defined height zones as well as setback requirements. Other than the proposed Specific Plan regulations, no project design features relevant to shading are identified. 3.

Mitigation Measures

The following mitigation measure is included in the MMP to reduce the significant shadow impacts associated with the proposed Project:

Mitigation Measure A.3-1: A 10-foot setback from the northern property line of the Camerford Lot shall be implemented to reduce shadow impacts affecting shadesensitive uses to the north. 4.

Findings

Specific economic, legal, social, technological or other considerations make infeasible additional mitigation measures or project alternatives identified in the EIR. 5.

Rationale for Findings

With implementation of Mitigation Measure A.3-1 set forth in the MMP, a 10-foot setback would be established from the northern property line of the Camerford Lot. As none of the yards of the residential properties north of the Camerford Lot would be shaded for three or more hours, the potential impact would be eliminated. As for the Lemon Grove Lot, an analysis was performed to determine the extent to which setbacks would need to be increased or building heights reduced in order to eliminate the significant shading impacts resulting from development on the Lemon Grove Lot. It was determined that no feasible mitigation is available to eliminate the significant shading impacts from the Lemon Grove Lot. Because mitigation of the proposed Project’s impacts associated with the Lemon Grove Lot would be infeasible, Project-level impacts would be significant and unavoidable. Cumulative shading impacts would be less than significant at the Lemon Grove Lot as no related projects would create shadows that would overlap with new shadows associated with the proposed Project or affect the same shade-sensitive uses as new shadows associated with the proposed Project. However, it is noted that the Project’s aesthetic impacts, including shading, would not be considered significant impacts on the environment pursuant to Public Resources Code Section 21099.

6.

Reference

For a complete discussion of environmental impacts with respect to shading, please see Section IV.A.3, Shading, of the Draft EIR.

F-71 B.

Air Quality (Construction: Regional Construction and Localized—Construction; Operational: Regional Operations, Localized Operations, Concurrent Construction and Operations) 1

.

Description of Effects a)

Construction (D

Regional Construction Impacts

Construction activities would include demolition of existing uses, grading and excavation, and construction of new structures and related infrastructure. It is anticipated that the proposed Project would result in the off-site export of approximately 420,000 cubic yards of excavated soil. Construction-related daily maximum regional construction emissions would not exceed the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) daily significance thresholds for CO, SOx, PM-io, and PM2.5. However, maximum regional emissions would exceed the SCAQMD daily significance thresholds for VOC during periods of architectural coatings application and NOx during periods of heavy construction equipment use. Therefore, regional construction emissions resulting from the proposed Project would result in a significant short-term impact.

m

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Operations (D

Regional Operational Impacts

Regional emissions resulting from operation of the proposed Project are expected to exceed the SCAQMD thresholds for VOC and NOx. Therefore, air quality impacts from Project operational emissions would be significant without mitigation. An analysis of daily operational emissions of existing conditions without the proposed Project versus with the proposed Project was also conducted. The net overall operational emissions associated with the proposed Project would be greater in comparison to Project build-out emissions due to emission factors that assume air quality improves over time based on regulations applicable to newer vehicles. As with the Project build-out analysis year, the proposed Project regional emissions analysis would exceed the established SCAQMD threshold levels for VOC and NOx The proposed Project would also exceed the SCAQMD regional significance threshold for CO. Therefore, air quality impacts from Project operational emissions would be significant without mitigation.

m Operation-ef-the-propesed-Rreject would not-mtroduce-any major new-sewees of air pollution

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F-72

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than-significant.

cl

Concurrent Construction and Operational Emissions

Concurrent construction and operational regional emissions of VOC and NOX would exceed the SCAQMD regional thresholds, but would not exceed the SCAQMD localized significance thresholds. di

Cumulative Impacts m

Construction

According to the SCAQMD, individual construction projects that exceed the SCAQMD’s recommended daily thresholds for project-specific impacts would cause a cumulatively considerable increase in emissions for those pollutants for which the Air Basin is in non-attainment. Constructionrelated daily emissions at the Project Site would exceed the SCAQMD’s regional significance threshold for NOx and VOC with mitigation. Consequently, the proposed Project would have a cumulative impact due to construction-related regional VOC and NOx emissions even with incorporation of mitigation measures. In terms of localized air quality impacts, construction of the proposed Project would have a less than significant cumulative impact due to localized emissions with implementation of mitigation measures.

F-73 (2)

Operation

According to the SCAQMD, if an individual project results in air emissions of criteria pollutants that exceed the SCAQMD’s recommended daily thresholds for project-specific impacts, then the project would also result in a cumulatively considerable net increase of these criteria pollutants. Regional emissions resulting from operation of the proposed Project are expected to exceed the SCAQMD thresholds for VOC and NOx. Therefore, air quality impacts from Project operational emissions would be significant without mitigation. Thus, the emissions of non-attainment pollutants and precursors generated by Project operation in excess of the SCAQMD project-level thresholds also would be cumulatively considerable. Aft-anatysi&-oTpotenfeTteeafee4-opefatiQnal.impacts-frem-efHsite-aetivffies-was-eQBduGte47 8ase4-en-#re-aflalystsTteeafeed-GQT-N03T-PM4er-and-PM2r5-epefatienat4mpaots-weuM-R©TexGeed-the

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2

.

Project Design Features

The following project design features are intended to implement requirements of SCAQMD Rule 403 (Fugitive Dust): Project Design Feature B.1-1: The owner or contractor shall keep the construction area sufficiently dampened to control dust caused by construction and hauling, and at all times provide reasonable control of dust caused by wind. All unpaved demolition and construction areas shall be wetted at least twice daily during excavation and construction, and temporary dust covers shall be used for haul trucks to reduce dust emissions and meet South Coast Air Quality Management District Rule 403. Project Design Feature B.1-2: All materials transported off-site shall be either sufficiently watered or securely covered to prevent excessive amounts of spillage or dust. Project Design Feature B.1-3: All clearing, earth-moving, or excavation activities shall be discontinued during periods of high winds (i.e., greater than 25 miles per hour), so as to prevent excessive amounts of dust. 3.

Mitigation Measures a]

Construction

The following mitigation measures set forth a program of air pollution control strategies designed to reduce the proposed Project’s air quality impacts to the extent feasible during construction.

Mitigation Measure B.1-1:

The Project representative shall make available to the lead

agency and the South Coast Air Quality Management District a comprehensive inventory of all off-road construction equipment, equal to or

F-74 greater than 50 horsepower, that will be used an aggregate of 40 or more hours during any portion of construction activities for the proposed Project. The inventory shall include the horsepower rating, engine production year, and certification of the specified Tier standard. A copy of each unit’s certified tier specification, Best Available Control Technology documentation, and California Air Resources Board or Air Quality Management District operating permit shall be available onsite at the time of mobilization of each applicable unit of equipment, Off-road diesel-powered equipment within the construction inventory list described above shall meet the Tier 3 standards where commercially available.

Mitigation Measure B.1 -2: All construction equipment shall be properly tuned and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications.

Mitigation Measure B.1-3: Contractors shall maintain and operate construction equipment so as to minimize exhaust emissions. During construction, trucks and vehicles in loading and unloading queues shall have their engines turned off after five minutes when not in use, to reduce vehicle emissions.

Mitigation Measure B.1-4: Construction activities shall be discontinued during second-stage smog alerts.

Mitigation Measure B.1-5: To the extent possible, petroleum-powered construction activity shall utilize electricity from power poles rather than temporary diesel power generators and/or gasoline power generators. If stationary petroleumpowered construction equipment, such as generators, must be operated continuously, such equipment shall be located at least 100 feet from sensitive land uses, whenever possible. b}

Operation

In addition to the project design features designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (which would also serve to reduce criteria air pollutants), the following mitigation measures would further reduce operational emissions from the proposed Project:

Mitigation Measure B.1-6: The Applicant or its successor shall minimize delivery truck idling times to a maximum of five minutes, per the California Air Resources Board’s Airborne Toxic Control Measure.

Mitigation Measure B.1-7: The Applicant or its successor shall route delivery trucks via the most efficient available route on the Project Site. 4.

Findings

Specific economic, legal, social, technological or other considerations make infeasible additional mitigation measures or project alternatives identified in the EIR.

5.

Rationale for Findings

Implementation of the mitigation measures and project design features set forth in the MMP would reduce construction emissions for all pollutants. However, even with the incorporation of mitigation measures, the proposed Project would exceed the SCAQMD regional significance thresholds for NOx and VOC during some periods of construction. As such, Project construction would

F-75 result in significant and unavoidable Project-level and cumulative regional impacts even with incorporation of all feasible mitigation measures.

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Reference

For a complete discussion of environmental impacts with respect to air quality, please see Section IV.B.1, Air Quality, of the Draft EIR. C.

Noise (Construction Noise and Vibration) 1

.

Description of Effects a]

On-Site Construction Noise Sources

Based on noise data collected by the Federal Highway Administration, individual pieces of construction equipment that would be used for construction of the proposed Project produce maximum noise levels (Lmax) of 74 A-weighted decibels (dBA) to 90 dBA at a reference distance of 50 feet from the noise source. These maximum noise levels would occur when equipment is operating under full

F-76

power conditions (i.e., the equipment engine at maximum speed). However, equipment used on construction sites often operates under less-than-full power conditions, or part power. To more accurately characterize construction-period noise levels, the average (hourly Leq) noise level associated with each construction stage (i.e., demolition, site grading, building construction, and landscaping) was calculated based on the quantity, type, and usage factors for each type of equipment that would be used during each construction stage. These noise levels are typically associated with multiple pieces of equipment operating simultaneously. The Project construction schedule would depend on market conditions and the business needs of the Applicant. For purposes of the construction noise analysis, a construction phasing schedule was developed that considers the anticipated business needs and the maximum amount of development that may simultaneously occur on the Project Site at any one time. As discussed in Section IV.H, Noise, of the Draft EIR, the analysis assumed the proposed Project would be constructed over four phases (A, B, C and D). Within each phase, construction activities were grouped by geographic area (sub-phase) to allow for maximum construction activities to occur within a phase while providing for continued studio operations within the Project Site. The analysis shows that construction noise levels generated during various phases of the Project construction activities could exceed the 5 dBA above ambient noise level significance threshold at the following off-site sensitive receptors: *

Phase A—Receptors R2, R3, R7, R8, R12, and R16



Phase B—Receptors R3, R5, R6, R10, R11, R14, R15, and R16

*

Phase C—Receptors R2, R3, R11, R12, R14, and R16



Phase D—Receptors R5, R11, R13, R14, and R16

In addition, based on the construction phasing schedule, the potential exists for overlapping construction between phases. The overlapping construction activities could result in an increase above the estimated highest construction noise level of 2.8 dBA at receptor R4 due to overlapping construction activities for sub-phases C4 and C5. Construction noise levels at the existing on-site childcare centers for all construction phases would be below the significance threshold. b)

Off-Site Construction Noise Sources

In addition to on-site construction noise, delivery/haul trucks (trucks), and construction worker vehicles would require access to the Project Site during various construction phases. Constructionrelated haul trucks would generate noise levels ranging from 56,3 dBA (Leq(hr)) during Phase A to 67.8 dBA (Leq(hr)) during Phase D. The estimated construction haul truck noise levels would be below the existing daytime hourly ambient noise levels measured along Lemon Grove Avenue, Melrose Avenue, and Western Avenue. The construction related trucks noise would exceed the existing ambient noise levels by up to 1.9 dBA (Leq(hr>) along Van Ness Avenue and up to 2.4 dBA (Leq(hr>) along Gower Street, which would be below the 5 dBA above ambient noise level significance threshold. As such, noise impacts associated with off-site construction truck traffic would be less than significant. cl

Construction Vibration

F-77

Construction activities can generate varying degrees of ground vibration, depending on the construction procedures and type of equipment used. Vibration velocities from typical heavy construction equipment operations that would be used during construction of the proposed Project would range from 0.003 to 0.089 peak particle velocity (PPV) at a distance of 25 feet from the equipment. The majority of the Project construction activities would occur within the Main Lot and would be a minimum of 50 feet from off-site building structures. Therefore, the estimated vibration velocity levels for construction activities within the Main Lot would be well below the most stringent significance threshold of 0.12 PPV. However, construction activities at the Ancillary Lots could occur in closer proximity to off-site building structures. Vibration levels generated by a large bulldozer or caisson drilling would be up to 0.995 PPV (at 5 feet from the equipment) and 0.192 PPV (at 15 feet from the equipment). With implementation of Project Design Feature H-2, which requires that the use of large bulldozers and caisson drilling occur a minimum of 15 feet from the nearest off-site building, vibration impacts associated with potential building damage during construction activities would be less than significant. Potential vibration impacts with respect to human annoyance were also evaluated. The anticipated construction equipment for Project construction would generate vibration levels ranging from 58 VdB (a decibel unit referenced to a velocity of 1 micro-inch per second) for a small bulldozer to up to 87 VdB for a large bulldozer operating at a distance of 25 feet. The vibration level from the large bulldozer would attenuate to below the 72 VdB significance threshold at a distance of 80 feet. Therefore, except for construction activities within 15 feet of Van Ness Avenue, vibration impacts with respect to human annoyance would be less than significant for construction activities within the Main Lot. Vibration levels generated by construction equipment operating at the Ancillary Lots would exceed the 72 VdB significance threshold at the adjacent sensitive receptors within 80 feet of large construction equipment. Impacts would occur on a short-term basis when large construction equipment (e.g., a large bulldozer) would operate within 80 feet from the sensitive receptors. Based on Federal Transit Administration (FTA) data, the vibration generated by a typical haul truck would be approximately 63 VdB (0.00566 PPV) at a distance of 50 feet from the truck. There are building structures and sensitive receptors (i.e., residential uses) that are located as close as 15 feet from the haul truck routes. Therefore, the vibration level generated by the haul trucks would be approximately 0.034 PPV, which would be well below the most stringent building damage threshold of 0.12 PPV for buildings. The vibration levels at sensitive receptors within 15 feet of the haul routes would be approximately 79 VdB, which would exceed the 72 VdB significance threshold for human annoyance. Per the FTA, “it is unusual for vibration from sources such as buses and trucks to be perceptible, even in locations close to major roads." However, vibration impacts with respect to human annoyance along the haul routes during construction would be significant at sensitive receptors located within 25 feet from the haul route.

d)

Cumulative Impacts

While the majority of the related projects are located a substantial distance from the Project Site, based on the location of the related projects identified in the area, there are three related projects near the Project Site, including: Related Project No. 61, which proposes cemetery-related uses within the cemetery immediately north of the Project Site; Related Project No. 24, a condominium and retail

F-78 development at 5663 Melrose Avenue (approximately 450 feet west of the Project Site); and Related Project No. 9, at 5651 Santa Monica Boulevard (approximately 800 feet from the Project Site, north of the Lemon Grove Lot). However, construction of Related Project No. 24 has recently been completed. The next closest related project is approximately 1,600 feet from the Project Site. Since the timing of the construction activities for related projects cannot be defined, any quantitative analysis that assumes multiple, concurrent construction projects would be entirely speculative. Nonetheless, if construction of Related Project No. 61 or Related Project No. 9 were to occur concurrently with the construction on the north or northeast sides of the Project Site, respectively, these related projects could have a contribution to the cumulative impact on nearby noise-sensitive receptors. Specifically, concurrent construction of the proposed Project and Related Project No. 61 could impact noise-sensitive receptors located in proximity to the northern boundary of the Project Site (i.e., elementary school and residential uses along Van Ness Avenue). Concurrent construction of the proposed Project and Related Project No. 9 could impact noise-sensitive receptors located between Related Project No. 9 and the Project Site (i.e., residential uses located along Van Ness Avenue, Ridgewood Place and Wilton Place, south of Santa Monica Boulevard, represented by R1). Construction-related noise levels from the related projects would be intermittent and temporary. Noise associated with cumulative construction activities would be reduced to the degree reasonably and technically feasible through proposed mitigation measures for each individual related project and compliance with locally adopted and enforced noise ordinances. Nonetheless, even with proposed mitigation measures, if nearby Related Project No. 61 and/or Related Project No. 9 were to be constructed concurrently with the proposed Project, significant and unavoidable cumulative construction noise impacts could result.

Potential vibration impacts due to construction activities are generally limited to buildings/structures that are located in close proximity of the construction site (i.e., less than 25 feet). Although the Related Project No. 61 site is adjacent to the Project Site, the proposed construction areas of Related Project No. 61 would be a minimum of approximately 90 feet from the Project Site. In addition, Related Project No. 9 is approximately 800 feet away from the Project Site. Therefore, due to the rapid attenuation characteristics of ground-borne vibration, there would be no potential cumulative construction impact with respect to ground-borne vibration. 2.

Project Design Features

Project Design Feature H-1: Power construction equipment (including combustion engines), fixed or mobile, shall be equipped with noise shielding and muffling devices (consistent with manufactures’ standards). All equipment shall be properly maintained. Project Design Feature H-2: The use of caisson drilling and/or large bulldozers shall occur a minimum of 15 feet from the nearest off-site building. 3.

Mitigation Measures

Mitigation Measure H-1: Prior to the issuance of grading permits for the development of a new building, structure or infrastructure for the proposed Project, the Applicant or its successor shall provide proof satisfactory to the City Department of Public Works or Department of Building and Safety, as applicable, that all related construction contractors have been required in writing to comply with the City Noise Ordinance, and the contractor or the

F-79 Applicant or its successor shall design a Construction Noise Mitigation Plan to minimize the construction-related noise impacts to off-site noise-sensitive receptors. The Construction Noise Mitigation Plan may include the following: •

Use temporary sound barriers between the proposed Project construction area and affected noise-sensitive receptors where feasible and necessary; Stationary source equipment which is flexible with regard to relocation (e.g., generators and compressors) shall be located so as to maintain the greatest feasible distance from off-site noise-sensitive land uses; To the extent feasible, the staging of high noise-generating activities should take place during mid-day and/or when fewer people are at home or ambient noise levels in the receptor areas are at their highest levels; To the extent feasible, construction and demolition activities should be scheduled so as to avoid operating several pieces of equipment simultaneously; Limit engine idling from construction equipment. Specifically, the idling of haul trucks shall be limited to 5 minutes at any given location as established by the South Coast Air Quality Management District; Provide for the location of construction staging areas to be situated and operated in a manner which will limit direct interference with residential streets surrounding the Project Site; Provide a hotline to enable the public to call and address construction related issues associated with the construction; and Project construction shall not use impact pile driving methods.

4.

Findings

Specific economic, legal, social, technological or other considerations make infeasible additional mitigation measures or project alternatives identified in the EIR. 5.

Rationale for Findings

Implementation of the project design features and compliance with the mitigation measures set forth in the MMP would reduce Project and cumulative construction noise and vibration levels to the extent feasible. Implementation of the noise mitigation measures would reduce the constructionrelated noise of the proposed Project. However, depending on the receptor and ambient noise levels at the time of construction, significant temporary construction noise impacts could exceed the significance threshold. Thus, proposed Project and cumulative noise impacts associated with construction activities would be significant and unavoidable.

F-80 As explained further in Section IV.H, Noise, of the Draft EIR, the estimation of potential construction noise levels represent a conservative noise impact scenario in which all construction equipment during each phase of construction was assumed to operate simultaneously and was assumed to be located at the construction area nearest to the potentially affected off-site noisesensitive receptor. Typically, construction activities would be spread throughout the entire site, further away from the affected receptors. As evaluated, construction noise impacts would be temporary and variable during construction, and would affect off-site noise-sensitive receptors differently depending on the location of the construction. Given that the potential impact is conservatively estimated and would be variable as to time, duration, and location, off-site noise-reduction measures would not be feasible. Implementation of Project Design Feature H-2 set forth in the MMP would ensure that vibration generated during construction activities would be reduced to levels below the significance threshold for building damage at the adjacent off-site buildings. In addition, Project Design Feature H-2 would reduce the vibration impacts with respect to human annoyance. However, there are no other feasible mitigation measures that would reduce the vibration levels during certain construction activities to below the significance threshold for human annoyance. Therefore, vibration impacts on human annoyance during construction would be significant and unavoidable. The vibration impacts on human annoyance would be short-term and would only occur when large construction equipment is operated within 80 feet of a sensitive receptor. Ground-borne vibration from each of the construction sites (proposed Project and related projects) would rapidly attenuate from each of the construction sites, which would not result in cumulative construction vibration impacts. Therefore, cumulative construction vibration impacts would be less than significant. 6

.

Reference

For a complete discussion of environmental impacts with respect to noise, please see Section IV.H, Noise, of the Draft EIR. D.

Traffic, Access, and Parking (Intersection Level of Service, Neighborhood Intrusion, In-Street Construction, Supplemental Caltrans Analysis) 1.

Description of Effects a]

Intersection Level of Service (D

Project Trip Generation

It is estimated that after Project construction, the Project Site (including the existing components that would remain after construction) would generate a total of 21,226 daily trips on a typical weekday, including approximately 2,160 morning peak-hour trips (1,650 inbound, 510 outbound) and 2,288 afternoon peak-hour trips (688 inbound, 1,600 outbound). The existing land uses on the Project Site are estimated to currently generate a total of 11,396 daily trips on a typical weekday, including approximately 1,235 morning peak-hour trips (938 Inbound, 297 outbound) and 1,255 afternoon peak-hour trips (391 inbound, 864 outbound). The proposed Project is, therefore, expected to generate a net total of 9,830 daily trips on a typical weekday, including approximately 925 morning peak-hour trips (712 inbound, 213 outbound) and 1,033 afternoon peak-hour trips (297 inbound, 736 outbound).

F-81 2)

(

Existing with Project Intersection Operations (Existing with Project Before Mitigation)

The Existing with Project analysis assumes the proposed Project is constructed to full buildout and added to existing traffic conditions. Of the 65 signalized study intersections, 51 are projected to operate at Level of Service (LOS) D or better during both the morning and afternoon peak hours under the Existing with Project conditions. The remaining 14 intersections are projected to operate at LOS E or F during one or both peak hours. Under Existing with Project conditions, the proposed Project would result in 11 significant impacts during the morning peak hour and 14 significant impacts during the afternoon peak hour at signalized intersections before implementation of the Project TDM program or mitigation measures discussed below. Because intersections impacted during the morning peak hour can be the same intersections impacted during the afternoon peak hour, a total of 17 of the 65 signalized study intersections are expected to be impacted during either the morning or afternoon peak hours under Existing with Project conditions. The remaining 48 signalized intersections would not be significantly impacted. Of the 11 unsignalized study intersections, 10 are projected to operate at LOS D or better during the morning peak hour under the Existing with Project conditions. The remaining intersection, US 101 Southbound Off-Ramp & Lexington Avenue (Unsignalized Intersection No, 9), is projected to operate at LOS E during the morning peak hour under both the Existing with Project Before Mitigation and the Existing with Project with Mitigation conditions. The intersection does not meet signal warrants, and thus does not meet the City’s criteria for signalization. Based on the City of Los Angeles CEQA Thresholds Guide methodology for analyzing unsignalized intersections, under Existing with Project conditions before mitigation, the proposed Project would cause significant impacts at the following two unsignalized study intersections: (1) Unsignalized Intersection No. 6: Gower Street & US 101 Southbound Off-Ramp/Yucca Street; and (2) Unsignalized Intersection No. 8: Western Avenue & US 101 Northbound On-Ramp. (3)

Future with Project Intersection Operations (Future with Project Before Mitigation)

The Future with Project analysis assumes the proposed Project is constructed to full buildout and added to future traffic conditions, which comprises existing traffic, interim projects, ambient, and related project traffic growth and future roadway and infrastructure improvements, but does not include any of the features or benefits of the proposed Project’s TDM program and mitigation measures. Of the 65 signalized study intersections, 41 would operate at LOS D or better during both the morning and afternoon peak hours under Future with Project conditions. The remaining 24 intersections would operate at LOS E or F during at least one analyzed peak hour. Under Future with Project conditions, the proposed Project would result in 13 significant impacts during the morning peak hour and 16 significant impacts during the afternoon peak hour at signalized intersections before implementation of the proposed Project’s TDM program or mitigation measures set forth below. As intersections impacted during the morning peak hour can be the same intersections impacted during the afternoon peak hour, a total of 19 of the 65 signalized study intersections are expected to be impacted during either the morning or afternoon peak hours under Future with Project conditions before mitigation. The remaining 46 signalized intersections would not be significantly impacted.

F-82 With regard to unsignalized intersections, 3 of the 11 unsignalized intersections would operate at LOS E or F during the morning or afternoon peak hour. The remaining 8 unsignalized intersections would operate at LOS D or better during both peak hours. Of these intersections, the following two intersections would meet Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT) criteria for signalization: •

Gower Street & US 101 SB Off-Ramp/Yucea Street (Unsignalized Intersection No. 6); and



Normandie Avenue & US 101 NB On-Ramp/Monroe Street (Unsignalized Intersection No. 10).

It should be noted that both of these intersections also meet signal warrants in both the Future without Project conditions before mitigation as well as under Existing conditions, so neither Project traffic nor ambient growth is causing the intersections to meet signal warrants. Under the City of Los Angeles CEQA Thresholds Guide methodology, the proposed Project would cause potential significant impacts at the following three unsignalized study intersections: (1) Unsignalized Intersection No. 6: Gower Street & US 101 Southbound Off-Ramp/Yucca Street: (2) Unsignalized Intersection No. 8: Western Avenue & US 101 Northbound On-Ramp; and (3) Unsignalized Intersection No. 10: Normandie Avenue & US 101 NB On-Ramp/Monroe Street. b)

Neighborhood Intrusion

Five neighborhoods were identified according to LADOT criteria that may be subject to significant neighborhood intrusion impacts (cut-through traffic) by the Project-generated traffic under either Existing with Project or Future with Project conditions before mitigation. These neighborhoods are described as follows: De Longpre Avenue to the north, Gower Street to the east, Santa Monica Boulevard to the south, and Vine Street to the west; Sunset Boulevard to the north, Bronson Avenue to the east, Fountain Avenue to the south, and Gordon Street to the west: Fountain Avenue to the north, Bronson Avenue to the east, Santa Monica Boulevard to the south, and Gower Street to the west; Santa Monica Boulevard to the north, Wilton Place to the east, Melrose Avenue to the south, and Van Ness Avenue to the west; and Santa Monica Boulevard to the north, Western Avenue to the east, Lemon Grove Avenue to the south, and Wilton Place to the west. These potential impacts are considered significant, and a Neighborhood Traffic Management Plan process by which the potential impacts can be identified and mitigated has been incorporated into the mitigation for neighborhood intrusion impacts, as discussed below.

F-83 c]

In-Street Construction

The maximum anticipated construction traffic during any phase of Project construction is expected to generate a maximum of 68 morning peak-hour trips and 108 afternoon peak-hour trips from construction activity. Depending on the haul route utilized, construction traffic could result in temporary traffic impacts at up to four study intersections. To reduce potential traffic impacts related to construction traffic, construction traffic management plans would be implemented, as discussed below, which would help to minimize the amount and effect of peak hour construction traffic. Project development along the Project Site perimeter streets, including Van Ness Avenue, Gower Street, Melrose Avenue, Ridgewood Place, Gregory Avenue, and Camerford Avenue, may result in temporary lane closures, temporary sidewalk closures, temporary loss of street parking, and/or temporary bus stop relocation. Therefore, temporary impacts could occur with regard to the loss of on-street parking, sidewalk closure, and relocation of bus stops. Such temporary impacts are considered significant. d)

Supplemental Caltrans Analysis

Caltrans uses different methodologies than the City of Los Angeles to evaluate operating conditions at Caltrans facilities (intersections, freeway mainline segments, and freeway on-ramps and off-ramps). While Caltrans does not have published criteria for determining potential impacts to its facilities, to be conservative, a supplemental analysis of Caltrans facilities according to Caltrans guidelines is presented in Appendix K of the Traffic Study included in Appendix Q of the Draft EIR. As summarized in this supplemental Caltrans analysis additional unsignalized intersections and freeway mainline segments may be impacted by the Project before mitigation. Due to the uncertainties surrounding the potential Caltrans evaluation of impacts to its facilities, to be conservative and for the purposes of the EIR analysis, the potential impacts are considered significant.

e]

Cumulative Impacts (1)

Intersections

Implementation of the proposed Project in conjunction with the interim projects and related projects identified in Section III, Environmental Setting, of the Draft EIR and projected regional growth would increase the amount of traffic in the Study Area. As discussed previously, the analysis of Futurewith-Project conditions reflects both Project-specific and future cumulative traffic impacts related to intersection LOS, because the Future-with-Project condition considers a combination of existing traffic conditions, plus traffic from regional growth and related projects, and Project traffic. Therefore, the proposed Project’s contribution to impacts that would occur under the future cumulative conditions would be considerable, and cumulative impacts would be significant at the intersections discussed above. (2)

Neighborhood Intrusion

Implementation of the proposed Project in conjunction with the related projects would increase the amount of traffic in the Study Area. As discussed previously, the analysis of the Future with Project condition reflects both Project-specific and future cumulative traffic impacts related to traffic volumes and traffic distribution in the Study Area. The proposed Project’s impacts related to neighborhood

F-84 intrusion at the five neighborhoods identified above as having the potential to experience significant neighborhood intrusion impacts could remain significant because at this time it is not known whether a consensus would be reached among residents in the affected neighborhoods on the implementation of mitigation measures or if the agreed upon measure would reduce impacts to less than significant levels. No other feasible mitigation was identified. Therefore, cumulative impacts related to neighborhood intrusion are conservatively considered significant and unavoidable. (3)

In-Street Construction

Most of the related projects are not located in close proximity to the Project Site and may or may not be developed within the same construction schedule as the proposed Project. In addition, per standard City practice, the construction of large development projects would occur in accordance with project-specific construction traffic management plans, as is the case with the proposed Project. As construction traffic management plans are reviewed and approved by LADOT, it is anticipated that through this process, LADOT would coordinate construction activities among the projects that would have the potential to result in cumulative intersection impacts. Under these circumstances, cumulative impacts at study intersections during construction would be less than significant. As discussed above, the proposed Project could result in temporary construction impacts associated with the loss of on-street parking, sidewalk closures, and relocation of bus stops. To the extent that nearby related projects (e.g., Related Project No. 61 at the cemetery north of the Project Site) also result in such temporary impacts concurrent with the proposed Project, these impacts would be considered cumulatively significant.

(4)

Supplemental Caltrans Analysis

As noted above, Caltrans uses different methodologies than the City of Los Angeles to evaluate operating conditions at Caltrans facilities. While Caltrans does not have published criteria for determining potential impacts to its facilities, to be conservative, a supplemental analysis of Caltrans facilities according to Caltrans guidelines is presented in Appendix K of the Traffic Study included in Appendix Q of the Draft EIR. As summarized in this supplemental Caltrans analysis additional unsignalized intersections and freeway mainline segments may be impacted by the Project before mitigation. Due to the uncertainties surrounding the potential Caltrans evaluation of impacts to its facilities, to be conservative and for the purposes of the EIR analysis, the potential impacts are considered significant. 2.

Project Design Features

Project Design Feature K-1: The Project Applicant shall prepare and implement a Transportation Demand Management (TDM) program to reduce traffic impacts of the proposed Project. The TDM program shall include implementation of several TDM strategies, which may include, but are not limited to the following: •

Flexible work schedules and telecommuting programs;



Bicycle amenities (bicycle racks, lockers, etc.);



Guaranteed Ride Home program;

F-85 Rideshare/carpool/vanpool promotion and support;



Transportation Information Center; On-Site TDM Coordinator; Discounted transit passes; Mobility hub support; Funding for bikeway improvements; and Continued provision of on-site personnel at studio entry gates to facilitate traffic flow onto the Project Site.

Project Design Feature K-2: Construction Traffic Management Plan The Project Applicant shall prepare detailed construction traffic management plans, including street closure information, detour plans, haul routes, and staging plans as necessary and satisfactory to the City. The construction traffic management plans shall be based on the nature and timing of the specific construction activities and other projects in the vicinity of the Project Site, and shall include the following elements as appropriate: •

Provisions for temporary traffic control during all construction activities along public rights-of-way to improve traffic flow on public roadways (e.g., flaggers); Scheduling construction activities to reduce the effect on traffic flow on arterial streets; Construction-related vehicles shall not park on surrounding public streets; Provision of safety precautions for pedestrians and bicyclists through such measures as alternate routing and protection barriers; Contractors shall be required to participate in a common carpool registry during all periods of contract performance monitored and maintained by the general contractor; ' Schedule construction-related deliveries, other than concrete and earthwork-related deliveries, to reduce travel during peak travel periods as identified in this study; Obtain the required permits for truck haul routes from the City of Los Angeles prior to the issuance of any grading permit for the proposed Project; and Obtain the required Caltrans transportation permit for use of oversized transport vehicles on Caltrans facilities.

F-86

3.

Mitigation Measures

Mitigation Measure K-1: The Project Applicant shall initiate, fund, and market a Hollywoodarea Transportation Management Organization (TMO) to promote alternative modes of transportation including walking and bicycling, carpooling and vanpooling, use of public transit, short-term automobile rentals, etc. This TMO would be available to anyone within the Hollywood community, not just patrons of the proposed Project, and would be accessible through a website and a mobile application providing users with information and allowing them to access TMO services. Mitigation Measure K-2: The Project Applicant shall pay LADOT to design and install signal controller upgrades, CCTV cameras, and system loops at the locations set forth below, and shown in Figure IV.K-4 in Section IV.K, Traffic, Access, and Parking, of the Draft EIR. These improvements would be implemented,by Paramount Pictures through payment of a fixed fee to LADOT to fund the cost of these improvements. If LADOT selects the payment option, then Paramount Pictures would be required to pay LADOT’s projected cost of installation, and LADOT shall design and construct these improvements. The TSM improvements shall target the following four travel corridors: (1) Franklin Avenue (between Cahuenga Boulevard and Bronson Avenue); (2) Santa Monica Boulevard (between La Brea Avenue and Vermont Avenue); (3) Melrose Avenue (between La Brea Avenue and Heliotrope Drive); and (4) Gower Street (between Franklin Avenue and Melrose Avenue). The following are the locations designated for signal controller upgrades, CCTV, and system loops. Signal Controller Upgrade Locations: • Vine Street & Franklin Avenue • Gower Street & Franklin Avenue

• Beachwood Drive & Franklin Avenue • Bronson Avenue & Franklin Avenue • Gower Street & Carlos Avenue • Gower Street & Sunset Boulevard

• Gower Street & Waring Avenue • Mansfield Avenue & Melrose Avenue • June Street & Melrose Avenue • Cahuenga Boulevard & Melrose Avenue • Larchmont Boulevard & Melrose Avenue • Gower Street & Melrose Avenue • Van Ness Avenue & Melrose Avenue • Wilton Place & Melrose Avenue • Harvard Boulevard & Melrose Avenue • Ardmore Avenue & Melrose Avenue

F-87 • Normandie Avenue & Melrose Avenue • Alexandria Avenue/US 101 Northbound Off-Ramp & Melrose Avenue • Heliotrope Drive & Melrose Avenue Closed Circuit Television Locations: Highland Avenue & Santa Monica Boulevard Normandie Avenue & Melrose Avenue Vine Street/Rossmore Avenue & Melrose Avenue System Loop Locations (Where necessary at signalized intersections within the following corridors):

Franklin Avenue between Cahuenga Boulevard and Bronson Avenue Santa Monica Boulevard between Orange Drive and Vermont Avenue Melrose Avenue between La Brea Avenue and Heliotrope Drive Gower Street between Franklin Avenue and Melrose Avenue

Mitigation Measure K-3:

Intersection #33—Gower Street & Santa Monica Boulevard. Convert the existing northbound shared through/right-turn lane into a separate through lane and right-turn lane by shifting the north/south lanes westward by approximately 1 foot, in order to provide the right-turn lane, two street parking stalls on the east side of Gower Street south of Santa Monica Boulevard would need to be removed. With this improvement, the northbound intersection approach would provide one left-turn lane, one through lane, and one right-turn lane.

Mitigation Measure K-4: Intersection #34—Gower Street & Melrose Avenue. Convert the existing westbound shared through/right-turn lane into a separate through lane and right-turn lane by dedicating necessary right of way for a right-turn curb cut from the Project Site to the north. With this improvement, the westbound intersection approach would provide two through lanes and one right-turn lane.

Mitigation Measure K-5:

The Applicant or its successors shall fund and coordinate implementation of LADOT’s Neighborhood Traffic Management Plan process set forth in Appendix Q of the Traffic Study prepared for the proposed Project, in an amount up to $500,000. Eligible communities shall include the residential neighborhoods within the boundaries listed below: De Longpre Avenue to the north, Gower Street to the east, Santa Monica Boulevard to the south, and Vine Street to the west; Sunset Boulevard to the north, Bronson Avenue to the east, Fountain Avenue to the south, and Gordon Street to the west; Fountain Avenue to the north, Bronson Avenue to the east, Santa Monica Boulevard to the south, and Gower Street to the west;

F-88

4.



Santa Monica Boulevard to the north, Wilton Place to the east, Melrose Avenue to the south, and Van Ness Avenue to the west; and



Santa Monica Boulevard to the north, Western Avenue to the east. Lemon Grove Avenue to the south, and Wilton Place to the west.

Findings

Specific economic, legal, social, technological or other considerations make infeasible additional mitigation measures or project alternatives identified in the EIR. 5.

Rationale for Findings a)

Intersection Level of Service (D

Existing With Project with Mitigation

With the implementation of the proposed Project’s TDM program and mitigation program, under Existing with Project conditions, Project impacts at 63 of the 65 signalized intersections would be reduced to less than significant levels. Significant impacts would remain at the following two intersections: (1) Intersection No. 31: Gower Street & Sunset Boulevard (morning peak hour); and (2) Intersection No. 44: Van Ness Avenue & Santa Monica Boulevard (afternoon peak hour). With implementation of the proposed Project’s TDM program and mitigation measures set forth in the MMP, the potential significant impact at the unsignalized intersection of Gower Street & US-101 Southbound Off-Ramp/Yucca Street would be reduced to a less than significant level. While the installation of a traffic signal at the intersection of Western Avenue & US-101 Northbound On-Ramp would reduce this potential impact to a less than significant level, this intersection does not meet LADOT’s criteria for signalization. The decision on whether a traffic signal will be installed at this location is made by the governing jurisdictions taking into consideration other factors such as spacing with adjacent signalized intersections and interruption to traffic flow along the major street. If a traffic signal control was not installed at this location, a significant and unavoidable impact would remain at the unsignalized intersection based on the City of Los Angeles CEQA Thresholds Guide criteria. (2)

Future With Project with Mitigation

With the implementation of the proposed Project’s TDM program and mitigation measures set forth in the MMP, Project impacts at 61 of the 65 signalized intersections would be reduced to less than significant levels. Significant impacts would remain at the following four signalized intersections: (1) Intersection No. 31: Gower Street & Sunset Boulevard (morning peak hour); (2) Intersection No. 44: Van Ness Avenue & Santa Monica Boulevard (afternoon peak hour); (3) Intersection No. 49: Wilton Place & Melrose Avenue (afternoon peak hour); and (4) Intersection No. 54: Western Avenue & Santa Monica Boulevard (morning peak hour). With implementation of the proposed Project’s TDM program and mitigation measures set forth in the MMP, the significant impact at the unsignalized intersection of Normandie Avenue & US-101 NB On-Ramp/Monroe Street would be reduced to a less than significant level. While the installation of a traffic signal at the intersection of Gower Street & US 101 Southbound Off-Ramp/Yucca Street

F-89 meets LADOT’s criteria, the intersection of Western Avenue & US-101 Northbound On-Ramp does not meet LADOT’s criteria for signalization. The decision on whether a traffic signal will be installed is made by the governing jurisdictions taking into consideration other factors such as spacing with adjacent signalized intersections and interruption'to traffic flow along the major street. If a traffic signal control was not installed at these two locations, a significant and unavoidable impact would remain based on the City of Los Angeles CEQA Thresholds Guide criteria. b)

Neighborhood Intrusion

Implementation of the proposed Project’s TDM program and mitigation measures set forth in the MMP may reduce the proposed Project’s neighborhood intrusion impacts to a less than significant level. The identified neighborhood intrusion mitigation measure would be applied to the boundaries of the identified neighborhoods to ensure that the cut-through traffic diverted from these neighborhoods moves to the neighboring arterial and collector streets does not result in a neighborhood impact at another neighborhood. However, as at this time it is not known whether consensus will be reached among the residents in the affected neighborhoods on the implementation of the neighborhood intrusion mitigation measure or if the agreed upon measure will reduce the impacts to less than significance, to be conservative, it is concluded that mitigation of the potential neighborhood intrusion impact will not be feasible. Therefore, it is conservatively concluded that a significant Project-level traffic intrusion impact in the identified neighborhoods would remain. Such impacts would also be considered cumulatively significant.

c)

In-Street Construction

Project impacts related to intersection operations during construction would be less than significant. Even with implementation of the project design features and mitigation measures set forth in the MMP, the proposed Project could result in temporary construction impacts associated with the loss of on-street parking, sidewalk closures, and relocation of bus stops. These potential impacts would be considered significant on a Project-level and cumulative basis.

d)

Supplemental Caltrans Analysis

In addition, while Caltrans does not have published criteria for determining potential impacts to its facilities, to be conservative, a supplemental analysis of Caltrans facilities according to Caltrans guidelines is presented in Appendix K of the Traffic Study included in Appendix Q of the Draft EIR. As summarized in this supplemental Caltrans analysis additional unsignalized intersections and freeway mainline segments may be impacted by the Project before mitigation. The mitigation measures identified above would provide traffic signal control, which would improve operating conditions at the unsignalized intersections. However, not all of the unsignalized intersections meet signal warrants, which are a component of LADOT’s criteria for signalization. Even if an intersection meets signal warrants, the decision on whether a traffic signal will be installed will be made by the governing jurisdictions by taking into consideration other factors, such as spacing with adjacent signalized intersections and interruption to traffic flow along the major street. With regard to freeway mainline segments, generally Caltrans has determined that there are no mitigation measures that a single project can feasibly implement that would directly reduce mainline impacts to a less than significant level. Caltrans instead requires that the applicant pay its fair share of any feasible improvements that

F-90 Caltrans may implement at significantly impacted segments. The Project Applicant will work with Caltrans to determine an equitable share of a feasible improvement for potential Project impacts, if any. There is the potential that feasible mitigation for any such impacts is not available; therefore, it is conservatively concluded that a significant Project-level impact on Caltrans facilities would remain. Such impacts would also be considered cumulatively significant. 6,

Reference

For a complete discussion of environmental impacts with respect to traffic, access, and parking, please see Section IV.K, Traffic, Access, and Parking, of the Draft EIR and Section II of the Final EIR. E.

Solid Waste (Operations) 1

.

Discussion of Effects a]

Operational Impacts

The transport of Project-generated solid waste to waste management/disposal facilities would continue to occur along existing solid waste routes of travel. As such, the proposed Project would not result in the need for additional solid waste collection routes to adequately handle Project-generated waste. The proposed uses would result in an approximate 3,807 ton-per-year (approximately 10 tons per day) net increase in solid waste generation over that produced by the existing mix of entertainment production uses on the Project Site. During 2012, approximately 4,112 tons of waste were generated at the Project Site. Thus, upon full buildout of the proposed Project, the Project Site would be expected to generate approximately 7,919 tons of solid waste per year (or approximately 20.5 tons per day). Assuming a diversion rate of approximately 70 percent based on implementation of Project Design Feature L.3-2, the net increase in solid waste disposal associated with the proposed Project would be approximately 1,142 tons per year or approximately 3 tons per day, which would represent approximately 0.001 percent of the estimated remaining Class III landfill capacity available to the City of Los Angeles as of 2011. As set forth in the Annual Report, the County anticipates that it would be able to adequately serve future disposal needs through 2026. At this time, it is not possible to project the available landfill capacity in 2038 (the Project buildout year). Various factors, including future County development and/or expansion of landfills, use of new waste-by-rail facilities, development of new conversion technologies, etc., will ultimately determine the available landfill capacity in 2038. While it is anticipated that future iterations of the Los Angeles County Integrated Waste Management Plan Annual Reports would provide for improvements beyond 2026 to serve future waste disposal needs, it is conservatively assumed that no new landfills or increases in capacity would occur. Thus, based on this worst case assumption, the County may not be able to accommodate the disposal needs of the proposed Project. Therefore, the proposed Project’s impacts to solid waste disposal facilities in 2038 are conservatively concluded to be potentially significant. b)

Cumulative Impacts

Per the Annual Report, the forecasted 2026 waste generation volume for the County is approximately 27.6 million tons. The estimated Project generation net increase of approximately 3,807 tons of waste per year would represent a limited percentage (approximately 0.01 percent) of the cumulative waste generation in 2026. Thus, the proposed Project’s contribution to the County’s cumulative waste stream for the last forecasted year available would not be substantial. Nonetheless,

F-91 while it is anticipated that future iterations of the County integrated Waste Management Rian Annual Reports would provide for improvements to serve future waste disposal needs, it is conservatively assumed that no new landfills or increases in capacity would occur. Thus, based on this worst case assumption, the County may not be able to accommodate the disposal needs of future growth, including the proposed Project and the interim projects, through 2038. Therefore, cumulative impacts on solid waste disposal facilities are conservatively concluded to be potentially significant. 2

.

Project Design Features

Project Design Feature L.3-2: During operations, the proposed Project shall have a solid waste diversion target of 70 percent based on current available recycling practices, including off-site sorting of waste by third party vendors, permitted by the Los Angeles Municipal Code. 3.

Mitigation Measures

Project-level and cumulative impacts with regard to solid waste would be reduced to the extent feasible through the above project design feature, and no other feasible mitigation measures have been identified. 4.

Findings

Specific economic, legal, social, technological or other considerations make infeasible additional mitigation measures or project alternatives identified in the EIR. 5.

Rationale for Findings

While the existing landfills serving Project Site have adequate'capacity to accommodate Project-related disposal needs, due to the uncertainty in future availability and capacity of these landfills over the entire buildout period for the proposed Project, it is conservatively assumed that the proposed Project's operational impacts to landfill capacity would remain significant and unavoidable. Likewise, cumulative impacts with regard to regional landfill disposal capacity would also remain significant and unavoidable. It should be noted that the identification of additional landfills is generally addressed at the City and County levels (e.g., through the County’s Countywide Siting Element) and, as such, is not under the control of the individual Project. Other than waste minimization and diversion, which are project design features, no other feasible mitigation measures have been identified to address this significant impact. 6

.

Reference

For a complete discussion of environmental impacts with respect to solid waste, please see Section IV.L.3, Utilities and Service Systems - Solid Waste, of the Draft EIR. X.

ALTERNATIVES TO THE PROPOSED PROJECT

A.

Summary of Findings

Based upon the following analysis, the City finds, pursuant to CEQA Guidelines section 15096(g)(2), that no alternative within its powers would substantially lessen or avoid any significant effect the Project would have on the environment.

F-92 B.

Project Objectives

An important consideration in the analysis of alternatives to the proposed Project is the degree to which such alternatives would achieve the objectives of the proposed Project. To facilitate this comparison, the objectives of the proposed Project contained in Section II, Project Description, of the Draft EIR were compared to the alternatives.

The underlying purpose of the proposed Project is to maintain and enhance studio operations, invest in new state-of-the-art soundstages and high-tech production facilities, and create entertainment jobs in Hollywood while respecting the studio’s history. The proposed Project provides the opportunity to evaluate the entire studio lot to improve synergy and efficiencies that are critical to preparing for the future.

C.

Project Alternatives

In accordance with CEQA Guidelines Section 15126.6(c), an EIR should identify any alternatives that were considered for analysis but rejected as infeasible and briefly explain the reasons for rejection. According to the CEQA Guidelines, among the factors that may be used to eliminate alternatives from detailed consideration is the alternative’s failure to meet most of the basic project objectives, the alternative’s infeasibility, or the alternative’s inability to avoid significant environmental impacts. As discussed in Section V., Alternatives, of the Draft EIR, numerous alternatives were considered and seven were retained for further analysis in the EIR as discussed below.

1.

Alternative A: No Project Alternative—Continued Operation of Existing Campus a)

Description of Alternative

Alternative A, the No Project—Continued Operation of Existing Campus Alternative, assumes the Project would not be approved, no new permanent development or land uses would be introduced within the Project Site, and the existing environment would be maintained. The existing uses within the Main Lot and the Ancillary Lots would continue to operate as they do currently. Temporary sets (both interior and exterior) would continue to be constructed and removed on a regular basis as part of ongoing studio operations, and regular maintenance and upkeep of existing buildings would continue to occur. However, no new permanent structures would be constructed or new permanent land uses introduced. Unlike the proposed Project, future development under Alternative A would not be guided by a Specific Plan. b)

Impact Summary of Alternative A

Alternative A would reduce to a less-than-significant level all of the significant impacts that would occur with the proposed Project, including: shading during operation; air quality during construction and operation; noise and vibration during construction; traffic intersection levels of service during operation; neighborhood traffic intrusion during operation; in-street construction impacts associated with the loss of on-street parking, sidewalk closures, and relocation of bus stops during construction; and solid waste generation during operation. Alternative A would result in the avoidance of most of the adverse, less than significant impacts anticipated to occur with the development of the proposed Project, including among other things: land use compatibility, operational noise, geology and

F-93 soils, public services, water, and wastewater. On the other hand, Alternative A would not have the same beneficial effect as the proposed Project in terms of creating new jobs. Additionally, Alternative A would be less consistent than the proposed Project with applicable employment growth plans and policies of the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) and the City. cl

Finding

Overall, Alternative A would reduce adverse environmental impacts when compared with the development of the proposed Project. Therefore, this Alternative would be an environmentally superior alternative to the Project. However, Alternative A would not-address any of the project objectives. It is found pursuant to Public Resources Code Section 21081(a)(3), that specific economic, legal, social, technological, or other considerations, including, considerations identified in Section XII of these Findings (Statement of Overriding Considerations), make infeasible the No Project Alternative described in the EIR. d]

Rationale for Finding

No new permanent development or land uses would be introduced on the Project Site under Alternative A, and the existing uses on the Project Site would continue to operate as they do currently. As such, Alternative A would not meet any of the proposed Project’s objectives or the proposed Project’s underlying purpose to maintain and enhance studio operations, invest in new state-of-the-art soundstages and high-tech production facilities, and create entertainment jobs in Hollywood while respecting the studio’s history. 2

.

Alternative B: No Project Alternative—Continued Operation of Existing Campus With Predicted Growth a)

Description of Alternative

Alternative B, the No Project/Continued Operation of Existing Campus With Predicted Growth Alternative, contemplates another reasonably foreseeable scenario that could occur if the proposed Project were not implemented. Under this Alternative, construction would continue to occur on the Project Site in a manner consistent with the development characteristics at Paramount Studios over the past 25 years. In the past 25 years, approximately 351,200 square feet of production office, support, office, and retail uses have been added to the Project Site. It is assumed that Alternative B would result in the removal of approximately 151,200 square feet of production office, support, office, and retail uses, and the construction of approximately 351,200 square feet of new production office, support, office, and retail uses. Overall, this Alternative would result in a net increase of approximately 34,300 square feet of production office uses, 167,800 square feet of office uses, and 28,400 square feet of retail uses, and a net decrease of approximately 30,500 square feet of support uses on the Project Site. Under Alternative B, less functional buildings and uses would be removed and replaced with new production office, support, office, and retail uses. The existing stages would remain, and no new stage uses would be constructed. Unlike the proposed Project, future development under Alternative B would not be guided by a Specific Plan. b)

Impact Summary of Alternative B

F-94 Alternative B would reduce to a less-than-significant level some of the significant impacts that would occur with the proposed Project, including: shading during operation; air quality during construction and operation; neighborhood traffic intrusion during operation; and in-street construction impacts associated with the loss of on-street parking, sidewalk closures, and relocation of bus stops during construction. Alternative B would reduce but not avoid the proposed Project’s significant and unavoidable impacts related to: noise and vibration during construction; traffic intersection levels of service during operation; and solid waste generation during operation. In addition, Alternative B would result in new significant impacts with regard to greenhouse gas emissions, historic resources, archaeological and paleontological resources, and operational noise, as compared to the proposed Project which would have less than significant impacts in these areas. Alternative B would result in the reduction but not the elimination of some of the adverse, less than significant impacts anticipated to occur with the development of the proposed Project, including among other things: land use compatibility, geology and soils, public services, water, and wastewater. Alternative B would not have the same beneficial effect as the proposed Project in terms of creating new jobs. Additionally, Alternative B would be less consistent than the proposed Project with applicable employment growth plans and policies of the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) and the City. cl

Finding

Overall, Alternative B would reduce some adverse environmental impacts when compared with the development of the proposed Project but would not eliminate all of the proposed Project’s significant impacts. In addition, Alternative B would generate additional significant impacts. Alternative B would not fully meet any of the proposed Project’s objectives. Rather, this Alternative would only partially meet or be incompatible with some of the proposed Project’s objectives. It is found pursuant to Public Resources Code Section 21081(a)(3), that specific economic, legal, social, technological, or other considerations, including considerations identified in Section XII of these Findings (Statement of Overriding Considerations), make infeasible Alternative B described in the EIR. d)

Rationale for Finding

Overall, Alternative B represents a greatly reduced scope of development compared to the proposed Project. New development would be implemented in a manner that is consistent with the characteristics of development at Paramount Studios over the past 25 years and would not be subject to a Specific Plan. As such, Alternative B would not create a singular, cohesive, and integrated campus that is guided by a unified set of development guidelines and standards. Therefore, Alternative B would not substantially enhance the role of the Project Site in the movie, television, and entertainment industry. While Alternative B would modernize and upgrade the facilities at the Project Site to some degree, the limited improvements would not meet the increased competition for movie, television, and entertainment production and post-production facilities from other states or worldwide locations. Alternative B would not provide new state-of-the-art and technologically advanced soundstages, production offices, and post-production areas within the Project Site to meet the anticipated future demand of the movie, television, and entertainment industry or allow flexibility to incorporate future technology advances. While some new employment opportunities would be created, Alternative B would not maximize opportunities for the local and regional economy by creating construction jobs or a wide range of jobs. Without the establishment of unified design guidelines and standards through the adoption of a Specific Plan, the extent to which Alternative B would improve the identity of the Project Site as a movie, television, and entertainment industry area and enhance the visual appearance of the Project Site while preserving the historic character of the Project Site would be

F-95 uncertain and greatly reduced in comparison to the proposed Project. Alternative B would not fully meet any of the proposed Project’s objectives. Rather, this Alternative would only partially meet or be incompatible with some of the proposed Project’s objectives, and it would not meet the underlying purpose of the proposed Project to maintain and enhance studio operations, invest in new state-ofthe-art soundstages and high-tech production facilities, and create entertainment jobs in Hollywood while respecting the studio’s history to the same extent as the proposed Project. 3.

Alternative C: Reduced Density Alternative—20 Percent Reduction Description of Alternative

Alternative C, the Reduced Density Alternative—20 Percent Reduction, would represent an overall reduction in net new Project development by approximately 20 percent. This alternative assumes that the reduction would occur mostly within the office uses, and that with the related reduction in office employees the need for support uses would also be reduced. The amount of net new stage, production office, and retail uses would be the same or substantially similar to that of the proposed Project. Alternative C would result in the removal of approximately 536,600 square feet of stage, production office, support, office, and retail uses and the development of approximately 1,638,400 square feet of new stage, production office, support, office, and retail uses. This would result in a net increase of approximately 1,101,800 square feet of floor area within the Project Site. Alternative C would involve the construction of 111,100 square feet of stage uses, 722,200 square feet of production office uses, 144,600 square feet of support uses, 568,500 square feet of office uses, and 92,000 square feet of retail uses. Like the proposed Project, Alternative C would be implemented under a Specific Plan that would guide development within the Project Site through the year 2038,

b)

Impact Summary of Alternative C

Alternative C would not eliminate any of the significant impacts that would occur with the proposed Project. Alternative C would result in similar significant and unavoidable impacts related to shading during operation and solid waste generation during operation. Alternative C would reduce but not eliminate the significant impacts related to: air quality during construction and operation; noise and vibration during construction; traffic intersection levels of service during operation; neighborhood traffic intrusion during operation; and temporary in-street construction impacts associated with the loss of on-street parking, sidewalk closures, and relocation of bus stops during construction. Alternative C would result in the reduction but not the elimination of some of the adverse, less than significant impacts anticipated to occur with the development of the proposed Project, including among other things: land use compatibility, geology and soils, public services, water, and wastewater. Alternative C would not have the same level of beneficial effect as the proposed Project in terms of creating new jobs. Additionally, Alternative C would be less consistent than the proposed Project with applicable employment growth plans and policies of the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) and the City.

c]

Finding

Overall, Alternative C would reduce some adverse environmental impacts when compared with the development of the proposed Project but would not eliminate any of the proposed Project’s significant impacts. Alternative C would meet or partially meet most of the proposed Project’s objectives, but to a lesser extent than the proposed Project, and would not meet some of the Project

F-96 objectives due to the reduced amount of net new floor area compared to the proposed Project and net loss of support floor area. It is found pursuant to Public Resources Code Section 21081(a)(3), that specific economic, legal, social, technological, or other considerations, including considerations identified in Section XII of these Findings (Statement of Overriding Considerations), make infeasible Alternative C described in the EIR. d]

Rationale for Finding

Alternative C would construct a similar mix of land uses as the proposed Project but with an approximate 20 percent reduction in overall square footage. Therefore, Alternative C would enhance the role of the Project Site in the movie, television, and entertainment industry, and in so doing, contribute to the preservation of Hollywood as the international focus for the movie, television, and entertainment industry, but to a lesser extent than the proposed Project. Alternative C would modernize and upgrade the facilities at the Project Site and provide new state-of-the-art and technologically advanced soundstages, production offices, and post-production areas within the Project Site, but to a lesser extent than the proposed Project. Alternative C would enhance opportunities for the local and regional economy by creating construction jobs and a wide range of jobs and production crew jobs, but to a lesser extent than the proposed Project. Alternative C would result in a net loss of support area on the Project Site, and as such, would not provide new production support facilities and expand employee amenities and increase gathering spaces for employees. Alternative C would meet or partially meet most of the proposed Project’s objectives, but to a lesser extent than the proposed Project, and would not meet some of the Project objectives due to the reduced amount of net new floor area compared to the proposed Project and net loss of support floor area. Overall, Alternative C would meet the underlying purpose to maintain and enhance studio operations, invest in new state-of-the-art soundstages and high-tech production facilities, and create entertainment jobs in Hollywood while respecting the studio’s history, but to a lesser extent than the proposed Project, and Alternative C would not eliminate any of the proposed Project’s significant impacts. 4.

Alternative D: Reduced Density Alternative—50 Percent Reduction a)

Description of Alternative

Alternative D, the Reduced Density Alternative—50 Percent Reduction, represents an overall reduction in net new Project development by approximately 50 percent. This alternative assumes that the reduction would occur mostly within the production office and office uses, and that with the related reduction in the office employees the need for support uses would also be reduced. The amount of net new stage and retail uses would be substantially similar to that of the proposed Project. Given the existing physical constraints on the Project Site, Alternative D would remove approximately 536,600 square feet of stage, production office, support, office, and retail uses and develop approximately 1,215,200 square feet of new stage, production office, support, office, and retail uses. This would result in a net increase of approximately 678,600 square feet of floor area within the Project Site. Alternative D would involve the construction of 111,100 square feet of stage uses, 434,100 square feet of production office uses, 144,600 square feet of support uses, 433,400 square feet of office uses, and 92,000 square feet of retail uses. Like the proposed Project, Alternative D would be implemented under a Specific Plan thatwould guide development within the Project Site through the year 2038. b)

Impact Summary of Alternative D

F-97 Alternative C would reduce the following significant impacts that would occur with the proposed Project to a less-than-significant level: air quality during operation; and traffic intersection levels of service during operation (Existing Plus Project). Alternative D would reduce but not eliminate the significant impacts related to: air quality during construction; noise and vibration during construction; traffic intersection levels of service during operation (Future Plus Project); neighborhood traffic intrusion during operation; temporary in-street construction impacts associated with the loss of on­ street parking, sidewalk closures, and relocation of bus stops during construction; and solid waste generation during operation. Alternative D would result in similar significant and unavoidable impacts related to shading during operation. Alternative D would result in the reduction but not the elimination of some of the adverse, less than significant impacts anticipated to occur with the development of the proposed Project, including among other things: land use compatibility, geology and soils, public services, water, and wastewater. Alternative D would not have the same beneficial effect as the proposed Project in terms of creating new jobs. Additionally, Alternative D would be less consistent than the proposed Project with applicable employment growth plans and policies of the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) and the City. .

cl

Finding

Overall, Alternative D would reduce adverse environmental impacts when compared with the development of the proposed Project. Alternative D would meet or partially meet some of the proposed Project’s objectives, but would not meet the majority of the objectives due to the reduced amount of net new floor area compared to the proposed Project and net loss of support floor area. It is found pursuant to Public Resources Code Section 21081(a)(3), that specific economic, legal, social, technological, or other considerations, including considerations identified in Section XII of these Findings (Statement of Overriding Considerations), make infeasible Alternative D described in the EIR.

d]

Rationale for Finding

Alternative D would construct a similar mix of land uses as the proposed Project but with an approximate 50 percent reduction in overall square footage. With this limited amount of net new development, Alternative D would not substantially enhance the role of the Project Site in the movie, television, and entertainment industry. While Alternative D would modernize and upgrade the facilities at the Project Site to some extent, the reduced amount of net new floor area would not meet the increased competition for movie, television, and entertainment production and post-production facilities from other states or worldwide locations. Similarly, while Alternative D would provide new state-of-the-art and technologically advanced soundstages, production offices, and post-production areas within the Project Site, the limited amount of net new floor area would not meet the anticipated future demand of the movie, television, and entertainment industry and allow flexibility to incorporate future technology advances. While some job opportunities would be created, Alternative D would not maximize opportunities for the local and regional economy by creating construction jobs and a wide range of jobs, including production crew jobs, serving the movie, television, and entertainment industry. Alternative D would not provide new producers, writers, talent and other creative personnel, and related administrative personnel with enough offices, work spaces, and general offices to meet the demand for the movie, television, and entertainment industry and to remain competitive with other production facilities in the region and worldwide. Because it would result in a net loss of support area on the Project Site, Alternative D would not provide new production support facilities or expand employee amenities and increase gathering spaces for employees. , Alternative D would meet or partially meet some of the proposed Project’s objectives, but would not meet the majority of the

F-98 objectives due to the reduced amount of net new floor area compared to the proposed Project and net loss of support floor area. Overall, Alternative D would generally meet the underlying purpose to maintain and enhance studio operations, invest in new state-of-the-art soundstages and high-tech production facilities, and create entertainment jobs in Hollywood while respecting the studio’s history, but to a much lesser extent than the proposed Project. However, Alternative D would not achieve objectives related to meeting.the increased competition for movie, television, and entertainment production and post-production facilities from other states or worldwide locations and meeting the future demand of the movie, television, and entertainment industry. Further, even with an approximate 50 percent reduction in overall square footage, Alternative D would not eliminate all of the proposed Project’s significant impacts. 5.

Alternative E: Alternative Land Use—New Residential Uses With Decreased Office Uses Description of Alternative

Alternative E, the Alternative Land Use—New Residential Uses With Decreased Office Uses Alternative, would introduce residential uses to the Project Site and reduce the amount of proposed office, production office, and support uses. Given the mix of uses in the surrounding area, Alternative E is included to evaluate the inclusion of residential uses on the Project Site. Alternative E would replace approximately 450,700 square feet of the proposed Project’s production office and office uses and approximately 2,200 square feet of support uses with approximately 380 multi-family residential units, and 27,200 square feet of additional retail uses. As compared to the proposed Project a slightly greater amount of demolition would occur, totaling approximately 556,800 square feet. Overall, Alternative E would develop approximately 1,896,800 square feet of new stage, production office, support, office, retail, and residential uses,3 resulting in a net increase of approximately 1,340,000 square feet of net new floor area within the Project Site upon completion of this Alternative. Alternative E would involve the construction of 111,100 square feet of stage uses, 630,300 square feet of production office uses, 261,400 square feet of support uses, 394,800 square feet of office uses, 119,200 square feet of retail uses, and 380,000 square feet of residential uses. This Alternative would result in a total site-wide floor area that is slightly less than that of the proposed Project. The layout of this Alternative would differ from that of the proposed Project in that the residential uses and the majority of the retail uses would be concentrated in the southwest corner of the Main Lot and separated from the studio by a perimeter wall. Like the proposed Project, Alternative E would be implemented under a Specific Plan that would guide development within the Project Site through the year 2038.

bl

Impact Summary of Alternative E

Alternative E would not eliminate any of the significant impacts that would occur with the proposed Project. Alternative E would reduce but not eliminate the significant impacts related to traffic intersection levels of service during operation. Alternative E would result in similar significant and unavoidable impacts related to: shading during operation; air quality during construction and operation; noise and vibration during construction; in-street construction impacts associated with the loss of on­ street parking, sidewalk closures, and relocation of bus stops during construction; and solid waste generation during operation. Significant impacts with regard to neighborhood traffic intrusion during operation would be similar or greater under Alternative E. Alternative E would result in similar or

The assumed size of each residential unit is 1,000 square feet.

.

F-99 reduced less than significant impacts anticipated to occur with the development of the proposed Project; however, Alternative E would result in greater less than significant impacts with regard to: aesthetics/visual quality during operation; light/glare during operation; land use consistency; land use compatibility; parks and recreation; libraries; wastewater; solid waste during construction; and energy during operation. In addition, Alternative E would not have the same level of beneficial effect as the proposed Project in terms of creating new jobs. Additionally, Alternative E would be less consistent than the proposed Project with applicable employment growth plans and policies of the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) and the City, including City policies related to employment. c1

Finding

Overall, Alternative E would not reduce adverse environmental impacts when compared with the development of the proposed Project. Alternative E would meet or partially meet most of the proposed Project’s objectives, but to a lesser extent than the proposed Project, and would not meet the project objective to provide new production support facilities due to the net loss of support floor area compared to the proposed Project. It is found pursuant to Public Resources Code Section 21081(a)(3), that specific economic, legal, social, technological, or other considerations, including considerations identified in Section XII of these Findings (Statement of Overriding Considerations), make infeasible Alternative E described in the EIR. d)

Rationale for Finding

Alternative E would involve the construction of 380 residential dwelling units and increased retail uses on the Project Site, in addition to a similar mix of stage and support uses as the proposed Project, but with a substantial reduction in office uses, and a net reduction of support uses. In addition, the conversion of a portion of the Project Site to residential use would result in the division of the Main Lot by an interior wall. Therefore, Alternative E would substantially enhance the role of the Project Site in the movie, television, and entertainment industry, but to a lesser extent than the proposed Project. While Alternative E would modernize and upgrade the facilities at the Project Site, the limited amount of net new office area and net loss of support area would not meet the increased competition for movie, television, and entertainment production and post-production facilities from other states or worldwide locations. Similarly, while Alternative E would provide new state-of-the-art and technologically advanced soundstages, production offices, and post-production areas within the Project Site, the limited amount of net new office area and net loss of support area would not meet the anticipated future demand of the movie, television, and entertainment industry and allow flexibility to incorporate future technology advances. Alternative E would not maximize opportunities for the local and regional economy by creating construction jobs and a wide range of jobs, including production crew jobs, serving the movie, television, and entertainment industry. Alternative E would improve the identity of the Project Site as a movie, television, and entertainment industry area and enhance the visual appearance of the Project Site, but to a lesser extent than the proposed Project as the Gower Street/Melrose Avenue corner would no longer be visually integrated with the rest of the Studio under Alternative E. While Alternative E would provide offices, work spaces, and general offices, the limited amount of net new office area would not meet the demand for the movie, television, and entertainment industry and allow the Applicant to remain competitive with other production facilities in the region and worldwide. Alternative E would result in a net loss of support area, and as such, would not provide new production support facilities and expand employee amenities and increase gathering spaces for employees to meet increased demand for facilities. Alternative E would meet or partially meet most

F-100 of the proposed Project’s objectives, but to a lesser extent than the proposed Project, and would not meet the project objective to provide new production support facilities due to the net loss of support floor area compared to the proposed Project. Overall, Alternative E would meet the underlying purpose to maintain and enhance studio operations, invest in new state-of-the-art soundstages and high-tech production facilities, and create entertainment jobs in Hollywood while respecting the studio’s history, but to a lesser extent than the proposed Project. 6

.

Alternative F: Alternative Land Use—Increased Retail Uses With Substantially Decreased Office Uses a]

Description of Alternative

Alternative F, the Alternative Land Use—Increased Retail Uses With Substantially Decreased Office Uses Alternative, represents a different configuration of land uses with a substantial reduction in office and production office uses, an increase in retail uses, and a minor reduction in support uses, and with a total floor area less than that of the proposed Project. The increased retail uses would serve the Project Site and surrounding neighborhood. Alternative F would replace approximately 450,700 square feet of the proposed Project’s production office and office uses and approximately 17,600 square feet of support uses, with approximately 115,500 square feet of retail uses. As compared to the proposed Project a slightly greater amount of demolition would occur, totaling approximately 556,800 square feet. Overall, approximately 1,589,700 square feet of new stage, production office, support, office, and retail uses would be developed, resulting in a net increase of approximately 1,032,900 square feet of floor area within the Project Site upon completion of this Alternative. Alternative F would involve the construction of 111,100 square feet of stage uses, 630,300 square feet of production office uses, 246,000 square feet of support uses, 394,800 square feet of office uses, and 207,500 square feet of retail uses. As compared to the proposed Project, this Alternative would result in the same amount of stage uses, a minor reduction in support uses, a reduction in production office floor area, a substantial reduction in office area, and a notable increase in retail uses, with a total site-wide floor area less than that of the proposed Project. The layout of this Alternative would differ from that of the proposed Project in that the majority of the retail uses would be concentrated in the southwest corner of the Main Lot and separated from the studio by a perimeter wall. Like the proposed Project, Alternative F would be implemented under a Specific Plan that would guide development within the Project Site through the year 2038. b)

Impact Summary of Alternative F

Alternative F would not eliminate any of the significant impacts that would occur with the proposed Project. Alternative F would reduce but not eliminate the significant impacts related to: air quality during construction and operation; noise and vibration during construction; traffic intersection levels of service during operation; and in-street construction impacts associated with the loss of on­ street parking, sidewalk closures, and relocation of bus stops during construction. Alternative F would result in similar significant and unavoidable impacts related to: shading during operation; neighborhood traffic intrusion during operation; and solid waste generation during operation. Alternative F would result in the reduction but not the elimination of some of the adverse, less than significant impacts anticipated to occur with the development of the proposed Project, including among other things: geology and soils, public services, water, and wastewater. Alternative F would result in similar less than significant impacts with regard to historic resources, land use compatibility, and operational noise, among other issues. However, Alternative F would result in greater less than

F-101

significant impacts with regard to: aesthetics/visual quality during operation; light/glare during operation; land use consistency; and solid waste during construction, in addition, Alternative F would not have the same level of beneficial effect as the proposed Project in terms of creating new jobs. Additionally, Alternative F would be less consistent than the proposed Project with applicable employment growth plans and policies of the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) and the City, including City policies related to employment. c}

Finding

Overall, Alternative F would have similar effects as compared with the development of the proposed Project. Alternative F would meet or partially meet most of the proposed Project’s objectives, but to a lesser extent than the proposed Project, and would not meet the project objective to provide new production support facilities, due to the net loss of support floor area compared'to the proposed Project. It is found pursuant to Public Resources Code Section 21081(a)(3), that specific economic, legal, social, technological, or other considerations, including considerations identified in Section XII of these Findings (Statement of Overriding Considerations), make infeasible Alternative F described in the EIR.

d}

Rationale for Finding

Alternative F would involve the construction of the same types of land uses as the proposed Project but with a substantial reduction in office and production office space, a minor reduction of support space, and more retail space, resulting in a total site-wide floor area less than that of the proposed Project. In addition, the retail area in the southwest corner of the Project Site would require the division of the Main Lot by an interior wall. Specifically, Alternative F would enhance the role of the Project Site in the movie, television, and entertainment industry, and in so doing, contribute to the preservation of Flollywood as the international focus for the movie, television, and entertainment industry but to a lesser extent than the proposed Project. While Alternative F would modernize and upgrade the facilities at the Project Site, the limited amount of net new floor area associated with the studio, and the focus on retail area, would meet the increased competition for movie, television, and entertainment production and post-production facilities from other states or worldwide locations to a lesser extent than the proposed Project. Similarly, while Alternative F would provide new state-of-theart and technologically advanced soundstages, production offices, and post-production areas within the Project Site, the reduced amount of net new floor area associated with the studio, and the focus on retail area, would meet to a lesser extent than the proposed Project the anticipated future demand of the movie, television, and entertainment industry and allow flexibility to incorporate future technology advances. Alternative F also would improve the identity of the Project Site as a movie, television, and entertainment industry area and enhance the visual appearance of the Project Site, but to a lesser extent than the proposed Project as the Gower Street/Melrose Avenue corner would no longer be visually integrated with the rest of the Studio under Alternative F. Alternative F would result in a net loss of support area, and as such, would not provide new production support facilities and expand employee amenities and increase gathering spaces for employees to meet increased demand for facilities. Alternative F would meet or partially meet most of the proposed Project’s objectives, but to a lesser extent than the proposed Project, and would not meet the project objective to provide new production support facilities, due to the net loss of support floor area compared to the proposed Project. Overall, Alternative F would meet the underlying purpose to maintain and enhance studio operations, invest in new state-of-the-art soundstages and high-tech production facilities, and create

F-102 entertainment jobs in Hollywood while respecting the studio’s history, but to a lesser extent than the proposed Project. 7.

Alternative G: Alternative Land Use—Increased Retail Uses With Moderately Decreased Office Uses

a)

Description of Alternative

Alternative G, the Alternative Land Use—Increased Retail Uses With Moderately Decreased Office Uses Alternative, represents a different configuration of land uses, with a moderate reduction in production office and office uses and an increase in retail uses, with a total floor area that would be somewhat less than the proposed Project. The increased retail uses would serve the Project Site and the surrounding neighborhood. Alternative G would replace approximately 229,600 square feet of the proposed Project’s production office and office uses and approximately 17,600 square feet of support uses with approximately 86,800 square feet of retail uses. As compared to the proposed Project a slightly greater amount of demolition would occur, totaling approximately 556,800 square feet. Overall, approximately 1,782,100 square feet of new stage, production office, support, office, and retail uses would be developed, resulting in a net increase of approximately 1,225,300 square feet of floor area within the Project Site upon completion of this Alternative. Alternative G would involve the construction of 111,100 square feet of stage uses, 630,300 square feet of production office uses, 246,000 square feet of support uses, 615,900 square feet of office uses, and 178,800 square feet of retail uses. The layout of this Alternative would differ from that of the proposed Project, with the majority of the retail uses concentrated in the southwest corner of the Main Lot and separated from the studio by a perimeter wall. Like the proposed Project, Alternative G would be implemented under a Specific Plan that would guide development within the Project Site through the year 2038.

b)

Impact Summary of Alternative G

Alternative G would not eliminate any of the significant impacts that would occur with the proposed Project. Alternative G would reduce but not eliminate the significant impacts related to: traffic intersection levels of service during operation; and neighborhood traffic intrusion during operation. Alternative G would result in similar significant and unavoidable impacts related to: shading during operation; air quality during construction and operation; noise and vibration during construction; in-street construction impacts associated with the loss of on-street parking, sidewalk closures, and relocation of bus stops during construction; and solid waste generation during operation. Alternative G would result in the reduction but not the elimination of some of the adverse, less than significant impacts anticipated to occur with the development of the proposed Project, including among other things: geology and soils, public services, water, and wastewater. Alternative G would result in similar less than significant impacts with regard to historic resources, land use compatibility, and operational noise, among other issues. However, Alternative G would result in greater less than significant impacts with regard to: aesthetics/visual quality during operation; light/glare during operation; land use consistency; and solid waste during construction. In addition, Alternative G would not have the same beneficial effect as the proposed Project in terms of creating new jobs. Additionally, Alternative G would be less consistent than the proposed Project with applicable employment growth plans and policies of the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) and the City, including City policies related to employment.

cl

Finding

F-103 Overall, Alternative G would have similar effects as compared with the development of the proposed Project. Alternative G would meet or partially meet most of the proposed Project’s objectives, but to a lesser extent than the proposed Project, and would not meet the project objective to provide new production support facilities due to the net loss of support floor area. It is found pursuant to Public Resources Code Section 21081(a)(3), that specific economic, legal, social, technological, or other considerations, including considerations identified in Section XII of these Findings (Statement of Overriding Considerations), make infeasible Alternative G described in the EIR. d)

Rationale for Finding

Alternative G would involve the construction of the same types of land uses as the proposed Project but with less office and production office space, a net loss of support space, and more retail space, resulting in a total site-wide floor area that is slightly less than that of the proposed Project. In addition, the retail/office area in the southwest corner of the Project Site would require the division of the Main Lot by an interior wall. Overall, Alternative G would substantially enhance the role of the Project Site in the movie, television, and entertainment industry, and in so doing, contribute to the preservation of Hollywood as the international focus for the movie, television, and entertainment industry, but to a slightly lesser extent than the proposed Project. Alternative G would modernize and upgrade the facilities at the Project Site to meet the increased competition for movie, television, and entertainment production and post-production facilities from other states or worldwide locations, but to a slightly lesser extent than the proposed Project. Alternative G would improve the identity of the Project Site as a movie, television, and entertainment industry area and enhance the visual appearance of the Project Site, but to a lesser extent than the proposed Project as the Gower Street/Melrose Avenue corner would no longer be visually integrated with the rest of the Studio under Alternative G. Alternative G would provide a campus environment and incorporate and integrate a mix of uses that maximizes synergies and efficiencies within the Project Site, but to a lesser extent than the proposed Project due to the separation of the southwest corner of the Main Lot. In addition, Alternative G would establish clear guidelines for the preservation of the historic character of the Project Site while allowing for the development of state-of-the-art facilities for the movie, television and entertainment industry. Alternative G would result in a net loss of support area on the Project Site, and as such, would not provide new production support facilities for storage and on-lot distribution of lighting, props, and other equipment, and expand employee amenities and increase gathering spaces for employees to meet increased demand for facilities to the same extent as the Project. Alternative G would meet or partially meet most of the proposed Project’s objectives, but to a lesser extent than the proposed Project, and would not meet the project objective to provide new production support facilities due to the net loss of support floor area. Overall, Alternative G would meet the underlying purpose to maintain and enhance studio operations, invest in new state-of-the-art soundstages and high-tech production facilities, and create entertainment jobs in Hollywood while respecting the studio’s history, but to a lesser extent than the proposed Project.

D.

Environmentally Superior Alternative

Section 15126.6(e)(2) of the CEQA Guidelines indicates that an analysis of alternatives to a project shall identify an Environmentally Superior Alternative among the alternatives evaluated in an EIR. The CEGA Guidelines also state that should it be determined that the No Project Alternative is the Environmentally Superior Alternative, the EIR shall identify another Environmentally Superior Alternative among the remaining alternatives.

F-104 Alternative A, the No Project/Continued Operation of Existing Campus Alternative, would reduce all of the proposed Project’s significant Project-level and cumulative impacts to a less than significant level. In accordance with the CEOA Guidelines requirement to identify an Environmentally Superior Alternative other than a No Project Alternative, a comparative evaluation of the remaining alternatives indicates that Alternative D, the Reduced Density Alternative—50 Percent Reduction, would reduce the greatest number of Project impacts and have the fewest significant and unavoidable impacts. On this basis, Alternative D is considered the Environmentally Superior Alternative. Specifically, the reduction in floor area occurring under this Alternative would likely avoid the proposed Project’s significant operational air quality impacts with regard to regional emissions, as well as the proposed Project’s significant operational traffic (intersection levels of service) impacts under Existing with Project with Mitigation conditions, but not Future with Project with Mitigation intersection conditions. Additionally, although Alternative D would not avoid the proposed Project’s significant impacts with regard to construction-related air quality, construction noise and vibration, operational traffic (intersection levels of service under Future with Project with Mitigation conditions and neighborhood intrusion), in-street construction traffic, and operational solid waste, the intensity of these significant impacts would be reduced in comparison to the proposed Project. It should also be noted that Alternative D would not reduce the proposed Project’s significant shading impacts, and the degree to which Alternative D would result in beneficial effects with regard to employment generation would be less than that of the proposed Project. With regard to cumulative impacts, Alternative D would avoid the proposed Project’s significant cumulative impacts associated with operational air quality and would reduce (but not avoid) the remaining significant cumulative impacts of the proposed Project. With less overall development, Alternative D also would have incrementally fewer impacts for those remaining issues where the amount of development influences the impact, including population and housing, public services, and utilities. However, Alternative D would not meet the majority of the Project objectives, including Project Objectives 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 9, and 10, due to the reduced amount of net new floor area compared to the proposed Project and the net loss of support floor area compared to existing conditions.

XI.

FINDINGS REGARDING GENERAL IMPACT CATEGORIES

A.

Potential Secondary Effects

Section 15126.4(a)(1)(D) of the state CEQA Guidelines requires mitigation measures to be discussed in less detail than the significant effects of the proposed project if the mitigation measure(s) cause one or more significant effects in addition to those that would be caused by the proposed project. In accordance with the CEGA Guidelines, proposed mitigation measures that could cause potential impacts were evaluated. The following provides a discussion of the potential secondary environmental effects that could occur as a result of implementing mitigation measures. Mitigation Measure K-3 set forth in the MMP addresses significant impacts at the intersection of Gower Street and Santa Monica Boulevard. This mitigation measure includes the conversion of the existing northbound shared through/right-turn lane into a separate through lane and right-turn lane by shifting the north/south lanes westward by approximately 1 foot. In order to provide the right-turn lane, up to two street parking stalls on each side of Gower Street south of Santa Monica Boulevard would need to be removed. As discussed in the LA DOT Assessment Letter, LADOT reviewed and approved the mitigation measures, including Mitigation Measure K-3, and a copy of the August 28, 2015, LADOT Assessment Letter is included as Appendix R of the Draft EIR. Although on-street parking stalls would remain in the Project vicinity and the proposed Project would provide more parking spaces on the

F-105 Project Site than required by the LAMC to accommodate parking for all guests, implementation of Mitigation Measure K-3 is conservatively concluded to result in an adverse secondary impact with respect to the loss of up to four on-street parking spaces. B.

Growth Inducing Impacts

Section 15126.2(d) of the CEGA Guidelines requires that growth-inducing impacts of a project be considered in an EIR. Growth-inducing impacts are characteristics of a project that could directly or indirectly foster economic or population growth or the construction of additional housing, either directly or indirectly, in the surrounding environment. According to the CEGA Guidelines, such projects include those that would remove obstacles to population growth (e.g., a major expansion of a waste water treatment plant that, for example, may allow for more construction in service areas). In addition, as set forth in the CEGA Guidelines, increases in the population may tax existing community service facilities, thus requiring construction of new facilities that could cause significant environmental effects. The CEGA Guidelines also require a discussion of the characteristics of projects which may encourage and facilitate other activities that could significantly affect the environment, either individually or cumulatively. Finally, the CEGA Guidelines also state that it must not be assumed that growth in an area is necessarily beneficial, detrimental, or of little significance to the environment. Growth can be induced or fostered by direct growth associated with a project; or indirect growth created by either the demand not satisfied by a project or the creation of surplus infrastructure not utilized by a project. .

Because the proposed Project would not include any new residential development, it would

not result in direct population growth. However, the proposed Project would have the potential to generate indirect population growth in the Project vicinity as a result of the new employees generated by the proposed Project. Construction workers would not relocate their households’ places of residence as a direct consequence of working on the proposed Project for the reasons discussed in Section IV.1.2, Housing, of the Draft EIR. Therefore, given the availability of local workers, the proposed Project would not be considered growth inducing from a short-term employment perspective, but rather the proposed Project would provide a public benefit by providing new direct and indirect employment opportunities during the construction period. As discussed in Section IV. 1.1, Employment, of the Draft EIR, it is estimated that the proposed Project would directly add 5,493 new direct jobs once all proposed improvements have been constructed and are in full operation, thereby adding to the developed urban community in and around Hollywood. The additional full and part-time jobs directly associated with annual operation of the completed proposed Project would be consistent with SCAG’s employment forecasts for the City of Los Angeles Subregion. In addition, the indirect housing/household demand and population growth that could be generated by the proposed Project would be consistent with SCAG’s housing and population forecasts for the City of Los Angeles Subregion. The property surrounding the Project Site is currently developed with a mix of commercial, industrial, and residential uses. All roadway improvements planned for the proposed Project would be tailored to improve circulation flows within the Project Site and the immediate Project vicinity. Utility and other infrastructure upgrades are intended primarily to meet Project-related demand. The Project employees’ demand for convenience commercial goods and services would be met by new retail and support uses included as part of the proposed Project or already located within close proximity to the Project Site. No new off-site development would be needed to specifically meet the commercial demands associated with the Project Site employees.

F-106 In addition, the proposed Project falls within the projected water supplies for normal, single­ dry, and multiple-dry years and LADWP found that it will be able to meet the water demand for the proposed Project, as well as existing and planned water demands of its future service area. Furthermore, the proposed Project’s additional wastewater flows would not substantially or incrementally exceed the future scheduled capacity of any treatment plant by generating flows greater than those anticipated in the Integrated Resources Plan. Therefore, the proposed Project would not require the expansion of existing water entitlements or upgrades to any wastewater treatment facilities, and as such, would not be considered growth-inducing in this regard. While the proposed Project may require local infrastructure upgrades to maintain and improve water, sewer, electricity, and natural gas lines on-site and in the immediate vicinity of the Project Site, the proposed Project would not necessitate regional utility infrastructure improvements that have not otherwise been accounted for and planned for on a regional level. In addition, all roadway improvements planned for the proposed Project or as mitigation are intended to provide for better circulation flows within the Project Site and the immediate Project vicinity, and would not open any large undeveloped areas for new use. As such, growth-inducing impacts associated with utilities and circulation systems would be less than significant. C.

Significant irreversible impacts

In accordance with Section 15126.2(c) of the CEQA Guidelines, an EIR is required to evaluate significant irreversible environmental changes that would be caused by implementation of the proposed Project. As stated in CEQA Guidelines Section 15126.2(c): Uses of nonrenewable resources during the initial and continued phases of the project may be irreversible since a large commitment of such resources makes removal or nonuse thereafter unlikely. Primary impacts and, particularly, secondary impacts (such as highway improvement which provides access to a previously inaccessible area) generally commit future generations to similar uses. Also irreversible damage can result from environmental accidents associated with the project. Irretrievable commitments of resources should be evaluated to assure that such current consumption is justified. The proposed Project would necessarily consume limited, slowly renewable, and non­ renewable resources, resulting in irreversible environmental changes. This consumption would occur during construction of the proposed Project and would continue throughout its operational lifetime. The development of the proposed Project would require a commitment of resources that would include: (1) building materials and associated solid waste disposal effects on landfills; (2) water; and (3) energy resources (e.g., petroleum-based fuels) for electricity, natural gas, and transportation and the associated impacts related to air quality. However, the consumption of such resources would not be considered substantial and would be consistent with regional and local growth forecasts and development goals for the area. The loss of such resources would not be highly accelerated when compared to existing conditions and such resources would not be used in a wasteful manner. Therefore, although irreversible environmental changes would result from the proposed Project, such changes are concluded to be less than significant. XII.

OTHER CEQA CONSIDERATIONS

F-107

1.

The City of Los Angeles (“the City"), acting through the Department of City Planning, is the “Lead Agency” for the Project evaluated in the EIR, The City finds that the EIR was prepared in compliance with CEQA and the CEQA Guidelines. The City finds that it has independently reviewed and analyzed the EIR for the Project, that the Draft EIR which was circulated for public review reflected its independent judgment and that the Final EIR reflects the independent judgment of the City.

2

The City finds that the EIR provides objective information to assist the decision-makers and the public at large in their consideration of the environmental consequences of the Project. The public review period provided all interested jurisdictions, agencies, private organizations, and individuals the opportunity to submit comments regarding the Draft EIR. The Final EIR was prepared after the review period and responds to comments made during the public review period.

3.

The Department of City Planning evaluated comments on environmental issues received from persons who reviewed the Draft EIR. In accordance with CEQA, the Department of City Planning prepared written responses describing the disposition of significant environmental issues raised. The Final EIR provides adequate, good faith and reasoned responses to the comments. The Department of City Planning reviewed and responded to the comments received and has determined that neither the comments received nor the responses to such comments add significant new information regarding environmental impacts to the Draft EIR. The Lead Agency has based its actions on full appraisal of all viewpoints, including all

.

comments received up to the date of adoption of these findings, concerning the environmental impacts identified and analyzed in the EIR. 4.

The EIR evaluated the following potential Project and cumulative environmental impacts: Aesthetics (including views, light/glare, and shading); Air Quality (including greenhouse gas emissions); Cultural Resources (including historic resources, and archaeological and paleontological resources); Geology and Soils; Hazards and Hazardous Materials; Hydrology and Surface Water Quality (including groundwater); Land Use and Planning; Noise; Employment, Housing and Population; Public Services (including police protection, fire protection, schools, parks and recreation, and libraries); Traffic, Access, and Parking; and Utilities and Service Systems (including water supply, wastewater, solid waste, and energy). Additionally, the EIR considered, in separate sections, Significant Irreversible Environmental Changes, Growth Inducing Impacts and potential secondary effects of the Project. The significant environmental impacts of the Project and the alternatives were identified in the EIR.

5.

The project design features and mitigation measures identified for the proposed Project were included in the Draft EIR and Final EIR. The final project design features and mitigation measures for the proposed Project are described in the Mitigation Monitoring Program (“MMP"). Each of the project design features and mitigation measures identified in the MMP is incorporated into the Project. The City finds that the impacts of the Project have been mitigated to the extent feasible by the project design features and mitigation measures identified in the MMP.

6.

Textual refinements and errata were compiled and presented to the decision-makers for review and consideration. The City staff has made every effort to notify the decision-makers and the interested public/agencies of each textual change in the various documents associated with project review. These textual refinements arose for a variety of reasons. First, it is inevitable that draft documents would contain errors and would require clarifications and corrections. Second, textual clarifications were necessitated in order to describe refinements suggested as part of the public participation process.

F-108 7.

The responses to the comments on the Draft EIR, which are contained in the Final EIR, clarify and amplify the analysis in the Draft EIR.

8

Having reviewed the information contained in the EIR and in the administrative record as well as the requirements of CEQA and the state CEQA Guidelines regarding recirculation of Draft EIRs, the City finds that there is no new significant information in the Final EIR and finds that recirculation of the Draft EIR is not required.

9.

CEQA requires the Lead Agency approving a project to adopt an MMP for the changes to the project which it has adopted or made a condition of project approval in order to ensure compliance with the mitigation measures during project implementation. The mitigation measures included in the EIR as certified by the City and included in the MMP as adopted by the City serves that function. The MMP includes all of the mitigation measures adopted by the City in connection with the approval of the Project and has been designed to ensure compliance with such measures during implementation of the Project. In accordance with CEQA, the MMP provides the means to ensure that the mitigation measures are fully enforceable. In accordance with the requirements of Public Resources Code §21081.6, the City hereby adopts the MMP.

10.

In accordance with the requirements of Public Resources Code §21081.6, the City hereby adopts each of the mitigation measures expressly set forth herein as conditions of approval

.

for the Project.

11

The custodian of the documents or other material which constitute the record of proceedings upon which the City decision is based is the Los Angeles Department of City Planning, 6262 Van Nuys Boulevard, Room 352, Van Nuys, CA 91401.

12

The City finds and declares that substantial evidence for each and every finding made herein is contained in the EIR, which is incorporated herein by this reference, or is in the record of proceedings in the matter.

13.

The City is certifying an EIR for, and is approving and adopting findings for, the entirety of the actions described in these Findings and in the EIR as comprising the Project. It is contemplated that there may be a variety of actions undertaken by other State and local agencies (who might be referred to as “responsible agencies” under CEQA). Because the City is the Lead Agency for the Project, the EIR is intended to be the basis for compliance with CEQA for each of the possible discretionary actions by other State and local agencies to carry out the Project.

14.

The EIR is a Project EIR for purposes of environmental analysis of the Project. A Project EIR examines the environmental effects of a specific project. The EIR serves as the primary environmental compliance document for entitlement decisions regarding the Project by the City of Los Angeles and the other regulatory jurisdictions.

XIII.

STATEMENT OF OVERRIDING CONSIDERATIONS

.

.

The EIR has identified unavoidable significant impacts that would result from implementation of the proposed Project. Section 21081 of the California Public Resources Code and Section 15093(b) of the CEQA Guidelines provide that when the decision of the public agency allows the occurrence of significant impacts that are identified in the EIR but are not at least substantially mitigated, the agency must state in writing the reasons to support its action based on the completed EIR and/or other information in the record. State CEQA Guidelines require, pursuant to CEQA Guidelines Section 15093(b), that the decision-maker adopt a Statement of Overriding Considerations at the time of

F-109

approval of a project if it finds that significant adverse environmental effects have been identified in the EIR which cannot be substantially mitigated to an insignificant level or be eliminated. These findings and the Statement of Overriding Considerations are based on substantial evidence in the record, including but not limited to the EIR, including the reference library to the EIR, and documents and materials that constitute the record of proceedings. The following impacts are not mitigated to a less than significant level for the Project, as identified in the EIR: shading during operations; air quality during construction and operation; noise and vibration during construction; traffic intersection levels of service during operation; neighborhood traffic intrusion during operation; in-street construction impacts associated with the loss of on-street parking, sidewalk closures, and relocation of bus stops during construction; Caltrans facilities based on supplemental Caltrans analysis; and solid waste generation during operation. In addition, implementation of the proposed Project would result in significant and unavoidable cumulative impacts related to: air quality during construction and operation; noise during construction; traffic intersection levels of service during operation; neighborhood traffic intrusion during operation; in-street construction impacts associated

with the loss of on-street parking, sidewalk closures, and relocation of bus stops during construction; Caltrans facilities based on supplemental Caltrans analysis; and solid waste generation during operation. Accordingly, the City adopts the following Statement of Overriding Considerations. The City recognizes that significant and unavoidable impacts would result from implementation of the proposed Project. Having (i) adopted all feasible mitigation measures, (ii) rejected alternatives to the proposed Project, as discussed above, (iii) recognized all significant, unavoidable impacts, and (iv) balanced the benefits of the Project against the Project’s significant and unavoidable impacts, the City hereby finds that the benefits outweigh and override the significant unavoidable impacts for the reasons stated below. These overriding considerations of economic, social, aesthetic, and environmental benefits for the Project justify adoption of the Project and certification of the completed EIR. Each of the following overriding considerations separately and independently (i) outweighs the adverse environmental impacts of the Project, and (ii) justifies adoption of the Project and certification of the completed EIR. In particular, achieving the underlying purpose for the Project would be sufficient to override the significant environmental impacts of the Project. 1.

The Project will enhance the future economic vitality of the City of Los Angeles by providing growth (a net increase of approximately 1,385,700 square feet of new stage, production office, support, office, and retail uses) in proximity to public transit, and will enhance the role of the Project Site in the movie, television, and entertainment industry and contribute to the preservation of Hollywood as the international focus for the movie, television, and entertainment industry.

2

Development and construction of the Project will generate more than 7,200 part-time and full-time jobs in the Los Angeles County economy, of which over 4,400 jobs are directly related to construction of the Project. Operation of the Project at full buildout will generate more than 12,600 jobs in the Los Angeles economy, of which more than 5,400 jobs are from on-site operations. Overall, the Project will create nearly 20,000 jobs during construction and operations, in accordance with City policies related to employment.

3

Development and construction of the Project includes an estimated $630 million investment in construction costs, with a resulting estimated $1.1 billion economic output to the Los Angeles economy from that construction.

.

F-110

4.

The Project also will be a significant economic engine in Los Angeles. The annual economic output from operation of the proposed Project, including employee compensation, is estimated to contribute approximately $3.1 billion in annually to the Los Angeles County economy.

5.

Total employee compensation from ongoing operation of the proposed Project will generate approximately $908 million annually in the City, with about 60 percent of this attributable to direct employees and 40 percent to indirect and induced employees.

6.

The Project would modernize the Paramount Pictures campus to respond to the evolving and increasingly technological nature of the entertainment business, while respecting the studio’s history and creating entertainment jobs in Hollywood. The Project would maintain and enhance studio operations, invest in new state-of-the-art soundstages and high-tech production facilities.

7.

The proposed Project’s variety of jobs would provide important employment opportunities for part-time and entry-level workers, whose numbers are increasing and who are having difficulty finding sufficient employment in the region’s new high technology sectors. The proposed Project would also create higher-skilled, higherwage positions. The Project is consistent with applicable growth forecasts and regional and local economic development and employment policies.

8.

The Project’s development and operation of additional studio, production, post­ production, and related uses would expand and enhance the Project Site’s historic role in the entertainment industry, allowing the incorporation of new technologies and operations and providing for facilities on the Project Site to meet the growing and changing needs of the industry.

9.

The proposed Project would directly address a key goal of the Hollywood Community Plan, which is the retention and promotion of Hollywood as an international center for motion picture production. The proposed Project would bring modern facilities and more efficient operations to Paramount Studios, an integral and historic entity in the entertainment industry, and the largest working film and television studio still headquartered in Hollywood. The proposed Project also would be consistent with the overall intent of the Wilshire Community Plan and focus commercial development along the Melrose Avenue commercial corridor, replacing surface parking lots with appropriately designed buildings that are compatible with the character of the surrounding area, including the residential uses to the south.

10.

The Project would facilitate a reduction of traffic impacts (and associated greenhouse gas emissions) by preparing and implementing a Transportation Demand Management (TDM) program that encourages employees and patrons to reduce vehicular traffic on the street and freeway system during the most congested time periods of the day. The TDM program would include implementation of several TDM strategies, which may include, but are not limited to the following: (1) flexible work schedules and telecommuting programs; (2) bicycle amenities (bicycle racks, lockers, etc.); (3) a guaranteed ride home program; (4) rideshare/carpool/vanpool promotion and support; (5) transportation information center; (6) on-site TDM coordinator; (7) discounted transit passes; (8) mobility hub support; (9) funding for bikeway improvements; and (10) continued provision of on-site personnel at studio entry gates to facilitate traffic flow onto the Project Site.

F-111 11.

The Project Applicant would initiate, fund, and market a Hollywood-area Transportation Management Organization (TMO) to promote alternative modes of transportation including walking and bicycling, carpooling and vanpooling, use of public transit, short-term automobile rentals, etc. This TMO would be available to anyone within the Hollywood community, not just patrons of the proposed Project, and would be accessible through a website and a mobile application providing users with information and allowing them to access TMO services.

12.

The Project will establish a telephone hotline to enable the public to call and address construction related issues associated with Project construction.

13.

Construction and implementation of the Project would institute on-site waste management and recycling programs. During new construction, a minimum of 50 percent of the non-hazardous demolition and construction debris by weight from construction of new Project buildings would be recycled and/or salvaged for reuse. During operations, the Project would have a solid waste diversion target of 70 percent based on current available recycling practices.

XIV.

14.

The Project would incorporate various energy efficient features into the design of new buildings for the proposed Project, including: efficient lighting and lighting control systems; light colored or “cool” roofs; energy-efficient heating and cooling systems, appliances (e.g., Energy Star) and equipment and control systems; light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for on-site street lighting; and education regarding energy efficiency, water conservation, waste diversion, and recycling services to the Project Site employees.

15.

The Project would preserve cultural resources, including the potential Paramount Pictures Historic District and the potential RKO Studios Historic District, through the implementation of the Historic Resources Preservation Plan.

MITIGATION and MONITORING PROGRAM

A Mitigation and Monitoring Program (MMP) has been prepared pursuant to Public Resources Code Section 21081.6, which requires adoption of a MMP for projects in which the Lead Agency has required changes or adopted mitigation to avoid significant environmental effects and is included with the City’s determination. The City of Los Angeles is the Lead Agency for the proposed Project and is, therefore, responsible for administering and implementing the MMP. The decision-makers must define specific reporting and/or monitoring requirements to be enforced during the Project implementation prior to final approval of the Project. The primary purpose of the MMP is to ensure that the project design features and mitigation measures identified in the EIR are implemented, thereby minimizing identified environmental effects. . The Project Applicant shall be obligated to provide documentation concerning implementation of the listed Project Design Features and Mitigation Measures to the appropriate Monitoring Agency and the appropriate Enforcement Agency as provided for in the MMP. All departments listed in the MMP are within the City of Los Angeles unless otherwise noted. The entity responsible for the implementation of all Project Design Features and Mitigation Measures shall be the Project Applicant or its successor unless otherwise noted. Each mitigation measure is categorized by impact area, with an accompanying identification of: •

The enforcement agency;



The monitoring agency;

F-112

The monitoring phase (i.e., the phase of the Project during which the measure should be monitored): -

Pre-construction Construction Operation (prior to and post-occupancy);



The monitoring frequency: and



The action indicating compliance with the mitigation measure(s).

The MMP for the Project will be in place throughout all phases of development of the Project. The entity responsible for implementing each Project Design Feature or Mitigation Measure is set forth within the text of the Project Design Feature or Mitigation Measure itself. The entity responsible for implementing the Project Design Feature or Mitigation Measure shall also be obligated to provide certification, as identified below, to the appropriate Monitoring Agency and the appropriate Enforcement Agency that compliance with the required Project Design Feature or Mitigation Measure has been implemented.

After review and approval of the final MMP by the Lead Agency, minor changes and modifications to the MMP are permitted, but can only be made by the Project Applicant or its successor subject to the approval by the Lead Agency for Project Design Features and Mitigation Measures applicable to the Lead Agency. In conjunction with any appropriate agencies or departments, the Lead Agency will determine the adequacy of any proposed change or modification. Other responsible agencies have the authority under CEQA to approve their own MMPs for the Project, provided that Mitigation Measures therein address only the direct or indirect environmental effects of those parts of the Project, which the responsible agency decides to carry out, finance, or approve. (Pub. Resources Code § 21081.6(a); CEQA Guidelines §§ 15096(g)(1), 15097(d).) Minor changes and modifications to any MMP approved by a responsible agency can only be made by the Project Applicant or its successor subject to the approval by that responsible agency. Any revisions to a Mitigation Measure in the final MMP or any MMP adopted thereafter by a responsible agency must achieve the same level or more of mitigation as the original mitigation measure.

RESOLUTION WHEREAS, the subject property Is located within the area covered by the Hollywood Community Plan and Wilshire Community Plan (“Community Plans"), which were adopted by the City Council on December 13, 1988 (CF 86-0695 SI) and September 19,

2001 (CF 01-1336); and WHEREAS, the applicant will maintain the potential Paramount Pictures Historic District, potential RKO Radio Pictures Historic District, and KCAL Building in accordance with the Secretary of the Interior Standards, and is proposing to update and expand a motion-picture studio by 1,385,700 net new square feet of stage, office, production office, support, and retail space that would enable a major motion picture studio to modernize and remain competitive, providing thousands of jobs in the Hollywood and Wilshire communities; and WHEREAS, to carry out the above-referenced project, the applicant has requested a General Plan Amendment to (a) change the land use designation for a portion of the subject property from Commercial Manufacturing, Neighborhood Office Commercial, Low Medium II Residential, and Medium Residential to General Commercial within the Hollywood Community Plan and Wilshire Community Plan (“Community Plans”); and, (b) amend the General Plan Generalized Land Use Map for the Community Plan areas to reflect the General Commercial land use designation; and WHEREAS, the General Plan Amendment is consistent with Charter Sections 555, 556, and 558, representing an Amendment in Part of the Hollywood Community Plan and an Amendment In part of the Wilshire Community' Plan; and WHEREAS, the City Planning Commission at its meeting of July 14, 2016, approved the foregoing General Plan Amendment; and WHEREAS, the General Plan Amendment of the subject property represents a significant social, economic, and physical identity within the Hollywood and Wilshire Community Plans, where Paramount Studios has historically contributed to the identity Los Angeles as an entertainment-capital, and which provides significant contributions to the City in the form of jobs, investment, and revenues; and WHEREAS, pursuant to the provisions of the Los Angeles City Charter, the Mayor and the City Planning Commission have transmitted their recommendations; and WHEREAS, the requested General Plan Amendment is consistent with the intent and purpose of the Hollywood Community Plan and Wilshire Community Plan to designate land uses In an orderly and unified manner; and WHEREAS, the General Plan Amendment and the PPSP are consistent as required by California State Law; and, WHEREAS, the subject request would provide for a more logical and uniform pattern of planned land use development that is compatible with surrounding land use designations on the General Plan; and

WHEREAS, the project has been reviewed by Environmental Impact Report, SCH No. 2011101035, in accordance with the City’s Guidelines for implementation of the California Environmental Quality Act (“CEQA”) by the City Planning Department. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Community Plans shall be amended as shown on the attached General Plan Amendment Map.

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ORDINANCE NO. An ordinance amending Sections 12.04 and 12.16.10 of the Los Angeles Municipal Code to establish Paramount Pictures Specific Plan Zone. THE PEOPLE OF THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES DO ORDAIN AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. The following language is added to the end of Subsection A of Section 12.04 of the Los Angeles Municipal Code:

13, Paramount Pictures Specific Plan Zone Section 2. The following language is added to the end of Subsection C of Section 12.04 of the Los Angeles Municipal Code: The height districts for the “PPSP" Zone are the Subareas shown in Section 5 of the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan. Section 3. A new section 12,16.10 is added to the Los Angeles Municipal Code to read:

SEC.12.16.10. PPSP PARAMOUNT PICTURES SPECIFIC PLAN ZONE The following regulations shall apply in the “PPSP" Paramount Pictures Specific Plan Zone: A.

Purpose: The purposes set forth in the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan Ordinance are incorporated by reference into these regulations.

B.

Use. No building, structure, or land shall be used and no building or structure shall be erected, structurally altered, enlarged or maintained, except as permitted by the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan Ordinance.

C.

Area. No building or structure, nor the enlargement of any building or structure, shall be erected or maintained unless the height, area, and parking requirements of the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan Ordinance are met and maintained in connection with the building, structure, or enlargement.

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PARAMOUNT PICTURES SPECIFIC PLAN BOUNDARY 0

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PARAMOUNT PICTURES SPECIFIC PLAN City of Los Angeles Ordinance No.

July 2016

TABLE OF CONTENTS Page SECTION 1: AUTHORITY AND SCOPE

.3

SECTION 2: PARAMOUNT PICTURES SPECIFIC PLAN OVERVIEW

6

SECTION 3: LAND USE REGULATIONS

12

SECTION 4: HISTORIC PRESERVATION REGULATIONS

,233

SECTION 5: DESIGN REGULATIONS

,300

SECTION 6: ALCOHOL SALES

,37

SECTION 7: CHILD CARE FACILITIES

,422

SECTION 8: PARKING REGULATIONS

,433

SECTION 9: SIGNAGE REGULATIONS,

4646

SECTION 10:

IMPLEMENTATION

SECTION 11:

NOTIFICATION

SECTION 12:

OTHER SPECIFIC PLAN PROCEDURES

.65

SECTION 13:

SEVERABILITY

,65

63

,6565

APPENDICES Appendix A: Trip Generation Factors Appendix B:

Historic Resources Preservation Plan

Appendix C:

Paramount Pictures Mitigation Monitoring Program EXHIBITS

Exhibit A:

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan Map

Exhibit B:

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan Boundaries Legal Description

Exhibit C:

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan Planning Areas Map

Exhibit D:

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan Height Zone Map

Exhibit E:

Paramount Pictures Historic District and RKO Historic District Map

ORDINANCE NO. An ordinance establishing a Specific Plan, known as the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan, for future development of the Paramount Pictures property, an approximately 62-acre site comprised of the main studio property, generally bounded by Melrose Avenue to the south, Gower Street to the west, a cemetery to the north and Van Ness Avenue to the east, and six surrounding properties. The main studio property and four of the surrounding properties north of Melrose Avenue are located within the Hollywood Community Plan area and two surrounding properties south of Melrose Avenue are located in the Wilshire Community Plan area, in Los Angeles, California. WHEREAS, the City of Los Angeles Municipal Code does not have a zoning designation that can address the unique characteristics of a major studio/entertainment site; WHEREAS, Paramount Pictures needs to modernize its facilities to meet the anticipated future demand of the movie, television and entertainment industry and contribute to the preservation of Hollywood as the international focus of the entertainment industry; WHEREAS, the entertainment industry is facing significant technological and other changes, many of which are not fully known, including competition from other states and countries, which requires long-term flexibility in land use and planning; WHEREAS, a clear and consistent set ofprincipl.es and guidelines, such as those established by this Specific Plan, provide a level of certainty that all interested parties may rely upon for future development to meet the anticipated future demands of the movie, television and entertainment industry, while remaining mindful of Specific Plan area’s historic resources and neighbors; WHEREAS, Paramount Pictures seeks to create a wide range of jobs and enhance its ability to stay competitive in the increasingly complex entertainment industry, while maximizing its contributions to the local and regional economy; WHEREAS, Paramount Pictures has evolved over time to its current footprint of approximately 62 acres such that a patchwork of requirements, conditions and approvals apply to various portions of the property, and a Specific Plan will provide a dear cohesive framework that applies to the entire property, unifies the different portions of property, integrates the mix of uses and maximizes synergies and efficiencies between people, uses and facilities, such that all interested parties may understand and rely on the Specific Plan; WHEREAS, it is the intent of the City Council that this Ordinance be applied and administered consistent with the goals and purposes stated above; and WHEREAS, in order to assure that such development proceeds in compliance with the General Plan and the above goals, it is necessary to adopt the following Specific Plan. NOW, THEREFORE, THE PEOPLE OF THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES DO ORDAIN AS

FOLLOWS:

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 2

SECTION 1: AUTHORITY AND SCOPE Section 1.

ESTABLISHMENT OF THE PARAMOUNT PICTURES SPECIFIC PLAN

A.

A Specific Plan is a regulatory land use ordinance, which controls or provides a framework for the systematic implementation of the General Plan of the City of Los Angeles (City). The Paramount Pictures Specific Plan is hereby established and is applicable to that area of the City shown within the heavy dashed lines on the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan Map shown on Exhibit A. The legal description of the boundaries of the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan is set forth in Exhibit B.

B.

In order to regulate the use of property as provided for in this Specific Plan, the Specific Plan is divided into seven Planning Areas that are designated as follows: Main Lot; Lemon Grove Lot (Parcels A, B, C, and D); South Bronson Lot; Windsor Lot; Camerford Lot; Waring Lot; and Gregory Lot (A and B). The location and boundaries of these Planning Areas are shown on the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan Planning Areas Map shown on Exhibit C.

Section 1.2.

RELATIONSHIP TO THE LOS ANGELES GENERAL PLAN

The Los Angeles General Plan is a comprehensive long-range policy document that guides the physical development of the City. The General Plan includes certain statemandated elements related to land use, circulation, housing, conservation, open space, noise, and safety. Whereas the General Plan is a broad policy document, this Specific Plan is a policy statement and implementation tool to cover a defined planning area. A specific plan must be consistent with the General Plan by furthering the objectives and policies of the General Plan, and not obstruct their attainment, pursuant to California Government Code Section 65454. This Specific Plan is intended to detail and foster the General Plan’s development policies, systematically implement the General Plan, and contain defined standards and development criteria that supplement those of the General Plan. Section 1.3.

RELATIONSHIP TO THE COMMUNITY PLAN

A community plan is a focused planning policy document that designates the distribution of types, amounts and location of land uses for a particular area of the City. The Hollywood Community Plan and Wilshire Community Plan are two of 35 Community Plans that comprise the Land Use element of the Los Angeles General Plan. The Hollywood Community Plan is applicable to the Main Lot; Lemon Grove Lot; Camerford Lot; Waring Lot; and Gregory Lot of the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan Area. The Wilshire Community Plan is applicable to the South Bronson Lot and Windsor Lot of the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan Area. The Hollywood Community Plan and Wilshire Community Plan are consistent with the objectives and policies of the General Plan. The Specific Plan is a more focused regulatory document that is consistent with both Community Plans and the General Plan and reflects the unique constraints and opportunities of the Specific Plan Area. The Specific Plan creates a regulatory Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 3

framework that accounts for the special needs of the Specific Plan Area and the surrounding community and allows flexibility for adapting to future changes that could occur in the entertainment industry. Section 1.4.

RELATIONSHIP TO CEQA

Pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), the Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project Environmental Impact Report (City Case No. ENV-2011-2460-EIR) was prepared for the Paramount Pictures Master Plan, which includes the implementation of this Specific Plan. The Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project Environmental Impact Report (State Clearinghouse No. 2011101035) identifies potential effects on the environment of the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan and sets forth mitigation measures to lessen those potential impacts. Section 1.5.

RELATIONSHIP TO THE LOS ANGELES MUNICIPAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE CODES

A.

The regulations of this Specific Plan are in addition to those set forth in the Los Angeles Municipal Code (Municipal Code), including planning, zoning and subdivision provisions of Chapter 1 of the Municipal Code, the Los Angeles Administrative Code (Administrative Code), and any other relevant ordinances; and do not convey any rights not otherwise granted under the provisions and procedures contained in Chapter 1 and other relevant ordinances, except as specifically provided for herein.

B.

Whenever provisions of this Specific Plan differ from, either in being more restrictive or less restrictive than, provisions contained in the Municipal Code or the Administrative Code as of the date of adoption of this Specific Plan, or other relevant ordinances, this Specific Plan shall prevail and supersede those other provisions. Whenever this Specific Plan is silent, the provisions of the Municipal Code, Administrative Code or other relevant ordinances shall apply.

C.

The regulations contained within this Specific Plan regarding Floor Area, maximum densities and yards shall supersede any such regulations within Chapter 1 of the Municipal Code.

D.

Without limiting the above paragraphs, the regulations and procedures in this Specific Plan shall supersede and serve as a substitute ordinance for the following provisions of the Municipal Code, as may be amended from time to time: 1.

Site Plan Review. Section 16.05.

2,

Major Development Project. Section 12.24.U. 14.

3.

Transitional Height. Sections 12.21.1.A.10 and 12.24.X.22.

4.

Height and Floor Area Limitations. Section 12.2LEA and 12.21.4. Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 4

5.

Motion Picture Studio Stage Heights. Section 12.21.1 .B.l.

6.

Specific Plan Project Permit Compliance and Modifications. Sections 11.5.7.C and 11.5.7.D.

7.

Specific Plan Exceptions, Amendments and Interpretations. Sections 11.5.7.F, 11.5.7.G and 11.5.7.H.

8.

Parking Requirements. Section 12.21 .A.4 through Section 12.21.A.6.

9.

Reduced or Shared Parking. Sections 12.24.X.17, 12.24.X.19 and 12.24.X.20.

10

.

.

Signage Regulations. Section 12.2 LA.7, Section 13.11, and Sections 14.4.1 through 14.4.20. Transportation Demand Management and Trip Reduction Measures. Sections 12.26.J.

12.

Alcoholic Beverage Sales and Service Regulations. Sections 12.21 .A. 10, 12.21 .A. 14, 12.24.W.1, 12.24.X.2. '

13.

Historic Buildings and Guidelines. Section 12.24.X. 12 and Los Angeles Administrative Code Section 22.171, et seq.

14.

Notification of Demolition. Section 91.106.4.5.4

15.

Studio Production and Filming. Sections 12.24.U.15 and 12.24.X.23.

16.

Green Building Program. Section 16.10.

17.

Ground Floor Restaurant Requirements. Sections 12.12.2, 12.13.A, 12.14.A, and 12.24.W.

18.

Child Care Facilities. Sections 12.24.W.51 and 12.24.X.24.

19.

Wireless Telecommunications Facilities Regulations. Sections 12.21.AGO. 12.21.A.21, and 12.24.W.49.

20

Area, Yard and Setback requirements. Section 12.21 .C.

21.

Mini-Shopping Center and Commercial Corner Development Regulations. Section 12.22.A.23 and Section 12.24.W.27.

22.

Fences and Walls. Section 12.22.C.20(f).

.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 5

Section 1.6.

RELATIONSHIP TO EXISTING USES

The Paramount Pictures Specific Plan creates a regulatory framework for long-term development of the Specific Plan Area. The Specific Plan also recognizes, however, that Existing Uses/Facilities within the Specific Plan Area may continue as the development permitted by this Specific Plan is implemented. Existing Uses/Facilities shall be permitted to continue within the Specific Plan Area. SECTION 2: PARAMOUNT PICTURES SPECIFIC PLAN OVERVIEW Section 2.1.

PURPOSES AND GOALS

The purpose and goals of this Specific Plan are to: A.

Provide regulatory controls and incentives for the systematic and incremental execution of that portion of the Community Plan which relates to this geographic area and to provide for public needs, convenience and general welfare as the development of such area necessitates;

B.

Set forth principles, standards and general procedures to assure the orderly development of the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan Area;

C.

Establish permitted uses and/or activities: and to provide a mechanism for implementing the appropriate operational requirements, regulations or other requirements for the uses;

D.

Provide continued development of the site as a major studio/entertainment institution, in conformance with the goals and objectives of local and regional plans and policies:

E.

Permit the removal, renovation, replacement and construction of Stage, Production Office, Support, Office, Retail, and parking facilities to meet the evolving needs-of both the entertainment industry and the surrounding community;

P.

Establish a set of general procedures by which the City can verify that proposed projects substantially comply with all regulations in the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan:

G.

Allow Net New Floor Area within the Specific Plan area as set forth in Table A and including changes of Floor Area by land use category, as may be permitted pursuant to Land Use Exchanges as set forth in Section 3.4 of this Specific Plan:

H.

Preserve the overall historic integrity of the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan Area consistent with the requirements of this Specific Plan.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 6

Section 2.2.

SPECIFIC PLAN SETTING AND DEVELOPMENT OVERVIEW

A.

The Specific Plan Area is approximately 62 acres, comprised of Paramount Pictures’ main studio property and six surrounding properties, and is located in the Hollywood area of the City. The Specific Plan is divided into seven Planning Areas that are designated as follows: Main Lot; Lemon Grove Lot: South Bronson Lot; Windsor Lot; Camerford Lot; Waring Lot; and Gregory Lot. The Main Lot is generally bounded by Melrose Avenue to the south, Gower Street to the west, a cemetery to the north and Van Ness Avenue to the east. The Lemon Grove Lot is located on the east side of Van Ness Avenue, north of Lemon Grove Avenue; the South Bronson Lot is located on the south side of Melrose Avenue at Bronson Avenue; the Windsor Lot is located on the south side of Melrose Avenue at Windsor Boulevard; the Camerford Lot is located on the west side of Gower Street at Camerford Avenue; the Waring Lot is located on the west side of Gower Street at Waring Avenue; and the Gregory Lot is located on the west side of Gower Street at Gregory Avenue.

B.

At the time of approval of this Specific Plan, development in the Specific Plan Area totals approximately 1.9 million square feet of floor area which includes approximately 362,100 square feet of Stage, 586,000 square feet of Support Uses, 332,300 square feet of Production Office, 546,300 square feet of Office, and 22,000 square feet of Retail.

C.

The proposed Project associated with this Specific Plan includes, with demolition of certain existing facilities, 21,000 square feet of net new Floor Area for Stage Uses, 635,500 square feet of net new Floor Area for Production Office Uses, 638,100 square feet of net new Floor Area for Office Uses, 89,200 square feet of net new Floor Area for Retail Uses, 1,900 square feet of net new Floor Area for Support Uses, and associated parking. With 536,600 square feet of proposed demolition of existing facilities, the total net new Floor Area is 1,385,700 square feet. This Specific Plan also allows for the ability to exchange permitted land uses through the Land Use Exchange procedure.

Section 2.3.

DEFINITIONS. The following words, whenever used in this Specific Plan, shall be construed as defined below. Words and phrases not defined herein shall be construed as defined in the Los Angeles Municipal Code.

Administrative Clearance. A ministerial process to determine compliance of a Project with all applicable provisions of the Specific Plan, as issued by the Director, pursuant to Section 10 of this Specific Plan.

Alcohol Use Approval. A ministerial process to determine compliance of an establishment seeking approval after the effecti ve date of this Specific P lan of the right to sell and/or serve alcoholic beverages with all applicable provisions of this Specific Plan, pursuant to Section 6 of this Specific Plan.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 7

Ancillary Lots. The Lemon. Grove Lot, South-Bronson Lot, Windsor Lot, Camerford Lot, Waring Lot, and Gregory Lot are collectively referred to as the Ancillary' Lots. Applicant. Any person or entity submitting an application for an Administrative Clearance, Modification of Administrative Clearance, Alcohol Use Approval, or Director’s Interpretation. Base Camp. Arrangement of mobile facilities (trucks, generators, support vehicles, etc.) related to Production Activities. Cellular Facilities. Wireless telecommunication facilities, including cellular facilities, for telephone, information and data transmission, and similar communication and future technological advances in such communication. Cellular Facilities shall also include all necessary support infrastructure, such as electrical or electromagnetic vaults, cabling, equipment racks, generators, transformers, and other related communication support equipment and systems. Child Care Facility'. A facility in which non-residential care is provided for children under 16 years of age, including infant care, day care, preschool care, before and after school care and child development facilities.

Communications Facilities. Any Structure or equipment used for the purpose of sending or receiving data and information communications or housing equipment to support the sending or receiving of communications, other than Cellular Facilities. Communication Facilities may include, but are not limited to, satellite and microwave dishes, antennae dishes and/or satellite farms, wireless telecommunication facilities such as WiFi, television and two-way radio transmitters and broadcast, communications facilities, communications and data facilities, control and telemetry signals, cable or fiber optic systems, or future technological advances in Communication Facilities. Communication Facilities shall also include all necessary support infrastructure, such as electrical or electromagnetic vaults, cabling, equipment racks, generators, transformers, downlink systems, uninterrupted power supply (UPS) systems, and other related broadcast and communication support equipment and systems. Contributing Building. A building or resource identified as a “contributor” to the potential Paramount Pictures Historic District or potential RKO Studios Historic District in the Paramount Pictures Historic Assessment Technical Report (August 2015), as noted on Table B and listed on Exhibit D hereto. Director. The Director of the City Planning Department or his or her successor or designee. Existing Uses/Facilities. Any use or facility, including but not limited to buildings, structures and infrastructure, existing within the Specific Plan area as of the effective date of this Specific Plan.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan

Floor Area. The area in square feet confined within the interior face of the exterior walls of a building, but not including the area of the following: exterior walls: stairways; shafts; light courts; rooms housing building-operating equipment machinery, recycling or waste management equipment or machinery; parking areas with associated driveways and ramps and areas incidental thereto; basement storage areas: outdoor eating areas (covered or uncovered); bicycle parking (covered or uncovered); trellis structures; outdoor production areas; production trailers; and Sets/'Fayades. Height. The vertical distance above grade measured to the highest point of the building or structure or roof structure or parapet wall, whichever is highest. For purposes of measuring Height, roof structures shall not include roof top equipment (including without limitation elevator lobbies, stairwells, operational and maintenance equipment, and heating, ventilation and air conditioning equipment), architectural elements, visual screening elements, landscaping and thematic elements. Height Allowance. A specified Height in which building(s) within designated areas

may exceed the maximum Height of the Height Zone up to the maximum stated Height for the Height Allowance as set forth in Section 5.1 of this Specific Plan and shown on the Height Zone Map, Exhibit D of this Speci fic Plan. Height Zone. A specific limitation on building and structure Heights within the Specific Plan as identified on the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan Height Zone Map as shown on Exhibit D and pursuant to Section 5 of this Specific Plan. Historic Districts. The Paramount Pictures Historic District and the RKO Studios Historic District. Historic Preservation Professional. A professional who meets the applicable Secretary of the Interior’s standards. Historic Resources Preservation Plan. The Paramount Pictures Historic Resources Preservation Plan, dated August 2015, prepared by Levin & Associates, Architects, and Rios Clementi Hale Studios and included as Appendix B of this Specific Plan. Infrastructure. Public or private infrastructure as an ancillary use to support development within the Specific Plan Area, including, but not limited to, water and sewer facilities, water reservoirs, gas, cable, water and electrical generation and transmission facilities and cooling towers. ' KCAL Building. The building located at 5515 Melrose Avenue, and identified on Exhibit F. Land Use Categories. Those five general categories of land uses within the Specific Plan area as set forth in Table A of Subsection 3.3 of this Specific Plan. The five Land Use Categories are: Stage, Production Office, Support, Office and Retail.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 9

Land Use Exchange. The ability to exchange a defined amount of square feet for one type of use (e.g. Office use) to a defined amount of square feet for a different use (e.g. Stage use), based on an equivalency factor established in Section 3.4 of this Specific Plan. Non-Contributing Building. A building or resource not identified as a contributor to the potential Paramount Pictures Historic District or potential RKO Studios Historic District in the Paramount Pictures Historic Assessment Technical Report (August 2015), as noted on Table B. Office. A Land Use Category that includes all office uses other than Production Office, including but not limited to merchandising, marketing, promotion, licensing, sales, leasing, accounting, distribution, legal, general commercial, professional, executive, business, and administration. Office includes related support functions and facilities including, but not limited to, conference rooms, reception and waiting rooms, file rooms, copy rooms, coffee rooms, restrooms, and other ancillary office functions/facilities. Paramount Pictures Historic District. That area identified as the potential Paramount Pictures Historic District in the Paramount Pictures Historic Assessment Technical Report (August 2015) and shown on Exhibit E. Planning Area. The Specific Plan Area is divided into seven Planning Areas that have specific design regulations, pursuant to Section 5 of this Specific Plan. These Planning Areas are designated as follows: Main Lot; Lemon Grove Lot (Parcels A, B, C and D); South Bronson Lot; Windsor Lot; Camerford Lot: Waring Lot; and Gregory Lot (Parcels A and B) as shown on the Planning Areas Map on Exhibit C. Preservation. The act or process of applying measures necessary to sustain the existing form, integrity, and materials of an historic property. Work, including preliminary measures to protect and stabilize the property, generally focuses upon the ongoing maintenance and repair of historic materials and features rather than extensive replacement and new construction. Production Activity. Indoor or outdoor activities in conjunction with the creation, development, production (on sound stages, Set/Fapade, studios, stages, television facilities and other indoor and outdoor locations), acquisition, reproduction, recording, processing, editing, synchronizing, duplication, transmission, reception, viewing, and other use of visual, digital, print and/or aural works, products, services, rights and communications, including sound and lighting effects associated with such activities. Production Activities shall include, but shall not be limited to, the use of any and all vehicles, aircraft, and watercraft; equipment, machinery (temporary or permanent); materials (including pyrotechnic and other special effects materials), animals; or activities for such purposes. Examples of such activities include, but are not limited to, motion pictures, internet, cable, commercials, television and radio production and programming, video games, video recordings, audio recordings, digital recordings, digital media, computerization, publications, and any derivation or evolution of the foregoing, as Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 10

well as maintenance and repair and construction of Set/Fapade or related structures used in production which are not buildings intended for permanent occupancy. Production Office. A Land Use Category that includes those uses associated with Production Activity in which the occupants conduct their primary work activity at a desk or work station, either within a private office or in an open area, and which use is related directly to Production Activities. Production Office includes related office uses, including but not limited to merchandising, marketing, promotion, licensing, sales, leasing, accounting, distribution, legal, general commercial, professional, executive, business, and administration. Production Office also includes related support functions and facilities including, but not limited to, conference rooms, reception and waiting rooms, file rooms, copy rooms, coffee rooms, restrooms, and other ancillary office functions/facilities. Project. The construction, erection, addition to or structural alteration or modification of any building or structure, or use of building or land, or change of use of a building or land located within the Specific Plan Area that requires the issuance of a grading permit, foundation permit, building permit or use of land permit,, or the construction of or addition to a parking structure, after the effective date of this Specific Plan. Set and Facades, which are temporary in nature shall not be considered projects under this Specific Plan. Rehabilitation. The act or process of making possible a compatible use for a property through repair, alterations, and additions while preserving those portions or features which convey its historical, cultural, or architectural values. Retail. A Land Use Category that includes those uses where goods are displayed, sold and/or serviced, including studio tours and related activities.

RKO Studios Historic District. That area identified as the potential RKO Studios Historic District in the Paramount Pictures Historic Assessment Technical Report (August 2015) and shown on Exhibit F. Set/Pagade. A temporary or permanent structure not intended for occupancy that is constructed and used for motion picture, film, television, commercials, or digital production and any derivation or evolution of the foregoing technologies utilized in conjunction with Production Activities. Special Events. Temporary uses, such as charitable, cultural and civic events, premieres, festivals, receptions, corporate events, concerts, and weddings, including sound, fighting and other special effects associated with such uses. Specific Plan. The Paramount Pictures Specific Plan, as defined in Ord. Specific Plan Area. The area within the Specific Plan, as shown on Exhibit A.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 11

Stage. A Land Use Category that includes buildings, structures, Sets/Faqades, and facilities, including sound stages, used for Production Activities other than Production Office and Support. Support. A Land Use Category primarily used for the support of Production Activities and employee services, including without limitation equipment facilities, wardrobe, lighting and grip, props, and storage (indoor and outdoor), utilities, central heating and cooling, Set/Faqade manufacturing, mill shop, equipment maintenance and repair, transportation fueling, maintenance and repair, child care, gym, financial services and other similar uses. Thematic Element. An object or non-occupiable structure or portion thereof,

freestanding or attached to any building or structure. Thematic Elements may include, but are not limited to, spheres, gateways, towers, sculptures, spires, special effect elements and architectural features. Thematic Elements may be an appurtenance to a building or structure or function as screening. A Thematic Element may be static or kinetic and may be internally or externally illuminated. SECTION 3: LAND USE REGULATIONS

Section 3.1.

PURPOSE AND INTENT

The land use regulations established by this Specific Plan specify the distribution, location and extent of the uses of land, including open space, within the Specific Plan Area. Section 3.2.

PROHIBITIONS

A.

Except as provided herein, no grading permit, foundation permit, building permit or use of land permit shall be issued for any Project on any lot located in whole or in part within the Specific Plan Area, unless the Director has issued an Administrative Clearance approval pursuant to the procedures set forth in Section 10 of this Specific Plan. In issuing an Administrative Clearance approval, the Director’s review shall determine whether an individual Project is in compliance with the applicable regulations and guidelines which are set forth in this Specific Plan.

B.

No Administrative Clearance shall be approved unless the Project substantially complies with all applicable provisions of this Specific Plan.

C.

Exemptions and Exceptions. The prohibitions specified in this Section 3.2 shall not apply to any of the following uses and facilities, which shall be exempt from the Administrative Clearance requirements, as set forth in Section 10 of this Specific Plan:

1.

Demolition, so long as the demolition is consistent with Section 4 of this Specific Plan. Paramount. Pictures Specific Plan

12

Section 3.3.

2.

Infrastructure.

3.

Interior remodeling, including the repair, replacement or modification of existing buildings or structures, or change of use of a building or land or relocation of existing uses, that do not increase the Floor Area of the existing building or structure by more than 10 percent but not to exceed 15,000 square feet.

4.

Exterior remodeling, for non-contributing buildings, so long as the exterior remodeling is consistent with Section 4 of this Specific Plan.

5.

Production Activities.

6.

Sets/Fapades.

7.

Special Events.

8

Temporary uses.

.

9.

Rehabilitation or reconstruction of an existing building or structure, notwithstanding Municipal Code Section 12.23.A.4, which was damaged or destroyed by fire, flood, wind, earthquake, or other disaster or the public enemy.

10.

Any demolition or construction for which a permit is required in order to comply with an order issued by the Department of Building and Safety to repair, replace, or demolish an unsafe or substandard condition.

LAND USE PLAN AND PERMITTED FLOOR AREA

A.

General Descriptions. To allow new development, the Specific Plan is divided into seven Planning Areas designated as follows: Main Lot; Lemon Grove Lot (Parcel A, B, C, and D); South Bronson Lot; Windsor Lot; Camerford Lot; Waring Lot; and Gregory Lot (Parcel A and B) as shown on the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan Planning Areas Map, Exhibit C.

B.

Permitted Floor Area of Development. The permitted net new Floor Area shall be as set forth in Table A, and may be adjusted pursuant to Appendix A and the Land Use Exchange provisions of Section 3.4 of this Specific Plan.

C.

Existing Uses/Facilities. 1.

Any Existing LJses/Facilities may, without limitation, be continued, maintained, remodeled, renovated or replaced for any reason, whether conforming or nonconforming with provisions of the Municipal Code and/or this Specific Plan.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 13

2.

Any building or structure, whether existing upon or after the effective date of this Specific Plan, may be demolished and replaced with a new building or structure of equal Floor Area of the same Land Lise Category, subject to Administrative Clearance as may be required pursuant to Section 3.2.

3.

Any existing building or structure, whether existing upon or after the effective date of this Specific Plan, may be demolished and replaced with a new building or structure of a different Land Use Category, subject, to Administrative Clearance as may be required pursuant to Section 3.2, provided that such building or structure complies with the Land Use Exchange procedures in Section 3.4 of this Specific Plan if the new building or structure would result in exceeding the Total Permitted Floor Area of an individual Land Use Category, as stated in Table A.

Table

Land Use Category

2 3

Proposed Demolition2 Floor Area (square feet)

Total Permitted2 Floor Area (square feet)

635,500

967,800

263,600

1,900

587,900

95,200

733,300

638,100

1,234,400

22,000

2,800

92,000

89,200

111,200

1,898,700

536,600

1,922,300

1,385,700

3,284,400

Production Office

332,300

Support

586,000

261,700

Office

596,300'

Retail

See

Net New 3 Floor Area (square feet)

383,100

362,100

Includes

Proposed Gross New Floor Area (square feet)

21,000

Stage

TOTAL i

Existing Floor Area (square feet)

A. Floor Area by Land Use Category.

90,100

111,110

86,800

722,300

50,000 square feet of Interim Projects.

Subsection 3.3.C of this Specific Plan regarding demolition of existing buildings and structures.

May be adjusted pursuant to Land

Use Exchange procedure as set forth in Section 3.4 of this Specific Plan, shall not exceed 3,284,400 square feet.

but the Total Permitted Floor Area of all land uses

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 14

Section 3.4.

LAND USE EXCHANGE

A.

Purpose. The Land Use Exchange procedure is established to provide development flexibility by permitting shifts of permitted Floor Area between certain Land Use Categories, as noted in Table A of this Specific Plan, over the life of this Specific Plan, while maintaining the intent and regulatory requirements of this Specific Plan. As noted in Table A of this Specific Plan, and Section 3.4.B below, the Total Permitted Floor Area by Land Use Category may exceed the square footages in Table A as a result of Land Use Exchanges, however, the Total Permitted Floor Area of 3,284,400 shall not be exceeded.

B.

Procedure. No grading permit, foundation permit, building permit, or use of land permit shall be issued for any Project on any lot located in whole or in part within the Specific Plan area, unless the Director has issued a Project Permit Compliance Review approval pursuant to the procedures set forth in LAMC Section 11.5.7, except as amended herein, and fees paid in accordance with Sec. 19.01 3. of the LAMC. In issuing a Project Permit Compliance, the Director’s review shall determine whether an individual Project is in compliance with those regulations, guidelines and mitigation measures which are set forth in this Specific Plan and the Mitigation Monitoring Program, Appendix C. 1.

2.

The Applicant shall submit a Land Use Exchange analysis along with the master land use application, and a parking table as required in Sec. 8.1 B. The Land Use Exchange analysis shall include the following information: a.

A statement as to which Land Use Category’s Total Permitted Floor Area set forth in Table A the Applicant wishes to draw against for the Land Use Exchange and the amount of the reduction of the selected Land Use Category Total Permitted Floor Area, based on the trip generation factors set forth in Appendix A.

b.

An analysis demonstrating that the Project does not exceed the environmental impacts described in the Paramount Pictures Master Plan Environmental Impact Report (EIR) (EIR SCH No. 2011101035).

c.

A description of how the Project is consistent with applicable provisions of this Specific Plan and a statement that the Project will comply with applicable mitigation measures in the Paramount Pictures Master Plan EIR Mitigation Monitoring Program.

The Applicant shall submit a revised Table A reflecting the change in Net New Floor Area and Total Permitted Floor Area based on the Land Use Exchange.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 15

3.

The adjustment of Total Permitted Floor Area for the Production Office. Office and Retail Land Use Categories pursuant to the Land Use Exchange shall be limited as follows: a.

The Total Permitted Floor Area for Production Office shall not be increased by more than 15 percent of the Total Permitted Floor Area for Production Office set forth in Table A.

b.

The Total Permitted Floor Area for Office shall not be increased by more than 15 percent of the Total Permitted Floor Area for Office set forth in Table A.

c.

The Total Permitted Floor Area for Retail shall not be increased above the Total Permitted Floor Area for Retail set forth in Table A.

C.

Director's Review. Notwithstanding, Sec. 11.5.7 of the LAMC, The Director’s review of the Land Use Exchange analysis shall be limited to verifying that the proposed Project is within the environmental impacts described in the Paramount Pictures Master Plan EIR, as set forth in Section 3.4.B.1 .b of this Specific Plan. The Director shall not impose additional conditions or mitigation measures on the Project. The time periods for review shall be the same as those set forth in LAMC Section 11.5.7. ■

D.

A Specific Plan Amendment shall not be required for the updated Table A stating the revised Floor Areas with the Land Use Exchange provided the Land Use Exchange analysis demonstrates that the environmental impacts do not exceed the impacts stated in the Paramount Pictures Master Plan EIR, as set forth in Section 3.4.B. 1 .b of this Specific Plan.

E.

Limitation. If the Project would not be within the environmental impacts stated in the Paramount Pictures Master Plan EIR, as set forth in Section 3.4.B.1 .b of this Specific Plan, then the Project Permit Compliance for the Land Use Exchange shall be disapproved, and additional analysis pursuant to CEQA shall be undertaken for the Project. The Director's determination shall not be appealable.

F.

Building and Safety Review. Upon approval of a Project Permit Compliance for a Land Use Exchange, the Department of Building and Safety shall issue no permit until it has verified compliance with the terms of CPC-2011-2462-DA, Development Agreement between the City of Los Angeles and the Paramount Pictures Corporation.

Section 3.5. A.

PERMITTED USES Main Lot. The following uses and facilities shall be permitted within the Main Lot:

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 16

Auto repair and car washes.

2.

Art galleries.

3.

Audience shows.

4.

Bakeries.

5.

Bank or financial institutions.

6

Barber shops or beauty parlors.

7.

Base Camps (see definition in Section 2.3).

8.

Book or stationery stores.

9.

Catering facilities.

10.

Cellular Facilities (see definition in Section 2.3).

11.

Ceremonies.

12.

Child Care Facilities (see definition in Section 2.3).

13.

Civic and charitable events.

14.

Clothes cleaning, laundry, dry cleaning, and/or pressing establishments.

15.

Clothing stores, including, but not limited to, tailor or wearing apparel shops.

16.

Communications Facilities (see definition in Section 2.3).

17.

Confectionary .stores.

18.

Construction trailers, for the duration of construction activities.

19.

Custom dressmaking or millinery stores.

20

.

Dance rehearsal halls.

21

.

Drug stores and pharmacies.

22.

Film, video, and other technology archives.

23.

Fitness and spa facilities.

24.

Florists.

.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 17

25.

Furniture sales.

26.

Gift shops.

27.

Grocery, fruit, or vegetable store.

28.

Guard shacks.

29.

Hardware or electric appliance stores.

30.

Infrastructure (see definition in Section 2.3).

31.

Interior decorating or upholstering shops.

32.

Jewelry stores.

33.

Kiosks.

34.

Locksmiths.

35.

Mail and/or parcel delivery services that include all activities such as storage, loading, and unloading.

36.

Maintenance facilities/ storage facilities.

37.

Medical offices (including emergency medical facilities).

38.

Mills/ manufacturing,

39.

Modular offices and trailers.

40.

Motion picture, television and broadcast studios and related incidental uses that are located on a studio site, including but not limited to: Production Activity; indoor or outdoor stages; Sets and Fapades; digital, film, video, audio, video game and media production; recording and broadcasting; sound labs; film editing; film video and audio processing; sets and props production; computer design; computer graphics; animation; and ancillary facilities related to those activities.

41.

Museums (public or private) including indoor and outdoor exhibits, commercial or cultural.

42.

Newsstands.

43.

Offices (see definition in Section 2.3).

44.

Outdoor sales of retail merchandise.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 18

45.

Paint shops and spray booths.

46,

Parking, including surface, structured, and subterranean parking.

47.

Photo shops/ Photographers.

48.

Premieres.

49.

Printing, publishing, or lithographing establishments.

50.

Production Offices (see definition in Section 2.3).

51.

Production trucks and trailers.

52.

Promotional activities.

53.

Restaurants, cafes, coffee shops, or dinner theaters, including outdoor/ sidewalk eating areas on the ground floor, patio area, or any other floor.

54.

Retail (see definition in Section 2.3).

55.

Screenings and screening rooms.

56.

Second-hand stores or consignment shops except pawnshops, if all activities other than incidental storage are conducted wholly within a completely enclosed building.

57.

Set/Fagade (see definition in Section 2.3).

58.

Signs.

59.

Special Events (see definition in Section 2.3).

60.

Stages (see definition in Section 2.3).

61.

Studio tours and related visitor activities.

62.

Support (see definition in Section 2.3).

63.

Temporary uses.

64.

Theaters, including without limitation, dinner theaters and showcase theaters.

65.

Trailers.

66.

Transportation facilities and fuel storage.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 19

67. B.

Similar uses as determined appropriate by the Director.

Ancillary Lots. The following uses and facilities shall be permitted within the Ancillary Lots, other than Parcels C and D of the Lemon Grove Lot: 1.

Auto repair and car washes located within a garage structure and limited to the use of employees, guests and visitors of the property owner.

2.

Art galleries.

3.

Bakeries.

4.

Bank or financial institutions.

5.

Barber shops or beauty parlors.

6.

Base Camps (see definition in Section 2.3).

7.

Book or stationer}' stores.

8.

Catering facilities.

9.

Cellular Facilities (see definition in Section 2.3).

10.

Ceremonies, limited to support: activities, including but not limited to parking, catering, and similar activities, for ceremonies conducted on the Main Lot.

11.

Child Care Facilities (see definition in Section 2.3).

12.

Civic and charitable events, limited to support activities, including but not limited to parking, catering, and similar activities, for civic and charitable events conducted on the Main Lot.

13.

Clothes cleaning, laundry', dry cleaning, and/or pressing establishments.

14.

Clothing stores, including, but not limited to, tailor or wearing apparel shops.

15.

Communications Facilities (see definition in Section 2.3).

16.

Confectionary stores.

17.

Construction trailers, for the duration of construction activities.

18.

Custom dressmaking or millinery stores.

19.

Dance rehearsal halls. Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 20

20.

Drug stores and pharmacies.

21

.

Film, video, and other technology archives.

22

.

Fitness and spa facilities.

23.

Florists.

24.

Furniture sales.

25.

Gift shops.

26.

Grocery, fruit, or vegetable stores.

27.

Guard shacks.

28.

Hardware or electric appliance stores.

29.

Infrastructure (see definition in Section 2.3).

30.

Interior decorating or upholstering shops.

31.

Jewelry stores.

32.

Kiosks.

33.

Locksmiths.

34.

Mail and/or parcel delivery services that include all activities such as storage, loading, and unloading.

35.

Maintenance facilities/storage facilities, which are enclosed.

36.

Medical offices (including emergency medical facilities).

37.

Modular offices and trailers.

38.

Motion picture, television and broadcast studios and related incidental uses that are located on a studio site, including but not limited to: Production Activity; indoor or outdoor stages; Sets and Facades; digital, film, video, audio, video game and media production: recording and broadcasting; sound labs; film editing; film video and audio processing; sets and props production; computer design; computer graphics; animation; and ancillary facilities related to those activities.

39.

Museums (public or private) including indoor and outdoor exhibits, commercial or cultural.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 21

40.

Newsstands.

41.

Offices (see definition in Section 2.3).

42.

Parking, including surface, structured, and subterranean parking.

43.

Photo shops/ Photographers.

44.

Premieres, limited to support activities, including but not limited to parking, catering, and similar activities, for Premieres conducted on the Main Lot.

45.

Printing, publishing, or lithographing establishments.

46.

Production Offices (see definition in Section 2.3).

47.

Production trucks and trailers.

48.

Promotional activities, limited to support activities, including but not limited to parking, catering, and similar activities, for promotional activities conducted on the Main Lot.

49.

Restaurants, cafes, coffee shops, or dinner theaters, including outdoor/ sidewalk eating areas on the ground floor, patio area, or any other floor.

50.

Retail (see definition in Section 2.3).

51.

Screenings and screening rooms.

52.

Second-hand stores or consignment shops except pawnshops, if all activities other than incidental storage are conducted wholly within a completely enclosed building.

53.

Set/Fagade (see definition in Section 2.3).

54.

Signs.

55.

Special Events (see definition in Section 2.3), limited to support activities, including but not limited to parking, catering, and similar activities, for special events conducted on the Main Lot.

56.

Stages (see definition in Section 2.3).

57.

Studio tours and related visitor activities.

58.

Support (see definition in Section 2.3).

59.

Temporary uses. Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 22

C.

60.

Theaters, including without limitation, dinner theaters and showcase theaters.

61.

Trailers.

62.

Transportation facilities.

63.

Similar uses as determined appropriate by the Director.

Lemon Grove Ancillary Parcels C and D. The following uses and facilities shall be permitted within Parcels C and D of the Lemon Grove Lot: 1.

Temporary Sets and fayades.

2.

Filming in accordance with the City of Los Angeles film permitting process. The notification process shall be provided in dual language of English and Spanish.

3.

Temporary modular offices.

4.

Storage, which shall be screened from pedestrian view.

SECTION 4: HISTORIC PRESERVATION REGULATIONS A.

This Section regulates the Preservation, Rehabilitation, including alteration, and demolition of historic resources, and the construction of new structures on the Main Lot within the Specific Plan Area as they relate to historic resources. The requirements of this Section 4 of the Specific Plan and the Historic Resources Preservation Plan, attached hereto as Appendix B, and any cultural resources Mitigation Measures set forth in the adopted Mitigation Monitoring Program, for the Paramount Pictures Master Plan, Appendix C, shall be the exclusive historic preservation requirements applicable to the Specific Plan Area.

B.

Non-Contributing Buildings. The demolition of Non-Contributing Buildings is permitted and no written verification from a Historic Preservation Professional is required. Prior to the issuance of a building permit for the exterior alteration of a Non-Contributing Building within the Main Lot, the Applicant shall submit to the City Department of Building and Safety written verification from a Historic Preservation Professional of compliance with the provisions of the Historic Resources Preservation Plan related to new construction within the Main Lot.

C.

Contributing Buildings. Prior to the issuance of a building permit for the exterior alteration or exterior Preservation of any Contributing Building within the potential Paramount Pictures Historic District or RKO Studios Historic District, the Applicant shall submit to the Director of Planning, written verification from a Historic Preservation Professional of compliance with the applicable provisions of

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 23

the Historic Resources Preservation Plan. The Director shall review the written verification in consultation with the Office of Historic Resources. D.

KCAL Building. Prior to the issuance of a building permit for the exterior alteration of the KCAL Building, the Applicant shall submit to the Director of Planning, written verification from a Historic Preservation Professional of compliance with the applicable provisions of the Historic Resources Preservation Plan. The Director shall review the written verification in consultation with the Office of Historic Resources (OHR).

E.

Interior Modifications. The Preservation or Rehabilitation, including alteration, of the interior of any Non-Contributing or Contributing Building is permitted and no written verification from a Historic Preservation Professional is required.

F.

New Construction. Prior to the issuance of a building permit for the construction of new structures (not including Sets/Fapades) within the Main Lot, the Applicant shall submit to the Director of Planning, written verification from a Historic Preservation Professional of compliance with the provisions of the Historic Resources Preservation Plan related to new construction within the Main Lot. The Director shall review the written verification in consultation with the Office of Historic Resources.

G.

Demolition of Contributing Buildings. Demolition of structures identified for removal on Table B is permitted and no written verification from a Historic Preservation Professional is required.

2.

Any proposed modification Table B to shall require submittal to the Director, in consultation with the Office of Historic Resources, of written verification from a Historic Preservation Professional that the modification complies with the following: a.

The retention of 60% of the applicable Historic District's Contributors, and; '

b.

A minimum of one example of each historic property type identified in the Historic Resources Preservation Plan is retained in the applicable Historic District in order to maintain the integrity of the Historic District and;

c.

Major historic circulation patterns are retained in a north/south and east/west orientation, and the relationship of the Historic District resources to Production Park and Lucy Park are retained, in order to maintain the integrity of the Historic District.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 24

3.

The Director shall grant approval of the modification of Table B if he or she finds, in consultation with the Office of Historic Resources, the modification complies with the requirements in 4.G.2 above. If the proposed modification would not meet the requirements of Subsection 4.G.2, the modification shall be subject to additional applicable analysis pursuant to CEQA, and consultation with the Office of Historic Resources, prior to a determination regarding the modification.

4.

Prior to the demolition of Stage 21, the Applicant shall use commercially reasonable efforts to remove the globe feature from the existing structure. The Applicant will have a historic preservation professional onsite to observe the removal of the globe feature, and the globe feature shall be stored in a manner to allow for its future re-use. Following demolition of Stage 21 and completion of a new structure in its place, the Applicant shall use commercially reasonable efforts to reinstall the globe feature on the new structure. The globe feature shall be reinstalled at a location and height which are substantially similar to the globe feature’s existing location and height. However, the relocated globe feature may be set back farther from the intersection of Melrose Avenue and Gower Street than the existing location, and the new height may correspond with the applicable height zone for the portion of the property on which the new building is located, provided that visibility of the globe feature from the intersection is substantially similar to the existing visibility of the globe feature from the intersection.

Table B: Paramount Pictures Historic District and RKO Studios Historic District Contributing Buildings Paramount Pictures Historic District Building Number

Common/ Current Name

Category

Proposed for Demolition

203

Set Lighting Warehouse

Contributor

205

Charles Bluhdom Building

Contributor

206

Stage 1

Contributor

X

207

Stage 2

Contributor

X

208

Edith Head

Contributor

X

209

Stage 4

Contributor

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 25

X

210

Milland

Contributor

211

Hospital

Contributor

212

Power House #1

Contributor

213

Property Building

Contributor

214

Cabinet Shop

Contributor

215

Freeman

Non-contributor

217

Sumner Redstone

Contributor

221

Dressing Room

Contributor

222

Preston Sturges

Contributor

223

Stage 3 & Film Shipping

Contributor

224

Stage 5

Contributor

225

Stage 6

Contributor

225

Stage 7

Contributor

226

Hans Dreier Building

Contributor

226

Stage 9

Contributor

226

Stage 8

Contributor

230

Machine Room

Non-contributor

X

232

Set Lighting & Grip

Contributor

X

238

Stage 15

Contributor

245

A.C. Lyles Building

Non-contributor

248

Sherry Lansing Theater & Film Vault

Contributor

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 26

Partial demolition

X

X

249

Studio Gym

Contributor

X

250

Foley / Security

Contributor

X

250

Stage 11

Contributor

X

250

Stage 12

Contributor

X

250

Stage 14

Contributor

251

Barney Balaban

Contributor

X

253

Production Storage

Contributor

X

255

Film Vault #5

Contributor

X

256

Ernst Lubitsch / Lubitsch Annex

Contributor

257

Marathon Mill / Manufacturing / Special Effects

Contributor

260

B.P. Schulberg

Contributor

261

Cecil B. DeMille

Contributor

263

Hal Wallis

Contributor

X

264

Editorial / Staff Shop / Paint & Sign Shop

Non-contributor

X

272

Lumber Yard / Lumber Storage

Non-contributor

X

273

Stage 16

Contributor

275

Stage 17

Contributor

275

Stage 18

Contributor

276

Power House #2

Contributor

278

Set Lighting & Grip Storage

Contributor

X

285

Jerry Lewis Annex

Contributor

X

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 27

286

Jerry Lewis

Contributor

298

Assembly Stage

Contributor

325

Marathon Substation

Non-contributor

X

329

Production Offices (Modular)

Non-contributor

X

351

Post- Production. Building

Non-contributor

352

Production Park

Contributor

Bronson Gate

Contributor

X

RKO Studios Historic District

Building Number

Common/ Current Name

Category Contributor

101

Maurice Chevalier

102

Josef Von Sternberg

Contributor

102

Stage 23

Contributor

103

Bob Hope

Contributor

104

Stage 24 & 24A

Contributor

105

Jesse Lasky

Contributor

106

Lucy Bungalow

Contributor

106

Stage 25

107

Clara Bow

108

Gower Mill (South)

109

Gower Mill North (formerly Transportation)

Contributor Contributor Contributor Contributor

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 28

Proposed for Demolition

Contributor

X

Maintenance Paint/Pyramid Scenic

Contributor

X

141

Stage 26, Studio A

Contributor

142

Billy Wilder

Contributor

146

Lucille Ball

Contributor

147

Power House #4

Contributor

149

Commissary/ Cafeteria

Non-contributor

154

Stage 29

Contributor

154

Stage 30

Contributor

154

Stage 31

Contributor

154

Stage 32

Contributor

157

Water Tower

Contributor

158

Stage 27

Contributor

158

Stage 28

Contributor

160

Gloria Swanson

Contributor

163

Facilities Mill

Contributor

X

165

Gary Cooper

Contributor

X

166

Mae West

Contributor

167

W.C. Fields

Contributor

171

Scene Dock

Non-contributor

X

172

Stage 19

Contributor

X

110

Power House #3

116

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 29

172

Stage 20

Contributor

X

172

Stage 21

Contributor

X

173

Carole Lombard

Contributor

X

175

Film Vault #4

Contributor

X

177

Facilities Supply Center

Non-contributor

X

178

William S. Hart

Contributor

179

Fleischer Brothers

Contributor

180

Dressing Rooms

Contributor

184

Marx Brothers

Contributor

190

B Annex 1

Contributor

X

191

B Annex 2

Contributor

X

192

Company Store

Non-contributor

X

195

Marlene Dietrich

Contributor

X

196

North Gower Gate

Contributor

353

Lucy Park

Contributor

X

SECTION 5: DESIGN REGULATIONS The design regulations set forth in this Section of the Specific Plan apply only to Projects subject to this Specific Plan. Section 5. A.

DESIGNATION OF HEIGHT ZONES. Height Zones. Within the Specific Plan area, 6 height zones are designated that establish the maximum permitted Heights of buildings and structures as shown on the Height Zone Map, Exhibit E. The Height Zones are designated as follows: 45-feet

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan

30

B.

2.

55-feet

3.

60-feet

4.

75-feet with 2 Height Allowances

5.

75-feet with 2 Height Allowances

6.

135-feet

Height Allowances. Within the Specific Plan area there are 4 Height Allowances as set forth below and shown on the Height Zone Map, Exhibit D of this Specific Plan.

1.

In the 75-foot Height Zone on the southern portion of the Main Lot, there shall be one Height Allowance up to a maximum of 150 feet in Height with no more than 30,000 square feet of total building floorplate(s) utilizing the Height Allowance, and one Height Allowance up to a maximum of 135-feet in Height with no more than 30,000 square feet of total building floorplate(s) utilizing the Height Allowance.

2.

In the 75-foot Height Zone on the northern portion of the Main Lot, there

shall be two Height Allowances up to a maximum of 95-feet in Height with no more than 40,000 square foot of total building floorplate(s)

utilizing each Height Allowance. 3.

Section 5.2.

Existing Buildings/Structures. Buildings or structures which exist prior to the effective date of this Specific Plan shall be permitted to exceed the Height Zone in which the building is located up to its existing Height. In the event of any damage or destruction to the building(s) or structure(s), it may be rebuilt up to the Height that existed as of the effective date of this Specific Plan. Any additions in excess of 10% of the Floor Area of the building(s) or structure(s) shall be subject to the Height Zone requirements of the Specific Plan.

MAIN LOT DESIGN REGULATIONS

A.

Height. New building construction shall not exceed those Heights as set forth in the Height Zone Map, Exhibit D.

B.

Screening. Projects that have roof-top equipment or outdoor storage that is visible from public pedestrian locations within 500 feet of the perimeter of the Main Lot shall screen such roof-top equipment and outdoor storage areas to minimize its view from the public pedestrian locations. Screening devices may include vegetated walls, fences, trellises, graphic treatments, other structures, or other measures approved by the Director.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 31

c.

Setbacks. No setbacks are required.

D.

Roof-top Parking. Lighting. Projects that have roof-top parking shall shield the light sources on the roof-top level so as to direct the lighting on-site. 2.

Section 5.3.

Screening. The roof-top parking level shall include a parapet wall of at least 3.5 feet.

LEMON GROVE LOT DESIGN REGULATIONS

A.

Height. New building construction shall not exceed those Heights as set forth in the Height Zone Map, Exhibit D.

B.

Projects that have roof-top equipment or outdoor storage that is visible from public pedestrian locations within 500 feet of the perimeter of the Lemon Grove Lot shall screen such roof-top equipment and outdoor storage areas to minimize its view from the public pedestrian locations. Screening devices may include vegetated walls, fences, trellises, graphic treatments or other measures approved by the Director.

C.

Setbacks. For Parcel A, no setbacks are required.

D.

2.

For Parcel B, as shown on Exhibit C, a 5 foot setback shall be provided from the eastern, northern and southern property line.

3.

For Parcel C, as shown on Exhibit C, a 5 foot setback shall be provided from the eastern, northern and southern property line.

4.

For Parcel D, as shown on Exhibit C, a 5 foot setback shall be provided from the eastern, northern, western, and southern property line.

5.

All required setbacks shall be attractively landscaped with a combination of trees, shrubs and groundcover and shall be maintained by the property owner, or its successor.

Parcels C and D Fencing and Maintenance. Chain link fencing and barbed wire shall be prohibited. Decorative fencing may be permitted up to a height of 8 feet. During the time period these parcels remain vacant, they shall be maintained in a clean and well kept manner including, repair of broken walls, removal of graffiti, and improved with either low maintenance landscaping, hardscape or a combination of both. ,

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 32

E.

F.

Section 5.4.

Parking Structures (Above-grade). 1.

Parcel B. The ground floor of any parking structures constructed on Parcel B, shall have a vertical clearance to match the vertical clearance of ' the existing parking structure on Parcel A.

2.

Parcel B. Two percent (2%) of the parking provided in a newly constructed parking structure shall be electric ready and twenty percent (20%) of the parking provided shall be wired for future electric use.

3.

Prior to the issuance of a building permit for construction of a parking structure on Parcel B, the Applicant shall provide the Director of Planning a figure indicating the location of replacement base camp parking within the Specific Plan area for base camps parked on Parcel B, if any.

Roof-top Parking. 1.

Lighting. Projects that have roof-top parking shall shield the light sources on the roof-top level so as to direct the lighting on-site.

2.

Screening. The roof-top parking level shall include a parapet wall of at least 3.5 feet.

SOUTH BRONSON LOT DESIGN REGULATIONS

A.

Height. New building construction shall not exceed those Heights as set forth in the Height Zone Map, Exhibit D.

B.

Screening. Projects that have roof-top equipment or outdoor storage that is visible from public pedestrian locations within 500 feet of the perimeter of the South Bronson Lot shall screen such roof-top equipment and outdoor storage areas to minimize its view from the public pedestrian locations. Screening devices may include vegetated walls, fences, trellises, graphic treatments or other measures approved by the Director.

C.

Setbacks. A 10 foot setback shall be provided from the southern property line. 1.

D.

The 10-foot setback shall be landscaped. Plans for the landscaping shall be submitted to the Urban Design Studio for review prior to the issuance of a building permit for the parking structure. All landscaping shall be maintained by the property owner, or its successor.

Parking Structures (Above-grade). E

The south facade of the parking structure, except for openings that may be required for access, shall be enclosed. Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 33

E.

F.

Section 5.5.

2.

The south, east, west and north facade of the parking structures shall include architectural styles or techniques that enhance the visual compatibility of the parking structures with the surrounding structures, which architectural styles or techniques may include fagade articulation; landscaping, including vegetated or living walls, and/or vertical gardens: and/or use of compatible building materials and colors. Plans for the design elements of the parking structures shall be submitted to the Urban Design Studio for review prior to the issuance of a building permit.

3.

Two percent (2%) of the parking provided in a newly constructed parking structure shall be electric ready and twenty percent (20%) of the parking provided shall be wired for future electric use.

Roof-top Parking. 1.

Lighting. Projects that have roof-top parking shall shield the light sources on the roof-top level so as to direct the lighting on-site.

2.

Screening. The roof-top parking level shall include a parapet wall of at least 3.5 feet.

Vehicular Access. Vehicular access to new buildings constructed within the South Bronson Lot shall be designed, so as to discourage vehicles entering or exiting the South Bronson Lot from travelling to/from the south. WINDSOR LOT DESIGN REGULATIONS

A.

Height. New building construction shall not exceed those Heights as set forth in the Height Zone Map, Exhibit E.

B.

Screening. Projects that have roof-top equipment or outdoor storage that is visible from public pedestrian locations within 500 feet of the perimeter of the Windsor Lot shall screen such roof-top equipment and outdoor storage areas to minimize its view from the public pedestrian locations. Screening devices may include vegetated walls, fences, trellises, graphic treatments or other measures approved by the Director.

C.

Setbacks. A 10 foot setback shall be provided from the southern property line. 1.

The 10-foot setback shall be landscaped. Plans for the landscaping setback shall be submitted to the Urban Design Studio for review prior to the issuance of a building permit for the parking structure. All landscaping shall be maintained by the property owner, or its successor.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 34

D.

E.

F.

Section 5.6.

Parking Structures (Above-grade). 1.

The south faqade of the parking structure, except for openings that may be required for access, shall be enclosed.

2.

The south, east, west and north fagade of the parking structures shall include architectural styles or techniques that enhance the visual compatibility of the parking structures with the surrounding structures, which architectural styles or techniques may include facade articulation; landscaping; including vegetated and living walls, and or and/or use of compatible building materials and colors. Plans for the design elements of the parking structures shall be submitted to the Urban Design Studio for review prior to the issuance of a building permit.

3.

Two percent (2%) of the parking provided in a newly constructed parking structure shall be electric ready and twenty percent (20%) of the parking provided shall be wired for future electric use.

Roof-top Parking. 1.

Lighting. Projects that have roof-top parking shall shield the light sources on the roof-top level so as to direct the lighting on-site.

2.

Screening. The roof-top parking level shall include a parapet wall of at least 3.5 feet.

Vehicular Access. Vehicular access to new buildings constructed within the Windsor Lot shall be designed to as to discourage vehicles entering or exiting the Windsor Lot from travelling to/from the south. CAMERFORD LOT DESIGN REGULATIONS

A.

Height. New building construction shall not exceed those Heights as set forth in the Height Zone Map, Exhibit E.

B.

Screening. Projects that have roof-top equipment or outdoor storage that is visible from public pedestrian locations within 500 feet of the perimeter of the Camerford Lot shall screen such roof-top equipment and outdoor storage areas to minimize its view from the public pedestrian locations. Screening devices may include vegetated walls, fences, trellises, graphic treatments or other measures approved by the Director.

C.

Setbacks. A 5 foot setback shall be provided from the western property line.

D.

Roof-top Parking.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 35

Lighting. Projects that have roof-top parking shall shield the light sources on the rooftop level so as to direct the lighting on-site.

2.

Section 5.7.

Screening. The roof-top parking level shall include a parapet wall of at least 3.5. feet. .

WARING LOT DESIGN REGULATIONS

A.

Height. The existing parking structure is'within the Heights noted in the Height Zone Map, Exhibit D. Any new building construction shall not exceed those Heights as set forth in the Height Zone Map, Exhibit D.

B.

Projects that have roof-top equipment or outdoor storage that is visible from public pedestrian locations within 500 feet of the perimeter of the Waring Lot shall screen such roof-top equipment and outdoor storage areas to minimize its view from the public pedestrian locations. Screening devices may include vegetated walls, fences, trellises, graphic treatments or other measures approved by the Director.

C.

Setbacks. No setbacks are required.

D.

Roof-top Parking. Lighting. Projects that have roof-top parking shall shield the light sources on the roof-top level so as to direct the lighting on-site.

2.

Section 5.8.

Screening. The roof-top parking level shall include a parapet wall of at least 3.5 feet.

GREGORY LOT DESIGN REGULATIONS

A.

Height. New building construction shall not exceed those Heights as set forth in the Height Zone Map, Exhibit E.

B.

Screening. Projects that have roof-top equipment or outdoor storage that is visible from public pedestrian locations within 500 feet of the perimeter of the Gregory Lot shall screen such roof-top equipment or outdoor storage areas to minimize its view from the public pedestrian locations. Screening devices may include vegetated walls, fences, trellises, graphic treatments or other measures approved by the Director.

C,

Setbacks. U

For Parcel A, a 5 foot setback shall be provided from the western property line.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 36

2.

D.

For Parcel B, a 5 foot setback shall be provided from the northern and western property line.

Roof-top Parking. 1.

Lighting. Projects that have roof-top parking shall shield the light sources on the roof-top level so as to direct the lighting on-site.

2.

Screening. The roof-top parking level shall include a parapet wall of at least 3.5 feet.

SECTION 6: ALCOHOL SALES

Section 6.1.

REGULATIONS FOR THE ON-SITE SALES, SERVICE AND CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOL

A.

The sale and service of alcoholic beverages for on-site sale, service and consumption shall be permitted within the Main Lot, Windsor Lot, and South Bronson Lot of the Specific Plan Area. Establishments that sell and serve alcoholic beverages for on-site consumption shall obtain, as required, licenses or permits from the State Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC).

B.

Existing Establishments/Uses. Existing establishments/uses for the on-site sales, service and consumption of a full line of alcoholic beverages are authorized to continue subject to their existing approvals until such authorizations expire or are otherwise terminated. Nothing herein shall prohibit an existing establishment from obtaining an Alcohol Use Approval pursuant to Section 6.1 .C or 6.2 below.

C.

New Establishments/Uses. New establishments/uses for the on-site sales, service and consumption of a full line of alcoholic beverages shall be subject to the following requirements. Establishments. A maximum of six new establishments shall be allowed for the sale and service of a full line of alcoholic beverages for on-site consumption, including, but not limited to restaurants, cafes, and dinner theaters. 2.

Alcohol Use Approval Procedure. Each establishment subject to this Section 6.1 shall apply to the Director for an Alcohol Use Approval following the same procedure as an Administrative Clearance, except that a separate sheet containing a table identifying all alcohol requests within the Specific Plan area, type of alcohol request, square footage of each particular restaurant, bar or event space shall be submitted with the application. The Applicant shall file an application with the Director prior to the utilization of any grant made herein pursuant to the sale of alcoholic beverages. The Director’s review shall follow the same

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 37

procedure as required for an Administrative Clearance, except that the Director’s review shall be limited to the review of the Alcohol Use Approval applications for substantial compliance with the conditions listed in Subsection 6.1.D below. 3.

D.

A request to exceed the maximum number of establishments permitted by this subsection 6.1.C shall require a conditional use permit pursuant to the Section 12.24.W.1 or Section 12.24.X.2 of the Municipal Code. Neither a Specific Plan Exception nor a Specific Plan Amendment pursuant to Section 10 shall be required.

Conditions. The following conditions shall apply for all alcohol sales and service for on-site consumption. 1.

The sale and service of alcoholic beverages shall be limited to on-site consumption only.

2.

All regulations of the State of California prohibiting the sale of alcoholic beverages to minors shall be strictly enforced.

3.

Electronic age verification device(s) may be used to determine the age of any individual attempting to purchase alcoholic beverages. If utilized, these devices shall be installed on the premises, maintained in an operational condition, and all establishment employees shall be instructed in their use.

4.

Each employee of said establishment/permitee who sells or serves alcoholic beverages shall enroll in, attend and complete a certified, ABCrecognized, training program for the responsible sale and service of alcohol. This training shall be scheduled for new employees within 30 days of the opening of the establishment, or within 30 days after the start of employment, whichever applies. A record of the completion of this training program shall be maintained on the premises and shall be presented upon request of the Director.

5.

A copy of these conditions shall be retained on the premises at all times and be immediately produced upon the request of any peace officer, employee of the State Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control, or the Los Angeles Department of City Planning.

6.

Restaurants, Cafes and Dinner Theaters. a.

Hours of sales. Alcoholic beverages may be sold /served during the following hours: 7 days a week, 8:00 a.m.- 2:00 a.m. All alcoholic beverage service and sales shall cease thirty minutes prior to closing of the establishment.

Paramount. Pictures Specific Plan 38

7.

b.

For restaurants, the premises shall be maintained as a bona fide restaurant and shall provide a menu containing an assortment of foods.

c.

Sales of alcoholic beverages shall only be made from an area where an employee of the restaurant/cafe obtains the product. No self-service of alcoholic beverages shall be permitted.

d.

A restaurant, cafe or dinner theater shall be considered a single permit and shall be permitted to sell a full line of alcoholic beverages from more than one bar or lounge within a restaurant, cafe or dinner theater establishment.

Theaters. a.

Hours of sales. Alcoholic beverages may be sold and/or served during the following hours: 7 days a week, 10:00 a.m.- 2:00 a.m. All alcoholic beverage service and sales shall cease thirty minutes prior to closing of the establishment.

b.

Alcoholic beverages may be sold, dispensed and consumed in the presence of persons under 21 years of age.

c.

The sale of distilled spirits by the bottle for same day or future consumption shall be prohibited.

d.

A theater shall be considered a single establishment with a single permit and shall be permitted to sell a full line of alcoholic beverages from more than one bar or lounge within the theater establishment.

Main Lot Special Events. a.

The Main Lot shall be considered a single establishment with a single permit and shall be permitted to sell a full line of alcoholic beverages within the boundaries of the Main Lot during Special Events, including but not limited to premieres, receptions, civic, corporate and charitable events.

b.

Hours of sales. Alcoholic beverages may be sold and/or served during the following hours: 7 days a week, 10:00 a.m.- 2:00 a.m. There shall be no limitation on the amount of Special Events with alcohol service.

c.

Alcoholic beverages may be sold, dispensed and consumed in the presence of persons under 21 years of age.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 39

E.

Section 6.2.

d.

Portable service bars may be used.

e.

Sales and/or service of alcoholic beverages for consumption outside the boundaries of the Main Lot shall be prohibited.

Revocation. If the conditions of Subsection 6.1 have not been complied with, the City may give notice to the Applicant/licensee, property owner, and any lessee of the real property affected at a time and place fixed by the City and show cause why the use permitted by this Subsection should not be modified, discontinued, or revoked. These proceedings shall be in accordance with Section 12.24.Z of the Municipal Code. ' REGULATIONS FOR THE OFF-SITE SALES, SERVICE AND CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOL

A.

The sale and service of alcoholic beverages for off-site consumption shall be permitted within the Main Lot, Windsor Lot, and South Bronson Lot of the Specific Plan area. Establishments that sell alcoholic beverages for off-site consumption shall obtain, as required, licenses or permits from the State of Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC).

B.

Existing Establishments/Uses. Existing establishments/uses for the sale and service of alcoholic beverages for off-site consumption are authorized to continue subject to their existing approvals until such authorizations expire or are otherwise terminated. Nothing herein.shall prohibit an existing establishment from obtaining an Alcohol Use Approval pursuant to Section 6.1 .C or 6.2 below.

C.

The sale of a full line of alcoholic beverages for off-site consumption shall be subject to the following requirements. Establishments. A maximum of two new establishments shall be allowed for the sale of a full line of alcoholic beverages for off-site consumption. In addition to the off-site sales, tastings shall be permitted in such establishments. 2.

Alcohol Use Approval Procedure. Each establishment subject to Section 6.2 shall apply to the Director for an Alcohol Use Approval, following the same procedure as an Administrative Clearance, except that a separate sheet containing a table identifying all alcohol requests within the Specific Plan area, type of alcohol request, square footage of each particular restaurant, bar or event space shall be submitted with the application. The Applicant shall file an application with the Director prior to the utilization of any grant made herein pursuant to the sale of alcoholic beverages. The Director’s review of the Alcohol Use Approval application shall follow the same procedures as required for an Administrative Clearance, except that the Director’s review shall be

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 40

limited to review of Alcohol Use Approval applications for substantial compliance with the conditions listed in Subsection 6.2.D below. 3.

D.

A request to exceed the maximum number of establishments permitted by this subsection 6.2.C shall require a conditional use permit pursuant to the Section 12.24.W. 1 or Section 12.24.X.2 of the Municipal Code. Neither a Specific Plan Exception nor a Specific Plan Amendment pursuant to Section 10 shall be required.

Conditions. The following conditions shall apply for all alcohol sales for off-site consumption. 1.

All regulations of the State of California prohibiting the sale of alcoholic beverages to minors shall be strictly enforced.

2.

Electronic age verification devices(s) may be used to determine the age of any individual attempting to purchase alcoholic beverages. If utilized, these devices shall be installed on the premises and maintained in an operational condition and all establishment employees shall be instructed in their use.

3.

Each employee of said establishment/permit who sells or serves alcoholic beverages shall enroll in, attend and complete a certified, ABCrecognized, training program for the responsible sale and service of alcohol. This training shall be scheduled for new employees within 30 days of the opening of establishment or within 30 days after the start of employment, whichever applies. This training shall be renewed each year by all employees who serve and /or sell alcoholic beverages. A record of the completion of this training program shall be maintained on the premises and shall be presented upon the request of the Director.

4.

A copy of these conditions shall be retained on the premises at all times and be immediately produced upon request of the peace officer, employee of the State Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control, or the City’s Planning Department.

5.

E.

Hours of sales. Alcoholic beverages may be sold seven days a week, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 2:00 a.m.

Revocation. If the conditions of Subsection 6.2 have not been complied with, the City may give notice to the Applicant/licensee, property owner, and any lessee of the real property affected to appear at a time and place fixed by the City and show cause why the use permitted by this Subsection should not be modified, discontinued, or revoked. These proceedings shall be in accordance with Section 12.24.Z of the Municipal Code.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan

41

SECTION 7: CHILD CARE FACILITIES Section 7.1.

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS. There are two Child Care Facilities existing within the Specific Plan Area as of the effective date of this Specific Plan. The existing Child Care Facilities are permitted to continue operation in accordance with applicable conditions set forth in this Specific Plan. In addition, expanded and new Child Care Facilities shall be permitted within the Specific Plan Area in accordance with the conditions set forth in this Section. The maximum permitted enrollment for Child Care Facilities within the Specific Plan Area shall not exceed 250 children at any one time.

Section 7.2.

CONDITIONS FOR CHILD CARE FACILITIES LOCATED WITHIN MAIN LOT.

A.

There shall be no overnight lodging of children.

B.

Operation of the Child Care Facility shall comply with the applicable regulations of the State of California, including without limitation all licensing requirements.

C.

The Child Care Facility shall provide an off-public-street pick-up/drop-off queuing area for the facility.

D.

Parking for new Child Care Facilities shall be provided as set forth in Section 8 of this Specific Plan.

Section 7.3.

CONDITIONS FOR CHILD CARE FACILITIES WITHIN ANCILLARY LOTS.

A.

A Child Care Facility within the Ancillary Lots may operate between the hours of 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., except for teacher preparation, building and grounds maintenance or special events intended for parent participation. There shall be no overnight lodging of children.

B.

Operation of the Child Care Facility shall comply with the applicable regulations of the State of California, including without limitation all licensing requirements.

C.

New Child Care Facilities shall provide an off-public-street pick-up/drop-off queuing area for the facility, except that white loading and unloading zones fronting ancillary lots shall continue to be used for such purposes.

D.

The use of a bell system, outdoor public address system, or similar acoustical devices, other than an emergency address system, is prohibited.

E.

Parking for New Child Care Facilities shall be provided as set forth in Section 8 of this Specific Plan.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 42

SECTION 8: PARKING REGULATIONS Section 8.1.

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS.

A.

Parking for Projects which are subject to this Specific Plan shall be provided in accordance with the requirements of this Section.

B.

Prior to the issuance of the first Administrative Clearance Review approval for the first Project developed under this Specific Plan, the Specific Plan Area property owner shall provide a table summarizing the existing parking supply for the Specific Plan Area. With each Administrative Clearance submittal, the Applicant shall provide a table summarizing the existing parking and any changes in parking required pursuant to this Section and proposed by the Project.

Section 8.2.

PARKING REQUIREMENTS

Automobile parking requirements for the following uses shall be as follows: A.

Stage. 1.0 parking spaces for each 1,000 square feet of Floor Area shall be provided.

B.

Production Office. 3.0 parking spaces for each 1,000 square feet of Floor Area shall be provided.

C.

Support. 1.0 spaces for each 1,000 square feet of Floor Area shall be provided.

D.

Office. 3.0 parking spaces for each 1,000 square feet of Floor Area shall be provided.

E.

Retail. Within the Main Lot, no parking spaces shall be required. Within the Ancillary Lots, 4.0 parking spaces for each 1,000 square feet of Floor Area shall be provided.

F.

Non-Occupiable structures, such as Sets/Facades and kiosks and parking/entry facilities, such as guard shacks. No parking space shall be required.

G.

Child Care Facilities. Within the Main Lot, no parking spaces shall be provided. Within the Ancillary Lots, 1.0 spaces for each 1,000 square feet of Floor Area shall be provided.

H.

For uses not listed above, parking space requirements shall be as set forth in Section 12.2 LA.4 of the Municipal Code.

Section 8.3. A.

MODIFICATIONS TO MINIMUM PARKING REQUIRED. The parking requirements listed in Subsection 8.2 of this Section may be modified for reduced or shared parking between two or more uses within the Specific Plan Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 43

area if the Director determines that a lower total number of parking spaces would provide adequate parking for these uses. A reduced/shared parking plan shall not be required for special events or temporary uses, which may utilize shared parking with other uses as needed on a temporary basis. An application for and consideration of a reduced/shared parking plan shall be processed pursuant to the following requirements: 1.

2.

Contents of Reduced/Shared Parking Plan. The reduced/shared parking plan shall contain the following information: i.

An analysis of parking demand. This analysis shall be conducted by a registered traffic engineer on an hourly basis, from 6:00 a.m. to 12:00 a.m., on a weekday and a weekend day or by other means acceptable to the Director;

n.

A description of the portion of the Specific Plan Area(s) or facilities subject to the reduced/shared parking plan;

in.

A description of the uses, hours of operation, parking requirements, and allocation of parking spaces which demonstrates that adequate parking for each use will be available, taking into account their hours of operation; and

iv.

A description of the characteristics of the affected uses and/or special programs which will reduce the need for the required number of parking spaces, which may include the availability of alternative transportation modes.

Review. The reduced/shared parking plan application shall be deemed complete within ten days of submittal unless the Director advises the Applicant in writing that the application is considered incomplete and the specific reasons therefore. Within 30 calendar days of receipt of a complete application for a reduced/shared parking plan, the Director shall approve the reduced/shared parking plan application or indicate how the proposed reduced/shared parking plan would not provide adequate parking. This time period may be extended by the mutual consent of the Applicant and Director. If the Director does not act within such 30-day period, the reduced/shared parking plan application shall be deemed approved. The decision of the Director shall be final and not appealable. The Director shall grant a reduced/shared parking plan request if he/she determines that: i.

The peak hours of operations are different or other operational characteristics warrant such a reduction: and

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 44

11.

Section 8.4.

The joint use or shared parking shall not create a negative parking impact on the surrounding City streets.

LOCATION OF PARKING.

A.

Parking for Projects required hereunder may be located at any location within the Specific Plan Area, or outside the boundaries of the Specific Plan Area upon submittal of an off-site parking agreement or covenant satisfactory to the Director. Such of'f-site parking agreement or covenant shall be provided to the Director for review when a Project seeks to rely on off-site parking outside the boundaries of the Specific Plan Area.

B.

Parking within the Specific Plan Area which is displaced by temporary production filming and related activities may be provided on-site by such measures as tandem or valet (see Section 8.5) or on a site outside the boundaries of the Specific Plan Area. If such relocated parking is outside the boundaries of the Specific Plan Area and further than 750’ from the Specific Plan Area, a shuttle or similar means of transportation shall be provided to transport individuals between the temporary relocated parking site and the Specific Plan Area.

Section 8.5.

TANDEM AND VALET PARKING.

Vehicles may be parked in tandem or by valet, provided that attendants to move vehicles are available at the times the parking area using tandem or valet parking is open for use. If the attendant requirement is met, each tandem or valet stall shall constitute the number of parking spaces equivalent to the number of cars it can accommodate. Section 8.6. A.

PARKING FOR EXISTING USES/FACILITIES. Any Existing Uses/Facilities may be continuously maintained with parking as provided as of the effective date of this Specific Plan with no change in parking requirements. 1.

Alterations or Modifications. Such Existing Uses/Facilities shall not be required to provide additional parking in connection with alternations or modifications to such uses, buildings or structures provided that such alterations or modifications do not increase the Floor Area by greater than 10 percent or 1,000 square feet, whichever is less. In the event that the alteration or modification increases the Floor Area by greater than 10 percent or 1,000 square feet, additional parking for the increased Floor Area shall be provided as required by this Specific Plan.

2.

Damage or Destruction. In the event of any damage or destruction to and Existing Use/Facility such Existing IJses/Facility may be rebuilt to the Floor Area existing as of the effective date of this Specific Plan without

Paramount. Pictures Specific Plan 45

providing any additional parking in excess of that provided by such uses or buildings as of the effective date of this Specific Plan. Section 8.7.

CREDIT FOR PARKING PROVIDED. In the event that a use or building is demolished, removed, or repurposed, the amount of parking that was provided for such use or building shall be credited and considered surplus parking. Such surplus parking may be allocated to satisfy the parking requirements for new uses or buildings as developed in accordance with this Specific Plan.

SECTION 9: SIGNAGE REGULATIONS Section 9.1.

The Paramount Pictures Sign Regulations are hereby incorporated into the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan as Section 9 thereof.

Section 9.2.

PURPOSES

These Sign Regulations are intended to:

Section 9.3.

A.

Support and enhance the vitality of the Hollywood entertainment industry;

B.

Reinforce and enhance the studio entertainment character of the Specific Plan area;

C,

Enable the regulation of Signs in order to: 1.

Ensure that new Signs are responsive to and integrated with the aesthetic character of the structures on which they are located, and are positioned in a manner that is compatible both architecturally and relative to other signage within the Specific Plan area;

2.

Encourage creative, well-designed Signs that area part of an integrated development that contribute in a positive way to the visual environment in the Specific Plan area and Hollywood;

3.

Minimize potential traffic hazards and protect public safety;

4.

Allow unique and vibrant signage that incorporate new technologies and will enhance the Specific Plan area as a world class entertainment studio.

Application of regulations

These Sign Regulations are in addition to those set forth in the planning and zoning provisions of the Los Angeles Municipal Code (Code). Wherever the regulations in these Sign Regulations contain provisions that establish regulations for Sign types, Sign height, Sign Area, Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 46

number of Signs, Sign dimensions. Sign content or other time, place or manner regulations that are different from, more restrictive than or more permissive than the Code would allow, these Sign Regulations shall prevail. Section 9.4.

DEFINITIONS

Whenever the following terms are used in the regulations herein, they shall be construed as defined in this Section. Words and phrases not defined here shall be construed as defined in Sections 12.03 and Article 4.4 of the Code. AERIAL VIEW SIGN: A Sign that is applied or placed upon the roof surface, approximately parallel with the roof plane, intended to be viewed from the sky. ARCHITECTURAL LEDGE SIGN: A Sign with individual channel letters, numbers and/or a pre-fabricated image, attached to a horizontal projection forming a narrow shelf on a wall or architectural projection. AWNING SIGN: A Sign displayed on a canopy that projects over a deck, door or window' of a building.

BANNER SIGN: A Sign that is generally constructed of fabric, canvas, metal or similar material and that is attached to a light fixture, pole, building or structure. BILLBOARD: A Sign on one or more poles or columns that: 1.

is four feet or greater in height as measured from the natural or finished grade, whichever is higher, to the bottom of the Sign; and

2.

is structurally separate from an existing building or other improvement on a lot; and/or

3.

is supported by an independent footing inside an existing building or other improvement on a lot extending through the roof of the supporting structure; and/or

4.

is supporting a Sign panel that is attached to the pole(s), post(s), or column(s) and that may be cantilevered over a building or structure on the lot.

BUILDING FRONTAGE: The projection of the exterior building walls upon the street used for street frontage. CAN SIGN: A Sign whose text, logos and/or symbols are placed on the face of an enclosed cabinet. CAPTIVE BALLOON SIGN: An object inflated with hot air or lighter-than-air gas that is tethered to the ground or a structure. Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 47

CHANNEL LETTER SIGN: A. Sign consisting of multi-dimensional, individually cut letters, numbers or figures, illuminated or un-illuminated, which are affixed to a building or structure. DIGITAL DISPLAY: A Sign face, building face, and/or any building or structural component that displays still images, scrolling images, moving images, or flashing images, including video and animation, through the use of grid lights, cathode ray projections, light emitting diode displays, plasma screens, liquid crystal displays, fiber optics, or other electronic media or technology that is either independent of or attached to, integrated into, or projected onto a building or structural component, and that may be changed remotely through electronic means. DIRECTOR: The Director of City Planning, or his or her successor or designee. HANGING SIGN: A type of Sign with individual channel letters and/or a pre-fabricated image that is suspended from a horizontal architectural ledge or projection, or from the ceiling of an architectural recess. INTERIOR SIGN: Any Sign that is: (a) within an interior courtyard, interior concourse or interior plaza of a building that is not intended to be visible in any way from the street, public right-of-way, or publicly accessible plaza adjacent to a public right-of-way or (b) immediately adjacent to a building on the premises and intended to be viewed primarily from grade by pedestrians within the Specific Plan area.

MARQUEE SIGN: A Sign that is located on a marquee or a permanent roof structure attached to and supported by a building. MONUMENT SIGN: A freestanding Sign that is erected directly upon the existing or artificially created grade, or that is raised no more than 12 inches from the existing or artificially created grade to the bottom of the Sign, and that has a horizontal dimension equal to or greater than its vertical dimension. MURAL SIGN: A Sign that is painted on or applied to and made integral with a wall. OFF-SITE SIGN: A Sign that displays any message directing attention to a business, product, service, profession, commodity, activity, event, person, institution or any other commercial message, which is generally conducted, sold, manufactured, produced, offered or occurs elsewhere than on the premises where the Sign is located. For purposes of these Sign Regulations, the premises shall include all properties within the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan area. ON-SITE SIGN: A Sign that is other than an Off-site Sign. PILLAR SIGN: A freestanding Sign that is mounted directly on the ground, consisting of rectangular Sign faces or a sculptural themed shape, with a vertical dimension equal to or greater than the horizontal dimension. POLE SIGN: A freestanding Sign that is erected or affixed to one or more poles or posts and that does not meet the requirements of a Monument Sign. Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 48

PROJECTED IMAGE SIGN: An image projected on the face of a delineated wall or screen from a distant electronic device, such that the image does not originate from the plane of the wall. PROJECTING SIGN: A Sign, other than a Wall Sign, that is attached to a building and projects outward from the building with one or more Sign faces approximately perpendicular to the face of the building. ' ROOF SIGN: A Sign erected upon a roof of a building. SANDWICH BOARD SIGN: A portable Sign consisting of two Sign faces that connect at the top and extend outward at the bottom of the Sign. SCROLLING DIGITAL DISPLAY: A type of Digital Display that contains a message composed only of individual letters on a neutral field. SIGN: Any whole or part of a display board, wall, screen or object, used to announce, declare, demonstrate, display or otherwise present a message and attract the attention of the public. SIGN AREA: An area circumscribed by the smallest geometric shape created with a maximum of eight straight lines, which will enclose all words, letters, figures, symbols, designs and pictures, together with all framing. Background material, colored or illuminated areas and attention-attracting devices, forming an integral part of an individual message except that: Wall Signs having no discernible boundary shall have the areas between letters, words intended to be read together and any device intended to draw attention to the Sign message included in any computation of surface area. 2.

For spherical, cylindrical or other three-dimensional Signs the area of the Sign shall be computed from the smallest two-dimensional geometrical shape or shapes, which will best approximate the greatest actual surface area visible from any one direction.

SUPERGRAPHIC SIGN: A Sign printed on vinyl, mesh or other material with or without written text, supported and attached to a wall by an adhesive and/or by using stranded cable and

eyebolts and/or other materials or methods, and which does not comply with the following provisions of the Code: Sections 14.4.10; 14.4.16; 14.4.17; 14.4.18; and/or 14.4.20. TEMPORARY CONSTRUCTION WALL: A wooden fence or wooden barrier that provides protection for pedestrians and is erected and maintained on the perimeter of a construction or demolition site pursuant to Sections 3303 and 3306 of the California Building Code. TEMPORARY SIGN: A Sign that is to be maintained for a limited duration, not to exceed 30 days, including paper Signs and other Signs that are not permanently affixed to the ground or building.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 49

VACANT PROPERTY: A lot that does not contain an occupied building or economic use (economic use includes surface parking lots). WALL SIGN: Any Sign attached to, painted on or erected against the wall of a building or structure, with the exposed face of the Sign in a plane approximately passsssssssssrallel to the plane of the wall. WINDOW SIGN: Any Sign, except for a Supergraphic Sign, that is attached to, affixed to, leaning against, or otherwise placed within six feet of a window or door in a manner so that the Sign is visible from outside the building. Section 9.5.

PROCEDURAL REQUIREMENTS

A. Building Permits. The Department of Building and Safety (LADBS) shall not issue a permit for a Sign, a Sign structure, Sign illumination, or alteration of an existing Sign unless the Sign complies with: (1) the regulations set forth herein as determined by the Director and (2) relevant, requirements of the Code. B. Director Sign Off Required. LADBS shall require a Director sign off on the sign permit application. The Director shall Sign off on the permit application if it complies with all the applicable Sign requirements of the regulations herein and the Code. C. Request for Adjustments from Regulations. The Director shall have the authority to grant minor adjustments or modifications to the Standards for Specific Types of Signs related to the individual Sign Area or the individual Sign dimensions. D. Request for Exceptions from Regulations. The City Planning Commission shall have initial decision-making authority for granting other exceptions from the provisions of the regulations herein. An applicant requesting an exception from the provisions of the regulations herein shall utilize the procedures for a Specific Plan Exception set forth in Section 11.5.7 F of the Code. In granting an exception, the City Planning Commission shall make all of the following findings, in lieu of the findings set forth in Section 11.5.7. F.2 of the Code: " " 1.

Strict compliance would result in practical difficulty or unnecessary hardship inconsistent with the purposes of the zoning restrictions, due to unique physical or topographic circumstances or conditions of design;

2.

Strict compliance would deprive the applicant of privileges enjoyed by owners of similarly zoned property; and

3.

An exception would not constitute a grant of special privilege. In addition to the limitations imposed by Section 11.5.7 of the Code, no exception may be granted from Section 6.A below, or from the regulations governing Off-site Signs herein.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 50

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

Section 9.6.

A. General Requirements of the Code. Unless specified herein to the contrary, the

general Sign requirements set forth in the Code shall apply to these Sign Regulations for construction permits, plans, design and construction, materials, street address numbers, identification, maintenance, prohibited locations, and Sign illumination. Interior Signs shall be exempt from these sign regulations so long as they remain within the definition of Interior Signs. B. Prohibited Signs. The following Signs shall be prohibited in the specific Sub-districts as set forth below, except for Signs permitted as Interior Signs: Aerial View Signs in all Sub-districts except Sub-districts 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5.

2

Billboards in all Sub-districts except Sub-districts 7 and 8.

3.

Can Signs in all Sub-districts.

4.

Captive Balloon Signs in all Sub-districts.

5.

Digital Display Signs in all Sub-districts.

6.

Mural Signs in Sub-districts 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11.

7.

Off-site Signs in all Sub-districts except Sub-districts 7 and 8.

8.

Projected Image Signs in all Sub-districts.

9.

Roof Signs in all Sub-districts.

10.

Sandwich Board Signs in all Sub-districts.

11.

Scrolling Digital Displays in all Sub-districts.

12.

Supergraphic Signs in all Sub-districts.

13.

Signs for which a permit is required on Vacant Property in all Sub­ districts. •

14.

Signs covering exterior doors and windows (whether operable or inoperable), rescue windows or other openings that serve habitable floor area, except for Identification Signs and Window Signs permitted pursuant to the regulations herein.

15.

Any Sign not specifically authorized by the regulations herein or the Code.

.



.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 51

C. Sign Sub-Districts. The Paramount Pictures Specific Plan is divided into Sign Sub­ districts, as shown in Exhibit D. The purpose of the Sign Sub-districts is to address the relationship and compatibility between signage and the uses surrounding each Sub­ district. Main Lot - Gower tdge. 2.

Main Lot - Melrose Edge.

3.

Main Lot - Van Ness Edge.

4.

Main Lot - Northern Edge.

5.

Main Lot - Internal.

6.

Lemon Grove Lot.

7.

South Bronson Lot.

8.

Windsor Lot.

9.

Camerford Lot.

10.

Waring Lot. Gregor)' Lot.

D. Vertical Sign Zones. The Specific Plan area is also divided into two Vertical Sign Zones within the Main Lot (Sign Sub-districts 1-5). The purpose of the Vertical Sign Zones is to address different Sign viewing distances. The Vertical Sign. Zones are as follows: 1.

Level 1. This Vertical Sign Zone is applicable to all Signs located from 0 to 60 feet above grade.

2.

Level 2. This Vertical Sign Zone is applicable to all Signs located above 60 feet from grade.

E. Permitted Signs. Signs defined in Section 4 above, which are not defined or otherwise allowed by the Code, shall be permitted within the Specific Plan provided such Signs comply with the regulations set forth herein. F. Permitted Number of Signs, Sign Area, Sign Type, and Sign Height. The regulations herein supersede Article 4.4 of the Code as it pertains to maximum permitted number of Signs, Sign Area, Sign type and Sign height. Signs may only be placed in the Sub­ districts as set forth below, and as further limited by the requirements for specific Sign types as set forth in Section 7 below.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 52

1.

Maximum Permitted Sign Area (By Sub-district), The maximum permitted combined Sign Area in a Sub-district for all Signs shall be as set forth in Table No. 1 below. All Signs in a Sub-district shall be included in the calculation of maximum permitted combined Sign Area except for the following Signs: a.

Aerial View Signs.

b.

Interior Signs.

c.

Mural Signs, provided that the square footage of the components composed of letters or logos shall be included in the calculation of total Sign Area.

d.

Temporary Signs.

Table No. 1 - Maximum Sign Area Sign Sub-District 1. Main Lot - Gower 2. Main Lot - Melrose 3. Main Lot - Van Ness 4. Main Lot - Northern Edge 5. Main Lot - Internal 6. Lemon Grove Lot 7. South Bronson Lot 8. Windsor Lot 9. Camerford Lot 10. Waring Lot 1L Gregory Lot 2.

Maximum Total Sign Area 1,000 square feet 12,000 square feet 800 square feet 400 square feet 15,000 square feet 200 square feet 2,800 square feet 2,500 square feet 600 square feet 100 square feet _ 1,000 square feet

Permitted Sign Types by Vertical Sign Zone on the Main Lot (Sign Sub-districts 1-5). Notwithstanding any provision in the Code to the contrary, the following Signs in Table No. 2 are the only Sign types permitted within Sub-districts 1-5.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 53

Table No. 2 - Permitted Sign Types

Sign Sub­ District

Vertical Sign Zone 1 (O’-60’)

Vertical Sign Zone 2 (+60’)

1. Main LotGower

Aerial View, Architectural Ledge, Awning, Banner, Channel Letter, Hanging, Interior, Marquee, Monument, Mural, Pillar, Pole, Projecting, Temporary, Wall, Window

Aerial View, Channel Letter, Wall, Interior, Mural and Temporary

2. Main LotMelrose

Aerial View, Architectural Ledge, Awning, Banner, Channel Letter, Hanging, Interior, Marquee, Monument, Mural, Pillar, Pole, Projecting, Temporary', Wall, Window Aerial View, Architectural Ledge, Awning, Banner, Channel Letter, Hanging, Interior, Marquee, Monument, Mural, Pillar, Pole, Projecting, Temporary, Wall,

Aerial View, Channel Letter, Projecting, Wall, Interior, Mural and Temporary

3. Main Lot Van Ness

Aerial View, Channel Letter, Projecting, Wail, Interior, Mural and Temporary7

4. Main Lot Northern Edge

Aerial View, Architectural Ledge, Channel Letter, Interior, Mural, Pillar, Pole, Projecting, Temporary, Wall, Window

5. Main Lot Internal

Aerial View, Architectural Ledge, Aerial View, Channel Letter, Awning, Banner, Channel Letter, Projecting, Wall, Interior, Hanging, Interior, Marquee, Mural, and Temporary Monument, Mural, Pillar, Pole, Projecting, Temporary, Wall, Window____________________ _

Aerial View, Channel Letter, Projecting, Wall, Interior and Temporary7

G. Existing Signs. Signs and/or Sign support structures that are existing on the effective date of these regulations shall be permitted to continue and shall not be required to comply with these regulations, but shall comply with the Code related to the construction, installation and maintenance of Sign structures. Signs that are existing on the effective date of these regulations shall count toward the maximum sign area permitted by this Specific Plan. H. Replacement of Existing Off-site Signs. Each existing Off-site Sign may be replaced. Sub-district 7 has one existing, double-sided Off-site Billboard Sign of 600 total square feet. Sub-district 8 has one existing, double-sided Off-site Billboard Sign of 600 total square feet. These existing Off-site Billboard Signs may be replaced with new Off-site

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 54

Signs within Sub-districts 7 and/or 8, with any Sign type permitted in that Sub-district,

up to a total of 1200 square feet. I.

Backs of Signs. All Signs which are located within 500 feet of the Specific Plan boundary and which are oriented so as to expose the unimproved back of the Sign toward a location outside of the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan shall be improved or screened with landscaping or other aesthetic treatment(s) to buffer the view of the back of the Sign.

J.

Illumination. Except for Temporary Signs, which may not be illuminated, all Signs within the Specific Plan may be illuminated by either internal or external means. The illumination regulations set forth in the Code, including but not limited to Section 93.0117, shall apply. Methods of signage illumination may include electric lamps, such as neon tubes; fiber optics; incandescent lamps; LED; LCD: cathode ray tubes exposed directly to view; shielded spot lights and wall wash fixtures.

K. Visual Maintenance. All Signs shall be maintained to meet the following criteria at all times: The building and ground area around the Signs shall be properly maintained. All unused mounting structures, hardware, and wall perforation from any abandoned Sign shall be removed and building surfaces shall be restored to their original condition. 2.

All Signage copy shall be properly maintained and kept free from damage and other unsightly conditions, including graffiti.

3.

All Sign structures shall be kept in good repair and maintained in a safe and sound condition and in conformance with all applicable codes.

4.

Razor wire, barbed wire, concertina wire, or other banders preventing unauthorized access to any Sign, if any, shall be hidden from, public view.

5.

The signage copy must be repaired or replaced immediately upon tearing, ripping, or peeling, or when marred or damaged by graffiti.

6.

No access platform, ladder, or other service appurtenance, visible from the sidewalk, street, or public right-of-way, shall be installed or attached to any Sign structure.

7.

Existing Signs that are no longer serving the current tenants, including support structures, shall be removed and the building fapades originally covered by the Signs shall be repaired/resurfaced with materials and colors that are compatible with the facades.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 55

L. Signs Within More Than One Vertical Sign Zone. Signs may be located in more than

one Vertical Sign Zone, provided that the requirements contained herein are met for each portion of the Sign contained in each of the Vertical Sign Zones. M. Hazard Review. Signs that adhere to the regulations outlined herein shall be exempted from the Hazard Determination review procedures in Section 14.4.5 of the Code. All Signs shall continue to be subject to Caltrans approval, where applicable. N. Alterations, Repairs or Rehabilitation. Every existing Sign or Sign structure shall be allowed to continue and be altered, repaired or maintained. The alternation, repair or rehabilitation of an existing Sign or Sign structure shall not increase the Sign Area or height or materially change the location or orientation of the Sign. O. Materials. The materials, construction, application, location and installation of any Sign shall be in conformance with the Los Angeles Building Code and the Los Angeles Fire Code. Section 9.7.

STANDARDS FOR SPECIFIC TYPES OF SIGNS.

A. Aerial View Signs. Aerial View Signs shall be permitted in Sub-district 1,2, 3, 4 and 5. Aerial View Signs may not be viewable from any public right of way and may not be illuminated. Aerial View Signs shall not count toward the total Sign Area limitations set forth in Table No. 1 herein. B. Architectural Ledge Signs. 1.

2.

General. a.

Architectural Ledge Signs shall be limited to Identification and Information Signs.

b.

Individual letters, numbers or logos no more than 24” in height may stand atop or be suspended from a ledge.

c.

Solid panels and Can Signs are not permitted as Architectural Ledge Signs.

d.

The Sign shall be oriented so that the message, graphic, or symbol on the Sign is approximately parallel with the fapade of the structure to which the Sign is attached.

Location. a.

An Architectural Ledge Sign shall only be located over a pedestrian or vehicle entranceway or window on the ground floor of a building; and

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 56

b.

3.

An Architectural Ledge Sign may be located on an architectural ledge, canopy or overhang provided all structural code requirements are met.

Dimensions. a.

Height. The bottom of the ledge on which an Architectural Ledge Sign is located shall be at least eight feet above the natural or finished grade as measured vertically. The bottommost portion of a Sign suspended from an architectural ledge shall be at least eight feet above the natural or finished grade as measured vertically.

b.

Length. A ledge that is constructed for the purpose of supporting an Architectural Ledge Sign may not exceed 15 feet in length as measured horizontally.

c.

Suspension. Supports that are constructed for the purpose of supporting an Architectural Ledge Sign may not exceed 24 inches in height as measured vertically from the top of the letter or symbol to the bottom of the supporting architectural appurtenance, nor may those supports exceed eight inches in width as measured horizontally.

C. Awning Signs. Awning Signs shall comply with Section 14.4.19 of the Code and shall be limited to Identification Signs. D. Banner Signs. Banners shall be permitted in Sub-districts 1,2, 3 and 5 subject to the following restrictions.

Maximum Number/Area of Signs. There shall be a maximum of two double-sided Signs per light fixture or pole. 2.

Location. Banner Signs shall be located at and between entrances to the Main Lot or along internal streets or paseos.

3.

Sign Area. The Sign Area for an individual Banner Sign shall not exceed 24 square feet per face.

E. Channel Letter Signs.

Maximum Number of Signs. Channel Letter Signs shall be regulated by the limitations on Identification and Information Signs.

2.

Sign Area. The Sign Area for an individual Channel Letter Signs shall be regulated by the limitations on Identification and Information Signs.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 57

F. Hanging Signs. General. a.

A Hanging Sign shall consist of individual letters or numbers no taller than 24 inches, or an icon no taller than 24 inches. Such letters, numbers, or Logo shall be suspended from a ledge.

b.

Solid panels are not permitted as Hanging Signs.

c.

Hanging Signs shall be oriented so that the message, graphic, or symbol on the Sign is approximately parallel with the facade of the structure to which the Sign is affixed.

d.

No message, graphic or symbol shall be located on that portion of . a Hanging Sign that is perpendicular to the facade of the structure to which the Sign is affixed.

2.

Dimensions, The lowest portion of a suspended Hanging Sign shall be at least eight feet above the natural or finished grade as measured vertically.

3.

Projection. A ledge designed to support a Hanging Sign may project a maximum of three feet from the face of the building where the Sign is located.

G. Interior Signs. General. a.

Interior Signs may be On-Site or Off-site Signs.

b.

Notwithstanding the limitations established in these regulations, Interior Signs may be any type of Sign installation.

2.

Maximum Number of Signs. There is no limitation on the number of Interior Signs permitted in the Specific Plan.

3.

Sign Area. There is no limitation on the Sign Area for an individual Interior Sign and no limitation on the total Sign Area for all Interior Signs. Interior Signs shall not count toward the total Sign Area limitations set forth in Table No. 1 herein.

H. Marquee Signs. Signs located on any marquee shall be affixed to and shall not extend above or below the structure comprising the marquee. Cloth or banner Signs or droproll curtains may be suspended below' the exterior of the marquee and may extend within seven feet and six inches of the natural or finished grade as measured vertically.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 58

I.

J.

Monument Signs. 1.

General. Monument Signs shall be limited to On-Site Signs.

2.

Maximum Number of Signs. A maximum of one Monument Sign per face of a building and a maximum of four Monument Signs per building are permitted.

3.

Sign Area. Monument Signs shall have a horizontal dimension equal to or greater than their vertical dimension.

4.

Sign Height. The bottom of Monument Signs shall be raised no more than 12 inches above finished grade and the top of the Monument Sign shall be no more than eight feet in height above grade.

Mural Signs. Mural Signs shall be permitted in Sub-districts 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 notwithstanding Section 14.4.4.B.10 of the Code. Mural Signs may include lettering and a logo identifying the name of a business or building within the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan area provided that the square footage of such components of the Mural Sign comprised of lettering or logo shall be included in the calculation of the total Sign Area limitations set forth in Table No. 1 herein.

K. Pillar Signs. Maximum Number of Signs. There is no limitation on the number of Pillar Signs permitted. 2.

3.

Sign Area. Pillar Signs shall have a horizontal dimension that does not exceed 25 percent of the length of the vertical dimension. a.

In Sub-districts 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, the Sign Area for an individual Pillar Sign shall not exceed 300 square feet.

b.

In Sub-districts 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11, the Sign Area for an individual Pillar Sign shall not exceed 100 square feet.

Location. a.

4.

Pillar Signs shall be set back at least 10 feet from the intersection of a driveway and the public right-of-way and shall not interfere with or present a hazard to pedestrian or vehicular traffic.

Landscaping Requirements. Landscaping shall be provided at the base of the supporting structure equal to twice the area of the largest face of the Pillar Sign.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 59

L. Pole Signs. 1.

Maximum Number of Signs. There is no limitation on the number of Pole Signs permitted. '

2.

Sign Area. The Sign Area for an individual Pole Sign shall be limited to 200 square feet, with no limitation on the total Sign Area for all Pole Signs.

M. Projecting Signs. 1.

General. a.

No text, message or logo shall be allowed on that portion of a Projecting Sign that is parallel to the Face of the Building.

2.

Maximum Number of Signs. There is no limitation on the number of Projecting Signs permitted.

3.

Extension Above The Roof. A Projecting Sign may extend above the top of the wall or roof parapet of a building face but the extension shall not exceed 30 percent of the total vertical height of the projecting Sign. In no event shall a Projecting Sign extend higher than 150 feet from grade.

4.

Projection From The Building Face. The planes of Projecting Sign faces, which are located within the same plane of a single building, shall be parallel to one another unless approved as a design element of a Project Permit Compliance review.

5.

Sign Height a.

A Projecting Sign shall not be located lower than eight feet above sidewalk grade nearest the Sign.

b.

A Projecting Sign shall not exceed 80 feet in height as measured vertically from the bottom of the Sign to the top of the Sign.

c.

The width of the Sign face of a Projecting Sign that is perpendicular to the building shall not exceed 20 percent of the overall height of the Sign and in no event shall exceed six feet. This measurement does not include the dimensions of the Sign’s supporting structure.

d.

No portion of a Projecting Sign that is parallel to the face of the building shall exceed two feet in width.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 60

6.

Location. a.

A Projecting Sign shall generally align with major building elements such as cornices, string courses, window banding, or vertical changes in material or texture.

N. Temporary Signs. General. Unless otherwise specified herein, a Temporary Sign shall comply with Section 14.4.16 of the Municipal Code. 2.

Maximum Number of Signs. There is no limitation on the number of Temporary Signs permitted.

3.

Sign Area. The Sign Area for an individual Temporary Sign shall not exceed 125 square feet. Temporary Signs shall not count toward the total Sign Area limitations set forth in Table No. 1 herein.

O. Temporary Signs on Temporary Construction Walls. Temporary Signs on Temporary Construction Walls shall comply with Sections 14.4.17.A-E of the Code. Temporary Signs on Temporary Construction Walls may be On-Site or Off-site Signs. P. Wall Signs. 1.

General. Wall Signs shall be regulated by the provisions in this Subsection 9.7.P.

2.

Sign Area. Wall Signs shall not exceed 600 square feet.

Q. Window Signs. General. Window' Signs shall be limited On-site Signs. 2.

Maximum Number of Signs. There is no limitation on the number of Window Signs permitted.

3.

Sign Area. a.

The Sign Area of Window Signs shall be regulated by Sub-district. (1)

In Sub-districts 1,2, 3, 4, and 5, the Sign Area for an individual Window Sign shall not exceed 300 square feet.

(2)

In Sub-districts 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11, the Sign Area for an individual Window Sign shall not exceed 100 square feet.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 61

b.

Section 9.8.

Window Signs located on or within six feet of the window plane, painted or attached, shall not exceed fifteen percent of the glassed area of the window in which the Window Sign is placed.

SEVERABILITY

If any provision of these Regulations or their application to any person or circumstance is held to be unconstitutional or otherwise invalid by any court of competent jurisdiction, the invalidity shall not affect other provisions, clauses or applications of said Regulations, which can be implemented without the invalid provision, clause or application, and to this end, the provisions and clauses of these Regulations are declared to be severable.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 62

SECTION 10: IMPLEMENTATION Section 10.1. ADMINISTRATIVE CLEARANCE A.

Administrative Clearance. Except as set forth in Section 10.1 ,C, no grading permit, foundation permit, building permit, or use of land permit shall be issued for a Project located within the Specific Plan Area unless an Administrative Clearance has been issued pursuant to the procedures set forth in this Section. The provisions of this Section shall replace the Project Permit Compliance provisions of Section 11.5.7.C of the Municipal Code. 1.

Director’s Authority. The Director shall have the authority to review each Project for compliance with all applicable provisions of this Specific Plan, and if in compliance, to grant an Administrative Clearance.

2.

Procedures. The Director shall establish the appropriate forms and fees required for the Administrative Clearance application, which shall include a parking table as required in Sec. 8.1 B. The Administrative Clearance application shall be deemed complete within 14 days of submittal unless the Director advises the Applicant in writing that the application is considered incomplete and the specific reasons therefore. Within 30 days of receipt of a complete application, the Director shall either approve the Administrative Clearance application or indicate how the application is not in substantial compliance with this Specific Flan. If the Director does not act within such 30-day period, the Administrative Clearance application shall be deemed approved. This 30-day period may be extended by the mutual consent of the Director and the Applicant. The decision of the Director shall be final and not appealable. If the Director denies an application for an Administrative Clearance, the Director shall set forth the specific reasons for denial in a determination letter. Following a denial, the Applicant may file without prejudice at any time a new application, for an Administrative Clearance with a revised Project addressing the Director’s reasons for denial. Review of the new Administrative Clearance application shall be in accordance with this Section 10.1 .A.

3.

Ministerial Review. The Administrative Clearance shall be a ministerial review of the applicable provisions of this Specific Plan and determination of whether a Project complies with the applicable provisions of the Specific Plan.

4.

Building and Safety Review. The Department of Building and Safety shall issue no permit until it has verified compliance with the terms of

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 63

CPC-2011-2462-DA, Development Agreement between the City of Los Angeles and the Paramount Pictures Corporation. B.

Modification of Administrative Clearance. Once an Administrative Clearance has been approved for a Project, any subsequent proposed material modification to that Project and related Administrative Clearance shall require a review by the Director, who shall grant approval of the modification if he or she finds the modification complies with the Specific Plan. 1.

C.

Procedures. To materially modify an approved Project, an Applicant shall file an application pursuant to the application procedure set forth in Subsection 10. LA above. The application shall include a description of the proposed modification.

Exceptions. An Administrative Clearance, as provided by Subsections 10.1 .A and 10.l.B, shall not apply to: Demolition, so long as the demolition is consistent with Section 4 of this Specific Plan. 2.

Infrastructure.

3.

Interior remodeling, including the repair, replacement or modification of existing buildings or structures, or change of use of a building or land or relocation of existing uses, that do not increase the Floor Area of the existing building or structure by more than 10 percent but not to exceed 15,000 square feet.

4.

Exterior remodeling, so long as the exterior remodeling is consistent with

Section 4 of this Specific Plan. 5.

Production Activities.

6.

Sets/Pagades.

7.

Special Events.

8.

Temporary uses.

9.

Rehabilitation or reconstruction of an existing building or structure, notwithstanding Municipal Code Section 12.23.A.4, which was damaged or destroyed by fire, flood, wind, earthquake, or other disaster or the public enemy.

10.

Any demolition or construction for which a permit is required in order to comply with an order issued by the Department of Building and Safety to repair, replace, or demolish an unsafe or substandard condition.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 64

SECTION 11: NOTIFICATION The Applicant shall provide a ten-day notice to property owners adjacent to the ancillary lots prior to the start of construction of new structures (excluding interior modifications) on those lots.

SECTION 12: OTHER SPECIFIC PLAN PROCEDURES' The procedures for adjustments, exceptions, amendments and interpretations to this Specific Plan shall follow the procedures set forth in Section 11.5.7.E-H of the Los Angeles Municipal Code, respectively, except that (i) in all instances where the Area Planning Commission is referenced as the body with authority, the City Planning Commission, and not the Area Planning Commission, shall have the authority to act; and (ii) the time limitations for rendering decision shall be pursuant to the time limitations set forth in this Specific Plan.

SECTION 13: SEVERABILITY If any provision of this Specific Plan or its application to any person or circumstance is held to be unconstitutional or otherwise invalid by any court of competent jurisdiction, the invalidity shall not affect other Specific Plan provisions, clauses or applications which can be implemented without the invalid provision, clause or application, and to this end the provisions and clauses of this Specific Plan are declared to be severable.

Paramount Pictures Specific Plan 65

Appendix A: Trip Generation Factors From / To

Stage

Support

Production Office

Retail

Office Stage

1.00

0.75

0.80

0.45

0.19

Support

1 .33

1.00

1.07

0.60

0.26

Production Office Office

1.24

0.94

1.00

0.56

0.24

2.21

1.67

1.78

1.00

0.43

Retail

5.20

3.92

4.18

2.35

1.00

Numbers shown in this chart represent conversion factors for exchanging square footage from one land use to another, in order to maintain trip totals equivalent to, and not exceeding, those described in the EIR.

H13Tnnir RESOURCES PRESERVATION PLAN

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PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC RESOURCES PRESERVATION PLAN

TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Introduction A. Purpose and Goals 2, Executive Summary of Historic Resources Preservation Plan 3, Historic District Contributors 4. Overview of Historic Resources A. Administrative & Office B. Pre-Production & Studio Services C, Post-Production Facilities D, Stages E. Utility & Storage F, Actor Services G, Entry Gates & Entry Points H. Landscape/Open Space

E. Window Overview Wood Windows Metal Windows Skylights F. Building Entrances and Porches G, New Additions to Identified Historic Contributors H, Code Compliance I. Site Characteristics 6. Guidelines for Rehabilitation and Preservation of KCAL Building 7, Guidelines for Alterations to Contributors 8, Guidelines for New Construction within Historic Districts and on the Main Lot 9, Sources

5, Guidelines for Rehabilitation and Preservation of Contributors within the Historic Districts A. General Principles of Rehabilitation B, Character-Defining features C. Exterior Materials Exterior Cement Plaster (Stucco) Exterior Wood Siding Exterior Metal Siding Cast Stone and Cast Concrete Decorative Metals and Entry Gates Exterior Wood Details and Trim D, Historic Roofing Overview Clay Tile Asphalt Shingles Metal Roofing

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PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC RESOURCES PRESERVATION PLAN

1. INTRODUCTION

Paramount Pictures Corporation Is proposing the Paramount Pictures Master Plan (the "Project") that consists of improvements to Paramount Studios (the "Project Site") in the Hollywood Community of the City of Los Angeles. The Paramount Studios property is comprised of the main studio property of approximately 56 acres (the "Main Lot") and six surrounding properties of approximately 6 acres that provide additional parking to the studio (the "Ancillary Lots"). The Main Lot and Ancillary Lots comprise the Project Site, encompassing a total of approximately 62 acres. The Project involves the redevelopment of portions of the Project Site that primarily include surface parking and underutilized buildings with up to 1,385,700 square feet of net new studio-related uses, parking facilities, and new landscaped areas. These improvements would be Implemented through a Specific Plan that would guide development within the Project Site through the year 2038. levin & Associates, Architects in association with Rios dementi Hale Studios were retained to prepare a master plan for the Project. In

connection with this master plan. Historic Resources Group, historic preservation consultants, evaluated the potential historic resources on the Paramount Pictures property. This evaluation was documented in the Paramount Pictures Historic Assessment Technical Report dated August .2015. The Paramount Pictures Historic Assessment Technical Report identified two potential historic districts on the Paramount Pictures Main Lot:

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"S ~n a1? p,, ricturnc ^hn'tic ->nri ;>,? nfinl 'wv’,Y\» Htstoric 'r (crtU ctr/H < *.iw "Hisionr Districts"), Mi'' ,ii -nnunt Teturcs Main Lot is located m H >l|v*'c d nnri U g’>'i>-a!Iv bnun'A*’ hy Han Ness 5 •'rvv on tlm ?rvl, Melrose Avenue -in it? ou h, Gower Street m the west, and z, *c rcrerv on the nrrth. in addition In the ’’vr* >> 't-ntial hertonc districts, the Paramount Pi mt-s Hirtr, ir Assir^mcnt Technic?! Report idem Iji'1-’ ih? Kt Al. 'luildinf; on the Main Lot »«■ a individual historic resource outside o tire t«'i -H'MnfSrl IPstoric OKLrscts (Figures 1 and 2)

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Based on the evaluations and findings in the Paramount Pictures Historic Assessment Technical Report, Levin & Associates, Architects, has developed the Paramount Pictures Historic Resources Preservation Plan ("Historic Resources Preservation Plan" or "Preservation Plan") for the rehabilitation and preservation of Contributing buildings ("Contributor/s") within the Historic Districts and the 5515 Melrose Avenue (KCAL) building identified as a potential historic resource outside the Historic Districts, and for the construction of new structures on the Main Lot, This Historic Resources Preservation Plan applies to the exterior of Contributing buildings. Work to the interior of the Contributing and Non-Contributing buildings may be conducted without the review of a qualified historic preservation professional.

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PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC RESOURCES PRESERVATION PLAN

1A. PURPOSE AND GOALS The purpose of the Historic Resources Preservation Plan is to ensure that the rehabilitation and preservation of Contributors to the Historic Districts and the KCAL building, and the construction of new structures on the Main tot, is done in accordance with the Secretary of the Interior's Standards1 and that eligibility for designation of both Historic Districts and the identified individual resource is maintained following implementation,of the project. The entertainment industry is constantly evolving and integrating new technologies. The Historic Resources Preservation Plan is intended to allow the Contributors to continue to function as part of a productive, working studio by permitting the buildings to adapt to new technologies and media uses. The Preservation Plan addresses rehabilitation of and preservation of Historic District Contributors; and the construction of new structures on the Main Lot. The Historic Resources Preservation Plan will facilitate new uses in a manner appropriate to the Historic Districts, while maintaining productivity and use in the day-to-day operation of the studio.

Retain the character-defining features that contribute to the Historic Districts. Foster awareness of the studio as a historic resource. Establish context sensitivity for new construction on the Main lot. Permit the continued studio use of the Contributors by adapting to new technologies and media uses. The Historic Resources Preservation Plan should be read in the context of the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings.2 Reference material including publications and "Preservation Briefs" published by the National Park Service are available to provide additional information regarding the Secretary of the Interior's Guidelines. Conformance with the Historic Resources Preservation Plan shall be interpreted by a qualified historic preservation professional who meets the applicable Secretary of the Interior's professional standards.

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The overall goals of the Historic Resources Preservation Plan are; • Rehabilitate and maintain the identified Contributors to the RKO Studios and Paramount Pictures Historic Districts. 1 "Secretary of the interior's Standards and Guidelines: Professional Qualifi­ cations Standards," Secretary of the Interior's Standards and Guidelines for Archeology and Historic Preservation, Washington, D.C,: Department of the Interior, National Park Service, September 29,1983 and as amended prior to January 1, 2012. These requirements have been previously published in the Code of Federal Regulations, 36 CFR Part 61. fhttp://www.nps.gov/tps/5tandards.html (http://www.nps.gov/Mstory/lat3Maw/amh_5tnds_9.htm}

2 Weeks, Kay D. and Anne E. Grimmer. Secretary of the Interior's Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties with Guidelines for Preserving, Re­ habilitating, Restoring, and Reconstructing Historic Buildings, Washington, D.C, U.S. Department of the interior, National Park Service, 1995. [http://www.nps.gov/hlstory/Iocal-i3w/arch_stnds_8_2.htmr1tech}

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GUIDELINES FOR NEW CONSTRUCTION WITH IN AND IN THE MAIN LOT New construction should be designed to be contextual and sensitive as to not overshadow the contributing historic resources within and adjacent to Historic Districts.

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BUILDING COLOR DOCUMENTATION Color sampling and analysis was performed on five buildings total in both Historic Districts. The results yielded a historic paint palette that may be used for the historic districts.

SITE AND BUILDING ENTRIES Entries to the site and buildings can be accomplished in a contextual manner, by standardizing materials and railing design.

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EXTERIOR MATERIALS AND FINISHES Exterior materials and finishes should be properly maintained and replaced In-klnd. Repair work on all finishes should comply with the Secretary of the Interior's recommendations.

EXTERIOR LIGHTING Exterior historic lighting is to he carefully refurbished and new exterior lighting should be standardized for better studio aesthetic and maintenance. Energy conserving fixtures and bulbs should be utilized.

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ROOFING Most historic roofs have been replaced throughout their life on the lot. Roofing should continue to adapt as energy conserving materia! becomes available. Accent roofs of red day tile or asphalt shingles should remain, and red clay tile roofs should be excluded in new construction to differentiate from the Contributor.

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PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC RESOURCES PRESERVATION PLAN

3. HISTORIC DISTRICT CONTRIBUTORS The following buildings, structures, and sites have beers identified in the Paramount Pictures Historic Assessment Technical Report to be Contributors to the RKO Studios Historic District and the Paramount Pictures Historic District and are anticipated to be retained in the Paramount Pictures Master Plan. The criteria for visual characteristics of historic districts are defined by the National Park Service as;

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Stage 29

Stage 25

Stage 30

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8-212 Powerhouse #1

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8-213 Property Building

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8-214 Cabinet Shop

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B-217 Redstone Building

Administrative & Office

Period of significance 1921 -1967

8-221 Dressing Room

Actor Services

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8-222 Sturges

Post Production Facilities

B-101 Chevalier

Administrative & Office

B-248 Sherry Lansing Theater

Post-Production Facilities

B-1G3 Hope

Administrative & Office

8-256 Lubtech

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B-105 Lasky

Administrative & Office

B-257 Marathon Mill

Pre-Production & Studio Services

8-106 Lucy Bungalow

Actor Services

0-260 Schuiberg

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B-107 Bow

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B-261 Demille

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8-108 Gower Mill South

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8-276 Powerhouse #2

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B-109 Gower Mill North

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B 298 Assembly Stage

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8-142 Wilder

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B-352 Production Park

Landscape/Open Space

S-146 Ball

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Bronson Gate

Entry Gates & Entry Points

B-147 Powerhouse U4

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B-157 Water Tower

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B-160 Swanson

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B-166 Mae West

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Stage is

8-167 W.C. Fields

Post-Production Facilities

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Stage 16

B-180 Dressing Rooms

Actor Services

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Stage 17

8-184 Marx Bros.

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Stage 18

B-190 Annex A

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Stage 9

8-191 Annex 8

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Entry Gates & Entry Points

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4. OVERVIEW OF HISTORIC RESOURCES

The Paramount Pictures Main Lot includes two potential Historic Districts that are described in the Paramount Pictures Historic Assessment Technical Report as the RKO Studios Historic District and the Paramount Pictures Historic District, The boundaries for the proposed Historic Districts are shown on Figure 2, The period of significance for the RKO Studios Historic District is 1921 - 1967. The period of significance for the Paramount Pictures Historic District is 1926 -1948. The Historic Districts are defined by seven building/structure typologies and one site typology. Each Is based on the historic uses of the buildings and structures during the periods of significance. Each of the building/structure typologies is composed of several architectural styles. » • • • • • • •

Administrative & Office Pre-Production & Studio Services Post-Production Facilities Stages Utility & Storage Actor Sendees Entry Gates & Entry Points Landscape/Open Space

4A. ADMINISTRATIVE & OFFICE OVERVIEW The Contributing Administrative & Office buildings in both the proposed RKO Studios and Paramount Pictures Historic Districts are designed in a variety of architectural styles with a varying degree of ornamentation. All have

exterior cement plaster facades with punched or recessed openings for doors arid windows. These buildings function as office space, housing Paramount Pictures administrative and third party production employees working on the Main Lot. The highly ornamented 1926 Paramount Pictures Redstone building is located along the original Marathon Street, on one side of the iconic Paramount Bronson Gate, Also unique to the Main Lot are the Administrative and Office buildings along Gower Street that form a street edge and historically operated as the entrance to RKO Studios. These buildings are the interface between the studio and the neighborhood on the west side of the Main Lot. The Chevalier building, that served as RKO Studios' administrative building, is an example of a building typology specific to studio lots, where each facade or portion is composed in a different revival style to simulate different buildings. These buildings are used as convenient exterior sets.

4B, PRE-PRODUCTION & STUDIO SERVICES OVERVIEW The Contributing Pre-Production and Studio Services buildings, including the Gower Mill South and the Assembly Stage, are industrial in nature, with cement plaster and/or metal siding facades. Clerestories and skylights provide natural light to illuminate large interior spaces. Large cargo doors provide for easy movement of materials. PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC DISTRICT CONTRIBUTOR PRE-PRODUCTION & STUDIO SERVICES BUILDINGS:

B-211 Hospital, B-213 Property Building, B-214 Cabinet Shop, B-257 Marathon Mill, B-298 Assembly Stage RKO STUDIOS HISTORIC DISTRICT CONTRIBUTOR PRE-PRODUCTION & STUDIO SERVICES BUILDINGS: B-1Q8 Gower Mill South, B-166 Mae West, B-184 Marx Bros

PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC DISTRICT CONTRIBUTOR ADMINISTRATIVE AND OFFICE BUILDINGS: B-217 Redstone Building, B-256 Lubitsch, B-260 Schulberg, B-261 Demilte

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PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC RESOURCES PRESERVATION PLAN

4C. POST-PRODUCTION FACILITIES

OVERVIEW The Contributing Post-Production Facilities served the functions associated with film editing and film cutting, and include buildings such as W.C, Fields, These spaces accommodate multiple uses, and are most often cement plaster buildings with punched openings and operable windows. PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC DISTRICT CONTRIBUTOR POST-PRODUCTION FACILITIES: B-222 Sturges, B-248 Sherry Lansing Theater RKO STUDIOS HISTORIC DISTRICT CONTRIBUTOR POST-PRODUCTION FACILITIES: B-167 W.C. Fields 4D, STAGES OVERVIEW The Contributing Stages are industrial buildings and unique to a studio lot. Stages are long span, high bay spaces. The Contributing stages in the Main Lot are clad in cement plaster/stucco and/ or metal siding with large "elephant" doors to move equipment in and out easily. Very few windows are found in this typology for maximum environmental and acoustic control. These buildings are dearly identified by large numbers on their facades on the Main Lot. PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC DISTRICT CONTRIBUTOR STAGES: Stage 3, Stage 4, Stage 6, Stage 7, Stage 8, Stage 3, Stage 14, Stage 15, Stage 16, Stage 17, Stage 18

RKO STUDIOS HISTORIC DISTRICT CONTRIBUTOR STAGES: Stage 23, Stage 24, Stage 25, Stage 26, Stage 27, Stage 28, Stage 23, Stage 30, Stage 31, Stage 32 4E, UTILITY & STORAGE OVERVIEW Contributing Utility & Storage buildings include storage, power stations, film vaults and the water tower. All were important to the self-sustaining function of the studios, but the buildings are the least architecturally delineated. The design of these buildings follow the function of the utility they provide. Most are clad in cement plaster with minimal detail, often with louvers for machinery ventilation.

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PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC DISTRICT CONTRIBUTOR UTILITY AND STORAGE BUILDINGS: B-210 MHIarsd, B-212 Powerhouse #1, B-276 Powerhouse #2 RKO STUDIOS HISTORIC DISTRICT UTILITY AND STORAGE BUILDINGS: B-109 Gower Mill North, B-147 Powerhouse #4, B-157 Water Tower 4F. ACTOR SERVICES OVERVIEW Contributing Actor Services buildings include dressing rooms, wardrobe and make-up functions. These function as costume storage, costume fitting and make-up and are a continuing component of motion pictures today.

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TRY POINTS OVERVIEW This property type encompasses historic entrances to Paramount Pictures and RKO Studios. It includes both physical structures that mark the major entrance points to the studios, as well as utilitarian entry points that are significant historically for their association with original access and circulation patterns of the Historic Districts. As seen from Melrose Avenue, the ornate wrought iron Bronson Gate is the Iconic entry to the original Paramount Pictures. The Bronson Gate3 is sited off of Marathon Street at the termination of Bronson Avenue (hence the name). Marathon Street was the boundary of the original Paramount Pictures lot and is now a pedestrian pathway. The Bronson Gate has been seen In many movie and television productions. The North Gower gate entry point as identified in the Historic Assessment Technical Report in the RKO Studios Historic District is significant as it was an access point to RKO Studios, It currently has a guard kiosk with wood arm and a gate that are not historically significant.

4H. LANDSCAPE / OPEN SPACE OVERVIEW

The Contributing Landscape/Open Space areas include two park spaces in the Paramount Pictures and RKO Studios Historic Districts, Production Park, located in the Paramount Pictures Historic District, is composed of a landscaped courtyard located between the Redstone, Dressing Room, Schulberg, and lubitsch Buildings that date to the 1920s and 1930s. in the RKO Studios Historic District, Lucy Park is located immediately to the west of the Maurice Chevalier Building, which was the original administration building at RKO Studios, it created the "front lawn" between the original RKO Studios entrance on Gower Street and the administration building. Both Lucy Park and Production Park function as open space today. Both open spaces have lawn space, landscaped planters, and pedestrian pathways. At tucv Park, the original brick walkway leading from the Lucy Bungalow remains.

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Lucy Park JULY 2016 Page 10

PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC RESOURCES PRESERVATION PLAN

5. GUIDELINES FOR REHABILITATION AND PRESERVATION OF CONTRIBUTORS WITHIN

THE HISTORIC DISTRICTS SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR'S STANDARDS FOR REHABILITATION This Historic Resources Preservation Plan, prepared for Paramount Pictures by Levin & Associates, Architects, should be read in the context of The Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings. The Preservation Plan addresses rehabilitation, including repair, alterations, and additions; and preservation, including maintenance and repair, of Contributors and the KCAL building; and the construction of new structures on the Main Lot. Conformance with this Historic Resources Preservation Plan and the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation shall be interpreted by a qualified historic preservation professional who meets the Secretary of the Interior's professional standards. IP

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property, generally focuses upon the ongoing maintenance and repair of historic materials and features rather than extensive replacement and new construction."

« Evaluate the overall condition of the material to determine whether repairs to features are necessary. • If necessary, obtain conservation and rehabilitation treatment specifications and methods for specific materials prior to commencing any work.

The Paramount Pictures Historic Resources Preservation Plan, based on the Secretary of Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation, includes the following principles: • Rehabilitation of buildings identified as Contributors should respect the historic significance and architectural character of the structure. • The ability of the site to continue as a working studio is of the utmost importance and therefore this Preservation Plan shall be applied in a manner that provides for operational flexibility. • Where new uses are required, existing Contributors should be adapted for re­ use.

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architectural values". Preservation is defined as "The act or process of applying measures necessary to sustain the existing form, integrity, and materials of an historic property. Work, including preliminary measures to protect and stabilize the

Pre-Rehabilitation Assessment

Prior to commencing rehabilitation or preservation on any identified Historic District Contributor, the following guidelines and procedures should be followed: » Identify, retain and preserve features that are important in defining the overall character of a building. These features • may include wall and surface materials, finishes, canopies, skylights, clearstories, awnings and decorative metals, railings, cornices, windows, doors, roofs, steps and cast stone/cast concrete.

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JULY 2016 Page 11

PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC RESOURCES PRESERVATION PLAN

SB, CHARACTER-DEFINING FEATURES The Secretary of the Interior's Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties embody two important goals: * The preservation of historic materials

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buildings depend on their use. There is a range of character-defining features associated with the individual resources in the potential Historic Districts, and there is no homogenous architectural style or character trait found throughout. Overall character-defining features of both Historic Districts include:

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4 Nelson, lea h Preservation Brief 17: Identifying the Visual Aspects of Historic Buildings a.? an Aid to Preserving Their Character, Washington, D.C: U.S. Department of the interior. National Park Service, 1988. 5 Shrimpton, Rebecca H., ed. National Register Bulletin 15: How to Apply the National Register Criteria for Evaluation. Washington D.C.: U.5. Depart­ ment of the Interior, National Park Service, 1997.

JULY 2016 Page 12

PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC RESOURCES PRESERVATION PLAN

SC. EXTERIOR MATERIALS EXTERIOR CEMENT PIASTER (STUCCO) EXISTING CONDITIONS The exterior cement plaster (stucco) finish appears on all of.the building typologies in both Historic Districts and the texture and finish varies slightly among buildings. The current condition of the exterior cement plaster also varies, but most Contributors reviewed have evidence of spalls at building corners and hairline cracks at window and door openings. Most all of the buildings have been repeatedly painted for decades leading to the softening of details, cornice lines and edges. The main conditions observed fall into the category of maintenance and repair. The rehabilitation goal is to conserve the exterior cement plaster by repairing it in place. GUIDELINES The following guidelines are based on the Secretary of the interior's Standards for Rehabilitation, and will be implemented when undertaking exterior maintenance, repair, alterations, or additions to any Contributor with exterior cement plaster.

GUIDELINES FOR REPAIR Most cement plaster deterioration is the result of water infiltration in the building from roof leaks, at window and or door openings and/or moisture penetrating through the foundation. The process to determine the repair approach should include the following: • Determine the cause of the deterioration, • Evaluate the extent of the repair, preserving the most plaster possible,

rather than wholesale replacement, but repair should not be visually obtrusive, • Repair cement plaster by removing damaged material and patching with new cement plaster in-kind. • Match new exterior cement plaster texture and finish to the existing, • Complete repair by repainting the entire surface of the repaired area to match. For hairline cracks in exterior cement plaster: * Repair small cracks to avoid them becoming larger. GUIDELINES FOR CLEANING AND PAINT REMOVAL Success of cement plaster cleaning depends greatly on the texture of the cement plaster. • Smoother plaster textures may be cleaned by scrubbing with natural bristle brushes and non-ionic detergents. • Heavily textured cement plaster can be cleaned with low pressure water wash and supplemented with scrubbing using natural bristle brushes with non- ionic detergent. » Paint can be removed using low- pressure water wash or chemically impregnated fibrous laminated paper. • Sandblasting or any other abrasive cleaning method should not be used on cement plaster. • Total paint removal is not recommended if not required to reveal lost architectural detail, to reach a stabilized substrate or toxic material removal for paint re­ application,

for further information refer to publications from the National Park Service: Preservation Brief 22; Preservation and Repair of Historic Stucco (http://www.nps.gov/tps/haw-to-preserve/briefs/22stucco.htm] CEMENT PIASTER/ STUCCO: Medium sand finish over hand troweled plaster underlayer loaves finish surface uneven, CEMENT PLASTER/ .... ..... . STUCCO Medium sand finish, appears machine ap­ plied over uniform base material. SUSPECTED WATER DAMAGE OF CEMENT PIASTER

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JULY 2016 Page 13

PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC RESOURCES PRESERVATION PLAN

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GUIDELINES The goal is to conserve the wood siding by repairing it in place and have the repair appear as seamless as possible. The following guidelines are based on the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation, and will be implemented when undertaking exterior maintenance, repair, alterations, or additions to any Contributor with exterior wood siding: • Evaluate the overall condition of the siding to determine the extent of the repair. . • Repair the wood siding by patching and piecing-ln using preservation methods. • Repair may include limited replacement in-kind and should not be visually obtrusive. • If replacement is required, match existing in size, scale, profile, material and color. • Sandblasting or any other abrasive cleaning method should not be used on wood siding,

• Paint or stain to match the original, covering entire surface of the repaired area.

EXTERIOR METAL SIDING EXISTING CONDITIONS Architectural metal siding is used in a utilitarian way as a building envelope on the Stages and Pre-Production Buildings. Both corrugated and pre-finished metal sidings are currently seen on the lot. The condition of the corrugated metal is unevenly corroded and patched.

For further information refer to publications from the National Park Service: Preservation Brief 6 for Dangers of Abrasive Cleaning to Historic Buildings. [http://www. nps.gov/tps/how-to-preserve/briefs/6-dangers-abrasivecieaning.htm] Preservation Brief 10 for Exterior Paint Problems on Historic Wood Work, [http://www.nps.gov/tps/how-topreserve/briefs/lQ-pamt-problerris.htmj

GUIDELINES

The goal Is to conserve the metal siding by repairing it in place or to replace in-kind. The following guidelines are based on the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation, and will be implemented when undertaking exterior maintenance, repair, alterations, or additions to any Contributor with exterior metal siding: • Evaluate the overall condition of the metal siding to determine the extent of the repair. • Repair or replace in-kind and match metal siding profile of the original. • Sheet patching of the corrugated siding has been a technique that has been used and may continue. • Evaluate the structural integrity of metal panels and repair/reattach if required. • To clean, remove existing loose paint and coatings and clean siding with the gentlest means possible, wipe with denatured alcohol after cleaning. • Sandblasting or any other abrasive cleaning method should not be used on metal siding. • Apply an anti-corrosion protective coating after cleaning. » If originally painted, paint to match.

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JULY 2016 Page 14

PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC RESOURCES PRESERVATION PLAN

CAST STONE AND CAST CONCRETE

EXISTING CONDITIONS Cast stone and concrete are both used as exterior decorative features on several of the Contributors within the RKO Studios and Paramount Pictures Historic Districts. Cast concrete and stone are very similar in appearance, with cast concrete having a more

open cellular appearance. For example, the 1326 Redstone building in the Paramount Pictures Historic District has cast concrete entry surround and details. The Bluhdorn building, also built in 1926, has cast stone details at its entry and decorative coins, surrounds and details on the facade. Cast stone and concrete are subject to deterioration.









• The main concerns observed with cast stone and concrete within the Historic Districts is cracking, pitting and erosion of elements. Some cast elements appear to have a cement plaster finish. GUIDELINES The goal of the cast stone conservation is to repair the material in place. The following guidelines are based on the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation, and will be implemented when undertaking exterior maintenance, repair, alterations, or additions to any Contributor with cast stone or cast concrete:



stone or cast concrete to determine the extent of the repair. Clean cast stone installations with gentlest means possible, testing the proposed methodology prior to initiating the cleaning. Remove paint from cast stone with chemically impregnated fibrous laminated paper. Reattach loose elements with stainless steel anchors/wires or pins when required. Remove loose material at spalls, clean and coat steel reinforcing with rust inhibitor, and patch with a matching material. Sandblasting or any other abrasive cleaning method should not be used on cast stone or cast concrete. Match the color, texture and character of the cement matrix when re-pointing or patching.

For further information refer to publications from the National Park Service: Preservation Brief 42: Cast Stone Preservation [http://www.nps.gov/tps/how-to-preserve/briefs/42-caststone.htm] Preservation Brief 6: Dangers of Abrasive Cleaning to Historic Buildings. [http://www.nps.gov/tps/how--to-preserve/brlefs/6-

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JULY 2016 Page 15

PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC RESOURCES PRESERVATION PLAN

DECORATIVE METALS AMD ENTRY GATES EXISTING CONDITIONS Decorative metal work is located throughout both Historic Districts, Decorative wrought iron work is a character-defining feature of the ornate Bronson Gate. The buildings of the 1930s and 1940s often have metal entry canopies and decorative window grilles such as part of the Lucy Bungalow, Most buildings in the two Historic Districts have metal fire escapes, balconies and stairs that are character­ defining features and are to be retained. Existing conditions of the architectural metal within the Historic Districts, as observed, were light rust and peeling {saint. GUIDELINES The goal of the architectural metal rehabilitation

is to retain this rrietai and repair in place. The following guidelines are based on the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation and will be implemented when undertaking exterior maintenance, repair, alterations, or additions to any Contributor with decorative metal work: • Retain and preserve architectural metal features that are important character­ defining features of the Contributor. • Evaluate the overall condition of the metal to determine whether more than cleaning and maintenance is requires/, • Evaluate the structural integrity of metal attachments in the case of stairs, balconies and fire escapes and repair/ . reattach if required.

» Repair metal by patching, splicing and reinforcing, limited replacement in-kind of extensively deteriorated features or missing parts is acceptable, * Clean soft metals such as tin, lead, copper, and zinc with appropriate chemical methods so as not to damage the finish. * Clean harder metals such as cast iron, wrought iron and steel with hand scraping and wire brush, * Sandblasting or any other abrasive cleaning method shall not be used on historic architectural metals. » Apply anti-corrosion protective coating after cleaning, * Repairs should be physically and visually compatible and identifiable upon close inspection. * The new work should match existing in size, scale, material, color, design, and texture; and be unobtrusively dated where possible to guide future research and treatment. For further Information refer to publications from the National Park Service: Preservation Brief 27: The Maintenance and Repair of Architectural Cast Iron

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iron.htm] Preservation Brief 6: Dangers of Abrasive Cleaning to Historic Buildings, [http://www.nps.gov/tps/how-to-preserve/briefs/6dangers-abrasive-cleanlng.htm] Technical Preservation Service (ITS) Number 13: Retention of Historic Fire Escapes

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JULY 2016 Page 16

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For further information refer to publications from the National Park Sendee; Preservation Brief 6: Dangers of Abrasive Cleaning to Historic Buildings.

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dangers-abrasive-cleaning.htm] Tech notes Number 1: Exterior Woodwork [http://www.nps.gov/tps/Siow-to-preserve/tech-notes.

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5D. HISTORIC ROOFING OVERVIEW The Contributors within the Historic Districts have several types of roofing material. Roof features such as towers, dormers, bay windows and stage fly lofts; along with roof shape, color, and patterning of the roofing material, indicate important design elements and are character­ defining features of the Contributors within the Historic Districts, In addition, a weather-tight roof is essential to the long-term preservation of the structure and can also aid in energy conservation. When undertaking roof repairs, generally include replacement in-kind, or with compatible substitute material of those extensively deteriorated.

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JULY 2016 Phrc 17

PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC RESOURCES PRESERVATION PLAN CLAY TILE

EXISTING CONDITIONS Clay tile roofs are located as accents on the most prominent Contributors within the Historic Districts. For example, in the Paramount Pictures Historic District both the Bluhdom and the Redstone buildings have terra-cotta barrel shaped tile with ornate cornices and decorative corbels with rafter tails on towers. The clay tile used is a solid reel terra cotta pantile that is not flashed. Red day tile roofs in the Historic Districts are located as towers, eyebrows and lower roofs. Other buildings and iconic .structures use clay tile as accents on entry overhangs such as found on the Chevalier building. GUIDELINES The following guidelines are based or. the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation, and will be implemented when undertaking roof repairs to any Contributor with a clay tile roof: '

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ASPHALT SHINGLES EXISTING CONDITIONS Several gabled roofs within the Historic Districts utilize asphalt shingles. Originally the asphalt roofing material would most likely have been wood shingles, as observed in photos, but all have been replaced with asphalt shingles for fire safety. The asphalt shingles are from the identified periods of significance established for the Historic Districts anti are in fair condition.

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GUIDELINES The following guidelines are based on the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation, and will be implemented when undertaking roof repairs on any Contributor with asphalt shingles.

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» If roof repair is required to eliminate leaks, remove the existing material to expose the wood deck. Inspect and replace deteriorated wood members and sheathing as required, and re-use existing clay tile when possible.

• Maintain roofing by cleaning and refinishing coping, routinely cleaning gutters and downspouts, and replace deteriorated flashing. - Evaluate the overall condition of the roofing to determine whether patching or replacement is required.

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JULY 2016 Page 18

PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC RESOURCES PRESERVATION PLAN

• If replacement is warranted, replace asphalt shingles from the period of significance in kind, matching appearance by number of tabs, texture and color.

of stages and adjoining buildings. These ducts are contained outside the building envelope for acoustic control. When new equipment is commissioned, these ducts should be eliminated or reduced if possible.

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CTISTTG cor5!)' r-ONG Mold for'ing :s prodominamly muon - >n portions o.' ihe Stages and Pro r-criueiim and Studio Services buildings, li'm the Gcwer 'Gill Scum, i«lii *.l) ,ir° Indus': mi in nature, ! he observed c.ondtiion ,<• that these Tirilities nre in paor ronrirtlor,, 'with nw'a' tTu'gue end rusting. GUIDELINES The following guidelines are based on the Secretary of the interior's Standards for Rehabilitation, and will be implemented when undertaking roof repairs on any Contributor with metal roofing: • Maintain roofing by cleaning anti refinishing coping, routinely cleaning gutters and downspouts, and replacing deteriorated flashing, « Evaluate the overall condition of the roofing to determine whether patching or replacement is required. » if replacement is warranted, replace metal roofing in kind, matching appearance, color and profile of the original metal roofing. EXPOSED DUCTWORK ON ROOFS The Historic Districts typically exhibit exposed mechanical ducts and equipment on the roofs

GUIDELINES

The following guidelines are based on the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation, and will be implemented when replacing mechanical equipment on the roofs of any Contributor:

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• Remove rooftop mechanical equipment when decommissioned and repair roofing to original configuration where feasible, • If central plants are developed, tie the existing structures to new central plants when possible, • Install new rooftop mechanical equipment in a non-visible area, away from public path of travel sight lines when possible. For further information refer to publications from the National Park Service: Preservation Brief 4: Roofing for Historic Buildings

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5E, WINDOW OVERVIEW Windows are an important component of the historic character of a building and part of the overall composition of a building. In most buildings, windows comprise a considerable amount of wall plane and thus are deserving of special consideration in rehabilitation. Original windows in both Historic Districts consist of

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JULY 2016 Page 19

PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC RESOURCES PRESERVATION PLAN

many different styles and materials: wood and steel, double hung, pivot, projecting fawning), casement, divided life, single pane and diamond patterned. These windows are set in individual recessed punched openings. There are a number of unique window types within the Historic Districts that are representative of various architectural styles, for example the bay window in the Lucille Ball building in the RKO Studios Historic District and the variety of styles of windows on the Dressing Room Building in the Paramount Pictures Historic District,

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The goal of the repair of wood windows throughout the Historic Districts is to repair and protect in place. The goal of the replacement of wood windows throughout the Historic Districts is to replace in-kind. The following guidelines are based on the Secretary of the interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation and will be implemented when repairing or replacing wood windows or replacing non-contextual aluminum windows on any Contributor. GUIDELINES FOR REPAIR • Identify, retain and preserve original

windows when possible, • At the time of renovation, consideration should be given to the replacement of window air conditioning units as building infrastructure is upgraded. Repair any windows after air conditioning units are removed. •» Sandblasting or any other abrasive cleaning method should not be used on wood windows, • Repair wood window frame, sash and (millions and glazing with material in­ kind, Replace non-original materials or areas that are too deteriorated to repair with replacement parts to match original using historic photographs and physical documentation. • Make windows weather tight and improve thermal efficiency by re-caulking and replacing weatherstripping. • Replace non-original glass with nonreflective glass to match historic configuration. Thermal glass is acceptable if it is not reflective and compatible with historic window frames, • Presen/e historic hardware and maintain in operable condition when possible. GUIDELINES FOR REPLACEMENT • If necessary, existing wood windows should be replaced in-kind, when possible, » Replacement of wood windows with factory finished aluminum clad wood windows may be considered if a satisfactory replacement matches the

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JULY 2016 Page 20

PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC RESOURCES PRESERVATION PLAN

profile of the original window, including dimensions and glazing details. A qualified historic preservation professional who meets the Secretary of the Interior's professional standards shall review these replacements prior to installation, • Aluminum clad wood window finish color should match the existing windows or the proposed Historic District colors. For further information refer to publications from the National Park Service: Preservation Brief 9 for repair of Historic Wood Windows

[http://www.nps.gov/tps/how-to-preserve/briefe/9wooden-wlndows.htm] Preservation Brief 3 for Improving Energy Efficiency in Historic Buildings, [http://www.nps.gov/tps/how-to-

preserve/briefs/3-improve-energy-effidency.htm]

METAL WINDOWS

Rolled steel {ferrous metal) windows were widely used in construction from the 1890s 1950s accommodating increased and expansive glass openings and fire resistance. The thin steel window profile contributed to the streamline appearance of Art Deco, Moderne, and the international style, among others. EXISTING CONDITIONS The steel windows within the Historic Districts are double hung, pivot and casement. Observations of the steel windows within the Historic Districts indicate that they are in fair condition, in need of painting, re-caulking, and removal of back painting on glass. GUIDELINES, The goal of the repair of metal windows throughout the Historic Districts is to repair and

protect in place. The goal of the replacement of metal windows throughout the Historic Districts is to replace in-kind. The following guidelines are based on the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation and will be implemented when repairing or replacing steel windows on any Contributor, GUIDELINES FOR REPAIR • Identify, retain and preserve original windows whenever possible. • At the time of renovation, consideration should be given to the replacement of window air conditioning units as building infrastructure is upgraded. Repair any windows after air conditioning units are removed. • Sandblasting or any other abrasive cleaning method shall not be used on metal windows. • Repair metal window frame, sash, mullions and glazing with material in­ kind, Replace non-original materials or areas that are too deteriorated to repair with replacement parts to match original using historic photographs and physical documentation. • Make windows weather tight and improve thermal efficiency by re-caulking and replacing weather stripping, • Replace non-original glass with nonreflective glass to match historic configuration. Thermal glass is acceptable if it is not reflective and compatible with historic window frames. • Preserve historic hardware and maintain in operable condition.

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JULY 2016 Page 21

PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC RESOURCES PRESERVATION PLAN

GUIDELINES FOR REPLACEMENT • Replace windows that are too deteriorated for repair, using the same sash, frame, ant! pane configuration to match original using historic photographs and physical documentation, • Install new windows within the depth and placement of the original in the wall plane. • Install only Integral muntins and horizontal bars. GUIDELINES FOR EXISTING SECURITY BARS • Remove non-historic security grilles and bars from the exterior, if an acceptable alternative security system has been provided. For further information refer to publications from the National Park Service: Preservation Brief 3 & 13 for Repair

and Thermal Upgrade of Historic Steel Windows and Improved Energy Efficiency in Historic Buildings,

[http://www.nps.gov/tps/how-to-praserve/briefs/13-stee!windows.htm]

[http://www.nps.gov/tps/how-to-preserve/briefs/3lmprove-energy-efficlency.htm] Technical Brief regarding steel windows:

[http://www.nps,govAps/how-to-preserve/tech-notes/ Tech-Notes-Windows01.pdf] [http://www.nps.gov/tps/how-to-preserve/tech-notes/ Ttech-Notes-Wlndows02,pdf] SKYLIGHTS

Skylights occur in buildings identified as Pre­ Production and Studio Services Buildings throughout the Historic Districts, to allow for natural light. The majority of skylights on Contributors are deteriorating and appear to have water infiltration issues.

GUIDELINES ■ The goal of the repair of the skylights throughout the Historic Districts is to repair and protect in place. The following guidelines are based on the Secretary of the interior's Standards for Rehabilitation, and will be implemented when repairing or replacing skylights on any Contributor: • Identify, retain and presen/e original skylights whenever possible. • Repair metal skylight frame and glazing with material in-kind. Replace non­ original materials or areas that are too deteriorated to repair with replacement parts to match original using historic photographs ant) physical documentation. 9 Sandblasting or any other abrasive cleaning method should not be used on skylight frame. » Replace in-kind entire skylight that is too deteriorated to repair using the same frame, and pane configuration to match original using historic photographs and physical documentation. • Replace glass with safety glass, dual or laminated glass if frame allows, low energy conserving non-reflective glass is preferred.

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For further information refer to publications from the National Park Service: Preservation Brief 3 & 13 for Repair and Thermal Upgrade of Historic Steel Windows and Improved Energy Efficiency In Historic Buildings,

[http://www.nps.gov/tps/how-to-preserve/brlefs/13-steelwindows.htm] [http://www.nps.gov/tps/how-to-preserve/briefe/3improve-energy-efficieney.htm]

JULY 2016 Page 22

PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC RESOURCES PRESERVATION PLAN

5F, BUILDING ENTRANCES AND PORCHES Doors, entrances and porches are often primary character-defining features of historic

• In place of handicap lifts, when possible, employ non-mechanical means of accessibility.

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Contributors in the Historic Districts.

GUIDELINES The goal is to develop guidelines for Contributors in Historic Districts to respond to barrier-free design when required of a Contributor. The following guidelines are based on the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation, and will be implemented when undertaking maintenance, repair, alterations, or additions to the building entrance of any Contributor: • Evaluate the overall entry condition and identify the Contributor's character­ defining features, and finishes to guide a barrier-free access design while retaining the character-defining spaces, features, and finishes. • Repair entrances by reinforcing historic characteristics and materials. Replace in-kind missing or deteriorated parts such as cornices, entablatures, columns and balustrades. • For new stair and ramp surfaces, use a contextual material such as natural, lightly sandblasted grey concrete to reduce attention to transitions and be more compatible with the existing studio pathway system. • for new stair and ramp railing design, it is recommended to standardize the railings among the different typologies of buildings.

For further information refer to publications from the National Park Service: Preservation Brief 32: Making Historic Properties Accessible

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[http://www.nps.gov/tps/how-to-preserve/brtefs/32accessibility.htm] Preservation Brief 6: Dangers of Abrasive Cleaning to Historic Buildings.

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[http://www.nps.gov/tps/how-to-preserve/briefs/6dangers-abraslve-cleaning.htm] Tech notes Number 1: Exterior Woodwork

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JULY 2016 Page 23

PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC RESOURCES PRESERVATION PLAN

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5H. CODE COMPLIANCE Alterations to historic structures are often necessary to comply with current code requirements. This work needs to he thoughtfully reviewed and carefully undertaken so that the code upgrades do not result in the loss of character defining features, spaces, and finishes.

existing. GUIDELINES The goaf is for additions to Identified Historic District Contributors to meet the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation. The following guidelines are based on the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation and will be implemented when undertaking additions to any Contributor: ® Identify, retain and preserve original character-defining historic features and material of the existing Contributor, • Design new additions to be compatible yet dearly defined as a non-original addition. • Design new additions to be compatible in massing, size, scale, architectural features, materials, and relationships of solid to voids. • Design new additions to be reversible, to the extent possible. For further Information refer to publications from the National Park Service; Preservation Brief 14; Exterior Additions to Historic Buildings; Preservation Concerns [http://www.nps, gov/tps/how-to-preserve/b riefs/14exterlor-additfons.htm}

GUIDELINES The following guidelines are based on the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation, and will be implemented when alterations to any Contributor are necessary to comply with current code requirements; • Identify the Contributing building or structure's character-defining features and finishes. • Comply with health and safety codes, Including seismic codes and barrier free access requirements, in such a manner that character-defining spaces, features, and finishes are preserved. « Use of the California Historical Building Code (CCR title 24, Part 8} will govern code requirements for the Contributors in the Historic Districts. • Conceal new structural or seismic reinforcement members, including anchor bolts and attachments from view whenever possible. For further information refer to publications from the National Park Service: Preservation Brief 41: Seismic Retrofit of Historic Buildings.

(http://www.nps.gov/tps/how-to-prese rve/briefs/41seismic-retrofit. htm]

JULY 2016 Page 24

PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC RESOURCES PRESERVATION PLAN

SI, SITE CHARACTERISTICS The Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation include historic building site characteristics and environment as well as historic structures. The relationship between identified Contributors of the Paramount Pictures and RKO Studios Historic Districts and the site and landscape features that define the historic character are integral parts of the studio planning. The mixed-use nature of the site should be preserved, while allowing for additional uses and amenities including, without limitation, new green space, additional trees, and improved landscape and hardscape features. The site characteristics of the Paramount Pictures Historic District include the industrial quality of the site as a working motion picture studio separated from the public right-of-way by walls, fences, or buildings. Within the district, there is an existing street grid; the primary north-south corridor is along Avenue P and the primary east-west corridor is Marathon Street. There is a hierarchy of primary and secondary streets; primary streets tend to be wider and have curbs and sidewalks, white secondary streets are typically more like alleys in function and appearance. RKO Studios Historic District was also a walled studio site, separated from the public right-ofway by walls, fences, or buildings. The existing street grid at the RKO Studios Historic District includes the primary north-south corridor along Avenue C, which includes curbs and sidewalks. In general, there are fewer curbs and sidewalks

at the RKO Studios Historic District than at the Paramount Pictures Historic District, and the streets at the RKO Studios Historic District are generally wider. There are landscaped planters throughout the RKO Studios Historic District, particularly along the rear facades of the buildings that front Gower Street.

rehabilitation of existing open spaces. • Encourage the use of street furniture and landscape elements, as provided on Marathon Street, to enhance the Historic Districts and pedestrian use of the Historic Districts.

Character-defining site features include: y

• Existing street grid and primary northsouth and east-west circulation in the Historic Districts, including Marathon Street as the historic southern boundary of the Paramount Pictures Historic District. • Existing Lucy Park and Production Park open spaces. • Historic entry points.



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The following should be implemented when contemplating any project that may impact character-defining landscape/open space or site characteristics:

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GUIDELINES

• Retain characteristics and scale of existing open space, and the historic relationships between buildings, circulation patterns, landscape/site characteristics and open space. ' • Retain existing primary north-south and east-west circulation patterns where

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• Use historic photographs to guide

JULY 2016 Page 25

PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC RESOURCES PRESERVATION PLAN

6, GUIDELINES FOR REHABILITATION AND PRESERVATION OF tCCAi BUILDING (SS15 MELROSE AVENUE) The Paramount Pictures Historic Assessment Technical Report identified two potential Historic Districts and one Individually significant historic resource outside of the Historic Districts. The individually significant historic; resource is the KCAL building located at 5515 Melrose Avenue between Gower Street and Windsor Avenue. OVERVIEW The first building on the 5515 Melrose site was built in 1920 as a film developing plant for the Rothacker Film Manufacturing Company. A fire gutted the building on October 24,1929. In 1935, the; National Broadcasting Company (NBC) purchased the building and constructed a new broadcasting facility and office. The building was designed In the Streamline Moderns architectural style and is considered an excellent example of the popular Los Angeles style with character-defining features that include; Horizontal orientation Rounded corners and curved surfaces flat roofs Speed fines at wail surfaces Smooth stucco cladding Metal, often steel casement windows Unadorned wall surfaces with minimal ornament Windows punched into wails with no surrounds

EXISTING CONDITION The existing building retains most of Its character defining features on its primary (public street facing) facade, and is in good condition. A substantial, two-story addition has been constructed to the north with possible loss of the rear elevation. There is an abundance of surface and rooftop electrical and mechanical infrastructure components placed on or at the north and east building elevations. GUIDELINES The following guidelines are based on the Secretary' of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation and will be Implemented when considering maintenance, repair, alterations, or additions to the KCAL Building: '

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preserve its eligibility as a historic resource. •. Rehabilitate the exterior materials in conformance with the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation under the supervision of a qualified historic preservation professional who meets the Secretary of the Interior's professional standards. Exterior rehabilitation will include relocating the surrounding electrical and mechanical infrastructure off of the historic building as much as possible, and maintaining the visibility of the original building entry on Melrose Avenue. « Remove the non-Contributor, rear, twostory addition and rehabilitate the north elevation according to the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation.

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JULY 2016 Page 26

PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC RESOURCES PRESERVATION PLAN , ** OR aLi ■nT.r ;.""TrT!'--opr> ■‘he -rpn-^p .lit'''? in or will nM aA ■''•sH”

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Tl.e nro josod plication "el: not t ih'ersHy .RTcc' the Contributor s - da .oosbip to its surroundings nd neighboring his^oi ir

resources. The proposed alteration will comply with the Secretary of the Interior's Standards Section 106.

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project. New construction within the Historic Districts will meet the Secretary of the Interior's Standards and will respect the surrounding architectural context, appropriate setting and the environment. Flans for new construction on the Main lot located outside the Historic District boundaries will be reviewed by a qualified Historic Preservation Architect or Consultant who will determine whether the proposed

new construction may have an impact on the eligibility of a Historic District. Consideration will be given as to whether there is adequate separation between the Contributor and the proposed new construction, including the physical distance between the old and new construction, and existing visual buffers including landscaping, open space, or existing street patterns. If the Historic Preservation Architect or Consultant determines that the proposed new construction is not adequately separated from the Contributor to minimize impacts to the Contributor, then the Historic Preservation Architect or Consultant will review the design of the new building for compatibility with the Contributor and compliance with the Preservation Plan in terms of the size, scale, massing, and materials. Specific considerations for new construction include:

• ®









Building Scale, Mass and Height

• New construction should be designed in a manner that protects the Contributor's prominence and significance and minimizes impacts on the Contributor. • Existing avenues within the Main lot shall be maintained to create a border between existing and new construction. Major historic circulation patterns should be retained in north-south and east-west orientation. • Maintain a landscape or building edge along Melrose and In general limit gaps to those necessary to accommodate vehicular and pedestrian access. • New construction should respect the



character, size, scale, and massing of adjacent identified Contributors. Differentiation between the base, middle and top levels is encouraged. Mew construction that exceeds the height of an adjacent Contributor should include setbacks to mitigate impacts. Installation of mechanical and service equipment on the roofs of new construction adjacent to the Contributor should be discouraged. Design of new parking structures should be as unobtrusive as possible to minimize the effect on the adjacent Contributor. Encourage subterranean and structured parking to be located to the interior of the Main tot. Individual window units in new construction adjacent to the Contributor should be recessed into a solid wall and have true divided lights. Glass should be non-refteetive, and dual glazing is encouraged to support energy conservation. In the event a Contributor, not otherwise identified for demolition, or KCAL is lost in a fire or earthquake or unforeseen event, primary consideration will be given to constructing a new building in the same footprint and height as the original. If it is determined that deviation from the original footprint is required, the new construction will be reviewed by a qualified Historic Preservation Architect or Consultant.

JULY 2016 Pace 2.7

PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC RESOURCES PRESERVATION PLAN '

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Bow, - Break down larger proposed building volumes with articulated sub-volumes to maintain a compatible scale and massing adjacent to or facing Bow, • Sloping floors should not be visible on the exterior facade of a parking structure adjacent to Bow,

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restricted to Contributors. The Conceptual Site Plan of the Paramount Pictures Master Plan identifies several new building sites of different building 'types. Based on the Conceptual Site Plan, the KCAL building and the following Contributors may be Impacted by proposed new construction. These guidelines are based on the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation and will be implemented when it is determined by a qualified Historic Preservation Architect or Consultant that proposed new construction is not adequately separated from a Contributor to minimize impacts to the Contributor:

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Bow - RKO Studios Historic District Built In 1920, Bow Is a two- story cement plaster building with roof access. Proposed projects adjacent to Bow should consider the following: B-107

Proposed projects adjacent to the Redstone Building and Demille Building should consider the following: • Respect the character, massing and maintain a compatible scale adjacent to the Contributor. • Break down larger proposed building volumes with articulated sub-volumes to maintain a compatible massing adjacent to or facing the Redstone and Demille buildings, • Building facades relating to the Melrose Avenue boundary may contrast to the facades facing the internal and historic district adjacent to the Marathon Street boundary,

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is located and entered from the vacated Marathon Street, an original boundary of the Paramount Pictures property.

District Built in 1934 for Director Cecil B, Demille, the two-story building is made of cement plaster with flat roof and wood windows. Demille

• Vary the architectural characteristics as the new construction rises, and articulate between the base, middle and top, ® Use regulating lines to promote contextual harmony between the Contributor and adjacent new construction, • Glass should be non-reflective, and dual glazing is encouraged to support energy conservation. • Open space to the south of the Redstone and Demille buildings should be encouraged to provide a buffer between the Historic District boundary and the new building sites.

JULY 2016 Page 28

PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC RESOURCES PRESERVATION PLAN

B-222 Sturges- Paramount Pictures Historic

B-298 Assembly Stage - Paramount Pictures

District Built in 1329, Sturges is a two- story cement plaster building with a flat roof. The west elevation forms one of the boundaries of the proposed Paramount Pictures Historic District along Avenue L.

Historic District Built in 1934 as a workshop, this high bay industrial building has a saw-tooth roof with distinctive clearstories. The east elevation of the Assembly Stage will form one of the boundaries to the Paramount Pictures Historic District.

8-248 Sherry Lansing Theater - Paramount Pictures Historic District Built in 1928, the four- story cement plaster building includes a theater, bridges and a film vault. The west elevation of the Sherry Lansing Theater forms one of the boundaries of the proposed Paramount Pictures Historic District along Avenue t. Entry to the Sherry Lansing Theater is currently provided from its south facade. Proposed projects adjacent to the Sturges Building and Sherry Lansing Theater should consider the fallowing:•

Proposed projects adjacent to the Assembly Stage should consider the following: • Respect the industrial character, massing and maintain a compatible scale adjacent to the Assembly Stage East facade. • Sloping floors should not be visible on any exterior facade of any parking structure adjacent to the Assembly Stage. • Glass should be non-reflective, and dual glazing is encouraged to support energy conservation. INDIVIDUALLY SIGNIFICANT, NATIONAL

• Respect the character, massing and maintain a compatible scale adjacent to the Sturges Building and Sherry Lansing Theater. • Break down larger proposed building volumes with articulated sub-volumes to maintain a compatible scale and massing facing Sturges and Sherry Lansing Theater’s west elevations. • Glass should be non-reflective, and dual glazing is encouraged to support energy conservation.

REGISTER ELIGIBLE PROPERTY: KCAL-551,5 Melrose

;C '. T'J.T Metr-'sc - EirRibir1 KSadnnal Register Thr' bedding designed in the Streamline Moderne architectural style was built in 1935 on

Melrose Avenue as one of the first broadcasting facilities on the west coast, at the time housing NBC and its affiliate KF1. The currently named KCAL building is a two-story cement piaster buildings with typical Streamline Moderne features such as rounded corners and glass,

speed lines on wall surfaces and punched windows. KCAL's original entry is located on Melrose Avenue. Proposed projects adjacent to the KCAL Building should consider the following: • Respect the character, massing and maintain a compatible scale adjacent to the KCAL Building. • Maintain a separation between the KCAL Building and the new construction. • Break down larger proposed building volumes with articulated sub-volumes to maintain a compatible scale and massing facing the KCAL Building from three sides. • Maintain public visibility of the original Melrose Avenue entry. • Use regulating lines to promote contextual harmony between the KCAL building and adjacent new construction. • Glass should be non-reflective, and dual glazing is encouraged to support energy conservation. • Retain KCAL's front planting area on Melrose Avenue as a character defining feature. Conformance with this Historic Resources Preservation Plan and the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation shall be interpreted by a qualified Historic Preservation Architect or Consultant who meets the Secretary of the Interior's professional standards.

JULY 2016 Page 29

PARAMOUNT PICTURES HISTORIC RESOURCES PRESERVATION PLAN

9, SOURCES Weaver, Martin E. with Matero, F. <3, Conserving New York: Preservation Press, 1997

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PRESERVATION BRIEFS Preservation Brief 4; Roofing for Historic Buildings, Washington D.C, National Park Service: U.S. Department of the Interior, 1978 Preservation Brief 6: Dangers of Abrasive Cleaning to Historic Buildings, Washington D.C. National Park Service: U.S. Department of the interior, 1979 Preservation Brief 9: The Repair of Historic Wood Windows, Washington D.C. National Park Service: U.S. Department of the Interior, 1981 Preservation Brief 10: Exterior Paint Problems on Historic Woodwork, Washington D.C. National Park Service: U.S. Department of the Interior, 1982 Preservation Brief 13: The Repair and Thermal Upgrading of Historic Steel Windows, Washington D.C. National Park Service: U.S. Department of the Interior, 1984

Preservation Brief 17; Architectural Character, Identifying Visual Aspects of Historic Buildings as an Aid to Preserving their Charter, Washington D.C. National Park Service; U.S, Department of the interior, 1988

PHOTO ARCHIVES Bison Photo Archives, Wanamaker, Marc, City of Los Angeles Public Library Photo Archives

Preservation Brief 22; The Preservation and Repair of Historic Stucco, Washington D.C. National Park Service: U.S. Department of the Interior, 1990 Preservation Brief 27: The Maintenance and Repair of Architectural Cast Iron, Washington D.C. National Park Service: U.S. Department of the Interior, 1990 Preservation Brief 30; The Preservation and Repair of Historic Clay Tile Roofs, Washington D.C. National Park Service: U.S. Department of the Interior, 1992 Preservation Brief 41: The Seismic Retrofit to Historic Buildings, Keeping Preservation in the Forefront, Washington D.C. National Park Service: U.S. Department of the Interior, 1997 PRESERVATION TECHNICAL NOTES NUMBER 1; Exterior Wood, Washington D.C. National Park Service: U.S, Department of the Interior, 1986 NUMBER 2: Exterior Wood, Washington D.C. National Park Service: U.S. Department of the interior, 1986 NUMBER 13; Retention of Historic Fire Escapes Washington D.C, National Park Service; U.S. ■ Department of the Interior, 1986 JULY 2016 Page 30

Appendix C

DEPARTMENT OF CITY PLANNING Mitigation Monitoring Program Paramount Pictures Master Plan

Environmental Impact Report: ENV-2011 -2460-ElR State Clearinghouse No. 2011101035

July 2016

Mitigation Monitoring Program

1. Introduction To ensure that the mitigation measures identified in an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) or Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND) are implemented, the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) requires the Lead Agency for a project to adopt a program for monitoring or reporting on the revisions it has required for a project and the measures it has imposed to mitigate or avoid significant environmental effects. As specifically set forth in Section 15097(c) of the CEQA Guidelines, the public agency may choose whether its program will monitor mitigation, report on mitigation, or both. As provided in Section 15097(c) of the CEQA Guidelines, “monitoring” is generally an ongoing or periodic process of project oversight. “Reporting” generally consists of a written compliance review that is presented to the decision-making body or authorized staff person. An EIR has been prepared to address the Project’s potential environmental impacts. The evaluation of the Project’s impacts takes into consideration project design features, which are measures proposed by the Applicant as a feature of the Project and which are detailed in the EIR. - Where appropriate, the EIR also identifies mitigation measures to avoid or substantially lessen any significant impacts. This MMP is designed to monitor implementation of those project design features and mitigation measures. This MMP has been prepared in compliance with the requirements of CEQA Section 21081.6 and CEQA Guidelines Section 15097. It is noted that while certain agencies outside of the City of Los Angeles (City) are listed as the monitoring/enforcement agencies for individual project design features and mitigation measures listed in this MMP, the City, as Lead Agency for the Project, is responsible for overseeing and enforcing implementation of the MMP as a whole.

2. Purpose It is the intent of this MMP to: 1. Verify compliance with the project design features and mitigation measures identified in the EIR;

City of Los Angeles

Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project June 2016

SCH. No. 2011101035

Page 1

2. Provide a framework to document implementation of the identified project design features and mitigation measures; 3. Provide a record of mitigation requirements; 4. Identify monitoring and enforcement agencies; 5. Establish and clarify administrative procedures for the clearance of project design features and mitigation measures; 6. Establish the frequency and duration of monitoring; and 7. Utilize the existing agency review processes wherever feasible.

3. Organization As shown on the following pages, each identified project design feature and mitigation measure for the Project is listed and categorized by environmental issue area, with accompanying discussion of: Enforcement Agency—the agency with the power to enforce the project design feature or mitigation measure. Monitoring Agency—the agency to which reports compliance, implementation, and development are made.

involving

feasibility

Monitoring Phase—the phase of the Project during which the project design feature or mitigation measure shall be monitored. Monitoring Frequency—the frequency at which the project design feature or mitigation measure shall be monitored. Action(s) Indicating Compliance—the action(s) by which the enforcement or monitoring agency indicates that compliance with the identified project design feature or required mitigation measure has been implemented.

4. Administrative Procedures and Enforcement This MMP shall be enforced throughout all phases of the Project. The Applicant shall be responsible for implementing each project design feature and mitigation measure and shall be obligated to provide certification, as identified below, to the appropriate monitoring agency and the appropriate enforcement agency that each project design feature and mitigation measures has been implemented. The Applicant shall maintain records demonstrating compliance with each project design feature and mitigation measure. Such records shall be made available to the City upon request. City of Los Angeles

Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project June 2016

SCH. No. 2011101035

Page 2

5. Program Modification After review and approval of the final MMP by the Lead Agency, minor changes and modifications to the MMP are permitted, but can only be made by the Applicant or its successors subject to City approval. The Lead Agency, in conjunction with any appropriate agencies or departments, will determine the adequacy of any proposed change or modification. This flexibility is necessary in light of the nature of the MMP and the need to protect the environment with a workable program. No changes will be permitted unless the MMP continues to satisfy the requirements of CEQA, as determined by the Lead Agency.

6. Mitigation Monitoring Program A.1 Aesthetics/Visual Quality and Views (1) Project Design Features Project Design Feature A,1-1: Where Project construction is visible from pedestrian locations adjacent to the Project Site and perimeter walls or fencing do not already exist, temporary construction fencing shall be placed along the periphery of the development sites to screen construction activity from view at the street level from off-site. •

Enforcement Agency: Building and Safety

City of Los Angeles Department of



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once during field inspection



Action Indicating Compliance; Field Inspection sign-off

Project Design Feature A.1-2: The Applicant shall ensure through appropriate postings and daily visual inspections that no unauthorized materials are posted on any temporary construction barriers or temporary pedestrian walkways that are accessible/visible to the public, and that such temporary barriers and walkways are maintained in a visually attractive manner throughout the construction period.



Enforcement Agency: Building and Safety



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Construction



Monitoring Frequency: During field inspection(s)

City of Los Angeles SCH. No. 2011101035

City of Los Angeles Department of

Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project June 2016

Page 3



Action Indicating Compliance: Field inspection sign-off

Project Design Feature A,1-3: New on-site utilities that may be required to serve the proposed Project shall be installed underground. •

Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety; City of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety; City of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction; Construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check; once during field inspection



Action indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of applicable building permit; issuance of Certificate of Occupancy

(2) Mitigation Measures No mitigation measures are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue.

A.2 Artificial Light and Glare (1) Project Design Features Project Design Feature A.2-1: Light sources associated with proposed Project construction shall be shielded and/or aimed so that no direct beam illumination is provided outside of the Project Site boundary. However, construction lighting shall not be so limited as to compromise the safety of construction workers.



Enforcement Agency: Building and Safety

City of Los Angeles Department of



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once during field inspection



Action Indicating Compliance: Field inspection sign-off

Project Design Feature A.2-2: Outdoor security and architectural lighting shall be shielded and/or directed toward the areas to be lit to limit spill-over onto adjacent uses where appropriate. •

Enforcement Agency:

City of Los Angeles Department of

Building and Safety

City of Los Angeles

Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project

SCH. No. 2011101035

June 2016

Page 4

1



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check; once during field inspection



Action Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of applicable building permit; issuance of Certificate of Occupancy

Project Design Feature A.2-3: Glass used in building fagades shall minimize glare in a manner consistent with applicable energy and building code requirements. •

Enforcement Agency: Building and Safety

City of Los Angeles Department of



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check; once during field inspection



Action Indicating Compliance; Plan approval and issuance of applicable building permit; issuance of Certificate of Occupancy

(2) Mitigation Measures No mitigation measures are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue

A.3 Shading (1) Project Design Features No project design features are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue. (2) Mitigation Measures Mitigation Measure A.3-1: A 10-foot setback from the northern property line of the Camerford Lot shall be implemented to reduce shadow impacts affecting shade-sensitive uses to the north. •

Enforcement Agency: Building and Safety



Monitoring Agency; City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety

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Monitoring Phase: Construction

'



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check



Action indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of applicable building permit

B.1 Air Quality (1) Project Design Features Project Design Feature B.1-1: The owner or -contractor shall keep the construction area sufficiently dampened to control dust caused by construction and hauling, and at all times provide reasonable control of dust caused by wind. All unpaved demolition and construction areas shall be wetted at least twice daily during excavation and construction, and temporary dust covers shall be used for haul trucks to reduce dust emissions and meet South Coast Air Quality Management District Rule 403. •

Enforcement Agency: South Coast Air Quality Management District; City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Construction



Monitoring Frequency: During field inspection(s)



Action(s) Indicating Compliance: Field inspection sign-off

Project Design Feature B.1-2: All materials transported off-site shall be either sufficiently watered or securely covered to prevent excessive amounts of spillage or dust. •

Enforcement Agency: South Coast Air Quality Management District; City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Agency; City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once during field inspection



Action indicating Compliance: Field inspection sign-off

Project Design Feature B.1-3: All clearing, earth-moving, or excavation activities shall be discontinued during periods of high winds (i.e., greater than 25 miles per hour), so as to prevent excessive amounts of dust, •

Enforcement Agency:

South Coast Air Quality Management

District; City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety

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Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once during field inspection



Action(s) Indicating Compliance: Field inspection sign-off

(2) Mitigation Measures Mitigation Measure B.1-1: The Project representative shall make available to the lead agency and the South Coast Air Quality Management District a comprehensive inventory of all off-road construction equipment, equal to or greater than 50 horsepower, that will be used an aggregate of 40 or more hours during any portion of construction activities for the proposed Project. The inventory shall include the horsepower rating, engine production year, and certification of the specified Tier standard. A copy of each unit’s certified tier specification, Best Available Control Technology documentation, and California Air Resources Board or Air Quality Management District operating permit shall be available onsite at the time of mobilization of each applicable unit of equipment. Off-road diesel-powered equipment within the construction inventory list described above shall meet the Tier 3 standards where commercially available. •

Enforcement Agency: South Coast Air Quality Management District; City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Pre-Construction; construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check; once during field inspection



Action Indicating Compliance: Field inspection sign-off

Mitigation Measure B.1-2: All construction equipment shall be properly tuned and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications, •

Enforcement Agency: Building and Safety



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once during field inspection



Action Indicating Compliance: Field inspection sign-off

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Mitigation Measure B.1-3: Contractors shall maintain and operate construction equipment so as to minimize exhaust emissions, During construction, trucks and vehicles in loading and unloading queues shall have their engines turned off after five minutes when not in use, to reduce vehicle emissions. •

Enforcement Agency; City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once during field inspection



Action(s) Indicating Compliance: Field inspection sign-off

Mitigation Measure B.1-4: Construction activities shall be discontinued during second-stage smog alerts. • •

Enforcement Agency:

South Coast Air Quality Management District; City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety

Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once during field inspection



Action Indicating Compliance: Field inspection sign-off

Mitigation Measure B.1-5:

To the extent possible, petroleum-powered construction activity shall utilize electricity from power poles rather than temporary diesel power generators and/or gasoline power generators. If stationary petroleum-powered construction equipment,

such as generators, must be operated continuously, such equipment shall be located at least 100 feet from sensitive land uses, whenever possible. •

Enforcement Agency:

City of Los Angeles Department of

Building and Safety •

Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once during field inspection



Action Indicating Compliance: Field inspection sign-off

Mitigation Measure B.1-6:

The Applicant or its successor shall minimize delivery

truck idling times to a maximum of five minutes, per the California Air Resources Board’s Airborne Toxic Control Measure.

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Enforcement Agency: Building and Safety

City of Los Angeles Department of



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Operation



Monitoring Frequency: Annually



Action(s) Indicating Compliance: Documentation of posting of limitation in loading dock areas in annual compliance report

Mitigation Measure B.1 -7: The Applicant or its successor shall route delivery trucks via the most efficient available route on the Project Site. •

Enforcement Agency: Building and Safety

City of Los Angeles Department of



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Operation



Monitoring Frequency: Annually



Action Indicating Compliance:

Documentation of instructions provided to delivery truck drivers via on-site security personnel in annual compliance report

B.2 Air Quality—Greenhouse Gas Emissions (1) Project Design Features Project Design Feature B.2-1:

Where Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) standards are applicable, the design of new buildings shall include features so as to be capable of achieving current LEED® Certified status.



Enforcement Agency:

City of Los Angeles Department of

Building and Safety



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction; construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check; once during field inspection



Action Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of applicable building permit; issuance of Certificate of Occupancy

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(2) Mitigation Measures

-

No mitigation measures are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue.

C.

Cultural Resources (1) Project Design Features

Project Design Feature G-1; When Stage 21 is demolished, the Applicant shall use commercially reasonable efforts to attempt to remove the globe from the structure. If the globe can be successfully removed, the Applicant shall work with an appropriate historic preservation or other group to relocate the globe to an off-site location, where it will be visible to the public, to the extent such a location is available. • •

Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning, Office of Historic Resources Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning, Office of Historic Resources

• •

Monitoring Phase: Construction Monitoring Frequency:

Once prior to issuance of demolition

permit for Stage 21



Action Indicating Compliance:

Issuance of demolition permit

for Stage 21

(2) Mitigation Measures Mitigation Measure C-1: Project

approval shall include a requirement to implement a preservation plan substantially in the form attached as L of the Paramount Pictures Historic Assessment Technical Report provided in Appendix F of the Draft EIR.

Appendix



Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning, Office of Historic Resources



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning, Office of Historic Resources



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project approval



Action Indicating Compliance: Approval of requirement to implement preservation plan with Project approval

Mitigation Measure C-2: The Applicant shall ensure that archival documentation (Historic American Building Survey [HABS] Level I documentation) will be prepared for district contributors that will be demolished prior

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to commencement of demolition. HABS Level I documentation shall consist of the following: •

Architectural and historical narrative;



Adequate archival drawings as available;



Approximately six (6) to ten (10) large-format photographs documenting each visible fagade, context views, and interior views.



Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning, Office of Historic Resources



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning, Office of Historic Resources



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once per applicable building, at Project plan check



Action Indicating Compliance:

Plan approval and issuance of

applicable building permit

Mitigation Measure C-3: No contributing building shall be demolished until the Applicant is ready to proceed with a substitute use, including, for example, a building, landscape, open space, circulation, or production area, for its site.



Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning, Office of Historic Resources



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning, Office of Historic Resources

• •

Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction Monitoring Frequency: Once per applicable building, at Project plan check



Action Indicating Compliance:

Plan approval and issuance of

applicable building permit

Mitigation Measure C-4: Production Park and Lucy Park within the Main Lot shall be retained as open space, and future rehabilitation shall conform to the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Cultural Landscapes and be based on historic photographs and other archival evidence. •

Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of City Office of Historic Resources

Planning, •

Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning, Office of Historic Resources

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Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project clearance under Specific Plan, as applicable



Action Indicating Compliance: Administrative clearance under Specific Plan, as applicable '

administrative

Mitigation Measure C-S: Existing avenues within the Main Lot shall be maintained to create a border between existing and new construction. Major historic circulation patterns shall be retained in north-south and eastwest orientation. •

Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning, Office of Historic Resources



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning, Office of Historic Resources



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check



Action Indicating Compliance:

Plan approval and issuance of

applicable building permit

Mitigation Measure C-6: A qualified preservation professional shall be retained in order to act as the monitor for mitigation measures related to historic resources on the Project Site. professional shall:

The

qualified preservation



Verify compliance with the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan Preservation Plan as set forth in the Paramount Pictures Specific Plan; and



Oversee the Historic American Building Survey documentation required in Mitigation Measure C-2.



Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning, Office of Historic Resources



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning, Office of Historic Resources



Monitoring Phase: Construction



Monitoring Frequency: Periodically during construction



Action

Indicating

Compliance:

Statement of submitted by a qualified preservation professional

compliance

Mitigation Measure C-7: The Applicant shall continue to include an interpretive program (e.g., informational signage) on the Main Lot. •

Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning, Office of Historic Resources

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Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning, Office of Historic Resources



Monitoring Phase: Post-construction



Monitoring Frequency: Annually



Action Indicating Compliance: Documentation of interpretive program in annual compliance report

Mitigation Measure C-8; If a unique archaeological resource is discovered during Project construction activities, work in the area shall cease and deposits shall be treated in accordance with applicable federal, State, and local guidelines, including those set forth in California Public Resources Code Section 21083.2. A unique archaeological resource is defined as an archaeological artifact, object, or site about which it can be clearly demonstrated that, without merely adding to the current body of knowledge, there is a high probability that it meets any of the following criteria: •

Contains information needed to answer important scientific research questions and that there is a demonstrable public interest in that information;



Has a special and particular quality such as being the oldest of its type or the best available example of its type; or



Is directly associated with a scientifically recognized important prehistoric or historic event or person [Public Resources Code Section 21083.2(g)].

In addition, if it is determined that an archaeological site is a historical resource, the provisions of Section 21084.1 of the Public Resources Code and CEQA Guidelines Section 15064.5 shall be implemented. A historical resource is defined as a resource listed in, or determined to be eligible for listing in, the California Register of Historical Resources [Public Resources Code Section 21084.1], In the event an archaeological resource is encountered that the archaeologist determines is potentially a Native American resource, the archaeologist shall retain a Native American representative to help determine the appropriate treatment for the resources. •

Enforcement Agency: Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Construction



Monitoring Frequency: To be determined by consultation with archaeologist if resource(s) are discovered

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Action Indicating Compliance: If unanticipated discoveries are found, submittal of compliance report by a qualified archaeologist

Mitigation Measure C-9: If human remains are encountered during construction, work in the affected area and the immediate vicinity shall be halted immediately. The construction manager at the Project Site shall be notified, and shall notify the archaeologist and Native American monitor, if they are not on-site at the time, as well as the responsible lead agency of the discovery, who in turn shall notify the Native American Heritage Commission and the County Coroner pursuant to procedures and requirements set forth in California Health and Safety Code Section 7050.5. Disposition of the human remains and any associated grave goods shall also be in accordance with this regulation and Public Resources Code 5097.91 and 5097.98, as amended. The archaeologist and the Native American monitor, with the concurrence of the City, shall determine the area of potential impact and the timing when construction activities can resume.



Enforcement Agency: Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Agency:

Los Angeles Department of Building and

Safety



Monitoring Phase: Construction



Monitoring Frequency: To be determined by consultation with archaeologist in consultation with the Native American monitor upon discovery of resource(s)



Action Indicating Compliance: If unanticipated discoveries are found, submittal of written evidence of compliance with Public Resources Code Section 5097.98 and Health and Safety Code Section 7050.5

Mitigation Measure C-10: If any paleontological materials are encountered during ground-disturbing activities for construction of the proposed Project, all further ground-disturbing activities in the area shall be temporarily diverted and the services of a qualified paleontologist shall then be secured. The paleontologist shall assess the discovered material(s) and prepare a survey, study or report evaluating the impact. The paleontologist’s survey, study or report shall contain a recommendation(s), if necessary, for the preservation, conservation, or relocation of the resource, as appropriate. The Applicant shall comply with the recommendations of the evaluating paleontologist, as contained in the survey, study or report, and a copy of the paleontological survey, study or report shall be submitted to the Los Angeles County Natural History Museum, Ground-disturbing activities may resume once the paleontologist’s recommendations have been implemented to the satisfaction of the paleontologist.

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Enforcement Agency: Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety Monitoring Phase: Construction Monitoring Frequency: To be determined by consultation with paleontologist if resource(s) are discovered Action Indicating Compliance: If unanticipated discoveries are found, submittal of compliance report by a qualified paleontologist

D.

Geology and Soils (1) Project Design Features

No project design features are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue. (2) Mitigation Measures Mitigation Measure D-1: A final site-specific, design-level geotechnical, geologic, and seismic hazard investigation report that complies with all applicable state and local code requirements shall be prepared by a qualified geotechnical engineer and certified engineering geologist and submitted to the Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety for each individual building project, consistent with City of Los Angeles requirements (see 2008 Los Angeles Building Code Section 1802.1), The site-specific, design-level geotechnical reports shall address each of the potential geologic hazards addressed in the Geotechnical Engineering Evaluation for the Paramount Pictures Master Plan, 5555 Melrose Avenue, Los Angeles, California, 90038 prepared by Geotechnologies, Inc., April 2015. The site-specific, design-level geotechnical reports shall include recommendations for each specific building location and building design, including recommendations pertaining to site preparation, fills and compaction, and foundations, and shall include the applicable recommendations . set forth in Mitigation Measures D-2 through D-4, below. Additionally, all such recommendations shall comply with applicable provisions and standards set forth in or established by: (a) California Geological Survey’s “Guidelines for Evaluating and Mitigating Seismic Hazards in California, Special Publication No. 117” (Special Publication 117);

(b) The version of the Uniform Building Code, as adopted and amended by the City of Los Angeles, in effect at the time of approval of each site-specific, design-level geotechnical report; City of Los Angeles

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(c) Relevant State, County, and City laws, ordinances, and Code requirements; and (d) Current standards of practice designed to minimize potential geologic, geotechnical, and related impacts. The site-specific, design-level geotechnical reports shall be reviewed and approved by the City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety. •

Enforcement Agency: Building and Safety

City of Los Angeles Department of



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check



Action Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of applicable building permit

Mitigation Measure D-2: During construction, encountered non-engineered fills shall be excavated and replaced as compacted fill properly bunched into suitable materials in accordance with City of Los Angeles requirements, or removed. The suitability of the excavated material for reuse in the compacted fills shall be confirmed during each final site-specific, design-level geotechnical investigation in accordance with the applicable provisions and standards detailed in Mitigation Measure D-1. •

Enforcement Agency: Building and Safety

City of Los Angeles Department of



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Construction

«

Monitoring Frequency: Once during field inspection



Action Indicating Compliance: Field inspection sign-off

Mitigation Measure D-3: As part of the site-specific geotechnical report provided for in Mitigation Measure D-1, corrosion testing of Project Site soils, including pH levels, resistivity, sulfate content, chloride content, and other major anions and cations, shall be performed to the extent necessary. Where the evaluation indicates corrosive soil, specific types of pipe, insulation, coatings, and cathodic protection shall be selected in accordance with the applicable provisions and standards detailed in Mitigation Measure D-1 in order to reduce the risk of corrosion damage to underground utilities.

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Enforcement Agency: Building and Safety

City of Los Angeles Department of



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Pre-Construction



Monitoring Frequency:. Once at Project plan check



Action Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of applicable building permit

Mitigation Measure D-4: The design and construction of the proposed Project shall comply with the Los Angeles Methane Seepage Regulations (Los Angeles Municipal Code, Chapter IX, Article 1, Division 71), as applicable, including requirements for site testing,

E.



Enforcement Agency: Building and Safety

City of Los Angeles Department of



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction; construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check; once during field inspection



Action Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of applicable building permit; field inspection sign-off

Hazards and Hazardous Materials (1) Project Design Features Project Design Feature E-1: Prior to the issuance of any demolition permit or permit for remodeling of existing buildings, if applicable, the Applicant would provide a letter to the Department of Building and Safety indicating that the demolition/renovation contract provides for a qualified asbestos abatement contractor/specialist to remove or otherwise abate or manage asbestos during demolition or renovation activities in accordance with the South Coast Air Quality Management District’s Rule 1403. The Applicant shall comply with State and federal regulations to test for asbestos prior to issuance of any demolition permit. If asbestos-containing materials are found to be present, it shall be abated in compliance with the South Coast Air Quality Management District’s Rule 1403, as well as all other applicable state and federal rules and regulations.



Enforcement Agency:

City of Los Angeles Department of

Building and Safety

City of Los Angeles

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A



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once per building at Project plan check prior to issuance of applicable demolition/remodeling permit



Action Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of applicable demolition/remodeling permit

'

Project Design Feature E-2: Prior to the issuance of any permit for demolition or alteration of an existing structure, if applicable, a lead-based paint survey would be performed in compliance with applicable State and federal regulations. Should lead-based paint materials be identified, the Applicant would provide evidence to the Department of Building and Safety demonstrating that the demolition/renovation contract provides that standard handling and disposal practices would be implemented pursuant to Occupational Safety and Health Act regulations. The Applicant shall comply with State and federal regulations to test for lead-based paint prior to issuance of any demolition permit. Should lead-based paint materials be identified, standard handling and disposal practices shall be implemented pursuant to Occupational Safety and Health Act regulations. •

Enforcement Agency: Building and Safety

City of Los Angeles Department of



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check prior to issuance of applicable demolition/remodeling permit



Action Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of applicable demolition/remodeling permit

(2) Mitigation Measures Mitigation Measure E-1: If excavation or grading occurs in areas identified in Figure IV.E-1, provided as Attachment 1 of this MMP (areas with potential for residual contamination in subsurface), then construction contracts shall include a provision that in the event that potential contamination is encountered during excavation or grading, work in the area of potential contamination shall be temporarily halted and the contamination evaluated by a qualified environmental professional using appropriate collection and sampling techniques as determined by the environmental professional based on the nature of the contamination.

The nature and extent of contamination shall be Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project

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determined and the appropriate handling, disposal and/or treatment shall be implemented (i.e., excavated/disposed of, treated in-situ [in-place], or otherwise managed) in accordance with applicable regulatory requirements, such as South Coast Air Quality Management District Rule 1166. If soil contamination is not suspected, but is observed (i.e., by sight, smell, visual, etc.) during excavation and grading activities, excavation and grading within the area of the observed contamination shall be temporarily halted and redirected around the area until the appropriate evaluation and follow-up measures are implemented by a qualified environmental professional, as described above. ' •

Enforcement Agency: Building and Safety

City of Los Angeles Department of



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction; construction, if excavation or grading occurs in areas identified in Figure IV.E-1, provided as Attachment 1 of this MMP



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check prior to issuance of grading permit; field inspection during construction, if excavation or grading occurs in areas identified in Figure IV.E-1, provided as Attachment 1 of this MMP•



Action Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of applicable grading permit; field inspection sign-off, if excavation or grading occurs in areas identified in Figure IV.E-1, provided as Attachment 1 of this MMP

Mitigation Measure E-2:

Prior to issuance of grading or building permits for construction in the area of the abandoned oil well that may exist in the northeast corner of the Main Lot, the Applicant shall comply with applicable regulations for California State Division of Oil, Gas and

Geothermal Resources site plan review. If any oil wells are encountered during excavation and construction, the Applicant shall comply with all applicable requirements of California State Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources for the investigation and/or re­ abandonment of the well.



City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety; California State Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources; City of Los Angeles Fire Department



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety; City of Los Angeles Fire Department



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction; construction

Enforcement Agency:

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Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check prior to issuance of grading or building permit; once during field inspection



Action Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of applicable grading or building permit; field inspection sign-off by City of Los Angeles Fire Department

F.1 Hydrology and Surface Water Quality (1) Project Design Features Project Design Feature F.1-1: Prior to the issuance of grading permits, the Applicant shall provide the City with evidence that a Notice of Intent has been filed with the State Water Resources Control Board to comply with the Construction General Permit. Such evidence shall consist of a copy of the Notice of Intent stamped by the State Water Resources Control Board or the Regional Water Resources Control Board, or a letter from either agency stating that the Notice of Intent has been filed. •

Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety; Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board; City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check prior to issuance of grading permit



Action Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of grading permit

Project Design Feature F.1-2: For all construction activities disturbing greater than 1 acre or more, prior to receiving a grading permit from the City of Los Angeles, the Applicant shall provide proof of a Waste Discharger Identification Number for filing a Notice of Intent for coverage under the Construction General Permit and a certification that a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan has been prepared. For individual construction activities that may occur over time that disturb less than 1 acre, the Applicant shall comply with the applicable City of Los Angeles local requirements. •

Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety; Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board; City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works

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Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check prior to issuance of grading permit



Action Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of grading permit

Project Design Feature F.1-3: Prior to issuance of a building permit for a project that triggers the Standard Urban Stormwater Mitigation Plan requirements, the Applicant shall prepare and submit for review and approval a Standard Urban Stormwater Mitigation Plan that shall include Best Management Practices (e.g., infiltration systems, bio­ filtration, structural treatment systems) to the City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works or Department of Building and Safety, as applicable. •

Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety or City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works, as applicable



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety; City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works



Monitoring Phase: Pre-Construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check



Action Indicating Compliance: Submittal of Standard Urban Stormwater Mitigation Plan and issuance of applicable building permit

Project Design Feature F.1-4: The proposed Project shall include up to three stormwater detention features on-site to reduce the peak flow rate to a level at or below the existing peak flow rate leaving the Project Site and pipe runoff to the City storm drain system (Catchment Area D, G and J). The detention features shall be sized to reduce the peak flow rate from those catchment areas to a level at or below the existing peak flow rates (24.11 cubic feet per second in Catchment Area D, 163.47 cubic feet per second in Catchment Area G, and 11.02 cubic feet per second in Catchment Area J), The potential location of the proposed detention features is shown on Figure IV.F.1-6 provided as Attachment 2 of this MMP. The proposed detention feature on the western portion of the Main Lot shall be installed when a new private on-site storm drain is connected to the 21-inch City storm drain in Melrose Avenue. The proposed detention feature in the south central portion of the Main Lot shall be installed when a new private on-site storm drain is connected to the 33-inch City storm drain in Melrose Avenue. The proposed detention feature in the southcity of Los Angeles

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eastern portion of the Main Lot shall be installed when a new private on-site storm drain is connected to the 42-inch City storm drain in Melrose Avenue. The proposed detention features shall be located underground and shall consist of either a flow-through or flow-by detention system, or an approved facility that would provide an equivalent reduction in peak runoff flow rate. The exact size and location of the detention features shall be determined prior to construction as final building plans and detailed hydrology reports are completed. •

Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety; City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction; construction Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check; once during field inspection Action Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of applicable building permit; field inspection sign-off

Project Design Feature F.1-5: The Applicant shall continue to require the control of live animals used in production by an animal wrangler to minimize the potential for animal waste to remain on-site. Enforcement Agency: Building and Safety

City of Los Angeles Department of

Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety Monitoring Phase: Operation Monitoring Frequency: Annually Action Indicating Compliance: in annual compliance report

Documentation of requirement

(2) Mitigation Measures No mitigation measures are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue.

F.2 Groundwater (1) Project Design Features Project Design Feature F.2-1:

Any discharge of groundwater during construction

or operation of the proposed Project shall occur pursuant to, and Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project

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^

comply with, the applicable National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit or industrial user sewer discharge permit ■ requirements. If contaminated groundwater is found during the management of construction or long-term dewatering, treatment and discharge, as appropriate, shall be conducted in compliance with the applicable regulatory requirements (i.e., the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board General Permit conditions, or the City’s industrial user sewer discharge permit requirements). •

Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety; Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board; City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Construction; operation



Monitoring Frequency: annually during operation



Action indicating Compliance: Field inspection sign-off during construction; annual compliance report during operation

Field inspections during construction;

Project Design Feature F.2-2: In the event a groundwater monitoring well needs to be removed or relocated during construction, the abandonment of the well shall occur in accordance with the guidelines set forth in the Department of Water Resources, California Water Weil Standards, Part III, Destruction of Monitoring Wells, and the California Department of Health Services guidelines. •

Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety; Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety; Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction; construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check; once during construction if well discovered during construction



Action Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of building permit; copy of well abandonment permit, if required

(2) Mitigation Measures

'

No mitigation measures are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue.

City of Los Angeles

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SCH. No. 2011101035



Page 23

June 2016

G.

Land Use (1) Project Design Features No project design features are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue. (2) Mitigation Measures

No mitigation measures are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue

H.

Noise (1) Project Design Features

Project Design Feature H-1: Power construction equipment (including combustion engines), fixed or mobile, shall be equipped with noise shielding and muffling devices (consistent with manufactures’ standards), All equipment shall be properly maintained. •

Enforcement Agency: Building and Safety



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once during field inspection



Action Indicating Compliance: Field inspection sign-off

City of Los Angeles Department of

Project Design Feature H-2: The use of caisson drilling and/or large bulldozers shall occur a minimum of 15 feet from the nearest off-site building. •

Enforcement Agency: Building and Safety

City of Los Angeles Department of



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once during field inspection



Action Indicating Compliance: Field inspection sign-off

Project Design Feature H-3: Ail Project outdoor loading dock and trash/recycling areas shall be located or constructed such that the line of sight between these noise sources and any adjacent noise sensitive land use shall be obstructed to the extent necessary to comply with Los Angeles Municipal Code noise requirements. Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project

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Enforcement Agency: Building and Safety

City of Los Angeles Department of



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction; construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check; once during field inspection



Action Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of applicable building permit; issuance of Certificate of Occupancy

Project Design Feature H-4: Non-squeal paving finishes shall be used within the proposed Project’s new parking structure(s). •

Enforcement Agency: Building and Safety

City of Los Angeles Department of



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction; construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check; once during field inspection



Action Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of applicable building permit; field inspection sign-off

Project Design Feature H-5: Special events in the Main Lot that include an outdoor amplified sound system shall implement the following noise management procedures: •

Prior to the special event, Paramount personnel shall test the sound level at the event speaker locations to confirm that the sound levels from the event’s amplified sound equipment are consistent with applicable Los Angeles Municipal Code requirements as directed by a qualified acoustical engineer.



Once the event has commenced, Paramount personnel shall test the sound levels from the event speakers to confirm that the sound levels from the amplified sound equipment are consistent with applicable Los Angeles Municipal Code requirements.



Paramount shall provide surrounding residents with a phone number to call during the special event with any concerns regarding the amplified sound levels.



Enforcement Agency: Building and Safety



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety

City of Los Angeles SCH. No. 2011101035

City of Los Angeles Department of

Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project June 2016

Page 25

'



Monitoring Phase: Operation



Monitoring Frequency: Annually



Action Indicating Compliance: Documentation management activities in annual compliance report

of

noise

Project Design Feature H-6: Project mechanical equipment for new buildings located along the Main Lot northern property line shall be designed not to exceed 45 dBA (in terms of hourly Leq) as measured at the northern property line. •

Enforcement Agency: Building and Safety

City of Los Angeles Department of



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction; construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check; once during field inspection



Action Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of applicable building permit; issuance of Certificate of Occupancy

Project Design Feature H-7: If a new above-ground parking structure is constructed within 100 feet of an off-site noise sensitive receptor, the fagade facing the receptor shall be designed with noise control features (e.g., acoustical louvers or solid parapet wall) so as to reduce noise to within 10 dBA above ambient. •

Enforcement Agency: Building and Safety

City of Los Angeles Department of



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction; construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check; once during field inspection



Action Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of applicable building permit; issuance of Certificate of Occupancy

(2) Mitigation Measures Mitigation Measure H-1: Prior to the issuance of grading permits for the development of a new building, structure, or infrastructure for the proposed Project, the Applicant or its successor shall provide proof satisfactory to the City Department of Public Works or Department of Building and Safety, as applicable, that all related construction contractors have been required in writing to comply with the City Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project

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Noise Ordinance, and the contractor or the Applicant or its successor shall design a Construction Noise Mitigation Plan to minimize the construction-related noise impacts to off-site noise-sensitive receptors. The Construction Noise Mitigation Plan may include the following: a) Use temporary sound barriers between the proposed Project construction area and affected noise-sensitive receptors where . feasible and necessary; b) Stationary source equipment which is flexible with regard to relocation (e.g., generators and compressors) shall be located so as to maintain the greatest feasible distance from off-site noisesensitive land uses; c) To the extent feasible, the staging of high noise-generating activities should take place during mid-day and/or when fewer people are at home or ambient noise levels in the receptor areas are at their highest levels; d) To the extent feasible, construction and demolition activities should be scheduled so as to avoid operating several pieces of equipment simultaneously; e) Limit engine idling from construction equipment. Specifically, the idling of haul trucks shall be limited to 5 minutes at any given location as established by the South Coast Air Quality Management District; f)

Provide for the location of construction staging areas to be situated and operated in a manner which will limit direct interference with residential streets surrounding the Project Site;

g) Provide a hotline to enable the public to call and address construction related issues associated with the construction; and h)

Project construction shall not use impact pile driving methods.



Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety or City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works, as applicable.



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety or City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works, as applicable.



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction; construction.



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check prior to issuance of grading permit; once during field inspection



Action Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of grading permit; field inspection sign-off

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1.1 Employment (1) Project Design Features No project design features are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue. (2) Mitigation Measures No mitigation measures are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue.

1.2 Housing (1) Project Design Features No project design features are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue. (2) Mitigation Measures No mitigation measures are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue.

1.3 Population (1) Project Design Features No project design features are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue. (2) Mitigation Measures No mitigation measures are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue.

J.1 Public Services—Police Protection (1) Project Design Features Project Design Feature J.1 -1: During Project construction, the Applicant shall implement security measures including security fencing, lighting, locked entry, and security patrols. •

Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Police Department; City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Construction Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project June 2016

City of Los Angeles SCH. No. 2011101035

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Monitoring Frequency; Once during field inspection



Action Indicating Compliance: Field inspection sign-off

Project Design Feature J.1-2: The Applicant shall continue to provide private on-site security throughout the Project Site during Project operation. •

Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Police Department; City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Phase: Operation



Monitoring Frequency: Annually



Action Indicating Compliance: Documentation of private on-site security in annual compliance report

(2) Mitigation Measures Mitigation Measure J.1-1: Prior to the issuance of a building permit for a building that abuts a public street, the Applicant shall consult with the Los Angeles Police Department Crime Prevention Unit regarding the incorporation of crime prevention features appropriate for the design of the building, including applicable features in the Los Angeles Police Department’s Design Out Crime Guidelines. •

Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Police Department, City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning



Monitoring Agency: Planning



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once prior to the issuance of applicable building permit



Action Indicating Compliance: Issuance of building permit



City of Los Angeles Department of City

Mitigation Measure J.1-2: The Applicant shall submit a diagram of the property to the Los Angeles Police Department West Bureau Commanding Officer on an annual basis unless no new construction has occurred within the previous year. The diagram shall include access routes, and any additional information that might facilitate police response. •

Enforcement Agency: Los Angeles Police Department, City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning



Monitoring Agency:

City of Los Angeles Department of City

Planning



Monitoring Phase: Operation Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project June 2016

City of Los Angeles SCH. No. 2011101035

Page 29



Monitoring Frequency: Annually



Action Indicating Compliance: Documentation of submittal of diagram or statement of no new construction to the Los Angeles Police Department West Bureau Commanding Officer in annual compliance report

J.2 Public Services—Fire Protection (1) Project Design Features Project Design Feature J.2-1: The Applicant shall submit a plot plan for approval of access and fire hydrants by the Los Angeles Fire Department prior to the issuance of a building permit by the City. The plot plan may include the following design features, as determined by the LAFD: •

No building or portion of a building shall be constructed more than 150 feet from the edge of a roadway of an improved street, access road, or designated fire lane.



Access for Los Angeles Fire Department apparatus personnel to and into all structures shall be required.



The width of private roadways for general access use and fire lanes shall not be less than 20 feet clear to the sky.



Fire lanes, where- required, and dead ending streets shall terminate in a cul-de-sac or other approved turning area. No dead ending street or fire lane shall be greater than 700 feet in length or secondary access would be required.



All access roads, including fire lanes, shall be maintained in an unobstructed manner, and removal of obstructions shall be at the owner’s expense. The entrance to all required fire lanes or required private driveways shall be posted with a sign no less than three square feet in area.



Fire lane width shall not be less than 20 feet. When a fire lane must accommodate the operation of Los Angeles Fire Department aerial ladder apparatus or where fire hydrants are installed, those portions shall not be less than 28 feet in width.



Private roadways for general access use shall have a minimum width of 20 feet.



Where access for a given development requires accommodation of Los Angeles Fire Department apparatus, overhead clearance shall not be less than 14 feet.



All structures shall be fully sprinklered.



Adequate public and private fire hydrants shall be required.

'

City of Los Angeles

and

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The Los Angeles Fire Department may require additional vehicular access where buildings exceed 28 feet in height.



Where fire apparatus shall be driven onto the road level surface of the subterranean parking structure, that structure shall be engineered to withstand a bearing pressure of 8,600 pounds per square foot. '



No building or portion of a building shall be constructed more than 300 feet from an approved fire hydrant. Distance shall be computed along path of travel,



Any required fire hydrants to be installed shall be fully operational and accepted by the Los Angeles Fire Department prior to any building construction.



No framing shall be allowed until the roadway is installed to the satisfaction of the Los Angeles Fire Department.



Private streets shall be recorded as Private Streets and Fire Lanes. All private street plans shall show the words “Private Street and Fire Lane” within the private street easement.



All parking restrictions for fire lanes shall be posted and/or painted prior to any Temporary Certificate of Occupancy being issued.



Plans showing areas to be posted and/or painted “FIRE LANE NO PARKING” shall be submitted and approved by the Los Angeles Fire Department prior to building permit application sign-• off.



Electric gates approved by the Los Angeles Fire Department shall be tested by the Los Angeles Fire Department prior to the Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety granting a Certificate of Occupancy.



Any required Fire Annunciator Panel or Fire Control Room shall be located within 50 feet of the visual line of sight of the main entrance stairwell or to the satisfaction of the Los Angeles Fire Department.



Enforcement Agency: Los Angeles Fire Department



Monitoring Agency: Los Angeles Fire Department



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction



Monitoring Frequency: building permit



Action Indicating Compliance: Issuance of building permit

Once prior to issuance of applicable

Project Design Feature J.2-2: The Applicant shall, continue to provide on-site safety and fire prevention equipment for internal use by trained staff. City of Los Angeles

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Enforcement Agency; Los Angeles Fire Department; City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Agency: Los Angeles Fire Department



Monitoring Phase: Operation



Monitoring Frequency: Annually



Action Indicating Compliance: Documentation of provision of on-site safety and fire prevention equipment in annual compliance report

Project Design Feature J.2-3: The Applicant shall continue to coordinate with and provide advance notice to the Los Angeles Fire Department regarding large special events (i.e., 2,500 attendees or more) taking place on the Project Site. •

Enforcement Agency: Los Angeles Fire Department



Monitoring Agency: Los Angeles Fire Department



Monitoring Phase: Operation



Monitoring Frequency: Prior to large special events



Action Indicating Compliance: Documentation of notification(s) to the Los Angeles Fire Department in annual compliance report

Project Design Feature J.2-4: The proposed Project shall comply with the fire flow requirements set forth in Section 57.507.3.1 of the Los Angeles Municipal Code. In doing so, the proposed Project shall provide a minimum fire flow ranging from up to 6,000 to up to 9,000 gallons per minute from six hydrants flowing simultaneously with a residual pressure of 20 pounds per square inch, as determined by the Los Angeles Fire Department based on its review of the proposed Project’s design plans. •

Enforcement Agency: Los Angeles Fire Department; City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety



Monitoring Agency: Los Angeles Fire Department



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction; construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check; once during field inspection



Action Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of applicable building permit; issuance of Certificate of Occupancy

(2) Mitigation Measures Mitigation Measure J.2-1:The Applicant shall submit an emergency response plan for approval by the Los Angeles Fire Department on an annual basis City of Los Angeles

Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project

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June 2016

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unless no new construction has occurred within the previous year. The emergency response plan shall include but not be limited to the following: mapping of emergency exits, evacuation routes for vehicles and pedestrians, and the location of the nearest hospitals and fire departments. •

Enforcement Agency: Los Angeles Fire Department



Monitoring Agency: Los Angeles Fire Department



Monitoring Phase: Operation



Monitoring Frequency: Annually



Action Indicating Compliance: Documentation of submittal of emergency plan or statement of no new construction to the Los Angeles Fire Department in annual compliance report

J.3 Public Services—Schools (1) Project Design Features No project design features are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue. (2) Mitigation Measures No mitigation measures are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue.

J.4 Public Services—Parks and Recreation (1) Project Design Features No project design features, are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue. (2) Mitigation Measures No mitigation measures are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue.

J.5 Public Services—Libraries (1) Project Design Features No project design features are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue.

City of Los Angeles

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(2) Mitigation Measures No mitigation measures are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue.

K.

Traffic, Access, and Parking

The traffic-related project design features and mitigation measures shall be implemented according to the Transportation Mitigation Phasing Program included in Attachment 3 to this MMP, as it may be modified and approved by the City of Los Angeles Department of Transportation in accordance with these provisions. The Transportation Mitigation Phasing Program may be revised, when appropriate and as determined by the City of Los Angeles Department of Transportation: (1) upon demonstration that mitigation measures for each phase in the revised phasing plan are equivalent or superior to the original project design features and/or mitigation measures; and/or (2) upon demonstration that approval or implementation of project design features or mitigation measures has been delayed by other governmental entities, provided that the Project Applicant or its successor has demonstrated reasonable efforts and due diligence to the satisfaction of the City of Los Angeles Department of Transportation. Prior to issuance of any Certificate of Occupancy for any project within a phase, onand off-site traffic project design features and mitigation measures applicable for that project shall be completed or suitably guaranteed to the satisfaction of the City of Los Angeles Department of Transportation. Prior to the issuance of the final Certificate of Occupancy for the final project of the final phase, all required improvements, except as modified or revised as allowed above, shall be funded, completed, or resolved to the satisfaction of the City of Los Angeles Department of Transportation. (1) Project Design Features Project Design Feature K-1: The Project Applicant shall prepare and implement a Transportation Demand Management (TDM) program to reduce traffic impacts of the proposed Project. The TDM program shall include implementation of several TDM strategies, which may include, but are not limited to the following: •

Flexible work schedules and telecommuting programs;



Bicycle amenities (bicycle racks, lockers, etc.);



Guaranteed Ride Home program;



Rideshare/carpool/vanpool promotion and support;



Transportation Information Center;



On-Site TDM Coordinator;

City of Los Angeles

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'



Discounted transit passes;



Mobility hub support;



Funding for bikeway improvements; and



Continued provision of on-site personnel at studio entry gates to facilitate traffic flow onto the Project Site.

. •

Enforcement Agency: Transportation

City of Los Angeles Department of



Monitoring Agency: Transportation

City of Los Angeles

Department of



Monitoring Phase: Construction of the phase indicated in Attachment 3, Transportation Mitigation Phasing Program, of this MMP



Monitoring Frequency: Certificate of Occupancy

Once prior to issuance of applicable



Action Indicating Compliance: Approval of TDM program from Los Angeles Department of Transportation; annual compliance report; issuance of Certificate of Occupancy

Project Design Feature K-2: Construction Traffic Management Plan The Project Applicant shall prepare detailed construction traffic management plans, including street closure information, detour plans, haul routes, and staging plans as necessary and satisfactory to the City. The construction traffic management plans shall be based on the nature and timing of the specific construction activities and other projects in the vicinity of the Project Site, and shall include the following elements as appropriate: 1. Provisions for temporary traffic control during all construction

activities along public rights-of-way to improve traffic flow on public roadways (e.g., flaggers); 2. Scheduling construction activities to reduce the effect on traffic flow on arterial streets; 3. Construction-related vehicles shall not park on surrounding public streets; 4. Provision of safety precautions for pedestrians and bicyclists through such measures as alternate routing and protection barriers; 5. Contractors shall be required to participate in a common carpool registry during all periods of contract performance monitored and maintained by the general contractor;

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6. Schedule construction-related deliveries, other than concrete and earthwork-related deliveries, to reduce travel during peak travel periods as identified in this study; 7. Obtain the required permits for truck haul routes from the City of Los Angeles prior to the issuance of any grading permit for the proposed Project; and 8. Obtain the required Caltrans transportation permit for use of oversized transport vehicles on Caltrans facilities. •

Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Transportation



Agency: Transportation



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction; construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check prior to issuance of grading or building permit; once during field inspection



Action Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of grading permit; field inspection sign-off

Monitoring

City of Los Angeles Department of

2) Mitigation Measures Mitigation Measure K-1: The Project Applicant shall initiate, fund, and market a Hollywood-area Transportation Management Organization (TMO) to promote alternative modes of transportation including walking and bicycling, carpooling and vanpooling, use of public transit, short-term automobile rentals, etc. This TMO would be available to anyone within the Hollywood community, not just patrons of the proposed Project, and would be accessible through a website and a mobile application providing users with information and allowing them to access TMO services. •

Enforcement Agency: Transportation

City of Los Angeles Department of



Monitoring Agency: Transportation



Monitoring Phase: Construction of the phase indicated in Attachment 3, Transportation Mitigation Phasing Program, of this

City of Los Angeles Department of

MMP



Monitoring Frequency: Once prior to issuance of applicable Certificate of Occupancy for initiation and initial funding, and annually thereafter for funding for remaining 9 years

City of Los Angeles

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Action Indicating Compliance: Documentation of establishment and funding of TMO; issuance of Certificate of Occupancy; annual report

Mitigation Measure K-2: The Project Applicant shall pay LADOT to design and install signal controller upgrades, CCTV cameras, and system loops at the locations set forth below, and shown in Figure IV.K-4, provided as Attachment 4 of this MMP. These improvements would be implemented by Paramount Pictures through payment of a fixed fee to LADOT to fund the cost of these improvements. If LADOT selects the payment option, then Paramount Pictures would be required to pay LADOT’s projected cost of installation, and LADOT shall design and construct these improvements. The TSM improvements shall target the following four travel corridors: (1) Franklin Avenue (between Cahuenga Boulevard and Bronson Avenue); (2) Santa Monica Boulevard (between La Brea Avenue and Vermont Avenue); (3) Melrose Avenue (between La Brea Avenue and Heliotrope Drive); and (4) Gower Street (between Franklin Avenue and Melrose Avenue). The following are the locations designated for signal controller upgrades, CCTV, and system loops. Signal Controller Upgrade Locations: •

Vine Street & Franklin Avenue



Gower Street & Franklin Avenue



Beachwood Drive & Franklin Avenue



Bronson Avenue & Franklin Avenue



Gower Street & Carlos Avenue



Gower Street & Sunset Boulevard



Gower Street & Waring Avenue



Mansfield Avenue & Melrose Avenue



June Street & Melrose Avenue



Cahuenga Boulevard & Melrose Avenue



Larchmont



Gower Street & Melrose Avenue



Van Ness Avenue & Melrose Avenue



Wilton Place & Melrose Avenue



Harvard Boulevard & Melrose Avenue



Ardmore Avenue & Melrose Avenue

Boulevard & Melrose Avenue

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Normandie Avenue & Melrose Avenue



Alexandria Avenue/US 101 Avenue



Heliotrope Drive & Melrose Avenue

Northbound Off-ramp & Melrose

Closed Circuit Television Locations: •

Highland Avenue & Santa Monica Boulevard



Normandie Avenue & Melrose Avenue



Vine Street/Rossmore Avenue & Melrose Avenue

System Loop Locations (Where within the following corridors):

necessary at signalized intersections



Franklin Avenue between Cahuenga Boulevard and Bronson Avenue



Santa Monica Boulevard between Orange Drive and Vermont Avenue



Melrose Avenue between La Brea Avenue and Heliotrope Drive



Gower Street between Franklin Avenue and Melrose Avenue



Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Transportation; City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning



Monitoring Agency: Transportation



Monitoring Phase: Construction of the phase indicated in Attachment 3, Transportation Mitigation Phasing Program, of this MMP



Monitoring Frequency: Certificate of Occupancy



Action Indicating Compliance: Written verification of payment of fees to the City of Los Angeles Department of Transportation or implementation of TSM improvements

City of Los Angeles Department of

Once prior to issuance of applicable

Mitigation Measure K-3: Intersection #33—Gower Street & Santa Monica Boulevard. Convert the existing northbound shared through/rightturn lane into a separate through lane and right-turn lane by shifting the north/south lanes westward by approximately 1 foot. In order to provide the right-turn lane, two street parking stalls on the east side of Gower Street south of Santa Monica Boulevard would need to be removed. With this improvement, the northbound intersection approach would provide one left-turn lane, one through lane, and one right-turn lane.

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Enforcement Agency: Transportation

City of Los Angeles Department of



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Transportation; City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works, Bureau of Engineering



Monitoring Phase: Construction of the phase indicated in Attachment 3, Transportation Mitigation Phasing Program, of this MMP



Monitoring Frequency: Certificate of Occupancy

Once prior to issuance of applicable



Action Indicating Compliance: Occupancy

Issuance of Certificate of

Mitigation Measure K-4: Intersection #34—Gower Street & Melrose Avenue. Convert the existing westbound shared through/right-turn lane into a separate through lane and right-turn lane by dedicating necessary right of way for a right-turn curb cut from the Project Site to the north. With this improvement, the westbound intersection approach would provide two through lanes and one right-turn lane. •

Enforcement Agency: Transportation

City of Los Angeles Department of



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Transportation; City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works, Bureau of Engineering



Monitoring Phase: Construction of the phase indicated in Attachment 3, Transportation Mitigation Phasing Program, of this MMP



Monitoring Frequency: Certificate of Occupancy

Once prior to issuance of applicable



Action Indicating Compliance: Occupancy

Issuance of Certificate of

Mitigation Measure K-5: The Applicant or its successors shall fund and coordinate implementation of LADOT’s Neighborhood Traffic Management Plan process set forth in Appendix Q of the Traffic Study prepared for the proposed Project, provided as Attachment 5 of this MMP, in an amount up to $500,000. Eligible communities shall include the residential neighborhoods within the boundaries listed below: 1. De Longpre Avenue to the north, Gower Street to the east, Santa Monica Boulevard to the south, and Vine Street to the west; 2. Sunset Boulevard to the north, Bronson Avenue to the east, Fountain Avenue to the south, and Gordon Street to the west; Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project

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3. Fountain Avenue to the north, Bronson Avenue to the east, Santa Monica Boulevard to the south, and Gower Street to the west; 4. Santa Monica Boulevard to the north, Wilton Place to the east, Melrose Avenue to the south, and Van Ness Avenue to the west; and 5. Santa Monica Boulevard to the north, Western Avenue to.the east, Lemon Grove Avenue to the south, and Wilton Place to the west. •

Enforcement Agency: Transportation

City of Los Angeles Department of



Monitoring Agency: Transportation



Monitoring Phase: Construction of the phase indicated in Attachment 3, Transportation Mitigation Phasing Program, of this MMP



Monitoring Frequency: Certificate of Occupancy



Action indicating Compliance: Written verification of payment to the City of Los Angeles Department of Transportation; issuance of Certificate of Occupancy

City of Los Angeles Department of

Once prior to issuance of applicable

L.1 Utilities and Service Systems—Water Supply (1) Project Design Features Project Design Feature L.1-1: New on-site water mains and laterals would be installed in accordance with City Plumbing Code requirements, where necessary, to distribute water within the Project Site. • . Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power •

Monitoring Agency: and Power

City of Los Angeles Department of Water



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction; construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check; once prior to issuance of Certificate of Occupancy



Action Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of applicable building permit; issuance of Certificate of Occupancy

Project Design Feature L.1-2: The proposed Project following water conservation features:

would

implement

the

For proposed outdoor areas of the proposed Project: Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project

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Expanded use of high-efficiency irrigation systems, including weather-based irrigation controllers with rain shutoff technology or smart irrigation controllers for any area that is either landscaped or designated for future landscaping. Drip or subsurface irrigation shall be utilized.



Use of water efficient landscaping, such as proper hydro-zoning, turf minimization, zoned irrigation and use of native/ drought-tolerant plant materials within the Project Site. At least 25 percent of new landscaping areas shall use drought-tolerant plants. Use of landscaped contouring in areas other than production areas and visitor entry points. ' Provide education on water conservation to employees.

For proposed indoor areas of the proposed Project: High-efficiency toilets with flush volume of 1.0 gallon of water per flush. High-efficiency urinals that use 0.125 gallon per flush or less. Indoor faucets that use 1,5 gallons per minute or less. Pre-rinse spray valves that use 1.6 gallons per minute or less. All installed dishwashers shall be ENERGY STAR rated. Shower stalls shall have no more than one showerhead per stall. High-efficiency clothes washers with a water savings factor of 7,5 or less. Tankless and on-demand water heaters. Domestic water heating system. Standardized bottleless water filters for drinking water. Cooling tower conductivity controllers or cooling tower pH conductivity controllers. Cooling towers shall operate at a minimum of 5.5 cycles of concentration. Enforcement Agency: Building and Safety

City of Los Angeles Department of

Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction; construction Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check; once prior to issuance of Certificate of Occupancy

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Action Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of applicable building permit; issuance of Certificate of Occupancy

(2) Mitigation Measures No mitigation measures are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue.

L.2 Utilities and Service Systems—Wastewater (1) Project Design Features Prior to the development of a new building, the capacity of the on-site sanitary sewers that would serve the building shall be evaluated based on applicable Bureau of Sanitation and California Plumbing Code standards and replacement or new sanitary sewers shall be installed on-site as necessary to accommodate proposed flows.

Project Design Feature L.2-1:



Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety; City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction; construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check; once prior to issuance of Certificate of Occupancy



Action(s) Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of applicable building permit; issuance of Certificate of Occupancy

Project Design Feature L.2-2: New Project sanitary sewers that may be necessary shall be designed and constructed to conform to the applicable Bureau of Sanitation and California Plumbing Code standards. •

Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety; City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction; construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once prior to issuance of construction permits for sewers; once prior to issuance of Certificate of Occupancy

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Page 42



Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of applicable building permit for sewers; issuance of Certificate of Occupancy Action(s)

Project Design Feature L.2-3: If it is determined, as part of the evaluation performed pursuant to Project Design Feature L.2-1, that existing on­ site laterals cannot be utilized for future service for new Project development, the Applicant shall be responsible for the construction of all new service connections to off-site City sanitary sewers. New Project service connections and laterals shall be designed and constructed in accordance with Bureau of Sanitation and California Plumbing Code standards. •

Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety; City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works



Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction; construction



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check; once prior to issuance of Certificate of Occupancy



Action(s)

Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of applicable building permit; issuance of Certificate of Occupancy

(2) Mitigation Measures No mitigation measures are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue.

L.3 Utilities and Service Systems—Solid Waste (1) Project Design Features Project Design Feature L.3-1: During new construction, a minimum of 50 percent of the non-hazardous demolition and construction debris by weight from construction of new Project buildings shall be recycled and/or salvaged for reuse in compliance with the requirements of City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety. •

Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety; City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works, Bureau of Sanitation



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety; City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works, Bureau of Sanitation



Monitoring Phase: Construction

City of Los Angeles

Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project

SCH. No. 2011101035

June 2016

Page 43



Monitoring Frequency: Annually during construction



Action Indicating Compliance: Documentation of recycling percentage in annual compliance report

Project Design Feature L.3-2: During operations, the a solid waste diversion target of 70 available recycling practices, including third party vendors, permitted by the Los

proposed Project shall have percent based on current off-site sorting of waste by Angeles Municipal Code.



Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of City Planning; City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works Bureau of Sanitation



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works, Bureau of Sanitation



Monitoring Phase: Operation



Monitoring Frequency; Annually during operation

«

Action Indicating Compliance: Documentation of solid waste diversion in annual compliance report

(2) Mitigation Measures No mitigation measures are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue.

L.4 Utilities and Service Systems—Energy (1) Project Design Features The Applicant shall incorporate the following measures into the design of new buildings for the proposed Project:

Project Design Feature L.4-1:



Efficient lighting and lighting control systems;



Light-colored or “cool” roofs;



Energy-efficient heating and cooling systems, appliances (e g., Energy Star) and equipment and control systems;



Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for on-site street lighting; and



Education regarding energy efficiency, water conservation, waste diversion, and recycling services to the Applicant’s employees.



Enforcement Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power



Monitoring Agency: City of Los Angeles Department of Building

and Safety •

Monitoring Phase: Pre-construction; construction

City of Los Angeles

Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project

SCH. No. 2011101035

June 2016

Page 44



Monitoring Frequency: Once at Project plan check; once prior to issuance of Certificate of Occupancy



Action Indicating Compliance: Plan approval and issuance of applicable building permit; issuance of Certificate of Occupancy

(2) Mitigation Measures No mitigation measures are identified in the EIR for this environmental issue.

City of Los Angeles

Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project

June 2016

SCH, No, 2011101035

Page 45

: Attachment 1

Figure IV.E-1 Areas of Potential Subsurface Contamination

City of Los Angeles

Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project

SCH. No. 2011101035

June 2016

Page 46

Attachment 2

Figure IV.F.1-6 Proposed Major Storm Drain Lines

City of Los Angeles

Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project

SCH. No. 2011101035

June 2016

Page 47

Attachment 3

Traffic Mitigation Phasing Program

Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project June 2016

City of Los Angeles SCH. No. 2011101035 Page 48

Attachment 4

Figure IV.K-4 Transportation System Management Improvements

City of Los Angeles

Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project

SCH. No. 2011101035

June 2016

Page 49

Attachment 5

LADOT Neighborhood intrusion Process

Paramount Pictures Master Plan Project

City of Los Angeles

June 2016

SCH. No. 2011101035

Page 50

Attachment 1 Figure IV.E-1 Areas of Potential Subsurface Contamination (Mitigation Measure E-1)

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Stage 17

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Areas with Potential Residual Contamination in Subsurface

Figure IV.E-1 Areas of Potential Subsurface Contamination (Mitigation Measure E-1)

Attachment 2 Figure IV.F.1-6 Proposed Conditions—Major Storm Drain Lines (Project Design Feature F.1-4)

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Attachment 3 Transportation Mitigation Phasing Program (Project Design Features K-1 through K-2 and Mitigation Measures K-1 through K-5)

ATTACHMENT F

Transportation improvement Phasing Program

As described in Chapter 7, the proposed Project design features include implementation of a transportation demand management (TDM) program.

The TDM program features various

programs designed to promote peak period trip reduction.

The proposed Project would also

implement mitigation measures consisting of three primary components.

The mitigation

measures include:

1.

Establishment and primary funding for a new Hollywood transportation management organization (Hollywood TMO) to promote transit usage, ride-sharing, and non-automotive means of transportation in the Hollywood area. The Hollywood TMO would encompass approximately 20 square miles, approximately bordered by State Route 134 to the north, 3rd Street to the south, Fairfax Avenue to the west, and Hoover Street to the east;

2.

Transportation Systems Management (TSM) improvements, including signal controller upgrades and installation of closed circuit television (CCTV) cameras at key intersections within the Study Area; and,

3.

Specific intersection improvements, including physical widening and addition of lanes.

The Project is expected to be developed through year 2038. The timing of development will be dependent on market forces affecting the entertainment industry and the overall real estate market.

As the Project will not be developed all at one time, the implementation of specific

transportation

improvements will

be

phased

as

applicable,

as

individual

buildings

are

constructed.

This phasing program ties the implementation of the TDM program and mitigation measures to construction of individual buildings or groups of buildings, based on the number of afternoon peak hour trips projected to be generated by the additional development.

As development

reaches each milestone in peak hour trip generation, the corresponding components of the transportation improvement program will be put in place.

The phasing triggers have been

chosen to mitigate impacts below a level of significance at all times, except at those four intersections where the effects of Project traffic cannot be fully mitigated.

The following four-phase schedule is proposed for implementation of the transportation improvement program:

1, Prior to Project construction upon issuance of the first building permit for net new Project Development (0 Project trips): o The Applicant will establish the Hollywood TMO. The Applicant would continue to contribute to the on-going operation and marketing of the Hollywood TMO for a period of 10 years. 2, When 30% of Project is Completed (310 Project trips): o The Applicant will implement the street improvement at Gower Street & Santa Monica Boulevard. 3. When 45% of Project is Completed (465 Project trips): o The Applicant will provide funding to LADOT to implement TSM improvements along the corridors of Franklin Avenue, Santa Monica Boulevard, Melrose Avenue, and Gower Street. o The Applicant will establish the TDM program with an on-site TDM coordinator, a shuttle (either by the Applicant or in conjunction with the TMO and/or LADOT) to connect the Project Site and the Metro Redline Station at Hollywood and Highland, and mobility hub support.

o

The Applicant will initiate discussions with the potentially impacted residential neighborhoods identified in Chapter 11 regarding traffic protection measures.

4. When 80% of the Project is Completed (826 Project trips): o The Applicant will expand the TDM program with a $250,000 contribution to LADOT for bikeway improvements in the Project area pursuant to the 2010 Bicycle Plan, establishment of an Employee Transit Pass Subsidization Plan, and a Transportation Information Center on-site to promote the benefits of the TDM program and the Hollywood TMO. Additionally, the Applicant will implement the intersection improvement at Gower Street & Melrose Avenue at the time that the structure on the Main Lot adjacent to this intersection is replaced as part of the Project.

The Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT) is responsible for overseeing the implementation of the TDM program and mitigation measures by the Applicant. This phasing program is intended to guide the implementation of the transportation improvement program over the project buildout period. However, just as the Project will be developed in response to the needs of the market over many years, LADOT has the flexibility to substitute equivalent

mitigation measures in response to the needs of the transportation network in and around the Project Study Area.

Attachment 4 Figure IV.K-4 Transportation Systems Management Improvements (Mitigation Measure K-2)

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Highland Ave

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Figure IV.K-4 Transportation Systems Management Improvements

Attachment 5 Traffic Study Appendix Q—LADOT Neighborhood Traffic Management Process (Mitigation Measure K-5)

Appendix Q LA DOT Neighborhood Traffic Management Process

LADOT Neighborhood Traffic Management Process

This appendix sets forth the Los Angeles Department of Transportation’s (LADOT) process for implementation of Neighborhood Traffic Management Plan(s) for the Project.

ELIGIBLE NEIGHBORHOODS After implementation of the Project’s proposed Transportation Demand Management (TDM) program and traffic mitigation measures, five neighborhoods, the boundaries of which are described below, have the potential to experience neighborhood intrusion traffic: 1. De Longpre Avenue to the north, Gower Street to the east, Santa Monica Boulevard to the south, and Vine Street to the west 2. Sunset Boulevard to the north, Bronson Avenue to the east, Fountain Avenue to the south, and Gordon Street to the west 3. Fountain Avenue to the north, Bronson Avenue to the east, Santa Monica Boulevard to the south, and Gower Street to the west 4. Santa Monica Boulevard to the north, Wilton Place to the east, Melrose Avenue to the south, and Van Ness Avenue to the west 5. Santa Monica Boulevard to the north, Western Avenue to the east, Lemon Grove Avenue to the south, and Wilton Place to the west

TRAFFIC CALMING MEASURES The following are traffic calming measures that may be included in Neighborhood Traffic Management Plan(s) for the Project.

Q-1

Non-restrictive Control Measures

Non-restrictive control measures are intended to reduce traffic speeds on local streets and/or make the neighborhood streets less inviting for through traffic.

Non-restrictive traffic calming

measures may include, but are not limited to, traffic circles, speed humps, roadway narrowing effects (raised medians, traffic chokers, etc.), landscaping features, roadway striping changes (adding bike lanes or parking striping to reduce the perceived width of the roadway), and stop sign pattern.

Non-restrictive Improvements

Non-restrictive improvements include neighborhood improvements that can offset the effects of added traffic, including street trees, sidewalks, landscaping, neighborhood identification features, and pedestrian amenities.

Such measures can support trip reduction efforts by encouraging

walking, bicycling, and the use of public transit.

NEIGHBORHOOD TRANSPORTATION MANAGEMENT PLAN(S) BUDGET Based on its experience implementing Transportation Management Plans, LADOT has determined that a budget of up to $500,000 is appropriate for the development of Neighborhood Transportation Management Plan(s) for the eligible neighborhoods identified above.

The

Applicant or its successor shall guarantee the budget in a form reasonably satisfactory to LADOT. The $500,000 budget is allocated among the five neighborhoods (based on the number of residential street blocks in each neighborhood) as follows:• •

Neighborhood 1 - $187,500



Neighborhood 2 - $31,250



Neighborhood 3 - $125,000



Neighborhood 4 - $62,500



Neighborhood 5 - $93,750

Q-2

Consultant time to develop the plans shall be paid'by the Applicant or its successors and shall not be counted against the $500,000 budget, but data collection and mailing costs shall be included in the budget as shall the costs associated with the design of any changes approved by the neighborhood.

NEIGHBORHOOD TRANSPORTATION MANAGEMENT PLAN PROCESS Each Neighborhood Transportation Management Plan process shall include three workshops that shall take place over a maximum four-month time period. Each workshop shall be rescheduled a maximum of one time if a quorum of the Committee (described below) is not present in person or by proxy. Failure to deliver a quorum for two consecutive meetings duly called and approved by the Committee shall constitute a declaration of non-interest in the process and the process shall cease.

1.

Kick-Off Neighborhood Workshops - Based on the schedule in the final Project mitigation program, the transportation consultant for the Applicant or its successors shall hold a “Kick-off Workshop” meeting with the residents of each of the neighborhoods.

Working with the Council Office, residents in the boundaries of the

neighborhood will be invited to participate in the workshops.

At the Kick-off

Workshop, each neighborhood shall select a Committee of seven members by a consensus of the neighbors present at the meeting. If fewer than seven members of the neighborhood attend the Kick-off Workshop, the meeting will be rescheduled,

If

fewer than seven members attend the rescheduled Kick-off Workshop, it shall constitute a declaration of non- interest in the process and the process shall cease and all funds allocated to that neighborhood shall be returned to the Applicant. A majority of the Committee members must be present at each of the workshops for the Neighborhood Transportation Management Plan.

The Agenda for the “Kick-off

Workshop” shall include the following:

i.

Identify the process to be used to develop the Neighborhood Traffic Management Plan

Q-3

n.

Identify the non-restrictive control measures and non-restrictive improvement choices for the neighborhood

iii.

Discuss the existing and anticipated traffic issues in the neighborhood

IV.

Match the types of improvements with the types of problems that each measure addresses

v.

Identify the types of improvements that the neighbors are likely to support

If a consensus of the residents present at the kick-off workshop approve of proceeding with data collection and development of a draft plan, the process shall proceed. If not, the process shall cease and all funds allocated to that neighborhood shall be returned to the Applicant. 2.

Data Collection - If the neighborhood approved of proceeding with data collection, the transportation consultant for the Applicant or its successors shall collect and submit to LADOT appropriate traffic data (average daily trips, speed data, intersection turning movement counts, roadway characteristics, etc.) for the applicable neighborhoods within 60 days.

3.

Draft Plan - Based on the data and input from the Kick-off Workshop, the transportation consultant for the Applicant or its successors shall develop a draft plan to implement for the neighborhood.

The transportation consultant for the Applicant

shall review the proposed measures with the appropriate City agency (LADOT, Bureau of Engineering, Street Services and Sanitation, etc.) to confirm the feasibility of each of the measures. 4.

Neighborhood Workshop 2 - Upon completion of a draft plan, Neighborhood Workshop 2 shall be held to get reactions to the draft plan and suggestions from the residents for modifications to the plan.

5.

Revised Plan - Based on input obtained during Neighborhood Workshop 2, the transportation consultant for the Applicant or its successors shall revise the draft plan for the neighborhood. The transportation consultant for the Applicant shall review the revised plan with the appropriate City agency (LADOT, Bureau of Engineering, Street Services and Sanitation, etc.) to confirm the feasibility of each of the measures.

Q-4

6.

Neighborhood Workshop 3 - Upon completion of the revised plan, Neighborhood Workshop 3 shall be held to finalize the plan. The plan shall be finalized based on the consensus of the residents present at Neighborhood Workshop 3.

7.

Information Brochure - The transportation consultant for the Applicant or its successors shall prepare an information brochure that summarizes the final plan approved in Neighborhood Workshop 3 and a process for the neighborhood to approve or reject the plan.

LADOT shall cause the information brochure to be mailed to all

households in the neighborhood at issue. 8.

Approval/Reiection

of the

Plan

If a

majority of the households

in

the

neighborhood approve of the plan, the Applicant or its successors shall implement the traffic management plan on a temporary basis based on the schedule in the final Project mitigation program. If a majority of the households do not approve of the plan, the measures in the plan shall not be implemented, the process shall be declared over and all remaining funds for that neighborhood shall be returned to the Applicant or its successors. 9.

Approval on Final Plan - If Step 8 above resulted in the approval of the plan and temporary measures were implemented, six months after the implementation of the temporary measures, LADOT shall cause a second survey of the households in the neighborhood at issue to determine the level of interest in making the temporary traffic measures in the

plan permanent. If a

majority of the households in the

neighborhood approve of permanent implementation of the measures, the traffic measures shall be made permanent. If a majority of the households do not approve of the traffic measures, the measures shall be removed. Upon completion of Steps 1 through 9 above, the Applicant’s or its successors’ responsibility for the Neighborhood Traffic Management Plan shall be deemed complete and any remaining funds allocated for that neighborhood shall be returned to the Applicant.

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EXHIBIT A: Paramount Pictures Specific Plan Map

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Exhibit B

LEGAL DESCRIPTION PARCEL I:

LOT i OF TRACT NO. 3 0487, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES. STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAT RECORDED IN ROOK 804 PAGES 20 AND 2! OT MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. EXCEPT THEREFROM ALL MINING AND MINERAL RIGHTS OR SUBSTANCES WHATSOEVER, WHETHER SOLID OR LIQUID, INCLUDING, WITHOUT BEING LIMITED TO. OIL, GAS AND OTHER HYDROCARBON SUBSTANCES, IN OR UNDER OR WHICH MAY BE PRODUCED FROM THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY', TOGETHER WITH THE RIGHT TO PROSPECT, EXPLORE, MINE OR DRILL FOR SAID SUBSTANCES, AS RESERVED BY RK0 TELERADIO PICTURES. INC, A DELAWARE CORPORATION, IN THE DEED RECORDED JANUARY 30, 1958 AS INSTRUMENT NO. J382 IN BOOK 56452 PAGE Ii2, OF OFFICIAL RECORDS.

SAID RIGHTS OF ENTRY FROM THE SURFACE OF SAID LAND WERE RELINQUISHED BY THE DEED RECORDED MARCH 4. 1959 AS INSTRUMENT NO. IN BOOK D-387 PAGE 496. OF OFFICIAL RECORDS.

2221

ALSO EXCEPT THEREFROM 1/4 OF ALL MINING AND MINERAL RIGHTS OR SUBSTANCES WHATSOEVER. WHETHER SOLID OR LIQUID, INCLUDING WITHOUT BEING LIMITED TO, OIL, GAS AND OTHER HYDROCARBON SUBSTANCES, IN OR UNDER OR WHICH MAY BE PRODUCED FROM THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY, AS RESERVED IN THE DEED FROM W1NDROSE, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, RECORDED JANUARY 30, 1958 AS INSTRUMENT NO. I3S3 IN BOOK 56452 PAGE 115, OF OFFICIAL RECORDS. SAID RIGHTS OF ENTRY FROM THE SURFACE OF SAID LAND WERE. RELINQUISHED BY THE DEED RECORDED MAY I, 1962 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 2003 IN BOOK D-1598 PAGE 432, OF OFFICIAL RECORDS. PARCEL 2: LOT "B" Of THE MARLBOROUGH TRACT, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA- AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 10. PAGE 9 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. PARCEL 3: THE NORTHERLY 50 FEET Of LOTS 24 AND 23 OF MARLBOROUGH TRACT, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 10 PAGE 9 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE Of THE COUNTY RECORDER OF

SAID COUNTY PARCEL 4: LOTS 9, 10, II AND 12 OF THE MARLBOROUGH TRACT, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES. COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 10 PAGE 9 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY

CLTA PreJiironarv Report Form - Modified (I M7-06}

Exhibit B

mued PARCEL 5: LOTS i, 2, 3, 4, 5 AND 6 Of TRACT NO. 7£34. !N THF CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA. AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 87 PACES 24 THROUGH 26 INCLUSIVE OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTS' RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. PARCEL 6: LOTS I AND 2 OF TRACT NO. 6512, IN THE CITY Of LOS ANGELES. COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER .MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 109 PAGES 62 AND 63 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY.

PARCEL 7: LOTS 3, 4, 5 AND 6 OF TRACT NO. 6512, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK m PAGES 62 AND 63 OF MAPS. IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY PARCEL 8: LOTS 7 AND 8 OF TRACT NO.6512, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 109 .PAGES 62 AND 63 OF MAPS, !N THE OFFICE OP THE COUNTY' RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. PARCH, 9; LOTS 9, 10, II, 12, 14 AND 15 OF TRACT NO, 6512, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY' OF LOS ANGEI.ES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 109 PAGES 62 AND 63 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. PARCEL 10: LOTS 16 AND 17 OF TRACT NO. 6512, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK. 109 PAGES 62 AND 63 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. PARCELi1; LOTS IS AND 19 OF TRACT NO. 6512, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES. STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 109 PAGES 62 AND 63 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER Of SAID COUNTY. PARCEL 12: LOTS 20, 21, 22 AND 23 OF TRACT NO. 6512, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE Of CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOICIQ9 PAGES 62 AND 63 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF TOE COUNTY RECORDER Of SAID COUNTY,

CLTA Prciiminsn- Report Form - Modified (f 1-174)6)

Exhibit B

LEGAL DESCRIPTION (continued)

PARCEL 13: LOT 24 OF TRACT NO. 6512, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES. STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN' BOOK 109 PAGES 62 AND 63 OF MAPS. IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. ' PARCEL 14: LOT 3 OF THE MARLBOROUGH TRACT, IN THE COY' OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES. STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 10 PAGE 9 OF MAPS. IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTYPARCEL 15: LOT 4 OF THE MARLBOROUGH TRACT, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA. AS PER MAP RECORDED-IN BOOK 10 PAGE 9 OF MAPS. IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. EXCEPT THEREFROM ALL MINERALS. ORES, PRECIOUS OR USEFUL METALS. SUBSTANCES AND HYDROCARBONS OF EVERY KIND AND CHARACTER, INCLUDING IN PART, PETROLEUM, OIL, GAS, ASPHALTUM AND TAR, IN OR UNDER SAID LAND, LYING BELOW A DEPTH OF 500 FEET FROM THE SURFACE, BUT WITHOUT THE RIGHT TO ENTER THE SURFACE Of SAID LAND, AS RESERVED BY BEN FREEMEN AND BETTY FREEMAN, HUSBAND AND WIFE, IN DEED RECORDED JANUARY 26. 1979 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 79­ 1 i 1226. OF OFFICIAL RECORDS. PARCEL 16: LOTS 5 AND 6 OF MARLBOROUGH TRACT, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES. STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 10 PAGE 9 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY.

PARCEL 17: LOTS 7 AND S OF TRACT NO. 7S34, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK. 87 PAGES 24 TO 26INCLUSIVE OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY'; ALSO THE SOUTH HALF OF THE ALLEY ADJOINING SAID LOTS 7 AND 8 ON THE NORTH. BOUNDED ON THE EAST AND WEST RESPECTIVELY, BY THE EAST LINE OF SAID LOT 8 AND THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT ?, PROLONGED NORTH AS VACATED AND ABANDONED BY ORDINANCE NO. 57956, OF OFFICIAL RECORDS SAID LOTS 7 AND 8 AND THE VACATED ALLEY ADJOINING ON THE NORTH -BEING RESUBDIVIDED AND NOW KNOWN AS A PART OF LOT "A" OF TRACT NO- 9850, IN SAID CITY, COUNTY AND STATE, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 139 PAGES 78 AND 79 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. EXCEPT THEREFROM THAT PORTION THEREOF, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: CLTA Preliminary Report Form - Modified (I !-57-06)

Exhibit B

LEGAL DESCRIPTION (continued)

BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 7; THENCE NORTH ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT, A DISTANCE OF 57 FEET; THENCE EAST PARALLEL TO THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LOTS 7 AND 8 TO THE BAST LINE OF SAID LOT I; THENCE SOUTH ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID LOT 8, A DISTANCE OF 57 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID JX>T 8; THENCE WEST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LOTS 7 AND 8 TO THE POINT OF BEG INNING. PARCEL 18: THOSE PORTIONS OF LOTS 7 AND 8 OF TRACT 7834, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA. AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 87 PAGES 24 THROUGH 26 INCLUSIVE OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 7; THENCE NORTH ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT 7, A DISTANCE OF 57 FEET: THENCE EAST PARALLEL TO THE SOUTH LINE Of SAID LOTS 7 AND E TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID LOT 8; THENCE SOUTH ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID LOT 8, A DISTANCE OF 57 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 8; THENCE WEST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LOTS 7 AND 8 TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.

SAID LOTS 7 AND 8 HAVE BEEN RESUBDIVIDED AND ARE NOW A PORTION Of LOT "A" OF TRACT 9850, JN SAID CITY, COUNTY AND STATE, AS PER MAP RECORDED « BOOK 139 PAGES 78 AND 79 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. EXCEPT THEREFROM ALL OIL, GAS AND OTHER HYDROCARBON SUBSTANCES LYING BELOW A DEPTH OF 500 FEET FROM THE SURFACE OF SAID LAND, BUT WITHOUT THE RIGHT OF SURFACE ENTRY, AS RESERVED IN THE DEED FROM MICHAEL R. NEWF1ELD, AS GRANTOR, TO TROY MELTON AND JEAN MELTON, AS GRANTEE, RECORDED JULY 16. 1984 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 84-844116. OF OFFICIAL RECORDS EXCEPT THAT THE UNDERSIGNED GRANTOR HEREBY AGREES TO CONVEY SAID RIGHTO RESERVED HEREUNDER TO THE WITHIN GRANTEE, OR HIS HEIRS, ASSIGNS OS SUCCESSORS, UPON THE RECORDATION OF THE FULL RECONVEYANCE OF THE TRUST DEED BEING RECORDED CONCURRENTLY HEREWITH EXECUTED BY THE WITHIN GRANTEE TO THE WITHIN GRANTOR. SAID RIGHTS TO ALL OIL, GAS AND OTHER HYDROCARBON SUBSTANCES WERE QUITCLAIMED IN DEED FROM SAID MICHAEL R. NEWFIELD TO SAID TROY MELTON AND JEAN MELTON, RECORDED MARCH 24, 1988 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 88-400914. OF OFFICIAL RECORDS PARCEL 19: LOT "A” OF TRACT NO. 9850, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES. STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 139 PAGES 78 AND 79 OF MAPS. IN THE OFFICE OF Tf IE COUNTY RECORDER OP SAID COUNTY. '

O.T A Preliminary .Report Form - Modified (li-f ?~06)

Exhibit B

LEGAL DESCRIPTION (continued) EXCEPT THEREFROM THAT PORTION OF LOT "A", LYING WITHIN LOTS 7 AND 8 OF TRACT NO. 7834, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 87 PAGES 24 TO 26 INCLUSIVE OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY AND THE SOUTH HALF OF THE ALLEY ADJOINING SAID LOTS 7 AND 8 ON THE NORTH. BOUNDED ON THE EAST AND WEST RESPECTIVELY, BY THE NORTHERLY PROLONGATION Of THE EASTERLY LINE OF SAID LOT 8 AND THE NORTHERLY PROLONGATION OF THE WESTERLY LINE OF SAID LOT 1, AS VACATED AND ABANDONED BY ORDINANCE NO. 57956, OF OFFICIAL RECORDS PARCEL 20: LOTS L 2, 7 AND 8 OF MARLBOROUGH TRACT. IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 10 PAGE 9 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. EXCEPT THEREFROM THAT PORTION OF SAID LOT 7, LYING NORTHERLY OF THE EASTERLY PROLONGATION OF THE NORTHERLY LINE OF LOT "A" OF TRACT 9850, AS SAID LOT IS SHOWN ON THE MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 139 PAGES 78 AND 79 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. PARCEL 21; LOT “A- OF MARLBOROUGH TRACT, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 10 PAGE 9 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTS'. EXCEPT THAT PORTION OF SAID LOT "A", LYING EASTERLY OF THE NORTHERLY PROLONGATION OF WESTERLY LINE OF THE EASTERLY 2.00 FEET OF LOT 12 OF SAID MARLBOROUGH TRACT, SAID PARCEL OF LAND BEING A PORTION OF THAT PORTION OF MARATHON STREET VACATED BY THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, RESOLUTION TO VACATE NO, 86-21484, A CERTIFIED COPY OF WHICH WAS RECORDED SEPTEMBER 22, 1986 AS DOCUMENT NO, 86­ 1256523 OF OFFICIAL RECORDS'. PARCEL 22: VACATED MARATHON STREET, FORMERLY KNOWN AS BRONSON AVENUE, 50.00 FEET WIDE, AS SHOWN AND DEDICATED ON TRACT NO. 7834, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 87 PAGES 24. 25, AND 26 OF MAPS,. IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY, NOW VACATED BY THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, RESOLUTION TO VACATE NO. 86-21484, A CERTIFIED COPY OF WHICH WAS RECORDED SEPTEMBER 22, 1986 AS DOCUMENT NO. 860256523 OF OFFICIAL RECORDS. EXCEPT THEREFROM THAT PORTION OF SAID LAND, INCLUDED WITHIN LOT "A" Of TRACT NO. 9885, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 147 PAGES 31 AND 32 OF MAPS, IN SAID RECORDERS OFFICE.

CLTA Preliminary Rcpon Form * Modified (I M7-06)

Exhibit B

LEGAL DESCRIPTION (continued) PARCEL 23: THAT PORTION OF LOT ? OF MARLBOROUGH TRACT. IN THE CITY OR LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA. AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 10 PAGE 9 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY, LYING NORTHERLY OF THE EASTERLY PROLONGATION oF THE NORTHERLY LIME OF LOT "A" OF TRACT NO. 9850, AS SHOWN ON MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 09 PAGES 7J AND 79 OF MAPS: SAID PROPERTY BEING ALSO DESCRIBED AS: THAT PORTION OF MARATHON STREET (50.00 FEET WIDE), AS SHOWN AND DEDICATED ON TRACT NO. 9885, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 147 PAGES 31 AND 32 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTS' RECORDER Of SAID COUNTY, MOW VACATED BY THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, RESOLUTION TO VACATE NO. 16-21484, A CERTIFIED COPY OF WHICH WAS RECORDED SEPTEMBER 22, 1986 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 860256523, OF OFFICIAL RECORDS OF SAID

COUNTY. PARCEL 24: THOSE PORTIONS OF VACATED MARATHON STREET (50.00 FEET WIDE), AS SHOWN AND DEDICATED ON TRACT" NO. 7834, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 87 PAGES 24. 25 AND 26 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY, NOW VACATED BY THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, RESOLUTION TO VACATE NO 86-21484, A CERTIFIED COPY OF WHICH WAS RECORDED SEPTEMBER 22, 1986 AS DOCUMENT NO. Ifc 12565.23 OF OFFICIAL RECORDS. PARCEL 25: LOT 7 OF TRACT NO. 4331, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 47.PAGE 69 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. PARCEL 26: LOTS 34 AND 35 OF TRACT NO. 8512, 04 THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 109 PAGES 62 AND 63 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. PARCEL 27:

LOT 36 OF TRACT NO. 65! 2, IN THE CITY Or LOS ANGELES, COUNTY Of LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 109 PAGES 62 AND 63 Or MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. PARCEL 28: LOT 16 OF TRACT NO. 7834, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 87 PAGES 24 TO 26 INCLUSIVE OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY CLTA Prefjrninan’ Report Forni - Modified <11-! 7-06)

Exhibit B

LEGAL DESCRIPTION (continued)

PARCEL 29: LOTS 17 AND 18 Of TRACT NO. 7834, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OP LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 87 PAGES 24 TO 26 INCLUSIVE OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE Of THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. PARCEL 30: LOT 6 OF TRACT 433!, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 47 PAGE 69 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. PARCEL 31: LOT 14 OF TRACT 4331, IN THE CITY' OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 47 PAGE 69 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. PARCEL 32: LOTS 8,9, 10, 0,23, 25,26,27,28,29, 30,3] AND 32 OF TRACT NO. 4331, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY Of LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 47 PAGE 69 Of MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. PARCEL 33: LOTS 2! AND 24 OF TRACT NO. 4131, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 47 PAGE 69 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY.

PARCEL 34: LOT 20, OF TRACT 4331, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES. STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 47 PAGE 69 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF'SAID COUNTY. PARCEL 35: LOT 22 OF TRACT NO. 4331. IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK TZJhAGBW Of MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY.

CLTA Preliminary Report Form - Modified <1

Exhibit R

<< r.u.i-'rt

PARCEL 36: THE EASTERLY 48 FEET 01-' THE WESTERLY 93 FELT OF LOT 16 OF TRACT NO. 4331 IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES. COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 47 PAGE 69 OF MAPS. !N THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OP SAID COUNTY.

EXCEPTING THEREFROM ALL OIL. PETROLEUM, GAS, BREA, ASPHALTUM AND ALL KINDRED SUBSTANCES AND OTHER MINERALS UNDER AND IN SAID LAND, BUT WITHOUT THE RIGHT OF SURFACE ENTRY, AS RESERVED BY VIVIAN ML O’KEEFE, A WIDOW, BY DEED RECORDED MARCH 27, 195? IN BOOK 54041 PAGE 333 OF OFFICIAL RECORDS, PARCEL 37:

LOTS g, 9, 10, ] 1 AND 12 OF TRACT NO. 5693, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 60 PAGE 96 MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY OF RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY,

OF OF

EXCEPT THEREFROM ALL OIL, PETROLEUM, NATURAL GAS, MINERAL RIGHTS AND OTHER HYDROCARBON SUBSTANCES LYING BELOW A DEPTH OF 500 VERTICAL FEET FROM THE SURFACE OF SAID LAND, FOR THE PURPOSE OF EXPLORING FOR, EXTRACTING, MINING, BORING, REMOVING OR MARKETING SAID SUBSTANCES, HOWEVER, WITHOUT ANY RIGHT OF ANY ENTRY UPON THE SURFACE OF SAID LAND, AS RESERVED BY GULF OIL CORPORATION, IN DEED RECORDED NOVEMBER 7, 1978 AS INSTRUMENT NO, 71-1251076. OF OFFICIAL RECORDS, PARCEL 3 S: LOTS 5, 6 AND 7 OF TRACT NO. 5693, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 60 PAGE 96 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE Of THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. PARCEL 39: LOTS 42 AND 71 OF TRACT NO. 5693, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 60 PAPE 96 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY,

PARCEL 40: LOTS i, 2, 3 AND 4 OF TRACT NO. 5663, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 61 PAGE 87 OF MAPS. IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY-' RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. ’

CLTA PYeiimman Rcpor. form - Modified (IM7-0&)

.

Exhibit B

LEGAL DESCRIPTION (continued)

PARCEL 4 I: LOT 13 OF TRACT 593*, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY Of LOS ANGELES. STATE Of CALIFORNIA, RECORDED IN BOOR 90. PAGE 65 OF MAPS, RECORDS OF SAID COUNTY. EXCEPT THEREFROM ALL OIL, MINERAL, GAS, AND OTHER HYDROCARBON SUBSTANCES BELOW A DEPTH OF 500 FEET UNDER THE REAL. PROPERTY DESCRIBED ABOVE, WITHOUT THE RIGHT OF SURFACE ENTRY, AS PROVIDED IN DEED RECORDED JULY 24, 1990 AS INSTRUMENT NO, 90-1285748. OF OFFICIAL RECORDS. PARCEL 42: THE SOUTH 47 FEET OF LOT 1 IN BLOCK 9 OF EL CENTRO TRACT, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA. AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 2 PAGE 84 OF MAPS, !N THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. PARCEL 43: LOT 2 IN BLOCK 9 OF EL CENTRO TRACT, COLEG ROVE, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES. COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES. STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 2. PAGE 84 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE Of THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY, PARCEL 44: LOTS 4 AND 6 IN BLOCK 9 OF EL CENTRO TRACT, COLEGROVE IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 2 PAGE 84 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY7. PARCEL 45: LOTS 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16 AND IS IN BLOCK i 1 OF EL CENTRO TRACT, COLEGROVE, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 2 PACE 84 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. EXCEPT AN UNDIVIDED ONE-FOURTH OF ALL MINING AND MINERAL RIGHTS OR SUBSTANCES WHETHER SOLID OR LIQUID, INCLUDING OIL, GAS AND OTHER HYDROCARBON SUBSTANCES IN OR UNDER SAID LOTS 2, 4, 6, 8, 10. 12, 14 AND 16, AS RESERVED BY RKO TELERADIO PICTURES, INC., IN DEED RECORDED JANUARY 30. 5958 IN BOOK. 56952 PAGE 112. OFFICIAL RECORDS. THE RIGHT TO USE OR OCCUPY THE SURFACE AND SUBSURFACE AREA OF SAID LAND

TO A DEPTHOF 500 FEET WAS RELINQUISHED TO THE RECORD OWNER OF SAID LAND BY DEED RECORDED MARCH 4, 1959 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 3221 IN BOOK D-387 PAGE 496, OF OFFICIAL RECORDS.

CLT k Preliminary Report Form - Modified JH-17-06)

Exhibit B

LEGAL DESCRIPTION (continued)

PARCEL 46: PARCEL A: LOTS AND 4 IN BLOCK 15 OF FT. CENTRO-TRACT. IN TSIE CITY OF LOS ANGELES. COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOKS PAGE 84 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY

PARCEL B: THOSE PORTIONS OF CAMERFORD AVENUE 60 FEET WIDE, OF GOWER STREET 55 FEET WIDE AND OF THE 'FIRST ALLEY 10 FEET WIDE, SOUTH OF SAID CAMERFORD AVENUE. AS SAID AVENUE, STREET AND ALLEY ARE SHOWN ON THE MAP OF EL CENTRO TRACT, RECORDED IN BOOK 2 PAGE £4 OF MAPS, WHICH WOULD PASS BY OPERATION OF LAW WITH A CONVEYANCE OF PARCEL A ABOVE DESCRIBED. PARCEL 47: THAT CERTAIN ALLEY, 20 FEET WIDE, ADJOINING LOTS 7 THROUGH 12 AND LOTS 14 THROUGH 19, TRACT NO. 6512, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY' OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 109 PAGES 62 AND 63 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY: BOUNDED EASTERLY BY THE NORTHERLY PROLONGATION OF THE STRAIGHT EASTERLY LINE Of SAID LOT 7, AND BOUNDED WESTERLY BY THE NORTHERLY PROLONGATION OF THE STRAIGHT WESTERLY LINE OF SAID LOT 19, AS VACATED BY THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES AS RESOLUTION TO VACATE NO. 95-21709, A CERTIFIED COPY OF WHICH RECORDED APRIL 18, 1996 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 96-616073. OF OFFICIAL. RECORDS,

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CLTA Prelknitim' Report Form - Modified ifM7-06)

Exhibit B

LEGAL DESCRIPTION (continued) [400377. A CERTIFIED COPY OF WHICH RECORDED APRIL 18, 1996 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 90 6.16078. OF OFFICIAL RECORDS. PARCEL 49: THAT PORTION OF VALENTINO PLACE (FORMERLY IRVING BOULEVARD). 50 FEET WIDE AND VARIABLE WIDTH, AS SHOWN ON I Hfc MAF OF 'I RAC T NO. 6512, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK. 109 PAGES 62 AND 63 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY; BOUNDED SOUTHERLY BY A LINE PARALLEL WITH AND DISTANT 3 FEET NORTHERLY MEASURED AT RIGHT ANGLES FROM THE NORTHERLY LINE OF MELROSE AVENUE, 80 FEET WIDE, AND BOUNDED NORTHERLY BY THE WESTERLY PROLONGATION OF THE NORTHERLY LINE OF LOT 34, SAID TRACT NO. 6512, AS VACATED BY THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES AS RESOLUTION TO VACATE NO. 95-1400390. A CERTIFIED COPY OF WHICH RECORDED APRIL 18, 1996 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 96-616087. OF OFFICIAL RECORDS. PARCEL 50: THAT PORTION OF BRONSON AVENUE, 50 FEET WIDE AMD VARIABLE WIDTH, ADJOINING LOT A, TRACT NO. 9850, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 139 PAGES 7% AND 79 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER, BOUNDED SOUTHERLY BY A LINE PARALLEL WITH AND DISTANT 3 FEET NORTHERLY MEASURED AT RIGHT ANGLES FROM THE NORTHERLY LINE OF SAID MELROSE AVENUE, 80 FEET WIDE, AND BOUNDED NORTHERLY BY THE WESTERLY PROLONGATION OF THE NORTHERLY LINE OF LOT A, SAID TRACT NO. 9850, AS VACATED BY THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES AS RESOLUTION TO VACATE NO. 95-1400390. A CERTIFIED COPY OF WHICH RECORDED APRIL IS, 1996 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 96-636087. OF OFFICIAL RECORDS. PARCEL 51; THAT CERTAIN ALLEY, 20 FEET WIDE, ADJOINING LOTS i THROUGH 6. OF TRACT NO. 6512, IN THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA. AS PER MAP RECORDED IN AND 63 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY; AND ADJOINING LOTS 1 THROUGH 6. OF TRACT NO. 7834, IN SAID CITY, COUNTY AMD STATE, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 87 PAGES 24 TO 26 INCLUSIVE Of MAPS, IN SAID COUNTY RECORDER'S OFFICE: BOUNDED WESTERLY BY THE NORTHERLY PROLONGATION OF THE WESTERLY LINE OF LOT 6. SAID TRACT NO. 6512; AND BOUNDED EASTERLY BY THE NORTHERLY PROLONGATION OF THE EASTERLY LINE OF LOT 6, SAID TRACT NO. 7834; AS VACATED BY THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES AS RESOLUTION TO VACATE NQ.95-1400390. A CERTIFIED COPY OF WHICH RECORDED APRIL 18. 1996 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 96-636087. OP OFFICIAL RECORDS.

CLTA Preliminary Report form - Modified (11-37-06')

Exhibit B

LEGAL DESCRIPTION (continued)

PARCEL 52: THAT PORTION OF MARATHON STREET, 50 FEET WIDE AND VARIABLE WIDTH, ADJOINING LOT 1, TRACT NO. 30487, IN TOE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK £04 PAGES 20 AND 21, OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY: BOUNDED EASTERLY BY THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF VACATED MARATHON STREET AS DESCRIBED IN RESOLUTION TO VACATE RECORDED AS DOCUMENT OF OFFICIAL RECORDS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER, AND BOUNDED WESTERLY BY THE NORTHERLY PROLONGATION OF THE EASTERLY LINE OF LOT 7, SAID TRACT NO. 6512, AS VACATED BY THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES AS RESOLUTION TO VACATE N0.95-1400390. A CERTIFIED COPY OF WHICH RECORDED APRIL 18, 1996 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 96-616087. OF OFFICIAL RECORDS. PARCEL 53; THAT PORTION OF LOT 1 OF TRACT NO. 3688, IN THE CITY OF LOS

ANGELES, COUNTY OF

LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 40 PAGE 22 OF MAPS, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY, DESCRIBED AS

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END OF LEGAL DESCRIPTION

CITA Preliminary Reprm Fomi - Modified (f I-17-06}

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POTENTIAL HISTORIC DISTRICTS

EXHIBIT 1

PARAMOUNT PICTURES & RKO

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DETERMINATION LETTER CPC-2011-2459 & TT-71751-1A

Sharon Keyser (Applicant) Paramount Pictures 5555 Melrose Avenue Hollywood, CA 90038

George Mihlsten Latham & Watkins LLP 355 S. Grand Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90071

Mary Ann Biewener- Appellant 1 9903 Santa Monica #204 Beverly Hills, CA 90212

Beth Dorris - Appellant 2 Law Offices of Beth Dorris 3226 Mandeville Canyon Road Los Angeles, CA 90049

Kristen Stavola 8757 Wonderland Park Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90046

Margo Hamilton 8233 Kirkwood Drive Los Angeles, CA 90046

Wendel Meldrum 2019 Cyprean Dr Los Angeles, CA 90046

Laura Rae-Yates 7532 Kimdale Lane Los Angeles, CA 90046

Gregory DeGraf 637 N. Bronson Los Angeles, CA 90004

Jim Rodarte 619 N. Windsor Los Angeles, CA 90004

Ellie Baron 528 Wilcox Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90004

Michael Gilman 4941 Elmwood Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90004

Maggie Pena 520 N. Bronson Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90004

Cynthia Chvatal 337 S. Las Palmas Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90020

Tom Carroll 419 N. Arden Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90004

Karen Gilman 4941 Elmwood Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90004

Doug Haines P.O. Box 93596 Los Angeles, CA 90093

Henry Wisch 526 N. Bronson Los Angeles, CA 90004

Tracey Clarke 575 N. Plymouth Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90004

John Girodo P.O. Box 2586 Hollywood, CA 90078

John Girodo 1929 Whitley Avenue #508 Los Angeles, CA 90068

Adrian Scott Fine 523 W. 6th Street, 826 Los Angeles, CA 90014

Dooner 118 % S. Avenue 64 Los Angeles, CA 90042

Marcus Davis 1149 N. McCAdden Pl. Los Angeles, CA 90038

Ron Miller 1626 Beverly Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90026

Fred Mariscal 667 SouthJune Street Los Angeles, CA 90005

Kathleen Sacchi 410 N. Rosemore Avenue #209 Los Angeles, CA 90004

Susan Ebert 828 Hollywood Way Burbank, CA 91505

Alycia Witzling 350 S. Bixel Street Los Angeles, CA 90017

Ernesto Pantoga 2005 W. Pico Blvd., 2nd Floor Los Angeles, CA 90006

John R. Eccles 355 N. Orange Dr. Los Angeles, CA 90036

Steve Marcussen 601 S. Figueroa Street Los Angeles, CA 90017

Dwayne Gathers 569 N. Rossmore Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90004

Leron Gubler 7018 Hollywood Blvd. Hollywood, CA 90028

Charles D’Atri 359 N. Van Ness Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90004

Brandon Matson 6055 E. Washington Blvd. Commerce, CA 90040

Marty Shelton 1830 Colby Avenue #9 Los Angeles, CA 90025

Rick Vazquez 12140 Rivera Rd. Whittier, CA 90604

Jeremy Diaz 5512 Cynthia Circle Cypress, CA 90680

Lori Tierney 15332 Antioch Street #319 Pacific Palisades, CA 90272

Ed Duffy Teamsters Local 399 4747 Vineland Avenue North Hollywood, CA 91602

Elizabeth Hanley 16600 Sherman Way, Suite 170 Van Nuys, CA 91406

Jonathan Herrera 16600 Sherman Way, Suite 170 Van Nuys, CA 91406

Steven Whiddon 4402 Los Feliz Blvd. #114 Los Angeles, CA 90027

Lily Kwan 5951 Carlton Way Los Angeles, CA 90028

Tom Inman 6700 Melrose Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90038

Matthew Riley 1827 N. Garfield Pl. #107 Hollywood, CA 90028

Kris Sandheinrich 1502 S. Orange Grove Ave., #3 Los Angeles, CA 90019

Don Easy 5643 Wonderland Avenue North Hollywood, CA 91601

Laurie Goldman 6464 Sunset Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90028

John Howland 626 Wilshire Blvd. #200 Los Angeles, CA 90012

Corinne Rogan 2619 Wilshire Los Angeles, CA 90057

Byron Sanchez 521 % N. Serrano Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90004

Steven Whidon 4402 Los Feliz Los Angeles, CA 90027

Jonathan H. 4506 10th Street Santa Monica, CA 90401

Maggie P. 520 N. Bronson Los Angeles, CA 90004

Myme G. 334 S. Rimpau Los Angeles, CA 90020

Billy Taylor 643 N. Gower Street Los Angeles, CA 90004

Suriya Prasad 5419 La Mirada Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90029

Thomas & Winnie Kwan 2201 N. Canyon Dr. Los Angeles, CA 90068

Susan Cabral - Ebert 828 N. Hollywood Way Burbank, CA 91505

Hasnik B. 905 N. Ridgewood Los Angeles, CA 90038

John Eccles 355 N. Orange Dr. Los Angeles, CA 90036

Hollywood Heritage 2100 N. Highland Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90068

Hollywood Heritage P.O. Box 2586 Los Angeles, CA 90078

Teresa A. 537 N. Irving Los Angeles, CA 90004

Kathy Simaneu 375 N. Wilton Pl. Los Angeles, CA 90004

Russell 2520 W. Olive Avenue Burbank, CA 91505

Bob I 1274 S. Lucerne Los Angeles, CA 90019

Resident 907 N. Ridgewood Pl. Los Angeles, CA 90038

Paul Hult 1166 % N. Hobart Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90029

Paul & M. Mishyda 5407 la Mirada Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90029

Louis 7 Jimmy Moreno 5427 La Mirada Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90029

Robert Silverstein 215 N. Marengo, 3rd Fl. Pasadena, CA 91101

PattyLombard 78 Fremont Pl. Los Angeles, CA 90005

Alex A. 3047 Hollycrest Dr. Los Angeles, CA 90068

Chalee T. 5417 La Mirada Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90029

Dan Wright 215 Marengo Avenue, 3rd Fl. Pasadena, CA 91101

Chris Robertson Council District 13 City Hall, Room 480 Mail Stop 222

Julia Duncan Council District 4 City Hall, Room 425 Mail Stop 206